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Sample records for general practice cluster

  1. Classification of shoulder complaints in general practice by means of cluster analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, JC; Groenier, KH; Sobel, JS; Arendzen, HH; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To determine if a classification of shoulder complaints in general practice can be made with a cluster analysis of variables of medical history and physical examination. Method: One hundred one patients with shoulder complaints were examined upon inclusion (week 0) and after 2 weeks. Elev

  2. Women's evaluation of abuse and violence care in general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial (weave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder Gene

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner abuse (IPA is a major public health problem with serious implications for the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of women, particularly women of child-bearing age. It is a common, hidden problem in general practice and has been under-researched in this setting. Opportunities for early intervention and support in primary care need to be investigated given the frequency of contact women have with general practice. Despite the high prevalence and health consequences of abuse, there is insufficient evidence for screening in primary care settings. Furthermore, there is little rigorous evidence to guide general practitioners (GPs in responding to women identified as experiencing partner abuse. This paper describes the design of a trial of a general practice-based intervention consisting of screening for fear of partner with feedback to GPs, training for GPs, brief counselling for women and minimal practice organisational change. It examines the effect on women's quality of life, mental health and safety behaviours. Methods/Design weave is a cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Approximately 500 women (16-50 years seen by the GP in the previous year are mailed a short lifestyle survey containing an item to screen for IPA. Women who indicate that they were afraid of a partner/ex-partner in the last year and provide contact details are invited to participate. Once baseline data are collected, GPs are randomly assigned to either a group involving healthy relationship and responding to IPA training plus inviting women for up to 6 sessions of counselling or to a group involving basic education and usual care for women. Outcomes will be evaluated by postal survey at 6 and 12 months following delivery of the intervention. There will be an economic evaluation, and process evaluation involving interviews with women and GPs, to inform understanding about implementation

  3. Implementing referral guidelines: lessons from a negative outcome cluster randomised factorial trial in general practice

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    Shaw Lindsey

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few patients with lower bowel symptoms who consult their general practitioner need a specialist opinion. However data from referred patients suggest that those who are referred would benefit from detailed assessment before referral. Methods A cluster randomised factorial trial. 44 general practices in North Trent, UK. Practices were offered either an electronic interactive referral pro forma, an educational outreach visit by a local colorectal surgeon, both or neither. The main outcome measure was the proportion of cases with severe diverticular disease, cancer or precancerous lesions and inflammatory bowel disease in those referred by each group. A secondary outcome was a referral letter quality score. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to identify key themes relating to the use of the software Results From 150 invitations, 44 practices were recruited with a total list size of 265,707. There were 716 consecutive referrals recorded over a six-month period, for which a diagnosis was available for 514. In the combined software arms 14% (37/261 had significant pathology, compared with 19% (49/253 in the non-software arms, relative risk 0.73 (95% CI: 0.46 to 1.15. In the combined educational outreach arms 15% (38/258 had significant pathology compared with 19% (48/256 in the non-educational arms, relative risk 0.79 (95% CI: 0.50 to 1.24. Pro forma practices documented better assessment of patients at referral. Conclusion There was a lack of evidence that either intervention increased the proportion of patients with organic pathology among those referred. The interactive software did improve the amount of information relayed in referral letters although we were unable to confirm if this made a significant difference to patients or their health care providers. The potential value of either intervention may have been diminished by their limited uptake within the context of a cluster randomised clinical trial. A number of

  4. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  5. Start improving the quality of care for people with type 2 diabetes through a general practice support program: a cluster randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goderis, G.; Borgermans, L.D.A.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Broeke, C. Van Den; Boland, B.; Verbeke, G.; Carbonez, A.; Mathieu, C.; Heyrman, J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effectiveness of a two-arm quality improvement program (QIP) to support general practice with limited tradition in chronic care on type 2 diabetes patient outcomes. METHODS: During 18 months, we performed a cluster randomized trial with randomization of General Practices. The

  6. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting A three-arm cluster randomised trial was

  7. Case-finding of dementia in general practice and effects of subsequent collaborative care; design of a cluster RCT

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    van den Dungen Pim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the primary care setting, dementia is often diagnosed relatively late in the disease process. Case finding and proactive collaborative care may have beneficial effects on both patient and informal caregiver by clarifying the cause of cognitive decline and changed behaviour and by enabling support, care planning and access to services. We aim to improve the recognition and diagnosis of individuals with dementia in general practice. In addition to this diagnostic aim, the effects of case finding and subsequent care on the mental health of individuals with dementia and the mental health of their informal carers are explored. Methods and design Design: cluster randomised controlled trial with process evaluation. Participants: 162 individuals ≥ 65 years, in 15 primary care practices, in whom GPs suspect cognitive impairment, but without a dementia diagnosis. Intervention; case finding and collaborative care: 2 trained practice nurses (PNs invite all patients with suspected cognitive impairment for a brief functional and cognitive screening. If the cognitive tests are supportive of cognitive impairment, individuals are referred to their GP for further evaluation. If dementia is diagnosed, a comprehensive geriatric assessment takes place to identify other relevant geriatric problems that need to be addressed. Furthermore, the team of GP and PN provide information and support. Control: GPs provide care and diagnosis as usual. Main study parameters: after 12 months both groups are compared on: 1 incident dementia (and MCI diagnoses and 2 patient and caregiver quality of life (QoL-AD; EQ5D and mental health (MH5; GHQ 12 and caregiver competence to care (SSCQ. The process evaluation concerns facilitating and impeding factors to the implementation of this intervention. These factors are assessed on the care provider level, the care recipient level and on the organisational level. Discussion This study will provide insight

  8. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? A cluster randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kortekaas, M F; Bartelink, M E L; Zuithoff, N P A; van der Heijden, G J M G; de Wit, N J; Hoes, A W

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules...

  9. Two generalizations of Kohonen clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdek, James C.; Pal, Nikhil R.; Tsao, Eric C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the sequential hard c-means (SHCM), learning vector quantization (LVQ), and fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithms is discussed. LVQ and SHCM suffer from several major problems. For example, they depend heavily on initialization. If the initial values of the cluster centers are outside the convex hull of the input data, such algorithms, even if they terminate, may not produce meaningful results in terms of prototypes for cluster representation. This is due in part to the fact that they update only the winning prototype for every input vector. The impact and interaction of these two families with Kohonen's self-organizing feature mapping (SOFM), which is not a clustering method, but which often leads ideas to clustering algorithms is discussed. Then two generalizations of LVQ that are explicitly designed as clustering algorithms are presented; these algorithms are referred to as generalized LVQ = GLVQ; and fuzzy LVQ = FLVQ. Learning rules are derived to optimize an objective function whose goal is to produce 'good clusters'. GLVQ/FLVQ (may) update every node in the clustering net for each input vector. Neither GLVQ nor FLVQ depends upon a choice for the update neighborhood or learning rate distribution - these are taken care of automatically. Segmentation of a gray tone image is used as a typical application of these algorithms to illustrate the performance of GLVQ/FLVQ.

  10. Prescribing Data in General Practice Demonstration (PDGPD project - a cluster randomised controlled trial of a quality improvement intervention to achieve better prescribing for chronic heart failure and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Margaret

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research literature consistently documents that scientifically based therapeutic recommendations are not always followed in the hospital or in the primary care setting. Currently, there is evidence that some general practitioners in Australia are not prescribing appropriately for patients diagnosed with 1 hypertension (HT and 2 chronic heart failure (CHF. The objectives of this study were to improve general practitioner’s drug treatment management of these patients through feedback on their own prescribing and small group discussions with peers and a trained group facilitator. The impact evaluation includes quantitative assessment of prescribing changes at 6, 9, 12 and 18 months after the intervention. Methods A pragmatic multi site cluster RCT began recruiting practices in October 2009 to evaluate the effects of a multi-faceted quality improvement (QI intervention on prescribing practice among Australian general practitioners (GP in relation to patients with CHF and HT. General practices were recruited nationally through General Practice Networks across Australia. Participating practices were randomly allocated to one of three groups: two groups received the QI intervention (the prescribing indicator feedback reports and small group discussion with each group undertaking the clinical topics (CHF and HT in reverse order to the other. The third group was waitlisted to receive the intervention 6 months later and acted as a “control” for the other two groups. De-identified data on practice, doctor and patient characteristics and their treatment for CHF and HT are extracted at six-monthly intervals before and after the intervention. Post-test comparisons will be conducted between the intervention and control arms using intention to treat analysis and models that account for clustering of practices in a Network and clustering of patients within practices and GPs. Discussion This paper describes the study protocol for a

  11. Kernel Generalized Noise Clustering Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-hong; ZHOU Jian-jiang

    2007-01-01

    To deal with the nonlinear separable problem, the generalized noise clustering (GNC) algorithm is extended to a kernel generalized noise clustering (KGNC) model. Different from the fuzzy c-means (FCM) model and the GNC model which are based on Euclidean distance, the presented model is based on kernel-induced distance by using kernel method. By kernel method the input data are nonlinearly and implicitly mapped into a high-dimensional feature space, where the nonlinear pattern appears linear and the GNC algorithm is performed. It is unnecessary to calculate in high-dimensional feature space because the kernel function can do itjust in input space. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is verified by experiments on three data sets. It is concluded that the KGNC algorithm has better clustering accuracy than FCM and GNC in clustering data sets containing noisy data.

  12. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? A cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, M.F.; Bartelink, M.E.L.; Zuithoff, N.P.A.; van der Heijden, G.J.M.G.; de Wit, N.J.; Hoes, A.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules. However, these studies have neither been performed in GP nor assessed E

  13. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? : A cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, M F; Bartelink, M E L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100449069; Zuithoff, N P A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313995494; van der Heijden, G J M G; de Wit, N J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100525393; Hoes, A W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101111762

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules. However, these studies have neither been performed in GP nor assessed

  14. General practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy: an examination of clustering within practices and prediction of patient-rated quality of care

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    Thapar Ajay K

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is wide variation in the quality of care provided by primary care practices to individuals with chronic illnesses. Individual doctor attitudes and interest have been demonstrated to influence patient outcomes in some instances. Given the trend towards larger practices and part-time working, continuity of care is likely to fall and thus practice-based rather than individual general practitioner attributes and attitudes are likely to become increasingly important. The aim in this paper was to examine the extent to which individual general practitioner (G.P. attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and predict patient-rated quality of care. Methods The sample consisted of 1255 people with active epilepsy (a recent seizure or on anti-convulsant medication for epilepsy and 199 GPs from 82 general practices. Measures of GP attitudes (a 17-item GP attitudes questionnaire and patient-rated quality of epilepsy care were obtained. 1210 individuals completed initial questionnaires and 975 patients filled in final questionnaires one year later. Responses were achieved from 64 practices (83% of total and 115 GPs (60% of total. Results 2 main factors were found to underlie GP attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy and these demonstrated clustering within practices "epilepsy viewed as a primary care responsibility" (Eigenvalue 3.98, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC 0.40, and "medication skills"(Eigenvalue 2.74, ICC 0.35. GP-rated scores on "epilepsy care being a primary care responsibility" were a significant predictor of patient-rated quality of GP care (p = 0.031. Other contributory factors were seizure frequency (p = 0.044, and patient-rated "shared decision making" (p = 0.022. Conclusion Specific general practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and are significantly associated with patient-rated quality of epilepsy care. It is important to take

  15. The effects of a brief intervention to promote walking on Theory of Planned Behavior constructs: a cluster randomized controlled trial in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stefanie L; Michie, Susan; Dale, Jeremy; Stallard, Nigel; French, David P

    2015-05-01

    Perceived behavioral control (PBC) is a consistent predictor of intentions to walk more. A previously successful intervention to promote walking by altering PBC has been adapted for delivery in general practice. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of this intervention on Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) constructs in this context. Cluster randomized controlled trial, with n = 315 general practice patients. Practice nurses and Healthcare Assistants delivered a self-regulation intervention or information provision (control). Questionnaires assessed TPB variables at baseline, post-intervention, 6 weeks and 6 months. Walking was measured by pedometer. The control group reported significantly higher subjective norm at all follow-up time points. There were no significant differences between the two groups in PBC, intention, attitude or walking behavior. TPB variables significantly predicted intentions to walk more, but not objective walking behavior, after accounting for clustering. The lack of effect of the intervention was probably due to a failure to maintain intervention fidelity, and the unsuitability of the behavior change techniques included in the intervention for the population investigated. This previously successful intervention was not successful when delivered in this context, calling into question whether practice nurses are best placed to deliver such interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial of early intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by practice nurse-general practitioner teams: Study Protocol

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    Bunker Jeremy M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is a leading cause of disability, hospitalization, and premature mortality. General practice is well placed to diagnose and manage COPD, but there is a significant gap between evidence and current practice, with a low level of awareness and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Under-diagnosis of COPD is a world-wide problem, limiting the benefit that could potentially be achieved through early intervention strategies such as smoking cessation, dietary advice, and exercise. General practice is moving towards more structured chronic disease management, and the increasing involvement of practice nurses in delivering chronic care. Design A pragmatic cluster randomised trial will test the hypothesis that intervention by a practice nurse-general practitioner (GP team leads to improved health-related quality of life and greater adherence with clinical practice guidelines for patients with newly-diagnosed COPD, compared with usual care. Forty general practices in greater metropolitan Sydney Australia will be recruited to identify patients at risk of COPD and invite them to attend a case finding appointment. Practices will be randomised to deliver either practice nurse-GP partnership care, or usual care, to patients newly-diagnosed with COPD. The active intervention will involve the practice nurse and GP working in partnership with the patient in developing and implementing a care plan involving (as appropriate, smoking cessation, immunisation, pulmonary rehabilitation, medication review, assessment and correction of inhaler technique, nutritional advice, management of psycho-social issues, patient education, and management of co-morbidities. The primary outcome measure is health-related quality of life, assessed with the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire 12 months after diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures include validated disease-specific and general health related

  17. Effectiveness of a Minimal Intervention for Stress-related mental disorders with Sick leave (MISS; study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial in general practice [ISRCTN43779641

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    van Marwijk Harm WJ

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main aims of this paper are to describe the setting and design of a Minimal Intervention in general practice for Stress-related mental disorders in patients on Sick leave (MISS, as well as to ascertain the study complies with the requirements for a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT. The potential adverse consequences of sick leave due to Stress-related Mental Disorders (SMDs are extensive, but often not recognised. Since most people having SMDs with sick leave consult their general practitioner (GP at an early stage, a tailored intervention given by GPs is justified. We provide a detailed description of the MISS; that is more accurate assessment, education, advice and monitoring to treat SMDs in patients on sick leave. Our hypothesis is that the MISS will be more effective compared to the usual care, in reducing days of sick leave of these patients. Methods The design is a pragmatic RCT. Randomisation is at the level of GPs. They received the MISS-training versus no training, in order to compare the MISS vs. usual care at patient level. Enrolment of patients took place after screening in the source population, that comprised 20–60 year old primary care attendees. Inclusion criteria were: moderately elevated distress levels, having a paid job and sick leave for no longer than three months. There is a one year follow up. The primary outcome measure is lasting full return to work. Reduction of SMD- symptoms is one of the secondary outcome measures. Forty-six GPs and 433 patients agreed to participate. Discussion In our study design, attention is given to the practical application of the requirements for a pragmatic trial. The results of this cluster RCT will add to the evidence about treatment options in general practice for SMDs in patients on sick leave, and might contribute to a new and appropriate guideline. These results will be available at the end of 2006.

  18. Preventing disease through opportunistic, rapid engagement by primary care teams using behaviour change counselling (PRE-EMPT): protocol for a general practice-based cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanou, Clio; Simpson, Sharon A; Hood, Kerry; Edwards, Adrian; Cohen, David; Rollnick, Stephen; Carter, Ben; McCambridge, Jim; Moore, Laurence; Randell, Elizabeth; Pickles, Timothy; Smith, Christine; Lane, Claire; Wood, Fiona; Thornton, Hazel; Butler, Chris C

    2010-09-21

    Smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet are the key modifiable factors contributing to premature morbidity and mortality in the developed world. Brief interventions in health care consultations can be effective in changing single health behaviours. General Practice holds considerable potential for primary prevention through modifying patients' multiple risk behaviours, but feasible, acceptable and effective interventions are poorly developed, and uptake by practitioners is low. Through a process of theoretical development, modeling and exploratory trials, we have developed an intervention called Behaviour Change Counselling (BCC) derived from Motivational Interviewing (MI). This paper describes the protocol for an evaluation of a training intervention (the Talking Lifestyles Programme) which will enable practitioners to routinely use BCC during consultations for the above four risk behaviours. This cluster randomised controlled efficacy trial (RCT) will evaluate the outcomes and costs of this training intervention for General Practitioners (GPs) and nurses. Training methods will include: a practice-based seminar, online self-directed learning, and reflecting on video recorded and simulated consultations. The intervention will be evaluated in 29 practices in Wales, UK; two clinicians will take part (one GP and one nurse) from each practice. In intervention practices both clinicians will receive training. The aim is to recruit 2000 patients into the study with an expected 30% drop out. The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients making changes in one or more of the four behaviours at three months. Results will be compared for patients seeing clinicians trained in BCC with patients seeing non-BCC trained clinicians. Economic and process evaluations will also be conducted. Opportunistic engagement by health professionals potentially represents a cost effective medical intervention. This study integrates an existing

  19. Dementia care initiative in primary practice – study protocol of a cluster randomized trial on dementia management in a general practice setting

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    Holle Rolf

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current guidelines for dementia care recommend the combination of drug therapy with non-pharmaceutical measures like counselling and social support. However, the scientific evidence concerning non-pharmaceutical interventions for dementia patients and their informal caregivers remains inconclusive. Targets of modern comprehensive dementia care are to enable patients to live at home as long and as independent as possible and to reduce the burden of caregivers. The objective of the study is to compare a complex intervention including caregiver support groups and counselling against usual care in terms of time to nursing home placement. In this paper the study protocol is described. Methods/Design The IDA (Initiative Demenzversorgung in der Allgemeinmedizin project is designed as a three armed cluster-randomized trial where dementia patients and their informal caregivers are recruited by general practitioners. Patients in the study region of Middle Franconia, Germany, are included if they have mild or moderate dementia, are at least 65 years old, and are members of the German AOK (Allgemeine Ortskrankenkasse sickness fund. In the control group patients receive regular treatment, whereas in the two intervention groups general practitioners participate in a training course in evidence based dementia treatment, recommend support groups and offer counseling to the family caregivers either beginning at baseline or after the 1-year follow-up. The study recruitment and follow-up took place from July 2005 to January 2009. 303 general practitioners were randomized of which 129 recruited a total of 390 patients. Time to nursing home admission within the two year intervention and follow-up period is the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints are cognitive status, activities of daily living, burden of care giving as well as healthcare costs. For an economic analysis from the societal perspective, data are collected from caregivers as well as

  20. [Manual therapy in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Березуцкий, Владимир И

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to manual therapy practice for diagnostics and treatment of vertebrogenic pain syndrome in general practice. Analytical roundup of sources proves medical advantage of implementation of manual therapy basic methods by general practice specialists.

  1. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice: the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simon D; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Mortimer, Duncan; Francis, Jill J; Michie, Susan; Spike, Neil; Schattner, Peter; Kent, Peter; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally E

    2013-01-01

    This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP) in general practice. General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control) or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention). We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions) and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP) level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes) and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data). All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. 47 practices (53 GPs) were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs) to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05) and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60). Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10) for x-ray or CT-scan. The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant changes in actual behaviour. Australian New Zealand

  2. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice: the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D French

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP in general practice. METHODS: General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention. We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data. All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. RESULTS: 47 practices (53 GPs were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05 and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60. Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10 for x-ray or CT-scan. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant

  3. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? A cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekaas, M F; Bartelink, M E L; Zuithoff, N P A; van der Heijden, G J M G; de Wit, N J; Hoes, A W

    2016-09-13

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules. However, these studies have neither been performed in GP nor assessed EBM behaviour of former trainees in daily clinical practice. GP specialty training in the Netherlands. All 82 third year GP trainees who started their final third year in 2011 were approached for inclusion, of whom 79 (96%) participated: 39 in the intervention group and 40 in the control group. Integrated EBM training, in which EBM is embedded closely within the clinical context by joint assignments for the trainee and supervisor in daily practice, and teaching sessions based on dilemmas from actual patient consultations. Stand-alone EBM training at the institute only. Our primary outcome was EBM behaviour, assessed by measuring guideline adherence (incorporating rational, motivated deviation) and information-seeking behaviour. Our secondary outcomes were EBM attitude and EBM knowledge. Data were acquired using logbooks and questionnaires, respectively. Analyses were performed using mixed models. Logbook data were available from 76 (96%) of the participating trainees at baseline (7614 consultations), 60 (76%) at the end of the third year (T1, 4973 consultations) and 53 (67%) 1 year after graduation (T2, 3307 consultations). We found no significant differences in outcomes between the 2 groups, with relative risks for guideline adherence varying between 0.96 and 0.99 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.11) at T1, and 0.99 and 1.10 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.25) at T2, and for information-seeking behaviour between 0.97 and 1.16 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.91) and 0.90 and 1.10 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.32), respectively. Integrated EBM training compared with stand-alone EBM training does not improve EBM behaviour, attitude or knowledge of (future) GPs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  4. An Audit and Feedback Intervention for Reducing Antibiotic Prescribing in General Dental Practice: The RAPiD Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

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    Paula Elouafkaoui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentists prescribe approximately 10% of antibiotics dispensed in UK community pharmacies. Despite clear clinical guidance, dentists often prescribe antibiotics inappropriately. This cluster-randomised controlled trial used routinely collected National Health Service (NHS dental prescribing and treatment claim data to compare the impact of individualised audit and feedback (A&F interventions on dentists' antibiotic prescribing rates.All 795 antibiotic prescribing NHS general dental practices in Scotland were included. Practices were randomised to the control (practices = 163; dentists = 567 or A&F intervention group (practices = 632; dentists = 1,999. A&F intervention practices were allocated to one of two A&F groups: (1 individualised graphical A&F comprising a line graph plotting an individual dentist's monthly antibiotic prescribing rate (practices = 316; dentists = 1,001; or (2 individualised graphical A&F plus a written behaviour change message synthesising and reiterating national guidance recommendations for dental antibiotic prescribing (practices = 316; dentists = 998. Intervention practices were also simultaneously randomised to receive A&F: (i with or without a health board comparator comprising the addition of a line to the graphical A&F plotting the monthly antibiotic prescribing rate of all dentists in the health board; and (ii delivered at 0 and 6 mo or at 0, 6, and 9 mo, giving a total of eight intervention groups. The primary outcome, measured by the trial statistician who was blinded to allocation, was the total number of antibiotic items dispensed per 100 NHS treatment claims over the 12 mo post-delivery of the baseline A&F. Primary outcome data was available for 152 control practices (dentists = 438 and 609 intervention practices (dentists = 1,550. At baseline, the number of antibiotic items prescribed per 100 NHS treatment claims was 8.3 in the control group and 8.5 in the intervention group. At follow-up, antibiotic

  5. Accreditation in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe K; Pedersen, Line B; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    practice and mortality. All outcomes relate to quality indicators included in the Danish Healthcare Quality Program, which is based on general principles for accreditation. Discussion: The consequences of accreditation and standard-setting processes are generally under-researched, particularly in general......Background: Accreditation is used increasingly in health systems worldwide. However, there is a lack of evidence on the effects of accreditation, particularly in general practice. In 2016 a mandatory accreditation scheme was initiated in Denmark, and during a 3-year period all practices, as default......, should undergo accreditation according to the Danish Healthcare Quality Program. The aim of this study is primarily to evaluate the effects of a mandatory accreditation scheme. Methods/design: The study is conducted as a cluster-randomized controlled trial among 1252 practices (clusters) with 2211...

  6. Practical Introduction to Clustering Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Alexander K

    2016-01-01

    Data clustering is an approach to seek for structure in sets of complex data, i.e., sets of "objects". The main objective is to identify groups of objects which are similar to each other, e.g., for classification. Here, an introduction to clustering is given and three basic approaches are introduced: the k-means algorithm, neighbour-based clustering, and an agglomerative clustering method. For all cases, C source code examples are given, allowing for an easy implementation.

  7. Accreditation in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe K; Pedersen, Line B; Siersma, Volkert;

    2017-01-01

    , should undergo accreditation according to the Danish Healthcare Quality Program. The aim of this study is primarily to evaluate the effects of a mandatory accreditation scheme. METHODS/DESIGN: The study is conducted as a cluster-randomized controlled trial among 1252 practices (clusters) with 2211...... practice and mortality. All outcomes relate to quality indicators included in the Danish Healthcare Quality Program, which is based on general principles for accreditation. DISCUSSION: The consequences of accreditation and standard-setting processes are generally under-researched, particularly in general...... to assess changes due to accreditation; (3) availability of data from registers with no self-reporting data. The primary outcome is the number of prescribed drugs in patients older than 65 years. Secondary outcomes are changes in outcomes related to other perspectives of safe medication, good clinical...

  8. Impetigo in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Koning (Sander)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImpetigo is a common skin infection, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus that mainly occurs in children. Patients with impetigo usually consult their general practitioner, who also treats the vast majority of cases. Impetigo is considered highly infectious, and consequently childr

  9. Behavioural science in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D R

    1979-10-01

    Dr Peter Sowerby has written an important criticism of Michael Balint's work based on his understanding of Karl Popper's writings. I dispute Sowerby's interpretation of Popper and disagree with his conclusions, which I suggest would lead general practice into a retreat. I believe Balint made a major contribution to general practice and has helped us towards practising whole-person medicine.

  10. Recruitment of general practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health service research often involves the active participation of healthcare professionals. However, their ability and commitment to research varies. This can cause recruitment difficulties and thereby prolong the study period and inflate budgets. Solberg has identified seven R......, which was fewer than planned (100 practices). In this evaluation, five of Solberg’s seven R-factors were successfully addressed and two factors were not. The need to involve (reciprocity) end users in the development of new software and the amount of time needed to conduct recruitment (resolution) were...

  11. Methodological practicalities in analytical generalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the existing literature on qualitative methodologies tend to discuss analytical generalization at a relatively abstract and general theoretical level. It is, however, not particularly straightforward to “translate” such abstract epistemological principles into more...... operative methodological strategies for producing analytical generalizations in research practices. Thus, the aim of the article is to contribute to the discussions among qualitatively working researchers about generalizing by way of exemplifying some of the methodological practicalities in analytical...... and processes in producing the three different ways of generalizing: ideal typologizing, category zooming, and positioning....

  12. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone consultations for fever or gastroenteritis using a formalised procedure in general practice: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Paul-Georges; Desmettre, Thibaut; Guinemer, Sabine; Ducros, Olivier; Begey, Stéphane; Ricard-Hibon, Agnès; Billier, Laurianne; Grignon, Océane; Megy-Michoux, Isabelle; Latouff, Jean-Noël; Sourbes, Adeline; Latier, Julien; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Vicaut, Eric; Adnet, Frédéric

    2016-09-22

    Telephone consultations in general practice are on the increase. However, data on their efficiency in terms of out-of-hours general practitioner (GP) workload, visits to hospital emergency departments (ED), cost, patient safety and satisfaction are relatively scant. The aim of this trial is to assess the effectiveness of telephone consultations provided by French emergency call centres in patients presenting with isolated fever or symptoms of gastroenteritis, mainly encountered diseases. This is a prospective, open-label, multicentre, pragmatic, cluster randomised clinical trial of an estimated 2880 patients making an out-of-hours call to one of six French emergency call centres for assistance with either fever or symptoms of gastroenteritis without seriousness criteria. Each call is handled by a call centre physician. Out-of-hours is 8 p.m. to 7.59 a.m. on weekdays, 1 p.m. to 7.59 a.m. on Saturdays and round-the-clock on Sundays and school holidays. Patients will be enrolled over 1 year. In the intervention arm, a telephone consultation based on a protocol, the formal Telephone Medical Advice (fTMA), is offered to each patient calling. This protocol aims to overcome a physical consultation during out-of-hours periods. It offers reassurance and explanations, advice on therapeutic management which may include, in addition to hygiene and diet measures, a telephone prescription of antipyretic, analgesic, rehydration medication or others, and recommendations on surveillance of the patient and any action to be taken. The patient is invited to call again if the condition worsens or new symptoms develop and to make an appointment with their family GP during office hours. In the control arm, the call centre physician handles calls as usual. This physician can carry out a telephone consultation with or without a telephone prescription, dispatch an on-duty GP, the fire brigade or an ambulance to the patient, or refer the patient to an on-duty physician or to the ED

  13. GDCluster: A General Decentralized Clustering Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashayekhi, Hoda; Habibi, Jafar; Khalafbeigi, Tania; Voulgaris, Spyros; van Steen, Martinus Richardus

    In many popular applications like peer-to-peer systems, large amounts of data are distributed among multiple sources. Analysis of this data and identifying clusters is challenging due to processing, storage, and transmission costs. In this paper, we propose GDCluster, a general fully decentralized

  14. Prescription in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L. van

    2006-01-01

    The second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (DNSGP-2) has combined registration data on morbidity and prescription, making it possible to unravel diagnosis-specific prescription behaviour of general practitioners(GPs). Prescription rates for different disorders vary considerably, especially

  15. Using MIQUEST in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Hammersley

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes ten months' experience with MIQUEST software used for the collection of data from computerised databases in General Practice. We report on the following: the MIQUEST software in use, the time costs to the practice, the completeness of confidentiality barriers and the accuracy of data collected using MIQUEST compared with similar data collected by the practice system (EMIS. There were no problems encountered with installation of MIQUEST-related software. With experience, MIQUEST was equal to the practice system for speed and ease of use. The confidentiality safeguards were found to be in accordance with the GMSC/RCGP Guidelines - patients could not be directly, or indirectly, identified from the data extracted by external searches. Inaccuracies in the data collected using MIQUEST were identified, but these were largely attributable to problems with the EMIS-written interpreter available on the practice system at the time, or with the coding schemes used by the practice. In an individual practice, MIQUEST represents an alternative data collection method to the practice-based software. For data collection from multiple general practices it should prove an invaluable tool for Health Authorities and research organisations.

  16. An embedded longitudinal multi-faceted qualitative evaluation of a complex cluster randomized controlled trial aiming to reduce clinically important errors in medicines management in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cresswell Kathrin M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need to shed light on the pathways through which complex interventions mediate their effects in order to enable critical reflection on their transferability. We sought to explore and understand key stakeholder accounts of the acceptability, likely impact and strategies for optimizing and rolling-out a successful pharmacist-led information technology-enabled (PINCER intervention, which substantially reduced the risk of clinically important errors in medicines management in primary care. Methods Data were collected at two geographical locations in central England through a combination of one-to-one longitudinal semi-structured telephone interviews (one at the beginning of the trial and another when the trial was well underway, relevant documents, and focus group discussions following delivery of the PINCER intervention. Participants included PINCER pharmacists, general practice staff, researchers involved in the running of the trial, and primary care trust staff. PINCER pharmacists were interviewed at three different time-points during the delivery of the PINCER intervention. Analysis was thematic with diffusion of innovation theory providing a theoretical framework. Results We conducted 52 semi-structured telephone interviews and six focus group discussions with 30 additional participants. In addition, documentary data were collected from six pharmacist diaries, along with notes from four meetings of the PINCER pharmacists and feedback meetings from 34 practices. Key findings that helped to explain the success of the PINCER intervention included the perceived importance of focusing on prescribing errors to all stakeholders, and the credibility and appropriateness of a pharmacist-led intervention to address these shortcomings. Central to this was the face-to-face contact and relationship building between pharmacists and a range of practice staff, and pharmacists’ explicitly designated role as a change agent

  17. An embedded longitudinal multi-faceted qualitative evaluation of a complex cluster randomized controlled trial aiming to reduce clinically important errors in medicines management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Sadler, Stacey; Rodgers, Sarah; Avery, Anthony; Cantrill, Judith; Murray, Scott A; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-06-08

    There is a need to shed light on the pathways through which complex interventions mediate their effects in order to enable critical reflection on their transferability. We sought to explore and understand key stakeholder accounts of the acceptability, likely impact and strategies for optimizing and rolling-out a successful pharmacist-led information technology-enabled (PINCER) intervention, which substantially reduced the risk of clinically important errors in medicines management in primary care. Data were collected at two geographical locations in central England through a combination of one-to-one longitudinal semi-structured telephone interviews (one at the beginning of the trial and another when the trial was well underway), relevant documents, and focus group discussions following delivery of the PINCER intervention. Participants included PINCER pharmacists, general practice staff, researchers involved in the running of the trial, and primary care trust staff. PINCER pharmacists were interviewed at three different time-points during the delivery of the PINCER intervention. Analysis was thematic with diffusion of innovation theory providing a theoretical framework. We conducted 52 semi-structured telephone interviews and six focus group discussions with 30 additional participants. In addition, documentary data were collected from six pharmacist diaries, along with notes from four meetings of the PINCER pharmacists and feedback meetings from 34 practices. Key findings that helped to explain the success of the PINCER intervention included the perceived importance of focusing on prescribing errors to all stakeholders, and the credibility and appropriateness of a pharmacist-led intervention to address these shortcomings. Central to this was the face-to-face contact and relationship building between pharmacists and a range of practice staff, and pharmacists' explicitly designated role as a change agent. However, important concerns were identified about the likely

  18. The PULSAR primary care protocol: a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial to test a training intervention for general practitioners in recovery-oriented practice to optimize personal recovery in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Joanne C; Shawyer, Frances; Brophy, Lisa; Russell, Grant; Fossey, Ellie; Inder, Brett; Mazza, Danielle; Vasi, Shiva; Weller, Penelope June; Wilson-Evered, Elisabeth; Edan, Vrinda; Meadows, Graham

    2016-12-20

    General practitioners (GPs) in Australia play a central role in the delivery of mental health care. This article describes the PULSAR (Principles Unite Local Services Assisting Recovery) Primary Care protocol, a novel mixed methods evaluation of a training intervention for GPs in recovery-oriented practice. The aim of the intervention is to optimize personal recovery in patients consulting study GPs for mental health issues. The intervention mixed methods design involves a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial testing the outcomes of training in recovery-oriented practice, together with an embedded qualitative study to identify the contextual enablers and challenges to implementing recovery-oriented practice. The project is conducted in Victoria, Australia between 2013 and 2017. Eighteen general practices and community health centers are randomly allocated to one of two steps (nine months apart) to start an intervention comprising GP training in the delivery of recovery-oriented practice. Data collection consists of cross-sectional surveys collected from patients of participating GPs at baseline, and again at the end of Steps 1 and 2. The primary outcome is improvement in personal recovery using responses to the Questionnaire about the Process of Recovery. Secondary outcomes are improvements in patient-rated measures of personal recovery and wellbeing, and of the recovery-oriented practice they have received, using the INSPIRE questionnaire, the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Participant data will be analyzed in the group that the cluster was assigned to at each study time point. Another per-protocol dataset will contain all data time-stamped according to the date of intervention received at each cluster site. Qualitative interviews with GPs and patients at three and nine months post-training will investigate experiences and challenges related to implementing recovery-oriented practice in primary

  19. GENERAL: Cluster Growth Through Monomer Adsorption Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jian-Hong; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Chen, Xiao-Shuang

    2010-02-01

    We propose a monomer adsorption model, in which only the monomers are allowed to diffuse and adsorb onto other clusters. By means of the generalized rate equation we investigate the kinetic behavior of the system with a special rate kernel. For the system without monomer input, the concentration aj(t) of the Aj clusters (j > 1) asymptotically retains a nonzero quantity, while for the system with monomer input, it decays with time and vanishes finally. We also investigate the kinetics of an interesting model with fixed-rate monomer adsorption. For the case without monomer source, the evolution of the system will halt at a finite time; while the system evolves infinitely in time in the case with monomer source. Finally, we also suggest a connection between the fixed-rate monomer adsorption systems and growing networks.

  20. The prevention access and risk taking in young people (PARTY project protocol: A cluster randomised controlled trial of health risk screening and motivational interviewing for young people presenting to general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanci Lena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are growing worldwide concerns about the ability of primary health care systems to manage the major burden of illness in young people. Over two thirds of premature adult deaths result from risks that manifest in adolescence, including injury, neuropsychiatric problems and consequences of risky behaviours. One policy response is to better reorientate primary health services towards prevention and early intervention. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to support this recommendation for young people. This paper describes the design and implementation of a trial testing an intervention to promote psychosocial risk screening of all young people attending general practice and to respond to identified risks using motivational interviewing. Main outcomes: clinicians’ detection of risk-taking and emotional distress, young people’s intention to change and reduction of risk taking. Secondary outcomes: pathways to care, trust in the clinician and likelihood of returning for future visits. The design of the economic and process evaluation are not detailed in this protocol. Methods PARTY is a cluster randomised trial recruiting 42 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Baseline measures include: youth friendly practice characteristics; practice staff’s self-perceived competency in young people’s care and clinicians’ detection and response to risk taking behaviours and emotional distress in 14–24 year olds, attending the practice. Practices are then stratified by a social disadvantage index and billing methods and randomised. Intervention practices receive: nine hours of training and tools; feedback of their baseline data and two practice visits over six weeks. Comparison practices receive a three hour seminar in youth friendly practice only. Six weeks post-intervention, 30 consecutive young people are interviewed post-consultation from each practice and followed-up for self-reported risk taking

  1. The prevention access and risk taking in young people (PARTY) project protocol: a cluster randomised controlled trial of health risk screening and motivational interviewing for young people presenting to general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanci, Lena; Grabsch, Brenda; Chondros, Patty; Shiell, Alan; Pirkis, Jane; Sawyer, Susan; Hegarty, Kelsey; Patterson, Elizabeth; Cahill, Helen; Ozer, Elizabeth; Seymour, Janelle; Patton, George

    2012-06-06

    There are growing worldwide concerns about the ability of primary health care systems to manage the major burden of illness in young people. Over two thirds of premature adult deaths result from risks that manifest in adolescence, including injury, neuropsychiatric problems and consequences of risky behaviours. One policy response is to better reorientate primary health services towards prevention and early intervention. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to support this recommendation for young people. This paper describes the design and implementation of a trial testing an intervention to promote psychosocial risk screening of all young people attending general practice and to respond to identified risks using motivational interviewing. clinicians' detection of risk-taking and emotional distress, young people's intention to change and reduction of risk taking. pathways to care, trust in the clinician and likelihood of returning for future visits. The design of the economic and process evaluation are not detailed in this protocol. PARTY is a cluster randomised trial recruiting 42 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Baseline measures include: youth friendly practice characteristics; practice staff's self-perceived competency in young people's care and clinicians' detection and response to risk taking behaviours and emotional distress in 14-24 year olds, attending the practice. Practices are then stratified by a social disadvantage index and billing methods and randomised. Intervention practices receive: nine hours of training and tools; feedback of their baseline data and two practice visits over six weeks. Comparison practices receive a three hour seminar in youth friendly practice only. Six weeks post-intervention, 30 consecutive young people are interviewed post-consultation from each practice and followed-up for self-reported risk taking behaviour and emotional distress three and 12 months post consultation. The PARTY trial is the

  2. The cluster bootstrap consistency in generalized estimating equations

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Guang

    2013-03-01

    The cluster bootstrap resamples clusters or subjects instead of individual observations in order to preserve the dependence within each cluster or subject. In this paper, we provide a theoretical justification of using the cluster bootstrap for the inferences of the generalized estimating equations (GEE) for clustered/longitudinal data. Under the general exchangeable bootstrap weights, we show that the cluster bootstrap yields a consistent approximation of the distribution of the regression estimate, and a consistent approximation of the confidence sets. We also show that a computationally more efficient one-step version of the cluster bootstrap provides asymptotically equivalent inference. © 2012.

  3. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  4. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, J; Fitzsimons, M; Delanty, N; Collins, C; Boland, M; Normand, C

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  5. A cluster-randomised, parallel group, controlled intervention study of genetic prostate cancer risk assessment and use of PSA tests in general practice--the ProCaRis study: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Pia; Vedsted, Peter; Edwards, Adrian; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Bro, Flemming

    2013-03-01

    Unsystematic screening for prostate cancer (PCa) is common, causing a high number of false-positive results. Valid instruments for assessment of individual risk of PCa have been called for. A DNA-based genetic test has been tested retrospectively. The clinical use of this test needs further investigation. The primary objective is to evaluate the impact on the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests of introducing genetic PCa risk assessment in general practice. The secondary objectives are to evaluate PCa-related patient experiences, and to explore sociocultural aspects of genetic risk assessment in patients at high PCa risk. The study is a cluster-randomised, controlled intervention study with practice as the unit of randomisation. We expect 140 practices to accept participation and include a total of 1244 patients in 4 months. Patients requesting a PSA test in the intervention group practices will be offered a genetic PCa risk assessment. Patients requesting a PSA test in the control group practices will be handled according to current guidelines. Data will be collected from registers, patient questionnaires and interviews. Quantitative data will be analysed according to intention-to-treat principles. Baseline characteristics will be compared between groups. Longitudinal analyses will include time in risk, and multivariable analysis will be conducted to evaluate the influence of general practitioner and patient-specific variables on future PSA testing. Interview data will be transcribed verbatim and analysed from a social-constructivist perspective. Consent will be obtained from patients who can withdraw from the study at any time. The study provides data to the ongoing conceptual and ethical discussions about genetic risk assessment and classification of low-risk and high-risk individuals. The intervention model might be applicable to other screening areas regarding risk of cancer with identified genetic components, for example, colon cancer. The study is

  6. An integrated general practice and pharmacy-based intervention to promote the use of appropriate preventive medications among individuals at high cardiovascular disease risk: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Adina; Joshi, Rohina; Usherwood, Tim; Webster, Ruth; Kaur, Baldeep; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol; Krass, Ines; Laba, Tracey-Lea; Reid, Christopher; Shiel, Louise; Hespe, Charlotte; Hersch, Fred; Jan, Stephen; Lo, Serigne; Peiris, David; Rodgers, Anthony; Patel, Anushka

    2016-09-23

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are responsible for significant morbidity, premature mortality, and economic burden. Despite established evidence that supports the use of preventive medications among patients at high CVD risk, treatment gaps remain. Building on prior evidence and a theoretical framework, a complex intervention has been designed to address these gaps among high-risk, under-treated patients in the Australian primary care setting. This intervention comprises a general practice quality improvement tool incorporating clinical decision support and audit/feedback capabilities; availability of a range of CVD polypills (fixed-dose combinations of two blood pressure lowering agents, a statin ± aspirin) for prescription when appropriate; and access to a pharmacy-based program to support long-term medication adherence and lifestyle modification. Following a systematic development process, the intervention will be evaluated in a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial including 70 general practices for a median period of 18 months. The 35 general practices in the intervention group will work with a nominated partner pharmacy, whereas those in the control group will provide usual care without access to the intervention tools. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients at high CVD risk who were inadequately treated at baseline who achieve target blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels at the study end. The outcomes will be analyzed using data from electronic medical records, utilizing a validated extraction tool. Detailed process and economic evaluations will also be performed. The study intends to establish evidence about an intervention that combines technological innovation with team collaboration between patients, pharmacists, and general practitioners (GPs) for CVD prevention. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000233426.

  7. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how...... the GPs’ prescribing behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Method The study consists of a register-based study and a questionnaire study. The register-based study is based on data from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (prescribed antibiotics), Statistics Denmark (socio-demographic data...

  8. Protocol for the PINCER trial: a cluster randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led IT-based intervention with simple feedback in reducing rates of clinically important errors in medicines management in general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in primary care. The aims of this study are to determine the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and acceptability of a pharmacist-led information-technology-based complex intervention compared with simple feedback in reducing proportions of patients at risk from potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management in general (family practice. Methods Research subject group: "At-risk" patients registered with computerised general practices in two geographical regions in England. Design: Parallel group pragmatic cluster randomised trial. Interventions: Practices will be randomised to either: (i Computer-generated feedback; or (ii Pharmacist-led intervention comprising of computer-generated feedback, educational outreach and dedicated support. Primary outcome measures: The proportion of patients in each practice at six and 12 months post intervention: - with a computer-recorded history of peptic ulcer being prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs - with a computer-recorded diagnosis of asthma being prescribed beta-blockers - aged 75 years and older receiving long-term prescriptions for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or loop diuretics without a recorded assessment of renal function and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months. Secondary outcome measures; These relate to a number of other examples of potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management. Economic analysis: An economic evaluation will be done of the cost per error avoided, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS, comparing the pharmacist-led intervention with simple feedback. Qualitative analysis: A qualitative study will be conducted to explore the views and experiences of health care professionals and NHS managers concerning the interventions, and investigate possible reasons why the interventions prove effective, or conversely prove

  9. Protocol for the PINCER trial: a cluster randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led IT-based intervention with simple feedback in reducing rates of clinically important errors in medicines management in general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Anthony J; Rodgers, Sarah; Cantrill, Judith A; Armstrong, Sarah; Elliott, Rachel; Howard, Rachel; Kendrick, Denise; Morris, Caroline J; Murray, Scott A; Prescott, Robin J; Cresswell, Kathrin; Sheikh, Aziz

    2009-05-01

    Medication errors are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in primary care. The aims of this study are to determine the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and acceptability of a pharmacist-led information-technology-based complex intervention compared with simple feedback in reducing proportions of patients at risk from potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management in general (family) practice. RESEARCH SUBJECT GROUP: "At-risk" patients registered with computerised general practices in two geographical regions in England. Parallel group pragmatic cluster randomised trial. Practices will be randomised to either: (i) Computer-generated feedback; or (ii) Pharmacist-led intervention comprising of computer-generated feedback, educational outreach and dedicated support. The proportion of patients in each practice at six and 12 months post intervention: - with a computer-recorded history of peptic ulcer being prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; - with a computer-recorded diagnosis of asthma being prescribed beta-blockers; - aged 75 years and older receiving long-term prescriptions for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or loop diuretics without a recorded assessment of renal function and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months. SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES; These relate to a number of other examples of potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management. An economic evaluation will be done of the cost per error avoided, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS), comparing the pharmacist-led intervention with simple feedback. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS: A qualitative study will be conducted to explore the views and experiences of health care professionals and NHS managers concerning the interventions, and investigate possible reasons why the interventions prove effective, or conversely prove ineffective. 34 practices in each of the two treatment arms would provide at least 80% power (two-tailed alpha

  10. Intercultural communication in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wieringen, Joke C M; Harmsen, Johannes A M; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2002-03-01

    Little is known about the causes of problems in communication between health care professionals and ethnic-minority patients. Not only language difficulties, but also cultural differences may result in these problems. This study explores the influence of communication and patient beliefs about health (care) and disease on understanding and compliance of native-born and ethnic-minority patients. In this descriptive study seven general practices located in a multi-ethnic neighbourhood in Rotterdam participated. Eighty-seven parents who visited their GP with a child for a new health problem took part: more than 50% of them belonged to ethnic-minorities. The consultation between GP and patient was recorded on video and a few days after the consultation patients were interviewed at home. GPs filled out a short questionnaire immediately after the consultation. Patient beliefs and previous experiences with health care were measured by different questionnaires in the home interview. Communication was analysed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System based on the videos. Mutual understanding between GP and patient and therapy compliance was assessed by comparing GP's questionnaires with the home interview with the parents. In 33% of the consultations with ethnic-minority patients (versus 13% with native-born patients) mutual understanding was poor. Different aspects of communication had no influence on mutual understanding. Problems in the relationship with the GP, as experienced by patients, showed a significant relation with mutual understanding. Consultations without mutual understanding more often ended in non-compliance with the prescribed therapy. Ethnic-minority parents more often report problems in their relationship with the GP and they have different beliefs about health and health care from native-born parents. Good relationships between GP and patients are necessary for mutual understanding. Mutual understanding has a strong correlation with compliance

  11. Can antibiotic prescriptions in respiratory tract infections be improved? A cluster-randomized educational intervention in general practice – The Prescription Peer Academic Detailing (Rx-PAD Study [NCT00272155

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rognstad Sture

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than half of all antibiotic prescriptions in general practice are issued for respiratory tract infections (RTIs, despite convincing evidence that many of these infections are caused by viruses. Frequent misuse of antimicrobial agents is of great global health concern, as we face an emerging worldwide threat of bacterial antibiotic resistance. There is an increasing need to identify determinants and patterns of antibiotic prescribing, in order to identify where clinical practice can be improved. Methods/Design Approximately 80 peer continuing medical education (CME groups in southern Norway will be recruited to a cluster randomized trial. Participating groups will be randomized either to an intervention- or a control group. A multifaceted intervention has been tailored, where key components are educational outreach visits to the CME-groups, work-shops, audit and feedback. Prescription Peer Academic Detailers (Rx-PADs, who are trained GPs, will conduct the educational outreach visits. During these visits, evidence-based recommendations of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs will be presented and software will be handed out for installation in participants PCs, enabling collection of prescription data. These data will subsequently be linked to corresponding data from the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD. Individual feedback reports will be sent all participating GPs during and one year after the intervention. Main outcomes are baseline proportion of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs and change in prescription patterns compared to baseline one year after the initiation of the tailored pedagogic intervention. Discussion Improvement of prescription patterns in medical practice is a challenging task. A thorough evaluation of guidelines for antibiotic treatment in RTIs may impose important benefits, whereas inappropriate prescribing entails substantial costs, as well as undesirable consequences like development

  12. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone triage of patients requesting same day consultations in general practice: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial comparing nurse-led and GP-led management systems (ESTEEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John L; Britten, Nicky; Green, Colin; Holt, Tim A; Lattimer, Valerie; Richards, Suzanne H; Richards, David A; Salisbury, Chris; Taylor, Rod S; Fletcher, Emily

    2013-01-04

    Recent years have seen an increase in primary care workload, especially following the introduction of a new General Medical Services contract in 2004. Telephone triage and telephone consultation with patients seeking health care represent initiatives aimed at improving access to care. Some evidence suggests that such approaches may be feasible but conclusions regarding GP workload, cost, and patients' experience of care, safety, and health status are equivocal. The ESTEEM trial aims to assess the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of nurse-led computer-supported telephone triage and GP-led telephone triage, compared to usual care, for patients requesting same-day consultations in general practice. ESTEEM is a pragmatic, multi-centre cluster randomised clinical trial with patients randomised at practice level to usual care, computer decision-supported nurse triage, or GP-led triage. Following triage of 350-550 patients per practice we anticipate estimating and comparing total primary care workload (volume and time), the economic cost to the NHS, and patient experience of care, safety, and health status in the 4-week period following the index same-day consultation request across the three trial conditions.We will recruit all patients seeking a non-emergency same-day appointment in primary care. Patients aged 12.0-15.9 years and temporary residents will be excluded from the study.The primary outcome is the number of healthcare contacts taking place in the 4-week period following (and including) the index same-day consultation request. A range of secondary outcomes will be examined including patient flow, primary care NHS resource use, patients' experience of care, safety, and health status.The estimated sample size required is 3,751 patients (11,253 total) in each of the three trial conditions, to detect a mean difference of 0.36 consultations per patient in the four week follow-up period between either intervention group and usual care 90% power, 5% alpha, and an

  13. A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction with point of care testing in a general practice setting – rationale, design and baseline characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glastonbury Briony

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Point of care testing (PoCT may be a useful adjunct in the management of chronic conditions in general practice (GP. The provision of pathology test results at the time of the consultation could lead to enhanced clinical management, better health outcomes, greater convenience and satisfaction for patients and general practitioners (GPs, and savings in costs and time. It could also result in inappropriate testing, increased consultations and poor health outcomes resulting from inaccurate results. Currently there are very few randomised controlled trials (RCTs in GP that have investigated these aspects of PoCT. Design/Methods The Point of Care Testing in General Practice Trial (PoCT Trial was an Australian Government funded multi-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction of PoCT in a GP setting. The PoCT Trial covered an 18 month period with the intervention consisting of the use of PoCT for seven tests used in the management of patients with diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and patients on anticoagulant therapy. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients within target range, a measure of therapeutic control. In addition, the PoCT Trial investigated the safety of PoCT, impact of PoCT on patient compliance to medication, stakeholder satisfaction, cost effectiveness of PoCT versus laboratory testing, and influence of geographic location. Discussion The paper provides an overview of the Trial Design, the rationale for the research methodology chosen and how the Trial was implemented in a GP environment. The evaluation protocol and data collection processes took into account the large number of patients, the broad range of practice types distributed over a large geographic area, and the inclusion of pathology test results from multiple pathology laboratories. The evaluation protocol developed reflects the complexity of the Trial setting

  14. [Psychotic disorders: special aspects in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmann, Julius

    2015-09-30

    In emergency situations the general practitioner is often the first professional contact psychotic patients have. The following article conveys basic knowledge about psychotic disorders and their clinical features typically seen in general practice.

