WorldWideScience

Sample records for general physiologists muscle

  1. Ludwig: the physiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentinuzzi, Max; Beneke, Klaus; Gonzalez, German

    2012-01-01

    The thought reproduced in the above epigraph is taken from an article by Thurau et al. [1], who attribute it to Arthur Schopenhauer (17881860), an outstanding philosopher and author of the far-reaching piece Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung (The World as Will and Representation). In German, it would perhaps read as etwas denken, das niemand vorher gedacht hat, während etwas sehen, was jeder sieht. We could not assert whether Schopenhauer really said that, but it should not be at all surprising if it were, because it sounds simple, perhaps even naïve, and very deep, indeed. It fits perfectly to Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwigs personality (18161895), whom we will look at as physiologist in this second note. Yes, second note-because in the first one [2], we looked at him as bioengineer. A third and last Retrospectroscope column completing this series will deal with his wonderful and always humble and generous activities as teacher.

  2. Griffith Pugh, pioneer Everest physiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael P; Milledge, James S

    2002-01-01

    Lewis Griffith Cresswell Evans Pugh (1909-1994), best known as the physiologist on the successful 1953 British Everest Expedition, inspired a generation of scientists in the field of altitude medicine and physiology in the decades after World War II. This paper details his early life, his introduction to exercise physiology during the war, and his crucially important work in preparation for the Everest expedition on Cho Oyu in 1952. Pugh's other great contribution to altitude physiology was as scientific leader of the 1960-1961 Himalayan Scientific and Mountaineering Expedition (the Silver Hut), and the origins and results of this important expedition are discussed. He had a major and continuing interest in the physiology of cold, especially in real-life situations in Antarctica, exposure to cold wet conditions on hills in Britain, and in long distance swimming. He also extended his interest to Olympic athletes at moderate altitude (Mexico City) and to heat stress in athletes. Pugh's strength as a physiologist was his readiness to move from laboratory to fieldwork with ease and his rigor in applying the highest standards in both situations. He led by example in both his willingness to act as a subject for experiments and in his attention to detail. He was not an establishment figure; he was critical of authority and well known for his eccentricity, but he inspired great loyalty in those who worked with him.

  3. Abstracts of Papers Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of General Physiologists (38th) Held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts on 6-9 September 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-09

    smooth muscle cells of the guinea pig taenia coli superfused in vitro. Neither high-intensity illumination alone (up to 5 X 10’ lx) nor erythrosine...alone (up to 2 X 10-4 M) affected the tone of the taenia preparation or its ability to respond to a test agonist (carbachol). Photoirradiation of

  4. [History of physiology physiologists Evgeniy Borisovich Babski (1902-1973)].

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    Reutov, V P

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyzes works of eminent physiologists of the twentieth century the Academician of Ukraine SSR, professor Eugene Borisovich Babskii. During 50 years of research in Moscow and Kiev E.B. Babskii published more than 400 works. His main research devoted to investigation of the motility of the digestive tract, general physiology of the nervous system, chemical factors of excitation, mechanisms of muscle contraction, medical electronics and cybernetics and history of human and animal physiology. However, the most significant contribution of Babskii E.B. is his analysis of circulation physiology--the investigation of miocard energy, the physiological effects of electrical stimulation of the heart in the experiment, neural regulation, the ionic mechanisms of automaticity of the heart and myocardial metabolism in different phases of the cardiac cycle. Babskii E.B. and his colleagues firstly created the original method of study of cardiac activity--dinamocardiografy. Academician Babskii E.B. is considered the progenitor of heart electrical stimulation method of Russian Physiology and Medicine. These and many other ideas of Babskii E.B. has been further developed by his students, colleagues and followers.

  5. Eulogy John Ludbrook: surgeon, physiologist and biostatistician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Roger G; Johnston, Colin I

    2017-08-12

    On the morning of Friday June 9, Professor John Ludbrook died peacefully in his sleep at the age of 87. John will be deeply missed by his family, friends and colleagues. John Ludbrook had a long and distinguished career as a teacher, educator, surgeon, physiologist and lastly as a statistician. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. A physiologist's view of homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-12-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of "constancy" of the internal environment in an explicit and concrete way. In the 1960s, homeostatic regulatory mechanisms in physiology began to be described as discrete processes following the application of engineering control system analysis to physiological systems. Unfortunately, many undergraduate texts continue to highlight abstract aspects of the concept rather than emphasizing a general model that can be specifically and comprehensively applied to all homeostatic mechanisms. As a result, students and instructors alike often fail to develop a clear, concise model with which to think about such systems. In this article, we present a standard model for homeostatic mechanisms to be used at the undergraduate level. We discuss common sources of confusion ("sticky points") that arise from inconsistencies in vocabulary and illustrations found in popular undergraduate texts. Finally, we propose a simplified model and vocabulary set for helping undergraduate students build effective mental models of homeostatic regulation in physiological systems.

