WorldWideScience

Sample records for general practice referral

  1. Open-access ultrasound referrals from general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct access referral for radiological investigations from General Practice (GP) provides an indispensable diagnostic tool and avoids the inherently long waiting time that referral through a hospital based specialty would entail. Improving access to hospital based radiology services is one of Health Information and Quality Authority\\'s key recommendations in its report on patient referrals from general practice. This study aimed to review all GP referrals for ultrasound investigations to a tertiary referral teaching hospital over a seven month period with respect to their demographics, waiting times and diagnostic outcomes. 1,090 ultrasounds originating in general practice were carried out during the study period. Positive findings were recorded in 332 (30.46%) examinations. The median waiting time from receipt of referral to the diagnostic investigation was 56 days (range 16 - 91 years). 71 (6.5%) patients had follow-up imaging investigations while recommendation for hospital based specialty referral was made in 35 cases (3.2%). Significant findings included abdominal aortic aneurysms, metastatic disease and lymphoma. Direct access to ultrasound for general practitioners allows the referring physician to make an informed decision with regard to the need for specialist referral. We believe these findings help support the case for national direct access to diagnostic ultrasound for general practitioners.

  2. Appropriate diagnostic imaging - Assessment of the quality of referrals from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe Kirstine Kousgaard; Torfing, Trine; Ulrichsen, Walther

    Background and aim Diagnostic imaging is the second most used paraclinical examination in Denmark and 15% of all referrals from general practice concerns radiology. The fast development in diagnostic imaging constitutes a challenge for general practitioners’ when determining the right type...... modality. Results Four regional radiological departments participated in the study. A total of 785 referrals were reviewed. Most reviews were conducted on x-ray referrals (35%). Diagnostic imaging was considered relevant or very relevant in 73.5% of the reviewed referrals, of which referrals to CT...... to diagnostic imaging were considered relevant from a radiologic perspective. However, there seems to be a potential for development regarding the exhaustiveness of information and modality relevance, particularly for referrals to MRI and ultrasound....

  3. Implementing referral guidelines: lessons from a negative outcome cluster randomised factorial trial in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Lindsey

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few patients with lower bowel symptoms who consult their general practitioner need a specialist opinion. However data from referred patients suggest that those who are referred would benefit from detailed assessment before referral. Methods A cluster randomised factorial trial. 44 general practices in North Trent, UK. Practices were offered either an electronic interactive referral pro forma, an educational outreach visit by a local colorectal surgeon, both or neither. The main outcome measure was the proportion of cases with severe diverticular disease, cancer or precancerous lesions and inflammatory bowel disease in those referred by each group. A secondary outcome was a referral letter quality score. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to identify key themes relating to the use of the software Results From 150 invitations, 44 practices were recruited with a total list size of 265,707. There were 716 consecutive referrals recorded over a six-month period, for which a diagnosis was available for 514. In the combined software arms 14% (37/261 had significant pathology, compared with 19% (49/253 in the non-software arms, relative risk 0.73 (95% CI: 0.46 to 1.15. In the combined educational outreach arms 15% (38/258 had significant pathology compared with 19% (48/256 in the non-educational arms, relative risk 0.79 (95% CI: 0.50 to 1.24. Pro forma practices documented better assessment of patients at referral. Conclusion There was a lack of evidence that either intervention increased the proportion of patients with organic pathology among those referred. The interactive software did improve the amount of information relayed in referral letters although we were unable to confirm if this made a significant difference to patients or their health care providers. The potential value of either intervention may have been diminished by their limited uptake within the context of a cluster randomised clinical trial. A number of

  4. Current Practice in the Referral of Individuals with Suspected Dementia for Neuroimaging by General Practitioners in Ireland and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciblis, Aurelia S.; Butler, Marie-Louise; Quinn, Catherine; Clare, Linda; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Mullins, Paul G.; McNulty, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While early diagnosis of dementia is important, the question arises whether general practitioners (GPs) should engage in direct referrals. The current study investigated current referral practices for neuroimaging in dementia, access to imaging modalities and investigated related GP training in Ireland and North Wales. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to GPs in the programme regions which included approximately two thirds of all GPs in the Republic of Ireland and all general practitioners in North Wales. A total of 2,093 questionnaires were issued. Results 48.6% of Irish respondents and 24.3% of Welsh respondents directly referred patients with suspected dementia for neuroimaging. Irish GPs reported greater direct access to neuroimaging than their Welsh counterparts. A very small percentage of Irish and Welsh GPs (4.7% and 10% respectively) had received training in neuroimaging and the majority who referred patients for neuroimaging were not aware of any dementia-specific protocols for referrals (93.1% and 95% respectively). Conclusions The benefits of direct GP access to neuroimaging investigations for dementia have yet to be established. Our findings suggest that current GP speciality training in Ireland and Wales is deficient in dementia-specific and neuroimaging training with the concern being that inadequate training will lead to inadequate referrals. Further training would complement guidelines and provide a greater understanding of the role and appropriateness of neuroimaging techniques in the diagnosis of dementia. PMID:27007435

  5. Detection of heart disease by open access echocardiography: a retrospective analysis of general practice referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John; Kabir, Saleha; Cajeat, Eric

    2014-02-01

    Heart disease is difficult to detect clinically and it has been suggested that echocardiography should be available to all patients with possible cardiac symptoms or signs. To analyse the results of 2 years of open access echocardiography for the frequency of structural heart disease according to request. Retrospective database analysis in a teaching hospital open access echocardiography service. Reports of all open access transthoracic echocardiograms between January 2011 and December 2012 were categorised as normal, having minor abnormalities, or significant abnormalities according to the indication. There were 2343 open access echocardiograms performed and there were significant abnormalities in 29%, predominantly valve disease (n = 304, 13%), LV systolic dysfunction (n = 179, 8%), aortic dilatation (n = 80, 3%), or pulmonary hypertension (n = 91, 4%). If echocardiography had been targeted at a high-risk group, 267 with valve disease would have been detected (compared to 127 with murmur alone) and 139 with LV systolic dysfunction (compared to 91 with suspected heart failure alone). Most GP practices requested fewer than 10 studies, but 6 practices requested over 70 studies. Open access echocardiograms are often abnormal but structural disease may not be suspected from the clinical request. Uptake by individual practices is patchy. A targeted expansion of echocardiography in patients with a high likelihood of disease is therefore likely to increase the detection of clinically important pathology.

  6. Detection of heart disease by open access echocardiography: a retrospective analysis of general practice referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John; Kabir, Saleha; Cajeat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart disease is difficult to detect clinically and it has been suggested that echocardiography should be available to all patients with possible cardiac symptoms or signs. Aim To analyse the results of 2 years of open access echocardiography for the frequency of structural heart disease according to request. Design and setting Retrospective database analysis in a teaching hospital open access echocardiography service. Method Reports of all open access transthoracic echocardiograms between January 2011 and December 2012 were categorised as normal, having minor abnormalities, or significant abnormalities according to the indication. Results There were 2343 open access echocardiograms performed and there were significant abnormalities in 29%, predominantly valve disease (n = 304, 13%), LV systolic dysfunction (n = 179, 8%), aortic dilatation (n = 80, 3%), or pulmonary hypertension (n = 91, 4%). If echocardiography had been targeted at a high-risk group, 267 with valve disease would have been detected (compared to 127 with murmur alone) and 139 with LV systolic dysfunction (compared to 91 with suspected heart failure alone). Most GP practices requested fewer than 10 studies, but 6 practices requested over 70 studies. Conclusion Open access echocardiograms are often abnormal but structural disease may not be suspected from the clinical request. Uptake by individual practices is patchy. A targeted expansion of echocardiography in patients with a high likelihood of disease is therefore likely to increase the detection of clinically important pathology. PMID:24567615

  7. Minor surgery in general practice and effects on referrals to hospital care: observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, C.E. van; Verheij, R.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2011-01-01

    Background: Strengthening primary care is the focus of many countries, as national healthcare systems with a strong primary care sector tend to have lower healthcare costs. However, it is unknown to what extent general practitioners (GPs) that perform more services generate fewer hospital

  8. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cost structure of radiological procedures in the intermediary referral hospitals and general practice and to develop a cost accounting system for radiological examinations that takes into consideration all relevant cost factors and is suitable for management of radiology departments and regional planning of radiological resources. The material comprised 174,560 basic radiological examinations performed in 1991 at 5 intermediate referral hospitals and 13 public health centres in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District in Finland. All radiological departments in the hospitals were managed by a specialist in radiology. The radiology departments at the public health care centres operated on a self-referral basis by general practitioners. The data were extracted from examination lists, inventories and balance sheets; parts of the data were estimated or calculated. The radiological examinations were compiled according to the type of examination and equipment used: conventional, contrast medium, ultrasound, mammography and roentgen examinations with mobile equipment. The majority of the examinations (87%) comprised conventional radiography. For cost analysis the cost items were grouped into 5 cost factors: personnel, equipment, material, real estate and administration costs. The depreciation time used was 10 years for roentgen equipment, 5 years for ultrasound equipment and 5 to 10 years for other capital goods. An annual interest rate of 10% was applied. Standard average values based on a sample at 2 hospitals were used for the examination-specific radiologist time, radiographer time and material costs. Four cost accounting versions with varying allocation of the major cost items were designed. Two-way analysis of variance of the effect of different allocation methods on the costs and cost structure of the examination groups was performed. On the basis of the cost analysis a cost accounting program containing both monetary and

  9. A retrospective audit of referral letter quality from general practice to an inner-city emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Emily; Hespe, Charlotte; Chalkley, Dane

    2016-06-01

    Our primary aim was to analyse the quality of letters from general practitioners (GPs) to the ED as defined by two checklists: the authors' own nine-item list and a template published in 2013 by the New South Wales Agency for Clinical Innovation. The secondary aim was to determine if referral quality was influenced by letter format (handwritten or computer-generated) or urgency of the patient's condition (defined by triage category). The present study is a retrospective audit of records of patients presenting to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital ED from a GP during February and March 2014. Out of 12 199 ED presentations, 575 (4.7%) were recommended by a GP and 414 (72.0%) had a letter. Greater than 60% completion was achieved in 80.9% of letters compared to our own checklist, and in 6.3% compared to the Agency for Clinical Innovation checklist. Computer-generated letters were more likely to be fully legible and include an accurate medical history and medication list. Handwritten letters were less frequent (11.9%) but of poorer quality and legibility. Overall, less than half of letters contained results, psychosocial history or vaccination history. Referrals for patients assigned an urgent triage category were more likely to contain examination findings, but there was otherwise no difference in quality. Referral quality was influenced by letter format but not by urgency of the patient's condition. Omission of information from referral letters potentially risks patient safety. Handwritten referrals should be abandoned. Comprehensive electronic letter templates and regular updating of medications, comorbidities and allergies are encouraged. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  10. Homeopathy in rural Australian primary health care: a survey of general practitioner referral and practice in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, J; Adams, J; Sibbritt, D

    2013-07-01

    Homeopathy has attracted considerable recent attention from the Australian conventional medical community. However, despite such increased attention there has been little exploration of the interface between homeopathy and Australian conventional medical practice. This article addresses this research gap by exploring homeopathic practice and referral by rural and regional Australian general practitioners (GPs). A 27-item questionnaire was sent to all 1486 GPs currently practising in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia (response rate 40.7%). Few GPs in this study utilised homeopathy in their personal practice, with only 0.5% of GPs prescribing homeopathy in the past 12 months, and 8.5% referring patients for homeopathic treatment at least a few times over the past 12 months. Nearly two-thirds of GPs (63.9%) reported that they would not refer for homeopathy under any circumstances. Being in a remote location, receiving patient requests for homeopathy, observing positive responses from homeopathy previously, using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners as information sources, higher levels of knowledge of homeopathy, and being interested in increasing CAM knowledge were all independently predictive of increased referral to homeopathy amongst GPs in this study. GPs in this study were less likely to refer to homeopathy if they used peer-reviewed literature as the major source of their information on CAM. Homeopathy is not integrated significantly in rural general practice either via GP utilisation or referral. There is significant opposition to homeopathy referral amongst rural and regional GPs, though some level of interaction with homeopathic providers exists. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differences in treatment regimes, consultation frequency and referral patterns of diabetes mellitus in general practice in five European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Fleming, D.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background. In many European countries, maturity onset diabetes mellitus (DM) is to a large extent managed in general practice. Objective. Our aim was to compare management of DM in general practice in five European countries in order to contribute to international guidelines on the management of DM

  12. The effect of direct referral for fast CT scan in early lung cancer detection in general practice. A clinical, cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldbrandt, Louise Mahncke

    2015-03-01

    This PhD thesis is based on the project "The effect of direct referral for fast CT scan in early lung cancer detection in general practice. A clinical, cluster-randomised trial", performed in Denmark in 2010-2013. The thesis includes four papers and focuses on early lung cancer diagnostics in general practice. A total of 4200 new cases of lung cancer are diagnosed in Denmark annually. The stage of the disease is an important prognostic factor; thus, the opportunity for curative treatment declines with more advanced tumour stage. Lung cancer patients in Denmark (like in the UK) have a poorer prognosis than lung cancer patients in other European countries. One explanation could be delayed diagnosis. A fast-track pathway was therefore introduced in an attempt to expedite the diagnosis of cancer. However, it seems that not all patients can be diagnosed through this pathway. In order to ensure fast and early lung cancer diagnosis, it is crucial to examine the initial diagnostic process in general and the role general practice plays in lung cancer diagnostics in particular. The specific areas of investigation include the pathways to diagnosis, the characteristics of patients who are at special risk of delayed diagnosis and the level of prediagnostic activity in general practice. A chest radiograph is often the first choice in the investigation of lung cancer. Unfortunately, radiographs are less suitable for central and small tumours. Low-dose computer tomography (LDCT), however, has a high sensitivity for lung cancer which implies that it can be used to detect patients with localised, potentially curable disease. The aim of this thesis was to increase our knowledge of the initial stages of lung cancer diagnostics in general practice. The thesis also examined the effect of a direct referral from general practice to an additional diagnostic test, the LDCT. The aims of this thesis were: 1) To describe Danish patients' pathways to the diagnosis of lung cancer in general and

  13. Psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doongaji D

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was undertaken to compare the patterns of psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals in Bombay viz. the King Edward Memorial Hospital (64 cases and the Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre (62 cases. It was observed that depressive symptoms were the most common presenting symptoms in these patients attending either of the hospitals. Similarly, the commonest diagnoses were depression and organic mental disorder. Attempted suicide with organophosphorous compounds was the commonest reason for hospitalization at K.E.M. Hospital (p less than 0.001. A significant number of these patients were females (p less than 0.05. The psychiatric referrals at Jaslok had been hospitalized mainly for suspected medical or neurological illness (p less than 0.001. These patients belonged to higher economic strata and hence had a better paying capacity compared to patients at KEM hospital, a significant number of whom were unemployed (p less than 0.001. The duration of pre-referred illness of patients and their stay at Jaslok hospital were longer as compared to those at KEM Hospital (p less than 0.01. The number of non-relevant special investigations carried out on patients in Jaslok was more (p less than 0.01. Further analysis of diagnoses revealed that a significant number of patients at KEM Hospital were admitted as primary psychiatric illness (p less than 0.05.

  14. Referral to a periodontist by a general dentist: An understanding of the referral process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Bhati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is one of the most common health care problems. The type of treatment of periodontal disease depends on the diagnosis. The treatment plan should also focus on managing the risk factors and modifying factors which affect the periodontal disease and treatment. The evidence-based advancements have given a success predictability level to the periodontal diagnosis and treatment plan. The level of specialty education is limited in the curriculum for undergraduates. Patients should receive the same quality of treatment whether administered by a specialist or general practitioner. Therefore, general dentists need to be well informed about how to make timely and appropriate referrals to periodontists when necessary. An online literature search was done through PubMed, PMC, and open access journals to understand the referral process. Articles pertaining to referral process were selected. Based on the search, it was found that knowledge of elements of the referral process, conditions (general and periodontal requiring referral, and selection of periodontist are important aspects of the referral process. This short communication will help the general dentist to understand the referral process that will enable them to provide the timely periodontal referral and treatment to the patients.

  15. Current referral practices and adolescent transition to Adult clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-02

    Feb 2, 2016 ... below. Table 3: Reasons for refusal of referral to adult clinic. Discussion. This study highlights the current practice of paediatri- cians with patient referral both within and outside the department. It also highlights the current mode of ado- lescent to adult care transition practice. Practically all respondents do ...

  16. Implementing nursing best practice guidelines: Impact on patient referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nancy; Davies, Barbara; Ploeg, Jenny; Virani, Tazim; Skelly, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Background Although referring patients to community services is important for optimum continuity of care, referrals between hospital and community sectors are often problematic. Nurses are well positioned to inform patients about referral resources. The objective of this study is to describe the impact of implementing six nursing best practice guidelines (BPGs) on nurses' familiarity with patient referral resources and referral practices. Methods A prospective before and after design was used. For each BPG topic, referral resources were identified. Information about these resources was presented at education sessions for nurses. Pre- and post-questionnaires were completed by a random sample of 257 nurses at 7 hospitals, 2 home visiting nursing services and 1 public health unit. Average response rates for pre- and post-implementation questionnaires were 71% and 54.2%, respectively. Chart audits were completed for three BPGs (n = 421 pre- and 332 post-implementation). Post-hospital discharge patient interviews were conducted for four BPGs (n = 152 pre- and 124 post-implementation). Results There were statistically significant increases in nurses' familiarity with resources for all BPGs, and self-reported referrals to specific services for three guidelines. Higher rates of referrals were observed for services that were part of the organization where the nurses worked. There was almost a complete lack of referrals to Internet sources. No significant differences between pre- and post-implementation referrals rates were observed in the chart documentation or in patients' reports of referrals. Conclusion Implementing nursing BPGs, which included recommendations on patient referrals produced mixed results. Nurses' familiarity with referral resources does not necessarily change their referral practices. Nurses can play a vital role in initiating and supporting appropriate patient referrals. BPGs should include specific recommendations on effective referral processes and

  17. Obstetric referrals: the practice by community health workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstetric referrals: the practice by community health workers. ... Highland Medical Research Journal ... This cross-sectional study documents the practice of referral of obstetric patients and the challenges faced by community health extension workers attending a Community Health Officers Training programme in a teaching ...

  18. Knowledge or noise? Making sense of General Practitioners' and Consultant use of 2-week-wait referrals for suspected cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Conan; Hart, Nigel; McCrorie, Allan David; Anderson, Lesley; Donnelly, Michael; Murchie, Peter; Gavin, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is the goal of the 2-week-wait referral pathway (2WW). Variation exists between General Practice use of 2WW and rates of consultant reprioritisation of GP referral from routine to 2WW (Consultant Upgrade). We investigated variation in General Practice and Consultant Upgrade 2WW referral activity.Methods:Data from 185 000 referrals and 29 000 cancers recorded between 2011 and 2013 from the Northern Ireland Cancer Waiting Time database (CaPPS)...

  19. Five proven strategies to expand your practice's referral base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bill

    2007-01-01

    The ultimate success of a practice in growing its referral base is contingent upon management's ability to provide a clear direction and vision, challenge and inspire staff, achieve a shared vision, challenge the process to achieve continuous quality improvement, reward success in achieving team goals, and celebrate team accomplishments. Keeping your patients loyal may be as simple as practicing good customer service. This article discusses customer service and the needs of patients coupled with the mechanics of a successful referral program.

  20. Knowledge or noise? Making sense of General Practitioners' and Consultant use of 2-week-wait referrals for suspected cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Conan; Hart, Nigel; McCrorie, Alan David; Anderson, Lesley; Donnelly, Michael; Murchie, Peter; Gavin, Anna

    2017-08-22

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is the goal of the 2-week-wait referral pathway (2WW). Variation exists between General Practice use of 2WW and rates of consultant reprioritisation of GP referral from routine to 2WW (Consultant Upgrade). We investigated variation in General Practice and Consultant Upgrade 2WW referral activity. Data from 185 000 referrals and 29 000 cancers recorded between 2011 and 2013 from the Northern Ireland Cancer Waiting Time database (CaPPS) were analysed to ascertain standardised referral rate ratios, detection rate (DR) (=sensitivity) and conversion rate (CR) (=positive predictive value) for Practice 2WW referrals and Consultant Upgrade 2WW. Metrics were compared using Spearman's rank correlation co-efficients. There was consistency in Practice and Consultant Upgrade 2WW referral rates over time, though not for annual DR (Spearman's ρConsultant Upgrade, 2WW CR and DR were strongly correlated but only when the same cancers were included in both rates. Results suggest 'random case mix' explains previously reported associations between CR and DR with more 'hard to detect' cancers in some Practices than in others in a given year corresponding to lower DR and CR. Use of Practice and Consultant Upgrade 2WW referral metrics to gauge General Practice performance may be misleading.

  1. Predicting referral practices of traditional healers of their patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be a useful theoretical model for predicting the referral practices of traditional healers. The empirical data here may be useful for future work designing interventions to provide traditional healers with the information and skills they require to appropriately refer patients with mental illness. Keywords: Medicine, African ...

  2. Predicting referral practices of traditional healers of their patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predicting referral practices of traditional healers of their patients with a mental illness: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. ... From the TPB application, the following cognitive variables were found to predict intentions: attitudes (ß = 0.612, p< 0.01); perceived behavioural control (ß = 0.355, p< 0.01); and past ...

  3. Assessment of sharps waste management practices in a referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharps waste is part of infectious waste generated in health facilities, management of which is critical. This study aimed at assessing the sharps waste management practices in a referral hospital. The study was conducted at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Data on sharps waste containers ...

  4. Factors influencing general practitioner referral of patients developing end-stage renal failure: a standardised case-analysis study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Montgomery, Anthony J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To understand why treatment referral rates for ESRF are lower in Ireland than in other European countries, an investigation of factors influencing general practitioner referral of patients developing ESRF was conducted. METHOD: Randomly selected general practitioners (N = 51) were interviewed using 32 standardised written patient scenarios to elicit referral strategies. Main outcome measures: General practitioner referral levels and thresholds for patients developing end-stage renal disease; referral routes (nephrologist vs other physicians); influence of patient age, marital status and co-morbidity on referral. RESULTS: Referral levels varied widely with the full range of cases (0-32; median = 15) referred by different doctors after consideration of first laboratory results. Less than half (44%) of cases were referred to a nephrologist. Patient age (40 vs 70 years), marital status, co-morbidity (none vs rheumatoid arthritis) and general practitioner prior specialist renal training (yes or no) did not influence referral rates. Many patients were not referred to a specialist at creatinine levels of 129 micromol\\/l (47% not referred) or 250 micromol\\/l (45%). While all patients were referred at higher levels (350 and 480 micromol\\/l), referral to a nephrologist decreased in likelihood as scenarios became more complex; 28% at 129 micromol\\/l creatinine; 28% at 250 micromol\\/l; 18% at 350 micromol\\/l and 14% at 480 micromol\\/l. Referral levels and routes were not influenced by general practitioner age, sex or practice location. Most general practitioners had little current contact with chronic renal patients (mean number in practice = 0.7, s.d. = 1.3). CONCLUSION: The very divergent management patterns identified highlight the need for guidance to general practitioners on appropriate management of this serious condition.

  5. Specialist Pediatric Palliative Care Referral Practices in Pediatric Oncology: A Large 5-year Retrospective Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Damani, Anuja; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, MaryAnn

    2016-01-01

    To audit referral practices of pediatric oncologists referred to specialist pediatric palliative care services. Retrospective review of medical case records of pediatric palliative care patients over a period of 5 years from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. Descriptive summaries of demographic, clinical variables, and patient circumstances at the time of referral and during end-of-life care were examined. A total of 1135 patients were referred from pediatric oncology with a gradual increasing trend over 5 years. About 84.6% consultations took place in the outpatient setting. In 97.9% of the cases, parents were the primary caregivers. Availability of specialist pediatric health-care services at local places was available in 21.2% cases and 48% families earned advanced disease at presentation. 30.3% of the referrals were made for counseling and communication and 54.2% had high symptom burden during referral. After referral, 21.2% patients continued with oral metronomic chemotherapy and 10.5% were referred back to oncology services for palliative radiotherapy. Only 4.9% patients had more than 2 follow-ups. 90.8% of the patients were cared for at home in the last days of illness by local general practitioners. 70.6% of the deaths were anticipated. Oncologists referred patients late in the course of disease trajectory. Most of the referrals were made for counseling and communication, but many patients had high symptom burden during referral.

  6. An analysis of referrals received by a psychiatric unit in a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis of referrals received by a psychiatric unit in a general hospital part 1: the need for and research design adopted to study referrals received by a psychiatric unit in a general hospital: research. M. Dor, V.J. Ehlers, M.M. Van der Merwe ...

  7. Implementing a tobacco assisted referral program in dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Sally J; Hollis, Jack F; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Snyder, John J; Dickerson, John F

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to design and implement a system-level tobacco-control intervention in a large prepaid dental group practice and assess effects on staff performance measures and patient satisfaction. We matched 14 dental facilities on size, socioeconomic status, smoking rate, and periodontal status, and then randomly assigned them to intervention or usual-care control. We trained intervention staff in an "Assisted Referral" team approach for assessing tobacco use, providing tailored advice and brief counseling, and encouraging smokers to talk by telephone with a specially trained tobacco counselor. Patients could call from the office or ask that the counselor call them later. Telephone counselors helped patients explore motivations and barriers for quitting; review available cessation-support strategies, programs, and medications; and identify next steps. During the 14-month study period, 66,516 members had annual- or new-patient examinations. Both intervention and control sites had high rates of tobacco assessment (97 percent) and advice (93 percent). Intervention patients were more likely than controls (69 percent versus 3 percent, P chair-side tobacco counseling and assistance, and 11 percent agreed to receive additional telephone counseling. Intervention patients were more satisfied than controls with the dental team's tobacco-control efforts (P dental care, was well received by patients, and resulted in increased patient satisfaction. Because free telephone-based tobacco counseling is now available nationwide, the approach may be a practical strategy for most dental-care settings.

  8. Referral Practices Among U.S. Publicly Funded Health Centers That Offer Family Planning Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Marion W; Robbins, Cheryl L; Gavin, Loretta; Moskosky, Susan

    2018-01-29

    Referrals to other medical services are central to healthcare, including family planning service providers; however, little information exists on the nature of referral practices among health centers that offer family planning. We used a nationally representative survey of administrators from 1,615 publicly funded health centers that offered family planning in 2013-14 to describe the use of six referral practices. We focused on associations between various health center characteristics and frequent use of three active referral practices. In the prior 3 months, a majority of health centers (73%) frequently asked clients about referrals at clients' next visit. Under half (43%) reported frequently following up with referral sources to find out if their clients had been seen. A third (32%) of all health centers reported frequently using three active referral practices. In adjusted analysis, Planned Parenthood clinics (adjusted odds ratio 0.55) and hospital-based clinics (AOR 0.39) had lower odds of using the three active referral practices compared with health departments, and Title X funding status was not associated with the outcome. The outcome was positively associated with serving rural areas (AOR 1.39), having a larger client volume (AOR 3.16), being a part of an insurance network (AOR 1.42), and using electronic health records (AOR 1.62). Publicly funded family planning providers were heavily engaged in referrals. Specific referral practices varied widely and by type of care. More assessment of these and other aspects of referral systems and practices is needed to better characterize the quality of care.

  9. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  10. Does an in-house internist at a GP practice result in reduced referrals to hospital-based specialist care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjel, Tessa C C; Winkens, Anne; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Struijs, Jeroen N; Winkens, Ron A G; Baan, Caroline A; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2018-03-01

    Consistent evidence on the effects of specialist services in the primary care setting is lacking. Therefore, this study evaluated the effects of an in-house internist at a GP practice on the number of referrals to specialist care in the hospital setting. Additionally, the involved GPs and internist were asked to share their experiences with the intervention. A retrospective interrupted times series study. Two multidisciplinary general practitioner (GP) practices. An internist provided in-house patient consultations in two GP practices and participated in the multidisciplinary meetings. The referral data extracted from the electronic medical record system of the GP practices, including all referral letters from the GPs to specialist care in the hospital setting. The number of referrals to internal medicine in the hospital setting. This study used an autoregressive integrated moving average model to estimate the effect of the intervention taking account of a time trend and autocorrelation among the observations, comparing the pre-intervention period with the intervention period. It was found that the referrals to internal medicine did not statistically significant decrease during the intervention period. This small explorative study did not find any clues to support that an in-house internist at a primary care setting results in a decrease of referrals to internal medicine in the hospital setting. Key Points An in-house internist at a primary care setting did not result in a significant decrease of referrals to specialist care in the hospital setting. The GPs and internist experience a learning-effect, i.e. an increase of knowledge about internal medicine issues.

  11. Recruitment of general practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine E; Maindal, Helle T

    2016-01-01

    -factors as determinants for successfully recruiting healthcare professionals: relationships, reputation, requirements, rewards, reciprocity, resolution, and respect. METHOD: This is a process evaluation of the seven R-factors. We applied these factors to guide the design of our recruitment strategy as well as to make...... adjustments when recruiting general practices in a guideline implementation study. In the guideline implementation study, we studied the effect of outreach visits, quality reports, and new patient stratification tools for low back pain patients. RESULTS: During a period of 15 months, we recruited 60 practices...

  12. Determinants of Referral Practices of Clients by Traditional Birth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 90%, whose source of skill acquisition was by inheritance did not refer their clients appropriately compared with 48% of those whose source of skill acquisition was through formal training (p<0.05). The more the numbers of trainings, the more appropriate the referral (p<0.05). Having supervisory visit by qualified ...

  13. Characteristics of referrals to an inpatient hospice and a survey of general practitioner perceptions of palliative care.

    OpenAIRE

    Seamark, D A; Lawrence, C; Gilbert, J

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine symptoms, drug prescribing and physical problems of patients referred to an inpatient hospice, case notes from 130 consecutive first admissions (95 general practitioner (GP) referrals, 35 consultant referrals) were analysed. GP referrals were more likely to be constipated, require care and be discharged to home. Consultant referrals were more gravely ill, dependent and more likely to die in the hospice. On admission 76 (58%) patients were receiving opiates with co-prescr...

  14. Internet guidance in oncology practice: determinants of health professionals' Internet referral behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Yvette; de Groot, Jos; Wetzels, Wendy; van Osch, Liesbeth

    2013-01-01

    Many cancer patients turn to the Internet to obtain information on their disease. This digital quest is often motivated by a perceived discrepancy between the information received from health professionals and patients' actual informational needs. This discrepancy may be reduced by supplementing standard patient education with reliable online information sources. This study investigates health professionals' opinions, cognitions, and behavior regarding referring cancer patients to Internet-based information. Online and written questionnaires were distributed among Dutch oncology nurses and medical specialists, measuring perception of patients' informational needs, prompted and unprompted Internet referral, and socio-cognitive factors regarding referral behavior. Health professionals (N = 130) positively appraised Internet use among cancer patients. Despite recognizing patients' needs for additional information (84%) and need for referral to reliable websites (67%), only 20% frequently referred patients to Internet-based information. Prompted Internet referral was higher (64%). Motives for nonreferral included unfamiliarity with websites and uncertainty about information quality. Intentions towards future referral were moderate to high. To translate intentions into referral, health professionals need reminder tools and information on reliability and content of websites. Cognitive determinants of referral behavior included professionals' attitude, self-efficacy, and intentions regarding referral. Recognition of patients' information needs does not culminate in Internet referral among health professionals in cancer care. High intentions to change, however, indicate good prospects for future referral. This study yields valuable insights into behavioral determinants of health professionals' Internet referral behavior. Targeting determinants and barriers in future interventions will provide opportunities for optimization of educational practices. Copyright © 2011 John

  15. 45 CFR 1177.11 - Referral to the Department of Justice or the General Accounting Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... General Accounting Office. 1177.11 Section 1177.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.11 Referral to the Department of Justice or the General Accounting Office. Debts over $600...

  16. Referral practices in patients suffering from non-malignant chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Erika; Hermann, Katja; Berghöfer, Anne; Hagmeister, Hartmut; Schuh-Hofer, Sigrid; Schenk, Michael; Kopf, Andreas; Vilain, Martyn; Martus, Peter; Willich, Stefan N; Boemke, Willehad

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a prospective observational cohort study investigating referral practices to six specialized pain centres (SPCs) in 303 patients with headache (HD), low back pain (LBP), and neuropathic pain (NP). The study was divided into three parts. Part 1: The pain health care history (contacts with general practitioners and specialists, further referrals, time spans, therapies) before first contact with the SPC. Part 2: Reality of pain therapy and management in the SPC (patients' attrition, interdisciplinarity of therapy and novel therapeutic strategies instigated). Part 3: Follow-up and assessment of pain levels (NRS, SES), disability scores (PDI), QoL scores (SF 12), and anxiety and depression scores (HADS) at 0, 6 and 12 months. Using an ordinal linear regression model, factors predicting a good treatment outcome were identified. On average it took 3 years of pain symptoms before first consultation with GP. The median time period from the first pain sensations until the appointment in the SPC was 12 years. Nearly half of the referrals to specialists or SPCs were initiated by a non-professional. In the SPC the medication was changed in 71% of cases. Care was interdisciplinary in only 32%. At 6 and 12 months after the first contact with the SPC, only 20% of the patients had improved with respect to levels of pain and psychometric data. A high degree of chronicity, a history of pain-associated surgeries and low social support were negative predictors for treatment outcome. Copyright 2009 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An audit of non-urgent general adult referrals to Stikland State Psychiatric Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Ras

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The national Department of Health strongly advocates the strengthening of primary health care systems, and recommendations for appropriate level of care referrals exist. Very few published data on the scope of current ambulatory specialised psychiatric hospital services in South Africa are currently available, making it difficult to assess whether these recommendations are being followed. As a starting point, an audit was conducted to obtain a profile of new non-urgent general adult patients seen at Stikland Hospital with a view to evaluating system needs and demands. Methods. The folders of 103 consecutively seen patients were selected for retrospective review. Patient demographic, referral and assessment information was entered into a single database. Descriptive statistics were compiled with reference to the above variables using SPSS. Results. Overall 58.3% of referrals were from the private sector. More than a third (36.7% of referral letters stated no clear reason for referral and 41.7% no psychiatric diagnosis, and 29.1% of patients were referred without psychotropic medication being started. On assessment 62.1% of patients were found to have a single Axis I diagnosis. Despite virtually no referral letters making any mention of them, substance use disorders (30.1%, personality traits/disorders (35.9% and co-morbid medical illness (36.7% were commonly found on assessment. Conclusions. A significant portion of the patients in our sample could have been managed at primary care level and were referred prematurely. The overall quality of referral letters was poor, and they lacked vital information required for appropriate pre-assessment decision making. Undergraduate training focusing on these skills should be intensified, and consideration should be given to incorporating aspects of our findings into primary health care updates.

  18. The initiator and timing of referral to breast cancer genetic counselling: an exploration of everyday person-centered practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, E. van; Hubers, A.J.; Witkamp, A.J.; Dulmen, S. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The referral process for genetic counselling in breast cancer patients may be compromised by patient-related factors, like patient’s age, referral initiative or cancer history. This study aimed to characterize this referral process in daily clinical practice. Methods: During genetic

  19. Avoiding inappropriate paediatric admission: facilitating General Practitioner referral to Community Children’s Nursing Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Richard G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children’s emergency admissions in England are increasing. Community Children’s Nursing Teams (CCNTs have developed services to manage acutely ill children at home to reduce demand for unscheduled care. Referral between General Practitioners (GPs and CCNTs may reduce avoidable admissions and minimise the psychosocial and financial impact of hospitalisation on children, families and the NHS. However, facilitators of GP referral to CCNTs are not known. The aim of this study was to identify facilitators of GP referral to CCNTs. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 39 health professionals were conducted between June 2009 and February 2010 in three Primary Care Trusts served by CCNTs in North West England. Interviewees included GPs, Community Children’s Nurses (CCNs, consultant paediatricians, commissioners, and service managers. Qualitative data were analysed thematically using the Framework approach in NVivo 8. Results Five facilitators were identified: 1 CCN/CCNT visibility; 2 clear clinical governance procedures; 3 financial and organisational investment in the role of CCNTs in acute care pathways; 4 access and out of hours availability; 5 facilitative financial frameworks. Conclusion GPs required confidence in CCNs’ competence to safely manage acutely ill children at home and secure rapid referral if a child’s condition deteriorated. Incremental approaches to developing GP referral to CCNTs underpinned by clear clinical governance protocols are likely to be most effective in building GP confidence and avoiding inappropriate admission.

  20. Assessment of the clinical transfusion practice at a regional referral hospital in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natukunda, B.; Schonewille, H.; Smit Sibinga, C. Th.

    The aim of this study was to determine the indications for transfusion, blood ordering practices and post-transfusion complications, and to assess the clinical transfusion practice at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Mbarara, Uganda. There are no guidelines on the appropriate use of

  1. General practitioners' views on and referral to NHS smoking cessation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A; West, R; Owen, L; Raw, M

    2005-04-01

    Increasing the rate of smoking cessation remains a major public health goal. To help achieve this in the UK, National Health Service (NHS) smoking cessation services have been established to provide treatment for smokers wanting help with stopping. Referrals from general practitioners (GPs) are crucial to the success of these clinics. This study aimed to assess English GPs' self-reported interactions with, and attitudes towards, their local smoking cessation services. Postal survey assessing the attitudes of GPs in England towards, and formal interactions with, NHS smoking cessation services. A questionnaire was posted to a random sample of 544 GPs in England (response rate 63%). GPs' self-reported interactions with smoking cessation services and their attitudes towards these clinics were assessed. GPs were also asked what factors determined whether they prescribed nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT) and Buproprion (Zyban), and what was the extent and nature of their smoking cessation interventions with their patients. Most GPs (94%) reported that they were aware of the specialist smoking cessation service in their area. Seventy percent of GPs supported the continuation of current funding for specialist smoking cessation services. Seventy percent reported that they referred patients to these services, and 55% had staff within their practices trained as community smoking cessation advisors. Most GPs (79%) reported 'clinical need' as a determinant of whether they prescribed NRT/Zyban, and a few GPs cited 'budgetary constraints' as a factor (15%). Ninety-eight percent of GPs reported that they record smoking status when new patients join their practice, and they advise smokers to stop 'at least every now and then'. GPs support the existence and continuation of specialist smoking cessation services, and most reported that they refer patients to them. Virtually every GP reported that they record smoking status when new patients join their practice, and they advise

  2. Re-Audit of the Contents of GP Referral letters to General Adult Community Psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odelola, Catherine; Jabbar, Farid

    2017-09-01

    The quality of information provided by referring general practitioners to secondary care mental health services are crucial elements in the effective management of patients. In order to establish effective communication, both primary and secondary care health professionals should contribute to planning and organising this process taking into account their different opinions and views. Anonymous questionnaire was designed to collect information on items that GPs and psychiatrist rated as most important items in GP referral letters to psychiatrists. The questionnaires were sent out electronically. Each item was scored using a rating scale where 0 was least important and 10 was most important. Items that scored 8 and above were agreed by all as the most important items. 76 GP letters were audited using a devised checklist of the identified most important items. Data was collected and analysed using a devised data collection tool. A re-audit was done 6months later. A response rate of 70% was obtained for both psychiatrists and GPs. Reasons for referral were described in almost all GP referral letters (95%). Only 24% referral letters had details about current physical health which improved to 59%. Concerns about risk were described in only 47% of letters and treatment provided by GP in 50% of letters. These improved in 79% and 71% of letters respectively in the re-audit. The involvement of professionals in devising a standardised approach for referral letters has improved communication in this re-audit between GPs and Psychiatrists. This is evident in the improvement in key aspects of the referral letters: past medical history, past psychiatric history, current physical health, treatment provided by GP. Efficient communication between GPs and psychiatrists improves the quality of health care for patients.

  3. Antenatal mental health referrals: review of local clinical practice and pregnant women's experiences in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwin, Zoe; McGowan, Linda; Edozien, Leroy C

    2015-03-01

    to investigate (i) the consistency and completeness of mental health assessment documented at hospital booking; (ii) the subsequent management of pregnant women identified as experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems; and (iii) women's experiences of the mental health referral process. mixed methods cohort study large, inner-city hospital in the north of England women (n=191) booking at their first formal antenatal appointment; mean gestational age at booking 13 weeks. women self-completed the routine mental health assessment in the clinical handheld maternity notes, followed by a research pack. Documentation of mental health assessment (including assessment of depression symptoms using the Whooley and Arroll questions, and mental health history), mental health referrals and their management were obtained from women's health records following birth. Longitudinal semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sub-sample of 22 women during and after pregnancy. documentation of responses to the Whooley and Arroll questions was limited to the handheld notes and symptoms were not routinely monitored using these questions, even for women identified as possible cases of depression. The common focus of referrals was on the women's previous mental health history rather than current depression symptoms, assessed using the Whooley questions. Women referred to a Mental Health Specialist Midwife for further support were triaged based on the written referral and few met eligibility criteria. Although some women initially viewed the referral as offering a 'safety net', analysis of health records and subsequent interviews with women both indicated that communication regarding the management of referrals was inadequate and women tended not to hear back about the outcome of their referral. mental health assessment was introduced without ensuring that identified needs would be managed consistently. Care pathways and practices need to encompass identification

  4. Developmental enamel and anatomical tooth defects in dogs – Experience from veterinary dental referral practice and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Catharina Boy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developmental tooth abnormalities in dogs are uncommon in general veterinary practice but understanding thereof is important for optimal management in order to maintain gnathic function through conservation of the dentition. The purpose of this review is to discuss abnormalities of enamel structure and macroscopic tooth anatomy in dogs encountered in veterinary dental referral practice in South Africa and the United Kingdom. The basis of the pathogenesis, resultant clinical appearance and the management principles of each anomaly will be considered. Future research should aim to provide a detailed individual tooth mineralization schedule for dogs.

  5. Impetigo in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Koning (Sander)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImpetigo is a common skin infection, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus that mainly occurs in children. Patients with impetigo usually consult their general practitioner, who also treats the vast majority of cases. Impetigo is considered highly infectious, and consequently

  6. Communication in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Bensing, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore the essence of the general practitioner (GP)-patient encounter by looking at what is actually being communicated in the consulting room. In terms of conversational input of GP and patient, the average GP-patient encounter appears quite equal. A more detailed analyses

  7. Managing corneal foreign bodies in office-based general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Alison; Lee, Lawrence R; Lee, Graham A

    2017-03-01

    Patients with a corneal foreign body may first present to their general practitioner (GP). Safe and efficacious management of these presentations avoids sight-threatening and eye-threatening complications. Removal of a simple, superficial foreign body without a slit lamp is within The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners' (RACGP's) curriculum and scope of practice. Knowing the rele-vant procedural skills and indications for referral is equally important. The objective of this article is to provide an evidence-based and expert-based guide to the management of corneal foreign bodies in the GP's office. History is key to identifying patient characteristics and mechanisms of ocular injury that are red flags for referral. Examination tech-niques and methods of superficial foreign body removal without a slit lamp are outlined, as well as the procedural threshold for referral to an ophthalmologist.

  8. Impetigo in General Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, Sander

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImpetigo is a common skin infection, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus that mainly occurs in children. Patients with impetigo usually consult their general practitioner, who also treats the vast majority of cases. Impetigo is considered highly infectious, and consequently children are often barred from schools. Patients and doctors seek prompt treatment. Although we know the causative bacteria, we do not know what factors promote contagiousness or severity of impetigo. There...

  9. Methodological practicalities in analytical generalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente

    2011-01-01

    operative methodological strategies for producing analytical generalizations in research practices. Thus, the aim of the article is to contribute to the discussions among qualitatively working researchers about generalizing by way of exemplifying some of the methodological practicalities in analytical...... generalization. Theoretically, the argumentation in the article is based on practice theory. The main part of the article describes three different examples of ways of generalizing on the basis of the same qualitative data material. There is a particular focus on describing the methodological strategies......In this article, I argue that the existing literature on qualitative methodologies tend to discuss analytical generalization at a relatively abstract and general theoretical level. It is, however, not particularly straightforward to “translate” such abstract epistemological principles into more...

  10. Prescription in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L. van

    2006-01-01

    The second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (DNSGP-2) has combined registration data on morbidity and prescription, making it possible to unravel diagnosis-specific prescription behaviour of general practitioners(GPs). Prescription rates for different disorders vary considerably, especially

  11. Global Imaging referral guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawooya, M.; Perez, M.; Lau, L.; Reeed, M.

    2010-01-01

    The medical imaging specialists called for global referral guidelines which would be made available to referring doctors. These referral guidelines should be:- Applicable in different health care settings, including resource-poor settings; Inclusive in terms of the range of clinical conditions; User-friendly and accessible (format/media); Acceptable to stakeholders, in particular to the referrers as the main target audience. To conceive evidence-based medicine as an integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. The Direct recipients of the Referral Guidelines would be:- Referrers: general practitioners / family doctors; paediatricians; emergency department doctors; other specialists and health workers. Providers (medical imaging practitioners): radiologists; nuclear medicine physicians; radiographers; other appropriately qualified practitioners providing diagnostic imaging services. For the Referral Guidelines to be effective there need to be: Credibility evidence-based Practicality end user involvement Context local resources, disease profiles Endorsement, opinion leaders Implementation- policy, education, CPOE - Monitoring of the use clinical audit, report feedback. The aim of the Referral Guidelines Project was to: Produce global referral guidelines that are evidence-based, cost effective and appropriate for the local setting, and include consideration of available equipment and expertise (RGWG; SIGs); Include supporting information about radiation doses, potential risks, protection of children and pregnant women (introductory chapter); Facilitate the implementation of the guidelines through guidance and tools (e.g. implementation guides, checklists, capacity building tools, guides on stakeholders engagement, audit support criteria); Conduct pilot testing in different clinical settings from each of the six WHO regions; Promote the inclusion of the referral guidelines in the curricula of medical schools; Develop and implement

  12. Using MIQUEST in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Hammersley

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes ten months' experience with MIQUEST software used for the collection of data from computerised databases in General Practice. We report on the following: the MIQUEST software in use, the time costs to the practice, the completeness of confidentiality barriers and the accuracy of data collected using MIQUEST compared with similar data collected by the practice system (EMIS. There were no problems encountered with installation of MIQUEST-related software. With experience, MIQUEST was equal to the practice system for speed and ease of use. The confidentiality safeguards were found to be in accordance with the GMSC/RCGP Guidelines - patients could not be directly, or indirectly, identified from the data extracted by external searches. Inaccuracies in the data collected using MIQUEST were identified, but these were largely attributable to problems with the EMIS-written interpreter available on the practice system at the time, or with the coding schemes used by the practice. In an individual practice, MIQUEST represents an alternative data collection method to the practice-based software. For data collection from multiple general practices it should prove an invaluable tool for Health Authorities and research organisations.

  13. Integrating Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) into Clinical Practice Settings: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerwala, Suneel M.; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.

    2013-01-01

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a public health approach to the delivery of early intervention and treatment services for individuals at risk of developing substance use disorders (SUDs) and those who have already developed these disorders. SBIRT can be flexibly applied; therefore, it can be delivered in many clinical care settings. SBIRT has been adapted for use in hospital emergency settings, primary care centers, office- and clinic-based practices, and other community settings, providing opportunities for early intervention with at-risk substance users before more severe consequences occur. In addition, SBIRT interventions can include the provision of brief treatment for those with less severe SUDs and referrals to specialized substance abuse treatment programs for those with more severe SUDs. Screening large numbers of individuals presents an opportunity to engage those who are in need of treatment. However, additional research is needed to determine how best to implement SBIRT. PMID:23210379

  14. An audit of non-urgent general adult referrals to Stikland State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than a third (36.7%) of referral letters stated no clear reason for referral and 41.7% no psychiatric diagnosis, and 29.1% of patients were referred without psychotropic medication being started. On assessment 62.1% of patients were found to have a single Axis I diagnosis. Despite virtually no referral letters making any ...

  15. An inclusive approach to raising standards in general practice: working with a 'community of practice' in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwa, Moyez; Deas, Kathleen; Ross, Jackie; Shaw, Tim; Wilcox, Helen; Spilsbury, Katrina

    2009-02-28

    In this study we explored the challenges to establishing a community of practice (CoP) to address standards in general practice. We focused on the issue of improving referral letters which are the main form of communication between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists. There is evidence to suggest that the information relayed to specialists at the time of referral could be improved. We aimed to develop a community of practice consisting of GPs in Western Australia to improve the quality of referral letters to six specialty clinics. Three phases included: establishing the CoP, monitoring the progress of the CoP and sustaining and managing the CoP. The CoP's activity centred on referral letters to each of six selected specialties. A local measure for the quality of the referral letters was developed from a survey of participants about specific items of history and weighted for their perceived importance in the referral letter. Referral letters by participants written before and after the benchmarking exercise were scored for quality based on the standards set by the CoP. Feedback to participants regarding the 'quality' of their individual referrals was provided by a nominated member of the CoP, including a comparison of before and after scores. 15 GPs were recruited. Only five GPs submitted referral letters both before and after benchmarking. The five GPs that participated in both study phases submitted a total of 102 referral letters (53 before and 49 after). There was a 26 point (95% CI 11-41) improvement in the average scores of the second set of letters after taking clustering by speciality into account, indicating the quality of referral letters improved substantially after feedback. There are many challenges to forming a CoP to focus on improving a specific issue in general practice. However we were able to demonstrate that those practitioners who participated in all aspects of the project substantially improved the quality of their referral letters. For

  16. An inclusive approach to raising standards in general practice: working with a 'community of practice' in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox Helen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we explored the challenges to establishing a community of practice (CoP to address standards in general practice. We focused on the issue of improving referral letters which are the main form of communication between general practitioners (GPs and specialists. There is evidence to suggest that the information relayed to specialists at the time of referral could be improved. Methods We aimed to develop a community of practice consisting of GPs in Western Australia to improve the quality of referral letters to six specialty clinics. Three phases included: establishing the CoP, monitoring the progress of the CoP and sustaining and managing the CoP. The CoP's activity centred on referral letters to each of six selected specialties. A local measure for the quality of the referral letters was developed from a survey of participants about specific items of history and weighted for their perceived importance in the referral letter. Referral letters by participants written before and after the benchmarking exercise were scored for quality based on the standards set by the CoP. Feedback to participants regarding the 'quality' of their individual referrals was provided by a nominated member of the CoP, including a comparison of before and after scores. Results 15 GPs were recruited. Only five GPs submitted referral letters both before and after benchmarking. The five GPs that participated in both study phases submitted a total of 102 referral letters (53 before and 49 after. There was a 26 point (95% CI 11–41 improvement in the average scores of the second set of letters after taking clustering by speciality into account, indicating the quality of referral letters improved substantially after feedback. Conclusion There are many challenges to forming a CoP to focus on improving a specific issue in general practice. However we were able to demonstrate that those practitioners who participated in all aspects of the project

  17. Survey of referrals and medical reports in optometric practices in Norway: midterm findings from a 3-year prospective Internet-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundmark PO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Per O Lundmark,1 Knut Luraas1,2 1Department of Optometry, Radiography and Lighting Design, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University College of Southeast Norway, Kongsberg, 2Rjukan Synssenter Optometri, Rjukan, Norway Purpose: The increasing demand for primary eye care due to an aging population implicates an enhanced role of optometrists in the communities. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the rate of referrals and returning medical reports between optometrists and health care professionals in Norway. The secondary objectives were to investigate the conformity of diagnoses in referrals and medical reports, the extent of optometric follow-up examinations and the use of ophthalmic diagnostic drugs in optometric practice.Materials and methods: This study is an ongoing prospective electronic survey administered on the Internet between November 2014 and December 2017. Optometrists in private optometric practice are eligible. Participants register data for up to 1 year, including examinations and the use of ophthalmic diagnostic drugs; referrals, including International Classification of Primary Care, second edition (ICPC-2 codes; medical reports, including the ICD-10 codes; and optometric follow-up enquiries. Analysis of agreement between referred and diagnosed conditions was made possible by encoding patients’ ID.Results: Seventeen months into the study, 67 optometrists were included (Female: 60%, mean age: 41 years.. There were 49,510 registered examinations (60% general, 28% contact lens, 12% auxiliary. Diagnostic drugs were used in 4% of these and in 14% of the examinations that resulted in a referral. There were 1,779 referrals (97% to ophthalmologists. Top three diagnoses were cataract (36%, glaucoma (11%, and age-related macular degeneration (7%. There were 1,036 returned medical reports, of which 76% could be linked with registered referrals. Diagnostic agreement was observed in 80% of the cases (74% for

  18. The volume-outcome relationship: practice-makes-perfect or selective-referral patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, H S; Hunt, S S; Maerki, S C

    1987-01-01

    Various studies have demonstrated that hospitals with larger numbers of patients with a specific diagnosis or procedure have lower mortality rates. In some instances, these results have been interpreted to mean that physicians and hospital personnel with more of these patients develop greater skills and that this results in better outcomes--the "practice-makes-perfect" hypothesis. An alternative explanation is that physicians and hospitals with better outcomes attract more patients--the "selective-referral pattern" hypothesis. Using data for 17 categories of patients from a sample of over 900 hospitals, we examine the patterns of selected variables with respect to hospital volume. To explore the plausibility of each hypothesis, a simultaneous-equation model is also used to test the relative importance of the two explanations for each diagnosis or procedure. The results suggest that both explanations are valid, and that the relative importance of the practice or referral explanation varies by diagnosis or procedure, in ways consistent with clinical aspects of the various patient categories. PMID:3112042

  19. Factors influencing general practitioners in the referral of elderly cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeaux Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have identified advanced age as a barrier to accessing specialised oncological care. Many factors can influence the care provided for elderly patients after a diagnosis of cancer has been established or is suspected. Only one European study has analysed the decision processes leading general practitioners (GPs to refer elderly patients with cancer to oncologists. The objectives of the current study are to describe the factors that influence these decisions and to identify the particular factors and GP characteristics that are associated with systematic referral of these patients in South-West France. Methods This is a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of GPs in Aquitaine, South-West France. Questionnaire items were selected using a Delphi consensus approach and sent by post. Two logistic regression models were constructed to investigate GPs' decisions to refer these patients. Results The response rate obtained was 30%. Half of the general practitioners reported "always" referring their elderly cancer patients to oncologists. More than 75% reported being influenced by patient-related elements (patient and/or family wishes, comorbid factors, unsuitability of invasive investigations, physical and mental autonomy, by cancer-related elements (severity of symptoms, expected side-effects and an organisational element (whether the general practitioner was used to collaborating with oncologists. Logistic regression analysis showed that cancer site and organisational difficulties in patient management were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients with early-stage cancer. For advanced stages, oncology training, patient age, organisational difficulties in patient management and stage of cancer were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients. Conclusions Cancer-linked factors and organisational difficulties have been highlighted as influencing the

  20. Specialist pediatric palliative care referral practices in pediatric oncology: A large 5-year retrospective audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunangshu Ghoshal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Oncologists referred patients late in the course of disease trajectory. Most of the referrals were made for counseling and communication, but many patients had high symptom burden during referral.