  15. Case management for the treatment of patients with major depression in general practices – rationale, design and conduct of a cluster randomized controlled trial – PRoMPT (Primary care Monitoring for depressive Patient's Trial [ISRCTN66386086] – Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krauth Christian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a disorder with high prevalence in primary health care and a significant burden of illness. The delivery of health care for depression, as well as other chronic illnesses, has been criticized for several reasons and new strategies to address the needs of these illnesses have been advocated. Case management is a patient-centered approach which has shown efficacy in the treatment of depression in highly organized Health Maintenance Organization (HMO settings and which might also be effective in other, less structured settings. Methods/Design PRoMPT (PRimary care Monitoring for depressive Patients Trial is a cluster randomised controlled trial with General Practice (GP as the unit of randomisation. The aim of the study is to evaluate a GP applied case-management for patients with major depressive disorder. 70 GPs were randomised either to intervention group or to control group with the control group delivering usual care. Each GP will include 10 patients suffering from major depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV criteria. The intervention group will receive treatment based on standardized guidelines and monthly telephone monitoring from a trained practice nurse. The nurse investigates the patient's status concerning the MDD criteria, his adherence to GPs prescriptions, possible side effects of medication, and treatment goal attainment. The control group receives usual care – including recommended guidelines. Main outcome measure is the cumulative score of the section depressive disorders (PHQ-9 from the German version of the Prime MD Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-D. Secondary outcome measures are the Beck-Depression-Inventory, self-reported adherence (adapted from Moriskey and the SF-36. In addition, data are collected about patients' satisfaction (EUROPEP-tool, medication, health care utilization, comorbidity, suicide attempts and days out of work. The study comprises three assessment times: baseline

  16. [Psychotropic drugs in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Alexander

    2014-06-18

    The article presents a user-friendly overview of psychotropic drugs which are helpful for the prescription in a primary care practice. The author recommends to get familiar with just a small selection of drugs first and second line. This means to know well about their effectiveness, short-and long-term side effects, interactions with other drugs and the necessary monitoring that should be done.

  17. [Tetanus prophylaxis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, F.S.; Wiersma, T.J.; Beaujean, D.; Burgmeijer, R.J.; Timen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In response to the report 'Immunisation against tetanus following injuries' from the Dutch Health Council, the Dutch College of General Practitioners, the National Coordinating Body for the Control of Infectious Diseases and The Netherlands Vaccine Institute have drawn up guidelines for tetanus

  18. [Tetanus prophylaxis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, F.S.; Wiersma, T.J.; Beaujean, D.; Burgmeijer, R.J.; Timen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In response to the report 'Immunisation against tetanus following injuries' from the Dutch Health Council, the Dutch College of General Practitioners, the National Coordinating Body for the Control of Infectious Diseases and The Netherlands Vaccine Institute have drawn up guidelines for tetanus prop

  19. Multiple sclerosis: management in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Foets, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A descriptive study on 118 MS patients in general practice, to describe the family physician's role in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. METHOD: Random sample of 103 general practices (161 family physicians) throughout The Netherlands with a total list of 335

  20. Spot-checks to measure general hygiene practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Ina L; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A variety of hygiene behaviors are fundamental to the prevention of diarrhea. We used spot-checks in a survey of 761 households in Burundi to examine whether something we could call general hygiene practice is responsible for more specific hygiene behaviors, ranging from handwashing to sweeping the floor. Using structural equation modeling, we showed that clusters of hygiene behavior, such as primary caregivers' cleanliness and household cleanliness, explained the spot-check findings well. Within our model, general hygiene practice as overall concept explained the more specific clusters of hygiene behavior well. Furthermore, the higher general hygiene practice, the more likely children were to be categorized healthy (r = 0.46). General hygiene practice was correlated with commitment to hygiene (r = 0.52), indicating a strong association to psychosocial determinants. The results show that different hygiene behaviors co-occur regularly. Using spot-checks, the general hygiene practice of a household can be rated quickly and easily.

  1. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for gastroe

  2. Generalizing and Skepticism: Bringing Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, David A.; Ellsworth, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical arguments rely on examples without necessarily addressing all cases. Students should be skeptical of empirical evidence and should seek more secure arguments for generalizations, such as those that explain why a generalization is true for all cases. Generalizing on the basis of patterns in data is an important mathematical practice;…

  3. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for

  4. Generalizing MOND to explain the missing mass in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Alistair O.; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2017-02-01

    Context. MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is a gravitational framework designed to explain the astronomical observations in the Universe without the inclusion of particle dark matter. MOND, in its current form, cannot explain the missing mass in galaxy clusters without the inclusion of some extra mass, be it in the form of neutrinos or non-luminous baryonic matter. We investigate whether the MOND framework can be generalized to account for the missing mass in galaxy clusters by boosting gravity in high gravitational potential regions. We examine and review Extended MOND (EMOND), which was designed to increase the MOND scale acceleration in high potential regions, thereby boosting the gravity in clusters. Aims: We seek to investigate galaxy cluster mass profiles in the context of MOND with the primary aim at explaining the missing mass problem fully without the need for dark matter. Methods: Using the assumption that the clusters are in hydrostatic equilibrium, we can compute the dynamical mass of each cluster and compare the result to the predicted mass of the EMOND formalism. Results: We find that EMOND has some success in fitting some clusters, but overall has issues when trying to explain the mass deficit fully. We also investigate an empirical relation to solve the cluster problem, which is found by analysing the cluster data and is based on the MOND paradigm. We discuss the limitations in the text.

  5. Organization and change in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl

    Organization and change in general practice Abstract for a symposium at Nordic Congress for General Practice Thursday 14 May at 15.30-17.00 General practice is under increasing pressure to assume new tasks, adopt new technologies and engage in new organizational structures. However, in a field...... of multiple actors and concerns such visions are rarely straightforward to realize. This symposium explores the significance of various organizational, cultural and regulative features of general practice in relation to proposals for change in the sector. Presentations: Thorkil Thorsen, Marius Kousgaard......, Ann Dorrit Guassora. Providing coherent care: Case-managers and other modes of coordination. A case-manager is often understood as a person coordinating health care services. It has been suggested that GPs should carry out this function for several types of diseases. The question addressed is whether...

  6. Improving evidence-based general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, MF

    2016-01-01

    This thesis provides knowledge on how to improve the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) by general practitioners (GPs) and GP trainees. EBM is defined as the integration of clinical expertise, patient values and the best available clinical evidence in daily clinical practice. We describe the

  7. Small business, cash budgets and general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A R

    1991-01-01

    In practice management, general practice falls into the category of small business with all its attendant generic problems. Disciplined planning and good financial management are not often seen in small business. These are required if general practitioners are to continue (or return to) the provision of high quality medical services. An effective budget process, especially cash-flow budgeting, is the key to successful planning and financial management. Budgeting will bring Control, Co-ordination, and Credibility to your practice. It will enable you to set goals and to achieve them.

  8. Undertreatment of urinary incontinence in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning-van Beest, F.J.A.; Sturkenboom, M.C.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.; Herings, R.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the urinary incontinence guidelines that are issued by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, treatment guidelines are related to the type of incontinence. It is unknown whether treatment of urinary incontinence in general practice complies with these guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To de

  9. Toward A Practical General Systems Methodological Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Nagib Callaos; Belkis Sánchez de Callaos

    2003-01-01

    Our main purpose in this paper is to describe the way in which we have been relating General System Theory (GST) to practice and to the design of a General Systems Methodology (GSM). Our first step was to apply GST to design a methodology for software development. Then, in a second step, by means of the experience/knowledge learned from applying the methodology to developing specific information systems, a continuous designing and re-designing process started, which simultaneously generalized...

  10. Adherence to asthma guidelines in general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghmann, M C; Sexton, M

    1999-06-01

    Adherence to asthma practice guidelines is low. Improved compliance could potentially improve care of patients with asthma. The purpose of this study was to determine if patients managed in a general practice with an associated asthma clinic are more likely to use asthma medications according to clinical practice guidelines than patients managed in the general surgery of the practice. A cross-sectional study of adult asthmatics, aged 18-55 years, was conducted in six British general practices. Prescription data on all asthma medication was collected for a 6-month period. Information on asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, and how patients used their inhaled beta2-agonist was collected through questionnaire. The prescription data for asthma medication and patient use of inhaled beta2-agonist were compared to the British Thoracic Society's (BTS) Guidelines for Management of Asthma in Adults to determine if the patient's asthma medication regimen was appropriate. There was no significant association found between appropriate asthma medication and asthma clinic attendance or other patient characteristics. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low. Fifty-eight percent of the asthma patients used asthma medication regimens that were not consistent with the BTS guidelines published 1 year earlier. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low regardless of patient characteristics, including asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, or individual practice. These findings underscore the need to document the utility of clinical practice guidelines which may improve physician compliance.

  11. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Industrial Maintenance General Maintenance Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards for the industrial maintenance general maintenance cluster are intended to be a guide to workforce preparation program providers in defining content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. An introduction provides the Illinois perspective; Illinois Occupational…

  12. Prognostic factors for neckpain in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Twisk, J.W.R.; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Windt, D. van der; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic studies on neck pain are scarce and are typically restricted to short-term follow-up only. In this prospective cohort study, indicators of short- and long-term outcomes of neck pain were identified that can easily be measured in general practice. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age, s

  13. Comorbidity of chronic diseases in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Velden, J. van der; Lisdonk, E. van de; Eijk, J.T.M. van; Weel, C. van

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing number of elderly people in The Netherlands the prevalence of chronic diseases will rise in the next decades. It is recognized in general practice that many older patients suffer from more than one chronic disease (comorbidity). The aim of this study is to describe the extent of

  14. Acute Neck Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Vos (Kees)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a prospective cohort study with one-year follow-up of patients with acute neck pain in general practice. Patients above 18 years of age consulting their GP for non-specific acute neck pain lasting no longer than six weeks were invited to participate. Self-administered quest

  15. Effects of electronic communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kam, WJ; Moorman, PW; Koppejan-Mulder, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To obtain insight into the effects of electronic communication on GPs by studying those publications in literature describing the effects of structured electronic clinical communication in general practice. Methods: We retrieved all publications in the English language indexed in MEDLINE

  16. Guidelines for computer security in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schattner

    2007-06-01

    Conclusions This paper maps out a process for developing computer security guidelines for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making these guidelines relevant to local contexts should help maximise their uptake.

  17. [Local registries in general/family practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Entering medical records into registries of all sorts has always been a part of everyday work of a general/family physician. There is a distinction between public/population registries on the one hand, and internal, local registries on the other hand. Local registries refer to the catchment population of a particular general/family practice. While keeping population-registries has become a routine with a high level of uniformity in collecting, delivering, recording, analyzing and controlling information, there are no recommendations or standards for keeping local registries, although their importance as well as indisputable necessity have been recognized. They are invaluable for providing an insight into the condition and history of a particular disease in a particular area, planning and taking preventive measures and activities, supervising therapy and medical treatment, as well as for statistical analyses and scientific studies. The most important registry in the field of general practice is the one called "List of health care under the supervision of chosen general/family physicians", which can serve as an index for any other individual record or record of diseases by name kept at a particular general/family practice. Although local registries have "evolved" from notebooks into modern informatic databases, the problem of up-to-dateness cannot be solved until the whole health care system has been connected for competent and authorized persons to be able to record changes of data where and when they take place.

  18. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

    of dyspepsia, dyspeptic episodes, main symptom, previous contact to general practice, previous gastroscopia, use of antacids or NSAID's, Helicobacter Pylori status and mental/physical well being (SF-36 measurement scale) (Table 1). After two weeks the GPs assessed 46 % of the patients to be free of symptoms...... Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general...... after 3 months.   Results: Response rate GPs after two weeks were 92% (330/357). Response rate patients after three months were 71% (252/357). There were no significant difference between the groups randomised to strategy 1(PPI group) and strategy 2 (endoscopy group) concerning, age, gender, duration...

  19. Open Access to General Practice Was Associated with Burnout among General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedsted, Peter; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Walk-in open access in general practice may influence the general practitioner's (GP's) work, but very little research has been done on the consequences. In this study from Danish general practice, we compare the prevalence of burnout between GPs with a walk-in open access and those without. In a questionnaire study (2004), we approached all 458 active GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, and 376 (82.8%) GPs returned the questionnaire. Walk-in open access was defined as at least 30 minutes every weekday where patients could attend practice without an appointment. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Analyses using logistic regression were adjusted for gender, age, marital status, job satisfaction, minutes per consultation, practice organisation, working hours, number of listed patients per GP, number of contacts per GP, continuing medical education- (CME-) activities, and clusters of GPs. In all, 8% of GPs had open access and the prevalence of burnout was 24%. GPs with walk-in open access were more likely to suffer from burnout. Having open access was associated with a 3-fold increased likelihood of burnout (OR = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.1-8.8, P = 0.035)). Although the design cannot establish causality, it is recommended to closely monitor possible negative consequences of open access in general practice.

  20. Description and process evaluation of pharmacists' interventions in a pharmacist-led information technology-enabled multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial for reducing medication errors in general practice (PINCER trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rachel; Rodgers, Sarah; Avery, Anthony J; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To undertake a process evaluation of pharmacists' recommendations arising in the context of a complex IT-enabled pharmacist-delivered randomised controlled trial (PINCER trial) to reduce the risk of hazardous medicines management in general practices. Methods PINCER pharmacists manually recorded patients' demographics, details of interventions recommended, actions undertaken by practice staff and time taken to manage individual cases of hazardous medicines management. Data were coded, double-entered into SPSS version 15 and then summarised using percentages for categorical data (with 95% confidence interval (CI)) and, as appropriate, means (± standard deviation) or medians (interquartile range) for continuous data. Key findings Pharmacists spent a median of 20 min (interquartile range 10, 30) reviewing medical records, recommending interventions and completing actions in each case of hazardous medicines management. Pharmacists judged 72% (95% CI 70, 74; 1463/2026) of cases of hazardous medicines management to be clinically relevant. Pharmacists recommended 2105 interventions in 74% (95% CI 73, 76; 1516/2038) of cases and 1685 actions were taken in 61% (95% CI 59, 63; 1246/2038) of cases; 66% (95% CI 64, 68; 1383/2105) of interventions recommended by pharmacists were completed and 5% (95% CI 4, 6; 104/2105) of recommendations were accepted by general practitioners (GPs), but not completed at the end of the pharmacists' placement; the remaining recommendations were rejected or considered not relevant by GPs. Conclusions The outcome measures were used to target pharmacist activity in general practice towards patients at risk from hazardous medicines management. Recommendations from trained PINCER pharmacists were found to be broadly acceptable to GPs and led to ameliorative action in the majority of cases. It seems likely that the approach used by the PINCER pharmacists could be employed by other practice pharmacists following appropriate training. PMID

  1. The new Australian after-hours general practice incentive payment mechanism: equity for rural general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Amanda L; Nelson, Mark; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    In July 2015, a national scheme for after-hours incentive funding for general practices was re-introduced in Australia, 2-years after funding was transferred to regional primary health care organisations (Medicare Locals). The re-introduction was recommended in a 2014 review of after-hours primary care reflecting the "overwhelming desire" among general practice. Given the centrality of after-hours care provision in rural and remote practices identified in the review, we compare and contrast the current and historical after-hours incentive funding mechanisms focussing on fairness towards rural general practices. While there are similarities between the current and historical mechanisms, significant differences exist. The comparison is not straightforward. The major consistency is utilisation of practice standardised whole patient equivalents (SWPE) as the basis of funding, inherently favouring large urban general practices. This bias is expected to increase given a shift in focus from practices with no option but to provide 24/7 care to any practice providing 24/7 care; and an associated increased funding per SWPE. Differences primarily pertain to classification processes, in which the realities of rural service provision and recognition of regional support mechanisms are given minimal consideration. Rapid introduction of the new general practice after-hours incentive funding mechanism has led to inconsistencies and has exacerbated inherent biases, particularly inequity towards rural providers. Impact on morale and service provision in non-urban areas should be monitored.

  2. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first....... The dissertation present the research study and a collection of three research papers prepared during the period from May 2010 to June 2014. Relational coordination and organisational social capital are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance. Relational coordination analyse the communication...

  3. E-dietician in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Carl J.; Arendal, Cecilia; Glintborg, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    of 46 obese patients in general practice were offered participation in a cohort study during May 15th to December 1st 2008. Patients from three different health centers were included. 32 patients gave informed consent to participate and were given access to weekly e-mail consultations with a dietician...... and the amount of consultations (p=0.3). The individual expense to prevention- and e-mail consultations was 1,165DKK. In comparison the expense of 3 months of conventional treatment with 6-8 visits would be 1,300-1,700DKK. We conclude that weight loss as a result of econsultations is comparable with conventional...... weight loss treatments in general practice. The utilization of e-mail consultations can furthermore result in a saving in expenses and premises if the e-mail correspondences are held outside of the health centre....

  4. Antibiotic Prescription in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov

    2016-01-01

    will explore how the GPs prescription behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Antibiotics are essential when treating potentially lethal infections. An increasing development of resistant bacteria is considered one of the primary threats to public health. The majority of antibiotics (90%) are prescribed...... from general practice. The prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics can cause unnecessary side effects for the individual and increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. Both the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the level of resistant bacteria......1. Background & Aim The overall aim of the project is to describe antibiotic consumption in Danish general practice with emphasis on specific types of antibiotics. The project will shed light on the impact of microbiological diagnostic methods (MDM) on the choice of antibiotic and the project...

  5. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AIMS: To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD...... guidelines. METHODS: A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted...... were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. RESULTS: Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed...

  6. Management of psychosis in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Janice; Miller, Graeme; Ng, Anthea

    2006-03-01

    The BEACH program, a continuous national study of general practice activity in Australia, gives us an overview of consultations involving the management of psychoses. In this analysis we have included schizophrenia, affective disorders/bipolar, organic psychoses, and senile psychoses, with undefined psychosis and chronic brain syndrome grouped as 'other'. This synopsis provides a backdrop against which the theme articles in this issue of Australian Family Physician can be further considered.

  7. Towards a PTAS for the generalized TSP in grid clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachay, Michael; Neznakhina, Katherine

    2016-10-01

    The Generalized Traveling Salesman Problem (GTSP) is a combinatorial optimization problem, which is to find a minimum cost cycle visiting one point (city) from each cluster exactly. We consider a geometric case of this problem, where n nodes are given inside the integer grid (in the Euclidean plane), each grid cell is a unit square. Clusters are induced by cells `populated' by nodes of the given instance. Even in this special setting, the GTSP remains intractable enclosing the classic Euclidean TSP on the plane. Recently, it was shown that the problem has (1.5+8√2+ɛ)-approximation algorithm with complexity bound depending on n and k polynomially, where k is the number of clusters. In this paper, we propose two approximation algorithms for the Euclidean GTSP on grid clusters. For any fixed k, both algorithms are PTAS. Time complexity of the first one remains polynomial for k = O(log n) while the second one is a PTAS, when k = n - O(log n).

  8. Prevalence of STI related consultations in general practice: results from the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Jan EAM; Kerssens, Jan J; Schellevis, Francois G; Sandfort, Theo G; Coenen, Ton J; Bindels, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background The role of the GP in the care of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is unclear. Aim We studied the prevalence of STI related consultations in Dutch general practice in order to obtain insight into the contribution of the GP in STI control. Design of study A descriptive study. Setting The study took place within the framework of the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2001, a large nationally representative population-based survey. Method During 1 year, data of all patient contacts with the participating GPs were recorded in electronic medical records. Contacts for the same health problem were clustered into disease episodes and their diagnosis coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care. All STI and STI related episodes were analysed. Results In total, 1 524 470 contacts of 375 899 registered persons in 104 practices were registered during 1 year and 2460 STI related episodes were found. The prevalence rate of STI was 39 per 10 000 persons and of STI/HIV related questions 23 per 10 000. More than half of all STIs were found in highly urbanised areas and STIs were overrepresented in deprived areas. Three quarters of all STIs diagnosed in the Netherlands are made in general practice. An important number of other reproductive health visits in general practice offer opportunities for meaningful STI counselling and tailored prevention. Discussion GPs contribute significantly to STI control, see the majority of patients with STI related symptoms and questions and are an important player in STI care. In particular, GPs in urban areas and inner-city practices should be targeted for accelerated sexual health programmes. PMID:16464323

  9. The Ontario printed educational message (OPEM) trial to narrow the evidence-practice gap with respect to prescribing practices of general and family physicians: a cluster randomized controlled trial, targeting the care of individuals with diabetes and hypertension in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarenstein, Merrick; Hux, Janet E; Kelsall, Diane; Paterson, Michael; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Davis, Dave; Laupacis, Andreas; Evans, Michael; Austin, Peter C; Slaughter, Pamela M; Shiller, Susan K; Croxford, Ruth; Tu, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Background There are gaps between what family practitioners do in clinical practice and the evidence-based ideal. The most commonly used strategy to narrow these gaps is the printed educational message (PEM); however, the attributes of successful printed educational messages and their overall effectiveness in changing physician practice are not clear. The current endeavor aims to determine whether such messages change prescribing quality in primary care practice, and whether these effects differ with the format of the message. Methods/design The design is a large, simple, factorial, unblinded cluster-randomized controlled trial. PEMs will be distributed with informed, a quarterly evidence-based synopsis of current clinical information produced by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Canada, and will be sent to all eligible general and family practitioners in Ontario. There will be three replicates of the trial, with three different educational messages, each aimed at narrowing a specific evidence-practice gap as follows: 1) angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, hypertension treatment, and cholesterol lowering agents for diabetes; 2) retinal screening for diabetes; and 3) diuretics for hypertension. For each of the three replicates there will be three intervention groups. The first group will receive informed with an attached postcard-sized, short, directive "outsert." The second intervention group will receive informed with a two-page explanatory "insert" on the same topic. The third intervention group will receive informed, with both the above-mentioned outsert and insert. The control group will receive informed only, without either an outsert or insert. Routinely collected physician billing, prescription, and hospital data found in Ontario's administrative databases will be used to monitor pre-defined prescribing changes relevant and specific to each replicate, following delivery of the educational messages. Multi-level modeling will be

  10. The Ontario printed educational message (OPEM trial to narrow the evidence-practice gap with respect to prescribing practices of general and family physicians: a cluster randomized controlled trial, targeting the care of individuals with diabetes and hypertension in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimshaw Jeremy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are gaps between what family practitioners do in clinical practice and the evidence-based ideal. The most commonly used strategy to narrow these gaps is the printed educational message (PEM; however, the attributes of successful printed educational messages and their overall effectiveness in changing physician practice are not clear. The current endeavor aims to determine whether such messages change prescribing quality in primary care practice, and whether these effects differ with the format of the message. Methods/design The design is a large, simple, factorial, unblinded cluster-randomized controlled trial. PEMs will be distributed with informed, a quarterly evidence-based synopsis of current clinical information produced by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Canada, and will be sent to all eligible general and family practitioners in Ontario. There will be three replicates of the trial, with three different educational messages, each aimed at narrowing a specific evidence-practice gap as follows: 1 angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, hypertension treatment, and cholesterol lowering agents for diabetes; 2 retinal screening for diabetes; and 3 diuretics for hypertension. For each of the three replicates there will be three intervention groups. The first group will receive informed with an attached postcard-sized, short, directive "outsert." The second intervention group will receive informed with a two-page explanatory "insert" on the same topic. The third intervention group will receive informed, with both the above-mentioned outsert and insert. The control group will receive informed only, without either an outsert or insert. Routinely collected physician billing, prescription, and hospital data found in Ontario's administrative databases will be used to monitor pre-defined prescribing changes relevant and specific to each replicate, following delivery of the educational messages. Multi

  11. Acute Neck Pain in General Practice

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a prospective cohort study with one-year follow-up of patients with acute neck pain in general practice. Patients above 18 years of age consulting their GP for non-specific acute neck pain lasting no longer than six weeks were invited to participate. Self-administered questionnaires were collected from patients at baseline and after 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks. 187 patients were included and we have follow-up data of 138 patients (74%). After one-year 47% still reported ne...

  12. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

     Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general......) for two weeks. If symptoms were unchanged after to weeks => referral to endoscopy. Later recurrence of symptoms => endoscopy (> 45 year) or management strategy according to helicobacter pylori status and/or clinical reflux (measures......)   Conclusion In management of dyspepsia therapy does have a better short term effect than endoscopy concerning symptom relief, but after 3 months the endoscopy strategy had a better effect than PPI concerning symptom relief  ...

  13. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  14. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  15. Knowledge between communities of practice and firms in clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner

    . This paper presents a case study in which theory about knowledge, communities of practice and networks is used to understand how knowledge is developed in high-tech companies placed in a cluster. The case study illuminates how internal and external relations and factors affect the knowledge development...... which factors that affect the knowledge development process in communities in the case companies. By analysing the interplay between formal and informal relations utilized by the companies, the knowledge embedded in the persons constituting the communities as well as knowledge embedded in objects used...... by the communities, the case study shows that apparently a special practice has evolved in the cluster. This practice is apparently shared among the communities in the case companies, with the result that the communities possess special capabilities, they are good at developing "whole phones". An explanation about...

  16. A qualitative study of collaboration in general practice: understanding the general practice nurse's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To explore the nature of collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners in Australian general practice. There is international recognition that collaboration between health professionals can improve care coordination, enhance health outcomes, optimise the work environment and reduce healthcare costs. However, effective collaboration requires a clear understanding of each team member's role. A qualitative approach guided by Naturalistic Inquiry was used to elicit and interpret participant narratives. Eight general practitioners and fourteen registered nurses working in general practice were purposefully recruited. Data were collected via individual, semi-structured face-to-face interviews during February to May 2015. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Data revealed three overarching themes. This study presents the data for the overarching theme 'Understanding the general practice registered nurse's role'. Many general practitioner participants lacked clarity around the role and scope of practice of the registered nurse. At the same time, nursing participants often articulated their role as an assistant rather than as an independent health professional. This limited collaboration and the nurses' role within the team. Collaboration was enhanced when general practitioners actively sought an understanding of the registered nurses scope of practice. Clarifying the nurses' role promotes collaboration and supports nurses to work to the full extent of their practice. This is important in terms of optimising the nurses' role within the team and reinforcing their professional identity. Identification of key issues around understanding the nurses' role may help inform strategies that improve collaboration and workplace relations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. General practice in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Rose Olsen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: General practice systems in the Nordic countries share certain common features. The sector is based on the Nordic model of a tax-financed supply of services with a political objective of equal access for all. The countries also share the challenges of increased political expectations to deliver primary prevention and increased workload as patients from hospital care are discharged earlier. However, within this common framework, primary care is organized differently. This is particularly in relation to the private-public mix, remuneration systems and the use of financial and non-financial incentives. Objective: The objective of this paper is to compare the differences and similarities in primary care among the Nordic countries, to create a mapping of the future plans and reforms linked to remuneration and incentives schemes, and to discuss the pros and cons for these plans with reference to the literature. An additional objective is to identify gaps in the literature and future research opportunities. Results/Conclusions: Despite the many similarities within the Nordic health care systems, the primary care sectors function under highly different arrangements. Most important are the differences in the gate-keeping function, private versus salaried practices, possibilities for corporate ownership, skill-mix and the organisational structure. Current reforms and political agendas appear to focus on the side effects of the individual countries’ specific systems. For example, countries with salaried systems with geographical responsibility are introducing incentives for private practice and more choices for patients. Countries with systems largely based on private practice are introducing more monitoring and public regulation to control budgets. We also see that new governments tends to bring different views on the future organisation of primary care, which provide considerable political tension but few actual changes. Interestingly

  18. EXTENDED CLUSTERING COEFFICIENTS:GENERALIZATION OF CLUSTERING COEFFICIENTS IN SMALL-WORLD NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The clustering coefficient C of a network, which is a measure of direct connectivity between neighbors of the various nodes, ranges from 0 (for no connectivity) to 1 (for full connectivity). We define extended clustering coefficients C(h) of a small-world network based on nodes that are at distance h from a source node, thus generalizing distance-1 neighborhoods employed in computing the ordinary clustering coefficient C = C(1). Based on known results about the distance distribution Pδ(h) in a network, that is, the probability that a randomly chosen pair of vertices have distance h, we derive and experimentally validate the law Pδ(h)C(h) ≤ c log N / N, where c is a small constant that seldom exceeds 1. This result is significant because it shows that the product Pδ(h)C(h) is upper-bounded by a value that is considerably smaller than the product of maximum values for Pδ(h) and C(h). Extended clustering coefficients and laws that govern them offer new insights into the structure of small-world networks and open up avenues for further exploration of their properties.

  19. Paediatric vaccination practice in a division of general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, I F; Murtagh, J

    2001-12-01

    Currently the National Health and Medical Research Council (NH&MRC) recommend the use of a 23 gauge, 25 mm long needle inserted 45-60 degrees into the anterolateral thigh for paediatric vaccination. To assess the compliance of general practitioners (GPs) in a rural practice division with vaccination practice (site and needle size and gauge) prescribed for infants and toddlers by the NH&MRC. In 1999, a questionnaire survey was sent by the divisional office to all 150 GPs in the Hunter Rural Division of General Practice. The questionnaire collected demographic data (age, gender, university of graduation, number of paediatric vaccines administered per week) and elicited responses about the site of vaccination and the size and gauge of needle to be used for children 2-18 months and 18 months and older. Completed questionnaires were available from 112 GPs (74.6% completion rate). There was a high level of compliance with the NH&MRC proscription of buttock vaccination with only 4.3% and 4.1% of responses to the question of vaccination site at 2-18 months and 18 months and older respectively nominating this site. The anterolateral thigh was the favoured site for vaccination in children 2-18 months old (77.5% of responses) with the deltoid being the favoured site in children 18 months and older (59.2% of responses). There was a very low level of compliance with the NH&MRC recommended standard needle (23 gauge, 25 mm long, blue hub needle) (3.5% of responses). The orange hub needle (25 gauge, 16 mm long needle) was most favoured (48.7% of responses) with additional strong support for the 25 gauge, 25 mm long needle (40.2% of responses). In the Hunter Rural Division of General Practice there was good compliance with the NH&MRC's recommendations for site of vaccination, but not needle size and gauge to be used in infants and small children. Imprecise wording of these recommendations has created apparent uncertainty about the site of vaccination of children at 18 months of age.

  20. [Midazolam sedation in the general dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertens, J; Abraham-Inpijn, L; Meuwissen, P J

    1994-03-01

    The general dental practitioner is occasionally confronted with patients who, on the basis of psychological--and often somatic--criteria, are difficult to treat. Medicinal sedation in combination with anxiety reduction may be deemed appropriate for such patients. In the Netherlands inhalation sedation by means of a combination of oxygen and nitrous oxide is generally used. The limitations and disadvantages of this method have directed attention towards sedation by means of midazolam, a quick-acting benzodiazepine. In view of the complications which may accompany the administration of midazolam, the general practitioner working alone or in a group practice is advised against using midazolam sedation. Such use should be reserved for a dentist working in a hospital setting, who is able to consult with a physician regarding the advisability of administering midazolam. Even then, the safety of the patient requires that the practitioners have a proper insight into the physical state of the patient, work according to a protocol and in accordance with clearly defined responsibilities, and provide adequate accommodation during and after treatment.

  1. Temperature of critical clusters in nucleation theory: generalized Gibbs' approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W P; Boltachev, Grey Sh; Abyzov, Alexander S

    2013-07-21

    According to the classical Gibbs' approach to the description of thermodynamically heterogeneous systems, the temperature of the critical clusters in nucleation is the same as the temperature of the ambient phase, i.e., with respect to temperature the conventional macroscopic equilibrium conditions are assumed to be fulfilled. In contrast, the generalized Gibbs' approach [J. W. P. Schmelzer, G. Sh. Boltachev, and V. G. Baidakov, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 6166 (2003); and ibid. 124, 194503 (2006)] predicts that critical clusters (having commonly spatial dimensions in the nanometer range) have, as a rule, a different temperature as compared with the ambient phase. The existence of a curved interface may lead, consequently, to an equilibrium coexistence of different phases with different temperatures similar to differences in pressure as expressed by the well-known Laplace equation. Employing the generalized Gibbs' approach, it is demonstrated that, for the case of formation of droplets in a one-component vapor, the temperature of the critical droplets can be shown to be higher as compared to the vapor. In this way, temperature differences between critically sized droplets and ambient vapor phase, observed in recent molecular dynamics simulations of argon condensation by Wedekind et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 064501 (2007)], can be given a straightforward theoretical interpretation. It is shown as well that - employing the same model assumptions concerning bulk and interfacial properties of the system under consideration - the temperature of critical bubbles in boiling is lower as compared to the bulk liquid.

  2. Improving infection control in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, S C; Zeuner, D; Hall, C

    1999-03-01

    Infection control measures in the health care setting should protect patients and staff from cross-infection. The prevention of harm is an essential part of good medical practice and failure might result in professional misconduct proceedings by the General Medical Council (GMC) and prosecution under the Health and Safety at Work legislation, as well as civil liability. For a health authority, overall responsibility for public health includes arrangements for the control of communicable diseases and infection in hospital and the community (NHS Management Executive, 1993), a function usually led by the Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (CCDC). This paper describes one district's collaborative approach between public health and GPs to assess and improve local infection control standards.

  3. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    the most preventive drugs are prescribed in general practice. Special considerations exist in relation to medication of elderly patients. The prevalence of polypharmacy and the subsequent increased risk of side effects and drug interactions is high. Drug-related problems represent the fifth leading cause...... of death in the United States. The public expenses to drug treatment are constantly increasing. The possibility to withdraw the medication must be taken into account but the decision to discontinue drugs is complex and poorly understood. Planned studies: 1. Patients’ views upon discontinuation...... of preventive drugs. Qualitative interviews with patients experiencing discontinuation of preventive drugs addressing: Which attitudes do the patients have towards preventive drugs? Which thoughts do the patients have in relation to discontinuation of the drugs? How do they understand their own and the GP...

  4. An approach to vertigo in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaraju, Sindhu; Perera, Eshini

    2016-04-01

    Dizziness is a common and very distressing presentation in general practice. In more than half of these cases, the dizziness is due to vertigo, which is the illusion of movement of the body or its surroundings. It can have central or peripheral causes, and determining the cause can be difficult. The aim of this article is to provide a clear framework for approaching patients who present with vertigo. A suggested approach to the assessment of vertigo is outlined. The causes of vertigo may be central (involving the brainstem or cerebellum) or peripheral (involving the inner ear). A careful history and physical examination can distinguish between these causes. The most common causes of vertigo seen in primary care are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), vestibular neuronitis (VN) and Ménière's disease. These peripheral causes of vertigo are benign, and treatment involves reassurance and management of symptoms.

  5. Rating scales in general practice depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Paykel, Eugene; Sireling, Lester

    2015-01-01

    within major depressive disorder. The CID was compared to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17). METHODS: 146 patients from a previous study in general practice with the CID were investigated. The item response theory model established by Rasch was used to investigate the scalability (a scale......׳s psychometric adequacy) of the subscales, and principal component analysis was used to identify subsyndromes with the symptoms of major depression according to DSM-5 or ICD-10. RESULTS: Whereas the HAM-D17 was found not to have an acceptable scalability, the three brief CID subscales for depression (six items......), anxiety (five items), and apathy (five items) all had an acceptable scalability. Within the major depressive symptoms, principal component analysis identified the CID items of hypersomnia, increased appetite or weight gain as defining the subsyndrome of atypical depression. In total 29 patients...

  6. Generalization of Clustering Coefficients to Signed Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Giulio; Perugini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The recent interest in network analysis applications in personality psychology and psychopathology has put forward new methodological challenges. Personality and psychopathology networks are typically based on correlation matrices and therefore include both positive and negative edge signs. However, some applications of network analysis disregard negative edges, such as computing clustering coefficients. In this contribution, we illustrate the importance of the distinction between positive and negative edges in networks based on correlation matrices. The clustering coefficient is generalized to signed correlation networks: three new indices are introduced that take edge signs into account, each derived from an existing and widely used formula. The performances of the new indices are illustrated and compared with the performances of the unsigned indices, both on a signed simulated network and on a signed network based on actual personality psychology data. The results show that the new indices are more resistant to sample variations in correlation networks and therefore have higher convergence compared with the unsigned indices both in simulated networks and with real data. PMID:24586367

  7. [Associations with Muslim patients in general practice surgeries--a survey among German general practicioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenthaler, A; Hiltner, H; Eissler, M

    2014-07-01

    Due to the increasing numbers of Muslims in Germany(1)--about 4.3 million at the moment--more Muslim patients are medicated in the practices of family doctors. Their heterogeneous cultural and religious backgrounds are nontheless unknown and unfamiliar for the treating general practitioner. Based on the daily experiences of the latter and in order to capture their development of intercultural competence, in the present study a brainwriting with general practitioners was conducted to record their spontaneous associations with Muslim patients. Individually and without exchange 90 general practitioners (66 male, 24 female) listed subjective thoughts regarding "Muslim patients" on a prepared sheet of paper. Additionally, sex, age, number of years as physician in a private practice and the frequency of treatment of Muslim patients in their own practice were requested. The content of the notes were evaluated using MAXQDA and were clustered in the categories of "language", "company", "violence", "men"/"women", "psychosomatic medicine", "compliance", "understanding of illness", "physical examination" and "head scarf". The ideas listed show that the majority of interviewed general practitioners regarded the treatment of Muslim patients as difficult. They associate Muslim patients with communication problems, a different type of disease understanding and a fear of contact, which hampers the examination situation. Less frequently, positive associations and unproblematic examination situations were noted. Due to a lack of knowledge about cultural and religious contexts Muslim patients are often described by using stereotypes. This underlines the necessity to foster intercultural competences and self-reflection in daily practice and its systematic inclusion in medical education. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Temperature of critical clusters in nucleation theory: Generalized Gibbs' approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.; Boltachev, Grey Sh.; Abyzov, Alexander S.

    2013-07-01

    According to the classical Gibbs' approach to the description of thermodynamically heterogeneous systems, the temperature of the critical clusters in nucleation is the same as the temperature of the ambient phase, i.e., with respect to temperature the conventional macroscopic equilibrium conditions are assumed to be fulfilled. In contrast, the generalized Gibbs' approach [J. W. P. Schmelzer, G. Sh. Boltachev, and V. G. Baidakov, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 6166 (2003), 10.1063/1.1602066; J. W. P. Schmelzer, G. Sh. Boltachev, and V. G. Baidakov, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 194503 (2006)], 10.1063/1.2196412 predicts that critical clusters (having commonly spatial dimensions in the nanometer range) have, as a rule, a different temperature as compared with the ambient phase. The existence of a curved interface may lead, consequently, to an equilibrium coexistence of different phases with different temperatures similar to differences in pressure as expressed by the well-known Laplace equation. Employing the generalized Gibbs' approach, it is demonstrated that, for the case of formation of droplets in a one-component vapor, the temperature of the critical droplets can be shown to be higher as compared to the vapor. In this way, temperature differences between critically sized droplets and ambient vapor phase, observed in recent molecular dynamics simulations of argon condensation by Wedekind et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 064501 (2007)], 10.1063/1.2752154, can be given a straightforward theoretical interpretation. It is shown as well that - employing the same model assumptions concerning bulk and interfacial properties of the system under consideration - the temperature of critical bubbles in boiling is lower as compared to the bulk liquid.

  9. Sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, F.W. van der; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting: Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  10. Educational outreach to general practitioners reduces children's asthma symptoms: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladden Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma is common in Cape Town, a province of South Africa, but is underdiagnosed by general practitioners. Medications are often prescribed inappropriately, and care is episodic. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of educational outreach to general practitioners on asthma symptoms of children in their practice. Methods This is a cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of intervention, randomisation, and analysis. The setting is Mitchells Plain (population 300,000, a dormitory town near Cape Town. Solo general practitioners, without nurse support, operate from storefront practices. Caregiver-reported symptom data were collected for 318 eligible children (2 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma, who were attending general practitioners in Mitchells Plain. One year post-intervention follow-up data were collected for 271 (85% of these children in all 43 practices. Practices randomised to intervention (21 received two 30-minute educational outreach visits by a trained pharmacist who left materials describing key interventions to improve asthma care. Intervention and control practices received the national childhood asthma guideline. Asthma severity was measured in a parent-completed survey administered through schools using a symptom frequency and severity scale. We compared intervention and control group children on the change in score from pre-to one-year post-intervention. Results Symptom scores declined an additional 0.84 points in the intervention vs. control group (on a nine-point scale. p = 0.03. For every 12 children with asthma exposed to a doctor allocated to the intervention, one extra child will have substantially reduced symptoms. Conclusion Educational outreach was accepted by general practitioners and was effective. It could be applied to other health care quality problems in this setting.

  11. Classification of shoulder complaints in general practice by means of nonmetric multidimensional scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, KH; Winters, JC; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if a classification of shoulder complaints in general practice can be made from variables of medical history and physical examination with nonmetric multidimensional scaling and to investigate the reproducibility of results from an earlier hierarchical cluster analysis. Desi

  12. Professional autonomy - is it the future of general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John

    2006-05-01

    Internationally, rising financial costs and increasing expectations of health care delivery have increased regulation and decreased the autonomy of general practitioners and other health care professionals. This article explores professional autonomy within Australian general practice, and outlines the importance of autonomy in systems approaches to organisational change in general practice.

  13. Effectiveness of empathy in general practice: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Derksen, F.; BENSING, J; Lagro-Janssen, A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Empathy as a characteristic of patient-physician communication in both general practice and clinical care is considered to be the backbone of the patient-physician relationship. Although the value of empathy is seldom debated, its effectiveness is little discussed in general practice. This literature review explores the effectiveness of empathy in general practice. Effects that are discussed are: patient satisfaction and adherence, feelings of anxiety and stress, patient enablemen...

  14. An integrated general practice and pharmacy-based intervention to promote the use of appropriate preventive medications among individuals at high cardiovascular disease risk: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hayek, Adina; Joshi, Rohina; Usherwood, Tim; Webster, Ruth; Kaur, Baldeep; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol; Krass, Ines; Laba, Tracey-Lea; Reid, Christopher; Shiel, Louise; Hespe, Charlotte; Hersch, Fred; Jan, Stephen; Lo, Serigne

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are responsible for significant morbidity, premature mortality, and economic burden. Despite established evidence that supports the use of preventive medications among patients at high CVD risk, treatment gaps remain. Building on prior evidence and a theoretical framework, a complex intervention has been designed to address these gaps among high-risk, under-treated patients in the Australian primary care setting. This intervention comprises a general p...

  15. Laser therapy in general dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Arun A.

    2006-02-01

    This is a clinical presentation on the use of laser therapy in a private dental practice using a 810nm diode. A wide range of conditions involving pain management, treatment and as an adjunct to procedures to enhance patient comfort and experience. This will include cases treated for TMD (Temporo mandibular dysfunction), apthous ulcers, angular chelitis, cold sores, gingival retraction, periodontal treatment and management of failing dental implants. The case presentation will include the protocols used and some long term reviews. The results have been very positive and will be shared to enable this form of treatment to be used more frequently and with confidence within dental practice.

  16. Management of rhinosinusitis in Dutch general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmans, R.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Weel, C. van; Fokkens, W.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether general practitioners (GPs) distinguish between the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), especially with regard to prescription of antibiotics and nasal steroids. METHODS: A questionnaire on the management of rhinosinusitis was sent to

  17. Efficient semiparametric estimation in generalized partially linear additive models for longitudinal/clustered data

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Guang

    2014-02-01

    We consider efficient estimation of the Euclidean parameters in a generalized partially linear additive models for longitudinal/clustered data when multiple covariates need to be modeled nonparametrically, and propose an estimation procedure based on a spline approximation of the nonparametric part of the model and the generalized estimating equations (GEE). Although the model in consideration is natural and useful in many practical applications, the literature on this model is very limited because of challenges in dealing with dependent data for nonparametric additive models. We show that the proposed estimators are consistent and asymptotically normal even if the covariance structure is misspecified. An explicit consistent estimate of the asymptotic variance is also provided. Moreover, we derive the semiparametric efficiency score and information bound under general moment conditions. By showing that our estimators achieve the semiparametric information bound, we effectively establish their efficiency in a stronger sense than what is typically considered for GEE. The derivation of our asymptotic results relies heavily on the empirical processes tools that we develop for the longitudinal/clustered data. Numerical results are used to illustrate the finite sample performance of the proposed estimators. © 2014 ISI/BS.

  18. The existential dimension in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergaard, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    . As a way to enhance a practice culture in which GPs pay more explicit attention to the patients’ multidimensional concerns, opportunities for professional development could be offered (courses or seminars) that focus on mutual sharing of existential reflections, ideas and communication competencies. Key...

  19. Building a General Purpose Beowulf Cluster for Astrophysics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, M. W. L.