  7. Cell Calcium and the Control of Membrane Transport. Annual Symposium of the Society of General Physiologists (40th) Held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts on September 3-7, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Atif embrane Tran sport Chapter 9 A Chemical Link in Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Skel- etal Muscle Julio !ergara, Kamlesh Asotra, and Michael...much smaller lesions ("holes" of effective diameter 4 nm). but has the advantage of being quick and chemically clean and the "holes" can be vern ...the upper limit of the normal range of Ca> determined in intact cells. The verN steep dependence of the uniporter upon Ca> means that any increase in

  8. Generalization of Muscle Strength Capacities as Assessed From Different Variables, Tests, and Muscle Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuk, Ivan; Prebeg, Goran; Sreckovic, Sreten; Mirkov, Dragan M; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-02-01

    Cuk, I, Prebeg, G, Sreckovic, S, Mirkov, DM, and Jaric, S. Generalization of muscle strength capacities as assessed from different variables, tests, and muscle groups. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 305-312, 2017-The muscle strength capacities to exert force under various movement conditions have been indiscriminately assessed from various strength tests and variables applied on different muscles. We tested the hypotheses that the distinctive strength capacities would be revealed (H1) through different strength tests, and (H2) through different strength variables. Alternatively, (H3) all strength variables independent of the selected test could depict the same strength capacity of the tested muscle. Sixty subjects performed both the standard strength test and the test of alternating contractions of 6 pairs of antagonistic muscles acting in different leg and arm joints. The dependent variables obtained from each test and muscle were the maximum isometric force and the rate of force development. A confirmatory principle component analysis set to 2 factors explained 31.9% of the total variance. The factor loadings discerned between the tested arm and leg muscles, but not between the strength tests and variables. An exploratory analysis applied on the same data revealed 6 factors that explained 60.1% of the total variance. Again, the individual factors were mainly loaded by different tests and variables obtained from the same pair of antagonistic muscles. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of the muscle strength capacity of the tested individual should be based on a single strength test and variable obtained from a number of different muscles, than on a single muscle tested through different tests and variables. The selected muscles should act in different limbs and joints, while the maximum isometric force should be the variable of choice.

  9. Feasibility of physiologist-led stress echocardiography for the assessment of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal N Khan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiologist-led stress echocardiography (PLSE services provide potential for expansion of SE services and increased productivity for cardiologists. There are however no published data on the feasibility of PLSE. We sought to assess the feasibility, safety and robustness of PLSE and cardiologist-led stress echocardiography (CLSE for coronary artery disease (CAD assessment. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 898 patients undergoing PLSE or CLSE for CAD assessment using exercise or dobutamine stress over 24 months. PLSE involved 2 cardiac physiologists (exercise or 1 physiologist plus 1 cardiac nurse (dobutamine. A cardiology registrar was present in the echocardiography department during PLSE in case of medical complications. CLSE involved 1 physiologist and 1 trainee cardiologist who analysed the study and reviewed findings with an imaging cardiologist. Sixteen-segment wall motion scoring (WMS, WMSI analysis was performed. Feasibility (stressor, image quality, proportion of completed studies, agreement with imaging cardiologist analysis and safety (complication rate were compared for PLSE and CLSE. Results: The majority of studies were CLSE (56.2% and used dobutamine (68.7%. PLSE more commonly used exercise (69.2%. Overall, 96% of studies were successfully completed (>14 diagnostic segments in 98%, P = 0.899 PLSE vs CLSE. Commencement of PLSE was associated with an increase in annual SE’s performed for CAD assessment. Complication rates were comparably very low for PLSE and CLSE (0.8% vs 1.8%, P = 0.187. There was excellent agreement between PLSE and CLSE WMS interpretation of 480 myocardial segments at rest (κ = 0.87 and stress (κ = 0.70 and WMSI (ICCs and Pearson’s r >0.90, zero Bland–Altman mean bias. Conclusion: This to our knowledge is the first study of the feasibility of PLSE. PLSE performed by well-trained physiologists is feasible and safe in contemporary practice. PLSE and CLSE interpretation of stress