  1. Weight Changes in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    with weight change over 9 years. Weight gain rates were large in young adults and incrementally smaller in middle aged adults. Subjects more than 60 years lost weight on average. Historical weight data suggest that the body weight increases throughout life to the age of 60-65years. A study with simulated data......INTRODUCTION: This PhD thesis is about weight changes. What determines long-term weight changes in the adult general population? Is it possible that weight loss may not always be healthy? The present clinical guidelines for general practice advice most overweight persons and patients with type 2...... indicates that bias in baseline BMI may misleadingly have favored weight loss in earlier cohort studies of intentional weight loss and mortality. DISCUSSION: The findings regarding weight loss and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes are in opposition to the prevailing observational literature...

  2. 20 CFR 404.520 - Referral of overpayments to the Department of the Treasury for tax refund offset-General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Referral of overpayments to the Department of the Treasury for tax refund offset-General. 404.520 Section 404.520 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... offset income tax refunds due taxpayers who have an outstanding overpayment are set forth in §§ 404.520...

  3. Characteristics of referrals to an inpatient hospice and a survey of general practitioner perceptions of palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamark, D A; Lawrence, C; Gilbert, J

    1996-02-01

    In order to determine symptoms, drug prescribing and physical problems of patients referred to an inpatient hospice, case notes from 130 consecutive first admissions (95 general practitioner (GP) referrals, 35 consultant referrals) were analysed. GP referrals were more likely to be constipated, require care and be discharged to home. Consultant referrals were more gravely ill, dependent and more likely to die in the hospice. On admission 76 (58%) patients were receiving opiates with co-prescription of opiate and laxative occurring in 41% (31/76) of the cases. The prescription of laxatives with the symptoms of constipation occurred in 62% (26/42) of the cases on admission. A telephone survey of 79 referring GPs revealed that 37% had attended neither a course nor a lecture relevant to palliative care in the past 3 years. GPs experienced difficulties frequently or always in: (a) managing pain (8/79); (b) managing other symptoms (25/79); (c) helping patients and relatives cope with their emotional distress (18/79); and (d) coping with their own emotional responses to death and dying (5/79). In conclusion, the differences demonstrated between the GP and consultant referrals have implications for purchasers. The high incidence of possible opiate-induced side-effects and the difficulties with symptom control expressed by some GPs indicate a continuing need for effective educational input.

  4. Introduction of electronic referral from community associated with more timely review by secondary services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J; White, S; Day, K J; Gu, Y; Pollock, M

    2011-01-01

    Electronic referral (eReferral) from community into public secondary healthcare services was introduced to 30 referring general medical practices and 28 hospital based services in late 2007. To measure the extent of uptake of eReferral and its association with changes in referral processing. Analysis of transactional data from the eReferral message service and the patient information management system of the affected hospital; interview of clinical, operational and management stakeholders. eReferral use rose steadily to 1000 transactions per month in 2008, thereafter showing moderate growth to 1200 per month in 2010. Rate of eReferral from the community in 2010 is estimated at 56% of total referrals to the hospital from general practice, and as 71% of referrals from those having done at least one referral electronically. Referral latency from letter date to hospital triage improves significantly from 2007 to 2009 (psystem usability issues. With eReferrals, a referral's status can be checked, and its content read, by any authorized user at any time. The period of eReferral uptake was associated with significant speed-up in referral processing without changes in staffing levels. The eReferral system provides a foundation for further innovation in the community-secondary interface, such as electronic decision support and shared care planning systems. We observed substantial rapid voluntary uptake of eReferrals associated with faster, more reliable and more transparent referral processing.

  5. Clinical psychology in general practice: a controlled trial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earll, Louise; Kincey, John

    1982-01-01

    A controlled trial study is described in which 50 consecutive potential referrals for psychological treatment from one general practice were randomly allocated either to behavioural treatment or no-treatment conditions. Treatment-group patients received treatment from a clinical psychologist working within the practice; the control-group patients continued to be managed by their general practitioner. The patients' use of NHS resources was assessed during the treatment period (or its equivalent for the control group) and at a follow-up comparison point, when the patients' subjective ratings of their progress were also obtained. Between referral and the end of treatment the treated group received significantly less psychotropic medication than the control group. This difference was not, however, maintained at the longer-term follow-up. No differences in general practice consultation rates, in the subjective ratings of psychological distress, in control orientation or life satisfaction were found between the two groups, but the level of patient satisfaction was high. Implications for the design of future studies and for psychological health care delivery systems are discussed. PMID:7086742

  6. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how......) and the Danish Microbiology Database (performed microbiological testing). We will assess and quantify the use of microbiological testing prior to antibiotic prescription. Furthermore we will investigate associations between GP characteristics, use of microbiological investigations and description patterns...

  7. Orthodontic treatment provision and referral preferences among New Zealand general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldawood, S; Ampuan, S N H; Medara, N; Thomson, W M

    2011-11-01

    General dental practitioners (GDPs) are key clinicians in the orthodontic referral chain as they complement (and may compete with) orthodontists in providing treatment for the public. To determine the nature and extent of GDPs' involvement in orthodontic treatment provision and to identify influences on GDPs' choice of orthodontist. An email survey was conducted of actively-practising GDPs in May-June 2010. Two timelines of contact were followed, with non-responders to the first survey re-contacted three weeks later. Just under one-fifth (19.3 per cent) reported providing forms of orthodontic treatment. This proportion was higher among males, more experienced practitioners, and dentists in rural locations. The percentage involvement ranged from 22.3 per cent in Greater Auckland to 10.5 per cent in Greater Wellington and 11.9 per cent in Christchurch. In the remainder of New Zealand, percentages ranged from 11.5 per cent in urban areas to 37.1 per cent in rural areas. Of those providing treatment, almost half had 1-10 patients under management, and just over one-third had greater numbers. Sixty-one per cent of orthodontically-involved GDPs in Auckland had more than 10 orthodontic patients. The most commonly treated condition was a simple crossbite, while the least commonly treated condition was the severe Class III malocclusion. The provision of orthodontic treatment by New Zealand GDPs has decreased in recent years to an average of about one in five, but this figure is considerably higher in rural areas and is a notable feature of the greater Auckland area. The findings suggest that the majority of the more complex cases are continuing to be referred to specialist orthodontists.

  8. Weight Changes in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus

    2017-06-01

    This PhD thesis is about weight changes. What determines long-term weight changes in the adult general population? Is it possible that weight loss may not always be healthy? The present clinical guidelines for general practice advice most overweight persons and patients with type 2 diabetes to lose weight. Are the guidelines based on firm evidence?   METHODS: The back-bone of the thesis is constituted by three scientific articles based on three different population based cohort studies. Multivariable modeling and other epidemiological methods were used.   RESULTS: Article 1 examined weight changes in the general population in relation to smoking status, and proposed a graphical 'smoking cessation weight change model', demonstrating the importance of time, age and smoking status in relation to long-term weight changes. Article 2 suggested new methods to improve the processing of dietary data. It was demonstrated how median imputation for missing values and assumptions about standard portion sizes were inferior to stochastic methods conditioning on information about physiology of the individual. Article 3 evaluated the influence of prospectively planned intentional weight loss on long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therapeutic intentional weight loss supervised by a medical doctor was not associated with reduced morbidity or mortality. In the general population the dietary intake of fructose and soft drinks sweetened with sugar was not associated with weight change over 9 years. Weight gain rates were large in young adults and incrementally smaller in middle aged adults. Subjects more than 60 years lost weight on average. Historical weight data suggest that the body weight increases throughout life to the age of 60-65years. A study with simulated data indicates that bias in baseline BMI may misleadingly have favored weight loss in earlier cohort studies of intentional weight loss and mortality.   DISCUSSION: The findings regarding

  9. Patients with HIV/AIDS: physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and referral practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, P O; Baldor, R A; Warfield, M E; Frazier, B

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated Massachusetts family physicians' current care and referral practices with respect to HIV/AIDS patients and examined actors that might influence family physicians in referring these patients to specialists. Educational opportunities for physicians with regard to HIV were also examined. In 1994, a 2-page survey was mailed to the 468 members of the Massachusetts Academy of Family Physicians. The survey questionnaire examined such factors as whether the respondents were teaching or nonteaching, rural or urban; number of years since medical school or residency training; and knowledge and attitudes with regard to HIV/AIDS patients. The data were analyzed using Student's t test, chi-square, and correlation analysis. Usable responses were returned by 281 (60%) of the physicians surveyed. Of these, 65% reported having HIV patients in their practice, and 46% reported having AIDS patients was being managed alone by 53% of these physicians, and 11% managed their patients with AIDS. Physicians providing care for HIV/AIDS patients were more likely to be practicing in urban locations, have three or more HIV/AIDS patients in their practice, or recently graduated from residency. Additionally, they were more likely to be involved in residency teaching programs. Those who did not care for HIV/AIDS patients felt less knowledgeable about HIV/AIDS care, and felt that they had no time in their practice to care for this population of patients. Physicians with HIV patients learn more about HIV care from their colleagues than those without HIV patients. Family physicians are increasingly seeing HIV/AIDS patients in their offices. The majority are continually caring for these patients, either by themselves or co-managing their care with a specialist. Local CME programs relying on colleagues and community resources to discuss management of these patients may be one of the best ways of ensuring that increasing numbers of family physicians obtain the appropriate

  10. Identifying crime victims who are at high risk for post traumatic stress disorder: developing a practical referral instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlfarth, T.; Winkel, F. W.; van den Brink, W.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To construct a practical instrument for the identification and referral of crime victims who are at high risk for post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Crime victims filing a complaint at a police station were asked to fill out a questionnaire probing risk factors for PTSD (n

  11. A multifaceted implementation strategy versus passive implementation of low back pain guidelines in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Bro, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    primary care to secondary care. The primary aim of this project was to reduce secondary care referral within 12 weeks by a multifaceted implementation strategy (MuIS). METHODS: In a cluster randomised design, 189 general practices from the North Denmark Region were invited to participate. Practices were...... randomised (1:1) and stratified by practice size to MuIS (28 practices) or a passive implementation strategy (PaIS; 32 practices). Included were patients with LBP aged 18 to 65 years who were able to complete questionnaires, had no serious underlying pathology, and were not pregnant. We developed a Mu.......31 to 0.81; p = 0.004]). CONCLUSIONS: Using a MuIS changed general practice referral behaviour and was cost effective, but patients in the MuIS group were less satisfied. This study supports the application of a MuIS when implementing guidelines. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01699256....

  12. Intercultural communication in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wieringen, Joke C M; Harmsen, Johannes A M; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2002-03-01

    Little is known about the causes of problems in communication between health care professionals and ethnic-minority patients. Not only language difficulties, but also cultural differences may result in these problems. This study explores the influence of communication and patient beliefs about health (care) and disease on understanding and compliance of native-born and ethnic-minority patients. In this descriptive study seven general practices located in a multi-ethnic neighbourhood in Rotterdam participated. Eighty-seven parents who visited their GP with a child for a new health problem took part: more than 50% of them belonged to ethnic-minorities. The consultation between GP and patient was recorded on video and a few days after the consultation patients were interviewed at home. GPs filled out a short questionnaire immediately after the consultation. Patient beliefs and previous experiences with health care were measured by different questionnaires in the home interview. Communication was analysed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System based on the videos. Mutual understanding between GP and patient and therapy compliance was assessed by comparing GP's questionnaires with the home interview with the parents. In 33% of the consultations with ethnic-minority patients (versus 13% with native-born patients) mutual understanding was poor. Different aspects of communication had no influence on mutual understanding. Problems in the relationship with the GP, as experienced by patients, showed a significant relation with mutual understanding. Consultations without mutual understanding more often ended in non-compliance with the prescribed therapy. Ethnic-minority parents more often report problems in their relationship with the GP and they have different beliefs about health and health care from native-born parents. Good relationships between GP and patients are necessary for mutual understanding. Mutual understanding has a strong correlation with compliance

  13. Using social exchange theory to understand non-terminal palliative care referral practices for Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prizer, Lindsay P; Gay, Jennifer L; Perkins, Molly M; Wilson, Mark G; Emerson, Kerstin G; Glass, Anne P; Miyasaki, Janis M

    2017-10-01

    A palliative approach is recommended in the care of Parkinson's disease patients; however, many patients only receive this care in the form of hospice at the end of life. Physician attitudes about palliative care have been shown to influence referrals for patients with chronic disease, and negative physician perceptions may affect early palliative referrals for Parkinson's disease patients. To use Social Exchange Theory to examine the association between neurologist-perceived costs and benefits of palliative care referral for Parkinson's disease patients and their reported referral practices. A cross-sectional survey study of neurologists. A total of 62 neurologists recruited from the National Parkinson Foundation, the Medical Association of Georgia, and the American Academy of Neurology's clinician database. Participants reported significantly stronger endorsement of the rewards ( M = 3.34, SD = 0.37) of palliative care referrals than the costs ( M = 2.13, SD = 0.30; t(61) = -16.10, p < 0.0001). A Poisson regression found that perceived costs, perceived rewards, physician type, and the number of complementary clinicians in practice were significant predictors of palliative care referral. Physicians may be more likely to refer patients to non-terminal palliative care if (1) they work in interdisciplinary settings and/or (2) previous personal or patient experience with palliative care was positive. They may be less likely to refer if (1) they fear a loss of autonomy in patient care, (2) they are unaware of available programs, and/or (3) they believe they address palliative needs. Initiatives to educate neurologists on the benefits and availability of non-terminal palliative services could improve patient access to this care.

  14. Organization and change in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl

    Organization and change in general practice Abstract for a symposium at Nordic Congress for General Practice Thursday 14 May at 15.30-17.00 General practice is under increasing pressure to assume new tasks, adopt new technologies and engage in new organizational structures. However, in a field...... the challenge of ensuring coherent cancer treatment can be handled by a case manager or if other modes should also be considered. Lars Borgquist. A new model for General Practice in Sweden- consequences for quality of care and economics. Many Swedish county councils will introduce new models for organizing......, Family Practice....

  15. Pediatric referrals to psychiatry in a Tertiary Care General Hospital: A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bheemsain Tekkalaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with chronic physical illnesses frequently have psychiatric comorbidities, which often go un-noticed and may lead to more resource utilization and morbidity. Pediatric liaison services can be effectively used to bridge this gap. Literature on pediatric liaison services is sparse. Aims: To study the referral patterns, reasons for referrals, psychiatric diagnoses and interventions in children and adolescents referred to psychiatry department in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of all children and adolescents below 19 years of age, referred to psychiatry department from 2010 to 2015, was done. Data was collected and statistical analysis was done. Results: Two hundred and nine subjects were included in the study. Mean age of sample was 12.15 (±4.20 years, with about 66.02% being males. About 54.06% of the participants were referred from pediatricians. Almost three fourth (72.25% of children had no diagnosable physical illness. Intellectual disability (19.62% was the most common psychiatric diagnosis, followed by depressive disorders (14.35%, and dissociative disorders (12.92%. Conclusions: In our study, majority of the referrals were the adolescent males from pediatric department. Intellectual disability, depressive disorder, and stress-related disorders were the common diagnoses. The fact that three-fourth of the referred children had no physical illness implies lack of awareness, stigma toward mental illness, and pathway of care.

  16. Improving malaria recognition, treatment and referral practices by training caretakers in rural Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Theodora A

    2010-05-01

    A caretaker training programme was carried out in Ugwuogo-Nike, a rural area in south-east Nigeria, based on formative research within the community. A training of trainers workshop was organized for 30 leaders of women groups who subsequently trained other mothers in their group. Community information activities, which lasted for a period of eight months, included the use of posters, drama group and jingles. The programme was evaluated using the quantitative and qualitative methods that were employed at baseline, which included community survey and focus group discussions (FGDs). For the community survey, households with children under five years of age were identified and provided the sampling frame, from which 300 households were chosen using the systematic sampling method. The target population for the FGDs were caretakers of children under five years. Post-intervention evaluation of the programme showed significant (pmanagement of malaria and referral practices for severe malaria. Those who correctly reported that mosquitoes were the cause of malaria rose markedly from 39.7% to 88.7%. Knowledge of symptoms of mild and severe malaria also increased significantly. Only 1.5% of caretakers were aware of the correct dose of anti-malarial before intervention, but this increased to 41.5%. The impact of intervention brought about a dramatic change in the practice of taking severely ill children, especially those with convulsion, to a traditional healer. A minority (6.7%) of caretakers took a severely ill child to a traditional healer as against 60% pre-intervention. There was also a significant increase in use of formal health facilities for the treatment of severely ill children. The study findings support the view that training of mothers to recognize, treat appropriately and refer severe cases of malaria is feasible and may lead to a reduction in the incidence of severe disease.

  17. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights at Uganda's national referral hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibuule, Dan; Mitonga-Kabwebwe, Honoré; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Ssempebwa, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The realisation of patients’ rights in resource-constrained and patient-burdened public health care settings in Uganda remains an obstacle towards quality health care delivery, health care-seeking behaviour and health outcomes. Although the Uganda Patients’ Charter of 2009 empowers patients to demand quality care, inequitable access and abuse remain common. Aim The study aimed to assess level of awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights amongst patients and health workers (HWs) at Uganda's national referral hospital, Mulago Hospital in Kampala. Methods A three-phase cross-sectional questionnaire-based descriptive survey was conducted amongst 211 patients, 98 HWs and 16 key informants using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The study was conducted in May–June 2012, 2.5 years after the launch of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Results At least 36.5% of patients faced a challenge regarding their rights whilst seeking health care. Most of the patients (79%) who met a challenge never attempted to demand their rights. Most patients (81.5%) and HWs (69.4%) had never heard of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Awareness of patients’ rights was significantly higher amongst HWs (70%) than patients (40%) (p bribe HWs with money to access care, and political, socio-economic and tribal status. Conclusion and recommendations Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel, multichannel, patient-centred approach that incorporates social services and addresses intrinsic patient, HW and health system factors to strengthen patients’ rights issues at the hospital. PMID:24563777

  18. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients' rights at Uganda's national referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoya, Harriet Rachel; Kibuule, Dan; Mitonga-Kabwebwe, Honoré; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Ssempebwa, John C

    2013-06-21

    The realisation of patients' rights in resource-constrained and patient-burdened public health care settings in Uganda remains an obstacle towards quality health care delivery, health care-seeking behaviour and health outcomes. Although the Uganda Patients' Charter of 2009 empowers patients to demand quality care, inequitable access and abuse remain common. The study aimed to assess level of awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients' rights amongst patients and health workers (HWs) at Uganda's national referral hospital, Mulago Hospital in Kampala. A three-phase cross-sectional questionnaire-based descriptive survey was conducted amongst 211 patients, 98 HWs and 16 key informants using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The study was conducted in May-June 2012, 2.5 years after the launch of the Uganda Patients' Charter. At least 36.5% of patients faced a challenge regarding their rights whilst seeking health care. Most of the patients (79%) who met a challenge never attempted to demand their rights. Most patients (81.5%) and HWs (69.4%) had never heard of the Uganda Patients' Charter. Awareness of patients' rights was significantly higher amongst HWs (70%) than patients (40%) ( p bribe HWs with money to access care, and political, socio-economic and tribal status. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients' rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel, multichannel, patient-centred approach that incorporates social services and addresses intrinsic patient, HW and health system factors to strengthen patients' rights issues at the hospital.

  19. Sphygmomanometers--an audit in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nayankumar C; Sibbritt, David W; Heaney, Susan; Sharples, Jan

    2004-11-01

    The accuracy of sphygmomanometers used in Australian general practice is unknown but potentially important. We measured the accuracy of sphygmomanometers in general practice in the Hunter region of New South Wales using a gold standard. Practices were recruited by an advertisement in the division newsletter. Sixty practices (35%) volunteered. A total of 404 instruments were checked. Over 95% of sphygmomanometers were within 4 mmHg of gold standard sphygmomanometer across the clinical pressure range. Mercury sphygmomanometers were more accurate than aneroid (pmercury.

  20. Organization and change in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl

    Organization and change in general practice Abstract for a symposium at Nordic Congress for General Practice Thursday 14 May at 15.30-17.00 General practice is under increasing pressure to assume new tasks, adopt new technologies and engage in new organizational structures. However, in a field...... the challenge of ensuring coherent cancer treatment can be handled by a case manager or if other modes should also be considered. Lars Borgquist. A new model for General Practice in Sweden- consequences for quality of care and economics. Many Swedish county councils will introduce new models for organizing...

  1. End-of-Life Palliative Care Practices and Referrals in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Daniel; Merkel, Emily C; Menon, Manoj; Loggers, Elizabeth; Ddungu, Henry; Leng, Mhoira; Namukwaya, Elizabeth; Casper, Corey

    2017-10-23

    While early involvement and integration of palliative care with oncology can positively impact quality of life and survival of patients with advanced cancer, there is a dearth of information regarding this integration in sub-Saharan Africa. We sought to describe the rate and factors predicting specialist palliative referrals among cancer patients in Uganda. We examined the rate of referrals of cancer patients to palliative specialists via a chart review, while also surveying and interviewing doctors at the Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI) about their approaches to palliative care. All adult patients at the UCI who died in a 20-month interval from 2014 to 2015. All UCI doctors were approached for the survey and 25 (96%) participated. Seven of these doctors were also individually interviewed. Number of referrals to palliative specialists and qualitative responses to questions about end-of-life care management. Sixty-six (11.1%) of 595 patients were referred to palliative care specialists. Patients with worse ECOG performance statuses were more likely to be referred to palliative specialists (odds ratio 2.23, p = 0.03); no other factors were predictive of a referral. Median number of days lived after referral was 5 days (interquartile range 2-13). Doctors explained the low referral rate and short life expectancy after referral by limited palliative resources and a reticence to have end-of-life management conversations with patients due to cultural taboos. Despite recognized benefits of palliative collaboration, doctors at the UCI seldom refer patients to palliative care specialists due to limited staffing, cultural barriers, and difficult interservice communication.

  2. Nutrition communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.M.E.; Hiddink, G.J.; Koelen, M.A.; Graaf, de C.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are frequently confronted with patients who suffer from obesity or other nutrition-related diseases, such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. There is increasing evidence that nutrition communication is effective in changing nutrition behaviour. Moreover, it is widely

  3. Eating disorders in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M B

    1986-01-01

    A total of 748 patients who attended four south London group practices were screened using the eating attitudes test; 1% of women had bulimia nervosa and a further 3% a partial syndrome eating disorder. Eating and weight control behaviour and psychiatric indicators for an eating disorder were analysed. Patients with bulimia nervosa and partial syndromes were remarkably similar. They were mainly women, from the middle to upper classes, in the normal weight range but having had considerable weight fluctuation in the past, more likely to have had a history of menstrual irregularity, often psychologically troubled, and tended to have more family psychopathology. PMID:3099893

  4. Sports medicine in The Netherlands: consultation with a sports physician without referral by a general practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruijn MC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Matthijs C de Bruijn,1 Boudewijn J Kollen,2 Frank Baarveld21Center for Sports Medicine, 2Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The NetherlandsBackground: In The Netherlands, sports medicine physicians are involved in the care of about 8% of all sports injuries that occur each year. Some patients consult a sports physician directly, without being referred by a general practitioner. This study aims to determine how many patients consult a sports physician directly, and to explore differences in the profiles of these patients compared with those who are referred.Methods: This was an exploratory cross-sectional study in which all new patients presenting with an injury to a regional sports medical center during September 2010 were identified. The characteristics of patients who self-referred and those who were referred by other medical professionals were compared.Results: A total of 234 patients were included (mean age 33.7 years, 59.1% male. Most of the injuries occurred during soccer and running, particularly injuries of the knee and ankle. In this cohort, 39.3% of patients consulted a sports physician directly. These patients were significantly more often involved in individual sports, consulted a sports physician relatively rapidly after the onset of injury, and had received significantly less care before this new event from medical professionals compared with patients who were referred.Conclusion: In this study, 39.3% of patients with sports injuries consulted a sports physician directly without being referred by another medical professional. The profile of this group of patients differed from that of patients who were referred. The specific roles of general practitioners and sports physicians in medical sports care in The Netherlands needs to be defined further.Keywords: sports injuries, sports medicine physician, primary care, secondary care

  5. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights at Uganda’s national referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet R. Kagoya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The realisation of patients’ rights in resource-constrained and patient-burdened public health care settings in Uganda remains an obstacle towards quality health care delivery, health care seeking behaviour and health outcomes. Although the Uganda Patients’ Charter of 2009 empowers patients to demand quality care, inequitable access and abuse remain common. Aim: The study aimed to assess level of awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights amongst patients and health workers (HWs at Uganda’s national referral hospital, Mulago Hospital in Kampala. Methods: A three-phase cross-sectional questionnaire-based descriptive survey was conducted amongst 211 patients, 98 HWs and 16 key informants using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The study was conducted in May–June 2012, 2.5 years after the launch of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Results: At least 36.5% of patients faced a challenge regarding their rights whilst seeking health care. Most of the patients (79% who met a challenge never attempted to demand their rights. Most patients (81.5% and HWs (69.4% had never heard of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Awareness of patients’ rights was significantly higher amongst HWs (70% than patients (40% (p < 0.01. Patients’ awareness was associated with education level (x2 = 42.4,p < 0.001, employment status (x2 = 33.6, p < 0.001 and hospital visits (x2 = 3.9, p = 0.048. For HWs it was associated with education level (x2 = 155.6, p < 0.001 and length of service (x2 = 154.5, p <0.001.Patients feel powerless to negotiate for their rights and fear being discriminated against based on their ability to bribe HWs with money to access care, and political, socio-economic and tribal status. Conclusion and recommendations: Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel

  6. Alarm symptoms of upper gastrointestinal cancer and contact to general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Svendsen, Rikke Pilsgaard

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival of upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancer depends on early stage diagnosis. Symptom-based guidelines and fast-track referral systems have been implemented for use in general practice. To improve diagnosis of upper GI cancer, knowledge on prevalence of alarm symptoms in the gene......INTRODUCTION: Survival of upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancer depends on early stage diagnosis. Symptom-based guidelines and fast-track referral systems have been implemented for use in general practice. To improve diagnosis of upper GI cancer, knowledge on prevalence of alarm symptoms...... in the general population and subsequent healthcare-seeking is needed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A nationwide study of 100,000 adults, who were randomly selected from the general population were invited to participate in an internet-based survey. People aged ≥45 years were included in this study. Items regarding...

  7. Using clinical audit, qualitative data from patients and feedback from general practitioners to decrease delay in the referral of suspected colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Elizabeth; van der Molen, Beverley; Cranston, Amanda

    2007-04-01

    There was local concern over possible delays in the diagnosis and referral of patients with suspected colorectal cancer and interest in understanding more about patients' experiences of diagnosis. To use clinical audit, qualitative data from patients and feedback from general practitioners (GPs) to identify possible delays in referral, and to decrease these by implementing referral guidelines. Audit of endoscopy referrals assessed how often these recorded rectal examination and whether patients were seen within 2 weeks. Qualitative interviews with 19 patients explored their experience of referral and diagnosis. Review of 33 case records assessed other possible delays. Most patients referred for endoscopy were seen within 2 weeks (67%, 119/177), but only 47% (71/151) of available referral letters mentioned rectal examination. Patients perceived most delay in secondary care and case records suggested that this occurred after non-urgent referral. Patients also identified some problems with communication, information and support about the diagnosis. We used the results to stimulate local acceptance of national referral guidelines and wider discussion about care. A consultation exercise with GPs informed the development of a faxable urgent referral pro forma and supporting educational meetings. We designed a database to monitor changes in waiting times and made plans to improve communication and support after diagnosis. Feeding back qualitative data from patients together with audit results seemed a powerful lever to stimulate action about hospital delays. Average waiting times dropped quickly and remained low due to the continuing national focus upon them. Seeking GP views may have promoted the use of referral pro formas, but monitoring waiting times distracted from a more thorough evaluation of their use. Qualitative data from patients raised awareness of their experience, but was time-consuming to collect and we had limited success in using it for specific

  8. [Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on 'Vaginal bleeding'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Corlien J H; Meijer, Loes J; Janssen, C A H Ineke; Burgers, Jako S; Opstelten, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The revised Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on 'Vaginal bleeding' provides recommendations for abnormal bleeding in women in the reproduction phase of life and for post-menopausal bleeding. This guideline is closely attuned to the guideline on 'Heavy menstrual bleeding' of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Transvaginal sonography is not reliable for excluding endometrial carcinoma in women with abnormal vaginal bleeding treated with tamoxifen. The choice of medical treatment is determined in consultation with the patient. The following factors are assessed: severity and bother, long-term need for contraception, preference for cycle control, desire to have a child, pain during menstruation, comorbidity and use of medication. Treatment options are nonhormonal (NSAIDs, or tranexamic acid) or hormonal (a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, or combined oral contraceptive). In women of reproductive age, referral is indicated if medical treatment is not effective. Other indications are intracavitary abnormalities diagnosed by transvaginal sonography, tamoxifen use, persistent contact bleeding, and suspicion of coagulation disorders. Indications for referral for post-menopausal bleeding include: sonographic endometrial thickness > 4 mm, abnormal cervical cytology, tamoxifen use, irregular bleeding during use of hormone therapy for vasomotor symptoms and persistent or recurrent bleeding, regardless of endometrial thickness.

  9. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for

  10. Multiple sclerosis, from referral to confirmed diagnosis: an audit of clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, S B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend a timeline of 6 weeks from referral to neurology consultation and then 6 weeks to a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVES: We audited the clinical management of all new outpatient referrals diagnosed with MS between January 2007 and May 2010. METHODS: We analysed the timelines from referral to first clinic visit, to MRI studies and lumbar puncture (LP) (if performed) and the overall interval from first visit to the time the diagnosis was given to the patient. RESULTS: Of the 119 diagnoses of MS\\/Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS), 93 (78%) were seen within 6 weeks of referral. MRI was performed before first visit in 61% and within 6 weeks in a further 27%. A lumbar puncture (LP) was performed in 83% of all patients and was done within 6 weeks in 78%. In total, 63 (53%) patients received their final diagnosis within 6 weeks of their first clinic visit, with 57 (48%) patients having their diagnosis delayed. The main rate-limiting steps were the availability of imaging and LP, and administrative issues. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that, even with careful scheduling, it is difficult for a specialist service to obtain MRI scans and LP results so as to fulfil NICE guidelines within the optimal six-week period. An improved service would require MRI scans to be arranged before the first clinic visit in all patients with suspected MS.

  11. Methadone and buprenorphine prescribing and referral practices in US prison systems: results from a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Amy; Zaller, Nickolas; Dickman, Samuel; Trimbur, Catherine; Nijhawan, Ank; Rich, Josiah D

    2009-11-01

    More than 50% of incarcerated individuals have a history of substance use, and over 200,000 individuals with heroin addiction pass through American correctional facilities annually. Opiate replacement therapy (ORT) with methadone or buprenorphine is an effective treatment for opiate dependence and can reduce drug-related disease and recidivism for inmates. Provision of ORT is nevertheless a frequently neglected intervention in the correctional setting. We surveyed the 50 state; Washington, District of Columbia (DC); and Federal Department of Corrections' medical directors or their equivalents about their facilities' ORT prescribing policies and referral programs for inmates leaving prison. We received responses from 51 of 52 prison systems nationwide. Twenty-eight prison systems (55%) offer methadone to inmates in some situations. Methadone use varies widely across states: over 50% of correctional facilities that offer methadone do so exclusively for pregnant women or for chronic pain management. Seven states' prison systems (14%) offer buprenorphine to some inmates. The most common reason cited for not offering ORT was that facilities "prefer drug-free detoxification over providing methadone or buprenorphine." Twenty-three states' prison systems (45%) provide referrals for some inmates to methadone maintenance programs after release, which increased from 8% in 2003; 15 states' prison systems (29%) provide some referrals to community buprenorphine providers. Despite demonstrated social, medical, and economic benefits of providing ORT to inmates during incarceration and linkage to ORT upon release, many prison systems nationwide still do not offer pharmacological treatment for opiate addiction or referrals for ORT upon release.

  12. General practice trainees face practice ownership with fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgiss, Elizabeth; Haesler, Emily; Anderson, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present secondary analysis of data collected in a grounded theory study was to explore the perceptions of Registrars and new Fellows to practice ownership and management. Methods Focus groups and interviews with Registrars and recent Fellows were undertaken to explore the desire to become an owner, facilitators and barriers to practice ownership and delivery models for practice ownership education. A secondary thematic analysis was conducted to understand emerging concepts related to perceptions of general practice ownership. Results A surprisingly strong theme of fear was evident across focus group and interview participants. Expressed fear was specifically related to financial concerns, lack of relevant knowledge and skills and concern over balancing different roles. Moderating factors included previous life and educational experiences, as well as role modelling. Conclusions Graduation of a cohort of new general practitioners (GPs) who express fear towards practice ownership is concerning. Creating more positive learning environments and opportunity for open discussion regarding practice management and ownership is an important step in providing adequate support for new GPs to give serious consideration to career options. What is known about the topic? The traditional model of general practice ownership has been for a doctor to own and/or manage the practice. Fewer new GPs are taking on the role of owning a general practice, and disinterest has been presumed to play a significant role in this trend. It has been reported that current curricula provide insufficient focus on providing learning opportunities for general practice trainees on ownership and management models; however, recent research has shown that general practice trainees have a strong interest in receiving this knowledge during their training. What does this paper add? The present qualitative research evaluated the emotional response that general practice trainees

  13. Candidemia in a major regional tertiary referral hospital – epidemiology, practice patterns and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Qi-Min Teo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candidemia is a common cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility patterns and outcomes of candidemia in a large regional tertiary referral hospital. Methods A retrospective surveillance study of patients with candidemia was conducted at Singapore General Hospital between July 2012 and December 2015. In addition, incidence densities and species distribution of candidemia episodes were analysed from 2008 to 2015. Results In the period of 2012 to 2015, 261 candidemia episodes were identified. The overall incidence was 0.14/1000 inpatient-days. C. glabrata (31.4%, C. tropicalis (29.9%, and C. albicans (23.8% were most commonly isolated. The incidence of C. glabrata significantly increased from 2008 to 2015 (Coefficient 0.004, confidence interval 0–0.007, p = 0.04. Fluconazole resistance was detected primarily in C. tropicalis (16.7% and C. glabrata (7.2%. fks mutations were identified in one C. albicans and one C. tropicalis. Candidemia episodes caused by C. tropicalis were more commonly encountered in patients with haematological malignancies (p = 0.01, neutropenia (p < 0.001 and higher SAPS II scores (p = 0.02, while prior exposure to echinocandins was associated with isolation of C. parapsilosis (p = 0.001. Echinocandins (73.3% were most commonly prescribed as initial treatment. The median (range time to initial treatment was 1 (0–9 days. The 30-day in-hospital mortality rate was 49.8%. High SAPS II score (Odds ratio, OR 1.08; 95% confidence interval, CI 1.05–1.11 and renal replacement therapy (OR 5.54; CI 2.80–10.97 were independent predictors of mortality, while drain placement (OR 0.44; CI 0.19–0.99 was protective. Conclusions Decreasing azole susceptibilities to C. tropicalis and the emergence of echinocandin resistance suggest that susceptibility

  14. Computers in general practice: the patient's voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of answers to a questionnaire on the use of computers in general practice showed that 19 per cent of patients in two practices in Staffordshire would be worried if their general practitioner used a computer to store medical records. Twenty-seven per cent of patients would be unwilling to speak frankly about personal matters to their general practitioner if he or she used a computer and 7 per cent said that they would change to another doctor. Fifteen per cent stated that their general practitioner already had information about them that they would not want to be included in a computerized record of their medical history. PMID:7328555

  15. Attitudes and referral practices of maternity care professionals with regard to complementary and alternative medicine: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jon; Lui, Chi-Wai; Sibbritt, David; Broom, Alex; Wardle, Jon; Homer, Caroline

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an integrative literature review examining the attitudes and referral practices of midwives and other maternity care professionals with regard to complementary and alternative treatment and its use by pregnant women. Use of complementary and alternative medicine during pregnancy is a crucial healthcare issue. Recent discussion has identified the need to develop an integrated approach to maternity care. However, there is a lack of understanding of attitudes and behaviours of maternity care professionals towards these treatments. A database search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Health Source, AMED and Maternity and Infant Care for the period 1999-2009. An integrative review method was employed. Studies were selected if they reported results from primary data collection on professional practice/referral or knowledge/attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine by obstetricians, midwives and allied maternity care providers. A total of 21 papers covering 19 studies were identified. Findings from these studies were extracted, grouped and examined according to three key themes: 'prevalence of practice, recommendation and referral', 'attitudes and views' and 'professionalism and professional identity'. There is a need for greater respect and cooperation between conventional and alternative practitioners as well as communication between all maternity care practitioners and their patients about the use of complementary and alternative medicine. There is a need for in-depth studies on the social dimension of practice as well as the inter- and intra-professional dynamics that shape providers' decision to use or refer to complementary and alternative medicine in maternity care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Mentoring medical students in your general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John

    2016-05-01

    Mentoring medical students in general practices is becoming more common in Australia due to formalised scholarship programs and informal approaches by students. This paper defines mentoring in Australian general practice. Practical suggestions are made on how to structure a mentorship program in your practice. Mentoring differs from leadership and teaching. It is a long-term relationship between a student and an experienced general practitioner. Avoiding summative assessment in mentorship is important to its success. Mentoring is about forming a safe place to confidentially discuss personal and professional issues between a mentor and student. This is based on defining roles and mutual trust. At the same time, students crave formative feedback. Unfortunately, present feedback models are based on teaching principles that can blur the differences between assessor, teacher and mentor. Mentorship can provide students with orientation and learning experiences so that they are prepared for practice as an intern.

  17. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Lambert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine general practice (GP care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts. Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for PD with/without agoraphobia. Follow-up measures recorded at 20 weeks/10 months following randomisation. Control arm, unrestricted routine GP care (practice appointments, referrals and prescriptions. Trial arm, occupational therapyled lifestyle treatment comprising lifestyle review of fluid intake, diet pattern, exercise, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Primary outcome measure: beck anxiety inventory. At baseline, participants attended 2-3 times more GP appointments than population average, reducing at 10 months to 1.6 times population average for routine GP care and 0.97 population average for lifestyle arm. At 10 months, 33% fewer referrals (6 referrals; 0 mental health than at baseline (9 referrals; 2 mental health were made for lifestyle arm patients compared with 42% increase (from 12 referrals; 8 mental health at baseline to 17 referrals; 7 mental health in GP care arm. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed most often. Benzodiazepines and beta-blockers were prescribed more often than tricyclic against current clinical guidelines. In conclusion, we found that PD patients at baseline were high healthcare resource users. Treatment in both study arms reduced resource use. Routine GP care requires further review for this patient group.

  18. The 'radiographer-referrer game': image interpretation dynamics in rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Kathryn; Smith, Anthony; Dalton, Lisa; Bull, Rosalind M

    2016-03-01

    Effective interprofessional communication is intrinsic to safe health care. Despite the identified positive impact of collaborative radiographic interpretation between rural radiographers and referrers, communication difficulties still exist. This article describes the strategies that Australian rural radiographers use for communication of their radiographic opinion to the referring doctor. In a two-phase interpretive doctoral study completed in 2012, data were collected from radiographers working in rural New South Wales, Western Australia and Tasmania using a paper based questionnaire followed by in-depth semistructured interviews. Data were analysed thematically in order to identify, analyse and report the emergent themes. The overarching theme was Patient Advocacy, where in the interest of patient care radiographers took measures to ensure that a referring doctor did not miss radiographic abnormalities. Strong interprofessional relationships enabled direct communication pathways. Interprofessional boundaries shaped by historical hierarchical relationships, together with a lack of confidence and educational preparation for radiographic interpretation result in barriers to direct communication pathways. These barriers prompted radiographers to pursue indirect communication pathways, such as side-stepping and hint and hope. A lack of formal communication pathways and educational preparation for this role has resulted in radiographers playing the radiographer-referrer game to overtly or covertly assist referrers in reaching a radiographic diagnosis. The findings from this study may be used to plan interventions for strengthening interprofessional communication pathways and improve quality of healthcare for patients.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Perspectives of General and Oral and Maxillofacial Pathologists about the Rate and Value of Second Referral in Assessment of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathologic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Liaghatdar, Alireza; Kargahi, Neda

    2017-02-16

    The main purpose in the practice of pathology is to provide an accurate diagnosis. Second referral and reassessment by a second pathologist significantly cause diagnostic errors, help to make an accurate diagnosis, and improve patient management. This study was aimed to assess the general perspectives of general and oral and maxillofacial pathologists in Iran on second referrals. In this cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study, a 20-item questionnaire on second referrals was used to assess the general and oral and maxillofacial pathologists' perspective in Iran. The obtained data were analyzed by chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). A total of 64 questionnaires from general and 45 questionnaires from oral and maxillofacial pathologists were collected. The findings showed 70.9% of pathologists were in favor of seeking a second opinion when faced with diagnostic challenges. Significant differences were found between the oral and general pathologists in terms of the most challenging oral and maxillofacial lesions (p value maxillofacial pathologists.

  20. Paediatric CT scan usage and referrals of children to computed tomography in Germany-a cross-sectional survey of medical practice and awareness of radiation related health risks among physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merzenich Hiltrud

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computed tomography (CT is a major source of ionizing radiation exposure in medical diagnostic. Compared to adults, children are supposed to be more susceptible to health risks related to radiation. The purpose of a cross-sectional survey among office-based physicians in Germany was the assessment of medical practice in paediatric CT referrals and to investigate physicians' knowledge of radiation doses and potential health risks of radiation exposure from CT in children. Methods A standardized questionnaire was distributed to all paediatricians and surgeons in two defined study areas. Furthermore, the study population included a random sample of general practitioners in the two areas. The questionnaire covered the frequency of referrals for paediatric CT examinations, the medical diagnoses leading to paediatric CT referrals, physicians' knowledge of radiation doses and potential health risks of radiation exposure from CT in children. Results A total of 295 (36.4% physicians responded. 59% of the doctors had not referred a child to CT in the past year, and approximately 30% referred only 1-5 children annually. The most frequent indications for a CT examination in children were trauma or a suspected cancer. 42% of the referrals were related to minor diagnoses or unspecific symptoms. The participants underestimated the radiation exposure due to CT and they overestimated the radiation exposure due to conventional X-ray examinations. Conclusions In Germany, the frequency of referrals of children to computed tomography is moderate. The knowledge on the risks from radiation exposure among office-based physicians in our sample varied, but there was a tendency to underestimate potential CT risks. Advanced radiological training might lead to considerable amendments in terms of knowledge and practice of CT referral.

  1. Validation of an instrument to measure inter-organisational linkages in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Cheryl; Proudfoot, Judith; Bubner, Tanya; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Holton, Christine; Winstanley, Julie; Beilby, Justin; Harris, Mark F

    2007-12-03

    Linkages between general medical practices and external services are important for high quality chronic disease care. The purpose of this research is to describe the development, evaluation and use of a brief tool that measures the comprehensiveness and quality of a general practice's linkages with external providers for the management of patients with chronic disease. In this study, clinical linkages are defined as the communication, support, and referral arrangements between services for the care and assistance of patients with chronic disease. An interview to measure surgery-level (rather than individual clinician-level) clinical linkages was developed, piloted, reviewed, and evaluated with 97 Australian general practices. Two validated survey instruments were posted to patients, and a survey of locally available services was developed and posted to participating Divisions of General Practice (support organisations). Hypotheses regarding internal validity, association with local services, and patient satisfaction were tested using factor analysis, logistic regression and multilevel regression models. The resulting General Practice Clinical Linkages Interview (GP-CLI) is a nine-item tool with three underlying factors: referral and advice linkages, shared care and care planning linkages, and community access and awareness linkages. Local availability of chronic disease services has no affect on the comprehensiveness of services with which practices link, however, comprehensiveness of clinical linkages has an association with patient assessment of access, receptionist services, and of continuity of care in their general practice. The GP-CLI may be useful to researchers examining comparable health care systems for measuring the comprehensiveness and quality of linkages at a general practice-level with related services, possessing both internal and external validity. The tool can be used with large samples exploring the impact, outcomes, and facilitators of high

  2. Implementation of a SNAP intervention in two divisions of general practice: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F; Hobbs, Coletta; Powell Davies, Gawaine; Simpson, Sarah; Bernard, Diana; Stubbs, Anthony

    2005-11-21

    "SNAP" is a model for the general practice management of four common behavioural risk factors: smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity. The SNAP program was developed for the Australian Government in 2002. In 2003 and 2004, a feasibility study was conducted in one urban and one rural division of general practice (DGP) in NSW, in partnership with their local area health services. Information technology support and referral directories were developed, based on an initial needs assessment, SNAP guidelines, a clinical summary chart, patient education materials, and general practitioner and staff training. GPs reported that the SNAP approach fitted general practice consultations well. After its implementation, they were more confident in using motivational interviewing and SNAP interventions and referred more frequently. The impact and sustainability of the SNAP program were limited by a lack of effective practice teamwork, poor linkages with referral services, and the lack of a business model to support SNAP in the practices. DGPs could play an important role in providing practice visits and resources to improve communication, education and collaboration to support SNAP programs.

  3. Patients' satisfaction with healthcare: comparing general practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' satisfaction with healthcare: comparing general practice services in a tertiary and primary healthcare settings. ... A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Result: Study ... Other predictors of satisfaction were younger age, male gender, married, higher education, and those of the Moslem religious faith.

  4. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    discussed at 4 of the 7 universities in the Netherlands: Groningen, Utrecht ... general practitioners give half of their time to the group- practice and the ... the work at university level, like the other institutes in. Holland. The original institute remains an independent in- stitute, one of its most important tasks being the gathering.

  5. How community based is general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D. de; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: One of the potentially strong points of general-practice-based primary care is that it is accessible within local communities. As the arm of clinical medicine with the broadest reach into the community, primary care clinicians are well-positioned to understand local needs and design

  6. The workload of trainees in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeda, G; Hutter, AW; Groenier, KH; Schuling, J

    During their first training period in general practice the authors felt that they did not encounter the balanced workload which is the foundation for learning to be a GP. Previous studies confirmed the existence of differences in overall and specific workload between trainees and trainers. From

  7. Guidelines for computer security in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schattner

    2007-06-01

    Conclusions This paper maps out a process for developing computer security guidelines for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making these guidelines relevant to local contexts should help maximise their uptake.

  8. Prognostic factors for neckpain in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Twisk, J.W.R.; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Windt, D. van der; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic studies on neck pain are scarce and are typically restricted to short-term follow-up only. In this prospective cohort study, indicators of short- and long-term outcomes of neck pain were identified that can easily be measured in general practice. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age,

  9. Validation of an instrument to measure inter-organisational linkages in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Amoroso

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Linkages between general medical practices and external services are important for high quality chronic disease care. The purpose of this research is to describe the development, evaluation and use of a brief tool that measures the comprehensiveness and quality of a general practice’s linkages with external providers for the management of patients with chronic disease. In this study, clinical linkages are defined as the communication, support, and referral arrangements between services for the care and assistance of patients with chronic disease. Methods: An interview to measure surgery-level (rather than individual clinician-level clinical linkages was developed, piloted, reviewed, and evaluated with 97 Australian general practices. Two validated survey instruments were posted to patients, and a survey of locally available services was developed and posted to participating Divisions of General Practice (support organisations. Hypotheses regarding internal validity, association with local services, and patient satisfaction were tested using factor analysis, logistic regression and multilevel regression models. Results: The resulting General Practice Clinical Linkages Interview (GP-CLI is a nine-item tool with three underlying factors: referral and advice linkages, shared care and care planning linkages, and community access and awareness linkages. Local availability of chronic disease services has no affect on the comprehensiveness of services with which practices link, however comprehensiveness of clinical linkages has an association with patient assessment of access, receptionist services, and of continuity of care in their general practice. Conclusions: The GP-CLI may be useful to researchers examining comparable health care systems for measuring the comprehensiveness and quality of linkages at a general practice-level with related services, possessing both internal and external validity. The tool can be used with large samples

  10. Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment: implications of SAMHSA's SBIRT initiative for substance abuse policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babor, Thomas F; Del Boca, Frances; Bray, Jeremy W

    2017-02-01

    management of substance use disorders into primary care and general medicine. Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment implementation was associated with improvements in treatment system equity, efficiency and economy. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

     Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general...... practitioner (GP) finds indication for treatment with antisecretory therapy and/or diagnostic Helicobacter Pylori test were included in general practice between June 2000 and June 2002.  Patients the GP want to refer to endoscopy were not included. Dyspepsia definition: persistent or recurrent pain...... or discomfort centred in the upper abdomen with or without nausea, vomiting, heartburn, acid regurgitation, early satiety or bloating. Patients were initially treated according to one of two management strategies. The patient was the unit of randomisation. Strategy 1:   Proton pump inhibitor (40 mg omeprazol...

  12. Sports medicine in The Netherlands: consultation with a sports physician without referral by a general practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Matthijs C; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Baarveld, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background In The Netherlands, sports medicine physicians are involved in the care of about 8% of all sports injuries that occur each year. Some patients consult a sports physician directly, without being referred by a general practitioner. This study aims to determine how many patients consult a sports physician directly, and to explore differences in the profiles of these patients compared with those who are referred. Methods This was an exploratory cross-sectional study in which all new patients presenting with an injury to a regional sports medical center during September 2010 were identified. The characteristics of patients who self-referred and those who were referred by other medical professionals were compared. Results A total of 234 patients were included (mean age 33.7 years, 59.1% male). Most of the injuries occurred during soccer and running, particularly injuries of the knee and ankle. In this cohort, 39.3% of patients consulted a sports physician directly. These patients were significantly more often involved in individual sports, consulted a sports physician relatively rapidly after the onset of injury, and had received significantly less care before this new event from medical professionals compared with patients who were referred. Conclusion In this study, 39.3% of patients with sports injuries consulted a sports physician directly without being referred by another medical professional. The profile of this group of patients differed from that of patients who were referred. The specific roles of general practitioners and sports physicians in medical sports care in The Netherlands needs to be defined further. PMID:24379706

  13. Abortion attitudes and practices of family and general practice physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, J M; Kallail, K J; Walling, A D

    1991-07-01

    Approximately 1.5 million abortions are performed each year in the United States. Little information has been published on the abortion attitudes and practices of family physicians. The object of this investigation was to assess the abortion attitudes and practices of family and general practice physicians in Kansas. A 19-item self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and mailed to 856 family and general practice physicians in Kansas. A 63% survey response rate was obtained. Seventy-eight percent of the physicians reported that abortion should be legal, but only 56% of the respondents classified themselves as pro-choice. Conversely, only 8% reported that legal abortion should not be available, even though 33% classified themselves as pro-life. The majority of physicians reported that abortion is an appropriate option to save the life of the mother, in cases of rape or incest, and when a fetal anomaly is diagnosed. Only three respondents (0.5%) had performed abortions during the previous year. In general, female physicians and physicians over the age of 40 years (regardless of sex) were more likely to be pro-choice and to view a woman's personal decision as a circumstance in which abortion may be appropriate. Physician's views about abortion and their practice patterns are important components of health care for thousands of women each day.