    2005-12-01

    The challenges of designing and deploying a high performance, Linux based, Beowulf cluster for use by many departments and projects are covered. Considerations include hardware, infrastructure (space, cooling, networking, etc.), and software; particularly scheduling systems.

  20. General dentist orthodontic practice in foreign legal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Toshio Maruo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: General dentist orthodontic practice is a controversial issue and this paper aims to analyze it comparing foreign laws to Brazilian Legal System. METHODS: Regulations and scientific texts concerning orthodontic practice by general dentists, in Portuguese or English language, were sought. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Portugal clearly forbids general dentist orthodontic practice; United States of America do not clearly forbid general dentist orthodontic practice, but do regulate and promote campaigns to encourage public to seek specialist service; in Australia and England, corrective orthodontics are offered both by orthodontists and general dentists; it was not possible to evaluate how orthodontic services are provided in Eastern Europe; and the fact that general dentists are forbidden to practice corrective orthodontics in Brazilian Legal System is compatible to other countries policy.

  1. Clinical guidelines: their implementation in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    M Conroy; Shannon, W

    1995-01-01

    In recent years the development of clinical guidelines has received increasing attention from medical educators and those involved in standard setting, and has been initiated at both central and local levels. This review article outlines the current state of knowledge with regard to clinical guideline implementation in medical practice. It deals with the main aspects of the current guideline debate, such as, clinical freedom and doctor autonomy, the importance of ownership in guideline implem...

  2. Dealing with uncertainty in general practice: an essential skill for the general practitioner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Riordan, M.; Dahinden, A.; Akturk, Z.; Ortiz, J.M.; Dagdeviren, N.; Elwyn, G.; Micallef, A.; Murtonen, M.; Samuelson, M.; Struk, P.; Tayar, D.; Thesen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Many patients attending general practice do not have an obvious diagnosis at presentation. Skills to deal with uncertainty are particularly important in general practice as undifferentiated and unorganised problems are a common challenge for general practitioners (GPs). This paper describes the mana

  3. Improvisational Practices in Elementary General Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenhagen, Lisa M.; Whitcomb, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Despite historic and ongoing support for the inclusion of improvisation in the elementary general music curriculum, music educators consistently report challenges with implementation of improvisational activities in their classes. This study was designed to examine (a) the extent to which improvisational activities were occurring in the…

  4. Accuracy and precision of desktop spirometers in general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Verweij, E.H.; Cretier, R.; Pellegrino, J.E.M.C.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry has become an essential tool for general practices to diagnose and monitor chronic airways diseases, but very little is known about the performance of the spirometry equipment that is being used in general practice settings. The use of invalid spirometry equipment may have con

  5. Effectiveness of empathy in general practice: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, F.; Bensing, J.; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Empathy as a characteristic of patient-physician communication in both general practice and clinical care is considered to be the backbone of the patient-physician relationship. Although the value of empathy is seldom debated, its effectiveness is little discussed in general practice. Th

  6. Effectiveness of empathy in general practice: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, F.; Bensing, J.; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Empathy as a characteristic of patient-physician communication in both general practice and clinical care is considered to be the backbone of the patient-physician relationship. Although the value of empathy is seldom debated, its effectiveness is little discussed in general practice. Th

  7. Inter-practice variation in diagnosing hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of inter-practice variation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus showed wide variations between practices. However, in these studies inter-practice variation was calculated without controlling for clustering of patients within practices and without adjusting for patient and practice characteristics. Therefore, in the present study inter-practice variation of diagnosed hypertension and diabetes mellitus prevalence rates was calculated by 1 using a multi-level design and 2 adjusting for patient and practice characteristics. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH in 2004. Of all 168.045 registered patients, the presence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and all available ICPC coded symptoms and diseases related to hypertension and diabetes, were determined. Also, the characteristics of practices were used in the analyses. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The 95% prevalence range for the practices for the prevalence of diagnosed hypertension and diabetes mellitus was 66.3 to 181.7 per 1000 patients and 22.2 to 65.8 per 1000 patients, respectively, after adjustment for patient and practice characteristics. The presence of hypertension and diabetes was best predicted by patient characteristics. The most important predictors of hypertension were obesity (OR = 3.5, presence of a lipid disorder (OR = 3.0, and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.6, whereas the presence of diabetes mellitus was particularly predicted by retinopathy (OR = 8.5, lipid disorders (OR = 2.8 and hypertension (OR = 2.7. Conclusion Although not the optimal case-mix could be used in this study, we conclude that even after adjustment for patient (demographic variables and risk factors for hypertension and diabetes mellitus and practice characteristics (practice size and presence of a practice nurse, there is a wide difference between general practices in

  8. Inter-practice variation in diagnosing hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielen, Markus MJ; Schellevis, François G; Verheij, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies of inter-practice variation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus showed wide variations between practices. However, in these studies inter-practice variation was calculated without controlling for clustering of patients within practices and without adjusting for patient and practice characteristics. Therefore, in the present study inter-practice variation of diagnosed hypertension and diabetes mellitus prevalence rates was calculated by 1) using a multi-level design and 2) adjusting for patient and practice characteristics. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH) in 2004. Of all 168.045 registered patients, the presence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and all available ICPC coded symptoms and diseases related to hypertension and diabetes, were determined. Also, the characteristics of practices were used in the analyses. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The 95% prevalence range for the practices for the prevalence of diagnosed hypertension and diabetes mellitus was 66.3 to 181.7 per 1000 patients and 22.2 to 65.8 per 1000 patients, respectively, after adjustment for patient and practice characteristics. The presence of hypertension and diabetes was best predicted by patient characteristics. The most important predictors of hypertension were obesity (OR = 3.5), presence of a lipid disorder (OR = 3.0), and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.6), whereas the presence of diabetes mellitus was particularly predicted by retinopathy (OR = 8.5), lipid disorders (OR = 2.8) and hypertension (OR = 2.7). Conclusion Although not the optimal case-mix could be used in this study, we conclude that even after adjustment for patient (demographic variables and risk factors for hypertension and diabetes mellitus) and practice characteristics (practice size and presence of a practice nurse), there is a wide difference between general practices in the prevalence rates

  9. [Euthanasia and general practice in Belgium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M

    2014-09-01

    In Belgium, the GP can perform euthanasia or be called as a consultant. He must know the laws concerning the end of life and be able to explain his rights to his patients. He will know the best practices and techniques for euthanasia. If necessary, he will call help or refer to a more competent colleague. He negotiates with the patient an advanced care planning following the evolution of its pathologies and will witness its wishes regarding end of life against other institutions and doctors.

  10. Finding Non-overlapping Clusters for Generalized Inference Over Graphical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Vats, Divyanshu

    2011-01-01

    Graphical models compactly capture stochastic dependencies amongst a collection of random variables using a graph. Inference over graphical models corresponds to finding marginal probability distributions given joint probability distributions. Several inference algorithms rely on iterative message passing between nodes. Although these algorithms can be generalized so that the message passing occurs between clusters of nodes, there are limited frameworks for finding such clusters. Moreover, current frameworks rely on finding clusters that are overlapping. This increases the computational complexity of finding clusters since the edges over a graph with overlapping clusters must be chosen carefully to avoid inconsistencies in the marginal distribution computations. In this paper, we propose a framework for finding clusters in a graph for generalized inference so that the clusters are \\emph{non-overlapping}. Given an undirected graph, we first derive a linear time algorithm for constructing a block-tree, a tree-s...

  11. Computerisation of general practice in the Republic of Croatia: experience gained in general practice use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman-Marković, Biserka; Katić, Milica; Kern, Josipa

    2007-01-01

    Well-organised medical records are the prerequisite for achieving a high level of performance in primary healthcare settings. Recording balanced structured and coded data as well as free text can improve both quality and organisation of work in the office. It provides a more substantiated support of financial transactions and accountancy, allows better communication with other facilities and institutions, and is a source of valuable scientific research material. This article is the result of an individual experience gained in general practice use of various programs/systems employed within the family medicine frame, and the frame of evaluation of available and commonly-exploited program solutions. The use of various programs allows for systematic adjustments as to the increasingly complex requirements imposed on electronic medical records (EMRs). The experience of a general practitioner, presented in this paper, confirms the assumption that an adequate program to be employed with EMRs should be developed, provided that family medicine practitioners, that is, the final users, have been involved in each and every stage of its development, adjustment, implementation and evaluation.

  12. Computerisation of general practice in the Republic of Croatia: experience gained in general practice use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biserka Bergman-Markovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Well-organised medical records are the prerequisite for achieving a high level of performance in primary healthcare settings. Recording balanced structured and coded data as well as free text can improve both quality and organisation of work in the office. It provides a more substantiated support of financial transactions and accountancy, allows better communication with other facilities and institutions, and is a source of valuable scientific research material. This article is the result of an individual experience gained in general practice use of various programs/ systems employed within the family medicine frame, and the frame of evaluation of available and commonly- exploited program solutions. The use of various programs allows for systematic adjustments as to the increasingly complex requirements imposed on electronic medical records (EMRs. The experience of a general practitioner, presented in this paper, confirms the assumption that an adequate program to be employed with EMRs should be developed, provided that family medicine practitioners, that is, the final users, have been involved in each and every stage of its development, adjustment, implementation and evaluation.

  13. Improving the safety features of general practice computer systems

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Avery; Boki Savelyich; Sheila Teasdale

    2003-01-01

    General practice computer systems already have a number of important safety features. However, there are problems in that general practitioners (GPs) have come to rely on hazard alerts when they are not foolproof. Furthermore, GPs do not know how to make best use of safety features on their systems. There are a number of solutions that could help to improve the safety features of general practice computer systems and also help to improve the abilities of healthcare professionals to use these ...

  14. General Framework for Effect Sizes in Cluster Randomized Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHoudnos, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Cluster randomized experiments are ubiquitous in modern education research. Although a variety of modeling approaches are used to analyze these data, perhaps the most common methodology is a normal mixed effects model where some effects, such as the treatment effect, are regarded as fixed, and others, such as the effect of group random assignment…

  15. Prevalence of alcohol problems in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Todisco, N; Gluud, C

    1996-01-01

    The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) and the response to a question about heavy alcohol consumption were used to assess the prevalence of alcohol problems in consecutive patients (77 males and 46 females) consulting a general practitioner in an urban area in the South of Italy (Castellam...... as a screening question in order to detect alcohol problems and give advice regarding reduction of alcohol consumption.......The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) and the response to a question about heavy alcohol consumption were used to assess the prevalence of alcohol problems in consecutive patients (77 males and 46 females) consulting a general practitioner in an urban area in the South of Italy...... (Castellammare di Stabia). Alcohol problems, which were defined by a cut-off score of 5 on the MAST and/or by heavy alcohol consumption (corresponding to at least 60 g of ethanol daily for males and 36 g of ethanol daily for females for at least 2 years), were identified in 54 patients [43.9%; 95% confidence...

  16. Recruitment difficulties in a primary care cluster randomised trial: investigating factors contributing to general practitioners' recruitment of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenzie Joanne E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruitment of patients by health professionals is reported as one of the most challenging steps when undertaking studies in primary care settings. Numerous investigations of the barriers to patient recruitment in trials which recruit patients to receive an intervention have been published. However, we are not aware of any studies that have reported on the recruitment barriers as perceived by health professionals to recruiting patients into cluster randomised trials where patients do not directly receive an intervention. This particular subtype of cluster trial is commonly termed a professional-cluster trial. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that contributed to general practitioners recruitment of patients in a professional-cluster trial which evaluated the effectiveness of an intervention to increase general practitioners adherence to a clinical practice guideline for acute low-back pain. Method General practitioners enrolled in the study were posted a questionnaire, consisting of quantitative items and an open-ended question, to assess possible reasons for poor patient recruitment. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise quantitative items and responses to the open-ended question were coded into categories. Results Seventy-nine general practitioners completed at least one item (79/94 = 84%, representing 68 practices (85% practice response rate, and 44 provided a response to the open-ended question. General practitioners recalled inviting a median of two patients with acute low-back pain to participate in the trial over a seven-month period; they reported that they intended to recruit patients, but forgot to approach patients to participate; and they did not perceive that patients had a strong interest or disinterest in participating. Additional open-ended comments were generally consistent with the quantitative data. Conclusion A number of barriers to the recruitment of patients with acute low

  17. [General practice--linear thinking and complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, H

    2006-09-27

    As physicians, we apply and teach linear thinking. This approach permits to dissect the patient's problem to the molecular level and has contributed enormously to the knowledge and progress of medicine. The linear approach is particularly useful in medical education, in quantitative research and helps to resolve simple problems. However, it risks to be rigid. Living beings (such as patients and physicians!) have to be considered as complex systems. A complex system cannot be dissected into its parts without losing its identity. It is dependent on its past and interactions with the outside are often followed by unpredictable reactions. The patient-centred approach in medicine permits the physician, a complex system himself, to integrate the patient's system and to adapt to his reality. It is particularly useful in general medicine.

  18. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergård, Jens

    2012-01-01

    General practice is the corner stone of Danish primary health care. General practitioners (GPs) are similar to family physicians in the United States. On average, all Danes have 6.9 contacts per year with their GP (in-person, telephone, or E-mail consultation). General practice is characterized...... education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new challenges....... Practice units are fairly small: close to 2 GPs per unit plus nurses and secretaries. The units are fully computerized, that is, with computer-based patient records and submission of prescriptions digitally to pharmacies etc. Over the past few years a decrease in solo practices has been seen...

  19. Going for gold: the health promoting general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion has been influential in guiding the development of 'settings' based health promotion. Over the past decade, settings such as schools have flourished and there has been a considerable amount of academic literature produced, including theoretical papers, descriptive studies and evaluations. However, despite its central importance, the health-promoting general practice has received little attention. This paper discusses: the significance of this setting for health promotion; how a health promoting general practice can be created; effective health promotion approaches; the nursing contribution; and some challenges that need to be resolved. In order to become a health promoting general practice, the staff must undertake a commitment to fulfil the following conditions: create a healthy working environment; integrate health promotion into practice activities; and establish alliances with other relevant institutions and groups within the community. The health promoting general practice is the gold standard for health promotion. Settings that have developed have had the support of local, national and European networks. Similar assistance and advocacy will be needed in general practice. This paper recommends that a series of rigorously evaluated, high-quality pilot sites need to be established to identify and address potential difficulties, and to ensure that this innovative approach yields tangible health benefits for local communities. It also suggests that government support is critical to the future development of health promoting general practices. This will be needed both directly and in relation to the capacity and resourcing of public health in general.

  20. The epidemiology of teaching and training General Practices in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot L; Gay, Simon P; McKinley, Robert K

    2016-11-01

    There is no national picture of teaching and training practices or the communities they serve. We aimed to describe the association between general practices' engagement with education and their characteristics, locality and patients' health-status and satisfaction. This data linkage study of all English practices calculated odds ratios for teaching and training status and practice, locality and patient variables. Teaching and training practices are larger than practices which do neither (mean list size (SD) 7074 (3736), 10112 (4934), and 5327 (3368) respectively, p quality and outcomes framework scores (0.507 (0.211, 0.804)) and (0.996 (0.650, 1.342)) respectively than those which did not. Educationally engaged practices are unrepresentative in serving less ethnically diverse and (for training practices) less urban environments. Investment is needed to increase the proportion of educational practices in diverse urban localities.

  1. General practice ethnicity data: evaluation of a tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwelt P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is evidence that the collection of ethnicity data in New Zealand primary care is variable and that data recording in practices does not always align with the procedures outlined in the Ethnicity Data Protocols for the Health and Disability Sector. In 2010, The Ministry of Health funded the development of a tool to audit the collection of ethnicity data in primary care. The aim of this study was to pilot the Ethnicity Data Audit Tool (EAT in general practice. The goal was to evaluate the tool and identify recommendations for its improvement. METHODS: Eight general practices in the Waitemata District Health Board region participated in the EAT pilot. Feedback about the pilot process was gathered by questionnaires and interviews, to gain an understanding of practices’ experiences in using the tool. Questionnaire and interview data were analysed using a simple analytical framework and a general inductive method. FINDINGS: General practice receptionists, practice managers and general practitioners participated in the pilot. Participants found the pilot process challenging but enlightening. The majority felt that the EAT was a useful quality improvement tool for handling patient ethnicity data. Larger practices were the most positive about the tool. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that, with minor improvements to the toolkit, the EAT has the potential to lead to significant improvements in the quality of ethnicity data collection and recording in New Zealand general practices. Other system-level factors also need to be addressed.

  2. Readiness for organisational change among general practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christl, B; Harris, M F; Jayasinghe, U W; Proudfoot, J; Taggart, J; Tan, J

    2010-10-01

    Increasing demands on general practice to manage chronic disease may warrant organisational change at the practice level. Staff's readiness for organisational change can act as a facilitator or barrier to implementing interventions aimed at organisational change. To explore general practice staff readiness for organisational change and its association with staff and practices characteristics. This is a cross-sectional study of practices in three Australian states involved in a randomised control trial on the effectiveness of an intervention to enhance the role of non-general practitioner staff in chronic disease management. Readiness for organisational change, job satisfaction and practice characteristics were assessed using questionnaires. 502 staff from 58 practices completed questionnaires. Practice characteristics were not associated with staff readiness for change. A multilevel regression analysis showed statistically significant associations between staff readiness for organisational change (range 1 to 5) and having a non-clinical staff role (vs general practitioner; B=-0.315; 95% CI -0.47 to -0.16; pchange which addresses the mix of practice staff. Moderately low job satisfaction may be an opportunity for organisational change.

  3. [The practice guideline 'Anemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Anaemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners will certainly be a support for the Dutch general practitioner. The inclusion of an algorithm to make a more precise diagnosis is an experiment that needs to be evaluated in the near future. However, many general

  4. [The practice guideline 'Anemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Anaemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners will certainly be a support for the Dutch general practitioner. The inclusion of an algorithm to make a more precise diagnosis is an experiment that needs to be evaluated in the near future. However, many general practi

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF CLUSTER POLICY: RUSSIAN AND INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Vertakova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The cluster policy is one of popular instruments of state regulation of regional development. Its main advantage – possibility of creation (on the ba-sis of clusters the “growth poles” in region economy. Feature of process of a clustering of economy both in Russia, and in other countries of the world, is the active role of the state in identification of clusters, maintenance of cluster initiatives, stimulation of their development and carrying out monitoring of efficiency of the clustering processes. As a result of the analysis of cluster policy in the certain countries, two main models of implementation of cluster policy are revealed: dirigisme and liberal. They differ in extent of the state intervention. The cluster policy has to be implemented taking into account specifics of spatial structure of economy of the countries and regions. Studying of experience of various countries allowed to allocate two main directions of modern cluster policy: ascending and descending. The ascending approach concentrates on ensuring effective functioning of the market and elimination of market deficiency. At the descending approach the government establishes regional and national priorities, formulates the stimulat-ing vision for the future. The structure of economy of Russia differs from economies of other countries therefore direct loan of institutes of cluster pol-icy is impossible. It is necessary to select the foreign experience with the use of benchmarking.

  6. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  7. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  8. An approximation algorithm for the generalized minimum spanning tree problem with bounded cluster size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, P.C.; Kern, Walter; Still, Georg J.

    2001-01-01

    Given a complete undirected graph with the nodes partitioned into m node sets called clusters, the Generalized Minimum Spanning Tree problem denoted by GMST is to find a minimum-cost tree which includes exactly one node from each cluster. It is known that the GMST problem is NP-hard and even finding

  9. Identifying At-Risk Students in General Chemistry via Cluster Analysis of Affective Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify academically at-risk students in first-semester general chemistry using affective characteristics via cluster analysis. Through the clustering of six preselected affective variables, three distinct affective groups were identified: low (at-risk), medium, and high. Students in the low affective group…

  10. Identifying At-Risk Students in General Chemistry via Cluster Analysis of Affective Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify academically at-risk students in first-semester general chemistry using affective characteristics via cluster analysis. Through the clustering of six preselected affective variables, three distinct affective groups were identified: low (at-risk), medium, and high. Students in the low affective group…

  11. A survey of statistics in three UK general practice journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many medical specialities have reviewed the statistical content of their journals. To our knowledge this has not been done in general practice. Given the main role of a general practitioner as a diagnostician we thought it would be of interest to see whether the statistical methods reported reflect the diagnostic process. Methods Hand search of three UK journals of general practice namely the British Medical Journal (general practice section, British Journal of General Practice and Family Practice over a one-year period (1 January to 31 December 2000. Results A wide variety of statistical techniques were used. The most common methods included t-tests and Chi-squared tests. There were few articles reporting likelihood ratios and other useful diagnostic methods. There was evidence that the journals with the more thorough statistical review process reported a more complex and wider variety of statistical techniques. Conclusions The BMJ had a wider range and greater diversity of statistical methods than the other two journals. However, in all three journals there was a dearth of papers reflecting the diagnostic process. Across all three journals there were relatively few papers describing randomised controlled trials thus recognising the difficulty of implementing this design in general practice.

  12. A multifaceted implementation strategy versus passive implementation of low back pain guidelines in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Bro, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    primary care to secondary care. The primary aim of this project was to reduce secondary care referral within 12 weeks by a multifaceted implementation strategy (MuIS). METHODS: In a cluster randomised design, 189 general practices from the North Denmark Region were invited to participate. Practices were....... In an intention-to-treat analysis, the primary and secondary outcomes pertained to the patient, and a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a healthcare sector perspective. Patients and the assessment of outcomes were blinded. Practices and caregivers delivering the interventions were not blinded....... RESULTS: Between January 2013 and July 2014, 60 practices were included, of which 54 practices (28 MuIS, 26 PaIS) included 1101 patients (539 MuIS, 562 PaIS). Follow-up data for the primary outcome were available on 100 % of these patients. Twenty-seven patients (5.0 %) in the MuIS group were referred...

  13. Cluster-state quantum computing enhanced by high-fidelity generalized measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, D N; Kaltenbaek, R; Hamel, D R; Weihs, G; Rudolph, T; Resch, K J

    2009-12-11

    We introduce and implement a technique to extend the quantum computational power of cluster states by replacing some projective measurements with generalized quantum measurements (POVMs). As an experimental demonstration we fully realize an arbitrary three-qubit cluster computation by implementing a tunable linear-optical POVM, as well as fast active feedforward, on a two-qubit photonic cluster state. Over 206 different computations, the average output fidelity is 0.9832+/-0.0002; furthermore the error contribution from our POVM device and feedforward is only of O(10(-3)), less than some recent thresholds for fault-tolerant cluster computing.

  14. Robust root clustering for linear uncertain systems using generalized Lyapunov theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of matrix root clustering in subregions of a complex plane for linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty. The nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman & Jury (1981) using the generalized Liapunov equation is extended to the perturbed matrix case, and bounds are derived on the perturbation to maintain root clustering inside a given region. The theory makes it possible to obtain an explicit relationship between the parameters of the root clustering region and the uncertainty range of the parameter space.

  15. Robust root clustering for linear uncertain systems using generalized Lyapunov theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of matrix root clustering in subregions of a complex plane for linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty. The nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman & Jury (1981) using the generalized Liapunov equation is extended to the perturbed matrix case, and bounds are derived on the perturbation to maintain root clustering inside a given region. The theory makes it possible to obtain an explicit relationship between the parameters of the root clustering region and the uncertainty range of the parameter space.

  16. The quality of COPD care in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Rasmussen, Finn Vejlø; Borgeskov, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in a large sample of general practices in Denmark. We focussed on whether participation by general practitioners (GPs) in an educational programme could enhance the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and staging of the disease and improve adherence...

  17. Positive experiences with a specialist as facilitator in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Thorsen, Thorkil

    2012-01-01

    The use of facilitators for quality improvement in general practice has accelerated during the past decade. As general practitioners (GPs) or pharmacists have typically been used as facilitators, there is a lack of knowledge of how other professionals function as facilitators. This article explor...

  18. Implant Dentistry in General Practice. Part 1: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Ken

    2016-06-01

    This paper, the first of two, provides an introduction to implant dentistry for the general dental practitioner. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Implant placement and restoration is becoming more common place in general dental practice to the point where it may already be considered a routine treatment option.

  19. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... included in the first audit and 2394 in the second audit. We observed a significantly increased utilisation of spirometry from the first (52.7%) to the second audit (71.4%) (p quality of management. We conclude that participation in an educational...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  20. The Use of General Practice Computer Systems for Data Handling and Clinical Audit - A Survey of General Practices in Leicestershire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooqi A

    1998-11-01

    Conclusion: Despite considerable investment in GP computer systems there is evidence of both under-utilisation and inefficient use. Most practices identified a number of training needs. This suggests that lack of training is a barrier to the effective use of computers. Health authorities and general practices need urgently to develop strategies to improve computer skills.

  1. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners practice guideline 'The menopause'; reaction of the field of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on the menopause will not be any major cause for discussion. The hot issue of giving oestrogens to peri- and postmenopausal women to prevent osteoporosis or cardiovascular disease was already covered in the practice guideline on osteopor

  2. The state, the market, and general practice: the Australian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K N

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the development of general practice in the latter half of the 20th century, documenting the issues of concern to both the profession and the state. General practice developed hand in hand with the welfare state in Australia. As the structural changes associated with restructuring of the welfare state have advanced, so have the fortunes of general practice declined, despite significant attempts in the 1970s and 1980s to "save" general practice by both the profession and the state. These structural changes have operated on two fronts, the economic and the cultural. On the economic, changes to the employment of general practitioners clearly indicate ongoing proletarianization, particularly in a changing environment of labor-capital relations. At the cultural level, development of the self-help and the women's movements and the elective affinity of these groups with the individualism of the new right are leading to deprofessionalization. The author advances this argument in a review of general practice over the last 40 years and in a case study of community health services. Theoretically he argues for a combination of the proletarianization and the deprofessionalization theses.

  3. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölter, Regine; Freund, Tobias; Ledig, Thomas; Boll, Bernhard; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Roos, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the possibility to spend one quarter of the internship, in the last year of their academic studies, in a practice of family medicine. The demonstrated teaching method aims at giving feedback to the student based on video recordings of patient consultations (student-patient) with the help of a checklist. Video-feedback is already successful used in medical teaching in Germany and abroad. This feasibility study aims at assessing the practicability of video-assisted feedback as a teaching method during internship in general practice. First of all, the general practice chooses a guideline as the learning objective. Secondly, a subsequent patient - student - consultation is recorded on video. Afterwards, a video-assisted formative feedback is given by the physician. A checklist with learning objectives (communication, medical examination, a structured case report according to the guideline) is used to structure the feedback content. The feasibility was assessed by a semi structured interview in order to gain insight into barriers and challenges for future implementation. The teaching method was performed in one general practice. Afterwards the teaching physician and the trainee intern were interviewed. The Following four main categories were identified: feasibility, performance, implementation in daily routine, challenges of the teaching concept.The results of the feasibility study show general practicability of this approach. Installing a video camera in one examination room may solve technical problems. The trainee intern mentioned theoretical and practical benefits using the guideline. The teaching physician noted the challenge to reflect on his daily routines in the light of evidence

  4. Web-based consultation between general practitioners and nephrologists: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke D; van Berkel, Saskia; Akkermans, Reinier P; de Grauw, Inge S; Adang, Eddy M; Assendelft, Pim J; de Grauw, Wim J C; Biermans, Marion C J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2017-08-01

    Consultation of a nephrologist is important in aligning care for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at the primary-secondary care interface. However, current consultation methods come with practical difficulties that can lead to postponed consultation or patient referral instead. This study aimed to investigate whether a web-based consultation platform, telenephrology, led to a lower referral rate of indicated patients. Furthermore, we assessed consultation rate, quality of care, costs and general practitioner (GPs') experiences with telenephrology. Cluster randomized controlled trial with 47 general practices in the Netherlands was randomized to access to telenephrology or to enhanced usual care. A total of 3004 CKD patients aged 18 years or older who were under primary care were included (intervention group n = 1277, control group n = 1727) and 2693 completed the trial. All practices participated in a CKD management course and were given an overview of their CKD patients. The referral rates amounted to 2.3% (n = 29) in the intervention group and 3.0% (n = 52) in the control group, which was a non-significant difference, OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.31 to 1.23. The intervention group's consultation rate was 6.3% (n = 81) against 5.0% (n = 87) (OR 2.00; 95% CI 0.75-5.33). We found no difference in quality of care or costs. The majority of GPs had a positive opinion about telenephrology. The data in our study do not allow for conclusions on the effect of telenephrology on the rate of patient referrals and provider-to-provider consultations, compared to conventional methods. It was positively evaluated by GPs and was non-inferior in terms of quality of care and costs.

  5. Planning a cluster randomized trial with unequal cluster sizes: practical issues involving continuous outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravaud Philippe

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster randomization design is increasingly used for the evaluation of health-care, screeening or educational interventions. At the planning stage, sample size calculations usually consider an average cluster size without taking into account any potential imbalance in cluster size. However, there may exist high discrepancies in cluster sizes. Methods We performed simulations to study the impact of an imbalance in cluster size on power. We determined by simulations to which extent four methods proposed to adapt the sample size calculations to a pre-specified imbalance in cluster size could lead to adequately powered trials. Results We showed that an imbalance in cluster size can be of high influence on the power in the case of severe imbalance, particularly if the number of clusters is low and/or the intraclass correlation coefficient is high. In the case of a severe imbalance, our simulations confirmed that the minimum variance weights correction of the variation inflaction factor (VIF used in the sample size calculations has the best properties. Conclusion Publication of cluster sizes is important to assess the real power of the trial which was conducted and to help designing future trials. We derived an adaptation of the VIF from the minimum variance weights correction to be used in case the imbalance can be a priori formulated such as "a proportion (γ of clusters actually recruit a proportion (τ of subjects to be included (γ ≤ τ".

  6. Quality of stroke prevention in general practice: relationship with practice organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. de Koning (Johan); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Prins (Ad); G.J.J.M. Borsboom (Gerard); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between elements of practice organization related to stroke prevention in general practice, and suboptimal preventive care preceding the occurrence of stroke. DESIGN: This study was conducted among 69 Dutch general practitioners in the Rotterda

  7. [The practice guideline 'Smoking cessation' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the practice guideline from the Dutch College of General Practitioners on smoking cessation. General practitioners (GP) should strive after smoking cessation when patients consult and ask for support to stop smoking. Moreover, the practitioner should also show such initiative wh

  8. Prevalence of anal symptoms in general practice: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournu, Géraldine; Abramowitz, Laurent; Couffignal, Camille; Juguet, Frédéric; Sénéjoux, Agnès; Berger, Stéphane; Wiart, Anne-Laure; Bernard, Marc; Provost, Françoise; Pillant-Le Moult, Hélène; Bouchard, Dominique; Aubert, Jean-Pierre

    2017-08-03

    Anal disorders are largely underestimated in general practice. Studies have shown patients conceal anal symptoms leading to late diagnosis and treatment. Management by general practitioners is poorly described. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of anal symptoms and their management in general practice. In this prospective, observational, national study set in France, all adult patients consulting their general practitioner during 2 days of consultation were included. Anal symptoms, whether spontaneously revealed or not, were systematically collected and assessed. For symptomatic patients, the obstacles to anal examination were evaluated. The general practitioner's diagnosis was collected and a proctologist visit was systematically proposed in case of anal symptoms. If the proctologist was consulted, his or her diagnosis was collected. From October 2014 to April 2015, 1061 patients were included by 57 general practitioners. The prevalence of anal symptoms was 15.6% (95% CI: 14-18). However, 85% of these patients did not spontaneously share their symptoms with their doctors, despite a discomfort rating of 3 out of 10 (range 1-5). Although 65% of patients agreed to an anal examination, it was not proposed in 45% of cases with anal symptoms. Performing the examination was associated with a significantly higher diagnosis rate of 76% versus 20% (p anal symptoms are significant in general practice despite the impact on quality of life. Anal examination is seldom done. Improved training of general practitioners is required to break the taboo.

  9. The role of general practice in postgraduate basic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Kodal, Troels; Qvesel, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family me...... identity. The educational environment in general practice is rated highly. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of family medicine in postgraduate basic training should be considered for all doctors.......BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family...

  10. Study with lormetazepam as a hypnotic in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöldinger, W; Sastre-y-Hernández, M; Fichte, K

    1983-01-01

    Due to the increasing pressure to investigate new drugs under conditions met with in practice, Lormetazepam (0.5 mg) was investigated in nine general practices under the direction and collaboration of a psychiatrist used to investigations with psychopharmaceuticals. The results of a double-blind study, carried out in comparison to triazolam (0.5 mg), in a total of 94 ambulatory patients are presented.

  11. An exemplar of naturalistic inquiry in general practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-01-23

    Background Before beginning any research project, novice researchers must consider which methodological approach will best address their research questions. The paucity of literature describing a practical application of naturalistic inquiry adds to the difficulty they may experience. Aim To provide a practical example of how naturalistic inquiry was applied to a qualitative study exploring collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners working in Australian general practice. Discussion Naturalistic inquiry is not without its critics and limitations. However, by applying the axioms and operational characteristics of naturalistic inquiry, the authors captured a detailed 'snapshot' of collaboration in general practice in the time and context that it occurred. Conclusion Using qualitative methods, naturalistic inquiry provides the scope to construct a comprehensive and contextual understanding of a phenomenon. No individual positivist paradigm could provide the level of detail achieved in a naturalistic inquiry. Implications for practice This paper presents a practical example of naturalistic inquiry for the novice researcher. It shows that naturalistic inquiry is appropriate when the researcher seeks a rich and contextual understanding of a phenomenon as it exists in its natural setting.

  12. Social environment and frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2005-01-01

    inequalities in health or whether social factors in themselves determine the use of general practice. AIM: To examine if social factors are associated with frequent attendance in general practice after adjusting for physical and psychological health variables. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based cross...... during the period November 1997-October 1998. A questionnaire about physical, psychological and social factors was sent to the patients. The associations between social factors and frequent attendance were adjusted for physical and psychological health and tendency towards somatisation. RESULTS: A total...

  13. Healthcare assistants in general practice: practical and conceptual issues of skill-mix change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley, Sara; Dale, Jeremy

    2008-02-01

    The emergence of healthcare assistants (HCAs) in general practice raises questions about roles and responsibilities, patients' acceptance, cost-effectiveness, patient safety and delegation, training and competence, workforce development, and professional identity. There has been minimal research into the role of HCAs and their experiences, as well as those of other staff working with HCAs in general practice. Lessons may be learned from their role and evidence of their effectiveness in hospital settings. Such research highlights blurred and contested role boundaries and threats to professional identity, which have implications for teamwork, quality of patient care, and patient safety. In this paper it is argued that transferability of evidence from hospital settings to the context of general practice cannot be assumed. Drawing on the limited research in general practice, the challenges and benefits of developing the HCA role in general practice are discussed. It is suggested that in the context of changing skill-mix models, viewing roles as fluid and dynamic is more helpful and reflective of individuals' experiences than endeavouring to impose fixed role boundaries. It is concluded that HCAs can make an increasingly useful contribution to the skill mix in general practice, but that more research and evaluation are needed to inform their training and development within the general practice team.

  14. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline "Dizziness"; reaction from a general practitioner's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline entitled 'Dizziness' concerns a complaint experienced by many people, yet it provides few scientific data to support the recommendations. The standard does, however, provide the general practitioner with some concrete advice: the diagnos

  15. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolter, R.; Freund, T.; Ledig, T.; Boll, B.; Szecsenyi, J.; Roos, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the

  16. Active FEL-Klystrons As Formers of Femto-Second Clusters of Electromagnetic Field. General Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ju. Brusnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative physical and technological substantiation of the creation possibility of a new class of Femto-second Free Electron Lasers (FFELs (active cluster FEL-klystrons is given in the article. The concept of “electromagnetic field” cluster is introduced. Apart from that, the main difference between the concepts “the electromagnetic cluster” and “the radio-pulse” (which is well-known in radio-physics is formulated. The concept of “cluster electromagnetic wave” is also discussed. A general approach to designing the proposed active cluster FEL-klystrons is formulated. The description of a principal design scheme of the active cluster FEL-klystrons and their key technological basis are discussed.

  17. Update in outpatient general internal medicine: practice-changing evidence published in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundsted, Karna K; Wieland, Mark L; Szostek, Jason H; Post, Jason A; Mauck, Karen F

    2015-10-01

    The practice of outpatient general internal medicine requires a diverse and evolving knowledge base. General internists must identify practice-changing shifts in the literature and reflect on their impact. Accordingly, we conducted a review of practice-changing articles published in outpatient general internal medicine in 2014. To identify high-quality, clinically relevant publications, we reviewed all titles and abstracts published in the following primary data sources in 2014: New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA Internal Medicine, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. All 2014 primary data summaries from Journal Watch-General Internal Medicine and ACP JournalWise also were reviewed. The authors used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus on inclusion of 8 articles using the following criteria: clinical relevance to outpatient internal medicine, potential for practice change, and strength of evidence. Clusters of important articles around one clinical question were considered as a single-candidate series. The article merits were debated until consensus was reached on the final 8, spanning a variety of topics commonly encountered in outpatient general internal medicine.

  18. Discourse analysis in general practice: a sociolinguistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessa, J; Malterud, K

    1990-06-01

    It is a simple but important fact that as general practitioners we talk to our patients. The quality of the conversation is of vital importance for the outcome of the consultation. The purpose of this article is to discuss a methodological tool borrowed from sociolinguistics--discourse analysis. To assess the suitability of this method for analysis of general practice consultations, the authors have performed a discourse analysis of one single consultation. Our experiences are presented here.

  19. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Jones J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. AIM: To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. METHODS: A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. RESULTS: The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. DISCUSSION: Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  20. Generalized chemical distance distribution in all-sided critical percolation clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katunin, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    The algorithm of evaluation of chemical distance distribution in 2D and 3D critical percolation clusters is presented in the following study. The algorithm is enriched by numerous examples of 2D and 3D critical percolation clusters related to the currently investigated problem of electrical percolation in a mixture of conducting/dielectric polymers. The introduced measure of the chemical distance distribution can be a useful tool for characterization of percolation clusters, and in problems of percolation theory and graphs theory in general.

  1. Sustainability economics. General versus specific, and conceptual versus practical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgaertner, Stefan [Department of Sustainability Sciences, Leuphana University of Lueneburg (Germany); Department of Economics, Leuphana University of Lueneburg (Germany); Quaas, Martin [Department of Economics, University of Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    We clarify the definition and interpretation of 'sustainability economic' (Baumgaertner and Quaas, 2010) in response to recent comments by van den Bergh (2010), Bartelmus (2010) and others. For that sake, we distinguish between general and specific definitions of sustainability and sustainability economics, as well as between conceptual and practical approaches. (author)

  2. Antibiotic prescribing in Danish general practice 2004-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup;

    2016-01-01

    general practice relative to the entire primary care sector. METHODS: This was a registry-based study including all patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription between July 2004 and June 2013 at a Danish community pharmacy. Antibiotic use was expressed as DDDs and treatments/1000 inhabitants...

  3. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new challenges...

  4. Transmission and treatment of cutaneous warts in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd Cristoffel

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although warts are one of the most common reasons to consult general practice, there is a considerable lack of evidence on the transmission and treatment of warts. This thesis presents epidemiological data from a cohort of primary school

  5. Respiratory Diseases in Children: studies in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis covers various aspects of the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of various respiratory symptoms and diseases in children frequently encountered in general practice. These respiratory tract symptoms and diseases can be categorized into symptoms and d

  6. Management of bibliographic information by Dutch researchers in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, AAH; Jong, BMD

    1997-01-01

    Background. As a result of changes in information technology and the rapid growth of publications methods of searching the literature have changed. Systematic searching of the growing literature has become very important. It is not known whether researchers in general practice search systematically,

  7. Persistent presentation of medically unexplained symptoms in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Meijer, S.A.; Visser, A.P.; Wolters, G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of persistent presentation of medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) in general practice. To assess socio-demographic characteristics, health status and use of health services of patients who frequently present MUPS, compared with reference groups. DESI

  8. Management of bibliographic information by Dutch researchers in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, AAH; Jong, BMD

    Background. As a result of changes in information technology and the rapid growth of publications methods of searching the literature have changed. Systematic searching of the growing literature has become very important. It is not known whether researchers in general practice search systematically,

  9. Transmission and treatment of cutaneous warts in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd Cristoffel

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although warts are one of the most common reasons to consult general practice, there is a considerable lack of evidence on the transmission and treatment of warts. This thesis presents epidemiological data from a cohort of primary school

  10. The British Telecom radiopaging service in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, F H

    1981-10-01

    This paper reports a new radiopaging service supplied by British Telecom that will eventually cover the whole United Kingdom. The use of this service by a three-man practice is described. The service is considered to be a major development in communications that will be of interest to most general practitioners.

  11. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  12. Potentials and pitfalls for nutrition counselling in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, M.W.; Bakx, J.C.; Weel, C. van; Staveren, W.A. van

    2005-01-01

    This paper was based on collaborative research efforts from Wageningen University and the University Medical Centre St Radboud in The Netherlands and describes the rationale for web-based nutrition counselling applications in general practice as well as some of the frequently used models and theorie

  13. Prognostic Factors in Adults With Knee Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Methods. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a

  14. Nurses in Australian general practice: implications for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Salamonson, Yenna; Ollerton, Richard; Griffiths, Rhonda

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic and employment characteristics of Australian practice nurses and explore the relationship between these characteristics and the nurses' role. Nursing in general practice is an integral component of primary care and chronic disease management in the United Kingdom and New Zealand, but in Australia it is an emerging specialty and there is limited data on the workforce and role. National postal survey embedded in a sequential mixed method design. 284 practice nurses completed a postal survey during 2003-2004. Descriptive statistics and factor analysis were utilized to analyse the data. Most participants were female (99%), Registered Nurses (86%), employed part-time in a group practice, with a mean age of 45.8 years, and had a hospital nursing certificate as their highest qualification (63%). The tasks currently undertaken by participants and those requiring further education were inversely related (R2 = -0.779). Conversely, tasks perceived to be appropriate for a practice nurse and those currently undertaken by participants were positively related (R2 = 0.8996). There was a mismatch between the number of participants who perceived that a particular task was appropriate and those who undertook the task. This disparity was not completely explained by demographic or employment characteristics. Extrinsic factors such as legal and funding issues, lack of space and general practitioner attitudes were identified as barriers to role expansion. Practice nurses are a clinically experienced workforce whose skills are not optimally harnessed to improve the care of the growing number of people with chronic and complex conditions. Relevance to clinical practice. Study data reveal a need to overcome the funding, regulatory and interprofessional barriers that currently constrain the practice nurse role. Expansion of the practice nurse role is clearly a useful adjunct to specialist management of chronic and complex disease

  15. Inter-practice variation in diagnosing hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.M.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of inter-practice variation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus showed wide variations between practices. However, in these studies inter-practice variation was calculated without controlling for clustering of patients within practices and without

  16. Inter-practice variation in diagnosing hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.M.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of inter-practice variation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus showed wide variations between practices. However, in these studies inter-practice variation was calculated without controlling for clustering of patients within practices and without

  17. Theory and interpretation in qualitative studies from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this article, I want to promote theoretical awareness and commitment among qualitative researchers in general practice and suggest adequate and feasible theoretical approaches.  Approach: I discuss different theoretical aspects of qualitative research and present the basic foundations...... theory is a consistent and soundly based set of assumptions about a specific aspect of the world, predicting or explaining a phenomenon. Qualitative research is situated in an interpretative paradigm where notions about particular human experiences in context are recognized from different subject...... in qualitative analysis are presented, emphasizing substantive theories to sharpen the interpretative focus. Such approaches are clearly within reach for a general practice researcher contributing to clinical practice by doing more than summarizing what the participants talked about, without trying to become...

  18. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    French, Simon D; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP) in general practice. Methods: General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP...... and 45 practices (59 GPs) to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs...

  19. Participatory design of a preliminary safety checklist for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Ferguson, Julie; MacLeod, Marion; Kennedy, Susan; de Wet, Carl; McNab, Duncan; Kelly, Moya; McKay, John; Atkinson, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The use of checklists to minimise errors is well established in high reliability, safety-critical industries. In health care there is growing interest in checklists to standardise checking processes and ensure task completion, and so provide further systemic defences against error and patient harm. However, in UK general practice there is limited experience of safety checklist use. To identify workplace hazards that impact on safety, health and wellbeing, and performance, and codesign a standardised checklist process. Application of mixed methods to identify system hazards in Scottish general practices and develop a safety checklist based on human factors design principles. A multiprofessional 'expert' group (n = 7) and experienced front-line GPs, nurses, and practice managers (n = 18) identified system hazards and developed and validated a preliminary checklist using a combination of literature review, documentation review, consensus building workshops using a mini-Delphi process, and completion of content validity index exercise. A prototype safety checklist was developed and validated consisting of six safety domains (for example, medicines management), 22 sub-categories (for example, emergency drug supplies) and 78 related items (for example, stock balancing, secure drug storage, and cold chain temperature recording). Hazards in the general practice work system were prioritised that can potentially impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of patients, GP team members, and practice performance, and a necessary safety checklist prototype was designed. However, checklist efficacy in improving safety processes and outcomes is dependent on user commitment, and support from leaders and promotional champions. Although further usability development and testing is necessary, the concept should be of interest in the UK and internationally. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  20. Open-access ultrasound referrals from general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct access referral for radiological investigations from General Practice (GP) provides an indispensable diagnostic tool and avoids the inherently long waiting time that referral through a hospital based specialty would entail. Improving access to hospital based radiology services is one of Health Information and Quality Authority\\'s key recommendations in its report on patient referrals from general practice. This study aimed to review all GP referrals for ultrasound investigations to a tertiary referral teaching hospital over a seven month period with respect to their demographics, waiting times and diagnostic outcomes. 1,090 ultrasounds originating in general practice were carried out during the study period. Positive findings were recorded in 332 (30.46%) examinations. The median waiting time from receipt of referral to the diagnostic investigation was 56 days (range 16 - 91 years). 71 (6.5%) patients had follow-up imaging investigations while recommendation for hospital based specialty referral was made in 35 cases (3.2%). Significant findings included abdominal aortic aneurysms, metastatic disease and lymphoma. Direct access to ultrasound for general practitioners allows the referring physician to make an informed decision with regard to the need for specialist referral. We believe these findings help support the case for national direct access to diagnostic ultrasound for general practitioners.

  1. Osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee in Dutch general practice and physiotherapy practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.J.; Swinkels, I.C.; Dorsman, S.A.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe demographic characteristics and the treatment process of patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) or knee OA treated in Dutch general practice (GP) and/or physiotherapy practice. Additionally, to investigate whether there are differences in characteristics between referred and non-

  2. The purpose of the general practice consultation from the patients perspective - theoretical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Hanne; Witt, Klaus; Malterud, Kirsti

    2001-01-01

    Consultation purposes, general practice, patients´expectations, patients satosfaction, patientcenteredness......Consultation purposes, general practice, patients´expectations, patients satosfaction, patientcenteredness...

  3. Intimate partner violence - identification and response in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Kelsey; O'Doherty, Lorna

    2011-11-01

    Intimate partner violence is a common problem among women attending general practice, with around one in 10 women currently experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse by a partner. Abused women frequently present with physical and psychosocial issues. Yet intimate partner violence often remains concealed and addressing it poses challenges for the clinician and patient alike. Although some of the general recommendations in this review may also apply to same-sex relationships and to women who abuse men, this article discusses identifying intimate partner violence in women who present to general practice. Identifying intimate partner violence is important in clinical practice as it underlies many common physical and mental health presentations. Facilitating disclosure and responding effectively requires good communication skills. Safety assessment of women and their families, pinpointing level of readiness to contemplate action, and providing appropriate referral options and ongoing nonjudgmental support are elements of an effective response. General practitioners have the potential to identify women and support them safely on a pathway to recovery, thereby avoiding the long term impacts of intimate partner violence.

  4. The uses and implications of standards in general practice consultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Maria Laura; Reventlow, Susanne; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2017-01-01

    was observed among general practitioners who strictly adhered to the procedural standards on the interactional aspects of care. Thus, when allowed to function as an overall frame for consultations, those standards supported adherence to general recommendations regarding which elements to be included in chronic...... standards for the ‘softer’ aspects of care. This article explores the consequences of both kinds of quality standards for chronic care consultations. The article presents findings from an explorative qualitative field study in Danish general practice where a standardized technology for quality development...... disease consultations. However, at the same time, adherence to those standards was observed to narrow the focus of doctor–patient dialogues and to divert general practitioners’ attention from patients’ personal concerns. Similar consequences of quality standards have previously been framed...

  5. Practical definition of averages of tensors in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boero, Ezequiel F

    2016-01-01

    We present a definition of tensor fields which are average of tensors over a manifold, with a straightforward and natural definition of derivative for the averaged fields; which in turn makes a suitable and practical construction for the study of averages of tensor fields that satisfy differential equations. Although we have in mind applications to general relativity, our presentation is applicable to a general n-dimensional manifold. The definition is based on the integration of scalars constructed from a physically motivated basis, making use of the least amount of geometrical structure. We also present definitions of covariant derivative of the averaged tensors and Lie derivative.