  10. Exercise physiologists: essential players in interdisciplinary teams for noncommunicable chronic disease management

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    Soan EJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esme J Soan,1–3 Steven J Street,1,2 Sharon M Brownie,3,4 Andrew P Hills1–31Mater Mothers' Hospital, South Brisbane, 2Mater Research Institute – University of Queensland, South Brisbane, 3Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 4Green Templeton College, Oxford University, Oxford, UKAbstract: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, are a growing public health challenge in Australia, accounting for a significant and increasing cost to the health care system. Management of these chronic conditions is aided by interprofessional practice, but models of care require updating to incorporate the latest evidence-based practice. Increasing research evidence reports the benefits of physical activity and exercise on health status and the risk of inactivity to chronic disease development, yet physical activity advice is often the least comprehensive component of care. An essential but as yet underutilized player in NCD prevention and management is the "accredited exercise physiologist," a specialist in the delivery of clinical exercise prescriptions for the prevention or management of chronic and complex conditions. In this article, the existing role of accredited exercise physiologists in interprofessional practice is examined, and an extension of their role proposed in primary health care settings.Keywords: interdisciplinary team, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, exercise physiology, accredited exercise physiologist

  11. Motor Performance in Children with Generalized Hypermobility : The Influence of Muscle Strength and Exercise Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanewinkel-van Kleef, Yvonne B.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Takken, Tim; Engelbert, Raoul H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether muscle strength and functional exercise capacity (FEC) influence motor performance in children with generalized joint hypermobility. Methods: Forty-one children (mean age: 8.1 years) with symptomatic generalized hypermobility were included. M

  12. Motor Performance in Children with Generalized Hypermobility : The Influence of Muscle Strength and Exercise Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanewinkel-van Kleef, Yvonne B.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Takken, Tim; Engelbert, Raoul H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether muscle strength and functional exercise capacity (FEC) influence motor performance in children with generalized joint hypermobility. Methods: Forty-one children (mean age: 8.1 years) with symptomatic generalized hypermobility were included. M

  13. Changes of general fitness and muscle properties following police cadet training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Hallbourg, Keith W; Collins, Sean M

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine the relationship between physical performance and muscle properties during police cadet training. The study's hypothesis was that improved physical performance brought about by training, would in turn cause a reduction in muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-nine police cadets were included in this study. Standard fitness tests and quantitative assessments of muscular biomechanical properties were conducted before, during and after the 20-week cadet training. [Results] General fitness had improved at the end of the police cadet training. There was no significant decrease in muscle flexibility as measured by the Sit-and-Reach test. However, muscle compliance of the non-dominant leg measured by the relaxation coefficient had decreased at the end of the police cadet training. [Conclusion] The increased sit-and-reach distance could be due in part to strengthening of the abdominal muscles. On the other hand, the biomechanical test, which was specific to muscle extensibility, showed a reduction in the relaxation coefficient of the non-dominant leg. Our data suggests that changes in muscle compliance as a result of lower extremity training should be considered. This data may be useful in the design of a training protocol that prevents the potential injuries caused by reduced muscle flexibility.

  14. Girls with generalized joint hypermobility display changed muscle activity and postural sway during static balance tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, B; Johansen, Kl; Hendriksen, P;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study knee muscle activity and static postural sway in girls with generalized joint hypermobility (GJH). METHOD: Sixteen girls with GJH and 11 girls with non-GJH (NGJH) aged 14 years, randomly recruited among schoolchildren, participated in this study. GJH inclusion criteria were: ......, compared with NGJH, static balance tasks with higher medial knee muscle activity relative to the lateral activity, and larger postural sway when vision was eliminated. The short- and long-term consequences should be studied further....

  15. Exercise Physiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and health-related courses, such as biology, anatomy, kinesiology, and nutrition, as well as clinical work. Pay ... and health-related courses, such as biology, anatomy, kinesiology, and nutrition, as well as clinical work. Education ...