  14. Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group's access to somatic specialist health care (SHC): a retrospective study on general practitioners’ referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The Sami people constitute the indigenous people in northern Norway. The objective of this study was to clarify whether they have a similar supply of somatic specialist health care (SHC) as others. Methods The referrals from general practitioners (GPs) in the primary health care (PHC) in the administration area of the Sami language law (8 municipalities) were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway and the time period 2007–2010 was analysed. The main outcome was the number of referrals per 1,000 inhabitants according to age group, gender and place of living. Results 504,292 referrals in northern Norway were indentified and the Sami and control group constituted 23,093 and 22,541 referrals, respectively. The major findings were a similar referral ratio (RR) (1.14 and 1.17) (p =0.624) and women more commonly referred (female/male ratio 1.45 and 1.41) in both groups. GPs in both groups were loyal to their local hospital trust. Conclusion Inhabitants in Sami-speaking municipalities in northern Norway have a similar supply of SHC services as controls. Inter-municipal variation was significant in both groups. PMID:22456052

  15. Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group's access to somatic specialist health care (SHC: a retrospective study on general practitioners’ referrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Norum

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Sami people constitute the indigenous people in northern Norway. The objective of this study was to clarify whether they have a similar supply of somatic specialist health care (SHC as others. Methods: The referrals from general practitioners (GPs in the primary health care (PHC in the administration area of the Sami language law (8 municipalities were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway and the time period 2007–2010 was analysed. The main outcome was the number of referrals per 1,000 inhabitants according to age group, gender and place of living. Results: 504,292 referrals in northern Norway were indentified and the Sami and control group constituted 23,093 and 22,541 referrals, respectively. The major findings were a similar referral ratio (RR (1.14 and 1.17 (p = 0.624 and women more commonly referred (female/male ratio 1.45 and 1.41 in both groups. GPs in both groups were loyal to their local hospital trust. Conclusion: Inhabitants in Sami-speaking municipalities in northern Norway have a similar supply of SHC services as controls. Inter-municipal variation was significant in both groups.

  16. Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group's access to somatic specialist health care (SHC): a retrospective study on general practitioners' referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-03-19

    The Sami people constitute the indigenous people in northern Norway. The objective of this study was to clarify whether they have a similar supply of somatic specialist health care (SHC) as others. The referrals from general practitioners (GPs) in the primary health care (PHC) in the administration area of the Sami language law (8 municipalities) were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway and the time period 2007-2010 was analysed. The main outcome was the number of referrals per 1,000 inhabitants according to age group, gender and place of living. 504,292 referrals in northern Norway were indentified and the Sami and control group constituted 23,093 and 22,541 referrals, respectively. The major findings were a similar referral ratio (RR) (1.14 and 1.17) (p = 0.624) and women more commonly referred (female/male ratio 1.45 and 1.41) in both groups. GPs in both groups were loyal to their local hospital trust. Inhabitants in Sami-speaking municipalities in northern Norway have a similar supply of SHC services as controls. Inter-municipal variation was significant in both groups.

  17. Child Health General Practice Hubs: a service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Taylor, Sarah; Watson, Mando; Klaber, Robert

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of an integrated child health system. Mixed methods service evaluation. Children, young people and their families registered in Child Health General Practitioner (GP) Hubs where groups of GP practices come together to form 'hubs'. Hospital paediatricians and GPs participating in joint clinics and multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings in GP practices, a component of an 'Inside-Out' change known as 'Connecting Care For Children (CC4C)'. Cases seen in clinic or discussed at MDT meetings and their follow-up needs. Hospital Episode data: outpatient and inpatient activity and A&E attendance. Patient-reported experience measures and professionals' feedback. In one hub, 39% of new patient hospital appointments were avoided altogether and a further 42% of appointments were shifted from hospital to GP practice. In addition, there was a 19% decrease in sub-specialty referrals, a 17% reduction in admissions and a 22% decrease in A&E attenders. Smaller hubs running at lower capacity in early stages of implementation had less impact on hospital activity. Patients preferred appointments at the GP practice, gained increased confidence in taking their child to the GP and all respondents said they would recommend the service to family and friends. Professionals valued the improvement in knowledge and learning and, most significantly, the development of trust and collaboration. Child Health GP Hubs increase the connections between secondary and primary care, reduce secondary care usage and receive high patient satisfaction ratings while providing learning for professionals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Pediatric blood transfusion practices at a regional referral hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabwera, Helen M; Fegan, Greg; Shavadia, Jay; Denje, Douglas; Mandaliya, Kishor; Bates, Imelda; Maitland, Kathryn; Hassall, Oliver W

    2016-11-01

    Severe anemia in children is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we describe clinical and operational aspects of blood transfusion in children admitted to Coast Provincial General Hospital, Kenya. This was an observational study where over a 2-year period, demographic and laboratory data were collected on all children for whom the hospital blood bank received a transfusion request. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective review of case notes over the first year. There were 2789 requests for blood for children (median age, 1.8 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.6-6.6 years); 70% (1950) of the samples were crossmatched with 85% (1663/1950) issued. Ninety percent (1505/1663) were presumed transfused. Median time from laboratory receipt of request to collection of blood was 3.6 hours (IQR, 1.4-12.8 hr). Case notes of 590 children were reviewed and median pretransfusion hemoglobin level was 6.0 g/dL (IQR, 4.2-9.1 g/dL). Ninety-four percent (186) were transfused "appropriately" while 52% (120) were transfused "inappropriately." There was significant disagreement between the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of severe anemia (exact McNemar's test; p blood transfusions but only 41% (106) of these had a positive blood film. In this setting, clinicians often order blood based on the clinical impression of "severe anemia." This has implications for laboratory workload and the blood supply itself. However, the majority of children with severe anemia were appropriately transfused. The use of antimalarials with blood transfusions irrespective of blood film results is common practice. © 2016 The Authors. Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  19. Pediatric blood transfusion practices at a regional referral hospital in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan, Greg; Shavadia, Jay; Denje, Douglas; Mandaliya, Kishor; Bates, Imelda; Maitland, Kathryn; Hassall, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Severe anemia in children is a major public health problem in sub‐Saharan Africa. In this study we describe clinical and operational aspects of blood transfusion in children admitted to Coast Provincial General Hospital, Kenya. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This was an observational study where over a 2‐year period, demographic and laboratory data were collected on all children for whom the hospital blood bank received a transfusion request. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective review of case notes over the first year. RESULTS There were 2789 requests for blood for children (median age, 1.8 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.6‐6.6 years); 70% (1950) of the samples were crossmatched with 85% (1663/1950) issued. Ninety percent (1505/1663) were presumed transfused. Median time from laboratory receipt of request to collection of blood was 3.6 hours (IQR, 1.4‐12.8 hr). Case notes of 590 children were reviewed and median pretransfusion hemoglobin level was 6.0 g/dL (IQR, 4.2‐9.1 g/dL). Ninety‐four percent (186) were transfused “appropriately” while 52% (120) were transfused “inappropriately.” There was significant disagreement between the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of severe anemia (exact McNemar's test; p blood transfusions but only 41% (106) of these had a positive blood film. CONCLUSION In this setting, clinicians often order blood based on the clinical impression of “severe anemia.” This has implications for laboratory workload and the blood supply itself. However, the majority of children with severe anemia were appropriately transfused. The use of antimalarials with blood transfusions irrespective of blood film results is common practice. PMID:27611471

  20. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    . The dissertation present the research study and a collection of three research papers prepared during the period from May 2010 to June 2014. Relational coordination and organisational social capital are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance. Relational coordination analyse the communication...... and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first...

  1. The existential dimension in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergaard, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to identify points of agreement and disagreements among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark concerning how the existential dimension is understood, and when and how it is integrated in the GP–patient encounter. Design: A qualitative methodology with semi......-structured focus group interviews was employed. Setting: General practice setting in Denmark. Subjects: Thirty-one GPs from two Danish regions between 38 and 68 years of age participated in seven focus group interviews. Results: Although understood to involve broad life conditions such as present and future being....... As a way to enhance a practice culture in which GPs pay more explicit attention to the patients’ multidimensional concerns, opportunities for professional development could be offered (courses or seminars) that focus on mutual sharing of existential reflections, ideas and communication competencies. Key...

  2. Antibiotic Prescription in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov

    2016-01-01

    will explore how the GPs prescription behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Antibiotics are essential when treating potentially lethal infections. An increasing development of resistant bacteria is considered one of the primary threats to public health. The majority of antibiotics (90%) are prescribed...... from general practice. The prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics can cause unnecessary side effects for the individual and increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. Both the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the level of resistant bacteria......1. Background & Aim The overall aim of the project is to describe antibiotic consumption in Danish general practice with emphasis on specific types of antibiotics. The project will shed light on the impact of microbiological diagnostic methods (MDM) on the choice of antibiotic and the project...

  3. PROBLEMS OF GENERAL PRACTICE IN RURAL CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Hollis L.; Andrews, Carroll B.

    1949-01-01

    Medical care for rural populations is an important problem facing the medical profession nationally and locally. The mechanism for solution lies in the existing American Medical Association and California Medical Association committees on rural medical service and further development of “local health councils.” Additional emphasis on training of physicians for general practice is essential through medical school graduate and postgraduate periods. The problem of providing additional adequately equipped and staffed hospitals must receive much consideration. Recognizing that passiveness invites aggressive non-medical agencies to foster bureaucratic dictation inimical to the practice of medicine, the rural physician must act through medical and community organizations to correct weaknesses in the structure of medical practice. PMID:18116230

  4. [Peer feedback for trainers in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, R A M J; Truijens, L

    2016-01-01

    In medical specialist training programmes it is common practice for residents to provide feedback to their medical trainers. The problem is that due to its anonymous nature, the feedback often lacks the specificity necessary to improve the performance of trainers. If anonymity is to be abolished, there is a need for residents to feel safe in giving their feedback. Another way to improve the performance of trainers might be peer feedback. For peer feedback it is necessary that trainers observe each other during their training sessions with the residents. In speciality training in general practice peer feedback is done in group sessions of 12 trainers. They show videos of their training sessions and get feedback from their fellow trainers. Trainers also visit each other in their practices to observe training sessions and provide feedback. In order to improve trainer performance there is a need for more focus on peer feedback in medical specialist training programmes.

  5. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AIMS: To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD...... guidelines. METHODS: A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted...... were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. RESULTS: Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed...

  6. Perceptions of the role of general practice and practical support measures for carers of stroke survivors: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Informal carers frequently suffer adverse consequences from caring. General practice teams are well positioned to support them. However, what carers of stroke survivors want and expect from general practice, and the practical support measures they might like, remain largely unexplored. The aims of this study are twofold. Firstly it explores both the support stroke carers would like from general practice and their reactions to the community based support proposed in the New Deal. Secondly, perceptions of a general practice team are investigated covering similar topics to carer interviews but from their perspective. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 stroke carers and 10 members of a general practice team. Carers' experiences and expectations of general practice and opinions of support measures from recent government policy were explored. General practice professionals were asked about their perceived role and their perceptions of carers' support needs. Interviews were content analysed. Results Carers' expectations of support from general practice were low and they neither received nor expected much support for themselves. General practice was seen as reactive primarily because of time constraints. Some carers would appreciate emotional support but others did not want additional services. Responses to recent policy initiatives were mixed with carers saying these might benefit other carers but not themselves. General practice professionals' opinions were broadly similar. They recognise carers' support needs but see their role as reactive, focussed on stroke survivors, rather than carers. Caring was recognised as challenging. Providing emotional support and referral were seen as important but identification of carers was considered difficult. Time constraints limit their support. Responses to recent policy initiatives were positive. Conclusions Carers' expectations of support from general practice for

  7. [Representativeness of general practice university lecturers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Céline; Leroy, Olivier; Huez, Jean-François; Bellanger, William; Ramond-Roquin, Aline

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop primary care research by general practice university lecturers, it was necessary to evaluate the representativeness of this group of lecturers at the Angers Faculty of Medicine. Declarative study based on self-administered questionnaires filled in by 216 university lecturers. The questionnaire was derived from that of the regional panel of the Research, studies, evaluation and statistics directorate of 2007, investigating the sociodemographic characteristics, professional organization, activities and certain professional practices of general practitioners. University lecturers were compared to the population of the panel by means of a Chi-square test of conformity. A total of 181 university lecturers participated in the survey, comprising 65% of men. The proportion of women was higher among university lecturers and the 45-54years age-group was underrepresented. The university lecturers group was significantly different from the panel in terms of predominantly group practice and shorter weekly working hours. No significant difference was observed for the type of town of practice ahd the continuing medical education participation rate. University lecturers present certain specificities, partly related to the reference population used. The development of research based on such a network appears to be feasible in terms ofrepresentativeness, provided these specificities are clearly described.

  8. General practice registrars' views on maternity care in general practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Hanna; Jaye, Chrystal; Miller, Dawn L

    2015-12-01

    The number of general practitioners (GPs) providing maternity care in New Zealand has declined dramatically since legislative changes of the 1990s. The Ministry of Health wants GPs to provide maternity care again. To investigate New Zealand general practice registrars' perspectives on GPs' role in maternity care; specifically, whether maternity services should be provided by GPs, registrars' preparedness to provide such services, and training opportunities available or required to achieve this. An anonymous online questionnaire was distributed to all registrars enrolled in The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners' (RNZCGP's) General Practice Education Programme (GPEP) in 2012, via their online learning platform OWL. 165 of the 643 general practice registrars responded (25.7% response rate). Most (95%) believe that GPs interested and trained in maternity care should consider providing antenatal, postnatal or shared care with midwives, and 95% believe women should be able to access maternity care from their general practice. When practising as a GP, 90% would consider providing antenatal and postnatal care, 47.3% shared care, and 4.3% full pregnancy care. Professional factors including training and adequate funding were most important when considering providing maternity care as a GP. Ninety-five percent of general practice registrars who responded to our survey believe that GPs should provide some maternity services, and about 90% would consider providing maternity care in their future practice. Addressing professional issues of training, support and funding are essential if more GPs are to participate in maternity care in New Zealand.

  9. Factors influencing accuracy of referral and the likelihood of false positive referral by optometrists in Bradford, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Christopher James; Scally, Andrew J; Green, Clare; Mitchell, Edwin S; Elliott, David B

    2016-01-01

    Levels of false positive referral to ophthalmology departments can be high. This study aimed to evaluate commonality between false positive referrals in order to find the factors which may influence referral accuracy. In 2007/08, a sample of 431 new Ophthalmology referrals from the catchment area of Bradford Royal Infirmary were retrospectively analysed. The proportion of false positive referrals generated by optometrists decreases with experience at a rate of 6.2% per year since registration (p<0.0001). Community services which involved further investigation done by the optometrist before directly referring to the hospital were 2.7 times less likely to refer false positively than other referral formats (p=0.007). Male optometrists were about half as likely to generate a false positive referral than females (OR=0.51, p=0.008) and as multiple/corporate practices in the Bradford area employ less experienced and more female staff, independent practices generate about half the number of false positive referrals (OR=0.52, p=0.005). Clinician experience has the greatest effect on referral accuracy although there is also a significant effect of gender with women tending to refer more false positives. This may be due to a different approach to patient care and possibly a greater sensitivity to litigation. The improved accuracy of community services (which often refer directly after further investigation) supports further growth of these schemes. Copyright © 2015 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Referral system in the Asir Region, Saudi Arabia: knowledge, attitude, and practice of physicians working in urban areas--a comparative study of governmental and private health sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Erian, R A; Mahfouz, A A; Alakija, W; al-Khozayem, A A

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study of knowledge, attitude and practice regarding referral system was undertaken among all governmental primary health care and private dispensary physicians (56 and 50 respectively) in Abha and Kamis, Asir Region. Results show that knowledge about referral is adequate in both groups, but the attitudes and practice of both groups need to be positively modified specially among the private sector physicians. The paper recommends more orientation programs for both groups of physicians and urges the private sector physicians to be more involved in Ministry of Health training programs and activities. Cooperation in referral between the private sector and government hospitals is seen as one way of improving health care in Saudi Arabia.

  11. Rheumatology in general practice — a survey in World Rheumatism Year 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, R. A.; Mole, K. F.

    1977-01-01

    Rheumatological complaints accounted for 10·6 per cent of new presentations in this general-practice survey. Spinal problems formed almost half of this total and led to a greater degree of disability than other locomotor system disorders. Active participation in the treatment of pain by the practitioner's use of manipulation and injection techniques is shown to be quite feasible in general. Forty-six per cent of all hospital referrals were simply requests for physiotherapy, and we suggest that physiotherapy departments should offer open access and so lead to a marked reduction in over-strained rheumatology consultant outpatient clinics. PMID:309006

  12. Glaucoma in general practice | Gundry | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... presenting with headaches and only leading to decreased vision in the very advanced stages. Disc cupping and intraocular pressure measurement are important features in making the diagnosis. Acute angle closure is very rare and needs urgent referral. Most patients will be well controlled with medical therapy alone.

  13. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergård, Jens

    2012-01-01

    ) an after-hours system staffed by GPs on a rota basis; (4) a mixed capitation and fee-for-service system; and (5) GPs are self-employed, working on contract for the public funder based on a national agreement that details not only services and reimbursement but also opening hours and required postgraduate...... by 5 key components: (1) a list system, with an average of close to 1600 persons on the list of a typical GP; (2) the GP as gatekeeper and first-line provider in the sense that a referral from a GP is required for most office-based specialists and always for in- and outpatient hospital treatment; (3...... education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new challenges...

  14. Advisory External Defibrillator Availability in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, T; Bury, G

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the availability of advisory external defibrillators (AEDs) in Irish General Practice. The study utilised a computer generated random sample of Irish general practitioners and involved a postal questionnaire, with telephone follow up of non-responders. The cohort of GPs already known to possess an AED (via participation in the Merit Project) was excluded. 115 valid paper survey responses were received representing a response rate of 59%. 5 of the responding GPs identified themselves as Merit project participants and were excluded from data analysis. 74/110 GPs (67%) reported having one or more AED(s) available for use at their practice. 41/77 GPs (53%) who had not responded to the paper survey but were contactable by telephone had an AED available. When AED availability was examined by practice setting a higher proportion of rural and mixed settings had AEDs available than in urban and city areas. Cost was reported as the most common reason for not having an AED.

  15. [E-mail communication in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Jepsen, Kristian L; Ruwald, Steen; Jepsen, Nis P; Nielsen, Hanne Hynding

    2005-11-21

    Our aim was to examine how e-mail communication in general practice affects the doctor/patient relationship and doctors' workload. Registration was done of e-mail activity in three Danish GP surgeries over a period of 12 months and focus group interviews with patients and doctors. The practices received 191 e-mails per 1,000 patients per year. The male/female ratio was 0.9 to 1. The average patient age was 47.2 years; the oldest user was 88 years old. Qualitative data were categorized under various headings, such as need, expectations, usability, workload, patient service, the communication part of professionalism, worries and barriers against use. E-mail is a requested and useful communication form between doctors and patients in general practice. But it requires guidance and structured communication. It works best when the doctor and patient know each other. It is being used less than might be expected. The barriers from patients' point of view are lack of knowledge of and access to computers, lack of awareness of the possibility of contacting the physician by e-mail and the absence of a personal invitation for use by the personal physician. It is a matter of concern that patients apparently don't read the recommendations concerning proper use of e-mail communication, even though they are clearly described on the Web site and patients have to click "has been read" to be able to continue.

  16. A comparison of country and metropolitan general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, H; Miles, D A; Bridges-Webb, C; Neary, S; Charles, J; Traynor, V

    1993-11-01

    To provide a description of country general practice in Australia, and to determine the extent to which country and metropolitan general practice differ in terms of the characteristics of the practitioners, the morbidity managed, treatments provided and the availability of support services. A survey requiring the recording of details of all direct and indirect patient encounters on encounter forms by a sample of general practitioners (GPs). Each GP recorded for two one-week periods separated by an interval of six months, between October 1990 and October 1991. The recording weeks were spread as evenly as possible throughout the year. Participants were drawn from a list of medical practitioners in Queensland, NSW and Victoria who provided more than 1500 general practice Medicare items of service during the previous year. The sample was stratified within States by population of postcode, into metropolitan areas and three country strata: "small country towns" (population less than 5000); "medium country towns" (5000-15,000); and "large country towns" (more than 15,000). The total country sample is referred to as "country areas". Planned sample size was 180 country GPs (20 in each stratum in each State) and 60 metropolitan GPs (20 in each of the three State capital cities). The final data set was weighted to be representative of the distribution of the source population. The variables studied included: GP characteristics; practice isolation factors; patient age, sex and status to the practice; patient reasons for encounter (up to three per encounter); problems managed (up to four); drugs prescribed and other treatments provided (up to four per problem); tests and investigations ordered and referrals made at these encounters; and planned follow-up. Data were centrally coded. Participation rate: The final sample of 231 GPs (177 country and 54 metropolitan) recorded information during 435 recording weeks (336 country and 99 metropolitan). These practitioners represented 50

  17. Direct access and patient/client self-referral to physiotherapy: a review of contemporary practice within the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, T J; Stokes, E K

    2013-12-01

    Direct access refers to service users being able to refer themselves to physiotherapy without a third-party referral. It represents a model of practice supported globally by the profession, growing research evidence and health policy in some health systems. To the authors' knowledge, no research has been reported to ascertain the extent to which direct access is available within the physiotherapy profession within the European Union (EU). To survey member organisations of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT); establish the number of member states within the EU where it is possible for individuals seeking physiotherapy services to self-refer; describe the legislative/regulatory and reimbursement contexts in which physiotherapy services are delivered; examine if physiotherapy practice is different in member states where direct access is permitted compared with member states where direct access is not permitted; and to describe the barriers and facilitators to direct access perceived by member organisations of the WCPT. Cross-sectional, online survey using a purposive sample. Member organisations of the WCPT in the EU. Direct access is not available in all member states of the EU, despite the majority having legislation to regulate the profession, and entry-level education programmes that produce graduates with the requisite competencies. Key barriers perceived are those that can influence policy development, including the views of the medical profession and politicians. Support of service users and politicians, as well as professional autonomy, are seen as key facilitators. These results represent the first report of a comprehensive mapping of direct access to physiotherapy and contexts within the EU. In over half of member states, service users can self-refer to physiotherapists. These results provide insights to further individuals' understanding about the similarities and differences in working practices and service delivery factors, such as

  18. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  19. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric care at a tertiary referral hospital in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyashadzaishe Mafirakureva, N.; Mberi, Y.T.; Khoza, S.; Mvere, D.A.; Emmanuel, J.C.; Postma, M.J.; Van Hulst, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusions are an essential element of obstetric care and may have a role in reducing maternal mortality, if used appropriately. Monitoring of transfusion practices provides information on current and future needs of blood. It may also lead to rational use of blood transfusions.

  20. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights at Uganda’s national referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet R. Kagoya

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion and recommendations: Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel, multichannel, patient-centred approach that incorporates social services and addresses intrinsic patient, HW and health system factors to strengthen patients’ rights issues at the hospital.

  1. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  2. Prevalence of fatigue in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, W; Kearney, Y; Bury, G

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue is an important symptom in general practice due to its association with physical, psychological and social problems. To determine the prevalence of fatigue as an unsolicited symptom during general practice consultations. A random sample of GPs practising in Ireland was invited to provide data on consultations held over one day. Data were recorded on the presence of fatigue as a main or supporting symptom, social and demographic characteristics. Data were recorded by 89 GPs on 1,428 consultations. The prevalence of fatigue was 25%. It was the main reason for attending the doctor in 6.5% and a secondary reason in 19%. Sixty-two per cent of patients were female and 48% were eligible for free GP services. The mean age was 47.1 years. The presence of fatigue was associated with: attending a female GP, being female, attending a GP who had been qualified for fewer years and attending the GP frequently. The prevalence of fatigue reported in this study is over three times higher than that reported in earlier work. Doctor characteristics appear to be as important as patient characteristics in determining fatigue.

  3. Minimal intervention dentistry in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostek, A M; Walsh, L J

    2014-06-01

    Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) is a modern approach to the management of caries, which emphasizes prevention and early interception of disease, underpinned by an understanding of the role of the dental plaque biofilm in disease initiation and progression, and how this is affected by lifestyle and behavioral factors. The MID approach should be the standard of care in modern restorative dentistry, as it avoids over-zealous restorative interventions as well as supervised neglect. Incorporating the principles of MID into general dental practice for the management of dental caries involves using Caries Risk Assessment (CRA), as well as a minimally invasive restorative approach utilizing conservative caries removal methods, minimal cavity designs and the use of adhesive restorative materials. A range of methods now exist for measuring the contribution of risk factors to dental caries risk, allowing the clinician to target their interventions at the factors operating in the individual patient, by applying the concepts of ecological change to modify the biofilm, and motivational interviewing to alter patient lifestyle and dietary behaviour. This review discusses how the principles of MID are used for individual patient care, and suggests methods for implementation of MID into general dental practice.

  4. A qualitative study of collaboration in general practice: understanding the general practice nurse's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To explore the nature of collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners in Australian general practice. There is international recognition that collaboration between health professionals can improve care coordination, enhance health outcomes, optimise the work environment and reduce healthcare costs. However, effective collaboration requires a clear understanding of each team member's role. A qualitative approach guided by Naturalistic Inquiry was used to elicit and interpret participant narratives. Eight general practitioners and fourteen registered nurses working in general practice were purposefully recruited. Data were collected via individual, semi-structured face-to-face interviews during February to May 2015. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Data revealed three overarching themes. This study presents the data for the overarching theme 'Understanding the general practice registered nurse's role'. Many general practitioner participants lacked clarity around the role and scope of practice of the registered nurse. At the same time, nursing participants often articulated their role as an assistant rather than as an independent health professional. This limited collaboration and the nurses' role within the team. Collaboration was enhanced when general practitioners actively sought an understanding of the registered nurses scope of practice. Clarifying the nurses' role promotes collaboration and supports nurses to work to the full extent of their practice. This is important in terms of optimising the nurses' role within the team and reinforcing their professional identity. Identification of key issues around understanding the nurses' role may help inform strategies that improve collaboration and workplace relations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Attitudes towards 12-step groups and referral practices in a 12-step naive treatment culture; a survey of addiction professionals in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laudet Alexandre

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Addressing substance use disorders effectively requires a long-term approach. Substance abuse treatment is typically of short duration; referring patients to Twelve Step based self-help groups (TSGs – e.g. Narcotics Anonymous, represents a promising complementary recovery resource. Clinicians' attitudes and referral practices towards the TSGs have mainly been studied in countries with high integration of the 12-step philosophy in their substance abuse services and where the TSGs are widely available, such as the US. In Norway, there are currently 294 weekly TSG meetings (6 per 100,000 inhabitants. This study describes clinicians' attitudes and referral practices to TSGs in Norway where health authorities seek to promote self-help participation, but where the treatment culture is unfamiliar with 12-step fellowships. Methods Data collected by a self-administered questionnaire, adapted from established US and UK instruments. Information covered the attitudes, knowledge and referral practices towards TSGs among addiction treatment professionals in Norway in mid 2008. Results The return rate was 79.7% (n = 291. Participants had moderately positive attitude scores towards TSGs, but referral to these groups among Norwegian addiction professionals was low, as was the level of knowledge about TSGs. More than six out of ten did not refer any patients to TSGs in the previous week. Local variation with more referrals to TSGs in the county with the one established 12-step treatment facility was observed. Respondents' integration of the 12-steps in their own treatment work, higher self-efficacy for making a successful referral, and greater TSG knowledge were associated with referring patients. Conclusion Low referral rates to TSGs point to the need for education and training to raise the awareness and knowledge about it among addiction professionals unfamiliar with these 12-step fellowships. Training should focus on the usefulness of

  6. 42 CFR 411.355 - General exceptions to the referral prohibition related to both ownership/investment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services provided to enrollees in any other plan or line of business offered or administered by the same... account the volume or value of any referrals or other business generated by the referring physician within... courtesy and volunteer faculty. For purposes of determining whether the majority of physicians on the...

  7. The existential dimension in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergård, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    or spiritual questions was mostly avoided by GPs due to shyness and perceived lack of expertise. GPs also reported infrequent referrals of patients to chaplains. CONCLUSION: GPs integrate issues related to the existential dimension in implicit and non-standardized ways and are hindered by cultural barriers...... having no explicit reference to spiritual or religious aspects. The integration of the existential dimension is delimited to patient cases where life-threatening diseases, life crises and unexplainable patient symptoms occur. Integration of the existential dimension happens in unsystematic and intuitive...

  8. Online referral and OPD booking from the GP desktop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Wright, Bernadette; Mainwaring, Paul; Holliday, Dimity; Lankowski, Andrew; Kardash, Christine

    2006-08-01

    The Brisbane Inner South E-referral Project (BISEP) developed an application which allowed general practitioners, from their desktop, to successfully search for and book an available hospital outpatient appointment for patients with suspected cancer, send the referral electronically, and inform the patient of both the appointment and referral during the consultation. The hospital changed their outpatient department processes to allow such functionality for local GPs with patients with suspected cancer, working from a mutually agreed set of best practice referral criteria. A group of 19 GPs participated in an 11-week pilot implementation of the application, and were enthusiastic about continuing and expanding the approach. Patient satisfaction measures post intervention indicated that they perceived no major disadvantage in this form of outpatient department referral.

  9. Choosing to biopsy or refer suspicious melanocytic lesions in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robison Sean

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners (GPs are involved in the management of most melanocytic skin lesions in Australia. A high quality biopsy technique is a crucial first step in management, as it is recognized that poor techniques can mislead, delay, or miss a diagnosis of melanoma. There has been little published on the biopsy decisions and techniques of GPs. This study aims to describe the current management choices made by GPs for suspicious melanocytic skin lesions and to compare their choices with the best practice guidelines. Methods An anonymous survey of GPs presented with three clinical scenarios with increasing complexity of melanoma in which a referral or biopsy decision was specified. Results 391 mailed surveys with a 76.3% response rate. Mean biopsy experience was 4.14 biopsies per GP per month. The rates of choosing to refer among the three scenarios were 31%, 52% and 81% respectively, with referral to surgery being the most common choice (81%. Most biopsy techniques (55% were chosen according to best practice guidelines, although non-guideline biopsy techniques chosen included shave (n = 10, punch biopsy (n = 57, wide excisions (n = 65, and flaps (n = 10. The few GPs (n = 5 who identified themselves as skin specialist GPs were no more likely to adhere to guidelines than their colleagues. Conclusion A majority of referrals and biopsies were chosen by GPs according to best practice guidelines, but concern remains for the high proportion of GPs making non-guideline based choices. How GPs choose to biopsy or refer needs further training, audit, and research if Australia is to improve the outcome of melanoma management in general practice.

  10. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion...... and lower endoscopies and colorectal cancer METHODS In Study I, survey data from more than 400 GPs and 4000 consultations were combined with registry data on serious disease. Study II and Study III were based only on registry data. RESULTS In Study I, we saw that a suspicion of cancer or another serious...... are randomised to a more liberal access to lower endoscopies. Alongside this, we need to keep on exploring alternative approaches including the use of iFOBT in symptomatic patients. Overall, this thesis indicates that the role of GPs in the diagnosis of cancer should be strengthened through easy access...

  11. E-dietician in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Carl J.; Arendal, Cecilia; Glintborg, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    and access to an advanced internet community. The weight was objectively decided by inclusion and conclusion of the study. 22 (17 women and 5 men) completed the study. The average age was 41 years, the weight was 103 kg and the BMI was 36.7 kg/m2. After four months (42-168 days) of treatment and averagely 17......Obesity is according to WHO one of the greatest health challenges of our time. The aim of the pilot project was to investigate the weight loss efficacy and the cost of individual dietetic internet-based consultations in a Danish medical centre in combination with an internet community. A total...... of 46 obese patients in general practice were offered participation in a cohort study during May 15th to December 1st 2008. Patients from three different health centers were included. 32 patients gave informed consent to participate and were given access to weekly e-mail consultations with a dietician...

  12. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    Introduction: In Denmark about 600,000 persons are treated for hypertension and more than 300,000 people are receiving cholesterol lowering drugs. The prevalence of hypertension in people aged 80 years is 70%. For antidepressants the defined daily doses/1000 aged >80 years/day exceed 200. By far...... the most preventive drugs are prescribed in general practice. Special considerations exist in relation to medication of elderly patients. The prevalence of polypharmacy and the subsequent increased risk of side effects and drug interactions is high. Drug-related problems represent the fifth leading cause...... of death in the United States. The public expenses to drug treatment are constantly increasing. The possibility to withdraw the medication must be taken into account but the decision to discontinue drugs is complex and poorly understood. Planned studies: 1. Patients’ views upon discontinuation...

  13. Sore throat management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P; Williamson, I

    1996-06-01

    This paper discusses primary care management of sore throat in the context of recent national 'consensus' guidelines from the Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin. The guidelines advise taking a throat swab, using typical clinical features where swabs are not available, and suggest that antibiotics shorten the duration of symptoms and prevent complications. Systematic reviews and individual studies indicate that the evidence for prescribing antibiotics for most presentations of sore throat in general practice is marginal, and the benefits are probably outweighed by the likely costs of antibiotics. Using clinical scorecards or symptom clusters to identify individuals who would benefit from treatment is insensitive with low predictive value, although inexpensive. Using throat swabs as a gold standard for diagnosis is inappropriate since they are neither very specific nor sensitive, and will greatly increase costs of management. The relative lack of evidence for the efficacy of antibiotics and for the use of throat swabs from primary care research, and also an unbalanced perspective of dangers and complications related predominantly to a secondary care setting, underlines the problem of achieving valid consensus guidelines. Guidelines not firmly based on evidence appropriate to the intended setting are more likely to be received sceptically and hinder getting research into practice.

  14. General practice: the DREEM attachment? Comparing the educational environment of hospital and general practice placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martina; Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun

    2012-01-01

    The clinical learning environment is changing. General practice placements are now a fundamental part of undergraduate medical education. There is growing recognition that changes in hospital work practices are altering the breadth of exposure available to students. Surprisingly little work has been done comparing the quality of clinical placements between the hospital and community using validated tools. Such comparisons inform curriculum planning and resource allocation. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of the educational environment experienced by junior medical students during hospital and general practice placements using a widely used tool. Following the introduction of a new integrated curriculum, all Year 3 students (n=108) completed a standardised evaluation instrument, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) at the end of each of their clinical attachments (two different hospital sites and one in general practice), giving a total of 324 questionnaires. All forms were analysed and input into Graphpad INSTAT version 3. Total DREEM scores as well as subscale scores were calculated for each site. These were compared across sites using a Mann-Whitney U non-parametric test. By comparison with international standards, clinical attachments in our new integrated curriculum were rated highly. In particular, attachments in general practice scored highly with a mean score of 156.6 and perform significantly better (P students' perceptions of atmosphere and students' social self-perceptions. Finally, significant differences also emerged in students' perceptions of teachers in general practice when compared to those in the hospital setting. These findings provide evidence of the high-quality educational environment afforded students in primary care. They challenge the traditional emphasis on hospital-based teaching and preempt the question - Is the community a better place for junior students to learn?

  15. The existential dimension in general practice: identifying understandings and experiences of general practitioners in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergaard, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette; Bjerrum, Lars; Gilså Hansen, Dorte; Olesen, Frede; Pedersen, Susanne S; Timm, Helle; Timmermann, Connie; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to identify points of agreement and disagreements among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark concerning how the existential dimension is understood, and when and how it is integrated in the GP-patient encounter. A qualitative methodology with semi-structured focus group interviews was employed. General practice setting in Denmark. Thirty-one GPs from two Danish regions between 38 and 68 years of age participated in seven focus group interviews. Although understood to involve broad life conditions such as present and future being and identity, connectedness to a society and to other people, the existential dimension was primarily reported integrated in connection with life-threatening diseases and death. Furthermore, integration of the existential dimension was characterized as unsystematic and intuitive. Communication about religious or spiritual questions was mostly avoided by GPs due to shyness and perceived lack of expertise. GPs also reported infrequent referrals of patients to chaplains. GPs integrate issues related to the existential dimension in implicit and non-standardized ways and are hindered by cultural barriers. As a way to enhance a practice culture in which GPs pay more explicit attention to the patients' multidimensional concerns, opportunities for professional development could be offered (courses or seminars) that focus on mutual sharing of existential reflections, ideas and communication competencies. Key points Although integration of the existential dimension is recommended for patient care in general practice, little is known about GPs' understanding and integration of this dimension in the GP-patient encounter. The existential dimension is understood to involve broad and universal life conditions having no explicit reference to spiritual or religious aspects. The integration of the existential dimension is delimited to patient cases where life-threatening diseases, life crises and unexplainable patient

  16. Visual inspection with acetic acid and Lugol's iodine in cervical cancer screening at the general referral hospital Kayembe in Mbuji-Mayi, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desire, Banza Kamba; Philippe, Cilundika Mulenga; Thierry, Kabengele; Félix, Kitenge Wa Momat; Wembodinga, Gilbert Utshudienyema; Prosper, Kakudji Luhete; Oscar, Luboya Numbi

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality of women from cancer in the developing World. It is the primary cause of reduced life expectancy in Sub-Saharan countries such as Democratic Republic of Congo. The aim of this work was to determinate the socio-demographic profile of women with precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix, to determinate the frequency of VIA and VILI positive cases and to show the challenges that can be faced in managing patients with abnormalities in the city of Mbuji-Mayi in the Democratic Republic of Congo. As part of its activities, the "Association de Lutte contre le Cancer du Col utérin" (ALCC) organized a community outreach followed by free voluntary testing for cervical cancer for two weeks (26(th)March to 10(th) April 2011) at the General Referral Hospital Kayembe in Mbuji-Mayi (Democratic Republic of Congo). A total of 229 women were examined. 38% of tests (VIA + VILI) were positive with 6 clinically suspected cases of invasive cancer at stage 1 (7% of cases). Nearly 70% of patients were still of childbearing age and had started their first sexual intercourse before 18 years of age and 86% of cases were multiparous. Given the material, financial and technical constraints, 75% of patients were placed in a monitoring program of 9 months to 1 year (= expectation and another test) while 11% of them were selected for a biopsy to be locally practiced and sent to the pathologist. Nearly 8% of the cases were candidates for hysterectomy. Given the difficulties encountered and the frequency of positive tests, we recommend another study with a larger sample, improved working conditions (mainly equipment) and the association of another test such as the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) test.

  17. Toward generally accepted forensic assessment practices among clinical neuropsychologists: a survey of professional practice and common test use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Casey; Barr, William; Brodale, Donald L; Rabin, Laura A

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated professional practice and common test use among clinical neuropsychologists engaging in forensic assessment.  Doctorate-level psychologists active in the practice of neuropsychology and on the INS and NAN membership listings (n = 502) were surveyed about their demographics, professional practice, and common test use. Participants who reported engaging in forensic practice (n = 255) were further surveyed about their forensic practice. Forensic participants were more likely to be male and Caucasian, and reported higher ages, more years of professional experience, and a higher prevalence of board certification. While characteristics of their professional and forensic practice varied, forensic participants reported spending most of their professional time conducting neuropsychological assessments with adult clients in a private or group practice setting, focusing on civil referrals and civil legal questions involving older adult issues, developmental issues, head injury, and psychiatric issues. Common test use across neuropsychological assessment domains is presented for board-certified forensic participants (n = 77). An examination of these results reveals that the current pattern of test use is similar to the results of a more general survey of neuropsychological test use.  The findings provide insight into the practice of forensic neuropsychological assessment, and further establish the admissibility of neuropsychological evidence in the United States legal system. Results will be useful for clinical neuropsychologists, field leaders, and legal professionals hoping to gain insight into the role of clinical neuropsychology in civil and criminal legal decision-making.

  18. Dermoscopy in General Dermatology: A Practical Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichetti, Enzo; Stinco, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general dermatological disorders. In this article, we sought to provide an up-to-date practical overview on the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analysing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological disorders grouped according to their clinical presentation, i.e. dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), papulosquamous/papulokeratotic dermatoses (lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, classical pityriasis rubra pilaris, porokeratosis, lymphomatoid papulosis, papulosquamous chronic GVHD, parakeratosis variegata, Grover disease, Darier disease and BRAF-inhibitor-induced acantholytic dyskeratosis), facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lupus vulgaris, granuloma faciale and demodicidosis), acquired keratodermas (chronic hand eczema, palmar psoriasis, keratoderma due to mycosis fungoides, keratoderma resulting from pityriasis rubra pilaris, tinea manuum, palmar lichen planus and aquagenic palmar keratoderma), sclero-atrophic dermatoses (necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma-forme dermatosis, urticaria pigmentosa and

  19. Sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, F.W. van der; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting: Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  20. [Epidemiology of fatigue in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, R

    1994-11-01

    The epidemiology of fatigue is not well known in France, and this study reports on factors associated with fatigue in a sample of 3,784 general practice patients. Prevalence rates according to several definitions of fatigue are presented and factors are examined that have been reported to be associated with fatigue. Although 41.2% of the sample report having experienced symptoms of fatigue for at least three days, only 7.6% declare fatigue as a reason for consulting a doctor. Women report more symptoms of fatigue, but they do not consult more often than men for this reason. Age is strongly correlated with fatigue, but this is found only for men. Socioprofessional category bears no relationship to fatigue as a reason for consultation, however, the diagnosis of fatigue is more often attributed to professionals and upper management than it is to office staff or skilled and unskilled workers. We do find a strong relationship between depressive symptomatology as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies (CES-D) and fatigue; nonetheless, fatigue is neither sensitive nor specific to the diagnosis of depression.

  1. Unlimited access to health care - impact of psychosomatic co-morbidity on utilisation in German general practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of psychosomatic co-morbidity on resource use for systems with unlimited access remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on practice visits, referrals and periods of disability in German general practices and to identify predictors of health care utilisation. Methods Cross sectional observational study in 13 practices in Upper Bavaria. Patients were included consecutively and filled in the Patients Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Numbers of practice visits, referrals and periods of disability within the last twelve months and permanent mental and somatic diagnoses were extracted manually by review of the computerised charts. Physicians in Germany are obliged to document repetitive reasons of encounter as permanent diagnoses in terms of ICD-10-codes. These ICD-10-codes are used for legitimisation of reimbursement in German general practices. Results 1005 patients were included (58.6% female). On average, patients had 15.3 (sd 16.3) practice contacts, 3.8 (sd 4.2) referrals and 7.5 (sd 23.1) days of disability per year. The mean number of coded permanent diagnoses was 0.4 (sd 0.7) for mental and 4.0 (sd 4.0) for somatic diagnoses. Patients with mental diagnoses scored higher in depression, anxiety, panic and somatoform disorder scales of PHQ. Frequent practice visits were associated stronger with coded permanent mental diagnoses (OR 20.0; 95%CI 7.5-53.9) than with coded permanent somatic diagnoses (OR 14.4; 95%CI 5.9-35.4). Frequent referrals were associated stronger with somatic diagnoses (OR 4.9; 95%CI 2.0-11.9) than with mental diagnoses (OR 3.6; 95%CI 1.4-9.8). Periods of disability were predicted by mental diagnoses (OR 5.0; 95%CI 1.6-15.8) but not by somatic diagnoses (OR 2.5; 95%CI 0.7-8.1). Conclusions Psychosomatic co-morbidity has a stronger impact on health care utilisation in German general practices with respect to practice visits and periods of disability whereas somatic disorders play a stronger role for

  2. Management of vertebral compression fracture in general practice: BEACH program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Z Megale

    Full Text Available The pain associated with vertebral compression fractures can cause significant loss of function and quality of life for older adults. Despite this, there is little consensus on how best to manage this condition.To describe usual care provided by general practitioners (GPs in Australia for the management of vertebral compression fractures.Data from the Bettering the Evaluation And Care of Health (BEACH program collected between April 2005 and March 2015 was used for this study. Each year, a random sample of approximately 1,000 GPs each recorded information on 100 consecutive encounters. We selected those encounters at which vertebral compression fracture was managed. Analyses of management options were limited to encounters with patients aged 50 years or over.i patient demographics; ii diagnoses/problems managed; iii the management provided for vertebral compression fracture during the encounter. Robust 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for the cluster survey design, were used to assess significant differences between group means.Vertebral compression fractures were managed in 211 (0.022%; 95% CI: 0.018-0.025 of the 977,300 BEACH encounters recorded April 2005- March 2015. That provides a national annual estimate of 26,000 (95% CI: 22,000-29,000 encounters at which vertebral fractures were managed. At encounters with patients aged 50 years or over (those at higher risk of primary osteoporosis, prescription of analgesics was the most common management action, particularly opioids analgesics (47.1 per 100 vertebral fractures; 95% CI: 38.4-55.7. Prescriptions of paracetamol (8.2; 95% CI: 4-12.4 or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (4.1; 95% CI: 1.1-7.1 were less frequent. Non-pharmacological treatment was provided at a rate of 22.4 per 100 vertebral fractures (95% CI: 14.6-30.1. At least one referral (to hospital, specialist, allied health care or other was given for 12.3 per 100 vertebral fractures (95% CI: 7.8-16.8.The prescription of oral

  3. [Summary of the practice guideline 'Vaginal discharge' (first revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukes, F S; Boeke, A J P; Dekker, J H; Wiersma, T; Goudswaard, A N

    2007-06-16

    The 1996 practice guideline of the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG) on vaginal discharge has been updated. Most women who visit their doctor with complaints about vaginal discharge do not have an increased risk of a sexually-transmitted disease. Investigations into vaginal discharge comprise history taking, physical examination and microscopic analysis in the laboratory of the general practitioner. Additional investigation into Chlamydia, gonorrhoea and Trichomonas infection is only necessary if the patient history reveals an increased risk of a sexually-transmitted disease. A Candida infection or bacterial vaginosis should only be treated if the patient experiences bothersome complaints. Treatment of a Candida infection consists of a vaginally applied imidazole compound. Bacterial vaginosis can be treated with oral administration of metronidazole. Patients with vaginal fluor can be examined and, if necessary, treated by their general practitioner. Referral to a gynaecologist is rarely necessary.

  4. Characteristics Of Referrals To An Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Practitioners (GMPS) sent the most referrals (507 or 74.0%), specialist medical practitioners (SMPs) sent 86(12.6%) and general dental practitioners (GDPs) sent 59(8.6%) referrals. The medical specialty with most referrals was paediatrics (29.0 % of the SMPs referrals). 44.5% of the referrals had no provisional diagnosis, ...

  5. Variation in number of general practitioner consultations before hospital referral for cancer: findings from the 2010 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Neal, Richard D; Barbiere, Josephine M; Rubin, Gregory P; Abel, Gary A

    2012-04-01

    Information from patient surveys can help to identify patient groups and cancers with the greatest potential for improvement in the experience and timeliness of cancer diagnosis. We aimed to examine variation in the number of pre-referral consultations with a general practitioner between patients with different cancers and sociodemographic characteristics. We analysed data from 41,299 patients with 24 different cancers who took part in the 2010 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey in England. We examined variation in the number of general practitioner consultations with cancer symptoms before hospital referral to diagnose cancer. Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of three or more pre-referral consultations, adjusting for cancer type, age, sex, deprivation quintile, and ethnic group. We identified wide variation between cancer types in the proportion of patients who had visited their general practitioner three or more times before hospital referral (7·4% [625 of 8408] for breast cancer and 10·1% [113 of 1124] for melanoma; 41·3% [193 of 467] for pancreatic cancer and 50·6% [939 of 1854] for multiple myeloma). In multivariable analysis, with patients with rectal cancer as the reference group, those with subsequent diagnosis of multiple myeloma (odds ratio [OR] 3·42, 95% CI 3·01-3·90), pancreatic cancer (2·35, 1·91-2·88), stomach cancer (1·96, 1·65-2·34), and lung cancer (1·68, 1·48-1·90) were more likely to have had three or more pre-referral consultations; conversely patients with subsequent diagnosis of breast cancer (0·19; 0·17-0·22), melanoma (0·34, 0·27-0·43), testicular cancer (0·47, 0·33-0·67), and endometrial cancer (0·59, 0·49-0·71) were more likely to have been referred to hospital after only one or two consultations. The probability of three or more pre-referral consultations was greater in young patients (OR for patients aged 16-24 years vs 65-74 years 2·12, 95% CI 1·63-2·75; pcancer type

  6. [Nosocomial urinary tract and surgical site infection rates in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukuke, Hendrick Mbutshu; Kasamba, Eric; Mahuridi, Abdulu; Nlandu, Roger Ngatu; Narufumi, Suganuma; Mukengeshayi, Abel Ntambue; Malou, Vicky; Makoutode, Michel; Kaj, Françoise Malonga

    2017-01-01

    In Intertropical Africa hospitalized patients are exposed to a risk of nosocomial infections. The dearth of published data on this subject limits the descriptive analysis of the situation. This study aimed to determine the incidence, the germs responsible for these infections and the risk factors of nosocomial infections in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo. We conducted a descriptive, longitudinal study from 1 October 2014 to 1 January 2015. Our study population consisted of 207 women who had been hospitalized in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba. We carried out a comprehensive data collection. Nosocomial infection rate accounted for 15.5%. Parturient women who had been hospitalized for more than three days were three times more likely to develop a nosocomial infection (p=0.003), while those who had had a complicated delivery were four times more likely to be at risk of developing nosocomial infection (p = 0.000). Escherichia coli was the most isolated causative agent (38.1%), followed by Citrobacter freundi (23.8%), Acinobacter baumani (.18, 2%), Staphylococcus aureus (18.2%), Enterococcus aureus (14.3%) and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (9.1%). Ampicillin was the most prescribed antibiotic, to which isolated microbes were resistant. It is necessary to improve hospital hygiene and to conduct further study to examine the similarity between germs strains in the environment and those in biological fluids.

  7. Allergic rhinitis in children: incidence and treatment in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bot, Cindy M A; Moed, Heleen; Schellevis, François G; de Groot, Hans; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; van der Wouden, Johannes C

    2009-09-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0-17 yr in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establish whether changes have occurred. A comparison was made with data from the first (1987) and second (2001) Dutch national surveys of general practice on children aged 0-17 yr. Incidence rates were compared by age, sex, level of urbanization and season. The management of the general practitioner was assessed regarding drug prescriptions and referrals to medical specialists, and compared with the clinical guideline issued in 1996. The incidence rate of allergic rhinitis increased from 6.6 (1987) to 9.2 (2001) per 1000 person-years. We found a male predominance with a switch in adolescence to a female predominance at both time points. The increase in incidence was the highest in rural (allergic rhinitis compared to 1987. In 1987, prescribed medication consisted mainly of nasal corticosteroids (36%) and in 2001 of oral antihistamines (45%). Although a clinical guideline was not issued until 1996, overall, the treatment of allergic rhinitis by general practitioners was in both years in accordance with the current clinical guideline, but with a stronger adherence in 2001. The results show an increased incidence in the past decades of allergic rhinitis in children in Dutch general practice. The shift to a smaller spectrum of prescriptions in 2001 may be a result of the 1996 clinical guideline.

  8. Body mass index and dental caries in children aged 5 to 8 years attending a dental paediatric referral practice in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong-Lenters, Maddelon; van Dommelen, Paula; Schuller, Annemarie A; Verrips, Erik H W

    2015-12-01

    Obesity and dental caries are widely-recognised problems that affect general health. The prevention of both dental caries and obesity have proven very difficult: children and their parents may need professional support to achieve behaviour change. To find out whether both dental caries and overweight in childhood can be targeted using a common risk factor approach, it is necessary to establish whether the two diseases are indeed linked. The aim of the present study was therefore to use anthropometric data obtained professionally to investigate the association between Body Mass Index and dental caries experience in children aged 5-8 years receiving treatment in a referral centre for paediatric dental care in the Netherlands. Children's dmft and dmfs scores were calculated using dental records and sociodemographic data were also extracted from these records. Dentists were trained to measure standing height and weight in a standardised way. Body Mass Index was calculated by dividing kilograms by height squared (kg/m(2)). Extended International (International Obesity Task Force) body mass index cut-offs were used to define 'no overweight' and 'overweight' (with the latter category including obesity). No statistically significant differences were found between the mean dmft or dmfs scores of the two groups (overweight and non-overweight), even after correction for the effect of the potential confounders sex, socio-economic status and ethnicity. The percentage of caries-active children in the non-overweight group was almost the same as in the overweight group. No statistically significant differences were found. We hypothesised to find a positive association between body mass index and dental caries experience in children aged 5-8 years attending our practice. However, this study did not find a relationship of this kind. A common risk factor approach for the prevention of caries and overweight is therefore not supported by our study.