  6. Gravitational redshift of galaxies in clusters as predicted by general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Hansen, Steen H; Hjorth, Jens

    2011-09-28

    The theoretical framework of cosmology is mainly defined by gravity, of which general relativity is the current model. Recent tests of general relativity within the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model have found a concordance between predictions and the observations of the growth rate and clustering of the cosmic web. General relativity has not hitherto been tested on cosmological scales independently of the assumptions of the ΛCDM model. Here we report an observation of the gravitational redshift of light coming from galaxies in clusters at the 99 per cent confidence level, based on archival data. Our measurement agrees with the predictions of general relativity and its modification created to explain cosmic acceleration without the need for dark energy (the f(R) theory), but is inconsistent with alternative models designed to avoid the presence of dark matter. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  7. The prevalence of humeral epicondylitis: a survey in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of all patients with humeral epicondylitis who presented over a two-year period in a group practice were examined to clarify the epidemiological features of this condition. In all 77 patients were seen. There was no observed difference in incidence between the sexes, lateral epicondylitis being more common than medial in both sexes. Medial epicondylitis is more common in the community than is generally recognized. Epicondylitis is a relapsing condition with a strong bias t...

  8. Prosthodontics in a general practice program of advanced dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plekavich, E J

    1976-01-01

    The problems involved in teaching prosthodontics in a general practice program outwardly appear to be due to the lack of sufficient basic prosthodontic training dispensed by the dental schools. This lack of sufficient training is not the fault of dental school faculties. The students are not learning what they are taught. What they need is more repetition, which means more time. The problems are not insurmountable. We just must find the route.

  9. Communicating fatigue in general practice and the role of gender

    OpenAIRE

    Meeuwesen, L.; BENSING, J; Brink-Muinen, A. van den

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor-patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor-patient communication as well. This study examined (1) whether or not communication patterns of gender-dyads in general practice consultations differ across and between Western-European countries, and (2) if so, whether these differences continue to exist when controlling for pa...

  10. Impact of an audiology clinic in one general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunti, K; Carr, M

    1997-01-01

    There is a large demand for the provision of hearing aids. However, there are lengthy delays involved between referral and fitment of National Health Service (NHS) hearing aids. This report shows that a general practice based audiology clinic can lead to an increase in the number of patients referred and fitted with a hearing aid. The introduction of the clinic also led to reduced waiting times for patients to be fitted with hearing aids. PMID:9474829

  11. Caring for refugees in general practice: perspectives from the coalface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Rebecca; Askew, Deborah; Kay, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research project explored the experiences of primary health care providers working with newly arrived refugees in Brisbane. Data from 36 participants (20 general practitioners, five practice nurses and 11 administrative staff) involved in five focus groups and four semi-structured interviews were analysed. The results indicated that despite difficulties, providers are committed and enthusiastic about working with refugees. The flexibility of the general practice setting enables innovative approaches. The establishment of a specialised refugee health service in Brisbane has improved providers' capacity to deliver refugee health care. However, most practices continue to feel isolated as they search for solutions, and the need for greater supports and a more coordinated approach to care were emphasised. The themes of communication, knowledge and practice and health care systems encapsulated the factors that influence health care providers' ability to care for refugees and provide a framework for improving available supports. Australian primary health care is currently undergoing great change, which provides an opportunity to make significant gains in the provision of care for refugees and other minority groups within our community. As health care reforms are implemented it is essential that they are responsive to the expressed needs of health care providers working in these areas.

  12. Treatment of heart failure in Dutch general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Frans JM; Schellevis, François G; Bakx, Carel; van den Bosch, Wil JHM; van der Zee, Jouke

    2006-01-01

    Background To study the relation between the prescription rates of selected cardiovascular drugs (ACE-inhibitors and Angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and combinations), sociodemographic factors (age, gender and socioeconomic class) and concomitant diseases (hypertension, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular accident, heart valve disease, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and asthma/COPD) among patients with heart failure cared for in general practice. Methods Data from the second Dutch National Survey in General Practice, conducted mainly in 2001. In this study the data of 96 practices with a registered patient population of 374.000 were used. Data included diagnosis made during one year by general practitioners, derived from the electronic medical records, prescriptions for medication and sociodemographic characteristics collected via a postal questionnary (response 76%) Results A diagnosis of HF was found with 2771 patients (7.1 in 1000). Their mean age was 77.7 years, 68% was 75 years or older, 55% of the patients were women. Overall prescription rates for RAAS-I, beta-blockers and diuretics were 50%, 32%, 86%, respectively, whereas a combination of these three drugs was prescribed in 18%. Variations in prescription rates were mainly related to age and concomitant diseases. Conclusion Prescription is not influenced by gender, to a small degree influenced by socioeconomic status and to a large degree by age and concomitant diseases. PMID:16822303

  13. Implementation of an Arranged Preventive Consultation in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Anne Gram; Kirkegaard, Pia; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    Background: In 2006 an arranged preventive consultation (0106-service) was implemented in Danish general practice. The purpose of the consultation is an attempt to improve the systematic prevention of the main chronic lifestyle diseases. Aim: This study examines the GP's experiences with the arra...... interaction between the GP/nurse and the patient, and therefore the GPs/nurses can in some respects experience it as difficult to apply the theoretical guidelines of the new consultation to their daily work with the patients.......Background: In 2006 an arranged preventive consultation (0106-service) was implemented in Danish general practice. The purpose of the consultation is an attempt to improve the systematic prevention of the main chronic lifestyle diseases. Aim: This study examines the GP's experiences...... with the arranged preventive consultation with focus on facilitators and barriers in the implementation of the consultation. Material & Method: Semi-structured interviews with 10 GPs and nurses in general practice. Results & Conclusions: Economically lucrative services are not an isolated motivation for the GPs...

  14. Management of acute rhinosinusitis in Danish general practice: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen JG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Jens Georg HansenDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkPurpose: To evaluate whether the ongoing debate over diagnostic problems and treatment choices for acute rhinosinusitis has had any influence on the management of the disease.Methods: We randomly selected 300 Danish general practitioners (GPs from the files of the Research Unit for General Practice at Aarhus University. Invitations to participate and a questionnaire were sent to the GPs by mail.Results: A total of 149 (49% GPs answered the questionnaire. When asked about symptoms, the highest priority was given to sinus pain and signs of tenderness. The most frequent examinations were objective examination of the ear-nose-throat (ENT, palpation of the maxillofacial area, and C-reactive protein point-of-care testing (or CRP rapid test. Nearly all GPs prescribed local vasoconstrictors, and in 70% of cases, antibiotics were prescribed. Phenoxymethylpenicillin was the preferred antibiotic. Use of the CRP rapid test, years in practice, or employment in an ENT department did not have a significant impact on the diagnostic certainty and antibiotic prescribing rate.Conclusion: The clinical diagnoses are based on a few symptoms, signs, and the CRP rapid test. Other examinations, including imaging techniques, are seldom used. Phenoxymethylpenicillin is the preferred antibiotic, and the GPs' diagnostic certainty was 70%.Keywords: general practice, acute rhinosinusitis, diagnosis, treatment, antibiotic

  15. Treatment of heart failure in Dutch general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Bosch Wil JHM

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the relation between the prescription rates of selected cardiovascular drugs (ACE-inhibitors and Angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and combinations, sociodemographic factors (age, gender and socioeconomic class and concomitant diseases (hypertension, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular accident, heart valve disease, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and asthma/COPD among patients with heart failure cared for in general practice. Methods Data from the second Dutch National Survey in General Practice, conducted mainly in 2001. In this study the data of 96 practices with a registered patient population of 374.000 were used. Data included diagnosis made during one year by general practitioners, derived from the electronic medical records, prescriptions for medication and sociodemographic characteristics collected via a postal questionnary (response 76% Results A diagnosis of HF was found with 2771 patients (7.1 in 1000. Their mean age was 77.7 years, 68% was 75 years or older, 55% of the patients were women. Overall prescription rates for RAAS-I, beta-blockers and diuretics were 50%, 32%, 86%, respectively, whereas a combination of these three drugs was prescribed in 18%. Variations in prescription rates were mainly related to age and concomitant diseases. Conclusion Prescription is not influenced by gender, to a small degree influenced by socioeconomic status and to a large degree by age and concomitant diseases.

  16. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Methods Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms “Community of Practice” (CoP AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR “Allied Health”. Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. Results The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders

  17. Dynamical signatures of infall around galaxy clusters: a generalized Jeans equation

    CERN Document Server

    Falco, Martina; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Hansen, Steen H; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We study the internal kinematics of galaxy clusters in the region beyond the sphere of virialization. Galaxies around a virialized cluster are infalling towards the cluster center with a non-zero mean radial velocity. We develop a new formalism for describing the dynamical state of clusters, by generalizing the standard Jeans formalism with the inclusion of the peculiar infall motions of galaxies and the Hubble expansion as well as the contributions due to background cosmology. Using empirical fits to the radial profiles of density, mean radial velocity and velocity anisotropy of both a stacked cluster-mass halo and two isolated halos of a cosmological dark matter only simulation, we verify that our generalized Jeans equation correctly predicts the radial velocity dispersion out to 4 virial radii. We find that the radial velocity dispersion inferred from the standard Jeans equation is accurate up to 2 virial radii, but overestimated by \\approx 20% for the stacked halo and by \\approx 40% for the isolated halos...

  18. CLUSTER PRACTICES IN HERITAGE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT – CASE STUDY IN SOUTHERN ALBANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirdaim AXHAM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As competitiveness is growing in the Balkans, a new approach in the development of heritage tourism, which can adapt to these circumstances, is required. Cluster practices can be the new approach that can improve competitiveness of Albanian tourism. Considering the nature of Albania and its rich heritage, it is a very attractive “magnet” for foreign tourists. The article starts with a presentation of tourism experience in Albania and discusses why heritage tourism is possibly the only way to develop tourism now and for the future, in the country. Some brief explanation concerning cluster practices follow: a presentation of the main issues about cluster practices, their benefits and drawbacks, their implementation and the ways they can be monitored and evaluated. It is important to direct attention to the fact that cluster practices are becoming an important means to development and to the enforcement of social capital in the geographical areas where they are implemented. In the end of the article is shown why cluster practices can be worth of being implemented in area of Butrint-Saranda-Gjirokastra-Korca. The paper concludes with the main findings and conclusions of the analysis.

  19. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  20. A Virtual Community of Practice for General Practice Training: A Preimplementation Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Robinson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Professional isolation is an important factor in low rural health workforce retention. Objective The aim of this study was to gain insights to inform the development of an implementation plan for a virtual community of practice (VCoP) for general practice (GP) training in regional Australia. The study also aimed to assess the applicability of the findings of an existing framework in developing this plan. This included ascertaining the main drivers of usage, or usefulness, of the VC...

  1. Improving communication: a practical programme for teaching trainees about communication issues in the general practice consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, M; Griffiths, J; Hall, D; McIntyre, M; Oliver, B; Woodward, J

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes a teaching programme, for use in general practice vocational training, which provides a theoretical and practical framework for exploring key aspects of the consultation with trainees. A particular emphasis is on the educational or 'cognitive' outcomes of the consultation and skills for improving them. The five stages of the programme are described and an example of experience of each stage is given. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the programme by the trainers, trainees and social scientist involved.

  2. Process evaluation of a practice nurse-led smoking cessation trial in Australian general practice: views of general practitioners and practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Furler, John S; Hermiz, Oshana S; Blackberry, Irene D; Smith, Julie P; Richmond, Robyn L; Zwar, Nicholas A

    2015-08-01

    Support in primary care can assist smokers to quit successfully, but there are barriers to general practitioners (GPs) providing this support routinely. Practice nurses (PNs) may be able to effectively take on this role. The aim of this study was to perform a process evaluation of a PN-led smoking cessation intervention being tested in a randomized controlled trial in Australian general practice. Process evaluation was conducted by means of semi-structured telephone interviews with GPs and PNs allocated in the intervention arm (Quit with PN) of the Quit in General Practice trial. Interviews focussed on nurse training, content and implementation of the intervention. Twenty-two PNs and 15 GPs participated in the interviews. The Quit with PN intervention was viewed positively. Most PNs were satisfied with the training and the materials provided. Some challenges in managing patient data and follow-up were identified. The Quit with PN intervention was acceptable to participating PNs and GPs. Issues to be addressed in the planning and wider implementation of future trials of nurse-led intervention in general practice include providing ongoing mentoring support, integration into practice management systems and strategies to promote greater collaboration in GPs and PN teams in general practice. The ongoing feasibility of the intervention was impacted by the funding model supporting PN employment and the competing demands on the PNs time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. DoD Planewave: A General Scalable Density Functional Code For Solids And Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Gon; Singh, D. J.; Kajihara, S. A.; Woodward, C.

    2000-03-01

    We will present our latest version of the DoD Planewave code, a general purpose scalable planewave basis density functional code. DoD Planewave is written in highly portable Fortran 90 and runs on many high-performance parallel machines including IBM SP2, SGI Orgin 2000 clusters and Pentium machines running Linux. The package including the complete source code and example runs is freely available. The code is capable of treating clusters or bulk structures of insulators, semiconductors, metals and magnetic materials, with general symmetry. The present version performs self-consistent electronic structure, total energy and force calculations within the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). It also does automatic structure optimization and ab initio molecular dynamics. Calculations demonstrating the capabilities of the code are presented. Further information may be found on our web-site (http://cst- www.nrl.navy.mil/people/singh/planewave/).

  4. Periodontal Treatment Protocol (PTP) for the general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Larry A; Davis, Karen; Cobb, Charles M

    2008-10-01

    A sequence of interrelated steps is inherent to effective periodontal treatment: early and accurate diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and continued periodontal maintenance and monitoring. A primary goal of periodontal therapy is to reduce the burden of pathogenic bacteria and thereby reduce the potential for progressive inflammation and recurrence of disease. Emerging evidence of possible perio-systemic links further reinforces the need for good periodontal health. In the private practice setting, the treatment of patients with periodontal disease is best accomplished within the structure of a uniform and consistent Periodontal Treatment Protocol (PTP). Such a protocol would reinforce accurate and timely diagnosis, treatment needs based on a specific diagnosis, and continual assessment and monitoring of outcomes. This is best achieved if everyone in the practice setting has a general understanding of the etiology of periodontal diseases, the benefits of treatment, and potential consequences of nontreatment. Communication skills and patient education are vital components of effective therapy since slight and even moderate stages of the disease often have few noticeable symptoms to the patient. Accurate documentation and reporting of procedures for dental insurance reimbursement, coupled with scheduling considerations, assist general practice settings in effectively managing the increasing volume of patients that can benefit from early diagnosis and treatment of periodontal diseases. This article presents the essential elements of a PTP including diagnosis, treatment planning, implementation of therapy, assessment and monitoring of therapy, insurance coding, introduction of the patient to periodontal therapy, and enhanced verbal skills. In addition, considerations for implementation of adjunctive local delivery antimicrobials is presented.

  5. Educational assessment of general practice experience for psychiatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, T; MacDonald, L; Sibbald, B; Gask, L; Roberts, G

    1995-03-01

    Eighteen psychiatric trainees spent 6 months each as general practice trainees. The educational impact of the experience was assessed by a self-assessment questionnaire, a semi-structured interview and a videotaped interview with a psychiatric patient. Each assessment was conducted at a baseline and after 12 months. A control group of 14 trainees was recruited from the same rotation. On the self-assessment questionnaire, the study registrars rated their abilities to solve general medical problems significantly improved compared to controls. They had also acquired greater understanding of the limitation of their knowledge and their legal responsibilities towards their patients. The semi-structured interview failed to distinguish between the two groups. Videotapes for rating at baseline and follow-up were available for only 17 of the trainees. Assessment of the tapes used the Maguire Scale and the Interview Behaviour Scale. Neither scale demonstrated any intervention effect. The interviews were all characterized by a preponderance of 'closed psychological' and 'checking-out' questions. It appears that psychiatric trainees' interviewing styles had not been influenced by the experience. This study suggests that psychiatric trainees gain greater confidence in their role as a doctor and greater understanding of the scope and nature of general practice by such an attachment. It is unclear whether or not supplementary interviewing skills had been acquired which were not utilized in the taped interview, which conforms very much to traditional psychiatric examination behaviour. Trainees were reassured that they had increased their knowledge without losing any of their specific professional skills.

  6. Time Dependent Coupled Cluster Approach to Resonance Raman Excitation Profiles from General Anharmonic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Durga Prasad

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A time dependent coupled cluster approach to the calculation of Resonance Raman excitation profiles on general anharmonic surfaces is presented. The vibrational wave functions on the ground electronic surface are obtained by the coupled cluster method (CCM. It is shown that the propagation of the vibrational ground state on the upper surface is equivalent to propagation of the vacuum state by an effective hamiltonian generated by the similarity transformation of the vibrational hamiltonian of that surface by the CCM wave operator of the lower surface up to a normalization constant. This time propagation is carried out by the time-dependent coupled cluster method in a time dependent frame. Numerical studies are presented to asses the validity of the approach.

  7. [General anaesthesia in children: a French survey of practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, I; Louvet, N; Guye, M-L; Sabourdin, N

    2012-09-01

    The practice of pediatric anesthesia requires a regular update of scientific knowledge and technical skills. To provide the most adequate Continuing Medical Education programs, it is necessary to assess the practices of pediatric anesthesiologists. Thus, the objective of this survey was to draw a picture of the current clinical practices of general anesthesia in children, in France. One thousand one hundred and fifty questionnaires were given to anesthesiologists involved in pediatric cases. These questionnaires collected information on various aspects of clinical practice relative to induction, maintenance, recovery from general anaesthesia and also classical debated points such as children with Upper Respiratory Infection (URI), emergence agitation, epileptoid signs or anaesthetic management of adenoidectomy. Differences in practices between CHG (general hospital), CHU (teaching hospital), LIBERAL (private) and PSPH (semi-private) hospitals were investigated. There were 1025 questionnaires completed. Fifty-five percent of responders worked in public hospitals (CHG and CHU); 77% had a practice that was 25% or less of pediatric cases. In children from 3 to 10 years: 72% of respondents used always premedication and two thirds performed inhalation induction in more than 50% of cases. For induction, 53% used sevoflurane (SEVO) at 7 or 8%. Respondents from LIBERAL used higher SEVO concentrations. Tracheal intubation was performed with SEVO alone (37%), SEVO and propofol (55%) and SEVO with myorelaxant (8%), 93% of respondents used a bolus of opioid. For maintenance, the majority of respondents used SEVO associated with sufentanil; desflurane and remifentanil were more frequently used in CHU. Two thirds of respondents used N(2)O. Depth of anesthesia was commonly assessed by hemodynamic changes (52%), end tidal concentration of halogenated (38%) or automated devices based on EEG (7%). In children with URI, 98% of respondents used SEVO for anesthesia. To control the

  8. Collaborative care for depression in general practice: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Mikkelsen, John Hagel; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Lundsteen, Merete; Csillag, Claudio; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-07-21

    Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an "active ingredient" in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression in general practice than standard detection. The trial is a cluster-randomised, clinical superiority trial investigating the effect of treatment according to the Collabri model for CC, compared to treatment as usual for 480 participants diagnosed with depression in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is depression symptoms (Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II)) after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include depression symptoms (BDI-II) after 15 months, anxiety symptoms (Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI)), level of functioning (Global Assessment of Function (GAF)) and psychological stress (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R)). In addition, case finding (with the recommended screening tool Major Depression Inventory (MDI)) and standard detection of depression is examined in a cluster-randomized controlled design. Here, the primary outcome is the positive predictive value of referral diagnosis. If the Collabri model is shown to be superior to treatment as usual, the study will contribute with important knowledge on how to improve treatment of depression in

  9. Improving population-based cervical cancer screening in general practice : effects of a national strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Mulder, J; Tacken, M A; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a Dutch national prevention programme, aimed at general practitioners (GPs), on the adherence to organizational guidelines for effective cervical cancer screening in general practice. To identify the characteristics of general practices determining success. DESIGN

  10. Prevalence of myofascial pain in general internal medicine practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Skootsky, S A; Jaeger, B; Oye, R K

    1989-01-01

    Myofascial pain is a regional pain syndrome characterized in part by a trigger point in a taut band of skeletal muscle and its associated referred pain. We examined a series of 172 patients presenting to a university primary care general internal medicine practice. Of 54 patients whose reason for a visit included pain, 16 (30%) satisfied criteria for a clinical diagnosis of myofascial pain. These patients were similar in age and sex to other patients with pain, and the frequency of pain as a ...

  11. Data Content and Exchange in General Practice: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalankesh, Leila R; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa; Rahimi, Niloofar

    2014-01-01

    Background: efficient communication of data is inevitable requirement for general practice. Any issue in data content and its exchange among GP and other related entities hinders continuity of patient care. Methods: literature search for this review was conducted on three electronic databases including Medline, Scopus and Science Direct. Results: through reviewing papers, we extracted information on the GP data content, use cases of GP information exchange, its participants, tools and methods, incentives and barriers. Conclusion: considering importance of data content and exchange for GP systems, it seems that more research is needed to be conducted toward providing a comprehensive framework for data content and exchange in GP systems. PMID:25648317

  12. Response to intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S

    1996-06-08

    The object of this study was to grade the response of patients undergoing a variety of dental procedures with the aid of intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice and to explore any relationships between the patients preoperative anxiety assessment and the clinician's assessment of co-operation whilst under sedation. One hundred consecutive patients aged between 18 and 58 years (mean 32 years; sd 10 years) and in ASA Class I or II were prospectively studied. Results showed that despite attempts to grade patient's behaviour it was not possible to reliably predict patient's responses under intravenous sedation. In addition to these findings, the great individual variation in sensitivity to midazolam was confirmed.

  13. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines on general anaesthesia for emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadegaard Jensen, Anders; Callesen, T; Hagemo, J S;

    2010-01-01

    Emergency patients need special considerations and the number and severity of complications from general anaesthesia can be higher than during scheduled procedures. Guidelines are therefore needed. The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care...... Medicine appointed a working group to develop guidelines based on literature searches to assess evidence, and a consensus meeting was held. Consensus opinion was used in the many topics where high-grade evidence was unavailable. The recommendations include the following: anaesthesia for emergency patients...

  14. Risk Reduction Technologies in General Practice and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Rexvid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available General practitioners (GPs and social workers (SWs are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT. It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed in that GPs were sceptical whilst SWs took a more pragmatic view. Furthermore the results suggest that SWs might experience professional benefits by adopting an adherent approach to the increased dissemination of risk reduction technologies (RRT. GPs, however, did not seem to experience such benefits. Keywords: Profession, risk, social worker, general practitioner, risk reduction technologies, evidence-based practice/medicine 

  15. [Cannabis use: what to do in general practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Victoire; Rolland, Benjamin; Messaadi, Nassir; Petit, Aymeric; Cottencin, Olivier; Karila, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use is now more frequent than alcohol drinking or tobacco smoking among young people (15-34years), whereas it may induce numerous medical aftermaths. Identifying and assessing cannabis use in general practice have become a current public health issue. The two steps of screening consist in spotting risky use of cannabis, and then in checking criteria for cannabis use disorder (CUD). Risky use requires a "brief intervention" by the general practitioner (GP). In case of CUD, the new DSM-5 criteria allow measuring the severity of the subsequent disorder, and listing the medical and social consequences. Using these criteria can help the GP to decide when the patient should be referred to an addiction-specialized unit. The GP has also to spot the different physical and psychiatric complications of cannabis use, in order to coordinate care between the different specialists.

  16. Practice nurses in general practice: a rapidly growing profession in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Noordman, J.; Korevaar, J.; Dorsman, S.W.; Hingstman, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Bakker, D. de

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 1999, nurse practitioners were introduced. The main objectives were to improve quality of care for chronic ill and to reduce workload of general practitioners. In ten years the number of practice nurses has grown tremendously. Meanwhile there are new tasks as a result of aging. Practi

  17. The management of otitis externa in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabla, L; Jindal, M; Latif, K

    2012-03-01

    Acute otitis externa is common and provides a heavy workload for general practitioners. We aim to determine the first-line treatment used by general practitioners in the management of otitis externa and subsequent second-line treatment in a hospital ENT clinic. In addition, this study aims to ascertain whether local and national guidelines are being followed appropriately. A prospective observational study on the management of otitis externa in consecutive patients referred to an ENT emergency clinic was undertaken. Data were collected and analysed on symptoms, initial management by general practitioners, findings and treatment in the ENT clinic. A total of 106 patients were studied. The mean duration of symptoms before presentation to clinic was 13 days; 42% of patients received no treatment by their GP prior to referral to the ENT emergency clinic. Only 14% of patients received topical antibiotics alone, whilst 44% received oral antibiotics, either alone or in conjunction with topical antibiotics by their GP. Of the 106 patients, 86% received topical antibiotics in the ENT emergency clinic and oral antibiotics were reserved for those presenting with complicated acute otitis externa. Topical antibiotics are associated with a decrease in disease persistence, whilst oral antibiotics are associated with an increase. However, general practitioners are prescribing oral antibiotics more often than required. There are few regional guidelines and no explicit national guidelines on the management of acute otitis externa for GPs to refer to. We suggest the implementation of national guidelines to aid clinical practice.

  18. Open Access to General Practice Was Associated with Burnout among General Practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Walk-in open access in general practice may influence the general practitioner's (GP's) work, but very little research has been done on the consequences. In this study from Danish general practice, we compare the prevalence of burnout between GPs with a walk-in open access and those without....... In a questionnaire study (2004), we approached all 458 active GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, and 376 (82.8%) GPs returned the questionnaire. Walk-in open access was defined as at least 30 minutes every weekday where patients could attend practice without an appointment. Burnout was measured by the Maslach...... of GPs. In all, 8% of GPs had open access and the prevalence of burnout was 24%. GPs with walk-in open access were more likely to suffer from burnout. Having open access was associated with a 3-fold increased likelihood of burnout (OR = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.1-8.8, P = 0.035)). Although the design cannot...

  19. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice: impact of an educational programme delivered on location in Danish general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse; Olsen, Kim Rose; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD guidelines. A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted of a 3-hr teaching lesson with a respiratory specialist and five visits by a representative from the sponsoring pharmaceutical company focusing on assessment and management of patients including written algorithms. A one-to-one propensity-matched control group of practices was selected. Register data were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed. Participating clinics had a significant increase in preventive consultations and influenza vaccinations (ppractices may improve adherence to COPD guidelines, not least for clinics with a high potential for improvement.

  20. Generalized linear models with coarsened covariates: a practical Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy R; Wiest, Michelle M

    2014-06-01

    Coarsened covariates are a common and sometimes unavoidable phenomenon encountered in statistical modeling. Covariates are coarsened when their values or categories have been grouped. This may be done to protect privacy or to simplify data collection or analysis when researchers are not aware of their drawbacks. Analyses with coarsened covariates based on ad hoc methods can compromise the validity of inferences. One valid method for accounting for a coarsened covariate is to use a marginal likelihood derived by summing or integrating over the unknown realizations of the covariate. However, algorithms for estimation based on this approach can be tedious to program and can be computationally expensive. These are significant obstacles to their use in practice. To overcome these limitations, we show that when expressed as a Bayesian probability model, a generalized linear model with a coarsened covariate can be posed as a tractable missing data problem where the missing data are due to censoring. We also show that this model is amenable to widely available general-purpose software for simulation-based inference for Bayesian probability models, providing researchers a very practical approach for dealing with coarsened covariates.

  1. Space station ECLSS integration analysis: Simplified General Cluster Systems Model, ECLS System Assessment Program enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The data base verification of the ECLS Systems Assessment Program (ESAP) was documented and changes made to enhance the flexibility of the water recovery subsystem simulations are given. All changes which were made to the data base values are described and the software enhancements performed. The refined model documented herein constitutes the submittal of the General Cluster Systems Model. A source listing of the current version of ESAP is provided in Appendix A.

  2. Poetry in general practice education: perceptions of learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William; Freeman, Elaine

    2008-08-01

    There has been little research into poetry-based medical education. Few studies consider learners' perceptions in depth. To explore general practice registrars' (GPRs) perceptions of two poetry-based sessions. GPRs in one general practice vocational training scheme experienced two poetry sessions. In one, the facilitator selected poems; in the other, poems were chosen by registrars. Poems were read and discussed, with emphasis on personal response. Data were obtained through in-depth semi-structured interviews with six registrars. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Identification of individual ideas and shared themes enabled exploration of the registrars' experiences. Registrars described how poetry helped them explore emotional territory. They recognized a broadening of education, describing how poems helped them consider different points of view, increasing their understanding of others. Vicarious experience, development of empathy and self-discovery were also reported. Participants speculated on how this might impact on patient care and professional practice. Facilitator-selected poems provided variety and ambiguity, provoking discussions with clinical relevance. Learner-selected poems enabled involvement, self-revelation and understanding of peers and developed emotional expression. These registrars reported difficulties expressing feelings in the culture of science-based medical training. Poetry sessions may provide an environment for emotional exploration, which could broaden understanding of self and others. Poetry-based education may develop emotional competence. The participants recognized development of key skills including close reading, attentive listening and interpretation of meaning. These skills may help doctors to understand individual patient's unique experience of illness, encouraging personalized care that respects patients' perspectives.

  3. Joint inversion of multiple geophysical and petrophysical data using generalized fuzzy clustering algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiajia; Li, Yaoguo

    2017-02-01

    Joint inversion that simultaneously inverts multiple geophysical data sets to recover a common Earth model is increasingly being applied to exploration problems. Petrophysical data can serve as an effective constraint to link different physical property models in such inversions. There are two challenges, among others, associated with the petrophysical approach to joint inversion. One is related to the multimodality of petrophysical data because there often exist more than one relationship between different physical properties in a region of study. The other challenge arises from the fact that petrophysical relationships have different characteristics and can exhibit point, linear, quadratic, or exponential forms in a crossplot. The fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique is effective in tackling the first challenge and has been applied successfully. We focus on the second challenge in this paper and develop a joint inversion method based on variations of the FCM clustering technique. To account for the specific shapes of petrophysical relationships, we introduce several different fuzzy clustering algorithms that are capable of handling different shapes of petrophysical relationships. We present two synthetic and one field data examples and demonstrate that, by choosing appropriate distance measures for the clustering component in the joint inversion algorithm, the proposed joint inversion method provides an effective means of handling common petrophysical situations we encounter in practice. The jointly inverted models have both enhanced structural similarity and increased petrophysical correlation, and better represent the subsurface in the spatial domain and the parameter domain of physical properties.

  4. Weight management in general practice: what do patients want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Daisy; Zwar, Nicholas A; Dennis, Sarah M; Vagholkar, Sanjyot

    2006-07-17

    To explore patients' views of the role of general practitioners in weight management. Waiting-room questionnaire survey, including measurement of height, weight and waist circumference, May-August 2005. 227 patients from five general practices located in metropolitan and rural New South Wales. Patients' views on: the role of GPs in weight management; the usefulness of weight-loss strategies; and the likelihood of following the GP's advice about weight loss. Most patients (78%) felt that GPs had a role in weight management, but only 46% thought that GPs would be able to spend enough time to provide effective weight loss advice. Over 80% of patients perceived advice on healthy eating and physical activity to be useful or very useful, and were likely to follow weight-loss recommendations; 78% were in favour of regular review. Patients indicated they would be less likely to see a dietitian or to attend information sessions, and unlikely to take weight-loss medication. Views of overweight and obese patients were generally similar to those of normal weight patients, but there were significant differences in perceptions of the usefulness of information on weight and weight-related medical conditions, as well as willingness to change lifestyle, possibly reflecting resistance to change among obese or overweight patients. These findings have implications for the design of primary care interventions for managing obesity.

  5. The Effects of Cluster-Based Mentoring Programme on Classroom Teaching Practices: Lessons from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Meher; Nagy, Philip

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents and evaluates a teacher training approach called the cluster-based mentoring programme (CBMP) for the professional development of government primary school teachers in Pakistan. The study sought to find differences in the teaching practices between districts where the CBMP was used (intervention) and control districts where it…

  6. An inclusive approach to raising standards in general practice: working with a 'community of practice' in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox Helen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we explored the challenges to establishing a community of practice (CoP to address standards in general practice. We focused on the issue of improving referral letters which are the main form of communication between general practitioners (GPs and specialists. There is evidence to suggest that the information relayed to specialists at the time of referral could be improved. Methods We aimed to develop a community of practice consisting of GPs in Western Australia to improve the quality of referral letters to six specialty clinics. Three phases included: establishing the CoP, monitoring the progress of the CoP and sustaining and managing the CoP. The CoP's activity centred on referral letters to each of six selected specialties. A local measure for the quality of the referral letters was developed from a survey of participants about specific items of history and weighted for their perceived importance in the referral letter. Referral letters by participants written before and after the benchmarking exercise were scored for quality based on the standards set by the CoP. Feedback to participants regarding the 'quality' of their individual referrals was provided by a nominated member of the CoP, including a comparison of before and after scores. Results 15 GPs were recruited. Only five GPs submitted referral letters both before and after benchmarking. The five GPs that participated in both study phases submitted a total of 102 referral letters (53 before and 49 after. There was a 26 point (95% CI 11–41 improvement in the average scores of the second set of letters after taking clustering by speciality into account, indicating the quality of referral letters improved substantially after feedback. Conclusion There are many challenges to forming a CoP to focus on improving a specific issue in general practice. However we were able to demonstrate that those practitioners who participated in all aspects of the project

  7. Dealing with uncertainty in general practice: an essential skill for the general practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, Margaret; Dahinden, André; Aktürk, Zekeriya; Ortiz, José Miguel Bueno; Dağdeviren, Nezih; Elwyn, Glyn; Micallef, Adrian; Murtonen, Mikko; Samuelson, Marianne; Struk, Per; Tayar, Danny; Thesen, Janecke

    2011-01-01

    Many patients attending general practice do not have an obvious diagnosis at presentation. Skills to deal with uncertainty are particularly important in general practice as undifferentiated and unorganised problems are a common challenge for general practitioners (GPs). This paper describes the management of uncertainty as an essential skill which should be included in educational programmes for both trainee and established GPs. Philosophers, psychologists and sociologists use different approaches to the conceptualisation of managing uncertainty. The literature on dealing with uncertainty focuses largely on identifying relevant evidence and decision making. Existing models of the consultation should be improved in order to understand consultations involving uncertainty. An alternative approach focusing on shared decision making and understanding the consultation from the patient's perspective is suggested. A good doctor-patient relationship is vital, creating trust and mutual respect, developed over time with good communication skills. Evidence-based medicine should be used, including discussion of probabilities where available. Trainers need to be aware of their own use of heuristics as they act as role models for trainees. Expression of feelings by trainees should be encouraged and acknowledged by trainers as a useful tool in dealing with uncertainty. Skills to deal with uncertainty should be regarded as quality improvement tools and included in educational programmes involving both trainee and established GPs.

  8. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hombergh, P. van den; Kunzi, B.; Elwyn, G.; Doremalen, J.H.M. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data fr

  9. Determinants related to gender differences in general practice utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Andersen, John Sahl; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the determinants related to gender differences in the GP utilization in Danish population aged 50-65 years. DESIGN: Cohort-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish general practice. SUBJECTS: Totally, 54,849 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer...... explain a large proportion, but not all of the gender difference in GP utilization. Medical conditions (somatic and mental) and unemployment are the main determinants of GP utilization in men and women, while lifestyle has minor effect. Key points: Female gender remained a dominant determinant of GP...... utilization, after adjustment for lifestyle, socio-demography, medical and gender specific factors, with females consulting their GP 18% more often than males. Female reproductive factors (use of postmenopausal hormone therapy and gravidity) explained a large proportion of the gender variation in use of GP...

  10. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  11. The motivation to teach as a registrar in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampy, Harish; Agius, Steven; Allery, Lynne A

    2013-07-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) states that teaching should be an integral part of the doctor's role and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) have incorporated teaching outcomes into the GP training curriculum. However, there are suggestions that the teaching role of a GP trainee declines as they move from hospital posts to the registrar community year. Using doctors in training as near-peer tutors offers multiple advantages. Trainees themselves benefit as teaching others is a strong driver of the tutor's own learning. In addition there are also practical incentives to mobilising this under-utilised pool of primary care clinical teachers given the continuing shift of focusing medical education in the community. This study forms part of a larger body of work exploring the attitudes and perceived learning needs of GP registrars with regards to developing a teaching role. A primary area of investigation was trainees' motivation to teach. This paper describes our attempts to establish: a) how strongly motivated are GP registrars to take on teaching roles? b) in consequence how strongly motivated are they to learn more about teaching? c) what are the factors which affect motivation to teach? Three themes emerged from the data. First, teaching was felt to be of low priority in comparison to competing clinical learning needs. Secondly, the clinical dominance to both formative and summative assessment during training further compounded this situation. Thirdly, registrars identified a number of practical barriers and incentives that influenced their teaching engagement. This included potential negative views from trainers as to their trainee's ability and requirement to be involved with teaching activities.By understanding and addressing these issues, it is hoped that GP trainees' engagement with teaching activities can be better engendered with subsequent benefits for both the trainee and those they teach.

  12. Economic evaluation of an implementation strategy for the management of low back pain in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Riis, Allan; Petersen, Karin Dam; Jensen, Martin Bach; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller

    2017-05-01

    In connection with the publication of a clinical practice guideline on the management of low back pain (LBP) in general practice in Denmark, a cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted. In this trial, a multifaceted guideline implementation strategy to improve general practitioners' treatment of patients with LBP was compared with a usual implementation strategy. The aim was to determine whether the multifaceted strategy was cost effective, as compared with the usual implementation strategy. The economic evaluation was conducted as a cost-utility analysis where cost collected from a societal perspective and quality-adjusted life years were used as outcome measures. The analysis was conducted as a within-trial analysis with a 12-month time horizon consistent with the follow-up period of the clinical trial. To adjust for a priori selected covariates, generalised linear models with a gamma family were used to estimate incremental costs and quality-adjusted life years. Furthermore, both deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results showed that costs associated with primary health care were higher, whereas secondary health care costs were lower for the intervention group when compared with the control group. When adjusting for covariates, the intervention was less costly, and there was no significant difference in effect between the 2 groups. Sensitivity analyses showed that results were sensitive to uncertainty. In conclusion, the multifaceted implementation strategy was cost saving when compared with the usual strategy for implementing LBP clinical practice guidelines in general practice. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in effect, and the estimate was sensitive to uncertainty.

  13. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, Lasse (Finnish Forest Research Inst. (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, Agneta H. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Straalberg, Elisabeth (Inst. Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-01-15

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  14. Parenting styles, feeding styles and food-related parenting practices in relation to toddlers’ eating styles: A cluster-analytic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleddens, Ester F. C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Toddlers’ eating behaviors are influenced by the way parents interact with their children. The objective of this study was to explore how five major constructs of general parenting behavior cluster in parents of toddlers. These parenting clusters were further explored to see how they differed in the use of feeding strategies (i.e. feeding styles and food parenting practices) and by reported child eating styles. Methods An online survey with 1005 mothers/caregivers (legal guardians) with at least one child between 12 and 36 months old was conducted in the United States in 2012, assessing general parenting behavior, feeding style, food parenting practices and the child eating styles. Results A three cluster solution of parenting style was found and clusters were labelled as overprotective/supervising, authoritarian, and authoritative. The clusters differed in terms of general parenting behaviors. Both overprotective and authoritative clusters showed high scores on structure, behavioral control, and nurturance. The overprotective cluster scored high on overprotection. The ‘authoritarian’ cluster showed lowest levels of nurturance, structure and behavioral control. Overprotective and authoritative parents showed very similar patterns in the use of food parenting practices, e.g. monitoring food intake, modeling, and promoting healthy food intake and availability at home. Overprotective parents also reported higher use of pressure to eat and involvement. Authoritarian parents reported high use of giving the child control over their food behaviors, emotion regulation, using food as a reward, and controlling food intake for weight control. Children’s eating styles did not largely vary by parenting cluster. Conclusion This study showed that a relatively new parenting style of overprotection is relevant for children’s eating behaviors. Overprotective parents reported food parenting practices that are known to be beneficial for children’s food intake

  15. Parenting styles, feeding styles and food-related parenting practices in relation to toddlers' eating styles: A cluster-analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Klazine; Sleddens, Ester F C

    2017-01-01

    Toddlers' eating behaviors are influenced by the way parents interact with their children. The objective of this study was to explore how five major constructs of general parenting behavior cluster in parents of toddlers. These parenting clusters were further explored to see how they differed in the use of feeding strategies (i.e. feeding styles and food parenting practices) and by reported child eating styles. An online survey with 1005 mothers/caregivers (legal guardians) with at least one child between 12 and 36 months old was conducted in the United States in 2012, assessing general parenting behavior, feeding style, food parenting practices and the child eating styles. A three cluster solution of parenting style was found and clusters were labelled as overprotective/supervising, authoritarian, and authoritative. The clusters differed in terms of general parenting behaviors. Both overprotective and authoritative clusters showed high scores on structure, behavioral control, and nurturance. The overprotective cluster scored high on overprotection. The 'authoritarian' cluster showed lowest levels of nurturance, structure and behavioral control. Overprotective and authoritative parents showed very similar patterns in the use of food parenting practices, e.g. monitoring food intake, modeling, and promoting healthy food intake and availability at home. Overprotective parents also reported higher use of pressure to eat and involvement. Authoritarian parents reported high use of giving the child control over their food behaviors, emotion regulation, using food as a reward, and controlling food intake for weight control. Children's eating styles did not largely vary by parenting cluster. This study showed that a relatively new parenting style of overprotection is relevant for children's eating behaviors. Overprotective parents reported food parenting practices that are known to be beneficial for children's food intake, such as modelling healthy food intake, as well as

  16. Setting goal and implementation intentions in consultations between practice nurses and patients with overweight or obesity in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, van S.; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with overweight or obesity increasingly attend general practice, which is an ideal setting for weight-loss counselling. The present study is the first to investigate the quality of weight-loss counselling provided by practice nurses in general practice to patients with overweight

  17. Setting goal and implementation intentions in consultations between practice nurses and patients with overweight or obesity in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with overweight or obesity increasingly attend general practice, which is an ideal setting for weight-loss counselling. The present study is the first to investigate the quality of weight-loss counselling provided by practice nurses in general practice to patients with overweight

  18. Setting goal and implementation intentions in consultations between practice nurses and patients with overweight or obesity in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with overweight or obesity increasingly attend general practice, which is an ideal setting for weight-loss counselling. The present study is the first to investigate the quality of weight-loss counselling provided by practice nurses in general practice to patients with overweight

  19. Moderately overweight and obese patients in general practice: a population based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuit Albertine J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a main threat to public health in the Western world and is associated with diseases such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases. Up to now a minority of research studied the relation between obesity and the use of primary health care. In the Netherlands the general practitioner (GP is the main primary health care provider. The objective of this article is to evaluate GP consultation and prescription of drugs in moderate and severely overweight (obese persons in the Netherlands. Methods Data were used from a representative survey of morbidity in Dutch general practice in 2001. Our study sample consisted of 8,944 adult respondents (18+ years who participated in an extensive health interview. Interview data were linked to morbidity and prescription registration data from 95 general practices where respondents were listed. Body mass index (BMI was calculated using self-reported height and weight. Analyses were controlled for clustering within practices as well as for socio-demographic and life style characteristics. Results Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 was observed in 8.9% of men and 12.4% of women; for moderate overweight (BMI 25- Conclusion Obesity increases the workload of Dutch general practitioners and the use of prescribed medication. The current increase in the prevalence of obesity will further increase the use of health care and related costs. Since a large majority of Dutch persons visit their GP over the course of one year, GPs' potential role in effective prevention strategies cannot be denied.

  20. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, R; Kavanagh, R; Coughlan, R J; Carey, J J

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant's confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant's self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  1. A study of the safety of tenoxicam in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, D; Waterworth, R F

    1989-11-08

    An open, noncomparative study was undertaken to examine the safety of tenoxicam, a new nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) in general practice. One thousand two hundred and sixty-seven patients with rheumatic conditions were recruited by 392 general practitioners throughout New Zealand. Forty-three point six percent of patients recruited were over 65 years of age, 62.5% had some form of concomitant disease and 76.3% of patients were already receiving NSAIDs. Three hundred and four (23.9%) patients experienced adverse drug reactions, the commonest being gastrointestinal (11.4%), central and peripheral nervous system disorders (2.8%) and skin reactions (2.5%). The profile of adverse drug reactions in those more than 65 was similar to those in patients under 65 years. Of the reactions reported, 14.7% were considered severe. Three peptic ulcers were reported. There were no unexpected adverse drug reactions. Eight hundred and forty-nine patients completed 6 months treatment. Subjective assessments of overall efficacy, pain at night, pain on movement and stiffness made before treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months posttreatment showed that tenoxicam significantly improved all parameters. The clinical response was maintained throughout the 6 month study period and was not different in patients less than or greater than 65 years.

  2. The role of culture in the general practice consultation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nasreen; Atkin, Karl; Neal, Richard

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, we will examine the importance of culture and ethnicity in the general practice consultation process. Good communication is associated with positive health outcomes. We will, by presenting qualitative material from an empirical study, examine the way in which communication within the context of a general practitioner (GP) consultation may be affected by ethnicity and cultural factors. The aim of the study was to provide a detailed understanding of the ways in which white and South Asian patients communicate with white GPs and to explore any similarities and differences in communication. This paper reports on South Asian and white patients' explanations of recent videotaped consultations with their GP. We specifically focus on the ways in which issues of ethnic identity impacted upon the GP consultation process, by exploring how our sample of predominantly white GPs interacted with their South Asian patients and the extent to which the GP listened to the patients' needs, gave patients information, engaged in social conversation and showed friendliness. We then go on to examine patients' suggestions on improvements (if any) to the consultation. We conclude, by showing how a non-essentialist understanding of culture helps to comprehend the consultation process when the patients are from Great Britain's ethnicised communities. Our findings, however, raise generic issues of relevance to all multi-racial and multi-ethnic societies.

  3. The importance of gender of patients and general practitioners in relation to treatment practices for overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Jeanett Friis; Hessner, Marie Vik; Lous, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    and treatment practices among Danish general practitioners (GPs), in relation to treatment of overweight, while taking gender of both the patients and practitioners into account. DESIGN: Questionnaire inventory covertly examining attitudes and practices among Danish general practitioners towards treatment...

  4. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care : data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wayenburg, CAM; van de Laar, FA; de Waal, MWM; Okkes, IM; van den Akker, M; van der Veen, WJ; Schellevis, FG; van Staveren, WA; van Binsbergen, JJ; van Weel, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care (

  5. [Summary of the practice guideline 'Thyroid disorders' (first revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, J. van; Wessels, P.; Rijswijk, E. van; Boer, A.M; Wiersma, A.; Goudswaard, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    --The practice guideline 'Thyroid disorders' developed by the Dutch College of General Practitioners replaces the practice guideline 'Functional thyroid disorders' from 1996. Recommendations for palpable thyroid disorders have been added. --Hypothyroidism can often be treated by the general practiti

  6. Variation in spirometry utilization between trained general practitioners in practices equipped with a spirometer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.E.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Jacobs, A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hartman, J.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore spirometry utilization among general practitioners and identify practitioner and practice-related factors associated with spirometry utilization. DESIGN: Multivariate multilevel cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey. SETTING: Some 61 general practices involved in a

  7. Variation in examination and treatment offers to patients with allergic diseases in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Munck, Anders Peter

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge about practice characteristics associated with the spectrum of examination and treatment offered in general practice are important for organisational planning. We aimed to analyse physician and practice characteristics associated with examination and treatment offered in gen...

  8. Assessing correlation of clustered mixed outcomes from a multivariate generalized linear mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Wehrly, Thomas E

    2015-02-20

    The classic concordance correlation coefficient measures the agreement between two variables. In recent studies, concordance correlation coefficients have been generalized to deal with responses from a distribution from the exponential family using the univariate generalized linear mixed model. Multivariate data arise when responses on the same unit are measured repeatedly by several methods. The relationship among these responses is often of interest. In clustered mixed data, the correlation could be present between repeated measurements either within the same observer or between different methods on the same subjects. Indices for measuring such association are needed. This study proposes a series of indices, namely, intra-correlation, inter-correlation, and total correlation coefficients to measure the correlation under various circumstances in a multivariate generalized linear model, especially for joint modeling of clustered count and continuous outcomes. The proposed indices are natural extensions of the concordance correlation coefficient. We demonstrate the methodology with simulation studies. A case example of osteoarthritis study is provided to illustrate the use of these proposed indices. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A comparison of disease prevalence in general practice in the Netherlands and in England & Wales.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, D.; Schellevis, F.; Linden, M. van der; Westert, G.