  16. Feasibility of eliciting the H reflex in the masseter muscle in patients under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulkatan, Sedat; Jaramillo, Ana Maria; Téllez, Maria J; Goodman, Robert R; Deletis, Vedran

    2017-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of eliciting the brainstem H reflex in the masseter muscle in patients under general anesthesia. We electrically stimulated the masseteric nerve, a branch of the trigeminal nerve, and recorded ipsilateral masseteric and temporalis muscle responses. We tested eight patients who presented with trigeminal neuralgia; one patient had a temporal bone tumor and one patient had a brainstem arteriovenous malformation. All responses were elicited when patients were under general anesthesia and before the initiation of surgery. The H reflex in the masseter muscle was reliably elicited in 70% of the patients. The reflexes met the usual criteria for the H reflex because they were elicited below the threshold of the direct M response, and their amplitudes decreased when the M response increased with stronger stimuli. The mean onset latencies of the masseter H reflex and the M response were 5.4±1.3ms and 2.6±0.6ms, respectively. In the present study, we provide evidence of the feasibility of eliciting the H reflex in the masseter muscles of patients under general anesthesia. The H reflex of the masseter muscle may represent a new method available for intraoperative monitoring. Specifically, this method may be important for the monitoring of brainstem functional integrity, particularly in the midbrain and mid-pons, in addition to the trigeminal nerve path. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Professor Bernardo Alberto Houssay, MD (1887-1971): Argentine physiologist and Nobel laureate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2004-05-01

    Professor Bernardo A Houssay, Director of the Institute of Physiology at the University of Buenos Aires, was an outstanding physiologist who created the first school of medical research in Argentina and brought it to world attention. His research covered a wide range of physiological fields, but particularly concerned the hormonal control of metabolism and arterial hypertension. Houssay was dismissed from the university during the Perón era but was able to found and direct the Institute of Biology and Experimental Medicine in Buenos Aires. He was joint winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1947 for his discovery of the role of the anterior pituitary in carbohydrate metabolism.

  18. Oxidative phosphorylation in human muscle in patients with ocular myopathy and after general anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Scholte (Hans); E. Agsteribbe (E.); H.F.M. Busch (Herman); T.U. Hoogenraad (T.); F.G.I. Jennekens (Frans G.); B. van Linge (Bert); I.E.M. Luyt-Houwen (I. E M); J.D. Ross (John); M.H.J. Ruiters (M. H J); M.H.M. Verduin (M. H M)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The fuel preference of human muscle mitochondria has been given. Substrates which are oxidized with low velocity cannot be used to detect defects in oxidative phosphorylation. After general anaesthesia, the oxygen uptake with the different substrates is much lower than aft

  19. Pelvic floor muscle function in a general population of women with and without pelvic organ prolapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.P. Slieker-ten Hove (Marijke); A.L. Pool-Goudzwaard (Annelies); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine); C.W. Burger (Curt); M.E. Vierhout (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction and hypothesis: This study aims to examine the relationship between pelvic floor muscle function (PFMF) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in a general female population. Methods: Cross-sectional study on women aged 45-85 years. Validated questionnaires were used to assess pelv

  20. Histological investigations of muscle atrophy and end plates in two critically ill patients with generalized weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wokke, J.H.J.; Jennekens, F.G.I.; Oord, C.J.M. van den; Veldman, H.; Gijn, Jan van

    1988-01-01

    We describe pathological alterations at the light microscopical and ultrastructural level of motor end plates and muscle fibres in 2 critically ill patients with generalized muscular atrophy and weakness. Axonal degeneration of intramuscular nerve fibres was not conspicuous. The sural nerve in one p

  1. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    was recorded from the deltoid muscles, on both sides, during 63 seizures from 20 patients with epilepsy (10 with generalized tonic and 10 with tonic–clonic seizures). Twenty age‐ and gender‐matched normal controls simulated 100 generalized tonic seizures. To characterize the signal properties we calculated...... the root mean square (RMS) of the amplitudes, the median frequency (MF), and the coherence. Based on the spectrograms of both epileptic and simulated seizures, we chose to determine the relative spectral power (RP) in the higher (100–500 Hz) frequency domain. Key Findings: During the tonic seizures...

  2. Adverse reactions to suxamethonium and other muscle relaxants under general anesthesia

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    Vervloet, D.; Nizankowska, E.; Arnaud, A.; Senft, M.; Alazia, M.; Charpin, J.