  9. Laser therapy in general dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Arun A.

    2006-02-01

    This is a clinical presentation on the use of laser therapy in a private dental practice using a 810nm diode. A wide range of conditions involving pain management, treatment and as an adjunct to procedures to enhance patient comfort and experience. This will include cases treated for TMD (Temporo mandibular dysfunction), apthous ulcers, angular chelitis, cold sores, gingival retraction, periodontal treatment and management of failing dental implants. The case presentation will include the protocols used and some long term reviews. The results have been very positive and will be shared to enable this form of treatment to be used more frequently and with confidence within dental practice.

  10. Implant Dentistry in General Practice Part 2: Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper, the second of a series of two, provides an introduction to treatment planning in implant dentistry for the general dental practitioner. Clinical relevance: Appropriate training has made implant placement and restoration a routine treatment option in general practice.

  11. General practice registration networks in the Netherlands: a brief report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.E. Hart (Bertien); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans); P. Hoppener; G.J. van Schendel; J.A. Knottnerus (André)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, several general practice registrations exist. Groups of general practitioners register elements of patient care according to agreed-upon criteria, and these data are collected in a central database. By means of a questionnaire the

  12. Stakeholder experiences with general practice pharmacist services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edwin C K; Stewart, Kay; Elliott, Rohan A; George, Johnson

    2013-09-11

    To explore general practice staff, pharmacist and patient experiences with pharmacist services in Australian general practice clinics within the Pharmacists in Practice Study. Qualitative study. Two general practice clinics in Melbourne, Australia, in which pharmacists provided medication reviews, patient and staff education, medicines information and quality assurance services over a 6-month period. Patients, practice staff and pharmacists. Semi-structured telephone interviews with patients, focus groups with practice staff and semi-structured interviews and periodic narrative reports with practice pharmacists. Data were analysed thematically and theoretical frameworks used to explain the findings. 34 participants were recruited: 18 patients, 14 practice staff (9 general practitioners, 4 practice nurses, 1 practice manager) and 2 practice pharmacists. Five main themes emerged: environment; professional relationships and integration; pharmacist attributes; staff and patient benefits and logistical challenges. Participants reported that colocation and the interdisciplinary environment of general practice enabled better communication and collaboration compared to traditional community and consultant pharmacy services. Participants felt that pharmacists needed to possess certain attributes to ensure successful integration, including being personable and proactive. Attitudinal, professional and logistical barriers were identified but were able to be overcome. The findings were explained using D'Amour's structuration model of collaboration and Roger's diffusion of innovation theory. This is the first qualitative study to explore the experiences of general practice staff, pharmacists and patients on their interactions within the Australian general practice environment. Participants were receptive of colocated pharmacist services, and various barriers and facilitators to integration were identified. Future research should investigate the feasibility and sustainability of

  13. Quality of stroke prevention in general practice: relationship with practice organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Johan S.; Klazinga, Niek; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Prins, A. D.; Borsboom, Gerard J. J. M.; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between elements of practice organization related to stroke prevention in general practice, and suboptimal preventive care preceding the occurrence of stroke. Design. This study was conducted among 69 Dutch general practitioners in the Rotterdam region.

  14. Quality of stroke prevention in general practice: relationship with practice organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. de Koning (Johan); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Prins (Ad); G.J.J.M. Borsboom (Gerard); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between elements of practice organization related to stroke prevention in general practice, and suboptimal preventive care preceding the occurrence of stroke. DESIGN: This study was conducted among 69 Dutch general practitioners in the

  15. Impact of Implementation of Electronically Transmitted Referrals on Pediatric Subspecialty Visit Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kristin N; Drnach, Michael; Mehrotra, Ateev; Suresh, Srinivasan; Docimo, Steven G

    2017-12-23

    One barrier to timely access to outpatient pediatric subspecialty care is the complexity of scheduling processes. We evaluated the impact of implementing electronically transmitted referrals on subspecialty visit attendance. Through collaboration with stakeholders, an electronically transmitted referral order system was designed, piloted, and implemented in 15 general pediatrics practices, with 24 additional practices serving as controls. We used statistical process control methods and difference-in-differences analysis to examine visits attended, appointments scheduled, appointment nonattendance, and referral volume. Electronically transmitted referrals then were expanded to all 39 practices. We surveyed referring pediatricians at all practices before and after implementation. From April 2015 through September 2016 there were 33,485 referral orders across all practices (7770 before the pilot, 11,776 during the pilot, 13,939 after full implementation). At pilot practices, there was a significant and sustained improvement in subspecialty visits attended within 4 weeks of referral (10.9% to 20.0%; P attended also improved but to a smaller degree: 11.8% to 14.7% (P attendance after pediatric subspecialty referral, the sizable percentage of children without attended visits, the muted effect at control practices, and pediatrician survey responses indicate that additional work is needed to address barriers to pediatric subspecialty care. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of alcohol problems in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Todisco, N; Gluud, C

    1996-01-01

    heavy alcohol consumption had a predictive negative value of 97.2% (95% CI 90.2-99.7%) and a predictive positive value of 73.1% (95% CI 59.0-84.4%) in relation to MAST positive patients. It is suggested that general practitioners should incorporate this question about heavy alcohol consumption...

  17. Heart Failure Care in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasing health care problem worldwide, and a multidisciplinary approach with a general practitioner (GP) in the health care team is considered optimal. HF management has improved substantially over the last two decades, mainly for patients with HF with a reduced ejection

  18. Prevalence of alcohol problems in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Todisco, N; Gluud, C

    1996-01-01

    The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) and the response to a question about heavy alcohol consumption were used to assess the prevalence of alcohol problems in consecutive patients (77 males and 46 females) consulting a general practitioner in an urban area in the South of Italy...... (Castellammare di Stabia). Alcohol problems, which were defined by a cut-off score of 5 on the MAST and/or by heavy alcohol consumption (corresponding to at least 60 g of ethanol daily for males and 36 g of ethanol daily for females for at least 2 years), were identified in 54 patients [43.9%; 95% confidence...... heavy alcohol consumption had a predictive negative value of 97.2% (95% CI 90.2-99.7%) and a predictive positive value of 73.1% (95% CI 59.0-84.4%) in relation to MAST positive patients. It is suggested that general practitioners should incorporate this question about heavy alcohol consumption...

  19. Generalized anxiety disorder: practical assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Michael G; Elsasser, Gary; Barone, Eugene J

    2009-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder is common among patients in primary care. Affected patients experience excessive chronic anxiety and worry about events and activities, such as their health, family, work, and finances. The anxiety and worry are difficult to control and often lead to physiologic symptoms, including fatigue, muscle tension, restlessness, and other somatic complaints. Other psychiatric problems (e.g., depression) and nonpsychiatric factors (e.g., endocrine disorders, medication adverse effects, withdrawal) must be considered in patients with possible generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy and the first-line pharmacologic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are effective treatments. However, evidence suggests that the effects of cognitive behavior therapy may be more durable. Although complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used, their effectiveness has not been proven in generalized anxiety disorder. Selection of the most appropriate treatment should be based on patient preference, treatment success history, and other factors that could affect adherence and subsequent effectiveness. Copyright (c) 2009 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  20. The development of professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Stephens, Moira; Bryce, Julianne; Foley, Elizabeth; Ashley, Christine

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the current role of general practice nurses and the scope of nursing practice to inform the development of national professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses. Increasing numbers of nurses have been employed in Australian general practice to meet the growing demand for primary care services. This has brought significant changes to the nursing role. Competency standards for nurses working in general practice were first developed in Australia in 2005, but limited attention has been placed on articulating the contemporary scope of practice for nurses in this setting. Concurrent mixed methods design. Data collection was conducted during 2013-2014 and involved two online surveys of Registered and Enrolled Nurses currently working in general practice, a series of 14 focus groups across Australia and a series of consultations with key experts. Data collection enabled the development of 22 Practice Standards separated into four domains: (i) Professional Practice; (ii) Nursing Care; (iii) General Practice Environment and (iv) Collaborative Practice. To differentiate the variations in enacting these Standards, performance indicators for the Enrolled Nurse, Registered Nurse and Registered Nurse Advanced Practice are provided under each Standard. The development of national professional practice standards for nurses working in Australian general practice will support ongoing workforce development. These Standards are also an important means of articulating the role and scope of the nurses' practice for both consumers and other health professionals, as well as being a guide for curriculum development and measurement of performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Health Promotion in General Medical Practice in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out among general medical practitioners in Ogun state to assess their attitude to and practice of health promotion in clinical practice. Although 91.1% of them indicated that health promotion is very important in clinical practice, only a quarter or less of them routinely asked or counseled their patients ...

  2. Getting a handle on the general practice workforce in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teljeur, C; Tyrrell, E; Kelly, A; O'Dowd, T; Thomas, S

    2014-06-01

    General practice makes a critical contribution to healthcare in Ireland. However, there is a weak understanding of the general practice workforce in Ireland. The aim of this study is to estimate the number of general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses in Ireland. A variety of data sources was used to corroborate counts of general practitioners and practice nurses. Capture-recapture methods were used to estimate the hidden population of GPs not identified by the databases included. There are 2,954 general practitioners in Ireland, equivalent to 64.4 per 100,000 population. There are 1,700 practice nurses nationally, equivalent to 37.1 per 100,000 persons. There is substantial regional variation in the number of general practitioners and practice nurses per 100,000. To some extent, deficits in one discipline may be counterbalanced by a surplus in the other. In the absence of a centralised register, it is not possible to track the number of GPs or practice nurses working in Ireland at present. This is despite the fact that there are twice as many general practice visits per annum compared to hospital visits.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Coronary Angiography in Symptomatic Patients Presenting to a Referral Cardiovascular Center During Daily Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, Arash; Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Joodi, Golsa; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Reza; Sheikholeslami, Farhad; Motevalli, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous studies that address the diagnostic value of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) as an alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA). However, the benefit of application of DSCT in a real world clinical setting should be evaluated. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of DSCT technique compared with CCA as the gold standard method in detection of coronary artery stenosis among symptomatic patients who are presented to a referral cardiovascular center during daily clinical practice. Evaluating the medical records of a tertiary care referral cardiovascular center, 47 patients who had undergone DSCT and CCA, and also met the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study were selected. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and likelihood ratios (LRs) of the DSCT imaging technique were calculated. In total, 97.8% of the segments (628/642) could be visualized with diagnostic image quality via DSCT coronary angiography. The mean heart rate during DSCT was 69.2 ± 12.2 bpm (range: 39 - 83 bpm), and the mean Agatston score was 507.7 ± 590.5 (range: 0 - 2328). Per segment analysis of the findings revealed that the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, positive LR (PLR) and negative LR (NLR) of DSCT technique for evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease were 93.7%, 96.8%, 92.7%, 97.2%, 29.4, and 0.066, respectively. Also per vessel, analysis of the findings showed a sensitivity of 97.1%, a specificity of 94.0%, PPV of 95.3%, NPV of 96.3%, PLR of 16.1, and NLR of 0.030. Our results indicate that DSCT coronary angiography provides high diagnostic accuracy for the evaluation of CAD patients during daily routine practice of a referral cardiovascular setting

  4. Cheques and challenges: business performance in New Zealand general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatbanks, Richard; Doolan-Noble, Fiona; McKenna, Alex

    2017-09-01

    INTRODUCTION New Zealand general practice mainly functions as small businesses, usually owned by a single or small group of doctors. Consequently, owners often have to balance the provision of patient care with varying funding priorities, changing patient needs and the pressures of running a sustainable business. Such balancing inevitably leads to tensions developing between these factors. AIM To explore and understand these tensions and responses to them, by examining the business performance measurements used by general practice. METHODS For this study, the unit of analysis and focus were individual practices, but qualitative semi-structured interviews with general practitioners (GPs) and practice managers were used to gather the data. RESULTS All participating practices had some form of governance or board review, where high-level aggregated business performance data were presented. More sophisticated business performance measures were evident in the larger, more developed practices and in practices functioning as community trusts. Examples of such measures included doctor utilisation and efficiency, appraisal of risk, patient satisfaction with services and responses to changes in patient demand. DISCUSSION As the number of general practices based on the traditional model decrease, a corresponding increase is likely in the establishment and development of 'super practices' based on a corporatized, multi-service, single-location model. Consequently, service delivery will become increasingly complex and will drive a need for increased sophistication in how general practice measures its business performance, thus ensuring a balance between high-quality, safe patient care and the maintenance of a sustainable business.

  5. Psychological stress and multimorbidity in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders

    2017-01-01

    and poor prognosis of physical diseases, including increased mortality. However, little is known on the physical consequences of sub‐threshold psychological stress, which is more common than psychiatric disorders in the background population and is highly prevalent in persons with multimorbidity....... Additionally, stress is a common reason for contacting the general practitioner (GP), and yet no guidelines for management and treatment exist. Aims The aim of this thesis was to investigate the consequences of psychological stress on the health while taking into account mental‐physical multimorbidity, i...... with a long‐term mortality increase of 40%. In absolute terms, stress was associated with more adverse outcomes among those with multimorbidity, and the combination of stress and multimorbidity seemed to result in less timely chronic care. Conclusions and perspectives Psychological stress was consistently...

  6. Undergraduate teaching in UK general practice: a geographical snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Helen; Rees, Eliot; Gay, Simon P; McKinley, Robert K

    2014-06-01

    Learning in general practice is an essential component of undergraduate medical education; currently, on average, 13% of clinical placements in the UK are in general practice. However, whether general practice can sustainably deliver more undergraduate placements is uncertain. To identify the geographical distribution of undergraduate teaching practices and their distance from the host medical school. National survey of all medical schools in the UK. All 33 UK medical schools were invited to provide the postcodes of their undergraduate teaching practices. These were collated, de-duplicated, and mapped. The distance in kilometres and journey times by car and public transport between each medical school and its teaching practices was estimated using Transport Direct (www.transportdirect.info). The postcodes of every practice in the UK were obtained from the UK's health departments. All 33 UK medical schools responded; 4392 practices contributed to teaching, with a median (minimum-maximum) of 142 (17-385) practices per school. The median (minimum-maximum) distance between a school and a teaching practice was 28 km (0-1421 km), 41 (0:00-23:26) minutes' travel by car and 1 hour 12 (0:00-17:29) minutes' travel by public transport. All teaching practices were accessible by public transport in one school and 90-99% were in a further four schools; 24 schools had >20% of practices that were inaccessible by public transport. The 4392 undergraduate teaching general practices are widely distributed and potentially any practice, no matter how isolated, could contribute to undergraduate education. However, this is, at the price of a considerable travel burden. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  7. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  8. Decision making on detection and triage of oral mucosa lesions in community dental practices: screening decisions and referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laronde, Denise M; Williams, P M; Hislop, T G; Poh, Catherine; Ng, Samson; Zhang, Lewei; Rosin, Miriam P

    2014-08-01

    Oral cancer is a substantial, often unrecognized issue globally, with close to 300 000 new cases reported annually. It is a management conundrum: a cancer site that is easily examined; yet more than 40% of oral cancers are diagnosed at a late stage when prognosis is poor and treatment can be devastating. Opportunistic screening within the dental office could lead to earlier diagnosis and intervention with improved survival. To describe how clinicians make decisions about referral based on the risk classification of the lesion. Eighteen dentists from 15 dental offices participated in a 1-day workshop on oral cancer screening. Participants then screened patients (medical history, conventional oral exam, fluorescent visualization examination) in-office for 11 months, triaging patients by apparent clinical risk: low risk (common benign conditions, geographic tongue, candidiasis, trauma), intermediate risk (lichenoid lesions) and high risk (white or red lesions or ulcers without apparent cause). Clinicians made the decision on which lesions to reassess in 3 weeks based on risk assessment and clinical judgment. Lesions of concern were seen by a community facilitator or referred to an oral medicine specialist. Of 2542 patients were screened, and 389 lesions were identified (15% of patients). 350 were determined to be low risk (90%), 19 intermediate risk (IR) (5%), and 20 high risk (HR) (5%). One hundred and sixty-six (43%) patients were recalled for 3-week reassessment: 90% of HR lesions, 63% of IR lesions (63%), and 39% of low-risk lesions. Compliance to recall was high (92% of cases). Reassessment eliminated the referral of 99/166 (60%) of lesions that had resolved. six lesions were biopsied with three low-grade dysplasias identified. Three key decision points were tested: risk assessment, need for reassessment, and need for referral. A 3-week reassessment appointment was invaluable to prevent the unnecessary referral due to confounders. There is a need for a well

  9. Psychiatric conditions and general practitioner attendance prior to HPV vaccination and the risk of referral to a specialized hospital setting because of suspected adverse events following HPV vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Tina Hovgaard; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    AIM: No association between human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and numerous diseases has been found. Still, a large number of Danish women are reporting suspected adverse events. Other factors may play a role, and the aim of this study is to examine the association between psychiatric...... conditions, general practitioner (GP) attendance and indicators of psychological symptoms prior to HPV vaccination and the risk of referral to an HPV center following vaccination. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Register-based, matched case-control study. Cases were identified from five Danish, regional HPV...... centers, and health data for cases and controls were obtained from national registries. PARTICIPANTS: Cases were defined as women referred to an HPV center between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 (n=1,496). Each case was matched with five controls on age, region and time of first vaccine...

  10. The Practice Nurse Mental Health in general practices: effects on diagnoses of alcohol abuse.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abidi, L.; Oenema, A.; Verhaak, P.; Mheen, D. van de

    2017-01-01

    Background: As part of health policy aiming to improve early detection and treatment of mental illness in general practices, from 2008 mental health practice nurses were gradually introduced in general practices in the Netherlands. The current study aims to investigate the effect of the

  11. Identifying people with a learning disability: an advanced search for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Amy M; Bryant, Louise; House, Allan

    2017-12-01

    People with learning disabilities (LD) have poor physical and mental health when compared with the general population. They are also likely to find it more difficult than others to describe their symptoms adequately. It is therefore harder for healthcare workers to identify the health needs of those with learning disabilities, with the danger of some problems being left unrecognised. Practice registers record only a proportion of those who are eligible, making it difficult to target improvements in their health care. To test a Read Code search supporting the identification of people with a mild-to-moderate learning disability who are not currently on the learning disability register. An observational study in primary care in West Yorkshire. Read Code searches were created to identify individuals with a learning disability not on the LD register; they were field tested and further refined before testing in general practice. Diagnostic codes identified small numbers of individuals who should have been on the LD register. Functional and service use codes often created large numbers of false-positive results. The specific descriptive codes 'Learning difficulties' and 'Referral to learning disability team' needed follow-up review, and then identified some individuals with LD who were not on the register. The Read Code search supported practices to populate their registers and was quick to run and review, making it a viable choice to support register revalidation. However, it did not find large numbers of people eligible for the LD register who were previously unidentified by their practice, suggesting that additional complementary methods are required to support practices to validate their registers. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  12. General practice ethnicity data: evaluation of a tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwelt P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is evidence that the collection of ethnicity data in New Zealand primary care is variable and that data recording in practices does not always align with the procedures outlined in the Ethnicity Data Protocols for the Health and Disability Sector. In 2010, The Ministry of Health funded the development of a tool to audit the collection of ethnicity data in primary care. The aim of this study was to pilot the Ethnicity Data Audit Tool (EAT in general practice. The goal was to evaluate the tool and identify recommendations for its improvement. METHODS: Eight general practices in the Waitemata District Health Board region participated in the EAT pilot. Feedback about the pilot process was gathered by questionnaires and interviews, to gain an understanding of practices’ experiences in using the tool. Questionnaire and interview data were analysed using a simple analytical framework and a general inductive method. FINDINGS: General practice receptionists, practice managers and general practitioners participated in the pilot. Participants found the pilot process challenging but enlightening. The majority felt that the EAT was a useful quality improvement tool for handling patient ethnicity data. Larger practices were the most positive about the tool. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that, with minor improvements to the toolkit, the EAT has the potential to lead to significant improvements in the quality of ethnicity data collection and recording in New Zealand general practices. Other system-level factors also need to be addressed.

  13. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  14. [The practice guideline 'Anemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Anaemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners will certainly be a support for the Dutch general practitioner. The inclusion of an algorithm to make a more precise diagnosis is an experiment that needs to be evaluated in the near future. However, many general

  15. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for adolescents: Attitudes, perceptions, and practice of New York school-based health center providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Brett R; Shaw, Benjamin A; Sherman, Barry R; Lawson, Hal A

    2016-01-01

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) has been endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics as an evidence-based strategy to address risky substance use among adolescents in primary care. However, less than half of pediatricians even screen adolescents for substance use. The purpose of this study was to identify variation in SBIRT practice and explore how program directors' and clinicians' attitudes and perceptions of effectiveness, role responsibility, and self-efficacy impact SBIRT adoption, implementation, and practice in school-based health centers (SBHCs). All 162 New York State SBHC program directors and clinicians serving middle and high school students were surveyed between May and June of 2013 (40% response rate). Only 22% of participants reported practicing the SBIRT model. Of the individual SBIRT model components, using a standardized tool to screen students for risky substance use, referring students with substance use problems to specialty treatment, and assessing students' readiness to change were practiced least frequently. Less than 30% of participants felt they could be effective at helping students reduce substance use, 63% did not believe it was their role to use a standardized screening tool, and 20-30% did not feel confident performing specific aspects of intervention and management. Each of these factors was correlated with SBIRT practice frequency (P SBIRT model and its adoption into practice within SBHCs, indicating a need for dissemination strategies targeting role responsibility, self-efficacy, and clinicians' perceptions of SBIRT effectiveness.

  16. 20 CFR 416.580 - Referral of overpayments to the Department of the Treasury for tax refund offset-General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the Treasury for tax refund offset-General. 416.580 Section 416.580 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Payment of Benefits... requesting the Department of the Treasury to offset income tax refunds due taxpayers who have an outstanding...

  17. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  18. A new approach to child mental healthcare within general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van Dijk, Marloes; Walstock, Dick; Zwaanswijk, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Child and adolescent mental health problems are frequently not identified and properly treated within general practice. Politicians in the Netherlands are promoting more primary healthcare treatment for mental health problems. The current study aims to evaluate an integrated primary

  19. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  20. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands | Ten Cate | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. With the aid of a film the training in general practice is discussed at 4 of the 7 universities in the Netherlands: Groningen, Utrecht, Nijmegen and Leyden. The differences in training methods are shown.

  1. Australian and overseas models of general practice training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Richard B; Morgan, Simon

    2011-06-06

    General practice training in Australia continues to evolve. It is now the responsibility of an independent organisation, is delivered by regional training providers, and comprises a structured training program. Overseas, general practice varies in its importance to health care systems, and training models differ considerably. In some cases training is mandatory, in others voluntary, but the aim is always similar--to improve the quality of care delivered to the large majority of populations that access health care through primary care. We review the current status of vocational general practice training in Australia, compare it with selected training programs in international contexts, and describe how the local model is well placed to address future challenges. Challenges include changes in population demographics, increasing comorbidity, increasing costs of technology-based health care, increasing globalisation of health, and workforce shortages. Although general practice training in Australia is strong, it can improve further by learning from other training programs to meet these challengers.

  2. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for hypertension in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, R S; Stockman, J; Kernick, D; Reinhold, D; Shore, A C; Tooke, J E

    1998-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is being increasingly used in general practice. There is at present little published evidence regarding the clinical utility of ABPM in the care of patients with established hypertension in this setting. We examined this issue by undertaking ABPM in a group of patients with established hypertension. 40 patients (aged 33-60 years) currently being treated for hypertension were randomly selected from a general practice list and underwent a single 24-ho...

  3. Diffusion of new drugs in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Flemming Hald; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Olesen, Frede

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is a large variation in implementing research findings in clinical practice. We examined whether the concept of early or late adopters is universal for the diffusion of all new drugs, and whether it is associated with non-scientific factors in general practice. METHODS: We...

  4. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment provided by nurses [ISRCTN51021015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oppen P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST is a brief psychological treatment tailored for use in a primary care setting. PST is provided by nurses, and earlier research has shown that it is a treatment at least as effective as usual care. However, research outcomes are not totally satisfying. This protocol describes a randomized clinical trial on the effectiveness of PST provided by nurses for patients in general practice. The results of this study, which currently being carried out, will be presented as soon as they are available. Methods/design This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of PST and usual care compared to usual care only. Patients, 18 years and older, who present psychological problems and are frequent attenders in general practice are recruited by the research assistant. The participants receive questionnaires at baseline, after the intervention, and again after 3 months and 9 months. Primary outcome is the reduction of symptoms, and other outcomes measured are improvement in problem solving skills, psychological and physical well being, daily functioning, social support, coping styles, problem evaluation and health care utilization. Discussion Our results may either confirm that PST in primary care is an effective way of dealing with emotional disorders and a promising addition to the primary care in the UK and USA, or may question this assumption. This trial will allow an evaluation of the effects of PST in practical circumstances and in a rather heterogeneous group of primary care patients. This study delivers scientific support for this use and therefore indications for optimal treatment and referral.

  5. Survey of Equine Referring Veterinarians' Satisfaction with Their Most Recent Equine Referral Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, C; Coe, J B; Hewson, J; Meehan, M; Kelton, D

    2018-02-22

    Little is known about the veterinary referral process and factors that contribute to positive outcomes. To investigate equine referring veterinarians' (rDVMs') satisfaction with their most recent referral experience and compare rDVM and specialist perspectives. 187 rDVMs and 92 specialists (referral care providers). Cross-sectional observational study. An online survey was administered to both rDVMs and specialists. Referring veterinarian satisfaction with their most recent referral experience was evaluated. Both rDVMs and specialists were asked to identify factors influencing a rDVM's decision where to refer, and the top 3 factors they perceive are barriers to referral care. Median rDVM satisfaction with their most recent referral care experience was 80 of 100 (mean, 75; range, 8-100). Referring veterinarians provided the lowest satisfaction score for the item asking about "The competition the referral hospital poses to your practice" (mean, 56.96; median, 62; range, 0-100). The top factor rDVMs identified as influencing their decision where to refer was "quality of care," whereas specialists identified "quality of communication and updates from the clinician." Referring veterinarians' top barrier to referral care was "high cost of referral care," and for specialists was "poor service provided to the client by the referral hospital." Referring veterinarians generally were satisfied with referral care, but areas exist where rDVMs and specialists differ in what they view as important to the referral process. Exploring opportunities to overcome these differences is likely to support high quality care. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Positive experiences with a specialist as facilitator in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Thorsen, Thorkil

    2012-01-01

    The use of facilitators for quality improvement in general practice has accelerated during the past decade. As general practitioners (GPs) or pharmacists have typically been used as facilitators, there is a lack of knowledge of how other professionals function as facilitators. This article explores...

  7. The quality of COPD care in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Rasmussen, Finn Vejlø; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in a large sample of general practices in Denmark. We focussed on whether participation by general practitioners (GPs) in an educational programme could enhance the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and staging of the disease and improve adherence...

  8. Identification of depression in a rural general practice | Strauss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Major depression is underdiagnosed by general practitioners, but the reasons for this are not clear. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of major depression and coexisting generalised anxiety disorder in a rural general practice in the Orange Free State. It also assessed the predictive value of a screening ...

  9. Implant Dentistry in General Practice. Part 1: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Ken

    2016-06-01

    This paper, the first of two, provides an introduction to implant dentistry for the general dental practitioner. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Implant placement and restoration is becoming more common place in general dental practice to the point where it may already be considered a routine treatment option.

  10. Acute pain management in general practice: Steps to effective pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pain is one of the most common complaints that general practitioners encounter in everyday practice. The swift and effective management of pain is a medical mandate, not only to fulfil an ethical obligation to the patient, but also to prevent long-term complications, such as chronic pain. General practitioners are often ...

  11. [Development of a pharmacological curriculum for general practice: Identifying and prescribing orally administered pharmacological substances with relevance for general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straßner, Cornelia; Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Flum, Elisabeth; Schwill, Simon; Brandt, Bettina; Steinhäuser, Jost

    2017-05-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are among the specialists who prescribe the highest number of medication. Therefore the improvement of pharmacological competencies is an important part of the GP specialist training. The self-concept of general practice stating that GPs are the first contact persons for all health problems makes it challenging to define and acquire competencies for specialist training. While the "Competence-based Curriculum" developed by the German College of General Practitioners and Family Physicians defines diagnoses, reasons for counselling and competencies which are essential for general practice, a similar orientation guide is lacking for the pharmacological field. The aim of this study is to define and characterize pharmacological substances which every GP should know so well that he or she is able to conduct counselling and monitoring. We analysed private and public health insurance prescriptions of all general practices participating in the CONTENT project in the period from 2009 to 2014. The analysis was limited to substances with oral application which were prescribed at least once by at least 25 % (n = 11) of the practices. While the 100 most frequent prescriptions were included due to their frequency, less frequently prescribed substances were assessed concerning their relevance for general practice in a rating procedure. The substances included were classified by diagnoses and reasons for counselling. We analysed 1,912,896 prescriptions from 44 practices and 112,535 patients on the basis of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. After applying the inclusion criteria, 453 substances were left, 302 of which were considered relevant for general practice and could be assigned to 45 diagnoses / reasons for counselling. The result of this study could be considered a working draft for a pharmacological curriculum for general practice, which may complement the "Competence-based Curriculum" in the medium term. Copyright

  12. Theory and interpretation in qualitative studies from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    of the interpretative paradigm. Associations between paradigms, philosophies, methodologies and methods are examined and different strategies for theoretical commitment presented. Finally, I discuss the impact of theory for interpretation and the development of general practice knowledge.  Main points: A scientific...... in qualitative analysis are presented, emphasizing substantive theories to sharpen the interpretative focus. Such approaches are clearly within reach for a general practice researcher contributing to clinical practice by doing more than summarizing what the participants talked about, without trying to become......Objective: In this article, I want to promote theoretical awareness and commitment among qualitative researchers in general practice and suggest adequate and feasible theoretical approaches.  Approach: I discuss different theoretical aspects of qualitative research and present the basic foundations...

  13. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.

    2008-01-01

    included in the first audit and 2394 in the second audit. We observed a significantly increased utilisation of spirometry from the first (52.7%) to the second audit (71.4%) (p quality of management. We conclude that participation in an educational......We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  14. Does indirect consultation lead to overprescribing in general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaijer-Ruskamp, F M; Stewart, R; Wesseling, H

    1987-01-01

    Indirect consultations (by telephone or receptionist) are of increasing importance in general practice and may result in more prescribing than during direct (face to face)-consultations. We analysed prescribing data for 14,660 disorders, presented in one week in 52 general practices. In general, a significant, but hardly relevant increase in prescribing during indirect consultations was observed. The effect varies strongly for different disorders and was especially relevant for repeat-prescriptions for the following conditions: musculoskeletal- and connective tissue diseases, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic disorders and disorders of the female genital tract.

  15. The language of "Circule": discursive construction of false referral in Iranian teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhosseini, Seyyed-Abdolhamid; Fattahi, Hossein

    2010-09-01

    This article explores the practice of false patient out-referral by medical students in Iranian teaching hospital emergency departments. Drawing on participant-observations and interviews during eight months in six hospitals in Tehran, we investigate how discourse is appropriated to construct and legitimate out-referrals through four general strategies of sympathy, mystification, intimidation, and procrastination. Based on a critical approach to false out-referral discourse, we revisit the medical and educational functioning of teaching hospitals in Iran: Focusing on medical students involved in false out-referrals, their discursive reproduction of deception is examined along with their legitimate challenges to institutional structures. Moreover, focusing on the institution of hospital, institutional corruption is discussed along with the problematic of covert cultural defiance faced by a modernist organizational construct in a nonmainstream cultural context. Finally, we argue that the discourse of false out-referral calls for more profound public awareness in dealing with health institutions.

  16. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölter, Regine; Freund, Tobias; Ledig, Thomas; Boll, Bernhard; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Roos, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the possibility to spend one quarter of the internship, in the last year of their academic studies, in a practice of family medicine. The demonstrated teaching method aims at giving feedback to the student based on video recordings of patient consultations (student-patient) with the help of a checklist. Video-feedback is already successful used in medical teaching in Germany and abroad. This feasibility study aims at assessing the practicability of video-assisted feedback as a teaching method during internship in general practice. First of all, the general practice chooses a guideline as the learning objective. Secondly, a subsequent patient - student - consultation is recorded on video. Afterwards, a video-assisted formative feedback is given by the physician. A checklist with learning objectives (communication, medical examination, a structured case report according to the guideline) is used to structure the feedback content. The feasibility was assessed by a semi structured interview in order to gain insight into barriers and challenges for future implementation. The teaching method was performed in one general practice. Afterwards the teaching physician and the trainee intern were interviewed. The Following four main categories were identified: feasibility, performance, implementation in daily routine, challenges of the teaching concept.The results of the feasibility study show general practicability of this approach. Installing a video camera in one examination room may solve technical problems. The trainee intern mentioned theoretical and practical benefits using the guideline. The teaching physician noted the challenge to reflect on his daily routines in the light of evidence

  17. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners practice guideline 'The menopause'; reaction of the field of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on the menopause will not be any major cause for discussion. The hot issue of giving oestrogens to peri- and postmenopausal women to prevent osteoporosis or cardiovascular disease was already covered in the practice guideline on

  18. The problem of diagnostic variability in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, D L; Cross, K W; Fleming, D M

    1992-08-01

    The aim was to examine the scale, source, and relevance of variation between general practices in respect of the rates with which patients consulted with illnesses falling in each of several diagnostic groups. This study involved a general practice morbidity survey conducted over two years, 1970-72. All patients who consulted their general practitioners were identified and the number of these who consulted with diagnoses attributable to each of the 18 main chapters of the International classification of diseases were counted. Patients who consulted for more than one diagnosis within a chapter were counted once only; those who consulted for one or more diagnoses in each of several chapters were counted once for each chapter. This was a national survey involving general practitioners in England and Wales. The study involved 214,524 patients from 53 selected general practices (115 doctors) who were registered with their general practitioners for the whole of the year 1970-71 and for whom their morbidity data had been linked with their social data from the 1971 census. Using the numbers of patients on the practice lists as denominators, practice patient consulting rates (PPCR) were calculated for each practice and for each ICD chapter. Variability in chapter PPCR was examined by calculating coefficients of variation and, after allowance for random variation, coefficients of residual variation. There were large interpractice (doctor) variations in all chapter rates. These variations were only marginally attributable to: chance; different age, sex and social class mixes of practice populations; geographical locations; and practice organisation. The rates were, however, consistent from one year to the next for any one practice. Approximately half of the interpractice (doctor) diagnostic variability was associated with overall patient consulting behaviour. When the effects of this behaviour were discounted, any major residual diagnostic variability was confined largely to

  19. Making the links between domestic violence and child safeguarding: an evidence-based pilot training for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilassy, Eszter; Drinkwater, Jess; Hester, Marianne; Larkins, Cath; Stanley, Nicky; Turner, William; Feder, Gene

    2017-11-01

    We describe the development of an evidence-based training intervention on domestic violence and child safeguarding for general practice teams. We aimed - in the context of a pilot study - to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes and self-efficacy of general practice clinicians caring for families affected by domestic violence. Our evidence sources included: a systematic review of training interventions aiming to improve professional responses to children affected by domestic violence; content mapping of relevant current training in England; qualitative assessment of general practice professionals' responses to domestic violence in families; and a two-stage consensus process with a multi-professional stakeholder group. Data were collected between January and December 2013. This paper reports key research findings and their implications for practice and policy; describes how the research findings informed the training development and outlines the principal features of the training intervention. We found lack of cohesion and co-ordination in the approach to domestic violence and child safeguarding. General practice clinicians have insufficient understanding of multi-agency work, a limited competence in gauging thresholds for child protection referral to children's services and little understanding of outcomes for children. While prioritising children's safety, they are more inclined to engage directly with abusive parents than with affected children. Our research reveals uncertainty and confusion surrounding the recording of domestic violence cases in families' medical records. These findings informed the design of the RESPONDS training, which was developed in 2014 to encourage general practice clinicians to overcome barriers and engage more extensively with adults experiencing abuse, as well as responding directly to the needs of children. We conclude that general practice clinicians need more support in managing the complexity of this area of practice. We need to

  20. Demand and supply for psychological help in general practice in different European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Bensing, J.; Gask, L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The general practitioner is usually the first health care contact for mental problems. The position of a general practitioner may vary between health care systems, depending on the referral system (gatekeepers versus directly accessible specialists), presence of fixed lists and the

  1. The epidemiology of teaching and training General Practices in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot L; Gay, Simon P; McKinley, Robert K

    2016-11-01

    There is no national picture of teaching and training practices or the communities they serve. We aimed to describe the association between general practices' engagement with education and their characteristics, locality and patients' health-status and satisfaction. This data linkage study of all English practices calculated odds ratios for teaching and training status and practice, locality and patient variables. Teaching and training practices are larger than practices which do neither (mean list size (SD) 7074 (3736), 10112 (4934), and 5327 (3368) respectively, p teach. Practices in rural areas (1.68 (1.43-1.98)), with more GPs (1.22 (1.27-1.39)), more full time equivalent GPs (2.68 (1.64-4.40)), fewer male GPs (0.17 (0.13-0.22)) and a higher proportion of White British people in their locality (1.34 (1.02-1.75)) were more likely to train. Teaching and training practices had higher patient satisfaction (0.293 (0.190, 0.397) and (0.563 (0.442, 0.685)) respectively and quality and outcomes framework scores (0.507 (0.211, 0.804)) and (0.996 (0.650, 1.342)) respectively than those which did not. Educationally engaged practices are unrepresentative in serving less ethnically diverse and (for training practices) less urban environments. Investment is needed to increase the proportion of educational practices in diverse urban localities.

  2. [The practice guideline 'Smoking cessation' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the practice guideline from the Dutch College of General Practitioners on smoking cessation. General practitioners (GP) should strive after smoking cessation when patients consult and ask for support to stop smoking. Moreover, the practitioner should also show such initiative

  3. [Suicide risk assessment tools for adults in general medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyron, Pierre-Antoine; David, Michel

    2015-06-01

    It is estimated that almost half of suicide victims have consulted a general practitioner during the month preceding their act. The implementation of a suicide risk assessment tool validated in primary care is therefore needed in general medical practice. To review the suicide risk assessment tools for adults, to discuss their validity, and to suggest a pertinent tool which could be used in primary care. Research into scientific databases (keywords: psychiatric status rating scales; tools; questionnaires; risk assessment; suicide; attempted suicide; suicidal ideation; primary care; family practice; general practice) and into French and English language primary care journals. Review of publications and recommendations from health promotion and suicide prevention organizations, and from general practice and psychiatry learned societies. Two categories of suicide risk assessment tools have been found. On one hand, questionnaires aim at predicting suicidal behaviours (or their recurrence) using a risk score. They are interesting in research but of limited value in clinical practice because of their low specificity and individual predictive power. On the other hand, semi-directive interviews unable clinicians to explore the three dimensions of suicidality (levels of risk, urgency and danger), thus knowing to what extent the patient is suicidal and to adopt the appropriate preventive care strategy. Their use in clinical routine is highly recommended. The Grille d'estimation de la dangerosité d'un passage à l'acte suicidaire is the only interview to have been validated in primary care so far. It could be a pertinent tool in general practice. Preventing suicide in primary care requires the assessment of suicide risk using a semi-directive interview. We suggest a qualitative study to be carried out in general practice on the Grille d'estimation de la dangerosité d'un passage à l'acte suicidaire. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Job satisfaction of practice assistants in general practice in Germany: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goetz, K.; Campbell, S.; Broge, B.; Brodowski, M.; Steinhaeuser, J.; Wensing, M.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Job satisfaction of practice staff is important for optimal health care delivery and for minimizing the turnover of non-medical professions. OBJECTIVE: To document the job satisfaction of practice assistants in German general practice and to explore associations between job satisfaction,

  5. [General practice research units in Denmark: multidisciplinary research in support of practical work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reventlow, Susanne; Broholm, Katalin Alexa Király; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark the general practice research units operating in connection with universities provide a home base, training and methodology support for researchers in the field from medical students to general practitioners carrying out practical work. Research issues frequently require a multidisciplinary approach and use of different kinds of materials. Problems arising from the practical work of general practitioners take priority in the wide selection of topics. The units have networked efficiently with organizations of general practitioners and medical education. The combination of research environments has created synergy benefiting everybody and increased the scientific productivity and visibility of the field.

  6. Implementation of an Arranged Preventive Consultation in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Anne Gram; Kirkegaard, Pia; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    Background: In 2006 an arranged preventive consultation (0106-service) was implemented in Danish general practice. The purpose of the consultation is an attempt to improve the systematic prevention of the main chronic lifestyle diseases. Aim: This study examines the GP's experiences...... with the arranged preventive consultation with focus on facilitators and barriers in the implementation of the consultation. Material & Method: Semi-structured interviews with 10 GPs and nurses in general practice. Results & Conclusions: Economically lucrative services are not an isolated motivation for the GPs....../nurses, but must be accompanied with a basic belief in the effect of preventive consultations in general practice. The better payment of the 0106-service is used to spend more time per consultation and it makes the GPs/nurses feel rewarded for the preventive work they perform. The consultation frames a social...

  7. The role of general practice in postgraduate basic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Kodal, Troels; Qvesel, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    medicine. AIM: To explore young Danish doctors' views on basic medical training including views on the participation of general practice. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all Danish doctors, who took part in the postgraduate basic training programmes in 2009. The survey consisted of rating......BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family...... scale and qualitative questions. We used a phenomenological approach. RESULTS: Almost all of the young Danish doctors responding felt that training in general practice is a necessary part of a postgraduate basic training programme. Early training in primary care not only gives doctors a broad...

  8. Antibiotic prescribing in Danish general practice 2004-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Antibiotic consumption in the primary care sector is often perceived as synonymous with consumption in general practice despite the fact that few countries stratify the primary care sector by providers' medical specialty. We aimed to characterize and quantify antibiotic use in Danish...... general practice relative to the entire primary care sector. METHODS: This was a registry-based study including all patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription between July 2004 and June 2013 at a Danish community pharmacy. Antibiotic use was expressed as DDDs and treatments/1000 inhabitants....../day (DIDs and TIDs, respectively) and assessed according to antibiotic spectrum (narrow versus broad) and their anatomical therapeutic classification codes in total as well as in six age groups. RESULTS: The contribution of general practice to the entire antibiotic use in the primary care sector declined...

  9. Social environment and frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A lack of social support is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased effect of prevention. Frequent attenders to primary care are characterised by poorer social conditions than other patients in general practice, but we do not know whether this is due to social...... inequalities in health or whether social factors in themselves determine the use of general practice. AIM: To examine if social factors are associated with frequent attendance in general practice after adjusting for physical and psychological health variables. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based cross...... during the period November 1997-October 1998. A questionnaire about physical, psychological and social factors was sent to the patients. The associations between social factors and frequent attendance were adjusted for physical and psychological health and tendency towards somatisation. RESULTS: A total...

  10. Emergency medicine in the general practice internship in Finnmark county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnålvatn, Kaja Hansen; Ivan, Daniela; Wisborg, Torben

    2017-12-12

    It is preferred that duty doctors in municipal health services participate in call-outs in emergency situations. The frequency of participation has previously been shown to vary. We wanted to examine the newly qualified doctors’ expectations and experiences – both before and after the general practice internship – of emergency medicine and ambulance call-outs. All 23 of the interns who were to undertake their general practice internship in Finnmark county in the period 2015–16 answered a questionnaire and participated in a focus group interview before the start of the internship. Twenty-one of the interns participated in the focus group interview after completing the internship. Each doctor took part in two interviews. We analysed the transcripts from the focus group interviews using the grounded theory method. The responses from the questionnaire before the general practice internship showed that the interns felt they needed more training in intravenous cannulation and in teamwork. Their expectations in connection with the challenges of call-outs are best characterised by the core category ‘Can I do anything useful?’ from the focus groups before the internship. After the internship, however, the core category ‘It all went well in the end’, was the best fit. Due to short transport times and their knowledge of certain patients, some of the doctors chose not to take part in call-outs. During the general practice internship, the interns were initially anxious about whether they might be superfluous in call-outs, but eventually found their footing in the call-out role. The study shows that there is a need for more practice in certain practical procedures, and that doctors’ non-technical skills need to be improved. This can be done through training in team leader roles before the general practice internship.

  11. Practical Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy for the General Equine Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneps, Andris J

    2016-04-01

    Physical treatment and rehabilitation play major roles in recovery and maintenance of the equine athlete, and many therapeutic measures are accessible by the veterinarian in general practice. An accurate diagnosis of the condition undergoing treatment is a requirement, and measurable parameters obtained at diagnosis allows for quantification of treatment outcomes. Therapeutic modalities accessible to the general practicing veterinarian are reviewed. Mechanisms of action, indications, and treatment protocols of thermal therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, extracorporeal shock wave, and laser are discussed. Manipulative therapies, including stretching and use of core strengthening exercises and equipment, are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolter, R.; Freund, T.; Ledig, T.; Boll, B.; Szecsenyi, J.; Roos, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the

  13. Discourse analysis in general practice: a sociolinguistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessa, J; Malterud, K

    1990-06-01

    It is a simple but important fact that as general practitioners we talk to our patients. The quality of the conversation is of vital importance for the outcome of the consultation. The purpose of this article is to discuss a methodological tool borrowed from sociolinguistics--discourse analysis. To assess the suitability of this method for analysis of general practice consultations, the authors have performed a discourse analysis of one single consultation. Our experiences are presented here.

  14. Towards a rationalization of counselling in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Nancy; Irving, Jill

    1984-01-01

    While there is good evidence to show that counselling may be beneficial to those patients in general practice with non-organic problems, deployment of the available resources lacks standardization and rationalization. The Counselling in Medical Settings Working Party of the British Association for Counselling is pressing for standardized training and accreditation of counsellors so that general practitioners will feel more confident about taking on workers who will ultimately be incorporated into the NHS team. PMID:6512752

  15. Focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible in the general practice setting and alters diagnosis and management of cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Yates

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound-assisted examination of the cardiovascular system with focused cardiac ultrasound by the treating physician is non-invasive and changes diagnosis and management of patient’s with suspected cardiac disease. This has not been reported in a general practice setting. Aim: To determine whether focused cardiac ultrasound performed on patients aged over 50 years changes the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease by a general practitioner. Design and setting: A prospective observational study of 80 patients aged over 50 years and who had not received echocardiography or chest CT within 12 months presenting to a general practice. Method: Clinical assessment and management of significant cardiac disorders in patients presenting to general practitioners were recorded before and after focused cardiac ultrasound. Echocardiography was performed by a medical student with sufficient training, which was verified by an expert. Differences in diagnosis and management between conventional and ultrasound-assisted assessment were recorded. Results and conclusion: Echocardiography and interpretation were acceptable in all patients. Significant cardiac disease was detected in 16 (20% patients, including aortic stenosis in 9 (11% and cardiac failure in 7 (9%, which were missed by clinical examination in 10 (62.5% of these patients. Changes in management occurred in 12 patients (15% overall and 75% of those found to have significant cardiac disease including referral for diagnostic echocardiography in 8 (10%, commencement of heart failure treatment in 3 (4% and referral to a cardiologist in 1 patient (1%. Routine focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible and frequently alters the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease in patients aged over 50 years presenting to a general practice.

  16. Open Access to General Practice Was Associated with Burnout among General Practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Walk-in open access in general practice may influence the general practitioner's (GP's) work, but very little research has been done on the consequences. In this study from Danish general practice, we compare the prevalence of burnout between GPs with a walk-in open access and those without....... In a questionnaire study (2004), we approached all 458 active GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, and 376 (82.8%) GPs returned the questionnaire. Walk-in open access was defined as at least 30 minutes every weekday where patients could attend practice without an appointment. Burnout was measured by the Maslach...... Burnout Inventory. Analyses using logistic regression were adjusted for gender, age, marital status, job satisfaction, minutes per consultation, practice organisation, working hours, number of listed patients per GP, number of contacts per GP, continuing medical education- (CME-) activities, and clusters...

  17. Nutrition Counselling Practices among General Practitioners in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumic, Albina; Mujkic, Aida; Miskulin, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases are a significant public health problem and imbalanced nutrition is one of the most significant risk factor for them. The objective of this study was to examine Croatia’s general practitioners’ nutrition counselling practice and determine the factors that influence such practice. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 444 (17.0%) randomly selected general practitioners (GPs) in Croatia from May to July 2013 via a 32-item anonymous questionnaire. Study showed that 77.0% of participants had provided nutrition counselling exclusively to patients with specific health risks; 18.7% participants had provided nutrition counselling for all patients, regardless of their individual risks, while 4.3% had not provide nutrition counselling. As the most significant stimulating factor for implementing nutrition counselling in their daily work with patients, 55.6% of the participants identified personal interest regarding nutrition and the effects it has on health. The latter factor was more frequently emphasized among female general practitioners (p < 0.001) and general practitioners without chronic diseases (p < 0.001). The most significant barrier for nutrition counselling was lack of time (81.6%). It is necessary to make additional efforts to increase the frequency of nutrition counselling provided by general practitioners in Croatia. The majority of Croatian general practitioners could increase their nutrition counselling practice in order to promote balanced nutrition and improve the overall health status of their patients. PMID:29207514

  18. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Jones J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. AIM: To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. METHODS: A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. RESULTS: The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. DISCUSSION: Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  19. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Jones, Joseph; Lucas, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  20. Self-referral psychological treatment centre for young adults: a 2-year observational evaluation of routine practice before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halje, Karin; Timpka, Toomas; Tylestedt, Petra; Adler, Anna-Karin; Fröberg, Lena; Schyman, Tommy; Johansson, Kristoffer; Dahl, Katarina

    2015-08-17

    To examine a self-referral psychological service provided to young adults with regard to effects on anxiety, depression and psychological distress and to explore client factors predicting non-adherence and non-response. Observational study over a 2-year period. Young Adults Centre providing psychological services by self-referral (preprimary care) to Linköping, Åtvidaberg, and Kinda municipalities (combined population 145,000) in Östergötland county, Sweden. 607 young adults (16-25 years of age); 71% females (n=429). Individually scheduled cognitive behavioural therapy delivered in up to six 45 min sessions structured according to an assessment of the client's mental health problems: anxiety, depression, anxiety and depression combined, or decreased distress without specific anxiety or depression. Pre-post intervention changes in psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire-12, GHQ-12), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Anxiety/Depression (HADS-A/D). 192 clients (32.5%) discontinued the intervention on their own initiative and 39 clients (6.6%) were referred to a psychiatric clinic during the course of the intervention. Intention-to-treat analyses including all clients showed a medium treatment effect size (d=0.64) with regard to psychological distress, and small effect sizes were observed with regard to anxiety (d=0.58) and depression (d=0.57). Restricting the analyses to clients who adhered to the agreed programme, a large effect size (d=1.26) was observed with regard to psychological distress, and medium effect sizes were observed with regard to anxiety (d=1.18) and depression (d=1.19). Lower age and a high initial HADS-A score were the strongest risk factors for non-adherence, and inability to concentrate and thinking of oneself as a worthless person increased the risk for discontinuation. We conclude that provision of psychological services to young people through a self-referral centre has potential to improve long-term mental health in

  1. NHS health checks through general practice: randomised trial of population cardiovascular risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cochrane Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global burden of the major vascular diseases is projected to rise and to remain the dominant non-communicable disease cluster well into the twenty first century. The Department of Health in England has developed the NHS Health Check service as a policy initiative to reduce population vascular disease risk. The aims of this study were to monitor population changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors over the first year of the new service and to assess the value of tailored lifestyle support, including motivational interview with ongoing support and referral to other services. Methods Randomised trial comparing NHS Health Check service only with NHS Health Check service plus additional lifestyle support in Stoke on Trent, England. Thirty eight general practices and 601 (365 usual care, 236 additional lifestyle support patients were recruited and randomised independently between September 2009 and February 2010. Changes in population CVD risk between baseline and one year follow-up were compared, using intention-to-treat analysis. The primary outcome was the Framingham 10 year CVD risk score. Secondary outcomes included individual modifiable risk measures and prevalence of individual risk categories. Additional lifestyle support included referral to a lifestyle coach and free sessions as needed for: weight management, physical activity, cook and eat and positive thinking. Results Average population CVD risk decreased from 32.9% to 29.4% (p Conclusions The NHS Health Check service in Stoke on Trent resulted in significant reduction in estimated population CVD risk. There was no evidence of further benefit of the additional lifestyle support services in terms of absolute CVD risk reduction.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitioners in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practice of general practicioners (GP's) in the Free State regarding the management of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Methods: Four hundred and nineteen GP's were identified in the Free State. Each GP was ...