    2006-01-01

    General practice-based morbidity surveys have been conducted in the Netherlands and in England and Wales primarily to estimate disease prevalence and examine health inequalities. We have compared disease prevalence in general practice reported in the second Dutch Natinal Survey of General Practice (

  10. A comparison of disease prevalence in general practice in the Netherlands and in England & Wales.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, D.; Schellevis, F.; Linden, M. van der; Westert, G.

    2006-01-01

    General practice-based morbidity surveys have been conducted in the Netherlands and in England and Wales primarily to estimate disease prevalence and examine health inequalities. We have compared disease prevalence in general practice reported in the second Dutch Natinal Survey of General Practice (

  11. The contribution of demographic and morbidity factors to self-reported visit frequency of patients: a cross-sectional study of general practice patients in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Helena

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the factors that affect patients' utilisation of health services is important for health service provision and effective patient management. This study aimed to investigate the specific morbidity and demographic factors related to the frequency with which general practice patients visit a general practitioner/family physician (GP in Australia. Methods A sub-study was undertaken as part of an ongoing national study of general practice activity in Australia. A cluster sample of 10,755 general practice patients were surveyed through a random sample of 379 general practitioners. The patient reported the number of times he/she had visited a general practitioner in the previous twelve months. The GP recorded all the patient's major health problems, including those managed at the current consultation. Results Patients reported an average of 8.8 visits to a general practitioner per year. After adjusting for other patient demographics and number of health problems, concession health care card holders made on average 2.6 more visits per year to a general practitioner than did non-card holders (p Conclusions Anxiety, back pain and depression are associated with greater patient demand for general practice services than other health problems. The effect of sociodemographic factors on patient utilisation of general practice services is complex. Equity of access to general practice services remains an issue for patients from remote areas, while concession health care card holders are attending general practice more frequently than other patients relative to their number of health problems.

  12. General transformation of α cluster model wave function to jj-coupling shell model in various 4N nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, N.; Matsuno, H.; Suhara, T.

    2016-09-01

    The antisymmetrized quasi-cluster model (AQCM) is a method to describe transitions from the α cluster wave functions to jj-coupling shell model wave functions. In this model, the cluster-shell transition is characterized by only two parameters: R representing the distance between α clusters and Λ describing the breaking of α clusters. The contribution of the spin-orbit interaction, very important in the jj-coupling shell model, can be taken into account starting with the α cluster model wave function. In this article we show the generality of AQCM by extending the application to heavier regions: various 4N nuclei from 4He to 100Sn. The characteristic magic numbers of the jj-coupling shell model, 28 and 50, are described starting with the α cluster model. The competition of two different configurations is discussed in 20Ne (16O + one quasi-cluster and 12C + two quasi-clusters) and 28Si (pentagon shape of five quasi-clusters and 12C + 16O). Also, we compare the energy curves for the α + 40Ca cluster configuration calculated with and without the α breaking effect in 44Ti.

  13. The generalized scaling relations for X-ray galaxy clusters: the most powerful mass proxy

    CERN Document Server

    Ettori, S

    2013-01-01

    The application to observational data of the generalized scaling relations (gSR) presented in Ettori et al. (2012) is here discussed. We extend further the formalism of the gSR in the self-similar model for X-ray galaxy clusters, showing that for a generic relation M_tot ~ L^a M_g^b T^c, where L, M_g and T are the gas luminosity, mass and temperature, respectively, the values of the slopes lay in the plane 4*a+3*b+2*c=3. Using published dataset, we show that some projections of the gSR are the most efficient relations, holding among observed physical X-ray quantities, to recover the cluster mass. This conclusion is based on the evidence that they provide the lowest chi^2, the lowest total scatter and the lowest intrinsic scatter among the studied scaling laws on both galaxy group and cluster mass scales. By the application of the gSR, the intrinsic scatter is reduced in all the cases down to a relative error on M_tot below 16 per cent. The best-fit relations are: M_tot ~ M_g^a T^{1.5-1.5a}, with a~0.4, and M_...

  14. The general mechanisms of Cu cluster formation in the processes of condensation from the gas phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I V Chepkasov; Yu Ya Gafner; S L Gafner; S P Bardakhanov

    2015-06-01

    Technological applications of metallic clusters impose very strict requirements for particle size, shape, structure and defect density. Such geometrical characteristics of nanoparticles are mainly determined by the process of their growth. This work represents the basic mechanisms of cluster formation from the gas phase that has been studied on the example of copper. The process of Cu nanoclusters synthesis has been studied by the moleculardynamics method based on tight-binding potentials. It has been shown that depending on the size and temperature of the initial nanoclusters the process of nanoparticle formation can pass through different basic scenarios. The general conditions of different types of particles formation have been defined and clear dependence of the cluster shape from collision temperature of initial conglomerates has been shown. The simulation results demonstrate a very good agreement with the available experimental data. Thus, it has been shown that depending on the specific application of the synthesized particles or in electronics, where particles of a small size with a spherical shape are required, or in catalytic reactions, where the main factor of effectiveness is the maximum surface area with the help of temperature of the system it is possible to get the realization of a certain frequency of this or that scenario of the shape formation of nanocrystalline particles.

  15. The identification of the general practice registrar needing assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladman G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDoctors undertaking vocational training in general practicein Australia may require assistance, in addition to thenormal training offered as part of their training programme.Issues requiring assistance may go undetected for a periodof time. Delay in the identification of issues leads to delay inthe provision of the assistance. The aim of this study is todetermine the most common reasons registrars requireextra assistance, and how these issues are identified. Thefindings of this study will provide direction for 21 regionallybased training providers (RTPs to develop improved toolsto ensure earlier detection of registrars requiring assistance.MethodThis study is based on qualitative research methods, usingsemi-structured interviews with senior medical educationstaff of four regional general practice training providers inVictoria, Australia.ResultsIssues identified included language and cultural issues,applied knowledge and skills, attitude and professionalism,and health and family issues.The principal method that training providers identifiedissues was via the GP supervisor. This was predominantly byinformal communication, rather than formal evaluationsheets. Other methods included the external clinicalteaching visit and other training formative assessments.These more formalised procedures were more likely toidentify issues later than desired. They were also used as away of clarifying suspected problems. The selection processwas not felt to be helpful, and the examinations providedinformation too late.ConclusionAn increased awareness of the potential issues leading to aregistrar to require assistance enables identification andsubsequent action to occur in a more timely and moreuseful fashion. Informal communication between practicesand training programme staff should be encouraged toenable these issues to be dealt with early in training.

  16. Impact of social prescribing on general practice workload and polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, A M; McCauley, F; McCarron, M O

    2017-07-01

    Social prescribing has emerged as a useful tool for helping patients overcome some of the social and behavioural determinants of poor health. There has been little research on the impact of social prescribing on use of primary healthcare resources. This study sought to determine whether social prescribing activities influenced patient-general practitioner (GP) contacts and polypharmacy. Quality-improvement design with social prescribing activity interventions from an urban general practice in Northern Ireland. Patients over 65 years of age with a chronic condition who attended their GP frequently or had multiple medications were offered a social prescribing activity. Participants' contacts with GP and the new repeat prescriptions before and during the social prescribing activity were measured. The total number of repeat prescriptions per patient was compared at the time of referral and 6-12 months later. Indications for referral, primary diagnoses and reasons for declining participation in a social prescribing activity after referral were prospectively recorded. Sixty-eight patients agreed to participate but only 28 (41%) engaged in a prescribed social activity. There was no statistically significant difference in GP contacts (visits to GP, home visits or telephone calls) or number of new repeat prescriptions between referral and completion of 12 weeks of social prescribing activity. Similarly there was no statistically significant difference in the total number of repeat prescriptions between referral and 6-12 months after social prescribing activity in either intention to treat or per protocol analyses. Social prescribing participants had similar demographic factors. Mental health issues (anxiety and/or depression) were more common among participants than those who were referred but declined participation in a social prescribing activity (P = 0.022). While social prescribing may help patients' self-esteem and well-being, it may not decrease GP workload. Further

  17. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conway, R

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant\\'s confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant\\'s self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  18. Update in Outpatient General Internal Medicine: Practice-Changing Evidence Published in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostek, Jason H; Wieland, Mark L; Post, Jason A; Sundsted, Karna K; Mauck, Karen F

    2016-08-01

    Identifying new practice-changing articles is challenging. To determine the 2015 practice-changing articles most relevant to outpatient general internal medicine, 3 internists independently reviewed the titles and abstracts of original articles, synopses of single studies and syntheses, and databases of syntheses. For original articles, internal medicine journals with the 7 highest impact factors were reviewed: New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), British Medical Journal, Public Library of Science Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and JAMA Internal Medicine. For synopses of single studies and syntheses, collections in American College of Physicians Journal Club, Journal Watch, and Evidence-Based Medicine were reviewed. For databases of synthesis, Evidence Updates and the Cochrane Library were reviewed. More than 100 articles were identified. Criteria for inclusion were as follows: clinical relevance, potential for practice change, and strength of evidence. Clusters of important articles around one topic were considered as a single-candidate series. The 5 authors used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus on inclusion of 7 topics for in-depth appraisal.

  19. The existential dimension in general practice: identifying understandings and experiences of general practitioners in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergaard, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette; Bjerrum, Lars; Gilså Hansen, Dorte; Olesen, Frede; Pedersen, Susanne S; Timm, Helle; Timmermann, Connie; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to identify points of agreement and disagreements among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark concerning how the existential dimension is understood, and when and how it is integrated in the GP-patient encounter. A qualitative methodology with semi-structured focus group interviews was employed. General practice setting in Denmark. Thirty-one GPs from two Danish regions between 38 and 68 years of age participated in seven focus group interviews. Although understood to involve broad life conditions such as present and future being and identity, connectedness to a society and to other people, the existential dimension was primarily reported integrated in connection with life-threatening diseases and death. Furthermore, integration of the existential dimension was characterized as unsystematic and intuitive. Communication about religious or spiritual questions was mostly avoided by GPs due to shyness and perceived lack of expertise. GPs also reported infrequent referrals of patients to chaplains. GPs integrate issues related to the existential dimension in implicit and non-standardized ways and are hindered by cultural barriers. As a way to enhance a practice culture in which GPs pay more explicit attention to the patients' multidimensional concerns, opportunities for professional development could be offered (courses or seminars) that focus on mutual sharing of existential reflections, ideas and communication competencies. Key points Although integration of the existential dimension is recommended for patient care in general practice, little is known about GPs' understanding and integration of this dimension in the GP-patient encounter. The existential dimension is understood to involve broad and universal life conditions having no explicit reference to spiritual or religious aspects. The integration of the existential dimension is delimited to patient cases where life-threatening diseases, life crises and unexplainable patient

  20. Assessment of general education teachers' Tier 1 classroom practices: contemporary science, practice, and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A; Fabiano, Gregory A; Jimerson, Shane R

    2013-12-01

    Progress monitoring is a type of formative assessment. Most work on progress monitoring in elementary school settings has been focused on students. However, teachers also can benefit from frequent evaluations. Research addressing teacher progress monitoring is critically important given the recent national focus on teacher evaluation and effectiveness. This special topic section of School Psychology Quarterly is the first to showcase the current research on measuring Tier 1 instructional and behavioral management practices used by prekindergarten and elementary school teachers in general education settings. The three studies included in the special section describe the development and validation efforts of several teacher observational and self-report measures of instruction and/or behavioral management. These studies provide evidence for the utility of such assessments for documenting the use of classroom practices, and these assessment results may be leveraged in innovative coaching models to promote best practice. These articles also offer insight and ideas for the next generation of teacher practice assessment for the field. Finally, the special topic is capped by a commentary synthesizing the current work and offers "big ideas" for future measurement development, policy, and professional development initiatives. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Bion's 'protomental system' and psychosomatic illness in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, K

    1984-06-01

    The work of Wilfred Bion, developing the psychoanalytic theories of Freud and Klein on the origins of anxiety in childhood, includes the hypothesis of a protomental system. This he defined as a matrix in the human organism in which physical and mental are at first undifferentiated. His postulate is that this system which equips human beings for life in a group is in conflict with their needs as individuals. The view of the world mediated by basic assumptions, relatively mindless, functioning by unconscious common consent, has a close association with psychosomatic illness. But individuals feel the need for a working relationship with others, where thought can be applied to problems before taking action. Within the family--a special case of a work group--the continuing experience by the infant of parental containment of its anxieties, through a process of projection and introjection, develops its capacity for thinking about frustration rather than evading it. The hypothesis is, that without this experience, frustration may lead to basic assumption mentality and psychosomatic illness rather than emotionality and thought. These ideas have been found useful in general practice as in the five cases described.

  2. Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, and Confidence of Australian General Practice Registrars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl A. Nowson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and confidence were assessed in General Practice Registrars (GPRs throughout Australia. Of approximately 6,000 GPRs invited to complete a nutrition survey, 93 respondents (2% completed the online survey, with 89 (20 males, 69 females providing demographic and educational information. Fifty-one percent had graduated from medical school within the last two years. From a list of 11 dietary strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk, respondents selected weight loss (84%, reducing saturated fats (90%, a maximum of two alcoholic drinks/day (82%, and increasing vegetables (83% as “highly appropriate” strategies, with only 51% indicating that salt reduction was “highly appropriate.” Two-thirds of registrars felt “moderately” (51% or “very” confident (16% providing nutrition advice. Most of them (84% recalled receiving information during training, but only 34% recalled having to demonstrate nutritional knowledge. The results indicate that this group of Australian GPRs understood most of the key dietary recommendations for reducing cardiovascular risk but lacked consensus regarding the recommendation to reduce salt intake and expressed mixed levels of confidence in providing nutritional advice. Appropriate nutrition education before and after graduation is recommended for GPRs to ensure the development of skills and confidence to support patients to make healthy dietary choices and help prevent chronic diseases.

  3. Description of a practice model for pharmacist medication review in a general practice setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mette; Hallas, Jesper; Hansen, Trine Graabæk;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practical descriptions of procedures used for pharmacists' medication reviews are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To describe a model for medication review by pharmacists tailored to a general practice setting. METHODS: A stepwise model is described. The model is based on data from the medical chart...... and clinical or laboratory data. The medication review focuses on the diagnoses of the patient instead of the individual drugs. Patient interviews are not part of the model. The model was tested in a pilot study by conducting medical reviews on 50 polypharmacy patients (i.e. receiving 7 or more drugs...... concerned the reporting of interventions and the considerations of the GPs. 208 interventions were proposed among the 50 patients. The acceptance rate among the GPs was 82%. The most common interventions were lack of clinical or laboratory data (n=57, 27%) and drugs that should be discontinued as they had...

  4. Organisational development in general practice: lessons from practice and professional development plans (PPDPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocking Paul

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the quality and effectiveness of clinical practice is becoming a key task within all health services. Primary medical care, as organised in the UK is composed of clinicians who work in independent partnerships (general practices that collaborate with other health care professionals. Although many practices have successfully introduced innovations, there are no organisational development structures in place that support the evolution of primary medical care towards integrated care processes. Providing incentives for attendance at passive educational events and promoting 'teamwork' without first identifying organisational priorities are interventions that have proved to be ineffective at changing clinical processes. A practice and professional development plan feasibility study was evaluated in Wales and provided the experiential basis for a summary of the lessons learnt on how best to guide organisational development systems for primary medical care. Results Practice and professional development plans are hybrids produced by the combination of ideas from management (the applied behavioural science of organisational development and education (self-directed adult learning theories and, in conceptual terms, address the lack of effectiveness of passive educational strategies by making interventions relevant to identified system wide needs. In the intervention, each practice participated in a series of multidisciplinary workshops (minimum 4 where the process outcome was the production of a practice development plan and a set of personal portfolios, and the final outcome was a realised organisational change. It was apparent during the project that organisational admission to a process of developmental planning needed to be a stepwise process, where initial interest can lead to a fuller understanding, which subsequently develops into motivation and ownership, sufficient to complete the exercise. The advantages of

  5. Organisational development in general practice: lessons from practice and professional development plans (PPDPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Hocking, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Background Improving the quality and effectiveness of clinical practice is becoming a key task within all health services. Primary medical care, as organised in the UK is composed of clinicians who work in independent partnerships (general practices) that collaborate with other health care professionals. Although many practices have successfully introduced innovations, there are no organisational development structures in place that support the evolution of primary medical care towards integrated care processes. Providing incentives for attendance at passive educational events and promoting 'teamwork' without first identifying organisational priorities are interventions that have proved to be ineffective at changing clinical processes. A practice and professional development plan feasibility study was evaluated in Wales and provided the experiential basis for a summary of the lessons learnt on how best to guide organisational development systems for primary medical care. Results Practice and professional development plans are hybrids produced by the combination of ideas from management (the applied behavioural science of organisational development) and education (self-directed adult learning theories) and, in conceptual terms, address the lack of effectiveness of passive educational strategies by making interventions relevant to identified system wide needs. In the intervention, each practice participated in a series of multidisciplinary workshops (minimum 4) where the process outcome was the production of a practice development plan and a set of personal portfolios, and the final outcome was a realised organisational change. It was apparent during the project that organisational admission to a process of developmental planning needed to be a stepwise process, where initial interest can lead to a fuller understanding, which subsequently develops into motivation and ownership, sufficient to complete the exercise. The advantages of introducing expert external

  6. Effects of anisotropy on gravitational infall in galaxy clusters using an exact general relativistic model

    CERN Document Server

    Troxel, M A; Ishak, Mustapha

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects and implications of anisotropies at the scale of galaxy clusters by building an exact general relativistic model of a cluster using the inhomogeneous and anisotropic Szekeres metric. The model is built from a modified Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile. We compare this to a corresponding spherically symmetric structure in the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) model and quantify the impact of introducing varying levels of anisotropy. We examine two physical measures of gravitational infall -- the growth rate of density and the velocity of the source dust in the model. We introduce a generalization of the LT dust velocity profile for the Szekeres metric and demonstrate its consistency with the growth rate of density. We find that the growth rate of density in one substructure increases by 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.75% for 5%, 10%, and 15% levels of introduced anisotropy, which is measured as the fractional displaced mass relative to the spherically symmetric case. The infall velocity of the dust is found...

  7. Patterns of healthcare utilization in patients with generalized anxiety disorder in general practice in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Berger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: To describe patterns of healthcare utilization among patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD in general practitioner (GP settings in Germany. Methods: Using a large computerized database with information from GP practices across Germany, we identified all patients, aged > 18 years, with diagnoses of, or prescriptions for, GAD (ICD-10 diagnosis code F41.1 between October 1, 2003 and September 30, 2004 ("GAD patients". We also constituted an age- and sex-matched comparison group, consisting of randomly selected patients without any GP encounters or prescriptions for anxiety or depression (a common comorbidity in GAD during the same period. GAD patients were then compared to those in the matched comparison group over the one-year study period. Results: The study sample consisted of 3340 GAD patients and an equal number of matched comparators. Mean age was 53.2 years; 66.3% were women. Over the 12-month study period, GAD patients were more likely than matched comparators to have encounters for various comorbidities, including sleep disorders (odds ratio [OR] = 6.75 [95% CI = 5.31, 8.57], substance abuse disorders (3.91 [2.89, 5.28], and digestive system disorders (2.62 [2.36, 2.91] (all p <0.01. GAD patients averaged 5.6 more GP encounters (10.5 [SD = 8.8] vs 4.9 [5.7] for comparison group and 1.4 more specialist referrals (2.3 [2.9] vs 0.9 [1.7] (both p <0.01. Only 58.3% of GAD patients received some type of psychotropic medication (i.e., benzodiazepines, antidepressants, and/or sedatives/hypnotics. Conclusions: Patients with GAD in GP practices in Germany have more clinically recognized comorbidities and higher levels of healthcare utilization than patients without anxiety or depression.

  8. Biomedicine, holism and general medical practice: responses to the 2004 General Practitioner contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkland, Kath; Harrison, Stephen; McDonald, Ruth; Grant, Suzanne; Campbell, Stephen; Guthrie, Bruce

    2008-07-01

    In 2004 a new contract was introduced for General Practitioners in the UK, which introduced a significant element of 'pay-for-performance', including both clinical and organisational targets. The introduction of this contract has caused interest across the world, particularly amongst those responsible for commissioning primary care services. It can be argued that the clinical targets in the contract (known as the Quality and Outcomes Framework, QOF) represent a move towards a more biomedical model of health and illness, which is contrary to the ideal of providing holistic (or biopsychosocial) care that has been traditionally espoused by GPs. This paper reports results from two linked studies (in England and Scotland) investigating the early stages of the new contract. We describe the way in which four practices with different organisational approaches and espoused identities have all changed their practice structures, consultations and clinical care in response to QOF in ways which will result in patients receiving a more biomedical type of care. In spite of these observed changes, respondents continued to maintain discursive claims to holism. We discuss how this disconnection between rhetoric and reality can be maintained, and consider its implications for the future development of GPs' claims to a professional identity.

  9. Influence of population and general practice characteristics on prescribing of minor tranquilisers in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner AC

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of generalised anxiety disorders is widespread in Great Britain. Previous small-scale research has shown variations in minor tranquiliser prescribing, identifying several potential predictors of prescribing volume. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between general practice minor tranquiliser prescribing rates and practice population and general practice characteristics for all general practices in England.Methods: Multiple regression analysis of minor tranquiliser prescribing volumes during 2004/2005 for 8,291 English general practices with general practice and population variables obtained from the General Medical Services (GMS statistics, Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF, 2001 Census and 2004 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD. Results: The highest rates of minor tranquiliser prescribing were in areas with the greatest local deprivation while general practices situated in areas with larger proportions of residents of black ethnic origin had lower rates of prescribing. Other predictors of increased prescribing were general practices with older general practitioners and general practices with older registered practice populations.Conclusion: Our findings show that there is wide variation of minor tranquilisers prescribing across England which has implications regarding access to treatment and inequity of service provision. Future research should determine the barriers to equitable prescribing amongst general practices serving larger populations of black ethnic origin.

  10. A spatial analysis of the expanding roles of nurses in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearce Christopher

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes to the workforce and organisation of general practice are occurring rapidly in response to the Australian health care reform agenda, and the changing nature of the medical profession. In particular, the last five years has seen the rapid introduction and expansion of a nursing workforce in Australian general practices. This potentially creates pressures on current infrastructure in general practice. Method This study used a mixed methods, ‘rapid appraisal’ approach involving observation, photographs, and interviews. Results Nurses utilise space differently to GPs, and this is part of the diversity they bring to the general practice environment. At the same time their roles are partly shaped by the ways space is constructed in general practices. Conclusion The fluidity of nursing roles in general practice suggests that nurses require a versatile space in which to maximize their role and contribution to the general practice team.

  11. [Deafness in adults. Study of practices in general medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, P; Kossowski, M; Pons, Y

    2012-01-01

    Deafness is a sensory disability responsible for communication disorder, sometimes impairing social life. In children, the hearing is an important concern for all stakeholders in early childhood (systematic neonatal screening, etc.). On the other hand, in the adult, it is rarely tested, and patients do consult when their audiometric status is already badly impaired. But their care is all the better if the deafness diagnosis is made early, as for the audio-prosthetic rehabilitation for example. Today, the general practitioner is the first link of the diagnostic and therapeutic management chain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic practices of practitioners in front of deafness in adults. This prospective study included 74 practitioners based in "Ile de France" interviewed using a multiple choice questionnaire (MCQ) on otoscopic and audiometric diagnostics and a Script Concordance test (SC) on clinical adult deafness situations validated by a 5 experts panel. The obtained average score was 66.35% of correct answers to the MCQ and 47.76% to the SC. In our study, the surveyed practitioners showed a good level of otoscopic and audiometric diagnosis in the MCQ. However, their answers were not concordant with those of the expert panel in the SC. They have been particularly poorly performing on issues related to functional signs and their use in a given clinical situation, often driving to establish an otoscopic misdiagnosis while their diagnostic recognition of a pathological eardrum in the MCQ was rather good. These results reflect a lack of confidence in their otoscopic diagnosis related to the lack of knowledge of the causes of deafness in adults and their symptoms.

  12. Consumer satisfaction with practice nursing: a cross-sectional survey in New Zealand general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Davies, Deborah; Salamonson, Yenna

    2015-01-01

    An important consideration in health service delivery is ensuring that services meet consumer needs. Whilst nursing services in primary care have grown internationally, there has been limited exploration of consumer satisfaction with these services. This paper reports a descriptive survey that sought to evaluate consumers' perceptions of New Zealand practice nurses (PNs). One thousand, five hundred and five patients who received nursing services at one of 20 participating New Zealand general practices completed a survey tool between December 2010 and December 2011. The 64-item self- report survey tool contained the 21-item General Practice Nurse Satisfaction (GPNS) scale. Data were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Internal consistency of the GPNS scale was high (Cronbach's α 0.97). Participants aged over 60 years and those of European descent were significantly less satisfied with the PN (P = 0.001). Controlling for these characteristics, participants who had visited the PN more than four times previously were 1.34 times (adjusted odds ratio 1.34 (95% CI: 1.06-1.70) more satisfied than the comparison group (up to 4 previous visits to PN). In addition to the further validation of the psychometric properties of the GPNS scale in a different setting, the study also revealed a high level of satisfaction with PNs, with increased satisfaction with an increased number of visits. Nevertheless, the lower levels of satisfaction with PNs in the older age group as well as those of European descent, warrants further examination. The study also highlights the need for PNs and consumers to discuss consumer's expectations of services and create a shared understanding of treatment goals.

  13. [Relationship between te general practice guidelines for the diagnosis of hypertension and the indication for treatment and practice in the Nijmegen region, the Netherlands, 1983-2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, J.C.; Deunk, L.; Gerwen, W.H.E.M. van; Aalst, M. van der; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with hypertension in general practice are diagnosed and treated according to the criteria of the Dutch College of General Practitioners guidelines. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive. METHOD: Using data from 9 general practices belonging to the general

  14. Automotive clusters in the European Union: Incidence, experience and best practices; Los clusters de automocion en la Union Europea: incidencia, trayectoria y mejores paracticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaez Aller, R.; Longas Garcia, J. C.; Ullibarri Arce, M.; Bilbao Ubillos, J.; Camino Beldarrain, V.; Intxaurburu Clemente, G.

    2010-07-01

    This paper has been developed to improve the comprehension of the concept of cluster. It has also been intended to describe the use of that concept as a basis for developing industrial and regional policies in the European Union to promote the competitiveness of the automotive industry. In addition, the paper points out those policies that could be considered as best practice ones in relation to cluster initiatives. The information on which this paper is based comes from a survey of 51 automotive cluster initiatives in the European Union. (Author) 25 refs.

  15. Correlates of the Orthodontic Aspects of the General Dentist's Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse, Robert J.; Dooley, Raynard J.

    1980-01-01

    A study undertaken to determine the extent of orthodontic referrals and treatment performed by general dentists is discussed. Results indicate that general practitioners who graduated after 1945 tend to make more referrals, and general practitioners who had treated patients orthodontically in their predoctoral training tend to continue in…

  16. Correlates of the Orthodontic Aspects of the General Dentist's Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse, Robert J.; Dooley, Raynard J.

    1980-01-01

    A study undertaken to determine the extent of orthodontic referrals and treatment performed by general dentists is discussed. Results indicate that general practitioners who graduated after 1945 tend to make more referrals, and general practitioners who had treated patients orthodontically in their predoctoral training tend to continue in…

  17. Provision of medical student teaching in UK general practices: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alex; Rosenthal, Joe; Al-Seaidy, Marwa; Gray, Denis Pereira; McKinley, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care is increasingly provided in general practice. To meet this demand, the English Department of Health recommends that 50% of all medical students should train for general practice after qualification. Currently 19% of medical students express general practice as their first career choice. Undergraduate exposure to general practice positively influences future career choice. Appropriate undergraduate exposure to general practice is therefore highly relevant to workforce planning Aim This study seeks to quantify current exposure of medical students to general practice and compare it with past provision and also with postgraduate provision. Design and setting A cross-sectional questionnaire in the UK. Method A questionnaire regarding provision of undergraduate teaching was sent to the general practice teaching leads in all UK medical schools. Information was gathered on the amount of undergraduate teaching, how this was supported financially, and whether there was an integrated department of general practice. The data were then compared with results from previous studies of teaching provision. The provision of postgraduate teaching in general practice was also examined. Results General practice teaching for medical students increased from teaching in 1968 to 13.0% by 2008; since then, the percentage has plateaued. The total amount of general practice teaching per student has fallen by 2 weeks since 2002. Medical schools providing financial data delivered 14.6% of the clinical curriculum and received 7.1% of clinical teaching funding. The number of departments of general practice has halved since 2002. Provision of postgraduate teaching has tripled since 2000. Conclusion Current levels of undergraduate teaching in general practice are too low to fulfil future workforce requirements and may be falling. Financial support for current teaching is disproportionately low and the mechanism counterproductive. Central intervention may be required to solve

  18. A Virtual Community of Practice for General Practice Training: A Preimplementation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Robinson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Professional isolation is an important factor in low rural health workforce retention. Objective The aim of this study was to gain insights to inform the development of an implementation plan for a virtual community of practice (VCoP) for general practice (GP) training in regional Australia. The study also aimed to assess the applicability of the findings of an existing framework in developing this plan. This included ascertaining the main drivers of usage, or usefulness, of the VCoP for users and establishing the different priorities between user groups. Methods A survey study, based on the seven-step health VCoP framework, was conducted with general practice supervisors and registrars—133 usable responses; 40% estimated response rate. Data was analyzed using the t test and the chi-square test for comparisons between groups. Factor analysis and generalized linear regression modeling were used to ascertain factors which may independently predict intention to use the VCoP. Results In establishing a VCoP, facilitation was seen as important. Regarding stakeholders, the GP training provider was an important sponsor. Factor analysis showed a single goal of usefulness. Registrars had a higher intention to use the VCoP (Psupervisors. Usefulness independently predicted intention to actively use the VCoP (Psupervisors to want allied health professional and specialist involvement (Pfeedback about site activity. Regarding technology and community, training can be online, but trust is better built face-to-face. Supervisors were significantly more likely than registrars to perceive that registrars needed help with knowledge (P=.01) and implementation of knowledge (P<.001). Conclusions Important factors for a GP training VCoP include the following: facilitation covering administration and expertise, the perceived usefulness of the community, focusing usefulness around knowledge sharing, and overcoming professional isolation with high-quality content. Knowledge needs

  19. Training medical students in general practice: a qualitative study among general practitioner trainers in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanayake, R P J C; De Silva, A H W; Perera, D P; Sumanasekera, R D N; Athukorala, L A C L; Fernando, K A T

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide Family Medicine has gained an important place in the undergraduate medical curriculum over the last few decades and general practices have become training centers for students. Exposure to patients early in the disease process, out patient management of common problems, follow up of chronic diseases and psychosocial aspects of health and disease are educational advantages of community based training but such training could have varying impact on patients, students and trainers. This study explored the views of General Practitioner (GP) trainers on their experience in training students. This qualitative study was conducted among GP trainers of the faculty of medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, to explore their experience on wide range of issues related to their role as GP trainers. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes expressed were identified. Altruistic reasons, self-satisfaction, self-esteem and opportunity to improve their knowledge were the motivations for their involvement in teaching. Teachers were confident of their clinical and teaching skills. They perceived that patients were willing participants of the process and benefited from it. There was a positive impact on consultation dynamics. Time pressure was the major problem and ideal number of trainees per session was two. They were willing to attend teacher training workshops to update their knowledge. GP trainers driven by altruistic reasons were willing participants of student training process. The perceived advantages of involvement of teaching for trainers and patients were an encouragement for potential trainers. University should organize training sessions for trainers which will boost their knowledge, confidence and teaching skills which will eventually benefit students.

  20. Experimenting clinical pathways in general practice: a focus group investigation with Italian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Zannini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB, Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods. Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results. Four major themes emerged: i clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions. Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment.

  1. CoP in focus : community of practice on metropolitan food clusters, resource use efficiency and climate adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranendonk, R.P.; Hoechstetter, S.; Castillo, A.; Smeets, P.J.A.M.; Mansfeld, van M.J.M.; Eetgerink, F.; Cserhaty, M.; Kalas, N.; Schneider, U.

    2014-01-01

    This Pathfinder project develops a focused EU Community of Practice (CoP) on development of Agro food-clusters that focuses on innovation of high tech, large scale, industrialized and sustainable agriculture and food production for Metropoles. The Metropolitan food clusters significantly contribute

  2. CoP in focus : community of practice on metropolitan food clusters, resource use efficiency and climate adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranendonk, R.P.; Hoechstetter, S.; Castillo, A.; Smeets, P.J.A.M.; Mansfeld, van M.J.M.; Eetgerink, F.; Cserhaty, M.; Kalas, N.; Schneider, U.

    2014-01-01

    This Pathfinder project develops a focused EU Community of Practice (CoP) on development of Agro food-clusters that focuses on innovation of high tech, large scale, industrialized and sustainable agriculture and food production for Metropoles. The Metropolitan food clusters significantly contribute

  3. Fuzzy Time Series Forecasting Model Based on Automatic Clustering Techniques and Generalized Fuzzy Logical Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangren Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of techniques for constructing high-order fuzzy time series models, there are three types which are based on advanced algorithms, computational method, and grouping the fuzzy logical relationships. The last type of models is easy to be understood by the decision maker who does not know anything about fuzzy set theory or advanced algorithms. To deal with forecasting problems, this paper presented novel high-order fuzz time series models denoted as GTS (M, N based on generalized fuzzy logical relationships and automatic clustering. This paper issued the concept of generalized fuzzy logical relationship and an operation for combining the generalized relationships. Then, the procedure of the proposed model was implemented on forecasting enrollment data at the University of Alabama. To show the considerable outperforming results, the proposed approach was also applied to forecasting the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index. Finally, the effects of parameters M and N, the number of order, and concerned principal fuzzy logical relationships, on the forecasting results were also discussed.

  4. Themes and methods of research presented at European General Practice Research Network conferences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruschinski, C.; Lange, Maaike; Lionis, C.; Weel, C. van; Hummers-Pradier, E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) defined core characteristics of general practice and general practitioners' competencies. It is unclear to which extent research has addressed these issues so far. OBJECTIVE: To determine themes and research methods of general practice res

  5. Practices, patients and (imperfect data - feasibility of a randomised controlled clinical drug trial in German general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical (drug trials supply high quality evidence for therapeutic strategies in primary care. Until now, experience with drug trials in German general practice has been sparse. In 2007/2008, the authors conducted an investigator-initiated, non-commercial, double-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial (HWI-01 to assess the clinical equivalence of ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI. Here, we report the feasibility of this trial in German general practices and the implementation of Good Clinical Practice (GCP standards as defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH in mainly inexperienced general practices. Methods This report is based on the experience of the HWI-01 study conducted in 29 German general practices. Feasibility was defined by 1 successful practice recruitment, 2 sufficient patient recruitment, 3 complete and accurate data collection and 4 appropriate protection of patient safety. Results The final practice recruitment rate was 18%. In these practices, 79 of 195 screened UTI patients were enrolled. Recruitment differed strongly between practices (range 0-12, mean 2.8 patients per practice and was below the recruitment goal of approximately 100 patients. As anticipated, practice nurses became the key figures in the screening und recruitment of patients. Clinical trial demands, in particular for completing symptom questionnaires, documentation of source data and reporting of adverse events, did not agree well with GPs' documentation habits and required support from study nurses. In many cases, GPs and practice staff seemed to be overwhelmed by the amount of information and regulations. No sudden unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs were observed during the trial. Conclusions To enable drug trials in general practice, it is necessary to adapt the setup of clinical research infrastructure to the needs of GPs and

  6. Management and marketing for the general practice dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Earl; Bhatia, Sanjeev

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews trends in the dental marketplace. Marketing is an essential element of dentistry. Communicating treatment options with patients is one aspect of marketing. Treatment planning helps patients understand the relationships between oral health, occlusion, temporomandibular joint function, and systemic health. Through marketing, dental practice owners inform patients of ever-changing treatment modalities. Understanding treatment options allows patients to make better, informed choices. More options leads to a higher level of care and more comprehensive dental treatment. Managing a practice requires tracking its financial health. Economic statistics measure the effect of management decisions that mark the direction of a dental practice.

  7. Influences on final year medical students’ attitudes to general practice as a career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker JE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: General practice is under-represented in student career choices. This study aimed to identify and explore factors that influence the attitudes of final year medical students to general practice as a career. METHODS: This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews of focus groups of final year undergraduate medical students at the University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. Thematic analysis and grounded theory were used to interpret the data. FINDINGS: General practitioners (GPs play a key role in influencing medical students’ attitudes to general practice as a career. Students identified their general practice placement during medical school training and personal contact with their own GP as principal factors. The media portrayal of general practice and the attitudes of friends and family were also influential. Students were positively influenced when they were made to feel part of the team, involved with consultations, allowed to carry out practical procedures under supervision, and witnessed what they perceived as good medical practice during clinical placements. Positive experiences often occurred later in training, when students felt more confident of their clinical abilities. While students reported occasional negative comments about general practice by some hospital doctors, these had a lesser role in influencing their perceptions of general practice compared with their own experiences, both as students and patients. CONCLUSION: GPs have a strong influence, positively and negatively, on the attitudes of medical students to general practice as a career. Effective influences include being made to feel welcome, involved, valued, and given legitimate roles during clinical placements.

  8. Relational Coordination and Organisational Social Capital Association with Characteristics of General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke; Edwards, Kasper; Bøllingtoft Knudsen, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Background. Relational coordination (RC) and organisational social capital (OSC) aremeasures of novel aspects of an organisation’s performance, which have not previously been analysed together, in general practice. Objectives.The aim of this studywas to analyse the associations between RC and OSC......, and characteristics of general practice. Methods. Questionnaire survey study comprising 2074 practices in Denmark. Results. General practitioners (GPs) rated both RC and OSC in their general practice higher than their secretaries and nurses. The practice form was statistically significantly associated with high RC...... and OSC. RC was positively associated with the number of patients listed with a practice per staff, where staff is defined as all members of a practice including both owners and employees. Conclusion. The study showed that RC and OSC were significantly associated with type of profession and practice type...

  9. neurological practIce analysis in neurosciences design general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA MEDICAL JOURNAL VOLUME 63 5 FEBRUARY 1983 neurological. •. practIce ... One was an analy- sis of neurological disorders in patients admitted to a university hospital, with an ... Alcohol and drug abuse, anxiety, depression ...

  10. An integrative review of facilitators and barriers influencing collaboration and teamwork between general practitioners and nurses working in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    To identify facilitators and barriers influencing collaboration and teamwork between general practitioners and nurses working in general (family) practice. Internationally, a shortage of doctors entering and remaining in general practice and an increasing burden of chronic disease has diversified the nurse's role in this setting. Despite a well-established general practice nursing workforce, little attention has been paid to the ways doctors and nurses collaborate in this setting. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Life, Cochrane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute Library of Systematic Reviews and Trove (dissertation and theses) were searched for papers published between 2000 and May 2014. This review was informed by the approach of Whittemore and Knafl (2005). All included papers were assessed for methodological quality. Findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Eleven papers met the inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis revealed three themes common to the facilitators of and barriers to collaboration and teamwork between GPs in general practice: (1) roles and responsibilities; (2) respect, trust and communication; and (3) hierarchy, education and liability. This integrative review has provided insight into issues around role definition, communication and organizational constraints which influence the way nurses and general practitioners collaborate in a team environment. Future research should investigate in more detail the ways doctors and nurses work together in general practice and the impact of collaboration on nursing leadership and staff retention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. General parenting, smoking-specific parenting practices and adolescent smoking in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Though the associations of general parenting styles and smoking-specific parenting practices with adolescent smoking have received much attention in recent years, important questions remain. Most general parenting studies focused on Caucasian parents but much less in the literature is known about Chinese parents. As for smoking-specific parenting practices in the household, anti-smoking practices have been the focus, with pro-smoking practices seldom being studied. The ob...

  12. Canopy Spectral Reflectance Characteristics of Rice with Different Cultural Practices and Their Fuzzy Cluster Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The influence of major cultural practices including different nitrogen application rates, population densities, transplanting leaf ages of seedling, and water regimes on rice canopy spectral reflectance was investigated. Results showed that increased nitrogen rates, water regimes and population densities and decreased seedling ages could enhance reflectance at NIR (near infrared) bands and reduce reflectance at visible bands. Using reflectance of green, red and NIR band and ratio index of 810-560 nm could distinguish the different type of rice by fuzzy cluster analysis.

  13. Health improvement and prevention study (HIPS - evaluation of an intervention to prevent vascular disease in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Gawaine

    2010-08-01

    intervention is compared between intervention and control groups after adjusting for baseline differences and clustering at the level of the practice. Discussion This study will provide evidence of the effectiveness of a primary care intervention to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in general practice patients. It will inform current policies and programs designed to prevent these conditions in Australian primary health care. Trial Registration ACTRN12607000423415

  14. General Assembly of Twisted Trigonal-Prismatic Nonanuclear Silver(I) Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Yu; Su, Hai-Feng; Zhou, Rui-Qi; Feng, Sheng; Tan, Yuan-Zhi; Wang, Xing-Po; Jia, Jiong; Kurmoo, Mohamedally; Sun, Di; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2016-02-24

    A general class of C3 -symmetric Ag9 clusters, [Ag9 S(tBuC6 H4 S)6 (dpph)3 (CF3 SO3 )] (1), [Ag9 (tBuC6 H4 S)6 (dpph)3 (CF3 SO3 )2 ]⋅CF3 SO3 (2), [Ag9 (tBuC6 H4 S)6 (dpph)3 (NO3 )2 ] ⋅NO3 (3), and [Ag9 (tBuC6 H4 S)7 (dpph)3 (Mo2 O7 )0.5 ]2 ⋅2 CF3 COO (4) (dpph=1,6-bis(diphenylphosphino)hexane), with a twisted trigonal-prism geometry was isolated by the reaction of polymeric {(HNEt3 )2 [Ag10 (tBuC6 H4 S)12 ]}n , 1,6-bis(diphenylphosphino)hexane, and various silver salts under solvothermal conditions. The structures consist of discrete clusters constructed from a girdling Ag9 twisted trigonal prism with the top and bottom trigonal faces capped by diverse anions (i.e., S(2-) and CF3 SO3 (-) for compound 1, 2×CF3 SO3 (-) for compound 2, 2×NO3 (-) for compound 3, and tBuC6 H4 S(-) and Mo2 O7 (2-) for compound 4). This trigonal prism is bisected by another shrunken Ag3 trigon at its waist position. Interestingly, two inversion-related Ag9 trigonal-prismatic clusters are dimerized by the Mo2 O7 (2-) ion in compound 4. The twist is amplified by the bulkier thiolate, which also introduces high steric-hindrance for the capping ligand, that is, the longer dpph ligand. Four more silver-sulfur clusters (namely, compounds 5-8) with their nuclearity ranging from 6-10 were solely characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to verify the above-described synergetic effect of mixed ligands in the construction of Ag9 twisted trigonal prisms. Surprisingly, only cluster 1 emits yellow luminescence at λ=584 nm at room temperature, which may be attributed to a charge transfer from the S 3p orbital to the Ag 5s orbital, or mixed with metal-centered (MC) d(10) →d(9) s(1) transitions. Upon cooling from 300 to 80 K, the emission intensity was enhanced along with a hypsochromic shift. The good linear relationship between the maximum emission intensity and the temperature for compound 1 in the range of 180-300 K indicates that this is a promising molecular luminescent

  15. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  16. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  17. [Malignant biliary obstruction, general review and clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnel, Didier; André, Thierry; Mader, Benoît; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Bensoussan, Emmanuel; Liguory, Claude

    2013-05-01

    This review recalls the clinical, anatomic, physiopathological and etiological features necessary in the management of patients with neoplastic bile duct obstruction and exposes the current practice concerning endoscopic and radiologic palliative drainage. Clinical practice according to the clinical situations is explained. This review exposes complications management for patients having undergone an endoscopic or percutaneous drainage of the biliary ducts, the particular case of periportal stenosis, the respective indications of endoscopic and transhepatic percutaneous drainage, usual immediate evolution according to the type of the stenosis and the technique used as well as the management in case of stent obstruction.

  18. [The practice guideline 'Bacterial skin infections' (first revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Hartman, T.C.; Uijen, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    The revised guideline 'Bacterial skin infections' from the Dutch College ofGeneral Practitioners offers a clear and extensive overview of the most prevalent superficial and deep bacterial infections in general practice. Given the lack of evidence, it is no longer recommended to keep children with im

  19. [The practice guideline 'Problematic alcohol consumption' (second revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    The recently revised version of the practice guideline 'Problematic alcohol consumption' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners offers realistic advice to general practitioners on how to manage problem drinkers. The number of patients with alcohol problems tends to increase among women of m

  20. Multimorbidity and comorbidity in the Dutch population – data from general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oostrom Sandra H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multimorbidity is increasingly recognized as a major public health challenge of modern societies. However, knowledge about the size of the population suffering from multimorbidity and the type of multimorbidity is scarce. The objective of this study was to present an overview of the prevalence of multimorbidity and comorbidity of chronic diseases in the Dutch population and to explore disease clustering and common comorbidities. Methods We used 7 years data (2002–2008 of a large Dutch representative network of general practices (212,902 patients. Multimorbidity was defined as having two or more out of 29 chronic diseases. The prevalence of multimorbidity was calculated for the total population and by sex and age group. For 10 prevalent diseases among patients of 55 years and older (N = 52,014 logistic regressions analyses were used to study disease clustering and descriptive analyses to explore common comorbid diseases. Results Multimorbidity of chronic diseases was found among 13% of the Dutch population and in 37% of those older than 55 years. Among patients over 55 years with a specific chronic disease more than two-thirds also had one or more other chronic diseases. Most disease pairs occurred more frequently than would be expected if diseases had been independent. Comorbidity was not limited to specific combinations of diseases; about 70% of those with a disease had one or more extra chronic diseases recorded which were not included in the top five of most common diseases. Conclusion Multimorbidity is common at all ages though increasing with age, with over two-thirds of those with chronic diseases and aged 55 years and older being recorded with multimorbidity. Comorbidity encompassed many different combinations of chronic diseases. Given the ageing population, multimorbidity and its consequences should be taken into account in the organization of care in order to avoid fragmented care, in medical

  1. Vertical Integration in Teaching And Learning (VITAL): an approach to medical education in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Marie-Louise B; King, David B; Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Kelly, Glynn D; Buckley, John F; Garside, Susan J

    2007-07-16

    There is increasing demand to provide clinical and teaching experiences in the general practice setting. Vertical integration in teaching and learning, whereby teaching and learning roles are shared across all learner stages, has the potential to decrease time demands and stress on general practitioners, to provide teaching skills and experience to GP registrars, and to improve the learning experience for medical students, and may also help meet the increased demand for teaching in general practice. We consider potential advantages and barriers to vertical integration of teaching in general practice, and provide results of focus group discussions with general practice principals and registrars about vertical integration. We recommend further research into the feasibility of using vertical integration to enhance the capacity to teach medical students in general practice.

  2. Flexible but boring: medical students' perceptions of a career in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Nicole; McMenamin, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Australia will continue to face a general practitioner (GP) shortage unless a significant number of medical students make general practice their chosen career. Perceptions regarding general practice may influence career choices. Thus this study investigated what Australian medical students perceived to be the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing a career in general practice via an anonymous online survey. Fifty-one students indicated general practice to be their first ranked career preference, 200 indicated a career other than general practice, and 106 were undecided. Two-hundred and two students reported having been on a GP placement, whereas 88 students had not. Flexibility, continuity of patient care and work-life balance were the three most common stated advantages to pursuing a career in general practice whereas general practice being boring, poorly paid, and of low prestige were the three most common disadvantages stated. Some disadvantages stated by those with a non-GP preference were not stated by those with a GP preference (e.g. lack of procedural skills, lack of career advancement opportunities). Students with more than 80 h of GP placement experience were more likely to list the advantages of work-life balance and a diversity of problems/illnesses/patients than those with no placement experience but were also more likely to list the disadvantage of low prestige. Negative stereotypes regarding general practice continue to exist which may influence students' career choices.