    1983-06-01

    The mechanisms of anaphylactic reactions to muscle relaxants under general anesthesia are not completely understood. Extending an earlier study, we report 41 cases of anaphylactic shock investigated by intradermal skin tests with muscle relaxants (suxamethonium, pancuronium, gallamine, nortoxiferine), in vitro leukocyte histamine release, and Prausnitz-Kuestner tests. Intradermal tests were significantly positive at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10(5) times less than those in controls. Reproducibility tested for suxamethonium at a 1-year interval in five patients was good. Histamine release induced by muscle relaxants in Tris-albumin-Ca++-Mg++ buffer showed positive results in 8/25 instances and was inhibited by antigen excess in seven cases. Addition of 50% deuterium oxide (D2O) caused significant increase of histamine release in positive cases and induced release in all five negative cases studied. Muscle relaxant-induced histamine release was inhibited by in vitro anti-IgE leukocyte desensitization. The mean maximal histamine release dropped from 58.2% +/- 9.7 to 5.8% +/- 2 (p less than 0.01). Similarly, leukocyte desensitization also inhibited histamine release induced by anti-IgE but not by formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine or poly-L-arginine. Prausnitz-Kuestner tests were positive in five out of 21 cases studied and became negative after heat inactivation. These results confirm the usefulness of intradermal skin tests in diagnosis of patients' reaction to muscle relaxants and suggest an IgE-mediated rather than an idiosyncratic mechanism.

  3. Force per cross-sectional area from molecules to muscles: a general property of biological motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    We propose to formally extend the notion of specific tension, i.e. force per cross-sectional area-classically used for muscles, to quantify forces in molecular motors exerting various biological functions. In doing so, we review and compare the maximum tensions exerted by about 265 biological motors operated by about 150 species of different taxonomic groups. The motors considered range from single molecules and motile appendages of microorganisms to whole muscles of large animals. We show that specific tensions exerted by molecular and non-molecular motors follow similar statistical distributions, with in particular, similar medians and (logarithmic) means. Over the 10(19) mass (M) range of the cell or body from which the motors are extracted, their specific tensions vary as M(α) with α not significantly different from zero. The typical specific tension found in most motors is about 200 kPa, which generalizes to individual molecular motors and microorganisms a classical property of macroscopic muscles. We propose a basic order-of-magnitude interpretation of this result.

  4. The generalized Hill model: A kinematic approach towards active muscle contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktepe, Serdar; Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion.

  5. Joyce After Flaubert: the cuckold as imperfect physician, the writer as physiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénéjam, Valérie

    2008-01-01

    Although Joyce was not as familiar with the practice and theory of medicine as was Gustave Flaubert, this article argues that, through Flaubert's legacy, Joyce's writing was influenced by the French school of medical thought. Several aspects of Flaubert's style and narration-what has been dubbed his "medical realism"-were taken up by Joyce: the artist's impersonal perspective, the precision of descriptions, and the materialist attack against Romanticism, as well as the irony built into the narrative voice through free indirect discourse. While the cuckold in Madame Bovary is an incompetent surgeon serving as foil to the precise description of sentiments offered by the narrator, Joyce's cuckold in Ulysses is an amateur physiologist, both perspicacious and sympathetic to human suffering. Bloom's interest in internal bodily processes opens up new dimensions for a modernist aesthetics as he relates physiology and psychology, in accordance with the theories of Xavier Bichat, Etienne Bonnot de Condillac, and Pierre Jean Georges Cabanis. In keeping with such focus, Joyce's physiological version of stream-of-consciousness stems from Flaubert's clinical description of characters, but he directs matters even further inward.

  6. [Shomatsu Yokoyama, a physiologist who refused to conduct experiments on living human bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Keiko

    2008-09-01

    This article introduces the life of Shomatsu Yokoyama (1913-1992), a physiologist and military doctor, to the reader. During the Sino-Japanese war, Yokoyama disobeyed orders given by his superior officer to conduct inhumane medical experiments on humans. Not only in Unit 731, but also in other units, many military doctors were involved in medical crimes against residents of the areas invaded by the Japanese Army. Inhumane living-body experiments and vivisections were widely conducted at that time. There were, however, a small number of researchers who did not follow the orders to perform human-body experiments. Highlighting the life of such a rare researcher for the purpose of ascertaining the reason for his noncompliance with the order will provide us with insights on medical ethics. When Yokoyama was a student, his teacher, Professor Rinya Kawamura, informed him that he had been requested by the army to conduct special experiments. The remuneration for conducting such experiments was over 10 times more than the research fund allocated to the professor. Kawamura declined the request on the grounds that accepting it was against humanity. Kawamura warned Yokoyama that he might face the same situation in the future and asked Yokoyama to mark his words. Yokoyama was called to Ko-1855 Unit in 1944 and ordered to carry out living-body experiments by his superior officer. He disregarded the order, remembering Kawamura's words. As a result, he was dispatched to the dangerous frontlines. This article explores why Yokoyama was able to disobey the order to conduct inhumane experiments while shedding light on his personal background and his relationship with Rinya Kawamura. This article chronicles the life of one medical researcher who followed the dictates of his conscience during and after the war.