  3. Respiratory Diseases in Children: studies in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis covers various aspects of the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of various respiratory symptoms and diseases in children frequently encountered in general practice. These respiratory tract symptoms and diseases can be categorized into symptoms and

  4. Nontraumatic Knee Complaints in Adults in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Belo (Janneke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn general practice, knee complaints (traumatic and nontraumatic) take second place after back pain in the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (19/1000 patients per year), mostly presented as knee pain or functional loss of the knee joint. Of these complaints, approximately 20% are

  5. Identification of depression in a rural general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    major depression. The study confirmed both the high prevalence of depression in a rural general practice and its low identification rate. It also showed the advantage of using a screening ... will, for example, not be suspected in young unmarried men as often as ... ~ere recorded for children 16 years and younger; and (iiJ) if.

  6. Digital Competence: general problems and experimental practices concerning highschools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gris

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current social context Information and Communication Technologies (ICT are more and more present and pervasive and the European institutions enter the Digital Competence in the Key Competences for Lifelong Learning. In this focus we are deepened the general problems of Digital Competence and competence-based education and to describe experimental practices concerning highschools.

  7. Management of bibliographic information by Dutch researchers in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, AAH; Jong, BMD

    Background. As a result of changes in information technology and the rapid growth of publications methods of searching the literature have changed. Systematic searching of the growing literature has become very important. It is not known whether researchers in general practice search systematically,

  8. Nutritional deficiency in general practice: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Laar, van de F.A.; Weel, van C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Binsbergen, van J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Nutritional deficiency is an independent risk factor for mortality. Despite its clinical relevance, the prevalence in a primary care setting is poorly documented. We performed a systematic review of reported prevalence and clinical assessment of nutritional deficiency in general practice.

  9. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of General Medical Practitioners In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    This study aims to access the knowledge, attitude and practice of general medical practitioner in Port. Harcourt toward the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Methods: A questionnaire survey was carried out on two hundred and twenty four private medical practitioners in. Port Harcourt. Data management was ...

  10. Sustainability economics – general versus specific, and conceptual versus practical

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Baumgärtner; Martin F. Quaas

    2010-01-01

    We clarify the definition and interpretation of 'sustainability economics' (Baumgärtner and Quaas 2010) in response to recent comments by van den Bergh (2010), Bartelmus (2010) and others. For that sake, we distinguish between general and specific definitions of sustainability and sustainability economics, as well as between conceptual and practical approaches.

  11. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  12. The South African Stroke Risk in General Practice Study | Connor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred general practices were randomly selected from lists provided by pharmaceutical .representatives. Each GP approached 50 consecutive patients aged 30 years and older. Patients completed an information sheet and the GP documented the patient's risk factors. The resulting sample is relevant.if not necessarily ...

  13. Prognostic Factors in Adults With Knee Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Methods. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a

  14. Patients' view on screening for depression in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittkampf, K. A.; van Zwieten, M.; Smits, F. Th; Schene, A. H.; Huyser, J.; van Weert, H. C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. In general practice, depression is often not recognized. As treatment of depression is effective, screening has been proposed as one solution to combat this 'hidden morbidity'. The results of screening programmes for depression, however, are inconsistent and most studies do not show a

  15. Prognostic factors for neck pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan L.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; van der Windt, Daniëlle; Koes, Bart W.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic studies on neck pain are scarce and are typically restricted to short-term follow-up only. In this prospective cohort study, indicators of short- and long-term outcomes of neck pain were identified that can easily be measured in general practice. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age,

  16. The quality and outcomes framework: QOF - transforming general practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillam, Stephen; Siriwardena, Aloysius Niroshan

    2011-01-01

    ... comprehensive scheme of its kind in the world. Champions claim the QOF advances the quality of primary care; detractors fear the end of general practice as we know it. The introduction of the QOF provides a unique opportunity for research, analysis and re ection. This book is the rst comprehensive analysis of the impact of the QOF, examining the claims and counter-claims ...

  17. 19 CFR 177.1 - General ruling practice and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authority to represent is known, any person appearing before the Customs Service as an agent in connection... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General ruling practice and definitions. 177.1 Section 177.1 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  18. Identifying practice-related factors for high-volume prescribers of antibiotics in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert; Sandholdt, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: In Denmark, general practice is responsible for 75% of antibiotic prescribing in the primary care sector. We aimed to identify practice-related factors associated with high prescribers, including prescribers of critically important antibiotics as defined by WHO, after accounting for c...... underuse or overuse of diagnostic tests in general practice as well as organizational factors were associated with high-prescribing practices. Furthermore, the choice of antibiotic type seemed less rational among high prescribers.......Objectives: In Denmark, general practice is responsible for 75% of antibiotic prescribing in the primary care sector. We aimed to identify practice-related factors associated with high prescribers, including prescribers of critically important antibiotics as defined by WHO, after accounting...... for case mix by practice. Methods: We performed a nationwide register-based survey of antibiotic prescribing in Danish general practice from 2012 to 2013. The unit of analysis was the individual practice. We used multivariable regression analyses and an assessment of relative importance to identify...

  19. Participatory design of a preliminary safety checklist for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Ferguson, Julie; MacLeod, Marion; Kennedy, Susan; de Wet, Carl; McNab, Duncan; Kelly, Moya; McKay, John; Atkinson, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The use of checklists to minimise errors is well established in high reliability, safety-critical industries. In health care there is growing interest in checklists to standardise checking processes and ensure task completion, and so provide further systemic defences against error and patient harm. However, in UK general practice there is limited experience of safety checklist use. To identify workplace hazards that impact on safety, health and wellbeing, and performance, and codesign a standardised checklist process. Application of mixed methods to identify system hazards in Scottish general practices and develop a safety checklist based on human factors design principles. A multiprofessional 'expert' group (n = 7) and experienced front-line GPs, nurses, and practice managers (n = 18) identified system hazards and developed and validated a preliminary checklist using a combination of literature review, documentation review, consensus building workshops using a mini-Delphi process, and completion of content validity index exercise. A prototype safety checklist was developed and validated consisting of six safety domains (for example, medicines management), 22 sub-categories (for example, emergency drug supplies) and 78 related items (for example, stock balancing, secure drug storage, and cold chain temperature recording). Hazards in the general practice work system were prioritised that can potentially impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of patients, GP team members, and practice performance, and a necessary safety checklist prototype was designed. However, checklist efficacy in improving safety processes and outcomes is dependent on user commitment, and support from leaders and promotional champions. Although further usability development and testing is necessary, the concept should be of interest in the UK and internationally. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  20. Prevalence of supporting limb laminitis in a UK equine practice and referral hospital setting between 2005 and 2013: implications for future epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, C E; Newton, J R; Bathe, A P; Payne, R J

    2015-01-17

    The electronic patient records of all equine patients of Rossdales Equine Practice between January 1, 2005 and November 1, 2013 were reviewed to determine the number of cases of supporting limb laminitis (SLL) in a large equine practice and referral hospital setting in the UK and to discuss the implications for future epidemiological studies. The clinical notes were searched electronically for a combination of 'laminitis AND (contralateral OR supporting OR overload OR weight bearing)'. The prevalence of SLL within each identified denominator population and the corresponding 95% CI were calculated. SLL developed in nine horses, one donkey and one pony. Thoroughbreds were the most commonly affected breed (72.7 per cent, CI 46.4 to 99.1 per cent), aged 2-14 years (median six years), and only mares (n=9) and stallions (n=2) were represented. SLL was not restricted to horses that were non-weightbearing lame, it developed within 4-100 days after injury (median 14.5 days) and occurred most commonly in a forelimb (54.6 per cent, CI 25.1 to 84.0 per cent). During the same time frame, a total of 65,327 horses were registered with Rossdales Equine Practice, resulting in an overall practice prevalence of SLL of 0.02 per cent (CI 0.01 to 0.03 per cent). Future epidemiological studies to investigate risk factors for SLL prevention will, therefore, be a logistical challenge. British Veterinary Association.

  1. Electrocardiogram interpretation in general practice: relevance to prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, W A; Saltissi, S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess, in the context of their possible role in prehospital thrombolysis, the ability of general practitioners to recognise acute transmural myocardial ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram. DESIGN--150 doctors (every fifth name) were selected from the alphabetical list of 750 on Merseyside general practitioner register and without prior warning were asked to interpret a series of six 12 lead electrocardiograms. Three of these showed acute transmural ischaemia/infarction, one was normal, and two showed non-acute abnormalities. Details of doctors' ages, postgraduate training, and clinical practice were sought. SETTING--General practitioners' surgeries and postgraduate centres within the Merseyside area. PARTICIPANTS--106 general practitioners (mean age 45 years) agreed to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Accuracy of general practitioners' interpretations of the six electrocardiograms. RESULTS--82% of general practitioners correctly recognised a normal electrocardiogram. Recognition of acute abnormalities was less reliable. Between 33% and 61% correctly identified acute transmural ischaemia/infarction depending on the specific trace presented. Accurate localisation of the site of the infarct was achieved only by between 8% and 30% of participants, while between 22% and 25% correctly interpreted non-acute abnormalities. Neither routine use of electrocardiography nor postgraduate hospital experience in general medicine was associated with significantly greater expertise. CONCLUSION--The current level of proficiency of a sample of general practitioners in the Merseyside area in recognising acute transmural ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram suggests that refresher training is needed if general practitioners are to give prehospital thrombolysis. Images PMID:8398491

  2. Selection of deep brain stimulation candidates in private neurology practices: referral may be simpler than a computerized triage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Genko; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Jones, Jacob D; Swartz, Camille; Merritt, Stacy; Unger, Richard; Hubmann, Monica; Delgado, Alain; Simon, Ely; Doniger, Glen M; Bowers, Dawn; Foote, Kelly D; Fernandez, Hubert H; Okun, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare a computerized deep brain stimulation (DBS) screening module (Comparing Private Practice vs. Academic Centers in Selection of DBS Candidates [COMPRESS], NeuroTrax Corp., Bellaire, TX, USA) with traditional triage by a movement disorders specialized neurologist as the gold standard. The COMPRESS consists of a combination of the Florida Surgical Questionnaire for Parkinson disease (FLASQ-PD), a cognitive assessment battery provided by MindStreams® (NeuroTrax Corp.), and the Geriatric Depression Scale and the Zung Anxiety Self-Assessment Scale. COMPRESS resulted in the classification of patients into three categories: "optimal candidate,"probable candidate," and "not a good candidate." Similar categorical ratings made by a referring private practice neurologist and by a trained movement disorders specialist were compared with the ratings generated by COMPRESS. A total of 19 subjects with Parkinson's disease were enrolled from five private neurological practices. The clinical impressions of the private practice neurologist vs. those of the movement disorders specialist were in agreement approximately half the time (10/19 cases). The movement disorders specialist and COMPRESS agreed on 15/19 cases. A further comparison between outcomes from the entire COMPRESS module and the FLASQ-PD questionnaire by itself resulted in high agreement (18/19 cases in agreement). The COMPRESS agreed with an in-person evaluation by a movement disorders neurologist approximately 80% of the time. The computerized COMPRESS did not provide any screening advantage over the short FLASQ-PD paper questionnaire. Larger studies will be needed to assess the utility and cost effectiveness of this computerized triage method for DBS. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. Method During one calendar year, 195 general practitioners in 104 practices in the Netherlands registered all their patient contacts. This study was performed by the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL in 2001. Of 82,053 children aged 0 to 18 years, the following variables were collected: number of episodes per patient, number of contacts per episode, month of the year in which the diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made, age, gender, urbanisation level, drug prescription and referral. Results The overall incidence rate was 19 episodes per 1000 person years. The incidence rate in girls was 8 times as high as in boys. The incidence rate in smaller cities and rural areas was 2 times as high as in the three largest cities. Throughout the year, incidence rates varied with a decrease in summertime for children at the age of 0 to 12 years. Of the prescriptions, 66% were in accordance with current guidelines, but only 18% of the children who had an indication were actually referred. Conclusion This study shows that incidence rates of urinary tract infections are not only related to gender and season, but also to urbanisation. General practitioners in the Netherlands frequently do not follow the clinical guidelines for urinary tract infections, especially with respect to referral.

  4. Prevalence of STI related consultations in general practice: results from the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, J.E.A.M. van; Kerssens, J.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Sandfort, T.G.; Coenen, T.J.; Bindels, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The role of the GP in the care of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is unclear.Aim:We studied the prevalence of STI related consultations in Dutch general practice in order to obtain insight into the contribution of the GP in STI control.Design of study: A descriptive

  5. Prevalence of STI related consultations in general practice: results from the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; Kerssens, Jan J.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Sandfort, Theo G.; Coenen, Ton J.; Bindels, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of the GP in the care of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is unclear.Aim:We studied the prevalence of STI related consultations in Dutch general practice in order to obtain insight into the contribution of the GP in STI control. DESIGN OF STUDY: A descriptive study.

  6. Open Access to General Practice Was Associated with Burnout among General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedsted, Peter; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Walk-in open access in general practice may influence the general practitioner's (GP's) work, but very little research has been done on the consequences. In this study from Danish general practice, we compare the prevalence of burnout between GPs with a walk-in open access and those without. In a questionnaire study (2004), we approached all 458 active GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, and 376 (82.8%) GPs returned the questionnaire. Walk-in open access was defined as at least 30 minutes every weekday where patients could attend practice without an appointment. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Analyses using logistic regression were adjusted for gender, age, marital status, job satisfaction, minutes per consultation, practice organisation, working hours, number of listed patients per GP, number of contacts per GP, continuing medical education- (CME-) activities, and clusters of GPs. In all, 8% of GPs had open access and the prevalence of burnout was 24%. GPs with walk-in open access were more likely to suffer from burnout. Having open access was associated with a 3-fold increased likelihood of burnout (OR = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.1-8.8, P = 0.035)). Although the design cannot establish causality, it is recommended to closely monitor possible negative consequences of open access in general practice.

  7. Prevalence of STI related consultations in general practice: results from the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Jan EAM; Kerssens, Jan J; Schellevis, Francois G; Sandfort, Theo G; Coenen, Ton J; Bindels, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background The role of the GP in the care of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is unclear. Aim We studied the prevalence of STI related consultations in Dutch general practice in order to obtain insight into the contribution of the GP in STI control. Design of study A descriptive study. Setting The study took place within the framework of the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2001, a large nationally representative population-based survey. Method During 1 year, data of all patient contacts with the participating GPs were recorded in electronic medical records. Contacts for the same health problem were clustered into disease episodes and their diagnosis coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care. All STI and STI related episodes were analysed. Results In total, 1 524 470 contacts of 375 899 registered persons in 104 practices were registered during 1 year and 2460 STI related episodes were found. The prevalence rate of STI was 39 per 10 000 persons and of STI/HIV related questions 23 per 10 000. More than half of all STIs were found in highly urbanised areas and STIs were overrepresented in deprived areas. Three quarters of all STIs diagnosed in the Netherlands are made in general practice. An important number of other reproductive health visits in general practice offer opportunities for meaningful STI counselling and tailored prevention. Discussion GPs contribute significantly to STI control, see the majority of patients with STI related symptoms and questions and are an important player in STI care. In particular, GPs in urban areas and inner-city practices should be targeted for accelerated sexual health programmes. PMID:16464323

  8. Is the Current Management of Patients Presenting With Spinal Trauma to District General Hospitals Fit for Purpose? Our Experience of Delivering a Spinal Service Using an Electronic Referral Platform in a Large District General Teaching Hospital Without Onsite Spinal Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel S; Marynissen, Hans

    2018-04-12

    A retrospective cross-sectional analysis. To describe the provision of a spinal service using an electronic platform to direct management from an external spinal unit, and quantify time taken to obtain definitive management plans whilst under prescribed spinal immobilization. Most attending district general hospitals following spinal trauma will have stable injuries and normal neurology, with only a small proportion requiring urgent transfer to a specialist centre. A retrospective review of 104 patients admitted following vertebral during a 12-month period. The British Orthopaedic Association Standards for Trauma consensus that "spinal immobilisation is not recommended for more than 48 hours" was the standard of care measured against. 100 patients occupied a total of 975 hospital inpatient bed days. 117 radiological investigations were requested after the point of external referral (47 CT-scans, 37 MRI-scans, and 33 weight bearing radiographs). The period between initial referral to the regional spinal service and then receiving a definitive final management had a median value of 72 hours and a range of 0 - 33 days. Patients will have been under some form of prescribed spinal immobilisation until the definitive management plan was communicated. 34 patients (34% of the overall cohort) had a definitive management plan in place within 48 hours. 80 patients had vertebral injuries (73 stable, 6 unstable), 3 patients had prolapsed intervertebral disks, 1 had metastatic disease, and 17 had not evidence of an acute injury following evaluation. Patients are being placed under prescribed immobilisation for longer than is recommended. Delays in obtaining radiological imaging were an important factor, together with the time taken to receive a definitive management plan. Limitations in social care provision and delays in arranging this were additional barriers to hospital discharge following the final management plan. 4.

  9. The General Practice Assessment Survey (GPAS): tests of data quality and measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, J; Campbell, J L; Schroter, S; Green, J; Roland, M

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the psychometric properties of the General Practice Assessment Survey (GPAS) and its acceptability to patients in the UK. GPAS comprises seven multiple item scales and two single item scales addressing nine key areas of primary care activity (access, technical care, communication, inter-personal care, trust, knowledge of patient, nursing care, receptionists and continuity of care). A further four single items relate to patients' perceptions of the GP's role in referral and co-ordination of care, their willingness to recommend their GP and their overall satisfaction with care received. Two hundred consecutive patients attending routine consulting sessions at 55 inner London practices were invited to complete the GPAS questionnaire. The acceptability, reliability and validity of GPAS was assessed using standard psychometric techniques. Out of 11 000 patients, 7247 (66%) completed a questionnaire in a GP surgery. Fifty-five out of a separate sample of 77 patients attending one practice completed a second questionnaire mailed to them 1 week following their attendance. GPAS was acceptable to patients as evidenced by low proportions of missing data for all items, and a full range of possible scores for all but one of the nine scales. Reliability of the instrument was good. Multiple item scales had excellent internal consistency, high item-total correlations, and test-retest reliability. Scaling assumptions were confirmed, with six of the seven scales achieving 100% scaling success (convergent and discriminant validity). Construct validity was evident, although this requires further evaluation against external measures. GPAS is a useful instrument for assessing several important dimensions of primary care. It is acceptable, reliable and valid, and has the potential for versatility in mode of administration. It will be a useful instrument for practices, primary care groups and primary care researchers evaluating key areas of primary

  10. Residents' experience of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) as a clinical tool following practical application: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemence, A Jill; Balkoski, Victoria I; Lee, Minsun; Poston, John; Schaefer, Bianca M; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M; Bromley, Nicole; Lukowitsky, Mark; Pieterse, Portia; Antonikowski, Angela; Hamilton, Christopher J; Hall, Schekeva; Glick, Stanley D

    2016-01-01

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), an evidence-based validated system for providing early detection and brief treatment of substance use disorders, has been widely used in the training of medical residents across specialties at a number of sites. This article investigates the effectiveness of SBIRT training during short-term follow-up at Albany Medical Center, one of the initial Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grantees. Training outcomes were measured by training satisfaction following opportunities to apply SBIRT skills in clinical work, the rate at which these techniques were applied in clinical work, and the degree to which residents felt that the SBIRT training provided skills that were applicable to their practice. We examined differences in learning experience by postgraduate year and by program, and conducted a qualitative analysis in a convergent parallel mixed-methods design to elucidate barriers encountered by residents upon using SBIRT techniques in clinical practice. Residents remained highly satisfied with the training at 4-month follow-up, with 80.1% reporting that they had used SBIRT skills in their clinical work. Use of SBIRT techniques was high at 6-month follow-up as well, with 85.9% of residents reporting that they regularly screened their patients for substance use, 74.4% reporting that they had applied brief intervention techniques, and 78.2% indicating that SBIRT training had made them overall more effective in helping patients with substance use issues. Differences in application rates and satisfaction were found by specialty. Qualitative analyses indicated that residents encountered patient readiness and specific contextual factors, such as time constraints, externally imposed values, and clinical norms, as barriers to implementation. Despite encountering obstacles such as time constraints and patient readiness, residents utilized many of the skills they had learned during

  11. Evaluating the referral preferences and consultation requests of primary care physicians with otolaryngology - head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John R; Wong, Eric; Sowerby, Leigh J

    2015-12-29

    No literature exists which examines referral preferences to, or the consultation process with, Otolaryngology. In a recent Canadian Medical Association nation-wide survey of General Practitioners and Family Physicians, Otolaryngology was listed as the second-most problematic specialty for referrals. The purpose of this study was to learn about and improve upon the referral process between primary care physicians (PCPs) and Otolaryngology at an academic centre in Southwestern Ontario. PCPs who actively refer patients to Otolaryngology within the catchment area of Western University were asked to complete a short paper-based questionnaire. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A total of 50 PCPs were surveyed. Subspecialty influenced 90.0% of the referrals made. Specialist wait times altered 58.0% of referrals. All PCPs preferred to communicate via fax. Half of those surveyed wanted clinical notes from every encounter. Seventy-four percent of respondents wanted inappropriate referrals forwarded to the proper specialist automatically. Twenty-two percent of those surveyed were satisfied with current wait times. A central referral system was favored by 74% of PCPs. Improvements could help streamline the referral and consultation practices with Otolaryngology in Southwestern Ontario. A central referral system and reduction in the frequency of consultative reports can be considered.

  12. A qualitative study of referral to community mental health teams in the UK: exploring the rhetoric and the reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Mairi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generic community mental health teams (CMHTs currently deliver specialist mental health care in England. Policy dictates that CMHTs focus on those patients with greatest need but it has proved difficult to establish consistent referral criteria. The aim of this study was to explore the referral process from the perspectives of both the referrers and the CMHTs. Methods Qualitative study nested in a randomised controlled trial. Interviews with general practitioner (GP referrers, CMHT Consultant Psychiatrists and team leaders. Taping of referral allocation meetings. Results There was a superficial agreement between the referrers and the referred to on the function of the CMHT, but how this was operationalised in practice resulted in a lack of clarity over the referral process, with tensions apparent between the views of the referrers (GPs and the CMHT team leaders, and between team members. The process of decision-making within the team was inconsistent with little discussion of, or reflection on, the needs of the referred patient. Conclusion CMHTs describe struggling to deal with GPs who are perceived as having variable expertise in managing patients with mental health problems. CMHT rhetoric about defined referral criteria is interpreted flexibly with CMHT managers and Psychiatrists concentrating on their own capacity, roles and responsibilities with limited consideration of the primary care perspective or the needs of the referred patient. Trial Registration number ISRCTN86197914

  13. The purpose of the general practice consultation from the patients perspective - theoretical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Hanne; Witt, Klaus; Malterud, Kirsti

    2001-01-01

    Consultation purposes, general practice, patients´expectations, patients satosfaction, patientcenteredness......Consultation purposes, general practice, patients´expectations, patients satosfaction, patientcenteredness...

  14. Clinical indications for antibiotic use in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    of antibiotic prescriptions per 1000 inhabitants by age and gender. Logistic regression analysis estimated the association between patient and provider factors and missing clinical indications on antibiotic prescriptions. Results: A total of 2.381.083 systemic antibiotic prescriptions were issued by Danish......Objective: To assess the availability and applicability of clinical indications from electronic prescriptions on antibiotic use in Danish general practice. Design: Retrospective cohort register-based study including the Danish National Prescription Register. Setting: Population-based study...... of routine electronic antibiotic prescriptions from Danish general practice. Subjects: All 975,626 patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription at outpatient pharmacies during the 1-year study period (July 2012 to June 2013). Main outcome measures: Number of prescriptions per clinical indication. Number...

  15. Management of COPD in general practice in Denmark--participating in an educational program substantially improves adherence to guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Hansen, Ejvind Frausing; Jensen, Michael Skov

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The general practitioner (GP) is the first contact with the health care system for most patients with COPD in Denmark. We studied, if participating in an educational program could improve adherence to guidelines, not least for diagnosis, staging, and treatment of the disease....... DESIGN AND SETTING: Two cross-sectional surveys were performed precisely one year apart before and after an educational program for the participating GPs. A total of 124 GPs completed the study; 1716 and 1342 patients with GP-diagnosed COPD and no concomitant asthma, respectively, were included...... activity, and referral for rehabilitation; use of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with mild COPD (FEV(1) > 80%pred) declined from 76% to 45%. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis and management of COPD in general practice in Denmark is not according to guidelines, but substantial improvements can be achieved...

  16. Musculoskeletal education in general practice: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, E M; Walker, D J; Coady, D A

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal education in primary care has previously been shown, in 1995, to be inadequate [1]. The aims of this study were to evaluate the current musculoskeletal education and skills during vocational training for general practice and to see if progress has been made. Questionnaires were sent to General Practice Registrars, in general practice attachments in June 2004. Four UK General Practice Deaneries participated (Northern, Mersey, Yorkshire and Wessex). Questionnaires were received from 251 (44 %) registrars. Of the responders, only 77 % reported receiving specific clinical rheumatology teaching at medical school and 30 % had not received any tutorials on musculoskeletal conditions during their vocational training. Of the registrars, 16 % reported having completed a rheumatology post, and an additional 19 % had been able to attend rheumatology outpatient clinics; 70 % of the registrars had injected or aspirated the knee although less than half of these (22 %) had done this in a primary care setting. Lack of experience was associated with low confidence at knowing when to perform the injection and with performing the injection itself. A significant proportion of registrars reported being pre-dominantly self-taught for performing injections (soft tissue = 10.7 %, joint injections = 8.7 %) and for the management of shoulder pain (20.1 %). Registrars rated their overall musculoskeletal training as inadequate. Primary care musculoskeletal education remains inadequate and needs to be improved to enable registrars to be confident in managing a significant proportion of their workload. Identifying learning needs for primary care would inform future educational interventions.

  17. A multifaceted implementation strategy versus passive implementation of low back pain guidelines in general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Riis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines are often slowly adapted into clinical practice. However, actively supporting healthcare professionals in evidence-based treatment may speed up guideline implementation. Danish low back pain (LBP guidelines focus on primary care treatment of LBP, to reduce referrals from primary care to secondary care. The primary aim of this project was to reduce secondary care referral within 12 weeks by a multifaceted implementation strategy (MuIS. Methods In a cluster randomised design, 189 general practices from the North Denmark Region were invited to participate. Practices were randomised (1:1 and stratified by practice size to MuIS (28 practices or a passive implementation strategy (PaIS; 32 practices. Included were patients with LBP aged 18 to 65 years who were able to complete questionnaires, had no serious underlying pathology, and were not pregnant. We developed a MuIS including outreach visits, quality reports, and the STarT Back Tool for subgrouping patients with LBP. Both groups were offered the usual dissemination of guidelines, guideline-concordant structuring of the medical record, and a new referral opportunity for patients with psycho-social problems. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the primary and secondary outcomes pertained to the patient, and a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a healthcare sector perspective. Patients and the assessment of outcomes were blinded. Practices and caregivers delivering the interventions were not blinded. Results Between January 2013 and July 2014, 60 practices were included, of which 54 practices (28 MuIS, 26 PaIS included 1101 patients (539 MuIS, 562 PaIS. Follow-up data for the primary outcome were available on 100 % of these patients. Twenty-seven patients (5.0 % in the MuIS group were referred to secondary care vs. 59 patients (10.5 % in the PaIS group. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR was 0.52 [95 % CI 0.30 to 0.90; p = 0.020]. The MuIS was cost

  18. Outcomes of implants and restorations placed in general dental practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, John D.; Kazimiroff, Julie; Papas, Athena; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Vena, Donald A.; Wu, Hongyu; Collie, Damon; Craig, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The authors conducted a study to determine the types, outcomes, risk factors and esthetic assessment of implants and their restorations placed in the general practices of a practice-based research network. Methods All patients who visited network practices three to five years previously and underwent placement of an implant and restoration within the practice were invited to enroll. Practitioner-investigators (P-Is) recorded the status of the implant and restoration, characteristics of the implant site and restoration, presence of peri-implant pathology and an esthetic assessment by the P-I and patient. The P-Is classified implants as failures if the original implant was missing or had been replaced, the implant was mobile or elicited pain on percussion, there was overt clinical or radiographic evidence of pathology or excessive bone loss (> 0.2 millimeter per year after an initial bone loss of 2 mm). They classified restorations as failures if they had been replaced or if there was abutment or restoration fracture. Results The authors enrolled 922 implants and patients from 87 practices, with a mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 4.2 (0.6) years. Of the 920 implants for which complete data records were available, 64 (7.0 percent) were classified as failures when excessive bone loss was excluded from the analysis. When excessive bone loss was included, 172 implants (18.7 percent) were classified as failures. According to the results of univariate analysis, a history of severe periodontitis, sites with preexisting inflammation or type IV bone, cases of immediate implant placement and placement in the incisor or canine region were associated with implant failure. According to the results of multivariate analysis, sites with preexisting inflammation (odds ratio [OR] = 2.17; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.41–3.34]) or type IV bone (OR = 1.99; 95 percent CI, 1.12–3.55) were associated with a greater risk of implant failure. Of the 908 surviving

  19. Treatment of heart failure in Dutch general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Bosch Wil JHM

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the relation between the prescription rates of selected cardiovascular drugs (ACE-inhibitors and Angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and combinations, sociodemographic factors (age, gender and socioeconomic class and concomitant diseases (hypertension, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular accident, heart valve disease, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and asthma/COPD among patients with heart failure cared for in general practice. Methods Data from the second Dutch National Survey in General Practice, conducted mainly in 2001. In this study the data of 96 practices with a registered patient population of 374.000 were used. Data included diagnosis made during one year by general practitioners, derived from the electronic medical records, prescriptions for medication and sociodemographic characteristics collected via a postal questionnary (response 76% Results A diagnosis of HF was found with 2771 patients (7.1 in 1000. Their mean age was 77.7 years, 68% was 75 years or older, 55% of the patients were women. Overall prescription rates for RAAS-I, beta-blockers and diuretics were 50%, 32%, 86%, respectively, whereas a combination of these three drugs was prescribed in 18%. Variations in prescription rates were mainly related to age and concomitant diseases. Conclusion Prescription is not influenced by gender, to a small degree influenced by socioeconomic status and to a large degree by age and concomitant diseases.

  20. Management of acute rhinosinusitis in Danish general practice: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen JG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Jens Georg HansenDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkPurpose: To evaluate whether the ongoing debate over diagnostic problems and treatment choices for acute rhinosinusitis has had any influence on the management of the disease.Methods: We randomly selected 300 Danish general practitioners (GPs from the files of the Research Unit for General Practice at Aarhus University. Invitations to participate and a questionnaire were sent to the GPs by mail.Results: A total of 149 (49% GPs answered the questionnaire. When asked about symptoms, the highest priority was given to sinus pain and signs of tenderness. The most frequent examinations were objective examination of the ear-nose-throat (ENT, palpation of the maxillofacial area, and C-reactive protein point-of-care testing (or CRP rapid test. Nearly all GPs prescribed local vasoconstrictors, and in 70% of cases, antibiotics were prescribed. Phenoxymethylpenicillin was the preferred antibiotic. Use of the CRP rapid test, years in practice, or employment in an ENT department did not have a significant impact on the diagnostic certainty and antibiotic prescribing rate.Conclusion: The clinical diagnoses are based on a few symptoms, signs, and the CRP rapid test. Other examinations, including imaging techniques, are seldom used. Phenoxymethylpenicillin is the preferred antibiotic, and the GPs' diagnostic certainty was 70%.Keywords: general practice, acute rhinosinusitis, diagnosis, treatment, antibiotic

  1. Detecting autism spectrum disorders in the general practitioner's practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tongerloo, M.A. van; Bor, H.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    It takes considerable time before Autism Spectrum Disorders are diagnosed. Validated diagnostic instruments are available, but not applicable to primary healthcare. By means of a case-control study we investigated whether there were differences in presented complaints and referral patterns between

  2. Structured printed referral letter (form letter; saves time and improves communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P.J.C. Ramanayake

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Referral of patients to hospitals, specialists and other institutions is an essential part of primary health care. Patients are referred to specialists when investigation or therapeutic options are exhausted in primary care or when opinion or advice is needed from them. Referral has considerable implications for patients, health care system and health care costs. Good communication between primary and secondary care is essential for the smooth running of any health care system. Referral and reply letters are the sole means of communication between doctors most of the time and breakdown in communication could lead to poor continuity of care, delayed diagnoses, polypharmacy, increased litigation risk and unnecessary testing. A referral letter also helps to avoid patient dissatisfaction and loss of confidence in family physician. Studies of referral letters have reported that specialists are dissatisfied with their quality and content. Inclusion of letter writing skills in the medical curriculum, peer assessment and feedback have shown to improve the quality of referral letters. . Form letters have shown to enhance information content and communication in referral process. In Sri Lanka referral letters are usually hand written and frequent complaints are that these letters do not contain adequate information and retrieval of information is a problem due to poor legibility and clarity. Sometimes Primary care doctors refer patients to hospitals and specialists with only verbal instructions. To address these short comings this form letter was introduced. Based on the guidelines and systematic review of published articles, items of information to be included were decided. Printed forms of the letter are kept in the practice and the doctor has to just fill up relevant information under each heading. The objectives of introducing this structured referral letter was to improve the quality and standard of referral letters and save time for both general

  3. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Bonney, Andrew

    2012-08-21

    Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms "Community of Practice" (CoP) AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic) AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR "Allied Health"). Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders rather than single company VCoPs. Specific goals are important

  4. Psychiatric conditions and general practitioner attendance prior to HPV vaccination and the risk of referral to a specialized hospital setting because of suspected adverse events following HPV vaccination: a register-based, matched case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lützen TH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tina Hovgaard Lützen,1 Bodil Hammer Bech,2 Jesper Mehlsen,3 Claus Høstrup Vestergaard,1 Lene Wulff Krogsgaard,1 Jørn Olsen,4 Mogens Vestergaard,1 Oleguer Plana-Ripoll,5 Dorte Rytter2 1Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark; 2Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark; 3Coordinating Research Centre, Frederiksberg Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark, 4Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark; 5National Center for Register-based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus V, Denmark Aim: No association between human papilloma virus (HPV vaccination and numerous diseases has been found. Still, a large number of Danish women are reporting suspected adverse events. Other factors may play a role, and the aim of this study is to examine the association between psychiatric conditions, general practitioner (GP attendance and indicators of psychological symptoms prior to HPV vaccination and the risk of referral to an HPV center following vaccination. Study design and setting: Register-based, matched case–control study. Cases were identified from five Danish, regional HPV centers, and health data for cases and controls were obtained from national registries. Participants: Cases were defined as women referred to an HPV center between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 (n=1,496. Each case was matched with five controls on age, region and time of first vaccine registration. The total study population consisted of 8,976 women. Results: Overall, women above 18 years who had been referred to an HPV center were more likely to have used psychiatric medication (odds ratio [OR]: 1.88 [95% CI 1.48–2.40] or to have been hospitalized because of a psychiatric disorder within 5 years prior to the first vaccine registration (OR: 2.13 [95% CI 1.59–2.86]. Specifically, referred women were more likely to have used

  5. Impetigo: incidence and treatment in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001--results from two national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, S; Mohammedamin, R S A; van der Wouden, J C; van Suijlekom-Smit, L W A; Schellevis, F G; Thomas, S

    2006-02-01

    Impetigo is a common skin infection in children. The epidemiology is relatively unknown, and the choice of treatment is subject to debate. The objective of our study was to determine the incidence and treatment of impetigo in Dutch general practice, and to assess trends between 1987 and 2001. We used data from the first (1987) and second (2001) Dutch national surveys of general practice. All diagnoses, prescriptions and referrals were registered by the participating general practitioners (GPs), 161 and 195, respectively. The incidence rate of impetigo increased from 16.5 (1987) to 20.6 (2001) per 1000 person years under 18 years old (P impetigo in the past decade, which may be the result of an increased tendency to seek help, or increased antibiotic resistance and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus. Further microbiological research on the marked regional difference in incidence may contribute to understanding the factors that determine the spread of impetigo. Trends in prescribing for impetigo generally follow evidence-based knowledge on the effectiveness of different therapies, rather than the national practice guideline.

  6. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Methods Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms “Community of Practice” (CoP AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR “Allied Health”. Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. Results The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders

  7. Knowledge, attitude and practice of health-care waste management and associated health risks in the two teaching and referral hospitals in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkonge Njagi, A; Mayabi Oloo, A; Kithinji, J; Magambo Kithinji, J

    2012-12-01

    Hazardous health-care waste poses a great danger to public health and the environment if it is not properly managed. There is need for health-care workers involved in its management to understand the integral link between human health and environmental health. This study was done to identify gaps in knowledge, attitude and practice among the healthcare workers involved in its management hence endangering public health and polluting the environment. A self administered questionnaire was used in both Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret to clinicians, nurses, laboratory technologists and hospital attendants to identify the gaps with a focus on their knowledge, attitude and practice. It was found that health and safety in health-care waste management, was not included in most of the curricula for training the three healthcare professionals. Most of them acquired this through on-job training from seminars and informally through organized talks at work-places. The hospital attendants had also an opportunity to acquire the knowledge through organized training at work places. The training improved the workers' compliance to hepatitis B vaccinations and use of personal protective equipment when handling health-care waste. There was also reduction on injuries from health-care waste. This study therefore concludes that it is necessary for healthcare workers training curricula to include health and safety issues while managing hazardous health-care waste as well as establishes the need for healthcare institutions to conduct continuing education on health and safety in the management of health-care waste.

  8. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  9. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  10. Audit and feedback by medical students to improve the preventive care practices of general practice supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkes, Lucy A; Liira, Helena; Emery, Jon

    Medical students benefit from their contact with clinicians and patients in the clinical setting. However, little is known about whether patients and clinicians also benefit from medical students. We developed an audit and feedback intervention activity to be delivered by medical students to their general practice supervisors. We tested whether the repeated cycle of audit had an effect on the preventive care practices of general practitioners (GPs). The students performed an audit on topics of preventive medicine and gave feedback to their supervisors. Each supervisor in the study had more than one student performing the audit over the academic year. After repetitive cycles of audit and feedback, the recording of social history items by GPs improved. For example, recording alcohol history increased from 24% to 36%. This study shows that medical students can be effective auditors, and their repeated audits may improve their general practice supervisors' recording of some aspects of social history.

  11. [Clerkship in general practice--organized for learning?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, Sarah Frandsen; Braend, Anja Maria Lyche; Lindbaek, Morten

    2008-11-06

    Clerkship in general practice has been considered removed from the fifth year at the University of Oslo for economical reasons. During the autumn 2007, we evaluated the clerkship after the implementation of a new feedback tool, StudPEP. This study presents how the clerkship was organized for learning based on pedagogical advice for effective learning. 79 of 81 students completed a questionnaire regarding the clerkship. After five independent tutor-observed consultations, the students recorded their patients' diagnosis, age and gender, in a total of 363 consultations. The students received eight patients per day on average during their last week of clerkship. On average, they had their own office during 64 % of their clerkship, but 19 % had their own office in less than a third of the time. The tutor observed 42 % of the students during more than six consultations in addition to the five compulsory ones, but 23 % of the students were only observed during the five compulsory sessions. The students were generally content with the feedback from their tutor, but 20 % gave critical answers. The students recorded 167 different diagnoses from all the chapters in the International Classification of Primary Care. The clerkship is well organized for learning medicine in general practice. There is a potential for quality improvement and this article presents suggestions from educational literature.

  12. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-04-01

    Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Prescribing and practice development decision-making in Irish general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, J

    2015-09-01

    In Ireland, primary care is considered the appropriate setting to meet the majority of health and personal social service needs, with GPs central to its provision. Irish general practices are characterised by considerable autonomy in terms of commercial practice and the range of medical services they provide; however, little is known about what influences their decision-making with respect to the adoption of new health-care technologies. The aim of this paper is to provide a holistic overview on prescribing and practice development decision-making in Irish general practices. A summary of recent publications examining the factors influencing the adoption of new drugs, medical equipment and information and communications technology (ICT) by Irish GPs is undertaken. These studies identify experiential learning, connectedness with others, and GP and practice characteristics as significant influences in the adoption of new drugs, medical equipment and ICT in Irish general practices. This summary identifies possible levers for encouraging the adoption of health-care technologies by Irish GPs.

  14. Three years' experience of electrocardiography in a general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, John M.

    1974-01-01

    Electrocardiography has a useful place in general-practice cardiology: (1) by bringing to light unexpected findings thereby altering the diagnostic spectrum and, in some cases at least, management. (2) by acting as a monitor in the continuing management of patients suffering from some forms of cardiovascular disease, and, in particular, from essential hypertension. In 1970 the purchase of a `Cambridge Transrite' 4-2 battery two-speed electrocardiograph made it possible to test the value of this working tool in a practice population of about 5,300 patients. Before this, members of the medical staff of the Department who needed electrocardiograms for any of their patients made the appointments with the Cardiology Department, The Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, or, later, with the nearby Family Doctor Centre of the Scottish Home and Health Department. PMID:1133807

  15. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify patient- and practice-related factors associated with potential drug interactions. Methods: A register analysis study in general practices in the county of Funen, Denmark. Prescription data were retrieved from a population-based prescription database (Odense University...... Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  16. Description of a practice model for pharmacist medication review in a general practice setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mette; Hallas, Jesper; Hansen, Trine Graabæk

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practical descriptions of procedures used for pharmacists' medication reviews are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To describe a model for medication review by pharmacists tailored to a general practice setting. METHODS: A stepwise model is described. The model is based on data from the medical chart...... no indication (n=47, 23%). Most interventions were aimed at cardiovascular drugs. CONCLUSION: We have provided a detailed description of a practical approach to pharmacists' medication review in a GP setting. The model was tested and found to be usable, and to deliver a medication review with high acceptance...

  17. Accuracy of Screening Tools for Pap Smears in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Harding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Data extraction tools (DETs are increasingly being used for research and audit of general practice, despite their limitations. Objective This study explores the accuracy of Pap smear rates obtained with a DET compared to that of the Pap smear rate obtained with a manual file audit. Method A widely available DET was used to establish the rate of Pap smears in a large multi-general practice (multi-GP in regional New South Wales followed by a manual audit of patient files. The main outcome measure was identification of possible discrepancies between the rates established. Results The DET used significantly underestimated the level of cervical screening compared to the manual audit. In some instances, the patient file contained phone/specialist record of Pap smear conducted elsewhere, which accounted for the failure of the DET to detect some smears. Those patients who had Pap smears whose pathology codes differed between time intervals, i.e. from different pathology providers or from within the same provider but using a different code, were less likely to have had their most recent Pap smear detected by the DET (p < 0.001. Conclusion Data obtained from DETs should be used with caution as they may not accurately reflect the rate of Pap smears from electronic medical records. How this fits in DETs are increasingly being used for research and audit of general practice. This study explores the accuracy of Pap smear rates obtained with a DET compared to that of the Pap smear rate obtained with a manual file audit The DET tested significantly underestimated the level of cervical screening compared to manual screening. Data obtained from DETs should be used with caution as they may not accurately reflect the rate of Pap smears from electronic medical records

  18. Health care worker hand hygiene in the pediatric special care unit at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Uganda: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhumuza, Christine; Gomersall, Judith Streak; Fredrick, Makumbi E; Atuyambe, Lynn; Okiira, Christopher; Mukose, Aggrey; Ssempebwa, John

    2015-03-01

    The hands of a health care worker are a common vehicle of pathogen transmission in hospital settings. Health care worker hand hygiene is therefore critical for patients' well being. Whilst failure of health care workers to comply with the best hand hygiene practice is a problem in all health care settings, issues of lack of access to adequate cleaning equipment and in some cases even running water make practicing good hand hygiene particularly difficult in low-resource developing country settings. This study reports an audit and feedback project that focused on the hand hygiene of the health care worker in the pediatric special care unit of the Mulago National Referral Hospital, which is a low-resource setting in Uganda. To improve hand hygiene among health care workers in the pediatric special care unit and thereby contribute to reducing transmission of health care worker-associated pathogens. The Joanna Briggs Institute three-phase Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System audit and feedback tool for promoting evidence utilization and change in health care was used. In phase one of the project, stakeholders were engaged and seven evidence-based audit criteria were developed. A baseline audit was then conducted. In phase two, barriers underpinning areas of noncompliance found in the baseline audit were identified and three strategies - education, reminders and provision of hand cleaning equipment - were implemented to overcome them. In phase three, a follow-up audit was conducted. Compliance with best practice hygiene was found to be poor in the baseline audit for all but one of the audit criteria. Following the implementation of the strategies, hand hygiene improved. The compliance rate increased substantially across all criteria. Staff education achieved 100%, whilst criterion 4 increased to 70%. However, use of alcohol-based hand-rub for hand hygiene only improved to 66%, and for six of the seven audit criteria, compliance remained below 74%. The

  19. The uses and implications of standards in general practice consultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Maria Laura; Reventlow, Susanne; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2017-01-01

    Quality standards play an increasingly important role in primary care through their inscription in various technologies for improving professional practice. While ‘hard’ biomedical standards have been the most common and debated, current quality development initiatives increasingly seek to include...... was observed among general practitioners who strictly adhered to the procedural standards on the interactional aspects of care. Thus, when allowed to function as an overall frame for consultations, those standards supported adherence to general recommendations regarding which elements to be included in chronic...... as manifestations of an inherent conflict between principles of patient-centredness and formal biomedical quality standards. However, this study suggests that standards on the ‘softer’ aspects of care may just as well interfere with a clinical approach relying on situated and attentive interactions with patients....

  20. Teaching medicine in general practice: the Guy's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, P M

    1989-11-01

    The development of teaching in general practice at Guy's Hospital Medical School is described. Important features of the current programme (a new programme for the United Schools of Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals will come into effect this year) are the emphasis on learning directly from patients and the active role and responsibility given to clinical students. Students welcome the opportunities to see patients first, to deal with undifferentiated problems, to work with one clinical teacher, to put to use knowledge and skills and to test themselves as clinicians. In these circumstances they gain confidence and display the human qualities required of doctors. An acceptable service to patients, the essential basis for effective clinical teaching, requires the general practitioner teachers devote more of their time to service than to clinical teaching.

  1. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette

    2016-01-01

    task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...... practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction appears to be sparse even though job satisfaction is acknowledged as an important factor associated with both patient satisfaction and medical quality of care. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was 1) to review the current research on the relation between...... attitude towards task delegation was positive and led to increased job satisfaction, probably because task delegation comprised a high degree of work autonomy. CONCLUSIONS: The few studies included in our review suggest that task delegation within general practice may be seen by the staff as an overall...

  2. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette

    2016-01-01

    practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction appears to be sparse even though job satisfaction is acknowledged as an important factor associated with both patient satisfaction and medical quality of care. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was 1) to review the current research on the relation between...... task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...... attitude towards task delegation was positive and led to increased job satisfaction, probably because task delegation comprised a high degree of work autonomy. CONCLUSIONS: The few studies included in our review suggest that task delegation within general practice may be seen by the staff as an overall...

  3. [Associations with Muslim patients in general practice surgeries--a survey among German general practicioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenthaler, A; Hiltner, H; Eissler, M

    2014-07-01

    Due to the increasing numbers of Muslims in Germany(1)--about 4.3 million at the moment--more Muslim patients are medicated in the practices of family doctors. Their heterogeneous cultural and religious backgrounds are nontheless unknown and unfamiliar for the treating general practitioner. Based on the daily experiences of the latter and in order to capture their development of intercultural competence, in the present study a brainwriting with general practitioners was conducted to record their spontaneous associations with Muslim patients. Individually and without exchange 90 general practitioners (66 male, 24 female) listed subjective thoughts regarding "Muslim patients" on a prepared sheet of paper. Additionally, sex, age, number of years as physician in a private practice and the frequency of treatment of Muslim patients in their own practice were requested. The content of the notes were evaluated using MAXQDA and were clustered in the categories of "language", "company", "violence", "men"/"women", "psychosomatic medicine", "compliance", "understanding of illness", "physical examination" and "head scarf". The ideas listed show that the majority of interviewed general practitioners regarded the treatment of Muslim patients as difficult. They associate Muslim patients with communication problems, a different type of disease understanding and a fear of contact, which hampers the examination situation. Less frequently, positive associations and unproblematic examination situations were noted. Due to a lack of knowledge about cultural and religious contexts Muslim patients are often described by using stereotypes. This underlines the necessity to foster intercultural competences and self-reflection in daily practice and its systematic inclusion in medical education. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A differentiated approach to referrals from general practice to support early cancer diagnosis - the Danish three-legged strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, P; Olesen, F

    2015-01-01

    Denne artikel slår til lyd for en trebenet diagnostisk strategi på kræftområdet i Danmark, som har til hensigt at sikre diagnosticering af kræft på tidligere sygdomsstadier. Artiklen diskuterer det kontinuum af symptomer, som patienterne præsenterer i almen praksis, og ser nærmere på de praktiser......Denne artikel slår til lyd for en trebenet diagnostisk strategi på kræftområdet i Danmark, som har til hensigt at sikre diagnosticering af kræft på tidligere sygdomsstadier. Artiklen diskuterer det kontinuum af symptomer, som patienterne præsenterer i almen praksis, og ser nærmere på de...

  5. Referral patterns and utilization of physiotherapy services following a one-time physiotherapist consultation in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H.J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.; Heerkens, Y.F.; Elvers, J.W.H.; Dekker, J.; Zee, J. van der; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of a one-time consultation of physiotherapists (PRs) by primary care physicians (PDPs) on utilization of physiotherapy services, functional outcomes, and number of treatment sessions of treatment episode. A 7-months observational study with 59

  6. Improving population-based cervical cancer screening in general practice : effects of a national strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Mulder, J; Tacken, M A; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a Dutch national prevention programme, aimed at general practitioners (GPs), on the adherence to organizational guidelines for effective cervical cancer screening in general practice. To identify the characteristics of general practices determining success.

  7. Challenges in day-to-day midwifery practice; a qualitative study from a regional referral hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremnes, Hanna Strømholt; Wiig, Åsil Kjøl; Abeid, Muzdalifat; Darj, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Maternal and infant mortality rates in Tanzania have decreased over the past decades, but remain high. One of the challenges the country faces, is the lack of skilled health care workers. High fertility rates make midwives and their patients particularly susceptible to stress as a result of understaffing. This paper explores the challenges midwives face in their day-to-day practice at a regional referral hospital in Tanzania, and investigates which measures the midwives themselves find necessary to implement to improve their situation. A qualitative study design with focus group discussions (FGDs) was employed to explore which challenges the midwives experienced. Each focus group consisted of five to six midwives. A FGD topic guide covering challenges, consequences, motivation, ideal situation and possible solutions was used. These data were analyzed using Systematic Text Condensation. A total of 28 Midwives, six men and 22 women, participated in five FGDs. Four categories emerged from the collected material: Feelings of demoralization, shortage of resources, societal challenges and personal struggles. A feeling of demoralization was especially prevalent and was caused by a lack of support from the leaders and little appreciation from the patients. Shortage of resources, and shortage of personnel in particular, was also highlighted as it led to an excessive workload resulting in difficulties with providing adequate care. These difficulties were intensified by lack of equipment, facilities and a non-optimal organization of the healthcare system. The challenges revealed during the FGDs prevent the midwives from providing sufficient midwifery care. To improve the situation, measures such as supportive leadership, reduction of workload, increasing availability of equipment and increasing knowledge of reproductive health in society, should be taken.

  8. Medical engagement and organizational characteristics in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Peder; dePont Christensen, René; Halling, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical engagement is a mutual concept of the active and positive contribution of doctors to maintaining and enhancing the performance of their health care organization, which itself recognizes this commitment in supporting and encouraging high quality care. A Medical Engagement Scale...... and this is determined by a complex interaction between both individual and organizational characteristics. Working in collaboration, having staff and being engaged in vocational training of junior doctors are all associated with enhanced levels of medical engagement among GPs....... (MES) was developed by Applied Research Ltd (2008) on the basis of emerging evidence that medical engagement is critical for implementing radical improvements. OBJECTIVES: To study the importance of medical engagement in general practice and to analyse patterns of association with individual...... younger GPs and female GPs had higher medical engagement than their male colleagues. Furthermore, GPs participating in vocational training of junior doctors were more engaged than GPs not participating in vocational training. CONCLUSION: Medical engagement in general practice varies a great deal...