  3. [What factors aid in the recruitment of general practice as a career? An enquiry by interview of general practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natanzon, Iris; Ose, D; Szecsenyi, J; Joos, S

    2010-05-01

    In some parts of Germany there is already a lack of general practitioners (GPs). The reasons for this lack are complex. On the one hand there is an increasing demand for GPs as a result to demographic changes and an increase in the number of chronic diseases. On the other hand fewer medical students decide to become a general practitioner. The aim of this study was to explore, from the perspective of GPs, factors influencing the choice of general practice as a career. Also analysed is the extent to which those factors influence medical students in their carrier choice. 16 GPs were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis according to Mayring has been assisted by the Atlas.ti software program. GPs thought that the occupational orientation of medical students would be strongly dependent on the attractiveness of their future profession. Factors affecting the day-to-day work of general practice and may deterring the carrier choice of students were: poor working and general conditions leading to an increasing dissatisfaction among GPs; decreasing prestige of GPs caused by changed personal and occupational values and attitudes within the society; as well as poor representation and image of general practice as a discipline within the medical curriculum. Various approaches aimed at different target groups can be derived from these identified factors: the government providing general and occupational conditions that would relieve GPs of excessive bureaucracy; universities and medical associations meeting the challenge by improving undergraduate and postgraduate education in general practice; and GPs themselves giving a more self-confident presentation of general practice. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart * New York.

  4. Role of Patient and Practice Characteristics in Variance of Treatment Quality in Type 2 Diabetes between General Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, Yeon Young; Sidorenkov, Grigory; Denig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background Accounting for justifiable variance is important for fair comparisons of treatment quality. The variance between general practices in treatment quality of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients may be attributed to the underlying patient population and practice characteristics. The objective of

  5. Role of Patient and Practice Characteristics in Variance of Treatment Quality in Type 2 Diabetes between General Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, Yeon Young; Sidorenkov, Grigory; Denig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background Accounting for justifiable variance is important for fair comparisons of treatment quality. The variance between general practices in treatment quality of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients may be attributed to the underlying patient population and practice characteristics. The objective of

  6. [General Strategies for Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Torres-Arreola, Laura Laura

    2015-01-01

    The need to use clinical practice guidelines (CPG) arises from the health conditions and problems that public health institutions in the country face. CPG are informative documents that help improve the quality of care processes and patient safety; having among its objectives, to reduce the variability of medical practice. The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social designed a strategic plan for the dissemination, implementation, monitoring and control of CPG to establish an applicable model in the medical units in the three levels of care at the Instituto. This paper summarizes some of the strategies of the plan that were made with the knowledge and experience of clinicians and managers, with which they intend to promote the adoption of the key recommendations of the guidelines, to promote a sense of belonging for health personnel, and to encourage changes in organizational culture.

  7. Standard practice for liquid penetrant examination for general industry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for penetrant examination of materials. Penetrant testing is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, shrinkage, laminations, through leaks, or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance testing. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, ferrous and nonferrous metals, and of nonmetallic materials such as nonporous glazed or fully densified ceramics, as well as certain nonporous plastics, and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a liquid penetrant examination process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain its applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications and procedures dealing with the liquid penetrant testing of parts and materials. Agreement by the customer requesting penetrant inspection is strongly rec...

  8. Clustering of diet- and activity-related parenting practices: Cross-sectional findings of the INPACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Rodenburg (Gerda); A. Oenema (Anke); S.P.J. Kremers (Stef); H. van de Mheen (Dike)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Various diet- and activity-related parenting practices are positive determinants of child dietary and activity behaviour, including home availability, parental modelling and parental policies. There is evidence that parenting practices cluster within the dietary domain and wi

  9. Management of gout in a South Auckland general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reaves E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT: In New Zealand, the highest prevalence of gout is in Maori and Pacific people. Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB has the highest Maori and Pacific population of any New Zealand District Health Board. A CMDHB study found that a high proportion of patients with gout were also at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEMS: The primary objective was to examine whether the control of gout had changed over time at one clinic. The secondary objective was to assess the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with gout at that clinic. RESULTS: The mean serum uric acid level of patients with gout in the practice had risen in comparison with a similar audit carried out in March 2009. This indicates that the control of gout for patients at the practice has worsened over time. Many patients had not had an annual serum uric acid test. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT: A repeat uric acid level was scheduled for all patients with gout in the practice, with follow-up appointments to be arranged if the result was abnormal. LESSONS: Gout is often suboptimally managed. Serum uric acid levels may only be tested when a patient presents with an acute attack of gout. Consideration should be given to a minimum of annual serum uric acid levels. Appropriate management of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in this particular cohort is important and should be a particular focus of care.

  10. Continuous Morbidity Registration at Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network 2009.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Mexican flu pandemic was limited to a mild pandemic, although the flu incidence rate was higher than in the previous three seasons. At the peak of the epidemic 189 per 100.000 registered patients consulted their general practitioner (GP). The sentinel GP’s of NIVEL registered the number of new f

  11. Promotion of nutrition and physical activity in Dutch general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.; Hiddink, G.J.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Promotion of nutrition and physical activity is important to slow down the increase of overweight. General practitioners (GPs) are in an unique position to communicate with their patients about nutrition and physical activity, because of the high referral score, high perceived expertis

  12. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette

    2016-01-01

    task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...

  13. New drugs in general practice: prescribing patterns and external influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis several studies are presented with the objective to detect and elucidate the patterns by which new drugs are prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, we studied the influences of medical specialists and community pharmacists as important factors on the GP's decision to

  14. Chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speets, Anouk Mariëlle

    2006-01-01

    Chest radiography (CXR) and abdominal ultrasound (US) are two widely used diagnostic imaging techniques in Western societies. General practitioners (GPs) in The Netherlands annually request approximately 500,000 CXRs and 200,000 abdominal US, and therefore clearly place a burden on health care. Besi

  15. Interpreted consultations as ‘business as usual’? : An analysis of organizational routines in general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenhagh, T.; Voisey, C.J.; Robb, N.

    2007-01-01

    UK general practices operate in an environment of high linguistic diversity, because of recent large-scale immigration and of the NHS's commitment to provide a professional interpreter to any patient if needed. Much activity in general practice is co-ordinated and patterned into organisational

  16. Knee complaints seen in general practice : active sport participants versus non-sport participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; van Linschoten, Robbart; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Since knee complaints are common among athletes and are frequently presented in general practice, it is of interest to investigate the type of knee complaints represented in general practice of athletes in comparison with those of non-athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to inve

  17. Knee complaints seen in general practice : active sport participants versus non-sport participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; van Linschoten, Robbart; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Since knee complaints are common among athletes and are frequently presented in general practice, it is of interest to investigate the type of knee complaints represented in general practice of athletes in comparison with those of non-athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to

  18. Epidemiology of respiratory tract infections in Dutch general practice: a historical analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Donker, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To describe time trends in the incidence of respiratory tract infections in general practice in the Netherlands and its relation to sex and age. Design and Methods: Data will be presented from several morbidity surveys conducted in general practices in the Netherlands: the Intermittent Morbidi

  19. Vocational trainees' views and experiences regarding the learning and teaching of communication skills in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Marc; Thijs, Gabie; Van Royen, Paul; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goedhuys, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To explore the views and experiences of general practice (GP) vocational trainees regarding communication skills (CS) and the teaching and learning of these skills. A purposive sample of second and third (final) year GP trainees took part in six focus group (FG) discussions. Transcripts were coded and analysed in accordance with a grounded theory approach by two investigators using Alas-ti software. Finally results were triangulated by means of semi-structured telephone interviews. The analysis led to three thematic clusters: (1) trainees acknowledge the essential importance of communication skills and identified contextual factors influencing the learning and application of these skills; (2) trainees identified preferences for learning and receiving feedback on their communication skills; and (3) trainees perceived that the assessment of communication skills is subjective. These themes are organised into a framework for a better understanding of trainees' communication skills as part of their vocational training. The framework helps in leading to a better understanding of the way in which trainees learn and apply communication skills. The unique context of vocational training should be taken into account when trainees' communication skills are assessed. The teaching and learning should be guided by a learner-centred approach. The framework is valuable for informing curricular reform and future research.

  20. Supervision--growing and building a sustainable general practice supervisor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jennifer S; Anderson, Katrina J; Mara, Paul R; Stevenson, Alexander D

    2011-06-06

    This article explores various models and ideas for future sustainable general practice vocational training supervision in Australia. The general practitioner supervisor in the clinical practice setting is currently central to training the future general practice workforce. Finding ways to recruit, retain and motivate both new and experienced GP teachers is discussed, as is the creation of career paths for such teachers. Some of the newer methods of practice-based teaching are considered for further development, including vertically integrated teaching, e-learning, wave consulting and teaching on the run, teaching teams and remote teaching. Approaches to supporting and resourcing teaching and the required infrastructure are also considered. Further research into sustaining the practice-based general practice supervision model will be required.

  1. Clustering in Cell Cycle Dynamics with General Response/Signaling Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Todd; Buckalew, Richard; Moses, Gregory; Boczko, Erik; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.10.002.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by experimental and theoretical work on autonomous oscillations in yeast, we analyze ordinary differential equations models of large populations of cells with cell-cycle dependent feedback. We assume a particular type of feedback that we call Responsive/Signaling (RS), but do not specify a functional form of the feedback. We study the dynamics and emergent behaviour of solutions, particularly temporal clustering and stability of clustered solutions. We establish the existence of certain periodic clustered solutions as well as "uniform" solutions and add to the evidence that cell-cycle dependent feedback robustly leads to cell-cycle clustering. We highlight the fundamental differences in dynamics between systems with negative and positive feedback. For positive feedback systems the most important mechanism seems to be the stability of individual isolated clusters. On the other hand we find that in negative feedback systems, clusters must interact with each other to reinforce coherence. We conclude fr...

  2. Leadership and management skills of general practice nurses: experience or education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rosalind; Cross, Wendy; Moss, Cheryle; Campbell, Annie; De Castro, Magali; Oxley, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    A key finding of this qualitative exploratory descriptive study into advanced nursing for general practice nurses (Australian setting) revealed that participants viewed leadership and management as best learnt 'apprenticeship' style on the job by years of experience. Participants (48) comprised of general practice nurses, practice managers and general practitioners from metropolitan Melbourne were interviewed. Other findings demonstrated that the participants generally had limited awareness that postgraduate education can assist in the development of leadership and management in advanced nursing practice. The participants lacked clarity about professional competencies and generally did not connect these to leadership and management. Professional bodies need to take the opportunity to promote awareness of the national competency standards. All three groups of participants expressed hopes about the future provision of professional development opportunities and support by the Medicare Local for leadership and management aspirations within advanced practice nursing.

  3. General practice observed. A do-it-yourself medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganner, A N; Lockie, A C

    1979-11-17

    A group practice commissioned a local building company to build their own medical centre comprising 370 m2 (4000 ft2) of building with an adequate car park at a total cost of 60 000 pounds with design to completion in nine months. A bank loan for 10 years was assigned to the partnership and each partner made his own arrangements for repayment. The updated cost for June 1979 is 80 000-85 000 pounds. Building a centre in this way is professionally and financially rewarding.

  4. A Generalized Uhlenbeck and Beth Formula for the Third Cluster Coefficient

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Sigurd Yves; Amaya-Tapia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Relatively recently (A. Amaya-Tapia, S. Y. Larsen and M. Lassaut. Ann. Phys., vol. 306 (2011) 406), we presented a formula for the evaluation of the third Bose fugacity coefficient - leading to the third virial coefficient - in terms of three-body eigenphase shifts, for particles subject to repulsive forces. An analytical calculation for a 1-dim. model, for which the result is known, confirmed the validity of this approach. We now extend the formalism to particles with attractive forces, and therefore must allow for the possibility that the particles have bound states. We thus obtain a true generalization of the famous formula of Uhlenbeck and Beth (G.E. Uhlenbeck and E. Beth. Physica, vol. 3 (1936) 729; E. Beth and G.E. Uhlenbeck. ibid, vol.4 (1937) 915) (and of Gropper (L. Gropper. Phys. Rev. vol. 50 (1936) 963; ibid vol. 51 (1937) 1108)) for the second virial. We illustrate our formalism by a calculation, in an adiabatic approximation, of the third cluster in one dimension, using McGuire's model as in our ...

  5. Generalized multiband typical medium dynamical cluster approximation: Application to (Ga,Mn)N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Nelson, R.; Siddiqui, Elisha; Tam, K.-M.; Yu, U.; Berlijn, T.; Ku, W.; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.; Moreno, J.; Jarrell, M.

    2016-12-01

    We generalize the multiband typical medium dynamical cluster approximation and the formalism introduced by Blackman, Esterling, and Berk so that it can deal with localization in multiband disordered systems with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder with complicated potentials. We also introduce an ansatz for the momentum-resolved typical density of states that greatly improves the numerical stability of the method while preserving the independence of scattering events at different frequencies. Starting from the first-principles effective Hamiltonian, we apply this method to the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ga1 -xMnxN , and find the impurity band is completely localized for Mn concentrations x 10 the impurity band has delocalized states but the chemical potential resides at or above the mobility edge. So, the system is always insulating within the experimental compositional limit (x ≈0.10 ) due to Anderson localization. However, for 0.03 10 hole doping could make the system metallic, allowing double-exchange mediated, or enhanced, ferromagnetism. The developed method is expected to have a large impact on first-principles studies of Anderson localization.

  6. A generalized Uhlenbeck and Beth formula for the third cluster coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Sigurd Yves [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Lassaut, Monique [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Amaya-Tapia, Alejandro, E-mail: jano@icf.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Fi ´sicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 48-3, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62251 (Mexico)

    2016-11-15

    Relatively recently (Amaya-Tapia et al., 2011), we presented a formula for the evaluation of the third Bose fugacity coefficient–leading to the third virial coefficient–in terms of three-body eigenphase shifts, for particles subject to repulsive forces. An analytical calculation for a 1-dim. model, for which the result is known, confirmed the validity of this approach. We now extend the formalism to particles with attractive forces, and therefore must allow for the possibility that the particles have bound states. We thus obtain a true generalization of the famous formula of Uhlenbeck and Beth (Uhlenbeck and Beth, 1936; Beth and Uhlenbeck, 1937) and of Gropper (Gropper, 1936, 1937) for the second virial. We illustrate our formalism by a calculation, in an adiabatic approximation, of the third cluster in one dimension, using McGuire’s model as in our previous paper, but with attractive forces. The inclusion of three-body bound states is trivial; taking into account states having asymptotically two particles bound, and one free, is not.

  7. Separation Number and Generalized Clustering Coefficient in Small World Networks based on String Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Toyota, Norihito

    2011-01-01

    We reformulated the string formalism given by Aoyama, using an adjacent matrix of a network and introduced a series of generalized clustering coefficients based on it. Furthermore we numerically evaluated Milgram condition proposed by their article in order to explore $q$-$th$ degrees of separation in scale free networks. In this article, we apply the reformulation to small world networks and numerically evaluate Milgram condition, especially the separation number of small world networks and its relation to cycle structures are discussed. Considering the number of non-zero elements of an adjacent matrix, the average path length and Milgram condition, we show that the formalism proposed by us is effective to analyze the six degrees of separation, especially effective for analyzing the relation between the separation number and cycle structures in a network. By this analysis of small world networks, it proves that a sort of power low holds between $M_n$, which is a key quantity in Milgram condition, and the gen...

  8. A Generalized Automatic Hybrid Fuzzy-Based GA-PSO Clustering Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hooshang Mazinan, ,

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of the present research arises from developing the traditional methods in the area of segmentation of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Contemporary research is now developing techniques to solve the whole considerable problems in this field, such as the fuzzy local information c-mean (FLICM approach that incorporate the local spatial and the gray level information. It should be noted that the present approach is robust against noise, although the high computational complexity is not truly ignored. A novel approach in segmentation of brain MRI has been investigated and presented through the proposed research. Because of so many noises embedded in the acquiring procedure, like eddy currents, the segmentation of the brain MR is now tangibly taken into account as a difficult task. Fuzzy-based clustering algorithm is one of the solutions in the same way. But, it is so sensitive to change through noise and other imaging artifacts. The idea of combining the genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO for the purpose of generalizing the FLICM is the ultimate goal in the present investigation, since the computational complexity could actually be reduced. The experiments with a number of simulated images as well as the clinical MRI data illustrate that the proposed approach is applicable and effective.

  9. A survey assessing the impact of a hospital-based general practice residency program on dentists and dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, Asif; Epstein, Joel B; Gibson, Gary; Le, Nhu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the outcome of completing a general practice hospital-based dental residency program. A survey was mailed to all individuals who had completed a general practice residency program (resident) between 1980 and 1996 and to dentists who had not completed a hospital program (undergraduate). The responses were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Seventy-four percent of the resident group and 68% from the undergraduate sample group returned the questionnaire. Approximately half the residents were in general dental practice. Twenty-six percent were involved in specialty dentistry, 7% in hospital dentistry, and 20% in teaching at a dental school. Of the undergraduate dentists, more than three-quarters were in general practice, 5% were entered into specialty programs, 1% were involved in hospital dentistry, and 15% taught at a dental school. Half of the residents held staff privileges in a hospital or ambulatory setting, compared with 16% of undergraduates. Forty-three percent of the residents provided consultation in a hospital or long-term-care facility, compared with 21% of the undergraduates. Practice characteristics suggested enhanced clinical skills in oral surgery, periodontics, emergency dental care, and oral medicine/pathology in those completing the hospital program. The findings of this study confirm that the outcome of completing a hospital program is a change in practice profile, site of practice, services for complex patients, and continuing involvement in teaching.

  10. Practical likelihood analysis for spatial generalized linear mixed models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonat, W. H.; Ribeiro, Paulo Justiniano

    2016-01-01

    We investigate an algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation of spatial generalized linear mixed models based on the Laplace approximation. We compare our algorithm with a set of alternative approaches for two datasets from the literature. The Rhizoctonia root rot and the Rongelap are, respectiv......We investigate an algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation of spatial generalized linear mixed models based on the Laplace approximation. We compare our algorithm with a set of alternative approaches for two datasets from the literature. The Rhizoctonia root rot and the Rongelap are...... of Laplace approximation include the computation of the maximized log-likelihood value, which can be used for model selection and tests, and the possibility to obtain realistic confidence intervals for model parameters based on profile likelihoods. The Laplace approximation also avoids the tuning...

  11. Team work load in an English general practice. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, G N; McNay, R A

    1974-02-23

    A survey of the total care provided by a general practitioner and his paramedical team for 3,137 patients in Teesside in 1972 showed that even in this area of high morbidity and mortality the work load was very small. The doctor held an average of 2.3 consultations per patient per year, and the overall average for the team of doctor, nurse, and health visitor was only 3.1. By delegating work to a team of trained paramedical workers, by increasing the proportion of personal medicine, and by engaging the co-operation of his patients, the general practitioner reduced his work load considerably, without any apparent reduction in standard of care.

  12. Risk reduction technologies in general practice and social work

    OpenAIRE

    Rexvid, Devin; Blom, Björn; Evertsson, Lars; Forssén, Annika

    2012-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) and social workers (SWs) are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT). It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed...

  13. Risk Reduction Technologies in General Practice and Social Work

    OpenAIRE

    Devin Rexvid; Björn Blom; Lars Evertsson; Annika Forssén

    2012-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) and social workers (SWs) are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT). It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed...

  14. The electrocardiogram in general practice: its use and its interpretation.

    OpenAIRE

    Macallan, D C; Bell, J. A.; Braddick, M; Endersby, K.; Rizzo-Naudi, J.

    1990-01-01

    General practitioners in one health district were surveyed by postal questionnaire (including 15 sample electrocardiogram tracings) to assess their usage and competence in interpretation of the electrocardiogram. A response rate of 60% was achieved, of whom 40% said they used the electrocardiogram at least monthly and 43% used it 'always' or 'usually' in patients with suspected myocardial infarction at home. Overall competence in recognizing a variety of abnormalities was felt to be good. Rec...

  15. Case Studies of Mental Health in General practice(28)---HIV and Mood Disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fiona Judd; Leon Piterman; Grant Blashki; Hui Yang

    2014-01-01

    The Journal presents the Column of Case Studies of Mental Health in General Practice;with aca-demic support from Australian eXperts in general practice,psychology and psychiatry from Monash University and the University of Mel-bourne. The Columnˊs purpose is to respond to the increasing need for the development of mental health services in China. Through study and analysis of mental health cases,we hope to improve understanding of mental illnesses in Chinese primary health settings,and to build capaci-ty amongst community health professionals in managing mental illnesses and psychological problems in general practice. A patient - centred whole - person approach in general practice is the best way to maintain and improve the physical and mental health of residents. Our hope is that these case studies will lead the new wave of general practice and mental health service development both in practice and research. A num-ber of Australian eXperts from the disciplines of general practice,mental health and psychiatry will contribute to the Column. Professor Blash-ki,Professor Judd and Professor Piterman are authors of the teXt General Practice Psychiatry;the Chinese version of the book to be published in 2014. The Journal cases are helping to prepare for the translation and publication of a Chinese version of the book in China. We believe Chi-nese mental health in primary health care will reach new heights under this international cooperation.

  16. A General Framework for Power Analysis to Detect the Moderator Effects in Two- and Three-Level Cluster Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo; Spybrook, Jessaca; Kelcey, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a general framework for power analyses to detect the moderator effects in two- and three-level cluster randomized trials (CRTs). The study specifically aims to: (1) develop the statistical formulations for calculating statistical power, minimum detectable effect size (MDES) and its confidence interval to…

  17. Whether the Autism Spectrum Quotient Consists of Two Different Subgroups? Cluster Analysis of the Autism Spectrum Quotient in General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazoe, Noriko; Fujita, Naofumi; Izumoto, Yuji; Terada, Shin-ichi; Hatakenaka, Yuhei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the individuals in the general population with high scores on the Autism Spectrum Quotient constituted a single homogeneous group or not. A cohort of university students (n = 4901) was investigated by cluster analysis based on the original five subscales of the Autism Spectrum Quotient. Based on…

  18. Medical engagement and organizational characteristics in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Peder; dePont Christensen, René; Halling, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    and this is determined by a complex interaction between both individual and organizational characteristics. Working in collaboration, having staff and being engaged in vocational training of junior doctors are all associated with enhanced levels of medical engagement among GPs.......BACKGROUND: Medical engagement is a mutual concept of the active and positive contribution of doctors to maintaining and enhancing the performance of their health care organization, which itself recognizes this commitment in supporting and encouraging high quality care. A Medical Engagement Scale...... results were analysed in conjunction with the GP register data. RESULTS: Statistically adjusted analyses revealed that the GPs' medical engagement varied substantially. GPs working in collaboration with colleagues were more engaged than GPs from single-handed practices, older GPs were less engaged than...

  19. The Main General Didactical Principles of Glotoeducological Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Juškienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As a pedagogical discipline glotoeducology is related to didactics, i. e. teaching theory. Three concepts of didactics are being distinguished: teaching, teaching principles and types of teaching activity. The authors limited themselves in their paper on one of them, namely: teaching principles that determine the usage of teaching regularities in the course of implementation of the objectives of teaching and education. The article also provides analysis of interaction of linguodidactical principles with general didactical principles, the impact thereof to teaching of foreign languages.

  20. General practice and pandemic influenza: a framework for planning and comparison of plans in five countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahomed S Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although primary health care, and in particular, general practice will be at the frontline in the response to pandemic influenza, there are no frameworks to guide systematic planning for this task or to appraise available plans for their relevance to general practice. We aimed to develop a framework that will facilitate planning for general practice, and used it to appraise pandemic plans from Australia, England, USA, New Zealand and Canada. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adapted the Haddon matrix to develop the framework, populating its cells through a multi-method study that incorporated the peer-reviewed and grey literature, interviews with general practitioners, practice nurses and senior decision-makers, and desktop simulation exercises. We used the framework to analyse 89 publicly-available jurisdictional plans at similar managerial levels in the five countries. The framework identifies four functional domains: clinical care for influenza and other needs, public health responsibilities, the internal environment and the macro-environment of general practice. No plan addressed all four domains. Most plans either ignored or were sketchy about non-influenza clinical needs, and about the contribution of general practice to public health beyond surveillance. Collaborations between general practices were addressed in few plans, and inter-relationships with the broader health system, even less frequently. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to provide a framework to guide general practice planning for pandemic influenza. The framework helped identify critical shortcomings in available plans. Engaging general practice effectively in planning is challenging, particularly where governance structures for primary health care are weak. We identify implications for practice and for research.

  1. Novel anticoagulants: general overview and practical considerations for dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, S; Marshall, J; Meyerowitz, C; Connolly, G

    2016-01-01

    Currently, 4 novel Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs) were approved by the FDA. This review focuses on these agents and proposes a matrix for the general dentists to assess bleeding risk in dental management of patient on DOACs. The outline covers the pharmacology of DOACs (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban and dabigatran), bleeding complications, risk associated with discontinuation, monitoring/reversal, and implications for the dental practitioners. A total of 18 randomized controlled trials were identified with mixed results in regards to the risk for bleeding. Considering the pharmacology of DOACs and challenges in monitoring and reversing their effect, the dentist should consider carefully the management of patients on DOACs as it may differ from patients on conventional anticoagulants. Based on the type of dental procedure and the medical risk assessment, several general treatment approaches can be considered: continue DOACs, time dental treatment as late as possible after the last DOACs dose, discontinue DOACs for 24hrs, or discontinue DOACs for 48hrs. Based on the current reported dental literature, limited dental surgery may benefit from the first 2 conservative options. However, this needs to be proven in comparative clinical trials.

  2. What Should General Practice Trainees Learn about Atopic Eczema?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepani Munidasa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective atopic eczema (AE control not only improves quality of life but may also prevent the atopic march. The Royal College of General Practitioners’ (RCGP curriculum does not currently provide specific learning outcomes on AE management. We aimed to gain consensus on learning outcomes to inform curriculum development. A modified Delphi method was used with questionnaires distributed to gather the views of a range of health care professionals (HCPs including general practitioners (GPs, dermatologists, dermatology nurses and parents of children with AE attending a dedicated paediatric dermatology clinic. Ninety-one questionnaires were distributed to 61 HCPs and 30 parents; 81 were returned. All agreed that learning should focus on the common clinical features, complications and management of AE and the need to appreciate its psychosocial impact. Areas of divergence included knowledge of alternative therapies. Parents felt GPs should better understand how to identify, manage and refer severe AD and recognized the value of the specialist eczema nurse. Dermatologists and parents highlighted inconsistencies in advice regarding topical steroids. This study identifies important areas for inclusion as learning outcomes on AE management in the RCGP curriculum and highlights the importance of patients and parents as a valuable resource in the development of medical education.

  3. Effectiveness of improvement plans in primary care practice accreditation: a clustered randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Nouwens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accreditation of healthcare organizations is a widely used method to assess and improve quality of healthcare. Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of improvement plans in practice accreditation of primary care practices, focusing on cardiovascular risk management (CVRM. METHOD: A two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial with a block design was conducted with measurements at baseline and follow-up. Primary care practices allocated to the intervention group (n = 22 were instructed to focus improvement plans during the intervention period on CVRM, while practices in the control group (n = 23 could focus on any domain except on CVRM and diabetes mellitus. Primary outcomes were systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, LDL cholesterol <2.5 mmol/l and prescription of antiplatelet drugs. Secondary outcomes were 17 indicators of CVRM and physician's perceived goal attainment for the chosen improvement project. RESULTS: No effect was found on the primary outcomes. Blood pressure targets were reached in 39.8% of patients in the intervention and 38.7% of patients in the control group; cholesterol target levels were reached in 44.5% and 49.0% respectively; antiplatelet drugs were prescribed in 82.7% in both groups. Six secondary outcomes improved: smoking status, exercise control, diet control, registration of alcohol intake, measurement of waist circumference, and fasting glucose. Participants' perceived goal attainment was high in both arms: mean scores of 7.9 and 8.2 on the 10-point scale. CONCLUSIONS: The focus of improvement plans on CVRM in the practice accreditation program led to some improvements of CVRM, but not on the primary outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00791362.

  4. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette;

    2016-01-01

    practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction appears to be sparse even though job satisfaction is acknowledged as an important factor associated with both patient satisfaction and medical quality of care. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was 1) to review the current research on the relation between...... task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...... relevance of the retrieved articles was evaluated by title and abstract by the first author, and papers that seemed to meet the aim of the review were then fully read by first author and last author independently judging the eligibility of content. RESULTS: We included four studies in the review...

  5. Determinants related to gender differences in general practice utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Andersen, John Sahl; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    and Health cohort (50-65 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The sum of cohort members' face-to-face consultations with general practitioner (GP) at the cohort baseline year (1993-1997). We obtained data on GP visits from the Danish National Health Service Register at the cohort baseline (1993-1997), when...... information on lifestyle (smoking, body mass index (BMI), alcohol use, physical activity), medical conditions (somatic and mental), employment, education, gravidity, and hormone therapy (HT) use was collected by questionnaire. RESULTS: Women had on average 4.1 and men 2.8 consultations per year. In a crude...... utilization, after adjustment for lifestyle, socio-demography, medical and gender specific factors, with females consulting their GP 18% more often than males. Female reproductive factors (use of postmenopausal hormone therapy and gravidity) explained a large proportion of the gender variation in use of GP...

  6. Evaluation of a sexually transmissible infections education program: Lessons for general practice learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reath, Jennifer; Abbott, Penelope; Dadich, Ann; Hosseinzadeh, Hassan; Hu, Wendy; Kang, Melissa; Usherwood, Tim; Murray, Carolyn; Bourne, Chris

    2016-03-01

    The New South Wales (NSW) Sexually Transmissible Infections Program Unit (STIPU) produced nine resources to support the diagnosis and management of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) in general practice. In this study, we explored the processes of developing the resources and outcomes achieved. We analysed project documents and undertook a focus group interview with the STIPU Working Group to evaluate resource development and dissemination. Interviews with general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs), combined with previously reported survey findings, provided an outcomes evaluation. STIPU used a rigorous, multimodal approach to develop evidence-based clinical resources. GPs and PNs received information opportunistically rather than through targeted searches unless they had a particular interest. GPs were less aware of online re-sources. STIPU's best practice translation of clinical guidelines could be enhanced by promotion of online resources, links through general practice software, strong engagement with general practice organisations, and developing the role of PNs.

  7. What is a 'learning organization' in general practice? A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantle, F

    2000-08-01

    The focus of the research herein was to examine the main characteristics of a learning organization in a general practice. An ethnographic approach was taken. Blockage instrument, structured interviews and documentary evidence were used to establish the validity and the reliability of the research. Data were collected and analysed systematically. It is shown that the case study practice contains the characteristics of a learning organization and key management and organizational issues, such as policy making, practice management and performance management, are identified. Management strategies are offered and recommendations made both for the case study practice and generally for primary and secondary healthcare services. We hope that our research will guide further strategic planning in the case study practice, and that it will help other general practices and the NHS as a whole in the development of a learning organization.

  8. Private or salaried practice: how do young general practitioners make their career choice? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinouani, Shérazade; Boukhors, Gary; Luaces, Baptiste; Durieux, William; Cadwallader, Jean-Sébastien; Aubin-Auger, Isabelle; Gay, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Young French postgraduates in general practice increasingly prefer salaried practice to private practice in spite of the financial incentives offered by the French government or local communities to encourage the latter. This study aimed to explore the determinants of choice between private or salaried practice among young general practitioners. A qualitative study was conducted in the South West of France. Semi-structured interviews of young general practitioners were audio-recorded until data saturation. Recordings were transcribed and then analyzed according to Grounded Theory by three researchers working independently. Sixteen general practitioners participated in this study. For salaried and private doctors, the main factors governing their choice were occupational factors: working conditions, need of varied scope of practice, quality of the doctor-patient relationship or career flexibility. Other factors such as postgraduate training, having worked as a locum or self-interest were also determining. Young general practitioners all expected a work-life balance. The fee-for-service scheme or home visits may have discouraged young general practitioners from choosing private practice. National health policies should increase the attractiveness of ambulatory general practice by promoting the diversification of modes of remuneration and encouraging the organization of group exercises in multidisciplinary medical homes and community health centers.

  9. Promoting leadership and management in Australian general practice nursing: what will it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    This paper outlines the current state of Australian practice nursing, describes the context of general practice and establishes the importance of promoting leadership and management in this setting. Australian general practice nurses have emerged as key stakeholders in primary health care. However, their role in leadership and management has been largely invisible. The reasons for this are multifactorial, including the delay to establish a strong professional organization, their negative power relationships with general medical practitioners, limited nursing leadership and poorly defined roles. To date, the impetus for practice nurse growth has been largely external to the nursing profession. Growth has been driven by the increasing burden of chronic disease and workforce shortages. This has further weakened the control of nurse leaders over the development of the specialty. The Australian practice nurse role is at a crossroads. While the practice nurse role is a viable force to improve health outcomes, the growing strength of the practice nurse challenges traditional professional roles and practice patterns. There is an urgent need to develop practice nurse leaders and managers to not only embrace the challenges of Australian general practice from an operational perspective, but also undertake a clinical leadership role. As clinical leaders, these nurses will need to develop a culture that not only optimizes health outcomes but also advances the status of the nursing profession.

  10. Patient-specific modelling of pulmonary airflow using GPU cluster for the application in medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, T; Wang, X; Aoki, T; Imai, Y; Ishikawa, T; Takase, K; Yamaguchi, T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel patient-specific method of modelling pulmonary airflow using graphics processing unit (GPU) computation that can be applied in medical practice. To overcome the barriers imposed by computation speed, installation price and footprint to the application of computational fluid dynamics, we focused on GPU computation and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The GPU computation and LBM are compatible due to the characteristics of the GPU. As the optimisation of data access is essential for the performance of the GPU computation, we developed an adaptive meshing method, in which an airway model is covered by isotropic subdomains consisting of a uniform Cartesian mesh. We found that 4(3) size subdomains gave the best performance. The code was also tested on a small GPU cluster to confirm its performance and applicability, as the price and footprint are reasonable for medical applications.

  11. Council tax valuation band as marker of deprivation and of general practice workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, N; Baker, N; Straker-Cook, D

    2000-07-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that Council Tax Valuation Banding (CTVB) is a measure both of UK socioeconomic status and of general practice workload. It is a retrospective cohort study based in a UK semi-rural general practice, North Wiltshire. The study group is a randomised selection of UK general practice patients. The outcome measures are socio-demographic and primary care workload parameters versus CTVBs by logistic regression analyses in a sample of 378 patients (90% participation rate). People who pay little or no council tax are significantly less likely to live in owner-occupied homes or to have access to a car than their counterparts. There is also a significant inverse association between CTVB and demand for general practitioner services. CTVB could be an accessible, universal, non-census marker of UK socioeconomic status and of general practice workload that would have validity in the context of primary care resource allocation and is a concept worthy of further investigation.

  12. Cluster Randomised Trials in Cochrane Reviews: Evaluation of Methodological and Reporting Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Marty; Garner, Paul; Donegan, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systematic reviews can include cluster-randomised controlled trials (C-RCTs), which require different analysis compared with standard individual-randomised controlled trials. However, it is not known whether review authors follow the methodological and reporting guidance when including these trials. The aim of this study was to assess the methodological and reporting practice of Cochrane reviews that included C-RCTs against criteria developed from existing guidance. Methods Criteria were developed, based on methodological literature and personal experience supervising review production and quality. Criteria were grouped into four themes: identifying, reporting, assessing risk of bias, and analysing C-RCTs. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched (2nd December 2013), and the 50 most recent reviews that included C-RCTs were retrieved. Each review was then assessed using the criteria. Results The 50 reviews we identified were published by 26 Cochrane Review Groups between June 2013 and November 2013. For identifying C-RCTs, only 56% identified that C-RCTs were eligible for inclusion in the review in the eligibility criteria. For reporting C-RCTs, only eight (24%) of the 33 reviews reported the method of cluster adjustment for their included C-RCTs. For assessing risk of bias, only one review assessed all five C-RCT-specific risk-of-bias criteria. For analysing C-RCTs, of the 27 reviews that presented unadjusted data, only nine (33%) provided a warning that confidence intervals may be artificially narrow. Of the 34 reviews that reported data from unadjusted C-RCTs, only 13 (38%) excluded the unadjusted results from the meta-analyses. Conclusions The methodological and reporting practices in Cochrane reviews incorporating C-RCTs could be greatly improved, particularly with regard to analyses. Criteria developed as part of the current study could be used by review authors or editors to identify errors and improve the quality of published

  13. Cluster Randomised Trials in Cochrane Reviews: Evaluation of Methodological and Reporting Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty Richardson

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews can include cluster-randomised controlled trials (C-RCTs, which require different analysis compared with standard individual-randomised controlled trials. However, it is not known whether review authors follow the methodological and reporting guidance when including these trials. The aim of this study was to assess the methodological and reporting practice of Cochrane reviews that included C-RCTs against criteria developed from existing guidance.Criteria were developed, based on methodological literature and personal experience supervising review production and quality. Criteria were grouped into four themes: identifying, reporting, assessing risk of bias, and analysing C-RCTs. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched (2nd December 2013, and the 50 most recent reviews that included C-RCTs were retrieved. Each review was then assessed using the criteria.The 50 reviews we identified were published by 26 Cochrane Review Groups between June 2013 and November 2013. For identifying C-RCTs, only 56% identified that C-RCTs were eligible for inclusion in the review in the eligibility criteria. For reporting C-RCTs, only eight (24% of the 33 reviews reported the method of cluster adjustment for their included C-RCTs. For assessing risk of bias, only one review assessed all five C-RCT-specific risk-of-bias criteria. For analysing C-RCTs, of the 27 reviews that presented unadjusted data, only nine (33% provided a warning that confidence intervals may be artificially narrow. Of the 34 reviews that reported data from unadjusted C-RCTs, only 13 (38% excluded the unadjusted results from the meta-analyses.The methodological and reporting practices in Cochrane reviews incorporating C-RCTs could be greatly improved, particularly with regard to analyses. Criteria developed as part of the current study could be used by review authors or editors to identify errors and improve the quality of published systematic reviews incorporating

  14. [General practice and surveillance: the example of influenza in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J M; Mosnier, A; Valette, M; Bensoussan, J L; Van Der Werf, S

    2005-05-01

    Data registration by the GROG national network (Regional Group for the Surveillance of Influenza) since 1984 has helped to identify methodological problems. The choice of sentinels and the selection of indicators depend on the analysis of actual influenza consequences. Various sentinels may be concerned: health insurance companies, private companies, schools, physicians, pharmacists. Health care organization modifies the validity of indicators. In France, for instance, home visits were an excellent indicator for early warning before 1995 but this indicator is no longer as efficient as before. The virological detection of Influenza depends on the organization of transportation (samples, results). The predictive value of cases definitions depends on the incidence of infection. The level of choice between specificity and sensibility modifies the perception of outbreaks. Sentinel participation rate influences the sample representativity. The farther this rate is from 100%, the more result validity decreases (in the same way that patients lost to follow-up compromise the validity of results in clinical trials). The publication of results can modify health expenses and behaviors. The GROG network stresses the important role that general practitioners play in health surveillance; it also raises questions in the field of mathematics, statistics, professional organization, training, education, and politics.

  15. The global financial crisis and Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Ian S; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    To explore the potential effects of the global financial crisis (GFC) on the market for general practitioner (GP) services in Australia. We estimate the impact of changes in unemployment rates on demand for GP services and the impact of lost asset values on GP retirement plans and work patterns. Combining these supply and demand effects, we estimate the potential effect of the GFC on the market for GP services under various scenarios. If deferral of retirement increases GP availability by 2%, and historic trends to reduce GP working hours are halved, at the current level of ~5.2% unemployment average fees would decline by $0.23 per GP consultation and volumes of GP services would rise by 2.53% with almost no change in average GP gross earnings over what would otherwise have occurred. With 8.5% unemployment, as initially predicted by Treasury, GP fees would increase by $0.91 and GP income by nearly 3%. The GFC is likely to increase activity in the GP market and potentially to reduce fee levels relative to the pre-GFC trends. Net effects on average GP incomes are likely to be small at current unemployment levels.

  16. [The practice of the mental health in the general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    On December 2, 2011 a new reform bill concerning the Labor Safety and Hygiene law was presented to parliament. The bill states that all companies and businesses regardless of size are obliged to have all employees take a stress test once a year in addition to the regular health check. In September 2010 the employees fo Toho University Sakura Hospital were given this new stress. The test included categories for occupation and the various departments in the hospital. There were 40 employees found to test high for stress and to have depressive tendencies. We interviewed about 16 of these employees. One employee started to receive medicine to help reduce the stress and 4 employees received counseling only. The other 11 employees did not need to receive counseling or medicine. From April 2005 to September 2011, we conducted another study. The subjects this time were 92 employees of the hospital who have received treatment at other facilities for mental problems from occupational physicians. We categorized the subjects by sex, age occupation, length of time employed at the hospital, department and period of time from the onset of symptoms to the time they sought treatment. In this paper I will present my findings and suggestions for improving mental health care for employees of general hospital throughout Japan.

  17. Strategic directions for developing the Australian general practice nurse role in cardiovascular disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Yallop, Julie; Griffiths, Rhonda; Daly, John

    2007-08-01

    Practice nursing is an integral component of British and New Zealand primary care, but in Australia it remains an emerging specialty. Despite an increased focus on the Australian practice nurse role, there has been limited strategic role development, particularly relating to national health priority areas. This paper reports the third stage of a Project exploring the Australian practice nurse role in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This stage involved a consensus development conference, undertaken to identify strategic, priority recommendations for practice nurse role development. 1. Practice nurses have an important role in developing systems and processes for CVD management; 2. A change in the culture of general practice is necessary to promote acceptance of nurse-led CVD management; 3. Future research needs to evaluate specific models of care, incorporating outcome measures sensitive to nursing interventions; 4. Considerable challenges exist in conducting research in general practice; and 5. Changes in funding models are necessary for widespread practice nurse role development. The shifting of funding models provides evidence to support interdisciplinary practice in Australian general practice. The time is ripe, therefore, to engage in prospective and strategic planning to inform development of the practice nurse role.

  18. [Factors influencing general practitioners and specialists of general practice to declare in favor of accepting the role of family doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapcević, Mirjana; Dimitrijević, Ivan; Ristić, Jelena; Vuković, Mira; Nikolić, Radivoje; Stanojević, Petar

    2006-10-01

    Protection and promotion of health of an individual, family and society as the whole depends on the organization and efficiency of the public health service. Modern health service is focused on the health prevention and improvement of the family which is the basic unit of society. The life cycle of the family indicates crisis related to development and underdevelopment as well as some expected and unexpected life situations and this is very important when discussing about many somatic and mental diseases. The objective of our project which included 473 specialists of general practice and 355 general practitioners was to determine the factors which influence the positive attitude of the general practitioners about becoming a family doctor. A total of 828 doctors in Serbia were required to answer the set of eight questions. Statistical analysis included Pearson chi square test with contingency tables and logistic regression, while dependent variable was doctor's attitude about becoming a family doctor in a certain situation. The answer 'no' or 'I don't know' was scored 1 point and the 'yes' answer was graded 2 points. Eight questions mentioned above were independent variables. Logistic model accounting for 79.3% of dependent variable was obtained. Positive attitude of doctors was very much affected by family problems and great majority of these doctors were specialists of general practice. Other questions were not so important for our results. Specialists of general practice, regardless of their working experience and years of practice, gave significantly more positive answers, and the situation was quite opposite with general practitioners. Family medicine supported by modern information systems provides ideal model of comprehensive and complete health prevention with high level of rationalism, quality, efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

  19. [The practice guideline 'Stable angina pectoris' (second revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazel, J A

    2004-11-06

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (Dutch acronym: NHG) practice guideline 'Stable angina pectoris' (second revision) provides clear guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients who experience chest pains as a result of angina pectoris, especially if coronary artery disease is the underlying cause of the complaints. The practice guideline clearly indicates for which complaints the general practitioner should suspect angina pectoris and which information from the anamnesis, family history and risk factors can contribute to distinguishing between stable and unstable angina pectoris. However, the physical examination should not be omitted because this can provide important indications for coronary or pulmonary dysfunction. According to the practice guideline, the treatment policy is determined by the estimated risk of significant coronary artery disease. However, additional tests can be useful even in the case of a small risk, as these can reassure patients. The indications and contraindications for medicinal substances are clearly presented.

  20. Maintaining capacity for in-practice teaching and supervision of students and general practice trainees: a cross-sectional study of early career general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catzikiris, Nigel; Tapley, Amanda; Morgan, Simon; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Ball, Jean; Henderson, Kim; Elliott, Taryn; Spike, Neil; Regan, Cathy; Magin, Parker

    2017-08-10

    Objectives Expanding learner cohorts of medical students and general practitioner (GP) vocational trainees and the impending retirement of the 'baby boomer' GP cohort threaten the teaching and supervisory capacity of the Australian GP workforce. Engaging newly qualified GPs is essential to sustaining this workforce training capacity. The aim of the present study was to establish the prevalence and associations of in-practice clinical teaching and supervision in early career GPs.Methods The present study was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of recent (within 5 years) alumni of three of Australia's 17 regional general practice training programs. The outcome factor was whether the alumnus taught or supervised medical students, GP registrars or other learners in their current practice. Logistic regression analysis was used to establish associations of teaching and supervision with independent variables comprising alumnus demographics, current practice characteristics and vocational training experiences.Results In all, 230 alumni returned questionnaires (response rate 37.4%). Of currently practising alumni, 52.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 45.6-59.0%) reported current teaching or supervisory activities. Factors significantly (Pcareer GPs in practice-based apprenticeship-like teaching or training should inform strategies to maintain workforce training capacity.What is known about the topic? Projected changes in the demand for and supply of clinical teaching and supervision within Australian general practice will require greater uptake of teaching and supervision by recently qualified GPs to ensure sustainability of this teaching model. Although interest in and undertaking of teaching roles have been documented for GP or family medicine trainees, studies investigating the engagement in these clinical roles by GPs during their early post-training period are lacking.What does this paper add? This paper is the first to document the prevalence of teaching and

  1. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-06-01

    Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and "other," which comprised mostly hand surgery.

  2. Health promotion and disease prevention in general practice and primary care: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Stephen; Hann, Alison; Kendall, Sally; Gillam, Steve

    2017-08-11

    This paper reports the findings of a scoping review on the organisation and delivery of health improvement activities in general practice and the primary healthcare team. The project was designed to examine who delivers these interventions, where they are located, what approaches are developed in practices and how individual practices and the primary healthcare team organise such public health activities and how these contribute to health improvement. Our focus was on health promotion and prevention activities and aimed to identify the current extent of knowledge about the health improvement activities in general practice and the wider primary healthcare team. Many of the research studies reviewed had some details about the type, process, location or who provided the intervention. Little attention is paid in the literature to examining the impact of the organisational context on the way services are delivered or how this affects the effectiveness of health improvement interventions in general practice. We found that the focus of attention is mainly on individual prevention approaches with practices engaging in both primary and secondary prevention. Although many GPs do not take a population approach and focus on individual patients some do see health promotion as an integral part of practice - whether as individual approaches to primary or secondary health improvement or as a practice-based approach to improving the health of their patients. Based on our analysis we conclude that there is insufficient good evidence to support many of the health improvement interventions undertaken in general practice and primary care.

  3. The k-means clustering technique: General considerations and implementation in Mathematica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Morissette

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Data clustering techniques are valuable tools for researchers working with large databases of multivariate data. In this tutorial, we present a simple yet powerful one: the k-means clustering technique, through three different algorithms: the Forgy/Lloyd, algorithm, the MacQueen algorithm and the Hartigan and Wong algorithm. We then present an implementation in Mathematica and various examples of the different options available to illustrate the application of the technique.

  4. Practice-based small group learning (PBSGL) for CPD: a pilot with general practice trainees to support the transition to independent practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, Jonathan; Scallan, Samantha

    2013-05-01

    The paper describes a small-scale enquiry with UK-based general practice specialty trainees (GPSTs) at the time of transition from training to independent practice. It aimed to identify whether they were supported in making this transition through attending practice-based small group learning (PBSGL) sessions. Participants in the study reported that the sessions helped them to consolidate their learning from their third year of training (GPST3), improved their ability to identify and use evidence in practice, and shifted the focus of their learning needs away from the two UK general practice postgraduate exams (applied Knowledge Test or aKT; and Clinical Skills assessment or CSa) and towards 'real world' practice. The two pilot groups have become established as means of peer support and continue to meet, with small changes in composition. The work has led to the wider roll out of PBSGL for newly qualified GPs across Wessex.