  9. [Summary of the practice guideline 'Viral hepatitis and other liver diseases' (second revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, M; van Geldrop, W J; Numans, M E; Wiersma, Tj; Goudswaard, A N

    2008-12-06

    The revised Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Viral hepatitis and other liver diseases' offers advice in the diagnosis and management of viral hepatitis A, B and C and other liver diseases. The guideline is important for general practitioners as well as specialists in internal medicine and gastroenterology. The emphasis is on the management of chronic hepatitis B en C, because the prevalence of these diseases has increased in the Netherlands and, in addition, the treatment options for chronic hepatitis have improved. Consequently, timely recognition and adequate referral of patients with chronic hepatitis B or hepatitis C have become more important. However, many patients with a chronic liver disease have no symptoms. Therefore, the general practitioner should be aware that a patient visiting the practice with fatigue and malaise could have a liver disease if he or she belongs to a high-risk group or has had high-risk contacts. If the general practitioner repeatedly finds increased liver transaminase values during routine examination of asymptomatic patients, additional diagnostic tests should be performed. Further tests should focus on viral hepatitis as well as on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or, depending on the history-taking, liver damage due to excessive alcohol, medication or drug use.

  10. Recognition of depression in children in general hospital-based paediatric units in Kenya: practice and policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutiso Victoria N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical disorders are commonly comorbid with depression in children attending general medical facilities. However, the depression component is rarely recognised. Methods A questionnaire on sociodemographics and history of presenting medical conditions was administered together with the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI to all 11-year-old to 17-year-old children attending at nine medical facilities. Results In all, 408 children were recruited from 9 health facilities. Whereas the clinicians diagnosed a mental disorder in only 2.5% of the sample studied, 41.3% had CDI scores that suggested mild to moderate depression. The highest proportion of children with depressive symptomatology was found at the Kenyatta National and Teaching Referral Hospital. Conclusion Although prevalence rate for depression among children is high, detection rates remain low. This finding has clinical practice and policy implications within and outside Kenya.

  11. The integration of complementary therapies in Australian general practice: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc M; Penman, Stephen; Pirotta, Marie; Da Costa, Cliff

    2005-12-01

    Australian general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes toward and use of a range of complementary therapies (CTs) were determined through a self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 2000 Australian GPs. The survey canvassed GPs' opinions as to the harmfulness and effectiveness of CTs; current levels of training and interest in further training; personal use of, and use in practice of, CTs; referrals to CT; practitioners; appropriateness for GPs to practice and for government regulation; perceived patient demand and the need for undergraduate education. The response rate was 33.2%. Based on GPs' responses, complementary therapies could be classified into: nonmedicinal and nonmanipulative therapies, such as acupuncture, massage, meditation, yoga, and hypnosis, that were seen to be highly effective and safe; medicinal and manipulative therapies, including chiropractic, Chinese herbal medicine, osteopathy, herbal medicine, vitamin and mineral therapy, naturopathy, and homeopathy, which more GPs considered potentially harmful than potentially effective; and esoteric therapies, such as spiritual healing, aromatherapy, and reflexology, which were seen to be relatively safe yet also relatively ineffective. The risks of CTs were seen to mainly arise from incorrect, inadequate, or delayed diagnoses and interactions between complementary medications and pharmaceuticals, rather than the specific risks of the therapies themselves. Nonmedicinal therapies along with chiropractic are widely accepted in Australia and can be considered mainstream. GPs are open to training in complementary therapies, and better communication between patients and GPs about use of CTs is required to minimize the risk of adverse events. There is also a need to prioritize and provide funding for further research into the potential adverse events from these therapies and other therapies currently lacking an evidence base.

  12. Using read codes to identify patients with irritable bowel syndrome in general practice: a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Elaine F; Grant, Laura; O'Brien, Sarah J; Chew-Graham, Carolyn A; Thompson, David G

    2013-12-02

    Estimates of the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) vary widely, and a large proportion of patients report having consulted their general practitioner (GP). In patients with new onset gastrointestinal symptoms in primary care it might be possible to predict those at risk of persistent symptoms. However, one of the difficulties is identifying patients within primary care. GPs use a variety of Read Codes to describe patients presenting with IBS. Furthermore, in a qualitative study, exploring GPs' attitudes and approaches to defining patients with IBS, GPs appeared reluctant to add the IBS Read Code to the patient record until more serious conditions were ruled out. Consequently, symptom codes such as 'abdominal pain', 'diarrhoea' or 'constipation' are used. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of recorded consultations for IBS and to explore the symptom profile of patients with IBS using data from the Salford Integrated Record (SIR). This was a database study using the SIR, a local patient sharing record system integrating primary, community and secondary care information. Records were obtained for a cohort of patients with gastrointestinal disorders from January 2002 to December 2011. Prevalence rates, symptom recording, medication prescribing and referral patterns were compared for three patient groups (IBS, abdominal pain (AP) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)). The prevalence of IBS (age standardised rate: 616 per year per 100,000 population) was much lower than expected compared with that reported in the literature. The majority of patients (69%) had no gastrointestinal symptoms recorded in the year prior to their IBS. However a proportion of these (22%) were likely to have been prescribed NICE guideline recommended medications for IBS in that year. The findings for AP and IBD were similar. Using Read Codes to identify patients with IBS may lead to a large underestimate of the community prevalence. The IBS diagnostic Read

  13. Poetry in general practice education: perceptions of learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William; Freeman, Elaine

    2008-08-01

    There has been little research into poetry-based medical education. Few studies consider learners' perceptions in depth. To explore general practice registrars' (GPRs) perceptions of two poetry-based sessions. GPRs in one general practice vocational training scheme experienced two poetry sessions. In one, the facilitator selected poems; in the other, poems were chosen by registrars. Poems were read and discussed, with emphasis on personal response. Data were obtained through in-depth semi-structured interviews with six registrars. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Identification of individual ideas and shared themes enabled exploration of the registrars' experiences. Registrars described how poetry helped them explore emotional territory. They recognized a broadening of education, describing how poems helped them consider different points of view, increasing their understanding of others. Vicarious experience, development of empathy and self-discovery were also reported. Participants speculated on how this might impact on patient care and professional practice. Facilitator-selected poems provided variety and ambiguity, provoking discussions with clinical relevance. Learner-selected poems enabled involvement, self-revelation and understanding of peers and developed emotional expression. These registrars reported difficulties expressing feelings in the culture of science-based medical training. Poetry sessions may provide an environment for emotional exploration, which could broaden understanding of self and others. Poetry-based education may develop emotional competence. The participants recognized development of key skills including close reading, attentive listening and interpretation of meaning. These skills may help doctors to understand individual patient's unique experience of illness, encouraging personalized care that respects patients' perspectives.

  14. Complementary medicine for cancer patients in general practice: qualitative interviews with german general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlhaus, Anne; Siebenhofer, Andrea; Guethlin, Corina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how general practitioners react when their cancer patients show interest in complementary medicine, and how their reaction is related to their knowledge in the field. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 German general practitioners. Interviewees came from 5 different federal states and varied in terms of urban/rural setting, single/joint practice, additional certifications, gender and length of professional experience. Interviews were electronically recorded, transcribed and then analysed using qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. General practitioners feel largely responsible for providing information on complementary medicine to their cancer patients. However, uncertainty and a lack of knowledge concerning CAM lead mainly to reactive responses to patients' needs, and the general practitioners base their recommendations on personal experiences and attitudes. They wish to support their cancer patients and thus, in order to keep their patients' hopes up and maintain a trusting relationship, sometimes support complementary medicine, regardless of their own convictions. Although general practitioners see themselves as an important source of information on complementary medicine for their cancer patients, they also speak of their uncertainties and lack of knowledge. General practitioners would profit from training in complementary medicine enabling them to discuss this topic with their cancer patients in a proactive, open and honest manner. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  15. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grol Richard

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. Methods Secondary analysis of data from 239 general practices, collected in practice visits between 2003 to 2006 in the Netherlands using a comprehensive set of measures of practice management. Data were collected by a practice visitor, a trained non-physician observer using patients questionnaires, doctors and staff. For this study we selected five measures of practice performance as outcomes and six measures of GP workload and job stress as predictors. A total of 79 indicators were used out of the 303 available indicators. Random coefficient regression models were applied to examine associations. Results and discussion Workload and job stress are associated with practice performance. Workload: Working more hours as a GP was associated with more positive patient experiences of accessibility and availability (b = 0.16. After list size adjustment, practices with more GP-time per patient scored higher on GP care (b = 0.45. When GPs provided more than 20 hours per week per 1000 patients, patients scored over 80% on the Europep questionnaire for quality of GP care. Job stress: High GP job stress was associated with lower accessibility and availability (b = 0.21 and insufficient practice management (b = 0.25. Higher GP commitment and more satisfaction with the job was associated with more prevention and disease management (b = 0.35. Conclusion Providing more time in the practice, and more time per patient and experiencing less job stress are all associated with perceptions by patients of better care and better practice performance. Workload and job stress should be assessed by using list size adjusted data in order to realise better quality of care. Organisational development using

  16. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hombergh, Pieter; Künzi, Beat; Elwyn, Glyn; van Doremalen, Jan; Akkermans, Reinier; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel

    2009-07-15

    The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. Secondary analysis of data from 239 general practices, collected in practice visits between 2003 to 2006 in the Netherlands using a comprehensive set of measures of practice management. Data were collected by a practice visitor, a trained non-physician observer using patients questionnaires, doctors and staff. For this study we selected five measures of practice performance as outcomes and six measures of GP workload and job stress as predictors. A total of 79 indicators were used out of the 303 available indicators. Random coefficient regression models were applied to examine associations. Workload and job stress are associated with practice performance.Workload: Working more hours as a GP was associated with more positive patient experiences of accessibility and availability (b = 0.16). After list size adjustment, practices with more GP-time per patient scored higher on GP care (b = 0.45). When GPs provided more than 20 hours per week per 1000 patients, patients scored over 80% on the Europep questionnaire for quality of GP care.Job stress: High GP job stress was associated with lower accessibility and availability (b = 0.21) and insufficient practice management (b = 0.25). Higher GP commitment and more satisfaction with the job was associated with more prevention and disease management (b = 0.35). Providing more time in the practice, and more time per patient and experiencing less job stress are all associated with perceptions by patients of better care and better practice performance. Workload and job stress should be assessed by using list size adjusted data in order to realise better quality of care. Organisational development using this kind of data feedback could benefit both patients and GP.

  17. Chronic care management in Danish general practice - a cross‒sectional study of workload and multimorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moth Grete

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 30% of the Danish population has one or more chronic conditions, and general practitioners (GPs play a key role in effective chronic care management. However, little is known about these encounters in general practice. The aim was to describe the frequency of patients with one or more chronic conditions in general practice and how these consultations were experienced by the GPs. Methods All GPs in the Central Denmark Region were invited to register all contacts during one day in the 12‒month study period from December; 404 (46% accepted. For each patient contact, the GPs were asked to fill in a one‒page registration form covering information on chronic disease, reason for encounter, diagnosis, number of additional psychosocial problems raised by the patient during the consultation, time consumption, experienced burden of the consultation, referral to specialized care, and whether a nurse could have substituted the GP. Patients were categorized according to the number of chronic conditions (none, one, two, three or more and the categories compared with regard to the GP‒experienced burden of the contacts. Moreover, we examined which chronic conditions posed the the greatest challenge to the GPs. Results Patients aged 40 years or more had a total of 8,236 contacts. Among these patients 2,849 (34.6%; 95% CI 33.6‒35.6 had one and 2,596 (31.5%; CI 30.5‒32.5 had more than one chronic disease. The time consumption and the burden of their contacts tended to rise with the number of chronic conditions. Being present in 22.9% (CI 21.6‒24.3 of all face‒to‒face contacts, hypertension was the most common chronic condition. The burden of the contacts was experienced as particularly heavy for patients with depression and dementia due to more additional psychosocial problems and the time consumption. Conclusion General practitioners considered consultations with multimorbid patients demanding and not easily delegated to

  18. Health profiles of overweight and obese youth attending general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Winifred D; Palmer, Millicent; Chondros, Patty; Kauer, Sylvia; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Sanci, Lena A

    2017-05-01

    Literature suggests that overweight and obese young people use healthcare services more often, but this awaits confirmation in primary care. To identify health profiles of underweight, overweight and obese young people attending general practice and compare them to normal-weight youth and also to explore the weight-related health risks of eating and exercise behaviour in the four different weight categories. This study used a cross-sectional design with baseline data from a trial including 683 young people (14-24 years of age) presenting to general practice. Through computer-assisted telephone interviews data were obtained on number and type of health complaints and consultations, emotional distress, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and eating and exercise behaviour. General practitioners (GPs) were consulted more often by overweight (incidence rate ratio (IRR): 1.28, 95% CI (1.04 to 1.57)) and obese youth (IRR: 1.54, 95% CI (1.21 to 1.97), but not for different health problems compared with normal-weight youth. The reason for presentation was seldom a weight issue. Obese youth reported lower physical HRQoL. Obese and underweight youth were less likely to be satisfied with their eating behaviour than their normal-weight peers. Exercise levels were low in the entire cohort. Our study highlights the need for effective weight management given that overweight and obese youth consult their GP more often. Since young people do not present with weight issues, it becomes important for GPs to find ways to initiate the discussion about weight, healthy eating and exercise with youth. ISRCTN16059206. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. [Practice assistant sometimes misses urgent request for help: telephone triage in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, M; Hanssen, S; Huibers, L; Giesen, P

    2016-01-01

    To assess the organisation and appropriateness of telephone triage in general practices in the Netherlands. Cross-sectional observational study. Via e-mail we invited all members of the Dutch Association of practice assistants to complete an online survey. The questionnaire included questions about practice assistants' background characteristics and the practices' triage organisation. Furthermore, they were asked to assess the indicated type of care for a number of fictive case scenarios involving a variety of health problems and levels of urgency. To determine the appropriateness of the respondents' assessments, each was compared to a reference standard agreed by experts. In addition, the association between practice assistants' background characteristics and organizational setup of the triage organisation with the appropriateness of triage was examined. The response rate was 41.1% (N=973). The required care was assessed appropriately in 63.6% of the cases, over-estimated in 19.3% and under-estimated in 17.1% of cases. The sensitivity of identifying patients with a highly urgent problem was 76.7%, whereas the specificity was 94.0%. The appropriateness of the assessments of the required care was higher for more experienced assistants and assistants with regular daily work meetings with the GP. Triage training, use of a triage tool and authorization of advice provision were not associated with appropriateness of triage. Triage by practice assistants in general practices is efficient, but potentially unsafe in highly urgent cases. It is therefore important to train practice assistants in the identification of highly urgent cases.

  20. An overview of 5 years of patient self-referral for physical therapy in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Ilse C S; Kooijman, Margit K; Spreeuwenberg, Peter M; Bossen, Daniël; Leemrijse, Chantal J; van Dijk, Christel E; Verheij, Robert; de Bakker, Dinny H; Veenhof, Cindy

    2014-12-01

    Self-referral for physical therapy was introduced in 2006 in the Netherlands. Internationally, debate on self-referral is still ongoing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of self-referral for physical therapy in the Netherlands, focusing on volume of general practice and physical therapy care (incidence rates and utilization of services). The study was based on monitoring data from existing data sources. Longitudinal electronic medical record data from general practitioners (GPs) and physical therapists participating in the NIVEL Primary Care Database were used, as well as public data from Statistics Netherlands. Descriptive statistics and Poisson multilevel regression analyses were used for analyzing the data. Incidence rates of back (including low back), shoulder, and neck pain in general practice declined slightly from 2004 to 2009. No linear trends were found for number of contacts in GP care for back (including low back) and neck pain. The number of patients visiting physical therapists and the proportion of self-referrers are growing. Self-referrers receive treatment less often after initial intake than referred patients, and the mean number of visits is lower. This study was based on data of various patient populations from existing data sources. The current study indicates that self-referral in the Netherlands has fulfilled most expectations held prior to its introduction, although no changes to the workload of GP care have been found. Use of physical therapy grew, but due to population aging and increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, it remains unclear whether self-referral affects health care utilization. Therefore, cost-benefit analyses are recommended. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  1. Determinants related to gender differences in general practice utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Andersen, John Sahl; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the determinants related to gender differences in the GP utilization in Danish population aged 50-65 years. DESIGN: Cohort-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish general practice. SUBJECTS: Totally, 54,849 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer...... and post-menopausal HT. In a fully adjusted model, subjects with hypertension (1.63; 1.59-1.67), mental illness (1.63; 1.61-1.66), diabetes (1.56; 1.47-1.65), angina pectoris (1.28; 1.21-1.34), and unemployed persons (1.19; 1.18-1.21) had highest rates of GP visits. CONCLUSIONS: Gravidity and HT use...

  2. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines on general anaesthesia for emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadegaard Jensen, Anders; Callesen, T; Hagemo, J S

    2010-01-01

    Emergency patients need special considerations and the number and severity of complications from general anaesthesia can be higher than during scheduled procedures. Guidelines are therefore needed. The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care...... Medicine appointed a working group to develop guidelines based on literature searches to assess evidence, and a consensus meeting was held. Consensus opinion was used in the many topics where high-grade evidence was unavailable. The recommendations include the following: anaesthesia for emergency patients...... breathing for 3 min or eight deep breaths over 60 s and oxygen flow 10 l/min should be used. Pre-oxygenation in the obese patients should be performed in the head-up position. The use of cricoid pressure is not considered mandatory, but can be used on individual judgement. The hypnotic drug has a minor...

  3. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  4. Laser regulation and safety in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, S

    2007-05-12

    Laser devices, instruments and machines vary in their potential for light energy emission from low-powered hand-held or integrated devices, to high-powered units capable of cutting and ablating tissue and materials. The safe use of lasers in dentistry extends to all personnel who might be exposed, either deliberately or by accident, and demands of the lead clinician an approach to their use in order that risk of accidental exposure to laser light is minimised. The scope for regulations extends in similar ways to those imposed on the use of ionising radiation in the dental practice. Laser safety measures in the dental surgery are often drawn from the safe approach to the use of lasers in general and other specialties in medicine and surgery. This article serves to examine the risks involved in laser use in dentistry, the regulations governing safe use and the responsibilities of personnel involved in providing treatment to patients.

  5. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hombergh, P. van den; Kunzi, B.; Elwyn, G.; Doremalen, J.H.M. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data

  6. Australian general practitioners' knowledge, attitudes and practices towards breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, Tim

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices of established general practitioners (GPs) in relation to breastfeeding. 10 GPs in the Australian Nepean Blue Mountains Health District were interviewed and the interviews transcribed and analyzed thematically. Emergent themes from each interview were identified and then compared between and across the 10 interviews. Five themes emerged following the analysis: breastfeeding knowledge and training; attitudes towards breastfeeding; GPs’ role in relation to breast feeding; GPs’ practices; influence of male gender. All the GPs interviewed had positive attitudes towards breastfeeding, however they were often lacking in knowledge and conviction to be able to provide strong support to women during their breastfeeding journey. Some reported ambivalence in their encouragement of breastfeeding due to their desire to maintain a good relationship with women who chose not to feed this way. Nine of the GPs had little or no formal breastfeeding training and relied mainly on personal experience. Their clinics did not provide formal breastfeeding support including a written breastfeeding friendly policy and most GPs were not proactive in creating such an environment. We hope that the results from this study will assist in developing breastfeeding policies and professional education to support GPs in this role. PMID:29489841

  7. Pneumococcal vaccination by general practitioners: an evaluation of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetermans, W E; Lacante, P

    1999-11-12

    During the first two years following registration of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine in Belgium, the numbers of doses administered were 166 and 211 per 10,000 inhabitants, representing a vaccination coverage of nearly 20% of the recommended target population as defined by the High Council for Public Health. The time course of vaccine use showed a seasonal variation with up to 74 and 85% of the doses administered from September through November in 1996 and 1997, respectively. Vaccination practices by general practitioners and the profile of the patients who received the pneumococcal vaccine were studied during the September through December period each year. Among the 18,236 patients included, 82% were above 60 years of age (mean age 69.5 years). The main indications for vaccination were chronic bronchopulmonary disease (41%) and cardiovascular disorders (26%). Age as the sole criterion was mentioned for only 17% of vaccine recipients. Sixty percent of the patients received influenza vaccine concomitantly. The intensity of the mass media campaign correlated with the public awareness of the national recommendations. These observations provide insight into current practices for pneumococcal vaccination in Belgium and suggest opportunities for future vaccination campaigns.

  8. Practices in communicating technical issues to the general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Storey, P.

    2006-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations of this session can be summarized this way. - Basic goal for the regulator is to protect the public and communication is a must to fully achieve this goal. - Regulator should become the prime source of information to the public and the media, regulator should base its actions upon values of competence, independence, transparency and stringency. - Set up of a Information and Communication Policy will help for consistency and efficiency. Policy will include setting goals, strategies, organisational aspects, procedures, and tools. Practices should be developed in accordance with local culture. - Challenges will consider transparency, public involvement and consultation with the stakeholders. - Practices will include in general: - Interactions with the media like press releases, news conferences, media workshops. Printed materials from plant periodical status reports, to periodical and annual reports and specific reports. Audio-visual materials. Use of radio and TV. Web site and electronic mail. - Method chosen depends on the targeted audience and the relevance of the topic. - Messages should be clearly understandable. Do not dehumanize the message by making it technically unintelligible. - Two excellent examples presented. How local culture and social characteristics were taken into account in designing and implementing plans is key for success. - Municipalities are to be considered as front line stakeholders. - Communicators role is relevant to meet regulatory needs. Good collaboration between communicators and technical staff produces benefits for the nuclear regulator and the public. (authors)

  9. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, Lasse (Finnish Forest Research Inst. (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, Agneta H. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Straalberg, Elisabeth (Inst. Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-01-15

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  10. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, Lasse; Plamboeck, Agneta H.; Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve; Straelberg, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  11. General practice registrars as teachers: a questionnaire-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bronwen; Amiel, Cressida

    2012-03-01

    To determine how many General Practice (GP) Registrars in the London Deanery taught medical students during their final year of training. For those who did teach, to evaluate their experiences and for those who did not, to identify perceived barriers to teaching. Cross sectional survey of GP Registrars in the London Deanery completing their training in August 2010. Online survey of GP Registrars sent after completion of training via the London Deanery GP Vocational Training Scheme (VTS) programme administrators. GP Registrars in the London Deanery completing their training in August 2010. The proportion of London Deanery GP registrars completing training in August 2010 who taught medical students during their registrar year. Over half of respondents were involved in some form of medical student teaching during their registrar year. Most of those who taught felt it enhanced their training, and the majority of those who did not teach would have liked to. Commonly cited barriers to teaching were: students not attached to the practice; not being given the opportunity to teach; and not having time to teach. This evaluation demonstrated that GP registrars are either already involved with undergraduate teaching or want to get involved and the majority who teach feel that it enhances their training. A UK-wide study investigating the experiences and views of both GP registrars and GP trainers is warranted and qualitative work using focus groups or semistructured interviews would be valuable to develop the questionnaire for wider dissemination.

  12. Salivary characteristics and dental caries: evidence from general dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Scott, JoAnna; Rothen, Marilynn; Mancl, Lloyd; Lawhorn, Timothy; Brossel, Kenneth; Berg, Joel

    2013-05-01

    Saliva is one of the intraoral host factors that influence caries development. The authors conducted a study to investigate whether salivary characteristics are associated with recent dental caries experience. Dentist-investigators and dental staff members collected data pertaining to a two-year cumulative incidence of dental caries (previous 24 months) and salivary characteristics during baseline assessment in an ongoing longitudinal study. The systematic random sample consisted of patients (n = 1,763) visiting general dental practices (n = 63) within the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT). The authors estimated adjusted rate ratios (RRs) by using generalized estimating equations log-linear regression to relate salivary characteristics to coronal carious lesions into dentin. Low resting pH (≤ 6.0) in the overall sample and low stimulated salivary flow rate (≤ 0.6 milliliter/minute) in older adults (≥ 65 years old) were associated with increased dental caries (RR, 1.6; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.2; RR, 2.4; 95 percent CI, 1.5-3.8, respectively). Low buffering capacity was associated with decreased dental caries in children and adolescents (RR, 0.3; 95 percent CI, 0.1-1.0; RR, 0.2; 95 percent CI, 0.1-0.7, respectively). A thick, sticky or frothy salivary consistency also was associated with decreased dental caries in adults (RR, 0.6; 95 percent CI, 0.4-1.0). Associations between other salivary characteristics and dental caries for the overall sample and within each age group were not statistically significant. Salivary characteristics were associated weakly with previous dental caries experience, but the authors did not find consistent trends among the three age groups. Different salivary characteristics were associated with an increased caries experience in older adults and a lowered caries experience in children and adolescents and adults. Practical Implications. Further investigations are

  13. Sterilization of re-usable instruments in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A J; Bagg, J; Hurrell, D; McHugh, S

    2007-10-27

    To examine the methods used for sterilisation of re-usable instruments in general dental practice, including the installation, commissioning and testing of benchtop steam sterilisers. This was an observational study in which the policies and procedures for sterilising instruments were viewed directly by trained surveyors at practice premises. Information relating to the installation, commissioning and testing of benchtop steam sterilisers was also collected by interview and observation of records. Data were recorded onto a standardised data collection form prepared for automated reading. Data were available fom 179 surgeries surveyed. Dental practices reprocess a range of instruments from critical to non-critical. The most common type of benchtop steam steriliser is a type N, or bowl and instrument (B&I) steriliser (88%). The remainder were type B, or vacuum sterilisers, though one surgery had access to a hot air steriliser. Sterilisers were usually installed by manufactures or suppliers (69%). Only 51% of sterilisers were tested on installation and 26% were commissioned, of which 38% were tested to SHTM 2010 standard. In most cases it was difficult to determine from the documentation available whether daily, weekly, quarterly or annual testing was undertaken in accordance with recognised standards. Written instructions for the operation of the steriliser were unavailable in 61% of practices. Insurance cover for pressure vessels was available in 79% of the surgeries with a B&I steriliser. In many instances there was inadequate separation of clean and dirty areas for segregating processed from unprocessed instruments. Ninety-six percent of surgeries did not have a procedure for the identification and traceability of instruments used on patients. There was no documentation of staff training in the use of sterilisers in 90% of surgeries. There has been significant uptake of the use of steam sterilisation to reprocess used dental instruments. However, there are

  14. Diagnosing dementia in Dutch general practice: a qualitative study of GPs' practices and views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Agnes; Hemke, Feia; Pols, Jeannette; Moll van Charante, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    GPs play an important role in recognising the symptoms of dementia; however, little is known about how they perceive their actual and future role in diagnosing dementia. To explore Dutch GPs' perceptions of their current position in diagnosing dementia, their reasons for referral to secondary care,

  15. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care: data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Laar, van de F.A.; Waal, de M.W.M.; Okkes, I.M.; Akker, van den M.; Veen, van der W.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Staveren, van W.A.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Weel, van C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care

  16. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care : data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wayenburg, CAM; van de Laar, FA; de Waal, MWM; Okkes, IM; van den Akker, M; van der Veen, WJ; Schellevis, FG; van Staveren, WA; van Binsbergen, JJ; van Weel, C

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care

  17. Variation in spirometry utilization between trained general practitioners in practices equipped with a spirometer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.E.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Jacobs, A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hartman, J.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore spirometry utilization among general practitioners and identify practitioner and practice-related factors associated with spirometry utilization. DESIGN: Multivariate multilevel cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey. SETTING: Some 61 general practices involved in a

  18. [Summary of the practice guideline 'Thyroid disorders' (first revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, J. van; Wessels, P.; Rijswijk, E. van; Boer, A.M; Wiersma, A.; Goudswaard, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    --The practice guideline 'Thyroid disorders' developed by the Dutch College of General Practitioners replaces the practice guideline 'Functional thyroid disorders' from 1996. Recommendations for palpable thyroid disorders have been added. --Hypothyroidism can often be treated by the general

  19. Importance of and satisfaction with work and professional interpersonal issues: a survey of physicians practicing general internal medicine in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Griffith, L E; Sackett, D L

    1995-09-15

    To explore the importance of and satisfaction with clinical responsibilities, teaching, research and interpersonal issues among general internists; to understand the barriers to satisfaction in these domains and the usefulness of potential solutions to these problems. Cross-sectional survey conducted from November 1992 to June 1994. Ontario. General internists who were fellows of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and members of the Ontario Medical Association. Of 1192 physicians, 1007 (84.5%) returned a completed questionnaire; only the 199 who devoted at least 50% of their time to the practice of general internal medicine were included in this analysis. The respondents were satisfied with their primary role as clinicians dealing with complex, undifferentiated problems caring for the total patient and providing consultation. Guidelines for the referral of patients to general internists, computerization of test results, recruitment of general internal medicine fellows and more confidence in the future of general internal medicine were some of the solutions considered likely to increase professional satisfaction. The respondents involved in teaching suggested additional solutions, such as an opportunity to improve their teaching and evidence-based medicine skills and a greater recognition for their teaching efforts. Few of the general internists conducted research, barriers included lack of personal and project funding, and pressure to generate clinical earnings. In the domain of professional interpersonal issues, women were significantly more likely than men to rate having a mentor, peer support groups, ongoing career counselling, promotion and tenure guidelines for parental leave, availability of on-site day care, addressing gender discrimination and adoption of gender-neutral language as likely to improve the work environment. The primary role of general internists is that of patient-centred clinician. Our findings suggest that general

  20. Multi-disciplinary decision making in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Ann; Murphy, Aileen; Bradley, Colin

    2018-04-09

    Purpose Internationally, healthcare systems are moving towards delivering care in an integrated manner which advocates a multi-disciplinary approach to decision making. Such an approach is formally encouraged in the management of Atrial Fibrillation patients through the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. Since the emergence of new oral anticoagulants switching between oral anticoagulants (OACs) has become prevalent. This case study considers the role of multi-disciplinary decision making, given the complex nature of the agents. The purpose of this paper is to explore Irish General Practitioners' (GPs) experience of switching between all OACs for Arial Fibrillation (AF) patients; prevalence of multi-disciplinary decision making in OAC switching decisions and seeks to determine the GP characteristics that appear to influence the likelihood of multi-disciplinary decision making. Design/methodology/approach A probit model is used to determine the factors influencing multi-disciplinary decision making and a multinomial logit is used to examine the factors influencing who is involved in the multi-disciplinary decisions. Findings Results reveal that while some multi-disciplinary decision-making is occurring (64 per cent), it is not standard practice despite international guidelines on integrated care. Moreover, there is a lack of patient participation in the decision-making process. Female GPs and GPs who have initiated prescriptions for OACs are more likely to engage in multi-disciplinary decision-making surrounding switching OACs amongst AF patients. GPs with training practices were less likely to engage with cardiac consultants and those in urban areas were more likely to engage with other (non-cardiac) consultants. Originality/value For optimal decision making under uncertainty multi-disciplinary decision-making is needed to make a more informed judgement and to improve treatment decisions and reduce the opportunity cost of making the wrong decision.

  1. Referral bias in ALS epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logroscino, Giancarlo; Marin, Benoit; Piccininni, Marco; Arcuti, Simona; Chiò, Adriano; Hardiman, Orla; Rooney, James; Zoccolella, Stefano; Couratier, Philippe; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Beghi, Ettore

    2018-01-01

    Despite concerns about the representativeness of patients from ALS tertiary centers as compared to the ALS general population, the extent of referral bias in clinical studies remains largely unknown. Using data from EURALS consortium we aimed to assess nature, extent and impact of referral bias. Four European ALS population-based registries located in Ireland, Piedmont, Puglia, Italy, and Limousin, France, covering 50 million person-years, participated. Demographic and clinic characteristics of ALS patients diagnosed in tertiary referral centers were contrasted with the whole ALS populations enrolled in registries in the same geographical areas. Patients referred to ALS centers were younger (with difference ranging from 1.1 years to 2.4 years), less likely to present a bulbar onset, with a higher proportion of familial antecedents and a longer survival (ranging from 11% to 15%) when compared to the entire ALS population in the same geographic area. A trend for referral bias is present in cohorts drawn from ALS referral centers. The magnitude of the possible referral bias in a particular tertiary center can be estimated through a comparison with ALS patients drawn from registry in the same geographic area. Studies based on clinical cohorts should be cautiously interpreted. The presence of a registry in the same area may improve the complete ascertainment in the referral center.

  2. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conway, R

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant\\'s confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant\\'s self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  3. The identification of the general practice registrar needing assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladman G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDoctors undertaking vocational training in general practicein Australia may require assistance, in addition to thenormal training offered as part of their training programme.Issues requiring assistance may go undetected for a periodof time. Delay in the identification of issues leads to delay inthe provision of the assistance. The aim of this study is todetermine the most common reasons registrars requireextra assistance, and how these issues are identified. Thefindings of this study will provide direction for 21 regionallybased training providers (RTPs to develop improved toolsto ensure earlier detection of registrars requiring assistance.MethodThis study is based on qualitative research methods, usingsemi-structured interviews with senior medical educationstaff of four regional general practice training providers inVictoria, Australia.ResultsIssues identified included language and cultural issues,applied knowledge and skills, attitude and professionalism,and health and family issues.The principal method that training providers identifiedissues was via the GP supervisor. This was predominantly byinformal communication, rather than formal evaluationsheets. Other methods included the external clinicalteaching visit and other training formative assessments.These more formalised procedures were more likely toidentify issues later than desired. They were also used as away of clarifying suspected problems. The selection processwas not felt to be helpful, and the examinations providedinformation too late.ConclusionAn increased awareness of the potential issues leading to aregistrar to require assistance enables identification andsubsequent action to occur in a more timely and moreuseful fashion. Informal communication between practicesand training programme staff should be encouraged toenable these issues to be dealt with early in training.

  4. A comparison of disease prevalence in general practice in the Netherlands and in England & Wales.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, D.; Schellevis, F.; Linden, M. van der; Westert, G.

    2006-01-01

    General practice-based morbidity surveys have been conducted in the Netherlands and in England and Wales primarily to estimate disease prevalence and examine health inequalities. We have compared disease prevalence in general practice reported in the second Dutch Natinal Survey of General Practice

  5. SEX-DIFFERENCES AMONG RECIPIENTS OF BENZODIAZEPINES IN DUTCH GENERAL-PRACTICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waals, F. W.; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective-To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting-Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  6. Bion's 'protomental system' and psychosomatic illness in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, K

    1984-06-01

    The work of Wilfred Bion, developing the psychoanalytic theories of Freud and Klein on the origins of anxiety in childhood, includes the hypothesis of a protomental system. This he defined as a matrix in the human organism in which physical and mental are at first undifferentiated. His postulate is that this system which equips human beings for life in a group is in conflict with their needs as individuals. The view of the world mediated by basic assumptions, relatively mindless, functioning by unconscious common consent, has a close association with psychosomatic illness. But individuals feel the need for a working relationship with others, where thought can be applied to problems before taking action. Within the family--a special case of a work group--the continuing experience by the infant of parental containment of its anxieties, through a process of projection and introjection, develops its capacity for thinking about frustration rather than evading it. The hypothesis is, that without this experience, frustration may lead to basic assumption mentality and psychosomatic illness rather than emotionality and thought. These ideas have been found useful in general practice as in the five cases described.

  7. Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, and Confidence of Australian General Practice Registrars

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    Caryl A. Nowson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and confidence were assessed in General Practice Registrars (GPRs throughout Australia. Of approximately 6,000 GPRs invited to complete a nutrition survey, 93 respondents (2% completed the online survey, with 89 (20 males, 69 females providing demographic and educational information. Fifty-one percent had graduated from medical school within the last two years. From a list of 11 dietary strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk, respondents selected weight loss (84%, reducing saturated fats (90%, a maximum of two alcoholic drinks/day (82%, and increasing vegetables (83% as “highly appropriate” strategies, with only 51% indicating that salt reduction was “highly appropriate.” Two-thirds of registrars felt “moderately” (51% or “very” confident (16% providing nutrition advice. Most of them (84% recalled receiving information during training, but only 34% recalled having to demonstrate nutritional knowledge. The results indicate that this group of Australian GPRs understood most of the key dietary recommendations for reducing cardiovascular risk but lacked consensus regarding the recommendation to reduce salt intake and expressed mixed levels of confidence in providing nutritional advice. Appropriate nutrition education before and after graduation is recommended for GPRs to ensure the development of skills and confidence to support patients to make healthy dietary choices and help prevent chronic diseases.

  8. REJUVENATING CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIAN PRIVATE GENERAL PRACTICE

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    PITERMAN L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid epidemiological transition globally has witnessed a rising prevalence of major chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity, chronic respiratory diseases and cancers over the past 30 years. In Malaysia, these conditions are commonly managed in primary care and published evidence has consistently shown suboptimal management and poor disease control. This in turn, has led to the massive burden of treating complications in secondary care, burden tothe patients and their families with regards to morbidity and premature death, and burden to the country with regards to premature loss of human capital. The crushing burden and escalating health care costs in managing chronic diseases pose a daunting challenge to our primary care system, as we remain traditionally oriented to care for acute, episodic illnesses. This paper re-examines the current evidence supporting the implementation of Wagner Chronic Care Model in primary careglobally; analyses the barriers of implementation of this model in the Malaysian private general practice through SWOT(strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis; and discusses fundamental solutions needed to bridge the gap to achieve better outcomes.

  9. Physician Referral Patterns

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The physician referral data was initially provided as a response to a Freedom of Information (FOIA) request. These files represent data from 2009 through June 2013...

  10. Experience as a doctor in the developing world: does it benefit the clinical and organisational performance in general practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wit Niek J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many physicians have medical experience in developing countries early in their career, but its association with their medical performance later is not known. To explore possible associations we compared primary care physicians (GPs with and without professional experience in a developing country in performance both clinical and organisational. Methods A retrospective survey using two databases to analyse clinical and organisational performance respectively. Analysis was done at the GP level and practice level. 517 GPs received a questionnaire regarding relevant working experience in a developing country. Indicators for clinical performance were: prescription, referral, external diagnostic procedures and minor procedures. We used the district health insurance data base covering 570.000 patients. Explorative secondary analysis of practice visits of 1004 GPs in 566 practices in the Netherlands from 1999 till 2001. We used a validated practice visit method (VIP; 385 indicators in 51 dimensions of practice management to compare having experience in a developing country or not. Results Almost 8% of the GPs had experience in a developing country of at least two years. These GPs referred 9,5% less than their colleagues and did more surgical procedures. However, in the multivariate analysis 'experience in a developing country' was not significantly associated with clinical performance or with other GP- and practice characteristics. 16% of the practices a GP or GPs with at least two years experience in a developing country. They worked more often in group and rural practices with less patients per fte GP and more often part-time. These practices are more hygienic, collaborate more with the hospital and score better on organisation of the practice. These practices score less on service and availability, spend less time on patients in the consultation and the quality of recording in the EMD is lower. Conclusions We found interesting

  11. Improving colorectal cancer referrals

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Claire

    2018-01-01

    The colorectal services at The Royal Bournemouth Hospital needed to adapt to meet the extra demand on fast-track patient referrals to the outpatient department, as a consequence of the changes in the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on cancer referrals in June 2015. Learning from other units, a telephone assessment clinic (TAC) triaging patients straight to colonoscopy was trialled. A Plan–Do–Study–Act (PDSA) methodology was used. A baseline study showed that ...

  12. Team climate for innovation: what difference does it make in general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Judith; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Holton, Chris; Grimm, Jane; Bubner, Tanya; Amoroso, Cheryl; Beilby, Justin; Harris, Mark F

    2007-06-01

    Teamwork in primary healthcare is associated with patient care processes and staff outcomes. The ability of teams to be innovative is a hypothesized mechanism. We examined the characteristics of general practices with good team climate for innovation, and assessed the impact of climate on chronically ill patients' assessment of their care and on the job satisfaction of the staff. Large cross-sectional study. Australian general practices. A total of 654 general practitioners and staff and 7505 chronically ill patients from 93 general practices in 6 Australian states and territories. The Team Climate Inventory and the Overall Job Satisfaction Scale, customized for use with general practices, were administered to general practitioners and practice staff, and the General Practice Assessment Survey was administered to patients. Practice characteristics were collected by survey from the principal doctor or practice manager. Mean scores of team climate in Australian general practices were similar to those reported in the UK, except that in our study there was no association between the number of doctors in a practice and their team climate. Better team climate was found in practices with fewer non-clinical staff. Team climate predicted the job satisfaction of the general practitioners and staff, irrespective of the number of practice staff. Better team climate was associated with greater satisfaction by patients with their care. Team climate is important for patient and staff satisfaction. In large general practices, separate sub-cultures may exist between administrative and clinical staff, which has implications for designing effective team interventions.

  13. Biomedicine, holism and general medical practice: responses to the 2004 General Practitioner contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkland, Kath; Harrison, Stephen; McDonald, Ruth; Grant, Suzanne; Campbell, Stephen; Guthrie, Bruce

    2008-07-01

    In 2004 a new contract was introduced for General Practitioners in the UK, which introduced a significant element of 'pay-for-performance', including both clinical and organisational targets. The introduction of this contract has caused interest across the world, particularly amongst those responsible for commissioning primary care services. It can be argued that the clinical targets in the contract (known as the Quality and Outcomes Framework, QOF) represent a move towards a more biomedical model of health and illness, which is contrary to the ideal of providing holistic (or biopsychosocial) care that has been traditionally espoused by GPs. This paper reports results from two linked studies (in England and Scotland) investigating the early stages of the new contract. We describe the way in which four practices with different organisational approaches and espoused identities have all changed their practice structures, consultations and clinical care in response to QOF in ways which will result in patients receiving a more biomedical type of care. In spite of these observed changes, respondents continued to maintain discursive claims to holism. We discuss how this disconnection between rhetoric and reality can be maintained, and consider its implications for the future development of GPs' claims to a professional identity.

  14. Organisational development in general practice: lessons from practice and professional development plans (PPDPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocking Paul

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the quality and effectiveness of clinical practice is becoming a key task within all health services. Primary medical care, as organised in the UK is composed of clinicians who work in independent partnerships (general practices that collaborate with other health care professionals. Although many practices have successfully introduced innovations, there are no organisational development structures in place that support the evolution of primary medical care towards integrated care processes. Providing incentives for attendance at passive educational events and promoting 'teamwork' without first identifying organisational priorities are interventions that have proved to be ineffective at changing clinical processes. A practice and professional development plan feasibility study was evaluated in Wales and provided the experiential basis for a summary of the lessons learnt on how best to guide organisational development systems for primary medical care. Results Practice and professional development plans are hybrids produced by the combination of ideas from management (the applied behavioural science of organisational development and education (self-directed adult learning theories and, in conceptual terms, address the lack of effectiveness of passive educational strategies by making interventions relevant to identified system wide needs. In the intervention, each practice participated in a series of multidisciplinary workshops (minimum 4 where the process outcome was the production of a practice development plan and a set of personal portfolios, and the final outcome was a realised organisational change. It was apparent during the project that organisational admission to a process of developmental planning needed to be a stepwise process, where initial interest can lead to a fuller understanding, which subsequently develops into motivation and ownership, sufficient to complete the exercise. The advantages of

  15. Organisational development in general practice: lessons from practice and professional development plans (PPDPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Hocking, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Background Improving the quality and effectiveness of clinical practice is becoming a key task within all health services. Primary medical care, as organised in the UK is composed of clinicians who work in independent partnerships (general practices) that collaborate with other health care professionals. Although many practices have successfully introduced innovations, there are no organisational development structures in place that support the evolution of primary medical care towards integrated care processes. Providing incentives for attendance at passive educational events and promoting 'teamwork' without first identifying organisational priorities are interventions that have proved to be ineffective at changing clinical processes. A practice and professional development plan feasibility study was evaluated in Wales and provided the experiential basis for a summary of the lessons learnt on how best to guide organisational development systems for primary medical care. Results Practice and professional development plans are hybrids produced by the combination of ideas from management (the applied behavioural science of organisational development) and education (self-directed adult learning theories) and, in conceptual terms, address the lack of effectiveness of passive educational strategies by making interventions relevant to identified system wide needs. In the intervention, each practice participated in a series of multidisciplinary workshops (minimum 4) where the process outcome was the production of a practice development plan and a set of personal portfolios, and the final outcome was a realised organisational change. It was apparent during the project that organisational admission to a process of developmental planning needed to be a stepwise process, where initial interest can lead to a fuller understanding, which subsequently develops into motivation and ownership, sufficient to complete the exercise. The advantages of introducing expert external

  16. Influence of population and general practice characteristics on prescribing of minor tranquilisers in primary care

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    Wagner AC

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of generalised anxiety disorders is widespread in Great Britain. Previous small-scale research has shown variations in minor tranquiliser prescribing, identifying several potential predictors of prescribing volume. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between general practice minor tranquiliser prescribing rates and practice population and general practice characteristics for all general practices in England.Methods: Multiple regression analysis of minor tranquiliser prescribing volumes during 2004/2005 for 8,291 English general practices with general practice and population variables obtained from the General Medical Services (GMS statistics, Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF, 2001 Census and 2004 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD. Results: The highest rates of minor tranquiliser prescribing were in areas with the greatest local deprivation while general practices situated in areas with larger proportions of residents of black ethnic origin had lower rates of prescribing. Other predictors of increased prescribing were general practices with older general practitioners and general practices with older registered practice populations.Conclusion: Our findings show that there is wide variation of minor tranquilisers prescribing across England which has implications regarding access to treatment and inequity of service provision. Future research should determine the barriers to equitable prescribing amongst general practices serving larger populations of black ethnic origin.

  17. A spatial analysis of the expanding roles of nurses in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearce Christopher

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes to the workforce and organisation of general practice are occurring rapidly in response to the Australian health care reform agenda, and the changing nature of the medical profession. In particular, the last five years has seen the rapid introduction and expansion of a nursing workforce in Australian general practices. This potentially creates pressures on current infrastructure in general practice. Method This study used a mixed methods, ‘rapid appraisal’ approach involving observation, photographs, and interviews. Results Nurses utilise space differently to GPs, and this is part of the diversity they bring to the general practice environment. At the same time their roles are partly shaped by the ways space is constructed in general practices. Conclusion The fluidity of nursing roles in general practice suggests that nurses require a versatile space in which to maximize their role and contribution to the general practice team.

  18. A baseline audit of referral and treatment delivered to patients in the intermediate minor oral surgery service in Croydon PCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Eunan; Gallagher, Jennifer E; Kendall, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Patients attending for primary dental care may require oral surgery procedures beyond the capability of a generalist and thus need to be treated by a dentist with greater expertise. In the United Kingdom, it is increasingly accepted that such care may be provided in primary care settings by specialists or dentists with a special interest. In response to local pressures, an intermediate minor oral surgery (IMOS) service has been established in Croydon, south west London, to provide oral surgery treatment for non-urgent patients on referral. To audit the appropriateness and quality of oral surgery referrals after triage to an IMOS service in Croydon and to set standards for future audits on this topic. An audit tool was developed in line with the local referral guidelines and agreed with local stakeholders. Information on 501 (10%) triaged referrals to IMOS practices over a 24-month period was obtained through the referral management centre. A 10% sample of referrals per month to each practice was calculated and IMOS providers randomly selected the relevant patient records. Using an agreed audit pro forma, information on the indications for referral, treatment provided, and dates relating to patient management, in addition to the age and sex of patients, was collected from the IMOS providers by one investigator. Descriptive analysis of the data was performed. Of the 501 patient records that were examined, 99% of patients were treated in IMOS practices, with only three (less than 1%) patients being referred on to hospital consultant services. The largest proportion (237; 40%) of referrals was for the extraction of teeth considered to have special difficulty, followed by lower third molars (154; 26%). Almost one-third (159; 32%) of patients were referred for more than one procedure. One in eight (72; 13%) teeth removed by the IMOS providers were recorded as a simple extraction without medical complications. In general, patients were referred appropriately to the

  19. Benefits and harms of general health checks- lifelong learning in general practice: how to read and use scientific literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arreskov, Anne Beiter; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Nielsen, Kirsten Lykke

    to assess if: • the research valid? • what are the results? • should we apply the research in our practice? Background GPs often experience difficulties in keeping up-to-date, and at times feel they reach the outer boundaries of their knowledge. The practice of medicine in which the busy physician finds...... will have a tool to assist life-long learning in practice. Based on the questions that arise in daily practice, we can learn by doing. What are the benefits and harms of general health checks? This workshop will invite participants to read the Cochrane review about general health checks and scrutinise...

  20. Continuous quality improvement in small general medical practices: the attitudes of general practitioners and other practice staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geboers, H.J.A.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Montfort, P.A.P. van; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Continuous quality improvement (CQI) offers opportunities to improve care in small-scale office-based practice. Little is yet known about the implementation of CQI in small primary care practices. We studied the attitudes of physicians and staff in small family practices to a model of

  1. The outcome of bone mineral density measurements on patients referred from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Sofia Inez; Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Rosenzweig, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporosis is increasing and the general practitioner is integral to identifying these patients. It is, therefore, of interest to characterize the referral pattern of patients scheduled for determination of bone density by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning...... calculated with respect to patient characteristics. Only 21% of the referred patients had osteoporosis and 34% had osteopenia. Of these, 24% had osteopenia and a Z-score below -1. Half of the referred patients were women less than 60 yr with a markedly low risk of osteoporosis. A BMI less than 20 kg/m(2...

  2. Community preferences in general practice: important factors for choosing a general practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Patricia; De Abreu Lourenco, Richard; Wong, Chun Yee; Haas, Marion; Goodall, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the important factors for choosing a general practitioner (GP) can inform the provision of consumer information and contribute to the design of primary care services. To identify the factors considered important when choosing a GP and to explore subgroup differences. An online survey asked about the respondent's experience of GP care and included 36 questions on characteristics important to the choice of GP. An Australian population sample (n = 2481) of adults aged 16 or more. Principal components analysis identified dimensions for the creation of summated scales, and regression analysis was used to identify patient characteristics associated with each scale. The 36 questions were combined into five scales (score range 1-5) labelled: care quality, types of services, availability, cost and practice characteristics. Care quality was the most important factor (mean = 4.4, SD = 0.6) which included questions about technical care, interpersonal care and continuity. Cost (including financial and time cost) was also important (mean = 4.1, SD = 0.6). The least important factor was types of services (mean = 3.3, SD = 0.9), which covered the range of different services provided by or co-located with the practice. Frequent GP users and females had higher scores across all 5 scales, while the importance of care quality increased with age. When choosing a GP, information about the quality of care would be most useful to consumers. Respondents varied in the importance given to some factors including types of services, suggesting the need for a range of alternative primary care services. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Experimenting clinical pathways in general practice: a focus group investigation with Italian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Zannini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB, Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods. Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results. Four major themes emerged: i clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions. Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment.

  4. Experimenting Clinical Pathways in General Practice: a Focus Group Investigation with Italian General Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannini, Lucia; Cattaneo, Cesarina; Peduzzi, Paolo; Lopiccoli, Silvia; Auxilia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB), Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs) care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs) held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results Four major themes emerged: i) clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii) they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii) nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv) the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment. Acknowledgments the Authors thank Dr. AP. Cantù and Dr D. Cereda who participated in the two focus groups as observers. PMID:25181354

  5. Training medical students in general practice: a qualitative study among general practitioner trainers in Sri Lanka

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    R.P.J.C. Ramanayake

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Worldwide Family Medicine has gained an important place in the undergraduate medical curriculum over the last few decades and general practices have become training centers for students. Exposure to patients early in the disease process, out patient management of common problems, follow up of chronic diseases and psychosocial aspects of health and disease are educational advantages of community based training but such training could have varying impact on patients, students and trainers. This study explored the views of General Practitioner (GP trainers on their experience in training students. Methodology: This qualitative study was conducted among GP trainers of the faculty of medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, to explore their experience on wide range of issues related to their role as GP trainers. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes expressed were identified. Results: Altruistic reasons, self-satisfaction, self-esteem and opportunity to improve their knowledge were the motivations for their involvement in teaching. Teachers were confident of their clinical and teaching skills. They perceived that patients were willing participants of the process and benefited from it. There was a positive impact on consultation dynamics. Time pressure was the major problem and ideal number of trainees per session was two. They were willing to attend teacher training workshops to update their knowledge. Conclusions: GP trainers driven by altruistic reasons were willing participants of student training process. The perceived advantages of involvement of teaching for trainers and patients were an encouragement for potential trainers. University should organize training sessions for trainers which will boost their knowledge, confidence and teaching skills which will eventually benefit students.

  6. Towards an educational continuing professional development (EdCPD) curriculum for Australian general practice supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon; Ingham, Gerard; Wearne, Susan; Saltis, Tony; Canalese, Rosa; McArthur, Lawrie

    2015-01-01

    Within the apprenticeship model of general practice training, the majority of teaching and learning occurs in the practice under the guidance of the general practice supervisor. One of the foundations of a high-quality general practice training program is the delivery of relevant, evidence-based educational continuing professional development (EdCPD) for general practice supervisors. Despite The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) standards requiring EdCPD, there is currently no standardised educational curriculum for Australian general practice supervisors. There are a number of emerging themes with significant implications for future general practice supervisor EdCPD. These include clinical supervision and structural issues, capacity constraints, and emerging educational issues. We propose the development of a core curriculum for general practice supervisors that is competency-based and evidence-based, and reflects the changing landscape of Australian general practice training. A national general practice supervisor core curriculum would provide standardisation, encourage collaboration, allow for regional adaptation, focus on developing competencies and require rigorous evaluation.

  7. 11. Basic Practice Methods in University General Piano Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raducanu Cristina Andra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to present and analyse some practicing piano methods which are used during secondary piano lessons at the university. The final goal was to show the benefits of these practice strategies in the process of learning a new piano piece. Experience demonstrated that in order to keep students motivated, there is a need for them to know how to approach and study a new repertoire and to be sure that implementing these practice methods will help them gain the necessary skills which will enable them to fluently perform a musical piece.

  8. Management and marketing for the general practice dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Earl; Bhatia, Sanjeev

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews trends in the dental marketplace. Marketing is an essential element of dentistry. Communicating treatment options with patients is one aspect of marketing. Treatment planning helps patients understand the relationships between oral health, occlusion, temporomandibular joint function, and systemic health. Through marketing, dental practice owners inform patients of ever-changing treatment modalities. Understanding treatment options allows patients to make better, informed choices. More options leads to a higher level of care and more comprehensive dental treatment. Managing a practice requires tracking its financial health. Economic statistics measure the effect of management decisions that mark the direction of a dental practice.

  9. Provision of medical student teaching in UK general practices: a cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alex; Rosenthal, Joe; Al-Seaidy, Marwa; Gray, Denis Pereira; McKinley, Robert K

    2015-06-01

    Health care is increasingly provided in general practice. To meet this demand, the English Department of Health recommends that 50% of all medical students should train for general practice after qualification. Currently 19% of medical students express general practice as their first career choice. Undergraduate exposure to general practice positively influences future career choice. Appropriate undergraduate exposure to general practice is therefore highly relevant to workforce planning This study seeks to quantify current exposure of medical students to general practice and compare it with past provision and also with postgraduate provision. A cross-sectional questionnaire in the UK. A questionnaire regarding provision of undergraduate teaching was sent to the general practice teaching leads in all UK medical schools. Information was gathered on the amount of undergraduate teaching, how this was supported financially, and whether there was an integrated department of general practice. The data were then compared with results from previous studies of teaching provision. The provision of postgraduate teaching in general practice was also examined. General practice teaching for medical students increased from student has fallen by 2 weeks since 2002. Medical schools providing financial data delivered 14.6% of the clinical curriculum and received 7.1% of clinical teaching funding. The number of departments of general practice has halved since 2002. Provision of postgraduate teaching has tripled since 2000. Current levels of undergraduate teaching in general practice are too low to fulfil future workforce requirements and may be falling. Financial support for current teaching is disproportionately low and the mechanism counterproductive. Central intervention may be required to solve this. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  10. Provision of medical student teaching in UK general practices: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alex; Rosenthal, Joe; Al-Seaidy, Marwa; Gray, Denis Pereira; McKinley, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care is increasingly provided in general practice. To meet this demand, the English Department of Health recommends that 50% of all medical students should train for general practice after qualification. Currently 19% of medical students express general practice as their first career choice. Undergraduate exposure to general practice positively influences future career choice. Appropriate undergraduate exposure to general practice is therefore highly relevant to workforce planning Aim This study seeks to quantify current exposure of medical students to general practice and compare it with past provision and also with postgraduate provision. Design and setting A cross-sectional questionnaire in the UK. Method A questionnaire regarding provision of undergraduate teaching was sent to the general practice teaching leads in all UK medical schools. Information was gathered on the amount of undergraduate teaching, how this was supported financially, and whether there was an integrated department of general practice. The data were then compared with results from previous studies of teaching provision. The provision of postgraduate teaching in general practice was also examined. Results General practice teaching for medical students increased from teaching in 1968 to 13.0% by 2008; since then, the percentage has plateaued. The total amount of general practice teaching per student has fallen by 2 weeks since 2002. Medical schools providing financial data delivered 14.6% of the clinical curriculum and received 7.1% of clinical teaching funding. The number of departments of general practice has halved since 2002. Provision of postgraduate teaching has tripled since 2000. Conclusion Current levels of undergraduate teaching in general practice are too low to fulfil future workforce requirements and may be falling. Financial support for current teaching is disproportionately low and the mechanism counterproductive. Central intervention may be required to solve

  11. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice: the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D French

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP in general practice. METHODS: General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention. We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data. All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. RESULTS: 47 practices (53 GPs were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05 and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60. Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10 for x-ray or CT-scan. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant

  12. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice: the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simon D; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Mortimer, Duncan; Francis, Jill J; Michie, Susan; Spike, Neil; Schattner, Peter; Kent, Peter; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally E

    2013-01-01

    This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP) in general practice. General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control) or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention). We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions) and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP) level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes) and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data). All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. 47 practices (53 GPs) were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs) to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05) and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60). Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10) for x-ray or CT-scan. The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant changes in actual behaviour. Australian New Zealand

  13. Dealing with major depression in general practice | Freeman | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 55, No 4 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Nigerian Journal of General Practice - Vol 10, No 2 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influencers of midwives'practice of interpersonal communication and counselling [IPCC]skills post workshop · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. BO Akin-Otiko, BR Bhengu, 31-36 ...

  15. Subjective memory complaints in general practice predicts future dementia: a 4-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Vogel, Asmus Mejling; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Many older patients in general practice have subjective memory complaints (SMC); however, not all share this information with their general practitioner (GP). The association between SMC and future cognitive decline or dementia is not clear, especially in a general practice population. The aim...

  16. An integrative review of facilitators and barriers influencing collaboration and teamwork between general practitioners and nurses working in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    To identify facilitators and barriers influencing collaboration and teamwork between general practitioners and nurses working in general (family) practice. Internationally, a shortage of doctors entering and remaining in general practice and an increasing burden of chronic disease has diversified the nurse's role in this setting. Despite a well-established general practice nursing workforce, little attention has been paid to the ways doctors and nurses collaborate in this setting. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Life, Cochrane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute Library of Systematic Reviews and Trove (dissertation and theses) were searched for papers published between 2000 and May 2014. This review was informed by the approach of Whittemore and Knafl (2005). All included papers were assessed for methodological quality. Findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Eleven papers met the inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis revealed three themes common to the facilitators of and barriers to collaboration and teamwork between GPs in general practice: (1) roles and responsibilities; (2) respect, trust and communication; and (3) hierarchy, education and liability. This integrative review has provided insight into issues around role definition, communication and organizational constraints which influence the way nurses and general practitioners collaborate in a team environment. Future research should investigate in more detail the ways doctors and nurses work together in general practice and the impact of collaboration on nursing leadership and staff retention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Gender and Psychiatric Morbidity at First Contact in General Practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gender is a predictor of prevalence of psychiatric morbidity. The present study was to examine gender difference, prevalence and pattern of psychiatric morbidity among attendees of a general outpatient clinic in a tertiary hospital in sokoto, Nigeria. Methods: A total of 267,000 patients attended the general ...

  18. Dealing with bipolar disorder in general practice | Rodseth | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... it is in the general realm of specialist diagnosis and care, general practitioners can play an important role in early identification of the disorder and long-term management, in shared care with the psychiatrist. Keywords: bipolar disorder, mania, hypomania, depression, DSM-IV criteria, bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder ...

  19. Hesitative introduction of E-mail consultations in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Ton, C.; Tates, K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care reported in 2005 that 70% of internet users would want to have the opportunity to consult their own general practitioner by e-mail [1]. Since January 1, 2006, general practitioners in the Netherlands are reimbursed 4.50 euro for

  20. Practices, patients and (imperfect data - feasibility of a randomised controlled clinical drug trial in German general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical (drug trials supply high quality evidence for therapeutic strategies in primary care. Until now, experience with drug trials in German general practice has been sparse. In 2007/2008, the authors conducted an investigator-initiated, non-commercial, double-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial (HWI-01 to assess the clinical equivalence of ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI. Here, we report the feasibility of this trial in German general practices and the implementation of Good Clinical Practice (GCP standards as defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH in mainly inexperienced general practices. Methods This report is based on the experience of the HWI-01 study conducted in 29 German general practices. Feasibility was defined by 1 successful practice recruitment, 2 sufficient patient recruitment, 3 complete and accurate data collection and 4 appropriate protection of patient safety. Results The final practice recruitment rate was 18%. In these practices, 79 of 195 screened UTI patients were enrolled. Recruitment differed strongly between practices (range 0-12, mean 2.8 patients per practice and was below the recruitment goal of approximately 100 patients. As anticipated, practice nurses became the key figures in the screening und recruitment of patients. Clinical trial demands, in particular for completing symptom questionnaires, documentation of source data and reporting of adverse events, did not agree well with GPs' documentation habits and required support from study nurses. In many cases, GPs and practice staff seemed to be overwhelmed by the amount of information and regulations. No sudden unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs were observed during the trial. Conclusions To enable drug trials in general practice, it is necessary to adapt the setup of clinical research infrastructure to the needs of GPs and

  1. Provision of diagnostic and preventive services in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D S; Spencer, A J

    2003-03-01

    Diagnosis and prevention are among the most frequently provided services in Australian private general dental practice, and have increased over recent times. The aims of this study were to examine the provision of examinations, radiographs, prophylaxis and topical fluoride, and to assess whether these services varied by patient, visit and oral health characteristics. Data were collected by a mailed survey of a random sample of dentists from each State/Territory in Australia in 1998-99 with a response rate of 71%. Data were collected from a log of service items provided on a typical day. Multivariate analyses of services showed that emergency visits were associated with higher rates [RR = Rate ratio, 95%CI] of radiographs (RR = 1.32, 1.06-1.66) but lower rates of prophylaxis (RR = 0.37, 0.29-0.48) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.20, 0.08-0.47) compared to non-emergency visits. Capital city patients had a higher rate of topical fluoride (RR = 2.06, 1.17-3.64) services than non-capital city patients. Patients with decayed teeth had a lower rate of prophylaxis services (RR = 0.82, 0.68-0.99) than patients with no decay. Compared to the reference of caries, patients with aesthetic problems had lower rates of radiographs (RR = 0. 19, 0.08-0.47) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.24, 0.08-0.71), those with cuspal fracture/failed restoration also had lower rates of radiographs (RR = 0.54, 0.37-0.80) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.52, 0.28-0.95), those with denture problems had lower rates of examinations (RR = 0.53, 0.32-0.87), radiographs (RR = 0.05, 0.01-0.28), prophylaxis (RR = 0.13, 0.04-0.37) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.04, 0.01-0.32), those with periodontal disease had higher rates of examinations (RR = 1.45, 1.13-1.85) and prophylaxis (RR = 2.39, 1.79-3.19), those with pulpal/periapical infection had lower rates of examination (RR = 0.55, 0.42-0.74) and prophylaxis (RR = 0.36, 0.19-0.66), but higher rates of radiographs (RR = 1.92, 1.48-2.50), those with recall

  2. Acute Care Referral Systems in Liberia: Transfer and Referral Capabilities in a Low-Income Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jimin; Barreix, Maria; Babcock, Christine; Bills, Corey B

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Following two decades of armed conflict in Liberia, over 95% of health care facilities were partially or completely destroyed. Although the Liberian health system has undergone significant rehabilitation, one particular weakness is the lack of organized systems for referral and prehospital care. Acute care referral systems are a critical component of effective health care delivery and have led to improved quality of care and patient outcomes. Problem This study aimed to characterize the referral and transfer systems in the largest county of Liberia. A cross-sectional, health referral survey of a representative sample of health facilities in Montserrado County, Liberia was performed. A systematic random sample of all primary health care (PHC) clinics, fraction proportional to district population size, and all secondary and tertiary health facilities were included in the study sample. Collected data included baseline information about the health facility, patient flow, and qualitative and quantitative data regarding referral practices. A total of 62 health facilities-41 PHC clinics, 11 health centers (HCs), and 10 referral hospitals (RHs)-were surveyed during the 6-week study period. In sum, three percent of patients were referred to a higher-level of care. Communication between health facilities was largely unsystematic, with lack of specific protocols (n=3; 5.0%) and standardized documentation (n=26; 44.0%) for referral. While most health facilities reported walking as the primary means by which patients presented to initial health facilities (n=50; 81.0%), private vehicles, including commercial taxis (n=37; 60.0%), were the primary transport mechanism for referral of patients between health facilities. This study identified several weaknesses in acute care referral systems in Liberia, including lack of systematic care protocols for transfer, documentation, communication, and transport. However, several informal, well-functioning mechanisms for

  3. Immediate reporting of chest X-rays referred from general practice by reporting radiographers: a single centre feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznitza, N; Piper, K; Rowe, S; Bhowmik, A

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of radiographer-led immediate reporting of chest radiographs (CXRs) referred from general practice. This 4-month feasibility study (November 2016 to March 2017) was carried out in a single radiology department at an acute general hospital. Comparison was made between CXRs that received an immediate and routine report to determine the number of lung cancers diagnosed, time to diagnosis of lung cancer, time to computed tomography (CT), and number of urgent referrals to respiratory medicine. Forty of 186 sessions (22%) were covered by radiographer immediate reporting. Of the 1,687 CXRs referred from general practice, 558 (33.1%) received an immediate report (radiographer or radiologist). Twenty-two (of 36) CT examinations performed were following an abnormal CXR with an immediate report (mean 0.8 scans/week). Time from CXR to CT was shorter in the immediate report group (n=22 mean 0.9 days SD=2.3) compared to routine reporting (n=14; mean 6.5 SD=3.2; F=27.883, preporting group (mean 4.1 SD=2.9) compared to routine reporting (mean 10.6; SD=4.5; F=11.59, preporting service. Patients can be taken off the lung cancer pathway sooner with the introduction of radiographer immediate reporting of CXRs and this may improve outcomes for patients. A definitive study assessing outcomes is required to determine whether this will have an impact mortality and morbidity for patients. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of urinary incontinence in women in general practice: observational study.

    OpenAIRE

    Seim, A.; Sivertsen, B.; Eriksen, B. C.; Hunskaar, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine what is attainable when treating urinary incontinence in women in general practice. DESIGN--Observational study with 12 months' follow up. Interview and clinical examination before, during, and after treatment of women seeking help for urinary incontinence in general practice. SETTING--General practice in the rural district of Rissa, Norway. SUBJECTS--105 women aged 20 or more with urinary incontinence. INTERVENTIONS--Treatment with pelvic floor exercises, electrostimula...

  5. Practical likelihood analysis for spatial generalized linear mixed models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonat, W. H.; Ribeiro, Paulo Justiniano

    2016-01-01

    , respectively, examples of binomial and count datasets modeled by spatial generalized linear mixed models. Our results show that the Laplace approximation provides similar estimates to Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood, Monte Carlo expectation maximization, and modified Laplace approximation. Some advantages...

  6. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Correct estimation of the severity of burns is important to obtain the right treatment of the patient and to avoid over- and undertriage. In this study we aimed to assess how often the guidelines for referral of burn injured patients are met at the national burn centre (NBC), Denmar...

  7. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Correct estimation of the severity of burns is important to obtain the right treatment of the patient and to avoid over- and undertriage. In this study we aimed to assess how often the guidelines for referral of burn injured patients are met at the national burn centre (NBC), Denmark....

  8. Nigerian Journal of General Practice - Vol 11, No 2 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Feeding Practice and the Use of Home-made and Food-based fluids during diarrhea episodes by mothers in Benin-City · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL ... Pattern of Disease Occurrence among Prisoners in Owerri Central Prison, Imo State, SouthEast Nigeria (A 5-Year Review: 2006-2011) · EMAIL FULL TEXT ...

  9. Dealing with bipolar disorder in general practice | Rodseth | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 53, No 6 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  10. Gatekeepers and the Gateway--a mixed-methods inquiry into practitioners' referral behaviour to the Gateway Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Jason; Peters, David

    2009-03-01

    The Gateway Clinic is a specialist NHS service in South London providing acupuncture and Chinese medicine. The clinic receives a diverse range of referrals from an expanding population of local general practitioners (GPs). This study explores the referral behaviour of GPs and other primary care users of the Gateway Clinic. A pragmatic mixed-methods approach was used, combining mapping of GPs' usage of the Gateway as taken from the clinic's database between the years 2000 and 2005, a questionnaire survey of the referring primary care practitioners in 2005, and data, including a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts from semi-structured interviews of a purposive sample of those GPs who refer. Doctors in the community refer a wide range of health problems to the Gateway Clinic. The most common referrals were musculoskeletal conditions (38-44%), general and unspecified conditions (11-14%), blood and immune system conditions (6-12%), psychological conditions (8-13%), neurological conditions (6-9%), gynaecological conditions (5-6%) and digestive conditions (5-6%). The health problems referred by local healthcare practitioners correlate strongly with the patient profile seen in private acupuncture practice. Between 2000 and 2005 numbers of healthcare practitioners increased by 218% resulting in a 300% increase in patient referrals made to the clinic; the mean frequency of referral per practitioner increased by 71%. Analysis of the qualitative data suggests that positive clinical experience encourages GPs to increase the range of conditions they refer leading to the development of informal referral guidelines. The Gateway Clinic has become an increasingly popular referral resource. The influences that drive referral to the clinic are multiple and follow "tacit guidelines". GPs select patients on the basis of their individual clinical experience, informed by positive patient feedback and often only after more conventional medical treatment options have been

  11. Specific and non-specific symptoms of colorectal cancer and contact to general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Søndergaard, Jens

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve survival rates for colorectal cancer, referral guidelines have been implemented. First step in the diagnostic process is for the individual to recognize the symptoms and contact his/her general practitioner (GP) for evaluation. OBJECTIVES: To determine (i) the prevalence...... of specific and non-specific symptom experiences indicative of colorectal cancer, (ii) the proportion of subsequent contacts to GPs, (iii) to explore the possible differences in symptom experience and contact to GPs between age and sex. METHODS: A nationwide study of 100000 adults, aged 20 years and older......, were randomly selected in the general population and invited to participate in an internet-based survey. Items regarding experience of specific and non-specific alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer within the preceding 4 weeks and contact to GP were included. RESULTS: A total of 49706 subjects completed...

  12. [What factors aid in the recruitment of general practice as a career? An enquiry by interview of general practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natanzon, Iris; Ose, D; Szecsenyi, J; Joos, S

    2010-05-01

    In some parts of Germany there is already a lack of general practitioners (GPs). The reasons for this lack are complex. On the one hand there is an increasing demand for GPs as a result to demographic changes and an increase in the number of chronic diseases. On the other hand fewer medical students decide to become a general practitioner. The aim of this study was to explore, from the perspective of GPs, factors influencing the choice of general practice as a career. Also analysed is the extent to which those factors influence medical students in their carrier choice. 16 GPs were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis according to Mayring has been assisted by the Atlas.ti software program. GPs thought that the occupational orientation of medical students would be strongly dependent on the attractiveness of their future profession. Factors affecting the day-to-day work of general practice and may deterring the carrier choice of students were: poor working and general conditions leading to an increasing dissatisfaction among GPs; decreasing prestige of GPs caused by changed personal and occupational values and attitudes within the society; as well as poor representation and image of general practice as a discipline within the medical curriculum. Various approaches aimed at different target groups can be derived from these identified factors: the government providing general and occupational conditions that would relieve GPs of excessive bureaucracy; universities and medical associations meeting the challenge by improving undergraduate and postgraduate education in general practice; and GPs themselves giving a more self-confident presentation of general practice. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart * New York.

  13. Protocol for the Quick Clinical study: a randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of an online evidence retrieval system on decision-making in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidd Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online information retrieval systems have the potential to improve patient care but there are few comparative studies of the impact of online evidence on clinicians' decision-making behaviour in routine clinical work. Methods/design A randomized controlled parallel design is employed to assess the effectiveness of an online evidence retrieval system, Quick Clinical (QC in improving clinical decision-making processes in general practice. Eligible clinicians are randomised either to receive access or not to receive access to QC in their consulting rooms for 12 months. Participants complete pre- and post trial surveys. Two-hundred general practitioners are recruited. Participants must be registered to practice in Australia, have a computer with Internet access in their consulting room and use electronic prescribing. Clinicians planning to retire or move to another practice within 12 months or participating in any other clinical trial involving electronic extraction of prescriptions data are excluded from the study. The primary end-points for the study is clinician acceptance and use of QC and the resulting change in decision-making behaviour. The study will examine prescribing patterns related to frequently prescribed medications where there has been a recent significant shift in recommendations regarding their use based upon new evidence. Secondary outcome measures include self-reported changes in diagnosis, patient education, prescriptions written, investigations and referrals. Discussion A trial under experimental conditions is an effective way of examining the impact of using QC in routine general practice consultations.

  14. Standard practice for liquid penetrant examination for general industry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for penetrant examination of materials. Penetrant testing is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, shrinkage, laminations, through leaks, or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance testing. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, ferrous and nonferrous metals, and of nonmetallic materials such as nonporous glazed or fully densified ceramics, as well as certain nonporous plastics, and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a liquid penetrant examination process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain its applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications and procedures dealing with the liquid penetrant testing of parts and materials. Agreement by the customer requesting penetrant inspection is strongly rec...

  15. Criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    An accurate age-sex register was used to identify patients in a practice who might be suffering from hypertension and to record the criteria on which the diagnosis was based. Information about blood pressure readings, diagnostic labels and treatment at the time of diagnosis were noted. The definition of hypertension sufficient to require treatment was a recorded diastolic pressure of 110 mm Hg or more on three occasion. Using these criteria, only 12 per cent of patients qualified.

  16. Patient exposure in general dental practice in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velders, X.L.; Selling, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    To estimate the population risk due to dental radiography an investigation was started among 1200 dental practitioners. A questionnaire was set up to inventory commonly applied indications of X-ray examinations, the number of examinations and the organizational actions taken by the dentists to limit radiation doses to the patients. Information was gathered on the type of X-ray machines, the use of aiming devices, protective measurements for patients and dental staff, developing procedures and the type of films. A number of practical tests was applied to obtain a quantitative impression of patient doses in accordance with special circumstances. For the practical tests films and lithium fluoride TLD-100 chips (Harshaw) were used to determine the beam diameter, the exposure of the X-ray machine and the scatter at a set distance of the middle of the beam, developing circumstances as well as entrance and exist skin doses measured on the skin of a patient. The results of 544 dental practices will be discussed. Finally an estimation of the possible extent of reduction in patient exposure in the Netherlands will be made

  17. Management of gout in a South Auckland general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reaves E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT: In New Zealand, the highest prevalence of gout is in Maori and Pacific people. Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB has the highest Maori and Pacific population of any New Zealand District Health Board. A CMDHB study found that a high proportion of patients with gout were also at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEMS: The primary objective was to examine whether the control of gout had changed over time at one clinic. The secondary objective was to assess the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with gout at that clinic. RESULTS: The mean serum uric acid level of patients with gout in the practice had risen in comparison with a similar audit carried out in March 2009. This indicates that the control of gout for patients at the practice has worsened over time. Many patients had not had an annual serum uric acid test. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT: A repeat uric acid level was scheduled for all patients with gout in the practice, with follow-up appointments to be arranged if the result was abnormal. LESSONS: Gout is often suboptimally managed. Serum uric acid levels may only be tested when a patient presents with an acute attack of gout. Consideration should be given to a minimum of annual serum uric acid levels. Appropriate management of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in this particular cohort is important and should be a particular focus of care.

  18. Remuneration, workload, and allocation of time in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.J. van den; Westert, G.P.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bakker, D.H. de; Zee, J. van der

    2006-01-01

    Background: General Practitioners (GPs) can cope with workload by, among others, spending more hours in patient care or by spending less time per patient. The way GPs are paid might affect the way they cope with workload. From an economical point of view, capitation payment is an incentive to

  19. General principles of advertising practices and consumer protection

    OpenAIRE

    Slánská, Martina

    2008-01-01

    Diploma thesis provides an overview of legal and ethical regulation of advertising, defines the basic concepts in advertising, summarizes the functions and objectives of advertising and characterized various forms of advertising by the communication media. Through the questionnaire survey detects and analyzes the general attitudes towards advertising as specific views on ethically problematic advertisements.

  20. Continuous Morbidity Registration at Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network 2009.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Mexican flu pandemic was limited to a mild pandemic, although the flu incidence rate was higher than in the previous three seasons. At the peak of the epidemic 189 per 100.000 registered patients consulted their general practitioner (GP). The sentinel GP’s of NIVEL registered the number of new

  1. Dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder in general practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTSD is accompanied by a range of psychobiological alterations, including changes in brain structure and functioning. General practitioners have an important role to play in identifying and assisting those in need of help. Efficacious psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies are available for PTSD, i.e. cognitive behavioural ...

  2. Recognizing and helping narcotic addicts in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, I W

    1978-10-01

    It is rare for many general practitioners to be consulted by a narcotic addict. It can be a disturbing experience. Those who practise in urban areas of low socioeconomic status where there is high youth unemployment are more likely to meet addicted young people, but the experiences are uneven, even in this context.

  3. Nutrition counselling in general practice: the stages of change model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Healthy lifestyles in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases are of utmost importance for people with non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and/or dyslipidemia. Because of their continuous contact with almost all segments of the population, general practitioners can play an

  4. Communicating fatigue in general practice and the role of gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwesen, L.; Bensing, J.; Brink-Muinen, A. van den

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to obtain more insight into the health condition of fatigued patients, their expectations when visiting the general practitioner (GP), the way they communicate, and possible gender differences. Data consisted of 579 patient questionnaires and 440 video-observations of

  5. Factors influencing adherence to guidelines in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, RE; Vroegop, S; van der Werf, GT; Meyboom-de Jong, B; Kamps, G.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and assess the effects of general practitioner and patient characteristics on global adherence to pharmacotherapeutic guidelines. Methods: In a cross-sectional study in the northern Netherlands, a two-level multilevel model was applied to patients (n = 269,067) in 190

  6. Memory during general anesthesia : Practical and methodological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonebakker, AE; Jelicic, M; Passchier, J; Bonke, B

    1996-01-01

    Evidence coming from several studies into memory and awareness during general anesthesia suggests that in surgical patients who seem to be adequately anesthetized (i.e., unaware of what happens in the operating theater), some form of cognitive functioning is preserved. This finding has important

  7. Flexible but boring: medical students' perceptions of a career in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Nicole; McMenamin, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Australia will continue to face a general practitioner (GP) shortage unless a significant number of medical students make general practice their chosen career. Perceptions regarding general practice may influence career choices. Thus this study investigated what Australian medical students perceived to be the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing a career in general practice via an anonymous online survey. Fifty-one students indicated general practice to be their first ranked career preference, 200 indicated a career other than general practice, and 106 were undecided. Two-hundred and two students reported having been on a GP placement, whereas 88 students had not. Flexibility, continuity of patient care and work-life balance were the three most common stated advantages to pursuing a career in general practice whereas general practice being boring, poorly paid, and of low prestige were the three most common disadvantages stated. Some disadvantages stated by those with a non-GP preference were not stated by those with a GP preference (e.g. lack of procedural skills, lack of career advancement opportunities). Students with more than 80 h of GP placement experience were more likely to list the advantages of work-life balance and a diversity of problems/illnesses/patients than those with no placement experience but were also more likely to list the disadvantage of low prestige. Negative stereotypes regarding general practice continue to exist which may influence students' career choices.

  8. Relational coordination amongst health professionals involved in insulin initiation for people with type 2 diabetes in general practice: an exploratory survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Blackberry, Irene; Young, Doris; O'Neal, David; Patterson, Elizabeth; Furler, John

    2014-11-01

    The majority of people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) receive their care in general practice and will eventually require initiation of insulin as part of their management. However, this is often delayed and frequently involves referral to specialists. If insulin initiation is to become more frequent and routine within general practice, coordination of care with specialist services may be required. Relational coordination (RC) provides a framework to explore this. The aim of this study was to explore RC between specialist physicians, specialist diabetes nurses (DNEs), generalist physicians in primary care (GPs) and generalist nurses (practice nurses (PNs)) and to explore the association between RC and the initiation of insulin in general practice, and the belief that it is appropriate for this task to be carried out in general practice. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of specialist physicians, DNEs, GPs and practice nurses. We collected data on demographics, models of care and RC in relation to insulin initiation. We expected that RC would be higher between specialists than between specialists and generalists. We expected higher RC between specialists and generalists to be associated with insulin initiation in general practice and with the belief that it is appropriate for insulin initiation to be carried out in general practice. We used descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests to explore these hypotheses. 179 health professionals returned completed surveys. Specialists reported higher RC with each other and lower RC with PNs. All groups except PNs reported their highest RC with DNEs, suggesting the potential for DNEs to serve as boundary spanners. Lower RC with specialists was reported by those working within a general practice model of care. Health professionals who felt that a general practice model was appropriate reported lower communication with specialist physicians and higher shared knowledge with GPs. Given the need for coordination

  9. Enhanced implementation of low back pain guidelines in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Bro, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines may improve treatment quality, but the uptake of guideline recommendations is often incomplete and slow. Recently new low back pain guidelines are being launched in Denmark. The guidelines are considered to reduce personal and public costs...... and secondary outcomes pertain to the patient level. Assessments of outcomes are blinded and follow the intention-to-treat principle. Additionally, a process assessment will evaluate the degree to which the intervention elements will be delivered as planned, as well as measure changes in beliefs and behaviours...

  10. An audit of the quality and content of periodontal referrals and the effect of implementing referral criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkouta, Styliani; Darbar, Ulpee R

    2006-07-01

    This audit aimed to assess the effect of implementing referral criteria on the quality and content of referral letters sent by general dental practitioners (GDPs) to the periodontal department of a teaching hospital. Retrospective data were collected from a total of 450 referrals made in: (i) 1997, prior to any changes; (ii) 2000/2001, after referral guidelines were implemented; and (iii) 2004/2005, after referral criteria were redefined and circulated via Primary Care Trusts. A standardised data-collection form was used to record the information that was provided in the referral letters. This information was also compared to the findings at initial hospital consultations. There was a small improvement in the administrative details provided in the referral communications in 2000/2001 and 2004/2005. Medical history was often incomplete and was mentioned in 31-34% of referral letters. Use of the Basic Periodontal Examination (BPE) score increased from 17% (1997) to 57% (2004/2005). The information on clinical details otherwise increased in 2000/2001 with a tendency to decrease in 2004/2005. There was little agreement between the clinical details in the referral communications and the findings at consultation in the periodontal department. Following implementation of referral criteria, there was an increase in the clinical details provided in referral letters. However, the validity of the information provided by the GDPs was often questionable. The number of referrals that provided medical history details remained unchanged. Use of a pro forma was not associated with an improvement in the quality of referrals in this audit.

  11. Health promotion, primary prevention and secondary prevention in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Karl, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    The WHO´s aims regarding healthcare for the European region are mainly based on health promotion and preventive as well as supporting health education. The Ottawa Charta declares health promotion as a process to provide all people with a higher degree of self-determination regarding their health and thereby enabling them to increase it. General practitioners are of major importance regarding the medical area of behaviour oriented prevention by promoting health and acting preventive. ...

  12. The Future of General Surgery: Evolving to Meet a Changing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Eric M; Ronson, Ashley R; Gorman, Lisa J; Taber, Sarah A; Harris, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Similar to other countries, the practice of General Surgery in Canada has undergone significant evolution over the past 30 years without major changes to the training model. There is growing concern that current General Surgery residency training does not provide the skills required to practice the breadth of General Surgery in all Canadian communities and practice settings. Led by a national Task Force on the Future of General Surgery, this project aimed to develop recommendations on the optimal configuration of General Surgery training in Canada. A series of 4 evidence-based sub-studies and a national survey were launched to inform these recommendations. Generalized findings from the multiple methods of the project speak to the complexity of the current practice of General Surgery: (1) General surgeons have very different practice patterns depending on the location of practice; (2) General Surgery training offers strong preparation for overall clinical competence; (3) Subspecialized training is a new reality for today's general surgeons; and (4) Generation of the report and recommendations for the future of General Surgery. A total of 4 key recommendations were developed to optimize General Surgery for the 21st century. This project demonstrated that a high variability of practice dependent on location contrasts with the principles of implementing the same objectives of training for all General Surgery graduates. The overall results of the project have prompted the Royal College to review the training requirements and consider a more "fit for purpose" training scheme, thus ensuring that General Surgery residency training programs would optimally prepare residents for a broad range of practice settings and locations across Canada. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 48 CFR 3003.301 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Reports Of Suspected Antitrust Violations 3003.301 General. (b) The procedures at (HSAR) 48 CFR 3003.203... shall be coordinated with legal counsel for referral to the Department of Justice, if deemed appropriate. ...

  14. Epidemiology of unintentional injuries in childhood: a population-based survey in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otters, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Damen, J.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A.; Koes, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the incidence of unintentional injuries presented in general practice, and to identify children at risk from experiencing an unintentional injury. We used the data of all 0–17-yearold children from a representative survey in 96 Dutch general practices in 2001. We computed

  15. Knee complaints seen in general practice: Active sport participants versus non-sport participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); R. van Linschoten (Robbart); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein); B.W. Koes (Bart); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Since knee complaints are common among athletes and are frequently presented in general practice, it is of interest to investigate the type of knee complaints represented in general practice of athletes in comparison with those of non-athletes. Therefore, the aim of this

  16. Knee complaints seen in general practice : active sport participants versus non-sport participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; van Linschoten, Robbart; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Since knee complaints are common among athletes and are frequently presented in general practice, it is of interest to investigate the type of knee complaints represented in general practice of athletes in comparison with those of non-athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to

  17. MR imaging in patients with knee injury: an observational study in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Boks (Simone)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractKnee trauma is often seen in general practice. The availability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has improved the diagnostic possibilities after knee trauma. Nevertheless, little is known about the findings on MR imaging after knee trauma in general practice. Especially, there is

  18. Patients with shoulder syndromes in general and physiotherapy practice : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, M.J.J.; Swinkels, I.C.S.; van Dijk, C.; de Bakker, D.H.; Veenhof, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder complaints are commonly seen in general practice and physiotherapy practice. The only complaints for which general practitioners (GPs) refer more patients to the physiotherapist are back and neck pain. However, a substantial group have persistent symptoms. The first goal of this

  19. Diagnostic approach to urinary tract infections in male general practice patients: a national surveillance study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D.J. den; Dongen, M.C.J.M. van; Donker, G.A.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic urinary tract infection (UTI) studies have primarily been performed among female patients. Aim: To create a diagnostic algorithm for male general practice patients suspected of UTI. Design and setting: Surveillance study in the Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network. Method:

  20. Patients with persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms: a descriptive study from Norwegian general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Aamland, Aase; Malterud, Kirsti; Werner, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Further research on effective interventions for patients with peristent Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS) in general practice is needed. Prevalence estimates of such patients are conflicting, and other descriptive knowledge is needed for development and evaluation of effective future interventions. In this study, we aimed to estimate the consultation prevalence of patients with persistent MUPS in general practice, including patients’ characteristics and...

  1. The pattern of trauma in private general medical practice set-up Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Private general medical practice establishments appear to be treating a significant number of trauma cases including more serious ones. Aim: To find out the extent of such treatment of trauma and what has made this possible. METHODS: All trauma cases treated in a private general medical practice set up ...

  2. A consultation leaflet to improve an older patient's involvement in general practice care: a randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.V.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Weel, C. van; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a programme to enhance the involvement of older patients in their consultations in general practice. DESIGN: Cluster randomized trial, in which data was collected from different cohorts. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five general practices in the south-east

  3. Patients with shoulder syndromes in general and physiotherapy practice: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, M.; Swinkels, I.; Dijk, C. van; Bakker, D. de; Veenhof, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Shoulder complaints are commonly seen in general practice and physiotherapy practice. The only complaints for which general practitioners (GPs) refer more patients to the physiotherapist are back and neck pain. However, a substantial group have persistent symptoms. The first goal of this

  4. Telephone triage in general practices: A written case scenario study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Hanssen, S.; Huibers, L.; Giesen, P.H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General practices increasingly use telephone triage to manage patient flows. During triage, the urgency of the call and required type of care are determined. This study examined the organization and adequacy of telephone triage in general practices in the Netherlands. DESIGN:

  5. Prescribing of pain medication in palliative care: a survey in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, S.D.; Deliens, L.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Schellevis, F.; Willems, D.L.; Wal, G. van der; Eijk, J.T.M. van

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine what pain and adjuvant medication is prescribed in palliative care patients at home in The Netherlands. METHODS: In a nationwide, representative, prospective study in general practice in The Netherlands, prescribed medication was registered in 95 general practices with a listed

  6. Prescribing of pain medication in palliative care. A survey in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, Sander D.; Deliens, Luc; Zuurmond, Wouter W. A.; Schellevis, François G.; Willems, Dick L.; van der Wal, Gerrit; van Eijk, Jacques Th M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To examine what pain and adjuvant medication is prescribed in palliative care patients at home in The Netherlands. Methods In a nationwide, representative, prospective study in general practice in The Netherlands, prescribed medication was registered in 95 general practices with a listed

  7. Interpreted consultations as ‘business as usual’? : An analysis of organizational routines in general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenhagh, T.; Voisey, C.J.; Robb, N.

    2007-01-01

    UK general practices operate in an environment of high linguistic diversity, because of recent large-scale immigration and of the NHS's commitment to provide a professional interpreter to any patient if needed. Much activity in general practice is co-ordinated and patterned into organisational

  8. Experiences of a commercial weight-loss programme after primary care referral: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jodie T; Cohn, Simon R; Ahern, Amy L

    2015-04-01

    Referral to a commercial weight-loss programme is a cost-effective intervention that is already used within the NHS. Qualitative research suggests this community-based, non-medical intervention accords with participants' view of weight management as a lifestyle issue. To examine the ways in which participants' attitudes and beliefs about accessing a commercial weight management programme via their doctor relate to their weight-loss experience, and to understand how these contextual factors influence motivation and adherence to the intervention. A qualitative study embedded in a randomised controlled trial evaluating primary care referral to a commercial weight-loss programme in adults who are overweight or obese in England. The study took place from June-September 2013. Twenty-nine participants (body mass index [BMI] ≥28 kg/m(2); age ≥18 years), who took part in the WRAP (Weight Loss Referrals for Adults in Primary Care) trial, were recruited at their 3-month assessment appointment to participate in a semi-structured interview about their experience of the intervention and weight management more generally. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed inductively using a narrative approach. Although participants view the lifestyle-based, non-medical commercial programme as an appropriate intervention for weight management, the referral from the GP and subsequent clinical assessments frame their experience of the intervention as medically pertinent with clear health benefits. Referral by the GP and follow-up assessment appointments were integral to participant experiences of the intervention, and could be adapted for use in general practice potentially to augment treatment effects. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  9. Leadership and management skills of general practice nurses: experience or education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rosalind; Cross, Wendy; Moss, Cheryle; Campbell, Annie; De Castro, Magali; Oxley, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    A key finding of this qualitative exploratory descriptive study into advanced nursing for general practice nurses (Australian setting) revealed that participants viewed leadership and management as best learnt 'apprenticeship' style on the job by years of experience. Participants (48) comprised of general practice nurses, practice managers and general practitioners from metropolitan Melbourne were interviewed. Other findings demonstrated that the participants generally had limited awareness that postgraduate education can assist in the development of leadership and management in advanced nursing practice. The participants lacked clarity about professional competencies and generally did not connect these to leadership and management. Professional bodies need to take the opportunity to promote awareness of the national competency standards. All three groups of participants expressed hopes about the future provision of professional development opportunities and support by the Medicare Local for leadership and management aspirations within advanced practice nursing.

  10. Assessing the long-term effect of educational reminder messages on primary care radiology referrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, C.R.; Eccles, M.; Grimshaw, J.M.; Steen, N.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the effect of educational reminder messages for knee and lumbar spine radiographs varied over a 12 month period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a previous randomized, controlled trial, educational reminder messages attached to x-ray reports were shown to be effective in reducing the number of radiograph requests by general practitioners for knee and lumbar spine radiographs. In this study, all radiology departments from the previous trial were asked for monthly referral records for the 12 month intervention period for knee and lumbar spine radiographs for each general practice. Poisson regression was used to test for a change over time in the number of referrals between control and intervention practices. RESULTS: Data were obtained for 66% of the general practices in the main trial. The number of referrals for both knee and lumbar spine radiographs remained consistently and statistically significantly lower in the educational reminder messages group compared with the control group (relative risk=0.65 and 0.64, respectively). There was no evidence that this difference increased or decreased throughout the 12 month period. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of educational reminder messages was produced as soon as the intervention was delivered and maintained throughout the intervention period. There was no evidence of the effect of the intervention wearing off

  11. What determines medical students' career preference for general practice residency training?: a multicenter survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Murata, Akiko; Tahara, Masao; Komiyama, Manabu; Ichikawa, Shuhei; Takemura, Yousuke C; Onishi, Hirotaka

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have systematically explored factors affecting medical students' general practice career choice. We conducted a nationwide multicenter survey (Japan MEdical Career of Students: JMECS) to examine factors associated with students' general practice career aspirations in Japan, where it has been decided that general practice will be officially acknowledged as a new discipline. From April to December 2015, we distributed a 21-item questionnaire to final year medical students in 17 medical schools. The survey asked students about their top three career preferences from 19 specialty fields, their demographics and their career priorities. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the effect of each item. A total of 1264 responses were included in the analyses. The top three specialty choice were internal medicine: 833 (65.9%), general practice: 408 (32.3%), and pediatrics: 372 (29.4%). Among demographic factors, "plan to inherit other's practice" positively associated with choosing general practice, whereas "having physician parent" had negative correlation. After controlling for potential confounders, students who ranked the following items as highly important were more likely to choose general practice: "clinical diagnostic reasoning (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.65, 95% CI 1.40-1.94)", "community-oriented practice (aOR: 1.33, 95% CI 1.13-1.57)", and" involvement in preventive medicine (aOR: 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38)". On the contrary, "acute care rather than chronic care", "mastering advanced procedures", and "depth rather than breadth of practice" were less likely to be associated with general practice aspiration. Our nationwide multicenter survey found several features associated with general practice career aspirations: clinical diagnostic reasoning; community-oriented practice; and preventive medicine. These results can be fundamental to future research and the development of recruitment strategies.

  12. Factors predicting team climate, and its relationship with quality of care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Teik T; Eccles, Martin P; Steen, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of care in general practice may be affected by the team climate perceived by its health and non-health professionals. Better team working is thought to lead to higher effectiveness and quality of care. However, there is limited evidence available on what affects team functioning and its relationship with quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to explore individual and practice factors that were associated with team climate, and to explore the relatio...

  13. What Should General Practice Trainees Learn about Atopic Eczema?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepani Munidasa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective atopic eczema (AE control not only improves quality of life but may also prevent the atopic march. The Royal College of General Practitioners’ (RCGP curriculum does not currently provide specific learning outcomes on AE management. We aimed to gain consensus on learning outcomes to inform curriculum development. A modified Delphi method was used with questionnaires distributed to gather the views of a range of health care professionals (HCPs including general practitioners (GPs, dermatologists, dermatology nurses and parents of children with AE attending a dedicated paediatric dermatology clinic. Ninety-one questionnaires were distributed to 61 HCPs and 30 parents; 81 were returned. All agreed that learning should focus on the common clinical features, complications and management of AE and the need to appreciate its psychosocial impact. Areas of divergence included knowledge of alternative therapies. Parents felt GPs should better understand how to identify, manage and refer severe AD and recognized the value of the specialist eczema nurse. Dermatologists and parents highlighted inconsistencies in advice regarding topical steroids. This study identifies important areas for inclusion as learning outcomes on AE management in the RCGP curriculum and highlights the importance of patients and parents as a valuable resource in the development of medical education.

  14. Comparison of patient referral processes between rural and urban health facilities in Liberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Patient referral systems in Liberia are relatively unsystematic. While formal and informal mechanisms for referrals exist at both rural and urban health facilities, establishing guidelines for referral care practices and transportation strategies tailored to each of these settings will help to strengthen the healthcare system as a whole.

  15. Regionalisation of general practice training--are we meeting the needs of rural Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David G; Greacen, Jane H; Giddings, Patrick H; Skinner, Lesley P

    2011-06-06

    The concept of "social accountability" has underpinned the development of many medical education programs over the past decade. Success of the regionalisation of the general practice training program in Australia will ultimately be measured by the ability of the program to deliver a sufficient rural general practice workforce to meet the health needs of rural communities. Regionalisation of general practice training in Australia arose from the 1998 recommendations of the Ministerial Review of General Practice Training. The resultant competitive structure adopted by government was not the preferred option of the Review Committee, and may be a negative influence on rural workforce, as the competitive corporate structure of regional training providers has created barriers to meaningful vertical integration. Available data suggest that the regionalised training program is not yet providing a sustainable general practice workforce to rural Australia. The current increase in medical student and general practice training places provides an opportunity to address some of these issues. In particular, it is recommended that changes be made to registrar selection processes, the rural pipeline and vertical integration of training, and training for procedural rural practice. To achieve these goals, perhaps it is time for another comprehensive ministerial review of general practice training in Australia.

  16. Diagnosis and management of zoonoses - a tool for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratnam, Praveena; Massey, Peter D; Eastwood, Keith; Durrhein, David; Graves, Stephen; Coote, Diana; Fisher, Louise

    2014-03-01

    Zoonotic infections such as Q fever, brucellosis and leptospirosis can lead to serious complications but pose diagnostic and management challenges to general practitioners (GPs) as patients often present with non-specific symptoms such as fever. To develop a tool to assist GPs in the diagnosis and management of common zoonotic infections An algorithm was developed with advice and comments from GPs, laboratory specialists and infectious disease specialists. Emphasis is placed on understanding patient risk factors, such as non-household contact with animals, excluding other possible causes of fever, such as influenza, and commencing empirical treatment as soon as a zoonotic infection is suspected. The algorithm is not exhaustive and GPs are urged to consult infectious disease specialists and medical microbiologists for further guidance if required.

  17. General Practice Messaging Standard Version 3.0, May 2014

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, J

    2014-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care.

  18. Early detection of eating disorders in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are often the first health professional consulted in regard to eating disorders and their varied presentations. Given the prognostic significance of early detection of, and intervention for, such conditions, it is important that GPs feel confident to do so. The aim of this article was to heighten awareness of the role of early identification and diagnosis of eating disorders, especially anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, in the primary care setting. The focus will be on their presentations and diagnosis, including changes to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), with a brief overview of management recommendations and admission criteria. Eating disorders are complex, potentially life-threatening illnesses with significant medical and psychosocial consequences. Early detection and intervention can significantly contribute to better outcomes, and GPs are ideally placed to effect this.

  19. Referral patterns and attitudes of Primary Care Physicians towards chiropractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allareddy Veerasathpurush

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the increasing usage and popularity of chiropractic care, there has been limited research conducted to examine the professional relationships between conventional trained primary care physicians (PCPs and chiropractors (DCs. The objectives of our study were to contrast the intra-professional referral patterns among PCPs with referral patterns to DCs, and to identify predictors of PCP referral to DCs. Methods We mailed a survey instrument to all practicing PCPs in the state of Iowa. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize their responses. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify demographic factors associated with inter-professional referral behaviors. Results A total of 517 PCPs (33% participated in the study. PCPs enjoyed strong intra-professional referral relationships with other PCPs. Although patients exhibited a great deal of interest in chiropractic care, PCPs were unlikely themselves to make formal referral relationships with DCs. PCPs in a private practice arrangement were more likely to exhibit positive referral attitudes towards DCs (p = 0.01. Conclusion PCPs enjoy very good professional relationships with other PCPs. However, the lack of direct formalized referral relationships between PCPs and chiropractors has implications for efficiency, continuity, quality, and patient safety in the health care delivery system. Future research must focus on identifying facilitators and barriers for developing positive relationships between PCPs and chiropractors.

  20. Effect of mailed reminders on the response rate in surveys among patients in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensing, M; Mainz, Jan; Kramme, O

    1999-01-01

    Randomized trials were performed in Denmark and The Netherlands to determine the effect of mailed reminders on the response rate in surveys among patients in general practice. In both countries, general practitioners handed out questionnaires to 200 adult patients who came to visit them. An inter......) but not in Denmark (87% versus 81%, respectively). Mailed reminders can improve the response rate in surveys related to a general practice, but they are not effective in all situations....

  1. The outcome of bone mineral density measurements on patients referred from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Sofia Inez; Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Rosenzweig, Mary

    2005-01-01

    calculated with respect to patient characteristics. Only 21% of the referred patients had osteoporosis and 34% had osteopenia. Of these, 24% had osteopenia and a Z-score below -1. Half of the referred patients were women less than 60 yr with a markedly low risk of osteoporosis. A BMI less than 20 kg/m(2....... Altogether, 1551 scans from first-time referred women were analyzed with respect to normal bone mineral density (BMD), osteopenia, and osteoporosis as the outcome, and the results were compared with age and body mass index (BMI). Using multiple regression analysis, risk estimates for osteoporosis were......) increased the predictive value considerably. A low BMI is a good indicator for referral of women less than 60 yr for measurements of bone density. Forty-five percent of the referred women from general practitioners had a normal BMD....

  2. Telephone triage in general practices: A written case scenario study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Marleen; Hanssen, Suzan; Huibers, Linda; Giesen, Paul

    2016-01-01

    General practices increasingly use telephone triage to manage patient flows. During triage, the urgency of the call and required type of care are determined. This study examined the organization and adequacy of telephone triage in general practices in the Netherlands. Cross-sectional observational study using a web-based survey among practice assistants including questions on background characteristics and triage organization. Furthermore, practice assistants were asked to assess the required type of care of written case scenarios with varying health problems and levels of urgency. To determine the adequacy of the assessments, a comparison with a reference standard was made. In addition, the association between background characteristics and triage organization and the adequacy of triage was examined. Daytime general practices. Practice assistants. Over- and under-estimation, sensitivity, specificity. The response rate was 41.1% (n = 973). The required care was assessed adequately in 63.6% of cases, was over-estimated in 19.3%, and under-estimated in 17.1%. The sensitivity of identifying patients with a highly urgent problem was 76.7% and the specificity was 94.0%. The adequacy of the assessments of the required care was higher for more experienced assistants and assistants with fixed daily work meetings with the GP. Triage training, use of a triage tool, and authorization of advice were not associated with adequacy of triage. Triage by practice assistants in general practices is efficient (high specificity), but potentially unsafe in highly urgent cases (suboptimal sensitivity). It is important to train practice assistants in identifying highly urgent cases. General practices increasingly use telephone triage to manage patient flows, but little is known about the organization and adequacy of triage in daytime practices. Telephone triage by general practice assistants is efficient, but potentially unsafe in highly urgent cases. The adequacy of triage is higher

  3. General practice and pandemic influenza: a framework for planning and comparison of plans in five countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahomed S Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although primary health care, and in particular, general practice will be at the frontline in the response to pandemic influenza, there are no frameworks to guide systematic planning for this task or to appraise available plans for their relevance to general practice. We aimed to develop a framework that will facilitate planning for general practice, and used it to appraise pandemic plans from Australia, England, USA, New Zealand and Canada. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adapted the Haddon matrix to develop the framework, populating its cells through a multi-method study that incorporated the peer-reviewed and grey literature, interviews with general practitioners, practice nurses and senior decision-makers, and desktop simulation exercises. We used the framework to analyse 89 publicly-available jurisdictional plans at similar managerial levels in the five countries. The framework identifies four functional domains: clinical care for influenza and other needs, public health responsibilities, the internal environment and the macro-environment of general practice. No plan addressed all four domains. Most plans either ignored or were sketchy about non-influenza clinical needs, and about the contribution of general practice to public health beyond surveillance. Collaborations between general practices were addressed in few plans, and inter-relationships with the broader health system, even less frequently. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to provide a framework to guide general practice planning for pandemic influenza. The framework helped identify critical shortcomings in available plans. Engaging general practice effectively in planning is challenging, particularly where governance structures for primary health care are weak. We identify implications for practice and for research.