  5. A framework for developing rural academic general practices: a qualitative case study in rural Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J B; Morrison, Tracy; Bryant, Melanie; Kassell, Lisa; Nestel, Debra

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing pressure for Australian rural general practices to engage in educational delivery as a means of addressing workforce issues and accommodating substantial increases in learners. For practices that have now developed a strong focus on education, there is the challenge to complement this by engaging in research activity. This study develops a rural academic general practice framework to assist rural practices in developing both comprehensive educational activity and a strong research focus thus moving towards functioning as mature academic units. A case study research design was used with the unit of analysis at the level of the rural general practice. Purposively sampled practices were recruited and individual interviews conducted with staff (supervisors, practice managers, nurses), learners (medical students, interns and registrars) and patients. Three practices hosted 'multi-level learners', two practices hosted one learner group and one had no learners. Forty-four individual interviews were conducted with staff, learners and patients. Audio recordings were transcribed for thematic analysis. After initial inductive coding, deductive analysis was undertaken with reference to recent literature and the expertise of the research team resulting in the rural academic general practice framework. Three key themes emerged with embedded subthemes. For the first theme, organisational considerations, subthemes were values/vision/culture, patient population and clinical services, staffing, physical infrastructure/equipment, funding streams and governance. For the second theme, educational considerations, subthemes were processes, clinical supervision, educational networks and learner presence. Third, for research considerations, there were the subthemes of attitude to research and research activity. The framework maps the development of a rural academic practice across these themes in four progressive stages: beginning, emerging, consolidating and

  6. Road safety risks in young people attending general practice: A cross-sectional study of road risks and associated health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer; Kauer, Sylvia D; Sanci, Lena

    2016-09-01

    Young people have a large burden of death and disease from risky road behaviours. Guidelines recommend injury prevention and harm minimisation counselling; however, little is known about road risks in youth attending primary care. The aim of this study was to examine the type of road risks and associated behaviours in young people attending general practice. A cross-sectional analysis was undertaken on health risk survey data from a sample of 901 patients, aged 14-24 years, attending 40 Victorian general practices in a stratified cluster randomised trial. Frequently occurring road risks included travelling with people under the influence of alcohol or drugs (55%), speeding (43%) and mobile phone use (40%). These behaviours were strongly associated with other health risks, including use of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs, and unprotected sex. High proportions of youth attending general practice engage in road risks, making this a potential setting to discuss road risks along with broader health risk prevention activities.

  7. Clinical accuracy of point-of-care urine culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Cordoba, Gloria; Sørensen, Tina Møller

    2017-01-01

    in boric acid used for transportation for the reference standard. (4) Accuracy based on expert reading of photographs of POC urine cultures performed in general practice. Standard culture performed in the microbiological department was used as reference standard for all four measures. RESULTS: Twenty...... excluded was 0.82 (0.77-0.86) and agreement between expert readings of photographs and reference results was 0.81 (CI: 0.76-0.85). CONCLUSIONS: POC culture used in general practice has high SEN but low SPE. Low SPE could be due to both misinterpretation in general practice and an imperfect reference......OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical accuracy (sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive predictive value and negative predictive value) of two point-of-care (POC) urine culture tests for the identification of urinary tract infection (UTI) in general practice. DESIGN: Prospective diagnostic...

  8. A nurse-led model of chronic disease management in general practice: Patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacqueline; Eley, Diann; Patterson, Elizabeth; Turner, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that current models of chronic disease management within general practice are not effective in meeting the needs of the community. The objective of this article is to examine patients' perceptions of a nurse-led collaborative model of care trialled in three general practices in Australia. This article reports on the second phase of a mixed-methods study in which semi-structured interviews with purposively selected patients were conducted to elicit information about their perceptions of nurse-led care. Three themes emerged from the data - time, ambiance and dimensions of the nurse role. The results suggest that general practice nurses had a positive impact on patients' ability to manage their chronic disease. This infers that there is scope for general practice nurses to expand their role in chronic disease management to assist patients to better self-manage their chronic diseases.

  9. The estimation of patients' views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice by general dental practitioners: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truin Gert-Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the changes in dental healthcare, such as the increasing assertiveness of patients, the introduction of new dental professionals, and regulated competition, it becomes more important that general dental practitioners (GDPs take patients' views into account. The aim of the study was to compare patients' views on organizational aspects of general dental practices with those of GDPs and with GDPs' estimation of patients' views. Methods In a survey study, patients and GDPs provided their views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice. In a second, separate survey, GDPs were invited to estimate patients' views on 22 organizational aspects of a general dental practice. Results For 4 of the 22 aspects, patients and GDPs had the same views, and GDPs estimated patients' views reasonably well: 'Dutch-speaking GDP', 'guarantee on treatment', 'treatment by the same GDP', and 'reminder of routine oral examination'. For 2 aspects ('quality assessment' and 'accessibility for disabled patients' patients and GDPs had the same standards, although the GDPs underestimated the patients' standards. Patients had higher standards than GDPs for 7 aspects and lower standards than GDPs for 8 aspects. Conclusion On most aspects GDPs and patient have different views, except for social desirable aspects. Given the increasing assertiveness of patients, it is startling the GDP's estimated only half of the patients' views correctly. The findings of the study can assist GDPs in adapting their organizational services to better meet the preferences of their patients and to improve the communication towards patients.

  10. The MOND External Field Effect on the Dynamics of the Globular Clusters: General Considerations and Application to NGC 2419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshani, Kamran

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics toward the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio, we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an order of magnitude in terms of the total χ2 of surface brightness and velocity dispersion.

  11. The mond external field effect on the dynamics of the globular clusters: general considerations and application to NGC 2419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derakhshani, Kamran, E-mail: kderakhshani@iasbs.ac.ir [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P. O. Box 45195-1159 Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics toward the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio, we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an order of magnitude in terms of the total χ{sup 2} of surface brightness and velocity dispersion.

  12. The MOND External Field Effect on the Dynamics of the Globular Clusters: General Considerations and Application to NGC 2419

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics towards the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an...

  13. Outcome of knee injuries in general practice: 1-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background Knee injuries may lead to pain and to functional limitations in the activities of daily living. Patients with knee injuries are frequently seen in general practice; however, the outcome and management in these patients is not known. Aim To assess the outcome and management of knee injuries at 12 months' follow-up in general practice. Design of study A prospective observational cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. Setting. Primary health care. Method Adult patients consulting their...

  14. Validation of an instrument to measure inter-organisational linkages in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Amoroso

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Linkages between general medical practices and external services are important for high quality chronic disease care. The purpose of this research is to describe the development, evaluation and use of a brief tool that measures the comprehensiveness and quality of a general practice’s linkages with external providers for the management of patients with chronic disease. In this study, clinical linkages are defined as the communication, support, and referral arrangements between services for the care and assistance of patients with chronic disease. Methods: An interview to measure surgery-level (rather than individual clinician-level clinical linkages was developed, piloted, reviewed, and evaluated with 97 Australian general practices. Two validated survey instruments were posted to patients, and a survey of locally available services was developed and posted to participating Divisions of General Practice (support organisations. Hypotheses regarding internal validity, association with local services, and patient satisfaction were tested using factor analysis, logistic regression and multilevel regression models. Results: The resulting General Practice Clinical Linkages Interview (GP-CLI is a nine-item tool with three underlying factors: referral and advice linkages, shared care and care planning linkages, and community access and awareness linkages. Local availability of chronic disease services has no affect on the comprehensiveness of services with which practices link, however comprehensiveness of clinical linkages has an association with patient assessment of access, receptionist services, and of continuity of care in their general practice. Conclusions: The GP-CLI may be useful to researchers examining comparable health care systems for measuring the comprehensiveness and quality of linkages at a general practice-level with related services, possessing both internal and external validity. The tool can be used with large samples

  15. NHS health checks through general practice: randomised trial of population cardiovascular risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cochrane Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global burden of the major vascular diseases is projected to rise and to remain the dominant non-communicable disease cluster well into the twenty first century. The Department of Health in England has developed the NHS Health Check service as a policy initiative to reduce population vascular disease risk. The aims of this study were to monitor population changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors over the first year of the new service and to assess the value of tailored lifestyle support, including motivational interview with ongoing support and referral to other services. Methods Randomised trial comparing NHS Health Check service only with NHS Health Check service plus additional lifestyle support in Stoke on Trent, England. Thirty eight general practices and 601 (365 usual care, 236 additional lifestyle support patients were recruited and randomised independently between September 2009 and February 2010. Changes in population CVD risk between baseline and one year follow-up were compared, using intention-to-treat analysis. The primary outcome was the Framingham 10 year CVD risk score. Secondary outcomes included individual modifiable risk measures and prevalence of individual risk categories. Additional lifestyle support included referral to a lifestyle coach and free sessions as needed for: weight management, physical activity, cook and eat and positive thinking. Results Average population CVD risk decreased from 32.9% to 29.4% (p Conclusions The NHS Health Check service in Stoke on Trent resulted in significant reduction in estimated population CVD risk. There was no evidence of further benefit of the additional lifestyle support services in terms of absolute CVD risk reduction.

  16. Moving to paperlessness: a case study from a large general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Carr-Bains

    2003-11-01

    The implications of this case study are that a committed general practice can achieve a largely paperless environment in approximately two years. The practice is now fit to be part of any move towards integration of records within its local health community, and can demonstrate from its computer records that it meets the quality targets for primary care.

  17. Long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants placed in a general dental practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hevinga, M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants applied in a general dental practice. METHODS: Regularly attending patients visiting the practice between July 2006 until November 2007 and who had received sealants befor

  18. Process evaluation of a tailored intervention programme of cardiovascular risk management in general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huntink, E.; Wensing, M.; Timmers, I.M.; Lieshout, J. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A tailored implementation programme to improve cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) in general practice had little impact on outcomes. The questions in this process evaluation concerned (1) impact on counselling skills and CVRM knowledge of practice nurses, (2) their use of the various

  19. The EMR-scan: assessing the quality of Electronic Medical Records in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Jabaaij, L.; Njoo, K.; Hoogen, H. van den; Bakker, D. de

    2008-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic medical records (EMR) in general practice has spread rapidly in the last decade (more than 90% today). Traditionally, these records are primarily used for direct patient care and for administrative purposes by the practice involved. In recent years, further technica

  20. Evaluation of an intervention to improve blood culture practices: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavese, P; Maillet, M; Vitrat-Hincky, V; Recule, C; Vittoz, J-P; Guyomard, A; Seigneurin, A; François, P

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an intervention to improve blood culture practices. A cluster randomised trial in two parallel groups was performed at the Grenoble University Hospital, France. In October 2009, the results of a practices audit and the guidelines for the optimal use of blood cultures were disseminated to clinical departments. We compared two types of information dissemination: simple presentation or presentation associated with an infectious diseases (ID) specialist intervention. The principal endpoint was blood culture performance measured by the rate of patients having one positive blood culture and the rate of positive blood cultures. The cases of 130 patients in the "ID" group and 119 patients in the "simple presentation" group were audited during the second audit in April 2010. The rate of patients with one positive blood culture increased in both groups (13.62 % vs 9.89 % for the ID group, p = 0.002, 15.90 % vs 13.47 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.009). The rate of positive blood cultures improved in both groups (6.68 % vs 5.96 % for the ID group, p = 0.003, 6.52 % vs 6.21 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.017). The blood culture indication was significantly less often specified in the request form in the simple presentation group, while it remained stable in the ID group (p = 0.04). The rate of positive blood cultures and the rate of patients having one positive blood culture improved in both groups. The ID specialist intervention did not have more of an impact on practices than a simple presentation of audit feedback and guidelines.

  1. Star Cluster Demographics. I. A General Framework and Application to the Antennae Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B C; Fall, S M; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali

    2006-01-01

    We present a framework for understanding the demographics of star cluster systems, and develop a toy model which incorporates a universal initial power law mass function, selected formation histories, selected disruption laws, and a convolution with common artifacts and selection effects found in observational data. The model confirms that the observed correlation between the brightest young cluster in a galaxy and the total number of young clusters can be understood as a statistical size-of-sample effect, rather than a difference in the physical process responsible for the formation of the clusters. A comparison is made between different cluster disruption laws and it is shown that the break in the dN/d\\tau diagram used to determine the parameters in the Boutloukos & Lamers model may be produced by incompleteness near the breakpoint. A model of the Antennae galaxies is developed and compared with the observational data. An important component of our model is the use of a "two-stage" disruption process, w...

  2. Cluster C maladaptive personality traits in a general population of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Paino, Mercedes; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín; Muñiz, José

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of the Cluster C traits and personality disorders in adolescents has been poorly analyzed. The main goal of this research was to analyze the rate of the Cluster C traits and maladaptive personality patterns in a community sample of adolescents. We also examined the dimensional structure and the influence of sex and age in its phenotypic expression. The sample comprised a total of 1443 participants (48.2% male) with a mean age of 15.92 years (SD = 1.18). We used the Cluster C subscales of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 + (PDQ-4+). The results showed that the traits of personalities "anxious" or "inhibited" are common among adolescents. As the cut-offs PDQ-4+, 28.3% of the sample showed at least one maladaptive personality pattern of Cluster C. The analysis of the internal structure of the items yielded a one-dimensional solution called Inhibited-Anxious personality. We found statistically significant differences by gender in mean scores in the Avoidant subscale and by age in the Dependent subscale. These data yield new clues that improve the understanding of the Cluster C traits and maladaptive patterns of personality in this sector of the population.

  3. Toward generally accepted forensic assessment practices among clinical neuropsychologists: a survey of professional practice and common test use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Casey; Barr, William; Brodale, Donald L; Rabin, Laura A

    2017-07-04

    This study investigated professional practice and common test use among clinical neuropsychologists engaging in forensic assessment.  Doctorate-level psychologists active in the practice of neuropsychology and on the INS and NAN membership listings (n = 502) were surveyed about their demographics, professional practice, and common test use. Participants who reported engaging in forensic practice (n = 255) were further surveyed about their forensic practice. Forensic participants were more likely to be male and Caucasian, and reported higher ages, more years of professional experience, and a higher prevalence of board certification. While characteristics of their professional and forensic practice varied, forensic participants reported spending most of their professional time conducting neuropsychological assessments with adult clients in a private or group practice setting, focusing on civil referrals and civil legal questions involving older adult issues, developmental issues, head injury, and psychiatric issues. Common test use across neuropsychological assessment domains is presented for board-certified forensic participants (n = 77). An examination of these results reveals that the current pattern of test use is similar to the results of a more general survey of neuropsychological test use.  The findings provide insight into the practice of forensic neuropsychological assessment, and further establish the admissibility of neuropsychological evidence in the United States legal system. Results will be useful for clinical neuropsychologists, field leaders, and legal professionals hoping to gain insight into the role of clinical neuropsychology in civil and criminal legal decision-making.

  4. Knowledge, illness perceptions and stated clinical practice behaviour in management of gout: a mixed methods study in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaetgens, B.; Pustjens, T.; Scheepers, L.E.; Janssens, H.J.E.M.; Linden, S. van der; Boonen, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore knowledge, illness perceptions and stated practice behaviour in relation to gout in primary care. This is a mixed methods study among 32 general practitioners (GPs). The quantitative assessment included the Gout Knowledge Questionnaire (GKQ; range

  5. Promoting chlamydia screening with posters and leaflets in general practice - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford-Young William

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practice staff are reluctant to discuss sexual health opportunistically in all consultations. Health promotion materials may help alleviate this barrier. Chlamydia screening promotion posters and leaflets, produced by the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP, have been available to general practices, through local chlamydia screening offices, since its launch. In this study we explored the attitudes of general practice staff to these screening promotional materials, how they used them, and explored other promotional strategies to encourage chlamydia screening. Methods Twenty-five general practices with a range of screening rates, were purposively selected from six NCSP areas in England. In focus groups doctors, nurses, administrative staff and receptionists were encouraged to discuss candidly their experiences about their use and opinions of posters, leaflets and advertising to promote chlamydia screening. Researchers observed whether posters and leaflets were on display in reception and/or waiting areas. Data were collected and analysed concurrently using a stepwise framework analytical approach. Results Although two-thirds of screening practices reported that they displayed posters and leaflets, they were not prominently displayed in most practices. Only a minority of practices reported actively using screening promotional materials on an ongoing basis. Most staff in all practices were not following up the advertising in posters and leaflets by routinely offering opportunistic screening to their target population. Some staff in many practices thought posters and leaflets would cause offence or embarrassment to their patients. Distribution of chlamydia leaflets by receptionists was thought to be inappropriate by some practices, as they thought patients would be offended when being offered a leaflet in a public area. Practice staff suggested the development of pocket-sized leaflets. Conclusion The NCSP

  6. An exploration of the role of pharmacists within general practice clinics: the protocol for the pharmacists in practice study (PIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Edwin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication-related problems are a serious concern in Australian primary care. Pharmacist interventions have been shown to be effective in identifying and resolving these problems. Collaborative general practitioner-pharmacist services currently available in Australia are limited and underused. Limitations include geographical isolation of pharmacists and lack of communication and access to patient information. Co-location of pharmacists within the general practice clinics is a possible solution. There have been no studies in the Australian setting exploring the role of pharmacists within general practice clinics. The aim of this study is to develop and test a multifaceted practice pharmacist role in primary care practices to improve the quality use of medicines by patients and clinic staff. Methods/design This is a multi-centre, prospective intervention study with a pre-post design and a qualitative component. A practice pharmacist will be located in each of two clinics and provide short and long patient consultations, drug information services and quality assurance activities. Patients receiving long consultation with a pharmacist will be followed up at 3 and 6 months. Based on sample size calculations, at least 50 patients will be recruited for long patient consultations across both sites. Outcome measures include the number, type and severity of medication-related problems identified and resolved; medication adherence; and patient satisfaction. Brief structured interviews will be conducted with patients participating in the study to evaluate their experiences with the service. Staff collaboration and satisfaction with the service will be assessed. Discussion This intervention has the potential to optimise medication use in primary care clinics leading to better health outcomes. This study will provide data about the effectiveness of the proposed model for pharmacist involvement in Australian general practice clinics

  7. Testing for sexually transmitted infections in general practice: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Gary M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care is an important provider of sexual health care in England. We sought to explore the extent of testing for chlamydia and HIV in general practice and its relation to associated measures of sexual health in two contrasting geographical settings. Methods We analysed chlamydia and HIV testing data from 64 general practices and one genitourinary medicine (GUM clinic in Brent (from mid-2003 to mid-2006 and 143 general practices and two GUM clinics in Avon (2004. We examined associations between practice testing status, practice characteristics and hypothesised markers of population need (area level teenage conception rates and Index of Multiple Deprivation, IMD scores. Results No HIV or chlamydia testing was done in 19% (12/64 of general practices in Brent, compared to 2.1% (3/143 in Avon. In Brent, the mean age of general practitioners (GPs in Brent practices that tested for chlamydia or HIV was lower than in those that had not conducted testing. Practices where no HIV testing was done had slightly higher local teenage conception rates (median 23.5 vs. 17.4/1000 women aged 15-44, p = 0.07 and served more deprived areas (median IMD score 27.1 vs. 21.8, p = 0.05. Mean yearly chlamydia and HIV testing rates, in practices that did test were 33.2 and 0.6 (per 1000 patients aged 15-44 years in Brent, and 34.1 and 10.3 in Avon, respectively. In Brent practices only 20% of chlamydia tests were conducted in patients aged under 25 years, compared with 39% in Avon. Conclusions There are substantial geographical differences in the intensity of chlamydia and HIV testing in general practice. Interventions to facilitate sexually transmitted infection and HIV testing in general practice are needed to improve access to effective sexual health care. The use of routinely-collected laboratory, practice-level and demographic data for monitoring sexual health service provision and informing service planning should be more widely evaluated.

  8. The epidemiology of suicide and attempted suicide in Dutch general practice 1983-2003.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquet, R.L.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Zee, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients attempting or committing suicide consult their general practitioner (GP) in the preceding period, indicating that GPs might play an important role in prevention. The aim of the present study was to analyse the epidemiology of suicidal behaviour in Dutch general practice in

  9. Personnel planning in general practices: development and testing of a skill mix analysis method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eitzen-Strassel, J. von; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Derckx, E.W.C.C.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2014-01-01

    Background: General practitioners (GPs) have to match patients’ demands with the mix of their practice staff’s competencies. However, apart from some general principles, there is little guidance on recruiting new staff. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a method which would allow GPs

  10. Personnel planning in general practices : Development and testing of a skill mix analysis method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Eitzen-Strassel, J.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Derckx, E.W.C.C.; de Bakker, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) have to match patients’ demands with the mix of their practice staff’s competencies. However, apart from some general principles, there is little guidance on recruiting new staff. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a method which would allow GPs

  11. 19 CFR 181.92 - Definitions and general NAFTA advance ruling practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions and general NAFTA advance ruling... Procedures § 181.92 Definitions and general NAFTA advance ruling practice. (a) Definitions. For purposes of... that interprets and applies the provisions of NAFTA to a specific set of facts involving any subject...

  12. A survey of cusp fractures in a population of general dental practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Kuys, R.H.; Kreulen, C.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Creugers, T.J.; Burgersdijk, R.C.W.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was conducted to expand the knowledge on the incidence of complete cusp fractures of posterior teeth in Dutch general practices. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During a 3-month period, data were obtained from 28 general practitioners, representing 46,394 patients. For each new case of co

  13. The epidemiology of suicide and attempted suicide in Dutch general practice 1983-2003.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquet, R.L.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Zee, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients attempting or committing suicide consult their general practitioner (GP) in the preceding period, indicating that GPs might play an important role in prevention. The aim of the present study was to analyse the epidemiology of suicidal behaviour in Dutch general practice in

  14. Consultations for mental problems in general practices with and without mental health nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnée, T.; Beurs, D. de; Verhaak, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: It seems cost-effective to provide mental health care to patient with mild mental problems in general practices instead of in specialized care, but general practitioners (GPs) often lack time or expertise. Since 2008, Dutch GPs have been collaborating with nurses with mental health

  15. Urinary tract infection in male general practice patients: uropathogens and antibiotic susceptibility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeijers, J.J.; Verbon, A.; Kessels, A.G.H.; Bartelds, A.; Donker, G.; Nys, S.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in male general practitioner (GP) patients presenting with an uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI). Material and Methods: A population-based study was conducted among males, 18 years and older, general practice patients,

  16. Generalization of Tactics in Tag Rugby from Practice to Games in Middle School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Ah; Ward, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many of the issues relating to game performance of students found in the physical education literature can be considered a failure of generalization from practices to games, and from games to games. However, no study in secondary physical education has examined generalization effects as a result of effective game pedagogy in the…

  17. Is it econmically viable to employ the nurse practitioner in general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierick-van Daele, Angelique; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Romeijn, Aria; Derckx, Emmy W.C.C.; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background:  General practitioners face the challenging task of finding the most efficient and effective mix of professionals in general practice to accommodate future care demands within scarce health care budgets. To enable informed decision-making about skill mix issues, economic information is

  18. Consultations for mental problems in general practices with and without mental health nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnée, T.; Beurs, D. de; Verhaak, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: It seems cost-effective to provide mental health care to patient with mild mental problems in general practices instead of in specialized care, but general practitioners (GPs) often lack time or expertise. Since 2008, Dutch GPs have been collaborating with nurses with mental health

  19. Child and adolescent mental health care in Dutch general practice: time trend analyses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Dijk, C.E. van; Verheij, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Because most children and adolescents visit their general practitioner (GP) regularly, general practice is a useful setting in which child and adolescent mental health problems can be identified, treated or referred to specialised care. Measures to strengthen Dutch primary mental health

  20. Is it economically viable to employ the nurse practitioner in general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierick-van Daele, Angelique; Steuten, Lotte M.G.; Romeijn, Aria; Derckx, Emmy W.C.C.; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background:  General practitioners face the challenging task of finding the most efficient and effective mix of professionals in general practice to accommodate future care demands within scarce health care budgets. To enable informed decision-making about skill mix issues, economic information is n

  1. Contributions from the lifeworld: quality, caring and the general practice nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Christopher; Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally; Sibbald, Bonnie; Porritt, Julie; Yates, Rachel; Dwan, Kathryn; Kljakovic, Marjan

    2009-01-01

    Enhancing quality and safety in primary health systems is of central importance to funders, practitioners, policy makers and consumers. In this paper we explore the roles of general practice nurses in relation to quality and safety. Cross-sectional multimethod study of 25 Australian general practices. Using rapid appraisal we collected data for each practice from interviews with practice nurses, general practitioners and practice managers; photographs of nurse-identified 'key workspaces'; structured observation of nurses for two one-hour sessions; and floor plans. Quality was articulated in two domains, reflecting both external and intrinsic determinants. External determinants included a large number of essentially structural, procedural or regulatory processes, the most marked of these being practice accreditation and occupational health and safety; these corresponded to the Habermasian idea of system. Intrinsic determinants related mostly to nurse perception of their own quality behaviour, and consisted of ways and means to improve or optimise patient care; these correspond to Habermas' notion of the lifeworld. Nurses describe a productive tension between the regulatory roles that they play in general practices, and patient-focused care, contrary to Habermas' suggestion that system subsumes lifeworld. Current funding systems often fail to recognise the importance of the particular elements of nurse contributions to quality and safety in primary care.

  2. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Preventive Practice Towards Breast Cancer among General Practitioner Health Professionals in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abda, Naima; Najdi, Adil; El Fakir, Samira; Tachfouti, Nabil; Berraho, Mohamed; Chami Khazraji, Youssef; Abousselham, Loubna; Belakhel, Latifa; Bekkali, Rachid; Nejjari, Chakib

    2017-04-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in Morocco and its diagnosis is usually made at advanced stages. The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, practices and attitudes of general practitioners regarding early detection of breast cancer. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during July 2011 on a sample of 140 general practitioners employed in basic health care facilities. Results: The majority (85.7%) of general practitioners were aware of the existence of a ministerial circular which aimed to generalize breast cancer screening. Systematic practice of clinical breast examination was reported by 18.0% of doctors for every woman between 45 and 70 years and a systematic breast self-examination check-up was reported by 59.4% of physicians. Mammography was requested by 54.1% of physicians in the presence of risk factors. Females and physicians practicing in urban areas were less likely to have a knowledge, attitudes and practices score higher than 8 as compared to male physicians and those practicing in rural areas. Discussion and conclusion: Our study showed that the knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitioners regarding the early detection of breast cancer program were not satisfactory; hence the urgent need for improved implementation of the program in the affected regions. Creative Commons Attribution License

  3. New graduate nurses as knowledge brokers in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Karen J; Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Practice nursing in New Zealand is not well described in the literature. One survey illustrated that most of the New Zealand practice nurses sampled did not know of the country's two premier evidence-based health websites. A recent review compared general practice in the UK, New Zealand and Australia and found that whereas there had been significant developments in empowering the practice nurse workforce to run nurse-led clinics in the UK, New Zealand and Australia lagged behind. The aim of this reported constructivist grounded theory study was to investigate practice nurses' use of information. Conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, data were collected through ethnographic techniques in one general practice between September 2009 and January 2010 to enhance theoretical sensitivity to the area of information use. Subsequently, six experienced practice nurses (one twice after moving jobs) and five new graduate nurses from five different general practices were interviewed, using open-ended questions, between January 2010 and August 2011. Concurrent data collection and analysis occurred throughout the study period. The use of memos, the constant comparative method, data categorisation and finally, data abstraction resulted in the final theory of reciprocal role modelling. Experienced practice nurses role modelled clinical skills to new graduate nurses. Unexpectedly, new graduate nurses were unconscious experts at sourcing information and role modelled this skill to experienced practice nurses. Once this attribute was acknowledged by the experienced practice nurse, mutual learning occurred that enabled both groups of nurses to become better practitioners. Graduate nurses of the millennial generation were identified as a resource for experienced practice nurses who belong to the baby boomer generation and generation X. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparison of physiotherapy, manipulation, and corticosteroid injection for treating shoulder complaints in general practice : Randomised, single blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, Jan C.; Sobel, J.S.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of physiotherapy, manipulation, and corticosteroid injection for treating patients with shoulder complaints in general practice. Design: Randomised, single blind study. Setting: Seven general practices in the Netherlands. Subjects: 198 patients with shoulder compla

  5. Comparison of physiotherapy, manipulation, and corticosteroid injection for treating shoulder complaints in general practice : Randomised, single blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, Jan C.; Sobel, J.S.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of physiotherapy, manipulation, and corticosteroid injection for treating patients with shoulder complaints in general practice. Design: Randomised, single blind study. Setting: Seven general practices in the Netherlands. Subjects: 198 patients with shoulder

  6. Depressive Symptom Clusters Are Differentially Associated with General and Visceral Obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, Radboud M.; Bus, Boudewijn A. A.; Holewijn, Suzanne; Franke, Barbara; Purandare, Nitin; de Graaf, Jacqueline; den Heijer, Martin; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Voshaar, Richard C. Oude

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the relationship between obesity and depressive symptoms taking into account different measures for obesity (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)) and different depressive symptom clusters. DESIGN Cross-sectional population-based survey.

  7. Photometric variability in the old open cluster M 67. II. General Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Stassun, K G; Mathieu, R D; Verbunt, F

    2001-01-01

    We use differential CCD photometry to search for variability in BVI among 990 stars projected in and around the old open cluster M 67. In a previous paper we reported results for 22 cluster members that are optical counterparts to X-ray sources; this study focuses on the other stars in our observations. A variety of sampling rates were employed, allowing variability on time scales ranging from \\sim 0.3 hours to \\sim 20 days to be studied. Among the brightest sources studied, detection of variability as small as sigma approx 10 mmag is achieved (with > 3 sigma confidence); for the typical star observed, sensitivity to variability at levels sigma approx 20 mmag is achieved. The study is unbiased for stars with 12.5 < B < 18.5, 12.5 < V < 18.5, and 12 < I < 18 within a radius of about 10 arcmin from the cluster centre. In addition, stars with 10 < BVI < 12.5 were monitored in a few small regions in the cluster. We present photometry for all 990 sources studied, and report the variability ...

  8. Transferable and non-transferable drug resistance in enteric bacteria from hospital and from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, JK; Bak, AL; Bülow, P

    1976-01-01

    Drug resistance to 8 different antibiotics in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from different hospitals and two groups of general practitioners was studied. Escherichia coli dominated among the 632 strains investigated. Drug resistance was found in 62% of the 512 hospital strains and in 38% of the 120...... strains from general practice. Multiple resistance was common especially in strains from hospital. R factors was found in 23% of the 317 drug-resistant strains from hospital and in 11% of the 46 drug-resistant strains from general practice. Resistance to streptomycin, sulphonamide and tetracycline either...

  9. The process of patient enablement in general practice nurse consultations: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Jane; Banfield, Michelle; Phillips, Christine; Mills, Jane

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the process of patient enablement in general practice nursing consultations. Enhanced roles for general practice nurses may benefit patients through a range of mechanisms, one of which may be increasing patient enablement. In studies with general practitioners enhanced patient enablement has been associated with increases in self-efficacy and skill development. This study used a constructivist grounded theory design. In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 general practice nurses and 23 patients from 21 general practices between September 2013 - March 2014. Data generation and analysis were conducted concurrently using constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling focussing on the process and outcomes of patient enablement. Use of the storyline technique supported theoretical coding and integration of the data into a theoretical model. A clearly defined social process that fostered and optimised patient enablement was constructed. The theory of 'developing enabling healthcare partnerships between nurses and patients in general practice' incorporates three stages: triggering enabling healthcare partnerships, tailoring care and the manifestation of patient enablement. Patient enablement was evidenced through: 1. Patients' understanding of their unique healthcare requirements informing their health seeking behaviours and choices; 2. Patients taking an increased lead in their partnership with a nurse and seeking choices in their care and 3. Patients getting health care that reflected their needs, preferences and goals. This theoretical model is in line with a patient-centred model of health care and is particularly suited to patients with chronic disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. General practice-based clinical trials in Germany - a problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, clinical trials and comparative effectiveness studies in primary care are still very rare, while their usefulness has been recognised in many other countries. A network of researchers from German academic general practice has explored the reasons for this discrepancy. Methods Based on a comprehensive literature review and expert group discussions, problem analyses as well as structural and procedural prerequisites for a better implementation of clinical trials in German primary care are presented. Results In Germany, basic biomedical science and technology is more reputed than clinical or health services research. Clinical trials are funded by industry or a single national programme, which is highly competitive, specialist-dominated, exclusive of pilot studies, and usually favours innovation rather than comparative effectiveness studies. Academic general practice is still not fully implemented, and existing departments are small. Most general practitioners (GPs work in a market-based, competitive setting of small private practices, with a high case load. They have no protected time or funding for research, and mostly no research training or experience. Good Clinical Practice (GCP training is compulsory for participation in clinical trials. The group defined three work packages to be addressed regarding clinical trials in German general practice: (1 problem analysis, and definition of (2 structural prerequisites and (3 procedural prerequisites. Structural prerequisites comprise specific support facilities for general practice-based research networks that could provide practices with a point of contact. Procedural prerequisites consist, for example, of a summary of specific relevant key measures, for example on a web platform. The platform should contain standard operating procedures (SOPs, templates, checklists and other supporting materials for researchers. Conclusion All in all, our problem analyses revealed that

  11. Integrating a pharmacist into the general practice environment: opinions of pharmacist’s, general practitioner’s, health care consumer’s, and practice manager’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Christopher

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacists are viewed as highly trained yet underutilised and there is growing support to extend the role of the pharmacist within the primary health care sector. The integration of a pharmacist into a general practice medical centre is not a new concept however is a novel approach in Australia and evidence supporting this role is currently limited. This study aimed to describe the opinions of local stakeholders in South-East Queensland on the integration of a pharmacist into the Australian general practice environment. Methods A sample of general practitioners, health care consumers, pharmacists and practice managers in South-East Queensland were invited to participate in focus groups or semi-structured interviews. Seeding questions common to all sessions were used to facilitate discussion. Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Leximancer software was used to qualitatively analyse responses. Results A total of 58 participants took part in five focus groups and eighteen semi-structured interviews. Concepts relating to six themes based on the seeding questions were identified. These included positively viewed roles such as medication reviews and prescribing, negatively viewed roles such as dispensing and diagnosing, barriers to pharmacist integration such as medical culture and remuneration, facilitators to pharmacist integration such as remuneration and training, benefits of integration such as access to the patient’s medical file, and potential funding models. Conclusions These findings and future research may aid the development of a new model of integrated primary health care services involving pharmacist practitioners.

  12. Integrating a pharmacist into the general practice environment: opinions of pharmacist’s, general practitioner’s, health care consumer’s, and practice manager’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmacists are viewed as highly trained yet underutilised and there is growing support to extend the role of the pharmacist within the primary health care sector. The integration of a pharmacist into a general practice medical centre is not a new concept however is a novel approach in Australia and evidence supporting this role is currently limited. This study aimed to describe the opinions of local stakeholders in South-East Queensland on the integration of a pharmacist into the Australian general practice environment. Methods A sample of general practitioners, health care consumers, pharmacists and practice managers in South-East Queensland were invited to participate in focus groups or semi-structured interviews. Seeding questions common to all sessions were used to facilitate discussion. Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Leximancer software was used to qualitatively analyse responses. Results A total of 58 participants took part in five focus groups and eighteen semi-structured interviews. Concepts relating to six themes based on the seeding questions were identified. These included positively viewed roles such as medication reviews and prescribing, negatively viewed roles such as dispensing and diagnosing, barriers to pharmacist integration such as medical culture and remuneration, facilitators to pharmacist integration such as remuneration and training, benefits of integration such as access to the patient’s medical file, and potential funding models. Conclusions These findings and future research may aid the development of a new model of integrated primary health care services involving pharmacist practitioners. PMID:22852792

  13. Do general practitioners adhere to the guideline on infectious conjunctivitis? Results of the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Remco P; ter Riet, Gerben; Bindels, Patrick JE; Schellevis, François G; van Weert, Henk CPM

    2007-01-01

    Background In 1996 the guideline 'The Red Eye' was first published by the Dutch College of General Practitioners. The extent to which general practitioners adhere to this guideline is unclear. Recently, data on the management of infectious conjunctivitis by general practitioners became available from the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice. We measured the age-specific incidence of infectious conjunctivitis, described its management by Dutch general practitioners, and then compared these findings with the recommendations made in the guideline. Methods In 2001, over a 12-month period, data from all patient contacts with 195 general practitioners were taken from electronic medical records. Registration was episode-oriented; all consultations dealing with the same health problem were grouped into disease episodes. Data concerning all episodes of infectious conjunctivitis (ICPC-code F70 and sub codes) were analysed. Results Over one year, 5,213 new and recurrent episodes of infectious conjunctivitis were presented to general practitioners from a population of N = 375,899, resulting in an overall incidence rate of 13.9 per 1000 person-years, varying from more than 80/1000 py in children up to one-year old, to less than 12/1000 py in children over the age of 4. Topical ophthalmic ointments were prescribed in 87% of the episodes, of which 80% was antibiotic treatment. Fusidic acid gel was most frequently prescribed (69%). In most episodes general practitioners did not adhere to the guideline. Conclusion In 2001, the management of infectious conjunctivitis by Dutch general practitioners was not in accordance with the recommendations of the consensus-based guideline published five years previously, despite its wide distribution. In 2006 this guideline was revised. Its successful implementation requires more than distribution alone. Probably the most effective way to achieve this is by following a model for systemic implementation. PMID:17868475

  14. Do general practitioners adhere to the guideline on infectious conjunctivitis? Results of the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 the guideline 'The Red Eye' was first published by the Dutch College of General Practitioners. The extent to which general practitioners adhere to this guideline is unclear. Recently, data on the management of infectious conjunctivitis by general practitioners became available from the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice. We measured the age-specific incidence of infectious conjunctivitis, described its management by Dutch general practitioners, and then compared these findings with the recommendations made in the guideline. Methods In 2001, over a 12-month period, data from all patient contacts with 195 general practitioners were taken from electronic medical records. Registration was episode-oriented; all consultations dealing with the same health problem were grouped into disease episodes. Data concerning all episodes of infectious conjunctivitis (ICPC-code F70 and sub codes were analysed. Results Over one year, 5,213 new and recurrent episodes of infectious conjunctivitis were presented to general practitioners from a population of N = 375,899, resulting in an overall incidence rate of 13.9 per 1000 person-years, varying from more than 80/1000 py in children up to one-year old, to less than 12/1000 py in children over the age of 4. Topical ophthalmic ointments were prescribed in 87% of the episodes, of which 80% was antibiotic treatment. Fusidic acid gel was most frequently prescribed (69%. In most episodes general practitioners did not adhere to the guideline. Conclusion In 2001, the management of infectious conjunctivitis by Dutch general practitioners was not in accordance with the recommendations of the consensus-based guideline published five years previously, despite its wide distribution. In 2006 this guideline was revised. Its successful implementation requires more than distribution alone. Probably the most effective way to achieve this is by following a model for systemic implementation.

  15. Benefits and harms of general health checks- lifelong learning in general practice: how to read and use scientific literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arreskov, Anne Beiter; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Nielsen, Kirsten Lykke

    the paper using the method of critical appraisal. Session content The didactic method used in the workshop is mostly small group activities with eight participants and two tutors in each group. The participants will receive two scientific papers: the BMJ-version of the Cochrane review about general health......Abstract title: Benefits and harms of general health checks - lifelong learning in general practice: how to read and use scientific literature Objectives After this workshop the participants will know the basics of how to read a systematic literature review and interpret a meta-analysis and be able......, assesses, and implements methods of diagnosis and treatment on the basis of the best available current research, clinical expertise, and combines this with the needs and preferences of the patient, is termed evidence-based medicine. By learning and practising the principles of evidence-based medicine, GPs...

  16. Bariatric surgery and the changing current scope of general surgery practice: implications for general surgery residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed R; Pierce, Jonathan L; Scherer, Lynette A; Galante, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The scope of general surgery practice has evolved tremendously in the last 20 years. However, clinical experience in general surgery residency training has undergone relatively little change. To evaluate the current scope of academic general surgery and its implications on surgical residency. The University HealthSystem Consortium and Association of American Medical Colleges established the Faculty Practice Solution Center (FPSC) to characterize physician productivity. The FPSC is a benchmarking tool for academic medical centers created from revenue data collected from more than 90,000 physicians who practice at 95 institutions across the United States. The FPSC database was queried to evaluate the annual mean procedure frequency per surgeon (PFS) in each calendar year from 2006 through 2011. The associated work relative value units (wRVUs) were also examined to measure physician effort and skill. During the 6-year period, 146 distinct Current Procedural Terminology codes were among the top 100 procedures, and 16 of these procedures ranked in the top 10 procedures in at least 1 year. The top 10 procedures accounted for more than half (range, 52.5%-57.2%) of the total 100 PFS evaluated for each year. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was consistently among the top 10 procedures in each year (PFS, 18.2-24.6). The other most frequently performed procedures included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (PFS, 30.3-43.5), upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (PFS, 26.5-34.3), mastectomy (PFS, 16.5-35.0), inguinal hernia repair (PFS, 15.5-22.1), and abdominal wall hernia repair (PFS, 21.6-26.1). In all years, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass generated the highest number of wRVUs (wRVUs, 491.0-618.2), and laparoscopic cholecystectomy was regularly the next highest (wRVUs, 335.8-498.7). A significant proportion of academic general surgery is composed of bariatric surgery, yet surgical training does not sufficiently emphasize the necessary exposure to technical expertise

  17. Can we import quality tools? a feasibility study of European practice assessment in a country with less organised general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pestiaux Dominique

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality is on the agenda of European general practice (GP. European researchers have, in collaboration, developed tools to assess quality of GPs. In this feasibility study, we tested the European Practice Assessment (EPA in a one-off project in Belgium, where general practice has a low level of GP organisation. Methods A framework for feasibility analysis included describing the recruiting of participants, a brief telephone study survey among non-responders, organisational and logistic problems. Using field notes and focus groups, we studied the participants' opinions. Results In this study, only 36 of 1000 invited practices agreed to participate. Co-ordination, administrative work, practice visits and organisational problems required several days per practice. The researchers further encountered technical problems, for instance when entering the data and uploading to the web-based server. In subsequent qualitative analysis using two focus groups, most participant GPs expressed a positive feeling after the EPA procedure. In the short period of follow-up, only a few GPs reported improvements after the visit. The participant GPs suggested that follow-up and coaching would probably facilitate the implementation of changes. Conclusion This feasibility study shows that prior interest in EPA is low in the GP community. We encountered a number of logistic and organisational problems. It proved attractive to participants, but it can be augmented by coaching of participants in more than a one-off project to identify and achieve targets for quality improvement. In the absence of commitment of the government, a network of universities and one scientific organisation will offer EPA as a service to training practices.

  18. Theory and interpretation in qualitative studies from general practice: Why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2016-03-01

    In this article, I want to promote theoretical awareness and commitment among qualitative researchers in general practice and suggest adequate and feasible theoretical approaches. I discuss different theoretical aspects of qualitative research and present the basic foundations of the interpretative paradigm. Associations between paradigms, philosophies, methodologies and methods are examined and different strategies for theoretical commitment presented. Finally, I discuss the impact of theory for interpretation and the development of general practice knowledge. A scientific theory is a consistent and soundly based set of assumptions about a specific aspect of the world, predicting or explaining a phenomenon. Qualitative research is situated in an interpretative paradigm where notions about particular human experiences in context are recognized from different subject positions. Basic theoretical features from the philosophy of science explain why and how this is different from positivism. Reflexivity, including theoretical awareness and consistency, demonstrates interpretative assumptions, accounting for situated knowledge. Different types of theoretical commitment in qualitative analysis are presented, emphasizing substantive theories to sharpen the interpretative focus. Such approaches are clearly within reach for a general practice researcher contributing to clinical practice by doing more than summarizing what the participants talked about, without trying to become a philosopher. Qualitative studies from general practice deserve stronger theoretical awareness and commitment than what is currently established. Persistent attention to and respect for the distinctive domain of knowledge and practice where the research deliveries are targeted is necessary to choose adequate theoretical endeavours. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  19. Searching for deviations from the general relativity theory with gas mass fraction of galaxy clusters and complementary probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Pereira, S. H.; Santos da Costa, S.

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, thanks to the improved precision of cosmological data, it has become possible to search for deviation from the general relativity theory with tests on large cosmic scales. Particularly, there is a class of modified gravity theories that breaks the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) in the electromagnetic sector, generating variations of the fine structure constant, violations of the cosmic distance duality relation, and the evolution law of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. In recent papers, this class of theories has been tested with angular diameter distances from galaxy clusters, type Ia supernovae, and CMB temperature. In this work we propose a new test by considering the most recent x-ray surface brightness observations of galaxy clusters jointly with type Ia supernovae and CMB temperature. The crucial point here is that we take into account the dependence of the x-ray gas mass fraction of galaxy clusters on possible variations of the fine structure constant and violations of the cosmic distance duality relation. Our basic result is that this new approach is competitive with the previous one, and it also does not show significant deviations from general relativity.

  20. Patients' experiences and expectations of general practice: a questionnaire study of differences by ethnic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Jane; Jain, Asha

    2005-01-01

    Background Research has highlighted variations in morbidity, mortality and health needs by ethnic group, and suggests that some ethnic groups may receive a poorer service. Aim To explore the impact of ethnic group on patients' experiences and expectations of their general practice consultation. Design of study Cross-sectional survey. Setting One general practice in a multicultural area of London. Method A total of 604 consecutive patients attending their general practice (response rate = 60.4%) who described their ethnic group as white British, black African, black African Caribbean or Vietnamese completed a measure relating to their experiences and their expectations of the general practice consultation in terms of treatment, communication, patients' agenda, patients' choice and doctor consistency. Results No differences were found for the black African or black African Caribbean patients. The Vietnamese patients reported better experiences of communication, more focus on their agenda and more attention to their choices than the white British patients. However, they also reported expecting lower levels of communication, less focus on their own agenda and reported wanting less GP consistency than the other ethnic groups. Conclusion Vietnamese patients state that they are receiving better standards of care in general practice than other ethnic groups. However, they also state that they expect less. This may illustrate a problem with assessing experiences of primary care. Higher scores of experience may not illustrate better consultations as such, but only better when compared with a lower level of initial expectation. A lower expectation is easier to fulfil. PMID:15904553

  1. Introducing undergraduate medical teaching into general practice: an action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Andy; Robling, Michael

    2006-11-01

    Following the publication of Tomorrow's Doctors and as a result of increasing numbers of students recruited to medical school it is necessary to involve more general practitioners (family physicians) in undergraduate medical education. Students have responded positively regarding experiences in general practices with a broad spectrum of clinical conditions to be seen and greater involvement in clinical decision-making. This action research study followed a small group general practice in South Wales through the required preparation for undergraduate medical education and its first year of teaching. Preparatory work for the practice focused mainly on summarizing patient notes, setting up a practice library and arranging accommodation for the students. Members of the Primary Health Care Team (PHCT) found that having students in the practice gave them a sense of achievement and enhanced self-worth. Individuals within the practice felt more confident in their professional role and the team ethic within the practice was strengthened. Doctors' anxieties regarding the adequacy of their clinical skills proved unfounded. Patients were reported to feel more included in their care and to have enjoyed hearing their condition being discussed with the students. Students valued the one-to-one teaching, seeing common illnesses and a variety of consulting styles. It is hoped that this paper will be of value to those responsible for recruiting GP practices into undergraduate teaching. It demonstrates benefits for the primary health care team in terms of improved morale and sense of professional self-worth. Patients felt more involved in their care. Generalization from these findings is limited by only one practice having been involved. Undergraduate teaching offers advantages, particularly in terms of professional self-esteem and team morale.

  2. Understanding the process of patient satisfaction with nurse-led chronic disease management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Rosemary; St John, Winsome; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

      To investigate the process of patient satisfaction with nurse-led chronic disease management in Australian general practice.   Nurses working in the primary care context of general practice, referred to as practice nurses, are expanding their role in chronic disease management; this is relatively new to Australia. Therefore, determining patient satisfaction with this trend is pragmatically and ethically important. However, the concept of patient satisfaction is not well understood particularly in relation to care provided by practice nurses.   A grounded theory study underpinned by a relativist ontological position and a relativist epistemology.   Grounded theory was used to develop a theory from data collected through in-depth interviews with 38 participants between November 2007-April 2009. Participants were drawn from a larger project that trialled a practice nurse-led, collaborative model of chronic disease management in three Australian general practices. Theoretical sampling, data collection, and analysis were conducted concurrently consistent with grounded theory methods.   Patients undergo a cyclical process of Navigating Care involving three stages, Determining Care Needs, Forming Relationship, and Having Confidence. The latter two processes are inter-related and a feedback loop from them informs subsequent cycles of Determining Care Needs. If any of these steps fails to develop adequately, patients are likely to opt out of nurse-led care.   Navigating Care explains how and why time, communication, continuity, and trust in general practitioners and nurses are important to patient satisfaction. It can be used in identifying suitable patients for practice nurse-led care and to inform the practice and organization of practice nurse-led care to enhance patient satisfaction. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  4. What needs to change to increase chlamydia screening in general practice in Australia? The views of general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairley Christopher K

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia is considering implementing a chlamydia screening program in general practice. The views of general practitioners (GPs are necessary to inform the design of the program. This paper aimed to investigate Australian GPs' views on how chlamydia screening could work in the Australian context. Methods This project used both qualitative interviews and a quantitative questionnaire. GPs were randomly selected from a national database of medical practitioners for both the qualitative and quantitative components. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs and a thematic analysis conducted. The results of the interviews were used to design a quantitative postal questionnaire for completion by a larger sample of GPs. Up to three reminders were sent to non-responders. Results Twenty one GPs completed an interview and 255 completed the postal questionnaire. The results of the postal survey were in strong concordance with those of the interview. GPs identified a number of barriers to increased screening including lack of time, knowledge of GPs and the public about chlamydia, patient embarrassment and support for partner notification. GPs felt strongly that screening would be easier if there was a national program and if the public and GPs had a greater knowledge about chlamydia. Incentive payments and mechanisms for recall and reminders would facilitate screening. Greater support for contact tracing would be important if screening is to increase. Conclusion Chlamydia screening in general practice is acceptable to Australian GPs. If screening is to succeed, policy makers must consider the facilitators identified by GPs.