  4. A comparison of the 'cost per child treated' at a primary care-based sedation referral service, compared to a general anaesthetic in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, K; Averley, P A; Shackley, P; Steele, J

    2007-09-22

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of dental sedation techniques used in the treatment of children, focusing on hospital-based dental general anaesthetic (DGA) and advanced conscious sedation in a controlled primary care environment. Data on fees, costs and treatment pathways were obtained from a primary care clinic specialising in advanced sedation techniques. For the hospital-based DGA cohort, data were gathered from hospital trusts in the same area. Comparison was via an average cost per child treated and subsequent sensitivity analysis. Analysing records spanning one year, the average cost per child treated via advanced conscious sedation was pound245.47. As some treatments fail (3.5% of cases attempted), and the technique is not deemed suitable for all patients (4-5%), DGA is still required and has been factored into this cost. DGA has an average cost per case treated of pound359.91, 46.6% more expensive than advanced conscious sedation. These cost savings were robust to plausible variation in all parameters. The costs of advanced conscious sedation techniques, applied in a controlled primary care environment, are substantially lower than the equivalent costs of hospital-based DGA, informing the debate about the optimum way of managing this patient group.

  5. [The practice of the mental health in the general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    On December 2, 2011 a new reform bill concerning the Labor Safety and Hygiene law was presented to parliament. The bill states that all companies and businesses regardless of size are obliged to have all employees take a stress test once a year in addition to the regular health check. In September 2010 the employees fo Toho University Sakura Hospital were given this new stress. The test included categories for occupation and the various departments in the hospital. There were 40 employees found to test high for stress and to have depressive tendencies. We interviewed about 16 of these employees. One employee started to receive medicine to help reduce the stress and 4 employees received counseling only. The other 11 employees did not need to receive counseling or medicine. From April 2005 to September 2011, we conducted another study. The subjects this time were 92 employees of the hospital who have received treatment at other facilities for mental problems from occupational physicians. We categorized the subjects by sex, age occupation, length of time employed at the hospital, department and period of time from the onset of symptoms to the time they sought treatment. In this paper I will present my findings and suggestions for improving mental health care for employees of general hospital throughout Japan.

  6. Caring for self-harming patients in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Joanne; Jaye, Chrystal

    2017-12-01

    INTRODUCTION Intentional self-harm is an international public health issue with high personal, social and financial costs to society. Poor relationship dynamics are known to have a negative influence on the psyche of people who self-harm, and this can increase anxiety and decrease self-esteem, both shown to be significant contributors to self-harm behaviours. Positive and functional social supports have been proposed as a cost-effective and constructive approach in diminishing self-harming behaviours. AIM This qualitative study investigated the aspects of professional, social, familial and romantic relationships that people who have self-harmed identified as having a positive and constructive effect on their self-harm behaviour. METHODS Twelve participants with a history of self-harming behaviours were recruited through free press advertising in primary care and interviewed. The participants ranged in age from 19 to 70 years, and represented New Zealand (NZ) European and Māori from across the Southern region of NZ. RESULTS This study shows that constructive relationships that inhibit self-harm behaviours are characterised by participants' perceptions of authenticity in their relationships, and knowing that other people genuinely care. Feeling cared for within an authentic therapeutic relationship enabled participants to overcome their perception of being damaged selves and gave them the skills and confidence to develop functional relationships within their communities. A relationship-centred care approach may be useful for general practitioners seeking to develop more effective therapeutic relationships with patients who deliberately self-harm.

  7. Asthma control in general practice -- GP and patient perspectives compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joan; Hancock, Kerry L; Armour, Carol; Harrison, Christopher; Miller, Graeme

    2013-10-01

    How general practitioners (GPs) and patients perceive asthma control, and concordance between these perceptions, may influence asthma management and medication adherence. The aims of this study were to determine asthma prevalence in adult patients, measure patient asthma control and the correlation between GP and patient perceptions of asthma control or impact. A Supplementary Analysis of Nominated Data (SAND) sub-study of the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) program surveyed 2563 patients from 103 GPs. Asthma control was measured using the Asthma Control Questionnaire 5-item version (ACQ-5), and medication adherence by patient self-report. Survey procedures in SAS software and Pearson's correlation statistics were used. Asthma prevalence was 12.7% (95% confidence interval: 10.9-14.5), with good correlation between GP and patient perceptions of asthma control/impact, and with raw ACQ-5 scores. Grouped ACQ-5 scores showed higher levels of uncontrolled asthma. Medication adherence was sub-optimal. The ACQ-5 questions are useful for assessing asthma control, for prompting medication reviews, and for reinforcing benefits of medication compliance to improve long-term asthma control.

  8. The global financial crisis and Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Ian S; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    To explore the potential effects of the global financial crisis (GFC) on the market for general practitioner (GP) services in Australia. We estimate the impact of changes in unemployment rates on demand for GP services and the impact of lost asset values on GP retirement plans and work patterns. Combining these supply and demand effects, we estimate the potential effect of the GFC on the market for GP services under various scenarios. If deferral of retirement increases GP availability by 2%, and historic trends to reduce GP working hours are halved, at the current level of ~5.2% unemployment average fees would decline by $0.23 per GP consultation and volumes of GP services would rise by 2.53% with almost no change in average GP gross earnings over what would otherwise have occurred. With 8.5% unemployment, as initially predicted by Treasury, GP fees would increase by $0.91 and GP income by nearly 3%. The GFC is likely to increase activity in the GP market and potentially to reduce fee levels relative to the pre-GFC trends. Net effects on average GP incomes are likely to be small at current unemployment levels.

  9. Recognition, perceptions and treatment practices for severe malaria in rural Tanzania: implications for accessing rectal artesunate as a pre-referral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Warsame

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Preparatory to a community trial investigating how best to deliver rectal artesunate as pre-referral treatment for severe malaria; local understanding, perceptions of signs/symptoms of severe malaria and treatment-seeking patterns for and barriers to seeking biomedical treatment were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 19 key informant interviews, 12 in-depth interviews and 14 focus group discussions targeting care-givers, opinion leaders, and formal and informal health care providers were conducted. Monthly fever episodes and danger signs or symptoms associated with severe malaria among under-fives were recorded. Respondents recognized convulsions, altered consciousness and coma, and were aware of their risks if not treated. But, these symptoms were perceived to be caused by supernatural forces, and traditional healers were identified as primary care providers. With some delay, mothers eventually visited a health facility when convulsions were part of the illness, despite pressures against this. Although vomiting and failure to eat/suck/drink were associated with malaria, they were not considered as indicators of danger signs unless combined with another more severe symptom. Study communities were familiar with rectal application of medicines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Communities' recognition and awareness of major symptoms of severe malaria could encourage action, but perceptions of their causes and poor discrimination of other danger signs - vomiting and failure to feed - might impede early treatment. An effective health education targeting parents/guardians, decision-makers/advisors, and formal and informal care providers might be a prerequisite for successful introduction of rectal artemisinins as an emergency treatment. Role of traditional healers in delivering such medication to the community should be explored.

  10. Action research led to a feasible lifestyle intervention in general practice for people with prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Bonde, Ane; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2014-04-01

    To develop and pilot a feasible lifestyle intervention for people with prediabetes tailored for general practice. The study was designed to explore (i) what resources and competencies would be required and (ii) which intervention components should be included. In the first of two action research cycles various interventions were explored in general practice. The second cycle tested the intervention described by the end of the first cycle. In total, 64 patients, 8 GPs and 10 nurses participated. An intervention comprising six consultations to be delivered during the first year after identified prediabetes was found feasible by the general practice staff in terms of resources. Practice nurses possessed the adequate competences to undertake the core part of the intervention. The intervention comprised fixed elements according to structure, time consumption and educational principles, and flexible elements according to educational material and focus points for behaviour change. Clinical relevant reductions in patients' BMI and HbA1c were found. A prediabetes lifestyle intervention for Danish general practice with potential for diabetes prevention was developed based on action research. The transferability of the developed intervention to other general practices depends on the GPs priorities, availability of practice nurses to deliver the core part, and the remuneration system for general practice. The long-term feasibility in larger patient populations is unknown. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Does a self-referral counselling program reach doctors in need of help? A comparison with the general Norwegian doctor workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rø, Karin E Isaksson; Gude, Tore; Aasland, Olaf G

    2007-03-16

    Doctors have a relatively high degree of emotional distress, but seek help to a lesser degree and at a later stage than other academic groups. This can be deleterious for themselves and for their patients. Prevention programs have therefore been developed but it is unclear to what extent they reach doctors in need of help. This study describes doctors who participated in a self-referrral, easily accessible, stress relieving, counselling program in Norway, and compares them with a nationwide sample of Norwegian doctors. Two hundred and twenty seven (94%) of the doctors, 117 women and 110 men, who came to the resort centre Villa Sana, Modum, Norway, between August 2003 and July 2005, agreed to participate in the study. Socio-demographic data, reasons for and ways of help-seeking, sick-leave, symptoms of depression and anxiety, job stress and burnout were assessed by self-reporting questionnaires. Forty-nine percent of the Sana doctors were emotionally exhausted (Maslach) compared with 25% of all Norwegian doctors. However, they did not differ on empathy and working capacity, the other two dimensions in Maslach's burnout inventory. Seventy-three percent of the Sana doctors could be in need of treatment for depression or anxiety based on their symptom distress scores, compared with 14% of men and 18% of women doctors in Norway. Twenty-one percent of the Sana doctors had a history of suicidal thoughts, including how to commit the act, as compared to 10% of Norwegian doctors in general. Sana doctors displayed a higher degree of emotional exhaustion, symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as job related stress, compared with all Norwegian doctors. This may indicate that the program at Villa Sana to a large extent reaches doctors in need of help. The counselling intervention can help doctors to evaluate their professional and private situation, and, when necessary, enhance motivation for seeking adequate treatment.

  12. Does a self-referral counselling program reach doctors in need of help? A comparison with the general Norwegian doctor workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gude Tore

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doctors have a relatively high degree of emotional distress, but seek help to a lesser degree and at a later stage than other academic groups. This can be deleterious for themselves and for their patients. Prevention programs have therefore been developed but it is unclear to what extent they reach doctors in need of help. This study describes doctors who participated in a self-referrral, easily accessible, stress relieving, counselling program in Norway, and compares them with a nationwide sample of Norwegian doctors. Methods Two hundred and twenty seven (94% of the doctors, 117 women and 110 men, who came to the resort centre Villa Sana, Modum, Norway, between August 2003 and July 2005, agreed to participate in the study. Socio-demographic data, reasons for and ways of help-seeking, sick-leave, symptoms of depression and anxiety, job stress and burnout were assessed by self-reporting questionnaires. Results Forty-nine percent of the Sana doctors were emotionally exhausted (Maslach compared with 25% of all Norwegian doctors. However, they did not differ on empathy and working capacity, the other two dimensions in Maslach's burnout inventory. Seventy-three percent of the Sana doctors could be in need of treatment for depression or anxiety based on their symptom distress scores, compared with 14% of men and 18% of women doctors in Norway. Twenty-one percent of the Sana doctors had a history of suicidal thoughts, including how to commit the act, as compared to 10% of Norwegian doctors in general. Conclusion Sana doctors displayed a higher degree of emotional exhaustion, symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as job related stress, compared with all Norwegian doctors. This may indicate that the program at Villa Sana to a large extent reaches doctors in need of help. The counselling intervention can help doctors to evaluate their professional and private situation, and, when necessary, enhance motivation for seeking adequate

  13. Effect of a national requirement to introduce named accountable general practitioners for patients aged 75 or older in England: regression discontinuity analysis of general practice utilisation and continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Isaac; Lloyd, Therese; Steventon, Adam

    2016-09-16

    To assess the effect of introducing named accountable general practitioners (GPs) for patients aged 75 years on patterns of general practice utilisation, including continuity of care. Regression discontinuity design applied to data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink to estimate the treatment effect for compliers aged 75. 200 general practices in England. 255 469 patients aged between 65 and 85, after excluding those aged 75. From April 2014, general practices in England were required to offer patients aged 75 or over a named accountable GP. This study compared having named accountable GPs for patients aged just over 75 with usual care provided for patients just under 75. Number of contacts (face-to-face or telephone) with GPs, longitudinal continuity of care (usual provider of care, or UPC, index), number of referrals to specialist care and numbers of common diagnostic tests. Outcomes were measured over 9 months following assignment to a named accountable GP and for a comparable period for those unassigned. The proportion of patients with a named accountable GP increased from 3.5% to 79.8% at age 75. No statistically significant effects were detected for continuity of care (estimated treatment effect 0.00, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.02) or the number of GP contacts per person (estimated treatment effect -0.11, 95% CI -0.31 to 0.09) over 9 months. No significant change was seen in the number of referrals, blood pressure or HbA1c diagnostic tests per person. A statistically significant treatment effect of -0.05 cholesterol tests per person (95% CI -0.07 to -0.02) was estimated; however, sensitivity analysis indicated that this effect predated the introduction of named accountable GPs. Continuity of care is valued by patients, but the named accountable GP initiative did not improve continuity of care or change patterns of GP utilisation in the first 9 months of the policy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  14. Health professionals responding to men for safety (HERMES): feasibility of a general practice training intervention to improve the response to male patients who have experienced or perpetrated domestic violence and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Emma; Jones, Sue K; Ferrari, Giulia; Debbonaire, Thangam; Feder, Gene; Hester, Marianne

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate a training intervention for general practice-based doctors and nurses in terms of the identification, documentation, and referral of male patients experiencing or perpetrating domestic violence and abuse (DVA) in four general practices in the south west of England. Research suggests that male victims and perpetrators of DVA present to primary care clinicians to seek support for their experiences. We know that the response of primary care clinicians to women patients experiencing DVA improves from training and the establishment of referral pathways to specialist DVA services. The intervention consisted of a 2-h practice-based training. Outcome measures included: a pre-post, self-reported survey of staff practice; disclosures of DVA as documented in medical records pre-post (six months) intervention; semi-structured interviews with clinicians; and practice-level contact data collected by DVA specialist agencies. Results show a significant increase in clinicians' self-reported preparedness to meet the needs of male patients experiencing or perpetrating DVA. There was a small increase in male patients identified within the medical records (6 pre- to 17 post-intervention) but only five of those patients made contact with a specialist DVA agency identified within the referral pathway. The training increased clinicians' confidence in responding to male patients affected by DVA. The increase in recorded identification of DVA male patients experiencing or perpetrating DVA was small and contact of those patients with a specialist DVA support service was negligible. We need to better understand male help seeking in relation to DVA, further develop interventions to increase identification of male patients experiencing or perpetrating DVA behaviours, and facilitate access to support services.

  15. Mental health care training priorities in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwick, S; Jones, R; Mann, A; Goldberg, D

    1997-04-01

    Mental health problems constitute a large part of general practitioners' (GPs') work, for which they may have received little training beyond their undergraduate education. They continue to find themselves criticized in the literature over inadequate recognition and management of these problems. While there is concern about the effectiveness of continuing medical education (CME), educational needs assessment can improve the outcome of CME programmes. To assess GPs' perceived educational needs regarding mental health problems. A questionnaire was developed, piloted and posted to GPs (n = 380) in the Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Family Health Services Authority (FHSA) area in south-east Thames. In addition to demographic data, the questionnaire asked practitioners to select from a list of 26 mental health topics those in which they would like further training, their preferred educational formats and timetabling, and willingness to attend for training. Two postal reminders were sent to non-respondents. Data were analysed using SPSS. Altogether, 62% (237/380) of the GPs responded. The range for the number of topics selected was from zero to 26 and the mode was 5. Most frequently selected topics were psychiatric emergencies, somatization, counselling skills, 'heartsink' patients, psychosexual problems and stress management, each of which was chosen by at least 40%. Small group work alone, and allied to a lecture, was rated as the most useful educational format. In all, 74% (175/237) indicated that they would be interested in attending a half-day training course. These results suggest that GPs working in the inner city recognize the importance of improving their skills in the care of mental health problems, and indicate which topics are regarded as the most important and suitable for educational interventions. A needs-led approach to continuing medical education of this kind will help to plan CME programmes relevant to GPs' needs.

  16. Mental health care training priorities in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwick, S; Jones, R; Mann, A; Goldberg, D

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental health problems constitute a large part of general practitioners' (GPs') work, for which they may have received little training beyond their undergraduate education. They continue to find themselves criticized in the literature over inadequate recognition and management of these problems. While there is concern about the effectiveness of continuing medical education (CME), educational needs assessment can improve the outcome of CME programmes. AIM: To assess GPs' perceived educational needs regarding mental health problems. METHODS: A questionnaire was developed, piloted and posted to GPs (n = 380) in the Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Family Health Services Authority (FHSA) area in south-east Thames. In addition to demographic data, the questionnaire asked practitioners to select from a list of 26 mental health topics those in which they would like further training, their preferred educational formats and timetabling, and willingness to attend for training. Two postal reminders were sent to non-respondents. Data were analysed using SPSS. RESULTS: Altogether, 62% (237/380) of the GPs responded. The range for the number of topics selected was from zero to 26 and the mode was 5. Most frequently selected topics were psychiatric emergencies, somatization, counselling skills, 'heartsink' patients, psychosexual problems and stress management, each of which was chosen by at least 40%. Small group work alone, and allied to a lecture, was rated as the most useful educational format. In all, 74% (175/237) indicated that they would be interested in attending a half-day training course. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that GPs working in the inner city recognize the importance of improving their skills in the care of mental health problems, and indicate which topics are regarded as the most important and suitable for educational interventions. A needs-led approach to continuing medical education of this kind will help to plan CME programmes relevant to

  17. The basis of general practice, its content and relation to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, J H

    1977-08-13

    The present status is the newly defined discipline of general practice is briefly outlined. The reasons for its worldwide upsurge in the past decade and the relative failure of South Africa to keep abreast are reviewed. A brief exposition is given of the knowledge and skills required for general practice, the consultation, the clinical process and the content of what in some countries is regarded as family medicine. The difference in ethos between 'doctor-orientated' and 'patient-orientated' medicine is discussed. The latter approach is essential to general practice, in which the attidudes of both doctor and patient and their interactions are known to have an effect on the clinical process. The non-directive educative approach is discussed in relation to undergraduate and postgraduate training, and the attempts to make postgraduate general practice examinations valid and reliable, so that they evaluate the actual day-to-day activities of the doctor, are alluded to. The content of general practice is as yet not clearly identified and the problems encountered in delineating these as well as suggested approaches are presented. It is concluded that in South Africa no serious attempts have been made by legislative bodies and most medical educational institutions to recognize general practice as a new displine in spite of pioneering work achieved by the Faculty of General Practice of the College of Medicine of South Africa.

  18. Clinical accuracy of point-of-care urine culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Cordoba, Gloria; Sørensen, Tina Møller

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical accuracy (sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive predictive value and negative predictive value) of two point-of-care (POC) urine culture tests for the identification of urinary tract infection (UTI) in general practice. DESIGN: Prospective diagnostic...... accuracy study comparing two index tests (Flexicult™ SSI-Urinary Kit or ID Flexicult™) with a reference standard (urine culture performed in the microbiological department). SETTING: General practice in the Copenhagen area patients. Adult female patients consulting their general practitioner with suspected...... uncomplicated, symptomatic UTI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Overall accuracy of POC urine culture in general practice. (2) Individual accuracy of each of the two POC tests in this study. (3) Accuracy of POC urine culture in general practice with enterococci excluded, since enterococci are known to multiply...

  19. Systems and complexity thinking in the general practice literature: an integrative, historical narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmberg, Joachim P; Martin, Carmel M; Katerndahl, David A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 7 decades, theories in the systems and complexity sciences have had a major influence on academic thinking and research. We assessed the impact of complexity science on general practice/family medicine. We performed a historical integrative review using the following systematic search strategy: medical subject heading [humans] combined in turn with the terms complex adaptive systems, nonlinear dynamics, systems biology, and systems theory, limited to general practice/family medicine and published before December 2010. A total of 16,242 articles were retrieved, of which 49 were published in general practice/family medicine journals. Hand searches and snowballing retrieved another 35. After a full-text review, we included 56 articles dealing specifically with systems sciences and general/family practice. General practice/family medicine engaged with the emerging systems and complexity theories in 4 stages. Before 1995, articles tended to explore common phenomenologic general practice/family medicine experiences. Between 1995 and 2000, articles described the complex adaptive nature of this discipline. Those published between 2000 and 2005 focused on describing the system dynamics of medical practice. After 2005, articles increasingly applied the breadth of complex science theories to health care, health care reform, and the future of medicine. This historical review describes the development of general practice/family medicine in relation to complex adaptive systems theories, and shows how systems sciences more accurately reflect the discipline's philosophy and identity. Analysis suggests that general practice/family medicine first embraced systems theories through conscious reorganization of its boundaries and scope, before applying empirical tools. Future research should concentrate on applying nonlinear dynamics and empirical modeling to patient care, and to organizing and developing local practices, engaging in community development, and influencing

  20. Informal Interpreting in General Practice: Comparing the perspectives of General Practitioners, migrant patients and family interpreters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zendedel, R.; Schouten, B.C.; van Weert, J.C.M.; van den Putte, B.

    Objective To explore differences in perspectives of general practitioners, Turkish-Dutch migrant patients and family interpreters on interpreters’ role, power dynamics and trust in interpreted GP consultations. Methods 54 semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with the three parties

  1. Promoting leadership and management in Australian general practice nursing: what will it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    This paper outlines the current state of Australian practice nursing, describes the context of general practice and establishes the importance of promoting leadership and management in this setting. Australian general practice nurses have emerged as key stakeholders in primary health care. However, their role in leadership and management has been largely invisible. The reasons for this are multifactorial, including the delay to establish a strong professional organization, their negative power relationships with general medical practitioners, limited nursing leadership and poorly defined roles. To date, the impetus for practice nurse growth has been largely external to the nursing profession. Growth has been driven by the increasing burden of chronic disease and workforce shortages. This has further weakened the control of nurse leaders over the development of the specialty. The Australian practice nurse role is at a crossroads. While the practice nurse role is a viable force to improve health outcomes, the growing strength of the practice nurse challenges traditional professional roles and practice patterns. There is an urgent need to develop practice nurse leaders and managers to not only embrace the challenges of Australian general practice from an operational perspective, but also undertake a clinical leadership role. As clinical leaders, these nurses will need to develop a culture that not only optimizes health outcomes but also advances the status of the nursing profession.

  2. Female genital cosmetic surgery: a cross-sectional survey exploring knowledge, attitude and practice of general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, M; Manocha, R; Ong, J J

    2016-09-26

    To explore general practitioner's (GP) knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding female genital cosmetic surgery (FGCS) in Australia. Cross-sectional survey. Australia. GPs who attended a women's health seminar and GPs who subscribed to a non-governmental, national health professional organisation database that provides education to primary care professionals. A national online survey of GPs was conducted for the 10-week period, starting 1 week prior and 2 months after a Women's Health seminar was held in Perth on 8 August 2015. 31 questions prompted GPs' knowledge, attitudes and practice in managing patients asking about FGCS. The survey was fully completed by 443 GPs; 54% had seen patients requesting FGCS. Overall, 75% (95% CI 71% to 79%) of GPs rated their knowledge of FGCS as inadequate and 97% (95% CI 94% to 99%) had been asked by women of all ages about genital normality. Of those who had seen patients requesting FGCS, nearly half (44%, 95% CI 38% to 51%) reported they had insufficient knowledge of risks of FGCS procedures and 35% (95% CI 29% to 41%) reported seeing females younger than 18 years of age requesting FGCS. Just over half (56%, 95% CI 51% to 60%) of the GPs felt that women should be counselled before making a referral for FGCS. More than half the GPs suspected psychological disturbances in their patients requesting FGCS such as depression, anxiety, relationship difficulties and body dysmorphic disorder. GPs see women of all ages presenting with genital anatomy concerns and in those who request FGCS, GPs often suspected a range of mental health difficulties. GPs require greater education to support their patients who request FGCS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Attitudes of newly qualified doctors towards a career in general practice: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, Alexandra; Jones, Daniel; Sein, Kim; Green, Trish; Macleod, Una

    2017-04-01

    A key element of the NHS is universal access to a GP. Recently, UK general practice has been described as being in crisis, with training places unfilled and multiple practices reporting vacancies or facing closure. The recruitment of GPs continues to be a key focus for both the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and the government. To understand the attitudes of newly qualified doctors towards a career in general practice, to appreciate potential reasons for the crisis in GP recruitment, and to recommend ways to improve recruitment. A qualitative study comprising five focus groups with 74 Foundation Year 1 (FY1) doctors from one Yorkshire deanery. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis undertaken. Foundation Year 1 doctors' thoughts towards a career in general practice were summarised in four themes: quality of life, job satisfaction, uncertainty surrounding the future of general practice, and the lack of respect for GPs among both doctors and the public. Participants felt that general practice could provide a good work-life balance, fair pay, and job stability. Job satisfaction, with the ability to provide care from the cradle to the grave, and to work within a community, was viewed positively. Uncertainties around future training, skill levels, pay, and workload, together with a perceived stigma experienced in medical schools and hospitals, were viewed as a deterrent to a career in general practice. This study has gathered the opinions of doctors at a critical point in their careers, before they choose a future specialty. Findings highlight areas of concern and potential deterrents to a career in general practice, together with recommendations to address these issues. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  4. Variation in examination and treatment offers to patients with allergic diseases in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Munck, Anders Peter

    2010-01-01

    disorders. SETTING: General practice in Denmark. RESULTS: In 2005, 895 (64.3%) of 1391 randomly selected general practitioners (GPs) participated in this survey. The extent of treatment offered and the involvement of staff were strongly associated with having a nurse on the practice team. Guideline...... recommendations for preparedness for anaphylactic shock in connection with allergy vaccine therapy were not fully implemented. CONCLUSION: General practice is substantially involved in the examination and treatment of patients with allergic diseases. There is room for further involvement of staff members...

  5. Strategic directions for developing the Australian general practice nurse role in cardiovascular disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Yallop, Julie; Griffiths, Rhonda; Daly, John

    2007-08-01

    Practice nursing is an integral component of British and New Zealand primary care, but in Australia it remains an emerging specialty. Despite an increased focus on the Australian practice nurse role, there has been limited strategic role development, particularly relating to national health priority areas. This paper reports the third stage of a Project exploring the Australian practice nurse role in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This stage involved a consensus development conference, undertaken to identify strategic, priority recommendations for practice nurse role development. 1. Practice nurses have an important role in developing systems and processes for CVD management; 2. A change in the culture of general practice is necessary to promote acceptance of nurse-led CVD management; 3. Future research needs to evaluate specific models of care, incorporating outcome measures sensitive to nursing interventions; 4. Considerable challenges exist in conducting research in general practice; and 5. Changes in funding models are necessary for widespread practice nurse role development. The shifting of funding models provides evidence to support interdisciplinary practice in Australian general practice. The time is ripe, therefore, to engage in prospective and strategic planning to inform development of the practice nurse role.

  6. Referral patterns of community health workers diagnosing and treating malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Magnussen, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Malaria-endemic countries have implemented community health worker (CHW) programs to provide malaria diagnosis and treatment to populations living beyond the reach of health systems. However, there is limited evidence describing the referral practices of CHWs. We examined the impact of malaria...... (ACT) for malaria and recognize signs and symptoms for referral to health centers. CHWs in the control arm used a presumptive diagnosis for malaria based on clinical symptoms, whereas intervention arm CHWs used mRDTs. CHWs recorded ACT prescriptions, mRDT results, and referral inpatient registers...... more distant from health centers were more likely to be referred (low transmission only). CHWs using mRDTs and ACTs increased referral compared with CHWs using a presumptive diagnosis. To address these concerns, referral training should be emphasized in CHW programs as they are scaled-up....

  7. 38 CFR 1.953 - Minimum amount of referrals to the Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... referrals to the Department of Justice. 1.953 Section 1.953 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.953 Minimum amount of referrals to the Department of Justice. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs...

  8. An overview of 5 years of patient self-referral for physical therapy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, Ilse C. S.; Kooijman, Margit K.; Spreeuwenberg, Peter M.; Bossen, D.; Leemrijse, Chantal J.; van Dijk, Christel E.; Verheij, Robert; de Bakker, Dinny H.; Veenhof, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-referral for physical therapy was introduced in 2006 in the Netherlands. Internationally, debate on self-referral is still ongoing. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of self-referral for physical therapy in the Netherlands, focusing on volume of general

  9. STD and HIV screening in general practice: a survey related to termination of pregnancy in south Thames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R L; Maguire, H C; Kurtz, Z

    1998-01-01

    It has been recommended that screening for sexually transmitted disease (STDs) be carried out at the time of termination of pregnancy to allow prevention of post-abortion infection. Screening offers the opportunity to treat an infected woman and prevent serious complications following the termination procedure. Our findings indicate that general practitioners (GPs) in South Thames did not routinely carry out screening and few realized it took place at referral centres. PMID:9624755

  10. HIV counselling and testing practices for children seen in an urban emergency department of a tertiary referral hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawe, Hendry R; Mfinanga, Juma A; Ringo, Faith H; Mwafongo, Victor; Reynolds, Teri A; Runyon, Michael S

    2016-02-15

    To describe the HIV counselling and testing practices for children presenting to an emergency department (ED) in a low-income country. The ED of a large east African national referral hospital. This retrospective review of all paediatric (counselling, or deferral of counselling, for children tested for HIV in the ED. Secondary measures included the overall rate of HIV testing, rate of counselling documented in the inpatient record when deferred in the ED, rate of counselling documented when testing was initiated by the inpatient service, rate of counselling documented by test result (positive vs negative) and the rate of referral to follow-up HIV care among patients testing positive. Of 418 patients tested in the ED, counselling, or deferral of counselling, was documented for 70 (17%). When deferred to the ward, subsequent counselling was documented for 15/42 (36%). Counselling was documented in 33% of patients testing positive versus 1.1% patients testing negative (OR 43 (95% CI 23 to 83). Of 199 patients who tested positive and survived to hospital discharge, 76 (38%) were referred for follow-up at the HIV clinic on discharge. Physicians documented the provision, or deferral, of counselling for Counselling was much more likely to be documented when the test result was positive. Less than 40% of those testing positive were referred for follow-up care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Advancing general practice nursing in Australia: roles and responsibilities of primary healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Riki; Halcomb, Elizabeth; McKenna, Lisa; Zwar, Nicholas; Naccarella, Lucio; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Russell, Grant

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Given increased numbers and enhanced responsibilities of Australian general practice nurses, we aimed to delineate appropriate roles for primary health care organisations (PHCOs) to support this workforce. Methods A two-round online Delphi consensus process was undertaken between January and June 2012, informed by literature review and key informant interviews. Participants were purposively selected and included decision makers from government and professional organisations, educators, researchers and clinicians from five Australian states and territories Results Of 56 invited respondents, 35 (62%) and 31 (55%) responded to the first and second invitation respectively. Participants reached consensus on five key roles for PHCOs in optimising nursing in general practice: (1) matching workforce size and skills to population needs; (2) facilitating leadership opportunities; (3) providing education and educational access; (4) facilitating integration of general practice with other primary care services to support interdisciplinary care; and (5) promoting advanced nursing roles. National concerns, such as limited opportunities for postgraduate education and career progression, were deemed best addressed by national nursing organisations, universities and peak bodies. Conclusions Advancement of nursing in general practice requires system-level support from a range of organisations. PHCOs play a significant role in education and leadership development for nurses and linking national nursing organisations with general practices. What is known about the topic? The role of nurses in Australian general practice has grown in the last decade, yet they face limited career pathways and opportunities for career advancement. Some nations have forged interprofessional primary care teams that use nurses' skills to the full extent of their scope of practice. PHCOs have played important roles in the development of general practice nursing in Australia and internationally

  12. Nurses and the wise organisation: techne and phronesis in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally

    2013-06-01

    This paper draws on classical theories of wisdom to explore the organisational impact of nurses on Australian general practice. Between 2004 and 2008, numbers of general practice nurses doubled, the most rapid influx of nurses into any Australian workplace over the decade. Using data from the Australian General Practice Nurses Study, we argue that nurses had a positive impact because they introduced techne at the organisational level and amplified phronesis in clinical activities. In its Hippocratic formulation, techne refers to a field of definable knowledge, which is purposeful and useful and requires mastery of rational principles. Nursing, with its focus on system and accountability, brought techne out of the GP's consulting room and into the general practice as a whole. Nurses also exemplify phronesis, an Aristotelian virtue connoting a reasoned and honourable capacity to make judgements: the practical wisdom that defines the interaction between clinician and patient in general practice. At a time of significant GP shortage, doctors and nurses began to collaborate around their more complex and time-consuming patients, leading to a deepening of phronesis in the workplace. By bringing techne to bear on the organisation, and complementing and enhancing phronesis, nurses propel organisational wisdom in general practices. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Factors predicting team climate, and its relationship with quality of care in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eccles Martin P

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of care in general practice may be affected by the team climate perceived by its health and non-health professionals. Better team working is thought to lead to higher effectiveness and quality of care. However, there is limited evidence available on what affects team functioning and its relationship with quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to explore individual and practice factors that were associated with team climate, and to explore the relationship between team climate and quality of care. Methods Cross sectional survey of a convenience sample of 14 general practices and their staff in South Tyneside in the northeast of England. Team climate was measured using the short version of Team Climate Inventory (TCI questionnaire. Practice characteristics were collected during a structured interview with practice managers. Quality was measured using the practice Quality and Outcome Framework (QOF scores. Results General Practitioners (GP had a higher team climate scores compared to other professionals. Individual's gender and tenure, and number of GPs in the practice were significantly predictors of a higher team climate. There was no significant correlation between mean practice team climate scores (or subscales with QOF scores. Conclusion The absence of a relationship between a measure of team climate and quality of care in this exploratory study may be due to a number of methodological problems. Further research is required to explore how to best measure team functioning and its relationship with quality of care.

  14. Factors predicting team climate, and its relationship with quality of care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Teik T; Eccles, Martin P; Steen, Nick

    2009-08-04

    Quality of care in general practice may be affected by the team climate perceived by its health and non-health professionals. Better team working is thought to lead to higher effectiveness and quality of care. However, there is limited evidence available on what affects team functioning and its relationship with quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to explore individual and practice factors that were associated with team climate, and to explore the relationship between team climate and quality of care. Cross sectional survey of a convenience sample of 14 general practices and their staff in South Tyneside in the northeast of England. Team climate was measured using the short version of Team Climate Inventory (TCI) questionnaire. Practice characteristics were collected during a structured interview with practice managers. Quality was measured using the practice Quality and Outcome Framework (QOF) scores. General Practitioners (GP) had a higher team climate scores compared to other professionals. Individual's gender and tenure, and number of GPs in the practice were significantly predictors of a higher team climate. There was no significant correlation between mean practice team climate scores (or subscales) with QOF scores. The absence of a relationship between a measure of team climate and quality of care in this exploratory study may be due to a number of methodological problems. Further research is required to explore how to best measure team functioning and its relationship with quality of care.

  15. The estimation of patients' views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice by general dental practitioners: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truin Gert-Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the changes in dental healthcare, such as the increasing assertiveness of patients, the introduction of new dental professionals, and regulated competition, it becomes more important that general dental practitioners (GDPs take patients' views into account. The aim of the study was to compare patients' views on organizational aspects of general dental practices with those of GDPs and with GDPs' estimation of patients' views. Methods In a survey study, patients and GDPs provided their views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice. In a second, separate survey, GDPs were invited to estimate patients' views on 22 organizational aspects of a general dental practice. Results For 4 of the 22 aspects, patients and GDPs had the same views, and GDPs estimated patients' views reasonably well: 'Dutch-speaking GDP', 'guarantee on treatment', 'treatment by the same GDP', and 'reminder of routine oral examination'. For 2 aspects ('quality assessment' and 'accessibility for disabled patients' patients and GDPs had the same standards, although the GDPs underestimated the patients' standards. Patients had higher standards than GDPs for 7 aspects and lower standards than GDPs for 8 aspects. Conclusion On most aspects GDPs and patient have different views, except for social desirable aspects. Given the increasing assertiveness of patients, it is startling the GDP's estimated only half of the patients' views correctly. The findings of the study can assist GDPs in adapting their organizational services to better meet the preferences of their patients and to improve the communication towards patients.

  16. Shortages in general practice despite feminisation of medicine: a seeming paradox? A cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiorova, T.; Stevens, F.; Zee, J. van der; Boode, B.; Scherpbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Female medical students often prefer primary care specialties, while male students appear to be attracted to hospital specialties. Notwithstanding the steady feminisation of medicine, in many countries there are still difficulties in recruiting trainees for general practice. This seeming

  17. General practice consultations, diagnostic investigations, and prescriptions in the year preceding a lung cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Louise M; Møller, Henrik; Jakobsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Patterns of general practice utilization in the period before lung cancer (LC) diagnosis may provide new knowledge to ensure timelier and earlier diagnosis of LC. This study aimed to explore the prediagnostic activity in general practice in the year preceding LC diagnosis. The activity was compared...... = 340,170). During months 12 to 1 prior to diagnosis, 92.6% of LC patients and 88.4% of comparison subjects had one or more contacts with general practice. 13.0% of LC patients and 3.3% of comparison subjects had two or more X-rays. 20.8% of LC patients and 8.5% of comparison subjects had two or more...... first-time antibiotics prescriptions. The incidence rate ratio for having a contact to general practice was similar for LC patients with localized disease compared to LC patients with metastatic disease. LC patients with COPD had more frequent contacts, lung functions tests, X-rays, and prescriptions...

  18. Physician gender differences in general and cancer-specific prevention attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Wildes, Kimberly A; Nápoles-Springer, Anna; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo; Talavera, Greg; Rios, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Findings are inconsistent regarding physician gender differences in general prevention practices and cancer-specific attitudes and practices. We analyzed cross-sectional data from randomly selected physicians (N = 722) to test associations of gender with prevention practices and attitudes. Chi-square analyses (P gender differences for 14% (7/49) of the general and cancer-specific practices and attitudes tested. Multivariate analyses revealed that gender significantly (P gender predicted discussion of physical activity, violence, and use of substances. Male gender predicted belief in effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen screening. Overall, male and female physicians showed more similarities than differences, but physician gender was associated with a number of important general and cancer-specific prevention services. Female physicians were more likely to discuss general health prevention activities than male physicians, especially issues considered sensitive. We discuss implications for research and education.

  19. The influence of population characteristics on variation in general practice based morbidity estimations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, van den C.; Hoeymans, N.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Akker, van den M.; Biermans, M.C.; Boven, van K.; Brouwer, H.J.; Verheij, R.A.; Waal, de M.W.; Schellevis, F.G.; Westert, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background General practice based registration networks (GPRNs) provide information on morbidity rates in the population. Morbidity rate estimates from different GPRNs, however, reveal considerable, unexplained differences. We studied the range and variation in morbidity estimates, as well as the

  20. General educational disciplines practice-oriented training in intermediate vocational education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya G. Skorobogatova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns crucial issues of practice-oriented training in Russia's intermediate vocational education, designates directions of general educational disciplines study in intermediate vocational education.

  1. Classification of shoulder complaints in general practice by means of nonmetric multidimensional scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, KH; Winters, JC; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Objectives: To determine if a classification of shoulder complaints in general practice can be made from variables of medical history and physical examination with nonmetric multidimensional scaling and to investigate the reproducibility of results from an earlier hierarchical cluster analysis.

  2. Simulation based education - models for teaching surgical skills in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sankar; Cooling, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    Simulation based education is an accepted method of teaching procedural skills in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. There is an increasing need for developing authentic simulation models for use in general practice training. This article describes the preparation of three simulation models to teach general practice registrars basic surgical skills, including excision of a sebaceous cyst and debridement and escharectomy of chronic wounds. The role of deliberate practise in improving performance of procedural skills with simulation based education is well established. The simulation models described are inexpensive, authentic and can be easily prepared. They have been used in general practice education programs with positive feedback from participants and could potentially be used as in-practice teaching tools by general practitioner supervisors. Importantly, no simulation can exactly replicate the actual clinical situation, especially when complications arise. It is important that registrars are provided with adequate supervision when initially applying these surgical skills to patients.

  3. Allergic rhinitis in children: incidence and treatment in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    OpenAIRE

    Bot, C.M.A. de; Moed, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groot, H. de; Wijk, R.G. van; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2009-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0–17 yr in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establish whether changes have occurred. A comparison was made with data from the first (1987) and second (2001) Dutch national surveys of general practice on children aged 0–17 yr. Incidence rates were compared by age, sex, level of urbani...

  4. Allergic rhinitis in children in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    OpenAIRE

    Bot, C.M.A. de; Moed, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groot, H. de; Wijk, R.G. van; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0-17 years in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establich whether changes have occurred. Materials & methods: a comparison was made with data from the first (1987) and second (2001) Dutch National Surveys of General Practice on children aged 0-17 years. The management of...

  5. Tired, weak, or in need of rest: fatigue among general practice attenders.

    OpenAIRE

    David, A; Pelosi, A; McDonald, E; Stephens, D; Ledger, D; Rathbone, R; Mann, A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the prevalence and associations of symptoms of fatigue. DESIGN--Questionnaire survey. SETTING--London general practice. PARTICIPANTS--611 General practice attenders. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Scores on a fatigue questionnaire and reasons given for fatigue. RESULTS--10.2% Of men (17/167) and 10.6% of women (47/444) had substantial fatigue for one month or more. Age, occupation, and marital status exerted minor effects. Subjects attributed fatigue equally to physical and n...

  6. Radiologists' responses to inadequate referrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Hofmann, Bjoern Morten; Espeland, Ansgar

    2010-01-01

    To investigate radiologists' responses to inadequate imaging referrals. A survey was mailed to Norwegian radiologists; 69% responded. They graded the frequencies of actions related to referrals with ambiguous indications or inappropriate examination choices and the contribution of factors preventing and not preventing an examination of doubtful usefulness from being performed as requested. Ninety-five percent (344/361) reported daily or weekly actions related to inadequate referrals. Actions differed among subspecialties. The most frequent were contacting the referrer to clarify the clinical problem and checking test results/information in the medical records. Both actions were more frequent among registrars than specialists and among hospital radiologists than institute radiologists. Institute radiologists were more likely to ask the patient for additional information and to examine the patient clinically. Factors rated as contributing most to prevent doubtful examinations were high risk of serious complications/side effects, high radiation dose and low patient age. Factors facilitating doubtful examinations included respect for the referrer's judgment, patient/next-of-kin wants the examination, patient has arrived, unreachable referrer, and time pressure. In summary, radiologists facing inadequate referrals considered patient safety and sought more information. Vetting referrals on arrival, easier access to referring clinicians, and time for radiologists to handle inadequate referrals may contribute to improved use of imaging. (orig.)

  7. Empathy Variation in General Practice: A Survey among General Practitioners in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Justin; Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Peder; Søndergaard, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of physician empathy may be correlated with improved patient health outcomes and high physician job satisfaction. Knowledge about variation in empathy and related general practitioner (GP) characteristics may allow for a more informed...... approach to improve empathy among GPs. Objective: Our objective is to measure and analyze variation in physician empathy and its association with GP demographic, professional, and job satisfaction characteristics. Methods: 464 Danish GPs responded to a survey containing the Danish version of the Jefferson...... Scale of Empathy for Health Professionals (JSE-HP) and questions related to their demographic, professional and job satisfaction characteristics. Descriptive statistics and a quantile plot of the ordered empathy scores were used to describe empathy variation. In addition, random-effect logistic...

  8. How our practice of histopathology, especially tumour pathology has changed in the last two decades: reflections from a major referral center in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zubair; Idrees, Romana; Fatima, Saira; Arshad, Huma; Din, Nasir-ud; Memon, Aisha; Minhas, Khurram; Ahmed, Arsalan; Fatima, Syeda Samia; Arif, Muhammad; Ahmed, Rashida; Haroon, Saroona; Pervez, Shahid; Hassan, Sheema; Kayani, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Continued advances in the field of histo-pathology (and cyto-pathology) over the past two decades have resulted in dramatic changes in the manner in which these disciplines are now practiced. This is especially true in the setting of a large university hospital where the role of pathologists as clinicians (diagnosticians), undergraduate and postgraduate educators, and researchers has evolved considerably. The world around us has changed significantly during this period bringing about a considerable change in our lifestyles and the way we live. This is the world of the internet and the world-wide web, the world of Google and Wikipedia, of Youtube and Facebook where anyone can obtain any information one desires at the push of a button. The practice of histo (and cyto) pathology has also evolved in line with these changes. For those practicing this discipline in a poor, developing country these changes have been breathtaking. This is an attempt to document these changes as experienced by histo (and cyto) pathologists practicing in the biggest center for Histopathology in Pakistan, a developing country in South Asia with a large (180 million) and ever growing population. The Section of Histopathology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology at the Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH) in Karachi, Pakistan's largest city has since its inception in the mid-1980s transformed the way histopathology is practiced in Pakistan by incorporating modern methods and rescuing histopathology in Pakistan from the primitive and outdated groove in which it was stuck for decades. It set histopathology in Pakistan firmly on the path of modernity and change which are essential for better patient management and care through accurate and complete diagnosis and more recently prognostic and predictive information as well.

  9. Acute referral of patients from general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer Mogensen, Christian; Mortensen, Anne Mette; Staehr, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the most efficient organization of admissions to an emergency hospital. It is important to know, who should be in front when the GP requests an acute admission. The aim of the study was to analyse how experienced ED nurses perform when assessing requests...

  10. Attitudes of general practice dentists in private dental clinics in Almadinah Almunawarah toward novel endodontic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothanna AlRahabi

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study provides data regarding the current trends and attitudes of general practitioners in private dental clinics in Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah regarding novel technologies in endodontic treatment and reveals the gap between the new advances in endodontics and clinical practice, as well as the need to improve root canal treatment in private dental practices.

  11. Food parenting practices and child dietary behavior. Prospective relations and the moderating role of general parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleddens, E.F.C.; Kremers, S.P.J.; Stafleu, A.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Vries, N.K. de; Thijs, C.

    2014-01-01

    Research on parenting practices has focused on individual behaviors while largely failing to consider the context of their use, i.e., general parenting. We examined the extent to which food parenting practices predict children's dietary behavior (classified as unhealthy: snacking, sugar-sweetened

  12. Relational coordination and organisational social capital association with characteristics of general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke; Edwards, Kasper; Knudsen, Thomas Bøllingtoft; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Reventlow, Susanne; Søndergaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background. Relational coordination (RC) and organisational social capital (OSC) are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance, which have not previously been analysed together, in general practice. Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyse the associations between RC and OSC, and characteristics of general practice. Methods. Questionnaire survey study comprising 2074 practices in Denmark. Results. General practitioners (GPs) rated both RC and OSC in their general practice higher than their secretaries and nurses. The practice form was statistically significantly associated with high RC and OSC. RC was positively associated with the number of patients listed with a practice per staff, where staff is defined as all members of a practice including both owners and employees. Conclusion. The study showed that RC and OSC were significantly associated with type of profession and practice type. RC was also found to be significantly positively associated with number of patients per staff. However, the low response rate must be taken into consideration when interpreting the self-reported results of this study.

  13. 78 FR 12412 - Generalized System of Preferences (GSP): Notice of Status of Certain Pending Country Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Generalized System of Preferences (GSP): Notice... country practice petitions submitted as part of previous GSP Annual Reviews, and (2) the schedule for public comments and a public hearing on the ongoing GSP country practice reviews regarding worker rights...

  14. Long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants placed in a general dental practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hevinga, M.A.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants applied in a general dental practice. METHODS: Regularly attending patients visiting the practice between July 2006 until November 2007 and who had received sealants

  15. The EMR-scan: assessing the quality of Electronic Medical Records in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Jabaaij, L.; Njoo, K.; Hoogen, H. van den; Bakker, D. de

    2008-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic medical records (EMR) in general practice has spread rapidly in the last decade (more than 90% today). Traditionally, these records are primarily used for direct patient care and for administrative purposes by the practice involved. In recent years, further

  16. Process evaluation of a tailored intervention programme of cardiovascular risk management in general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntink, E; Wensing, M; Timmers, I M; van Lieshout, J

    2016-12-15

    A tailored implementation programme to improve cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) in general practice had little impact on outcomes. The questions in this process evaluation concerned (1) impact on counselling skills and CVRM knowledge of practice nurses, (2) their use of the various components of the intervention programme and adoption of recommended practices and (3) patients' perceptions of counselling for CVRM. A mixed-methods process evaluation was conducted. We assessed practice nurses' motivational interviewing skills on audio-taped consultations using Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI). They also completed a clinical knowledge test. Both practice nurses and patients reported on their experiences in a written questionnaire and interviews. A multilevel regression analysis and an independent sample t test were used to examine motivational interviewing skills and CVRM knowledge. Framework analysis was applied to analyse qualitative data. Data from 34 general practices were available, 19 intervention practices and 14 control practices. No improvements were measured on motivational interviewing skills in both groups. There appeared to be better knowledge of CVRM in the control group. On average half of the practice nurses indicated that they adopted the recommended interventions, but stated that they did not necessarily record this in patients' medical files. The tailored programme was perceived as too large. Time, follow-up support and reminders were felt to be lacking. About 20% of patients in the intervention group visited the general practice during the intervention period, yet only a small number of these patients were referred to recommended options. The tailored programme was only partly used by practice nurses and had little impact on either their clinical knowledge and communication skills or on patient reported healthcare. If the assumed logical model of change is valid, a more intensive programme is needed to have an impact on CVRM

  17. Why general practitioners and consultants change their clinical practice: a critical incident study.

    OpenAIRE

    Allery, L. A.; Owen, P. A.; Robling, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the complete range of factors which doctors recognise as changing their clinical practice and provide a measure of how often education is involved in change. DESIGN: Interviews using the critical incident technique. SETTING: Primary and secondary care. SUBJECTS: Random sample of 50 general practitioners and 50 consultants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Categories of reasons for change in clinical practice. RESULTS: Doctors described 361 changes in clinical practice, with an av...

  18. Improving outcomes for people with COPD by developing networks of general practices: evaluation of a quality improvement project in east London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Sally; Mathur, Rohini; Lloyd-Owen, Simon; Round, Thomas; Robson, John

    2014-10-16

    Structured care for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can improve outcomes. Delivering care in a deprived ethnically diverse area can prove challenging. Evaluation of a system change to enhance COPD care delivery in a primary care setting between 2010 and 2013 using observational data. All 36 practices in one inner London primary care trust were grouped geographically into eight networks of 4-5 practices, each supported by a network manager, clerical staff and an educational budget. A multidisciplinary group, including a respiratory specialist and the community respiratory team, developed a 'care package' for COPD management, with financial incentives based on network achievements of clinical targets and supported case management and education. Monthly electronic dashboards enabled networks to track and improve performance. The size of network COPD registers increased by 10% in the first year. Between 2010 and 2013 completed care plans increased from 53 to 86.5%, pulmonary rehabilitation referrals rose from 45 to 70% and rates of flu immunisation from 81 to 83%, exceeding London and England figures. Hospital admissions decreased in Tower Hamlets from a historic high base. Investment of financial, organisational and educational resource into general practice networks was associated with clinically important improvements in COPD care in socially deprived, ethnically diverse communities. Key behaviour change included the following: collaborative working between practices driven by high-quality information to support performance review; shared financial incentives; and engagement between primary and secondary care clinicians.

  19. Role modeling in clinical practice: A whirlpool around master and apprentice in lifestyle interventions for obesity in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeuw, H.G.A.

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of the research reported in this thesis was to gain insight into the influence of the clinical trainer as a role model for the trainee, and to find a way to improve the role model behavior of the clinical trainer in general practice. Incorporating attributes of positive role

  20. General surgery graduates may be ill prepared to enter rural or community surgical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Lawrence M; Vergis, Ashley

    2013-06-01

    Rural/community surgery presents unique challenges to general surgeons. Not only are they required to perform "classic" general surgery procedures, but they are also often expected to be competent in other surgical disciplines. Final-year Canadian-trained residents in general surgery were asked to complete the survey. The survey explored chief residents' career plans for the following year and whether or not they would independently perform various procedures, some general surgical, and others now considered within the domain of the subspecialties. Sixty-four residents (71%) completed the survey. Twenty percent planned to undertake a rural surgical practice, 17% an urban community practice, and 55% had confirmed fellowships. Most residents (>90%) expressed comfort with basic general surgical procedures. However, residents were less comfortable with subspecialty procedures that are still performed by general surgeons in many rural practices. More than half of graduating general surgery residents are choosing subspecialty fellowship training over proceeding directly to practice. Those choosing a rural or community practice are likely to feel ill prepared to replace existing surgeons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.