  5. Direct observation of the nutrition care practices of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball LE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nutrition care refers to nutrition-related advice or counselling provided by health professionals in an attempt to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the practices of a sample of Australian general practitioners (GPs when providing nutrition care to adult patients. METHODS: Eighteen GPs (13 male, 5 female were observed by fourth-year medical students during their general practice rotation. Each GP was observed for five consultations that included nutrition care, totalling 90 observed consultations. In each consultation, students completed a 31-item nutrition care checklist of nutrition care practices that could feasibly occur in a standard consultation. Each practice was marked with either a ‘yes’ (completed, ‘no’ (did not complete or ‘completed by practice nurse prior to or after the consultation’. RESULTS: Twenty-eight nutrition care practices were observed at least once. The most frequently observed practices were measuring and discussing blood pressure (76.7%; n=69, followed by general questions about current diet (74.4%; n=67. Approximately half of the consultations included a statement of a nutrition-related problem (52.2%; n=47, and the provision of nutrition advice that focused on a nutrient (45.6%; n=41 or food group (52.2%; n=47. Consultations with male GPs, as well as GPs with more than 25 years of experience, were associated with an increased number of nutrition care practices per consultation. DISCUSSION: The GPs performed nutrition care practices in varying frequencies. Further research is required to identify the most effective GP nutrition care practices to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients.

  6. Access to complementary medicine in general practice: survey in one UK health authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearn, A M; Greenfield, S M

    1998-09-01

    Complementary therapy (CT) has become increasingly popular with the general public and interest from the health professions has been rising. There has been no study focusing on the pattern of availability of CT within urban and inner-city general practice. We aimed to describe the prevalence and pattern of access to complementary therapy in this setting, identifying the characteristics of practices offering CT and the perceived barriers to service provision. We sent a postal questionnaire to all 254 general practices on the Birmingham Family Health Services Authority list. Practices were asked whether they offered any access to CTs, how services were organized and which therapies were available and to identify any barriers to provision. 175 practices (68.9%) responded. Half of the practices offered access to CT. Of these, half offered an in-house service, usually provided by the doctor (81.8%). Of GPs practising therapies themselves, 58% began in or after 1990. Seventeen separate therapies were offered, most commonly acupuncture, osteopathy, chiropractic, hypnotherapy and homoeopathy. Practices significantly more likely to offer access to CT were of larger list size and training or teaching practices. They were equally likely to be fundholders or non-fundholders. Practices offering an in-house service tended to be fundholding, training and of larger list size. Finance was perceived as the major barrier. In the area studied, many patients now have some access to CT within primary care, often within their own practice. In the main, therapies offered are the 'medically acceptable face' of complementary medicine.

  7. A generalized Lyapunov theory for robust root clustering of linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of analyzing and designing controllers for linear systems subject to real parameter uncertainty is considered. An elegant, unified theory for robust eigenvalue placement is presented for a class of D-regions defined by algebraic inequalities by extending the nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman and Jury (1981) to linear uncertain time systems. The author presents explicit conditions for matrix root clustering for different D-regions and establishes the relationship between the eigenvalue migration range and the parameter range. The bounds are all obtained by one-shot computation in the matrix domain and do not need any frequency sweeping or parameter gridding. The method uses the generalized Lyapunov theory for getting the bounds.

  8. A comparison of three tests to detect general clustering of a rare disease in Santa Clara County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E G; Ding, L; Waller, L A

    2000-05-30

    Statistical tests to detect clustering of a rare disease investigate whether an observed spatial pattern of cases appears to be due to chance alone. Heterogeneous population density and the geographic structure of the data under consideration complicate the ability to make comparisons of different tests. Further, interpretation of test results depends on the nature of the test used and what feature of the data it is designed to detect. With these issues in mind, we compare three recent tests for assessing general clustering among cases where the population is distributed heterogeneously across the study area, namely those of Besag and Newell, Turnbull et al. and Tango. We compare these methods using 1981 incidence data for severe cardiac birth defects from Santa Clara County, California.

  9. A generalized Lyapunov theory for robust root clustering of linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of analyzing and designing controllers for linear systems subject to real parameter uncertainty is considered. An elegant, unified theory for robust eigenvalue placement is presented for a class of D-regions defined by algebraic inequalities by extending the nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman and Jury (1981) to linear uncertain time systems. The author presents explicit conditions for matrix root clustering for different D-regions and establishes the relationship between the eigenvalue migration range and the parameter range. The bounds are all obtained by one-shot computation in the matrix domain and do not need any frequency sweeping or parameter gridding. The method uses the generalized Lyapunov theory for getting the bounds.

  10. Engineering practice variation through provider agreement: a cluster-randomized feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarren M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Madeline McCarren,1 Elaine L Twedt,1 Faizmohamed M Mansuri,2 Philip R Nelson,3 Brian T Peek3 1Pharmacy Benefits Management Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, Hines, IL, 2Wilkes-Barre VA Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre, PA, 3Charles George VA Medical Center, Asheville, NC, USA Purpose: Minimal-risk randomized trials that can be embedded in practice could facilitate learning health-care systems. A cluster-randomized design was proposed to compare treatment strategies by assigning clusters (eg, providers to “favor” a particular drug, with providers retaining autonomy for specific patients. Patient informed consent might be waived, broadening inclusion. However, it is not known if providers will adhere to the assignment or whether institutional review boards will waive consent. We evaluated the feasibility of this trial design.Subjects and methods: Agreeable providers were randomized to “favor” either hydrochlorothiazide or chlorthalidone when starting patients on thiazide-type therapy for hypertension. The assignment applied when the provider had already decided to start a thiazide, and providers could deviate from the strategy as needed. Prescriptions were aggregated to produce a provider strategy-adherence rate.Results: All four institutional review boards waived documentation of patient consent. Providers (n=18 followed their assigned strategy for most of their new thiazide prescriptions (n=138 patients. In the “favor hydrochlorothiazide” group, there was 99% adherence to that strategy. In the “favor chlorthalidone” group, chlorthalidone comprised 77% of new thiazide starts, up from 1% in the pre-study period. When the assigned strategy was followed, dosing in the recommended range was 48% for hydrochlorothiazide (25–50 mg/day and 100% for chlorthalidone (12.5–25.0 mg/day. Providers were motivated to participate by a desire to contribute to a comparative effectiveness study. A study promotional mug, provider information

  11. Usefulness of a virtual community of practice and web 2.0 tools for general practice training: experiences and expectations of general practitioner registrars and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Bonney, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    General practice training is a community of practice in which novices and experts share knowledge. However, there are barriers to knowledge sharing for general practioner (GP) registrars, including geographic and workplace isolation. Virtual communities of practice (VCoP) can be effective in overcoming these barriers using social media tools. The present study examined the perceived usefulness, features and barriers to implementing a VCoP for GP training. Following a survey study of GP registrars and supervisors on VCoP feasibility, a qualitative telephone interview study was undertaken within a regional training provider. Participants with the highest Internet usage in the survey study were selected. Two researchers worked independently conducting thematic analysis using manual coding of transcriptions, later discussing themes until agreement was reached. Seven GP registrars and three GP supervisors participated in the study (average age 38.2 years). Themes emerged regarding professional isolation, potential of social media tools to provide peer support and improve knowledge sharing, and barriers to usage, including time, access and skills. Frequent Internet-using GP registrars and supervisors perceive a VCoP for GP training as a useful tool to overcome professional isolation through improved knowledge sharing. Given that professional isolation can lead to decreased rural work and reduced hours, a successful VCoP may have a positive outcome on the rural medical workforce.

  12. Beyond the specific child. What is 'a child's case' in general practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Tulinius, C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Too many abused and neglected children are being overlooked by GPs and other professionals who are in contact with the families. Some suggestions for a definition of 'a child in need' have been given, but the functionality of these definitions has not been tested in general practice...... the wellbeing of the family or the child. CONCLUSION: Based on this analysis, one suggestion as to why some abused and neglected children are overlooked in general practice is that GPs often have to navigate in difficult indirect consultations, where there is a high risk of losing the overview Udgivelsesdato....... AIM: To describe the problems presented by GPs as cases with children in need during supervision, and from here to suggest an empirically-based definition of a child in need in general practice. DESIGN OF STUDY: A mixed-method evaluation design was used. SETTING: Twenty-one GPs, in Denmark...

  13. Beyond the specific child. What is 'a child's case' in general practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Tulinius, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Too many abused and neglected children are being overlooked by GPs and other professionals who are in contact with the families. Some suggestions for a definition of 'a child in need' have been given, but the functionality of these definitions has not been tested in general practice...... the wellbeing of the family or the child. CONCLUSION: Based on this analysis, one suggestion as to why some abused and neglected children are overlooked in general practice is that GPs often have to navigate in difficult indirect consultations, where there is a high risk of losing the overview........ AIM: To describe the problems presented by GPs as cases with children in need during supervision, and from here to suggest an empirically-based definition of a child in need in general practice. DESIGN OF STUDY: A mixed-method evaluation design was used. SETTING: Twenty-one GPs, in Denmark...

  14. Ad hoc supervision of general practice registrars as a 'community of practice': analysis, interpretation and re-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, T; Brown, J; Morrison, J; Nestel, D

    2016-05-01

    General practice registrars in Australia undertake most of their vocational training in accredited general practices. They typically see patients alone from the start of their community-based training and are expected to seek timely ad hoc support from their supervisor. Such ad hoc encounters are a mechanism for ensuring patient safety, but also provide an opportunity for learning and teaching. Wenger's (Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press, New York, 1998) social theory of learning ('communities of practice') guided a secondary analysis of audio-recordings of ad hoc encounters. Data from one encounter is re-presented as an extended sequence to maintain congruence with the theoretical perspective and enhance vicariousness. An interpretive commentary communicates key features of Wenger's theory and highlights the researchers' interpretations. We argue that one encounter can reveal universal understandings of clinical supervision and that the process of naturalistic generalisation allows readers to transfer others' experiences to their own contexts. The paper raises significant analytic, interpretive, and representational issues. We highlight that report writing is an important, but infrequently discussed, part of research design. We discuss the challenges of supporting the learning and teaching that arises from adopting a socio-cultural lens and argue that such a perspective importantly captures the complex range of issues that work-based practitioners have to grapple with. This offers a challenge to how we research and seek to influence work-based learning and teaching in health care settings.

  15. Health problems presented in general practice by survivors before and after a fireworks disaster: associations with mental health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, D.J. den; Dirkzwager, A.J.E.; IJzermans, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the health problems presented to general practitioners by disaster survivors who received specialized ambulatory mental health care. Design: (Longitudinal) case-control study based on general practitioners' electronic medical records. Setting: General practice and a mental health

  16. Associations between general parenting styles and specific food-related parenting practices and children's food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Carine; Legiest, Erwin; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Maes, Lea

    2009-01-01

    Explore the impact of general parenting style and specific food-related parenting practices on children's dietary habits. Cross-sectional study of sixth graders and their parents. Data were gathered (in 2003) in 69 of 100 randomly selected elementary schools in Belgium. All sixth graders (N = 1957) were invited to participate; 82.4% of their parents gave consent and completed questionnaires, resulting in 1614 parent-child pairs. Children's consumption of breakfast, fruit, vegetables, soft drinks, and sweets was assessed by self-administered food frequency questionnaires. Parents completed questionnaires on sociodemographic characteristics, general parenting styles (authoritarian, authoritative, indulgent, or neglecting) and specific food-related parenting practices (pressure, reward, encouragement through negotiation, catering on children's demands, permissiveness, avoiding negative modeling, and praise). Logistic regression analyses were performed, with general parenting style and specific food-related parenting practices as predictors and dietary habits as dependent variables, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics and children's weight status. General parenting style did not show any significant impact on dietary habits. In contrast, the food-related parenting practice "encouragement through negotiation" showed a significant positive impact, whereas "pressure," "catering on demand," and "permissiveness" were practices with an unhealthy impact. Nutrition education programs that guide parents in firm but not coercive food parenting skills are likely to have a positive impact upon children's dietary habits.

  17. The impact of extensive loss of telecommunications on general practice: A case study in rural Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nancy H; Pedler, Daryl

    2017-04-01

    To describe the impact of major loss of telecommunications on general practice in a rural region of Australia. A multi-stage qualitative study. Purposively selected participants were invited to contribute to initial data collection using an online survey, followed by interviews with selected participants. Thematic analysis of the data was performed by both research team members. South-western Victoria, Australia. Individuals from organisations involved in Telstra recovery efforts, disaster management, health care and general practice staff. The survey collected freeform responses from participants. Semi-structured interviews further explored a variety of experiences from purposively selected participants. Organisations and practices in the region were prepared for major disasters, but not for the unusual and 'limited' disaster of losing telecommunications, including lack of Internet access and loss of telephone services. Although alternative measures were found for telecommunications, there was still a significant impact on many health-care-related activities and general practice functionality during the outage period. In particular, there was an increase in duties for administrative staff to compensate for loss of telecommunications. Patient traffic for many services decreased due to uncertainty about availability and continuation of business. The Warrnambool outage could be used as a case study illustrating the dramatic impact of communication loss. Major impacts include changes in patient traffic, increased administrative duties and slowing of patient care. When developing or assessing disaster management plans, general practices should consider the impact of telecommunication loss on functionality and prepare appropriate alternative, accessible and reliable measures. © 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  18. The influence of experiential learning on medical equipment adoption in general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Jane; Roper, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The benefits of the availability and use of medical equipment for medical outcomes are understood by physicians and policymakers alike. However, there is limited understanding of the decision-making processes involved in adopting and using new technologies in health care organisations. Our study focuses on the adoption of medical equipment in Irish general practices which are marked by considerable autonomy in terms of commercial practice and the range of medical services they provide. We examine the adoption of six items of medical equipment taking into account commercial, informational and experiential stimuli. Our analysis is based on primary survey data collected from a sample of 601 general practices in Ireland on practice characteristics and medical equipment use. We use a multivariate Probit to identify commonalities in the determinants of the adoption. Many factors, such as GP and practice characteristics, influence medical equipment adoption. In addition, we find significant and consistent evidence of the influence of learning-by-using effects on the adoption of medical equipment in a general practice setting. Knowledge generated by experiential or applied learning can have commercial, organisational and health care provision benefits in small health care organisations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Motivations for the Adoption of Chronic Disease Information Systems in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Carbone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key motivational factors that lead to the successful implementation of Chronic Diseases Information Systems (CDISs in twenty eight general practices in a case study of a large general practice division network in Australia. The literature identified three major areas of CDIS motivation: patient care gap motivator, internal motivators and external motivators. Patient care emerged as the most important motivation for adopting CDIS, followed by risk management and financial incentives. However, the study also determined that the motivational forces are inter-related and suggests that the decision to adopt CDIS should consider a number of these identified factors.

  20. Can the use of Electronic Health Records in General Practice reduce hospitalizations for diabetes patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Line Planck; Mellace, Giovanni; Rose Olsen, Kim

    on Electronic Health Records (EHR) on diabetes patients total hospitalizations, diabetes related hospitalizations and hospitalizations with diabetes and cardiovascular related Ambulatory Care Sentive Conditions (ACSC). We use a rich nationwide panel dataset (2004-2013) with information of stepwise enrolment......Disease management programmes (DMP) in the general practice sector are increasingly used to improve health of chronically ill patients, reduce hospitalizations and thereby costs. The aim of this paper is to estimate the causal effects of the enrolment of general practices (GP) in a DMP based...

  1. Screening and brief intervention targeting risky drinkers in Danish general practice - a pragmatic controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beich, A.; Gannik, D.; Saelan, H.

    2007-01-01

    -14 months. Outcome measures focused on patients' acceptance of screening and intervention and their self-reported alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Patient acceptance of screening and intervention -10.3% (N = 794) of the target population (N = 7, 691) explicitly refused screening. All intervention group...... general practice performed on the basis of systematic questionnaire screening may fall short of theoretical expectations. When applied to non-selected groups in everyday general practice SBI may have little effect and engender diverse outcome. Women may be more susceptible to defensive reactions than men...

  2. Producing guidance for the management of patients with chronic periodontal disease in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G

    2015-04-24

    The vast majority of patients will experience gingival-related disease at some point in their life, and up to a quarter of those are susceptible to advanced periodontal disease. This makes its effective management an important part of general dental practice. This paper provides guidance on management which incorporates periodontal assessment, management and recall according to patient's oral hygiene and modifiable risk factors. This has been produced in flow diagram format to aid non-surgical management of chronic gingival and periodontal disease in general dental practice.

  3. General-purpose molecular dynamics simulations on GPU-based clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Trott, Christian R.; Winterfeld, Lars; Crozier, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a GPU implementation of LAMMPS, a widely-used parallel molecular dynamics (MD) software package, and show 5x to 13x single node speedups versus the CPU-only version of LAMMPS. This new CUDA package for LAMMPS also enables multi-GPU simulation on hybrid heterogeneous clusters, using MPI for inter-node communication, CUDA kernels on the GPU for all methods working with particle data, and standard LAMMPS C++ code for CPU execution. Cell and neighbor list approaches are compared for be...

  4. Patients' adherence to hard acrylic interocclusal appliance treatment in general dental practice in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Erik; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate patient adherence to treatment with hard acrylic interocclusal appliance in general dentistry in Sweden and to see if some general factors could predict patient adherence or non-adherence. During the period January - May 2009 a postal questionnaire was sent to all adult patients (> or = 20 years of age) that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance from the public dental health service in the County of Uppsala during 2007 (n=388). The same questionnaire was also sent to all adult patients that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance at a specialist clinic during the same year (n=69). The response rate in general dental practice was 71% and at the specialist clinic the response rate was 91%. In general dental practice, 97% of the hard acrylic interocclusal appliances were stabilisation appliances. At the specialist clinic other types of interocclusal appliances was used to a greater extent. A vast majority of patients in both general dental practice and at the specialist clinic experienced that the interocclusal appliance had a positive treatment effect. In general dental practice, 73% of the patients still used their interocclusal appliances 1 1/2-2 years after they had received them. The corresponding figure at the specialist clinic was 54%. The main reasons for not using the interocclusal appliance, besides disappearance/reduction of TMD symptoms, were different kinds of comfort problems. From the results of this study it is concluded that the patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances made in general dental practice in Sweden is good. It can also be concluded that a perceived good treatment effect, as well as treatment of more long-term conditions, predicted a better patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances. More studies concerning factors affecting patient adherence in TMD therapy are warranted.

  5. Constructing and proving the ground state of a generalized Ising model by the cluster tree optimization algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Wenxuan; Dacek, Stephen; Rong, Ziqin; Ding, Zhiwei; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Generalized Ising models, also known as cluster expansions, are an important tool in many areas of condensed-matter physics and materials science, as they are often used in the study of lattice thermodynamics, solid-solid phase transitions, magnetic and thermal properties of solids, and fluid mechanics. However, the problem of finding the global ground state of generalized Ising model has remained unresolved, with only a limited number of results for simple systems known. We propose a method to efficiently find the periodic ground state of a generalized Ising model of arbitrary complexity by a new algorithm which we term cluster tree optimization. Importantly, we are able to show that even in the case of an aperiodic ground state, our algorithm produces a sequence of states with energy converging to the true ground state energy, with a provable bound on error. Compared to the current state-of-the-art polytope method, this algorithm eliminates the necessity of introducing an exponential number of variables to ...

  6. Genetic structure and admixture between Bayash Roma from northwestern Croatia and general Croatian population: evidence from Bayesian clustering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novokmet, Natalija; Galov, Ana; Marjanović, Damir; Škaro, Vedrana; Projić, Petar; Lauc, Gordan; Primorac, Dragan; Rudan, Pavao

    2015-01-01

    The European Roma represent a transnational mosaic of minority population groups with different migration histories and contrasting experiences in their interactions with majority populations across the European continent. Although historical genetic contributions of European lineages to the Roma pool were investigated before, the extent of contemporary genetic admixture between Bayash Roma and non-Romani majority population remains elusive. The aim of this study was to assess the genetic structure of the Bayash Roma population from northwestern Croatia and the general Croatian population and to investigate the extent of admixture between them. A set of genetic data from two original studies (100 Bayash Roma from northwestern Croatia and 195 individuals from the general Croatian population) was analyzed by Bayesian clustering implemented in STRUCTURE software. By re-analyzing published data we intended to focus for the first time on genetic differentiation and structure and in doing so we clearly pointed to the importance of considering social phenomena in understanding genetic structuring. Our results demonstrated that two population clusters best explain the genetic structure, which is consistent with social exclusion of Roma and the demographic history of Bayash Roma who have settled in NW Croatia only about 150 years ago and mostly applied rules of endogamy. The presence of admixture was revealed, while the percentage of non-Croatian individuals in general Croatian population was approximately twofold higher than the percentage of non-Romani individuals in Roma population corroborating the presence of ethnomimicry in Roma.

  7. Examining variations in prescribing safety in UK general practice: cross sectional study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Akbarov, Artur; Rodgers, Sarah; Avery, Anthony J; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the prevalence of different types of potentially hazardous prescribing in general practice in the United Kingdom, and what is the variation between practices? Methods A cross sectional study included all adult patients potentially at risk of a prescribing or monitoring error defined by a combination of diagnoses and prescriptions in 526 general practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) up to 1 April 2013. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of potentially hazardous prescriptions of anticoagulants, anti-platelets, NSAIDs, β blockers, glitazones, metformin, digoxin, antipsychotics, combined hormonal contraceptives, and oestrogens and monitoring by blood test less frequently than recommended for patients with repeated prescriptions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and loop diuretics, amiodarone, methotrexate, lithium, or warfarin. Study answer and limitations 49 927 of 949 552 patients at risk triggered at least one prescribing indicator (5.26%, 95% confidence interval 5.21% to 5.30%) and 21 501 of 182 721 (11.8%, 11.6% to 11.9%) triggered at least one monitoring indicator. The prevalence of different types of potentially hazardous prescribing ranged from almost zero to 10.2%, and for inadequate monitoring ranged from 10.4% to 41.9%. Older patients and those prescribed multiple repeat medications had significantly higher risks of triggering a prescribing indicator whereas younger patients with fewer repeat prescriptions had significantly higher risk of triggering a monitoring indicator. There was high variation between practices for some indicators. Though prescribing safety indicators describe prescribing patterns that can increase the risk of harm to the patient and should generally be avoided, there will always be exceptions where the indicator is clinically justified. Furthermore there is the possibility that some information is not captured by CPRD for some practices—for example, INR results in

  8. Clusters as a Form of Spatial Organisation of Economic Activity: Theory and Practical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shastitko Andrey

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at explaining the clustering of economic activity using instruments of new institutional economics, taking into account well-known descriptive characteristics of the cluster, as well as recent developments in research on hybrid institutional agreements, primarily, the research conducted by Michael Porter, Claude Ménard and others.

  9. Clusters as a Form of Spatial Organisation of Economic Activity: Theory and Practical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shastitko A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at explaining the clustering of economic activity using instruments of new institutional economics, taking into account well-known descriptive characteristics of the cluster, as well as recent developments in research on hybrid institutional agreements, primarily, the research conducted by Michael Porter, Claude Ménard and others.

  10. Routine mortality monitoring for detecting mass murder in UK general practice: test of effectiveness using modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Bruce; Love, Tom; Kaye, Rebecca; MacLeod, Margaret; Chalmers, Jim

    2008-05-01

    The Shipman Inquiry recommended mortality rate monitoring if it could be 'shown to be workable' in detecting a future mass murderer in general practice. To examine the effectiveness of cumulative sum (CUSUM) charts, cross-sectional Shewhart charts, and exponentially-weighted, moving-average control charts in mortality monitoring at practice level. Analysis of Scottish routine general practice data combined with estimation of control chart effectiveness in detecting a 'murderer' in a simulated dataset. Practice stability was calculated from routine data to determine feasible lengths of monitoring. A simulated dataset of 405,000 'patients' was created, registered with 75 'practices' whose underlying mortality rates varied with the same distribution as case-mix-adjusted mortality in all Scottish practices. The sensitivity of each chart to detect five and 10 excess deaths was examined in repeated simulations. The sensitivity of control charts to excess deaths in simulated data, and the number of alarm signals when control charts were applied to routine data were estimated. Practice instability limited the length of monitoring and modelling was consequently restricted to a 3-year period. Monitoring mortality over 3 years, CUSUM charts were most sensitive but only reliably achieved >50% successful detection for 10 excess deaths per year and generated multiple false alarms (>15%). At best, mortality monitoring can act as a backstop to detect a particularly prolific serial killer when other means of detection have failed. Policy should focus on changes likely to improve detection of individual murders, such as reform of death certification and the coroner system.

  11. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  12. Documenting organisational development in general practice using a group-based assessment method: the Maturity Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Tina; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Løgstrup, Louise; Buch, Martin Sandberg; Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian

    2010-10-01

    The Maturity Matrix (MM) comprises a formative evaluation instrument for primary care practices to self-assess their degree of organisational development in a group setting, guided by an external facilitator. The practice teams discuss organisational development, score their own performance and set improvement goals for the following year. The objective of this project was to introduce a translated and culturally adapted version of the MM in Denmark, to test its feasibility, to promote and document organisational change in general practices and to analyse associations between the recorded change(s) and structural factors in practices and the factors associated with the MM process. MM was used by general practices in three counties in Denmark, in two assessment sessions 1 year apart. First rounds of MM visits were carried out in 2006-2007 in 60 practice teams (320 participants (163 GPs, 157 staff)) and the second round in 2007-2008. A total of 48 practice teams (228 participants (117 GPs; 111 staff) participated in both sessions. The MM sessions were the primary intervention. Moreover, in about half of the practices, the facilitator reminded practice teams of their goals by sending them the written report of the initial session and contacted the practices regularly by telephone reminding them of the goals they had set. Those practice teams had password-protected access to their own and benchmark data. Where the minimum possible is 0 and maximum possible is 8, the mean overall MM score increased from 4.4 to 5.3 (difference=0.9, 95%, CI 0.76 to 1.06) from first to second sessions, indicating that development had taken place as measured by this group-based self-evaluation method. There was some evidence that lower-scoring dimensions were prioritised and more limited evidence that the prioritisation and interventions between meetings were helpful to achieve changes. This study provides evidence that MM worked well in general practices in Denmark. Practice teams appeared

  13. Feasibility and acceptance of electronic quality of life assessment in general practice: an implementation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochen Michael M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' health related quality of life (HRQoL has rarely been systematically monitored in general practice. Electronic tools and practice training might facilitate the routine application of HRQoL questionnaires. Thorough piloting of innovative procedures is strongly recommended before the conduction of large-scale studies. Therefore, we aimed to assess i the feasibility and acceptance of HRQoL assessment using tablet computers in general practice, ii the perceived practical utility of HRQoL results and iii to identify possible barriers hindering wider application of this approach. Methods Two HRQoL questionnaires (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire SGRQ and EORTC QLQ-C30 were electronically presented on portable tablet computers. Wireless network (WLAN integration into practice computer systems of 14 German general practices with varying infrastructure allowed automatic data exchange and the generation of a printout or a PDF file. General practitioners (GPs and practice assistants were trained in a 1-hour course, after which they could invite patients with chronic diseases to fill in the electronic questionnaire during their waiting time. We surveyed patients, practice assistants and GPs regarding their acceptance of this tool in semi-structured telephone interviews. The number of assessments, HRQoL results and interview responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Over the course of 1 year, 523 patients filled in the electronic questionnaires (1–5 times; 664 total assessments. On average, results showed specific HRQoL impairments, e.g. with respect to fatigue, pain and sleep disturbances. The number of electronic assessments varied substantially between practices. A total of 280 patients, 27 practice assistants and 17 GPs participated in the telephone interviews. Almost all GPs (16/17 = 94%; 95% CI = 73–99%, most practice assistants (19/27 = 70%; 95% CI = 50–86% and the majority of

  14. [The practice guideline 'Anxiety disorders' (first revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weel-Baumgarten, E M; van Rijswijk, E

    2005-05-28

    The recommendations provided by the revised guideline 'Anxiety disorders' are well suited to every-day practice. The multidisciplinary approach reflects the increasing cooperation between primary and secondary care in the management of mental-health problems. The description of the various anxiety disorders and the questions that can be asked to elicit the symptoms will facilitate recognition. The indications for treatment with medication are clear: a limited number of antidepressants should be used. Although it is agreed that patient education is an important part of treatment, the guidelines could have described in more detail how this should be done. Cognitive-behavioural techniques may be used but this requires extra training; its effectiveness when used by general practitioners needs further study. This guideline will add to existing knowledge and improve the skills of general practitioners in dealing with anxiety.

  15. [Consultation skills training as an element of general practice training in Germany - a qualitative survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittritz, Christine; Schaffer, Susann; Kühlein, Thomas; Roos, Marco

    2016-11-01

    The consultation is at the heart of general practice. It is the central setting through which primary care is delivered. The competency requirements are laid down internationally by competency-based curricula for undergraduate and postgraduate education. So far, there is no competency-based vocational training to develop consultation skills in general practice in Germany. The study describes experiences with consultation skills training as an element of general practice training as reported by trainees and trainers in Germany. A qualitative and exploring approach was chosen because there is little experience with the German situation. We conducted structured focus group interviews with trainees and trainers, respectively. We recruited all participants by e-mail via the mail distributor "Junge Allgemeinmedizin Deutschland" (JADE, a trainee and junior GP organization) and the academic teachers of the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg. Altogether, four focus group interviews with three to five participants were conducted, varying in length from 25 to 65minutes. All interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. Then a qualitative content analysis was performed. The statements of the ten trainees and five trainers mapped a system of four main categories: (a) association with the term consultation, (b) parts of a consultation, (c) competencies required for professional practice, (d) consultation skills training as an element of vocational training. Overall, all participants regarded the consultation as the most important element in general practice. Important content of consultations is to build a relationship with the patient, gather information, conduct physical examinations and achieve informed consent on further proceedings. All participants agreed that physicians need different sets of competencies: medical expertise, communication skills, examination skills and professionalism. Finally, there was a broad consensus that a competency

  16. Organizational values in general practice and public involvement: case studies in an urban district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I

    2001-05-01

    A multiple case study design was used to explore dimensions of organizational values in general practice with respect to developing public involvement. The study was undertaken in an urban district in England with data collected through in-depth individual and focus group interviews with service providers and service users. Four general practice organizations were randomly selected for study after sorting all in the district according to their record of developing involvement activities. The case studies provide evidence of how organizational values can differ markedly in general practice in relation to ideas of public involvement, with consequences for the quantity and quality of activities for involving local people and service users. The differences manifest themselves in the beliefs and attitudes of service providers about the purpose of the organization and the types of relationships that are appropriate with service users and local people. Service users appear to be very perceptive to the underlying ethos and purpose to their practice organization and this affects their responsiveness to initiatives for their involvement. The dimensions of the different values found in the study appear to be essentially the same as a number of established empirical findings of variations in values in general practice: an orientation to a narrow medical role and to general practice as a business are associated with a low valuation of involvement; an orientation to teamwork and to a broader social role appear more congruent with the development of involvement. Power is a critical issue in this setting with evidence in the study of the dominance of the medical practitioners in establishing organizational values and the nature of public involvement activities.

  17. Experiences of using email for general practice consultations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Pappas, Yannis; Heneghan, Carl; Murray, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    Reports suggest approximately 21-23% of GPs in the UK have consulted with patients using email, but little is known about the nature of this use and what it means for clinicians and patients in general practice. To understand the use of email consultation in general practice by investigating the experiences of existing users and views of experts. A qualitative study conducted in 2010 using purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews in general practice and community settings in some London boroughs. A maximum variation sample of GPs and patients who had used email for consultation in general practice were recruited, as were policy and/or implementation experts. Interviews continued until saturation was achieved. In total 10 GPs, 14 patients, and six experts were interviewed. Consultation by email was often triggered by logistic or practical issues; motivators for ongoing use were the benefits, such as convenience, for GPs and patients. Both GPs and patients reported concerns about safety and lack of guidance about the 'rules of engagement' in email consultations, with GPs also concerned about workload. In response, both groups attempted to introduce their own rules, although this only went some way to addressing uncertainty. Long term, participants felt there was a need for regulation and guidance. Consultations by email in general practice occur in an unregulated and unstructured way. Current UK policy is to promote consultations by email, making it crucial to consider the responsibility and workload faced by clinicians, and the changes required to ensure safe use; not doing so may risk safety breaches and result in suboptimal care for patients.

  18. Green shoots of recovery: a realist evaluation of a team to support change in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Maggie; Basten, Ruth; McKinley, Robert K

    2017-02-08

    A multidisciplinary support team for general practice was established in April 2014 by a local National Health Service (NHS) England management team. This work evaluates the team's effectiveness in supporting and promoting change in its first 2 years, using realist methodology. Primary care in one area of England. Semistructured interviews were conducted with staff from 14 practices, 3 key senior NHS England personnel and 5 members of the support team. Sampling of practice staff was purposive to include representatives from relevant professional groups. The team worked with practices to identify areas for change, construct action plans and implement them. While there was no specified timescale for the team's work with practices, it was tailored to each. In realist evaluations, outcomes are contingent on mechanisms acting in contexts, and both an understanding of how an intervention leads to change in a socially constructed system and the resultant changes are outcomes. The principal positive mechanisms leading to change were the support team's expertise and its relationships with practice staff. The 'external view' provided by the team via its corroborative and normalising effects was an important mechanism for increasing morale in some practice contexts. A powerful negative mechanism was related to perceptions of 'being seen as a failing practice' which included expressions of 'shame'. Outcomes for practices as perceived by their staff were better communication, improvements in patients' access to appointments resulting from better clinical and managerial skill mix, and improvements in workload management. The support team promoted change within practices leading to signs of the 'green shoots of recovery' within the time frame of the evaluation. Such interventions need to be tailored and responsive to practices' needs. The team's expertise and relationships between team members and practice staff are central to success. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  19. Understanding diagnosis and management of dementia and guideline implementation in general practice: a qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kerry; O'Connor, Denise A; Browning, Colette J; French, Simon D; Michie, Susan; Francis, Jill J; Russell, Grant M; Workman, Barbara; Flicker, Leon; Eccles, Martin P; Green, Sally E

    2014-03-03

    about capabilities'); and having adequate time and resources ('Environmental context and resources'). This is the first study to our knowledge to use a theoretical approach to investigate the barriers and enablers to guideline-recommended diagnosis and management of dementia in general practice. It has identified key factors likely to explain GPs' uptake of the guidelines. The results have informed the design of an intervention aimed at supporting practice change in line with dementia guidelines, which is currently being evaluated in a cluster randomised trial.

  20. Evaluation of a rule base for decision making in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essex, B; Healy, M

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Decision making in general practice relies heavily on judgmental expertise. It should be possible to codify this expertise into rules and principles. AIM. A study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness, of rules from a rule base designed to improve students' and trainees' management decisions relating to patients seen in general practice. METHOD. The rule base was developed after studying decisions about and management of thousands of patients seen in one general practice over an eight year period. Vignettes were presented to 93 fourth year medical students and 179 general practitioner trainees. They recorded their perception and management of each case before and after being presented with a selection of relevant rules. Participants also commented on their level of agreement with each of the rules provided with the vignettes. A panel of five independent assessors then rated as good, acceptable or poor, the participants' perception and management of each case before and after seeing the rules. RESULTS. Exposure to a few selected rules of thumb improved the problem perception and management decisions of both undergraduates and trainees. The degree of improvement was not related to previous experience or to the stated level of agreement with the proposed rules. The assessors identified difficulties students and trainees experienced in changing their perceptions and management decisions when the rules suggested options they had not considered. CONCLUSION. The rules developed to improve decision making skills in general practice are effective when used with vignettes. The next phase is to transform the rule base into an expert system to train students and doctors to acquire decision making skills. It could also be used to provide decision support when confronted with difficult management decisions in general practice. PMID:8204334

  1. Iterative solution of general sparse linear systems on clusters of workstations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Gen-Ching; Saad, Y. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Solving sparse irregularly structured linear systems on parallel platforms poses several challenges. First, sparsity makes it difficult to exploit data locality, whether in a distributed or shared memory environment. A second, perhaps more serious challenge, is to find efficient ways to precondition the system. Preconditioning techniques which have a large degree of parallelism, such as multicolor SSOR, often have a slower rate of convergence than their sequential counterparts. Finally, a number of other computational kernels such as inner products could ruin any gains gained from parallel speed-ups, and this is especially true on workstation clusters where start-up times may be high. In this paper we discuss these issues and report on our experience with PSPARSLIB, an on-going project for building a library of parallel iterative sparse matrix solvers.

  2. Becoming willing to role model. Reciprocity between new graduate nurses and experienced practice nurses in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarea, Karen J; Millsc, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Graduate nurses in general practice became a feature of New Zealand's health care system in 2008 following an expansion of the New Entrant to Practice Programme. General practice in New Zealand comprises general practitioner business owners who employ nursing and administration staff. Practice nurses are an ageing workforce in New Zealand, it is imperative therefore to attract younger nurses into general practice. This paper reports a section of the findings from a constructivist grounded theory study which examines the use of information by practice nurses in New Zealand. Initially data were collected using the ethnographic technique of observation and field notations in one general practice. Theoretical sensitivity to the value of role models was heightened by this first phase of data collection. A total of eleven practice nurses were interviewed from six general practices. One practice nurse agreed to a second interview; five of the interviewees were new graduate nurses and the other six were experienced practice nurses. The grounded theory constructed from this research was reciprocal role modelling which comprises the following three categories, becoming willing, realising potential and becoming a better practitioner. Graduate nurses and experienced practice nurses enter into a relationship of reciprocal role modelling. Becoming willing, the first core category of this grounded theory features three sub-categories: building respectful relationships, proving yourself and discerning decision making which are reported in this paper. Findings from this study may address the reported phenomenon of 'transition shock' of newly graduated nurses in the work place.

  3. Primary health care and general practice--a comparison between Australia and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee-Ming Khoo; Kidd, Michael Richard

    2002-01-01

    The Australian and Malaysian systems of general practice were examined and compared. The issues of similarity and difference identified are discussed in this paper. Quality clinical practice and the importance of compulsory vocational training prior to entry into general practice and continuing professional development is one important area. A move towards preventive health care and chronic disease management was observed in both countries. Practice incentive programmes to support such initiatives as improved rates of immunisation and cervical smear testing and the implementation of information technology and information management systems need careful implementation. The Medicare system used in Australia may not be appropriate for general practitioners in Malaysia and, if used, a pharmaceutical benefit scheme would also need to be established. In both countries the corporatisation of medical practice is causing concern for the medical profession. Rural and aboriginal health issues remain important in both countries. Graduate medical student entry is an attractive option but workforce requirements mean that medical education will need individual tailoring for each country. Incorporating nurses into primary health care may provide benefits such as cost savings. The integration model of community centres in Malaysia involving doctors, nurses and allied health professionals, such as physiotherapists, in a single location deserves further examination.

  4. Patient participation in general practice based undergraduate teaching: a focus group study of patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sophie E; Allfrey, Caroline; Jones, Melvyn M; Chana, Jasprit; Abbott, Ciara; Faircloth, Sofia; Higgins, Nicola; Abdullah, Laila

    2017-04-01

    Patients make a crucial contribution to undergraduate medical education. Although a national resource is available for patients participating in research, none is as yet available for education. This study aimed to explore what information patients would like about participation in general practice based undergraduate medical education, and how they would like to obtain this information. Two focus groups were conducted in London-based practices involved in both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Patients both with and without teaching experience were recruited using leaflets, posters, and patient participation groups. An open-ended topic guide explored three areas: perceived barriers that participants anticipated or had experienced; patient roles in medical education; and what help would support participation. Focus groups were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Patients suggested ways of professionalising the teaching process. These were: making information available to patients about confidentiality, iterative consent, and normalising teaching in the practice. Patients highlighted the importance of relationships, making information available about their GPs' involvement in teaching, and initiating student-patient interactions. Participants emphasised educational principles to maximise exchange of information, including active participation of students, patient identification of student learner needs, and exchange of feedback. This study will inform development of patient information resources to support their participation in teaching and access to information both before and during general practice based teaching encounters. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  5. The importance of gender of patients and general practitioners in relation to treatment practices for overweight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanett Friis Rohde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies suggest that men and women are treated differently for similar disease including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Differences in attitudes and treatment practices towards men and women with obesity are not well recognized. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the attitudes and treatment practices among Danish general practitioners (GPs, in relation to treatment of overweight, while taking gender of both the patients and practitioners into account. DESIGN: Questionnaire inventory covertly examining attitudes and practices among Danish general practitioners towards treatment of overweight. All 3.637 general practitioners from the Danish Medical Association register were invited to participate in the survey. In total 1.136 participated. RESULTS: The GPs found weight loss to be more important for overweight male than overweight female patients. They also treated complications to overweight more rigorously among male than female patients, and recommended lipid lowering medicine more often to male than female overweight patients. In addition, the younger female GPs and older male GPs more often said that they would treat an overweight patient with lipid lowering medicine. CONCLUSION: Among general practitioners in Denmark, treatment for weight loss is more often practiced for overweight male than overweight female patients presenting with same symptoms. In addition, hyperlipidemia among overweight males is also more often treated with lipid lowering medicine than hyperlipidemia among overweight females.

  6. Food parenting practices and child dietary behavior. Prospective relations and the moderating role of general parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleddens, Ester F C; Kremers, Stef P J; Stafleu, Annette; Dagnelie, Pieter C; De Vries, Nanne K; Thijs, Carel

    2014-08-01

    Research on parenting practices has focused on individual behaviors while largely failing to consider the context of their use, i.e., general parenting. We examined the extent to which food parenting practices predict children's dietary behavior (classified as unhealthy: snacking, sugar-sweetened beverage; and healthy: water and fruit intake). Furthermore, we tested the moderating role of general parenting on this relationship. Within the KOALA Birth Cohort Study, in the Netherlands, questionnaire data were collected at 6 and 8 years (N = 1654). Correlations were computed to assess the association between food parenting practices and general parenting (i.e., nurturance, behavioral control, structure, coercive control, and overprotection). Linear regression models were fitted to assess whether food parenting practices predict dietary behavior. Instrumental and emotional feeding, and pressure to eat were found to have associations with undesirable child dietary behavior (increased unhealthy intake/decreased healthy intake), whereas associations were in the desirable direction for covert control, encouragement and restriction. Moderation analyses were performed by evaluating interactions with general parenting. The associations of encouragement and covert control with desirable child dietary behaviors were found to be stronger for children who were reared in a positive parenting context. Future research should assess the influence of contextual parenting factors moderating the relationships between food parenting and child dietary behavior as the basis for the development of more effective family-based interventions.

  7. The course of mental health problems in children presenting with abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvone; Passchier, Jan; Koes, Bart W.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Leuwen, Y.L.V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the course of mental health problems in children presenting to general practice with abdominal pain and to evaluate the extent to which abdominal pain characteristics during follow-up predict the presence of mental health problems at 12 months' follow-up. Design. A prospect

  8. Multimorbidity and blood pressure control in 37 651 hypertensive patients from Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Maja Skov; Andersen, Morten; Thomsen, Janus L

    2013-01-01

    Patients with hypertension are primarily treated in general practice. However, major studies of patients with hypertension are rarely based on populations from primary care. Knowledge of blood pressure (BP) control rates in patients with diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), who have...

  9. Following the funding trail: financing, nurses and teamwork in Australian general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, C.; Phillips, C.; Hall, S.; Sibbald, B.S.; Porritt, J.; Yates, R.; Dwan, K.; Kljakovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Across the globe the emphasis on roles and responsibilities of primary care teams is under scrutiny. This paper begins with a review of general practice financing in Australia, and how nurses are currently funded. We then examine the influence on funding structures on the role of the nur

  10. Do general practices adhere to organizational guidelines for effective cervical cancer screening?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Mulder, J; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Well-organized cervical screening has been shown to be effective in the reduction of both morbidity and mortality from cancer of the uterine cervix. In The Netherlands, the GP plays an important role in the cervical screening. The question is whether the general practices are able to org

  11. Alarm symptoms of upper gastrointestinal cancer and contact to general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Svendsen, Rikke Pilsgaard;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival of upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancer depends on early stage diagnosis. Symptom-based guidelines and fast-track referral systems have been implemented for use in general practice. To improve diagnosis of upper GI cancer, knowledge on prevalence of alarm symptoms...

  12. Reliability and validity of the assessment of depression in general practice : the Short Depression Interview (SDI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B; van Hout, HPJ; van Marwijk, HWJ; Ader, HJ; van der Meer, K; de Haan, M; van Dyck, R

    2002-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are recommended to use DSM-IV criteria to diagnose major depression in daily clinical practice. This implies the assessment of nine depressive symptoms and four additional criteria. A short structured interview has been developed to assess these symptoms and criteria, and

  13. Following the funding trail: financing, nurses and teamwork in Australian general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, C.; Phillips, C.; Hall, S.; Sibbald, B.S.; Porritt, J.; Yates, R.; Dwan, K.; Kljakovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Across the globe the emphasis on roles and responsibilities of primary care teams is under scrutiny. This paper begins with a review of general practice financing in Australia, and how nurses are currently funded. We then examine the influence on funding structures on the role of the

  14. The whispered voice: The best test for screening for hearing impairment in general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhof, J.A.H.; Bock, G.H. de; Laat, J.A.P.M. de; Dap, R.; Schaapveld, K.; Springer, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    Hearling loss is an important health problem in the elderly which sometimes leads to social isolation. In a study with 62 patients, the diagnostic value of four simple tests for screening for hearing loss in general practice was examined. When paying attention to the loudness of the whispering, the

  15. Are formalised implementation activities associated with aspects of quality of care in general practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Riisgaard, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a substantial variation in how different general practices manage knowledge implementation, including the degree to which activities are collectively and formally organised. Yet, it is unclear how these differences in implementation activities affect quality of care. Aim To in...

  16. Rhinosinusitis in morbidity registrations in Dutch General Practice: a retro-spective case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmans, R.; Schermer, T.R.; Linde, K. van der; Bor, H.; Boven, K. van; Weel, C. van; Fokkens, W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is only limited accurate data on the epidemiology of rhinosinusitis in primary care. This study was conducted to assess the incidence of acute and chronic rhinosinusitis by analysing data from two Dutch general practice registration projects. Several patient characteristics and dis

  17. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbæk, Annelli

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including...

  18. 40 CFR 60.18 - General control device and work practice requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 60.18 General control device and work practice requirements. (a) Introduction. (1) This section... MJ/scm (300 Btu/scf) or greater if the flare is steam-assisted or air-assisted; or with the net heating value of the gas being combusted being 7.45 MJ/scm (200 Btu/scf) or greater if the flare...

  19. Management of Overweight during Childhood: A Focus Group Study on Health Professionals’ Experiences in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone Marie Larsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Because of the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood in the Western world, focus on the management in general practice has also increased. Objective. To explore the experiences of general practitioners (GPs and practice nurses participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT comparing two management programmes in general practice for children who are overweight or obese. Methods. Three focus groups with GPs and nurses participating in the RCT. Transcribed data were analysed using systematic text condensation followed by thematic analysis. Results. Health professionals considered it their responsibility to offer a management programme to overweight children. They recognised that management of overweight during childhood was a complex task that required an evidence-based strategy with the possibility of supervision. Health professionals experienced a barrier to addressing overweight in children. However, increasing awareness of obesity in childhood and its consequences in society was considered helpful to reach an understanding of the articulations concerning how best to address the issue. Conclusions. Health professionals in general practice recognised that they have a special obligation, capacity, and role in the management of obesity in childhood. Implementation of future management programmes must address existing barriers beyond an evidence-based standardised strategy.

  20. [Summary of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on food hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luning-Koster, M.N.; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.; Boukes, F.S.; Goudswaard, A.

    2011-01-01

    October 2010 the Dutch College of General Practitioners issued a revised version of their previous practice guideline of 1995 on food hypersensitivity in infants. If patients suspect either themselves or their child of having a food allergy, this is usually not demonstrated in subsequent investigati