  7. Prolonged muscle weakness following general anesthesia in a parturient on combined antiretroviral therapy--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jotish; Maddali, Madan Mohan; Fahr, Jutta

    2007-10-01

    We report a case of an otherwise healthy; ambulatory 32 year old parturient on combined antiretroviral therapy that developed prolonged muscle weakness needing postoperative artificial ventilation. Despite no preoperative indication of muscle weakness, she developed respiratory insufficiency following general anesthesia with drugs that are deemed safe for her condition. After ruling out all the likely causes for her respiratory insufficiency that needed 12 hrs of artificial ventilation, we address the issue of undiagnosed preoperative muscle weakness as a likely cause for her problem. The role of a preoperative neurological evaluation to caution the anesthesiologist of the likelihood of a possible need for prolonged artificial ventilation following general anesthesia in this subgroup of patients, emphasized.

  8. Patterns of Hamstring Muscle Tears in the General Population: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kuske

    Full Text Available Hamstring tears are well recognised in the sporting population. Little is known about these injuries in the general population.Evaluating the rates, patterns and risk factors of non-sporting hamstring tears, compared to sporting related hamstring tears.MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1989-2015.Studies reporting patients with a grade 2 or 3 hamstring muscle tear, identified clinically, confirmed by MRI imaging or direct visualisation during surgical exploration.144 sets of linked data were extracted for analysis. Most injuries were in males (81.3%, where mean age at injury was lower (30.2, 95% CI 29.1-31.3 than in females (35.4, 95% CI 32.4-38.4 p = 0.06. Key differences were found in the proportion of non-sporting injuries in patients under and over the age 40 (p = 0.001. The proportion of non-sporting injuries was significantly higher in females compared to males (25.9% female non-sporting injuries, versus 8.5% male; p = 0.02. Avulsions were more frequently reported in non-sporting activities (70.5%. The proportion of such injuries was notably higher in females, though this failed to meet significance (p = 0.124. Grouped by age category a bimodal distribution was noted, with the proportion of avulsions greater in younger (age 40 (p = 0.008. 86.8% of patients returned to pre-injury activity levels with a similar frequency across all study variables; age, activity (sporting vs non-sporting and injury type (avulsion vs tear.This review highlights a proportion of adults suffering grade 2 or 3 hamstring injuries from activities other than the classic sports trauma. The majority of these non-sporting injuries were avulsion injuries that clustered in older female and skeletally immature patients suggesting a potential link to bone mineral density.

  9. Patterns of Hamstring Muscle Tears in the General Population: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuske, Barbara; Hamilton, David F; Pattle, Sam B; Simpson, A Hamish R W

    2016-01-01

    Hamstring tears are well recognised in the sporting population. Little is known about these injuries in the general population. Evaluating the rates, patterns and risk factors of non-sporting hamstring tears, compared to sporting related hamstring tears. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1989-2015). Studies reporting patients with a grade 2 or 3 hamstring muscle tear, identified clinically, confirmed by MRI imaging or direct visualisation during surgical exploration. 144 sets of linked data were extracted for analysis. Most injuries were in males (81.3%), where mean age at injury was lower (30.2, 95% CI 29.1-31.3) than in females (35.4, 95% CI 32.4-38.4) p = 0.06. Key differences were found in the proportion of non-sporting injuries in patients under and over the age 40 (p = 0.001). The proportion of non-sporting injuries was significantly higher in females compared to males (25.9% female non-sporting injuries, versus 8.5% male; p = 0.02). Avulsions were more frequently reported in non-sporting activities (70.5%). The proportion of such injuries was notably higher in females, though this failed to meet significance (p = 0.124). Grouped by age category a bimodal distribution was noted, with the proportion of avulsions greater in younger (age 40) (p = 0.008). 86.8% of patients returned to pre-injury activity levels with a similar frequency across all study variables; age, activity (sporting vs non-sporting) and injury type (avulsion vs tear). This review highlights a proportion of adults suffering grade 2 or 3 hamstring injuries from activities other than the classic sports trauma. The majority of these non-sporting injuries were avulsion injuries that clustered in older female and skeletally immature patients suggesting a potential link to bone mineral density.

  10. An optimized histochemical method to assess skeletal muscle glycogen and lipid stores reveals two metabolically distinct populations of type I muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Nordby, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle energy metabolism has been a research focus of physiologists for more than a century. Yet, how the use of intramuscular carbohydrate and lipid energy stores are coordinated during different types of exercise remains a subject of debate. Controversy arises from contradicting data f...

  11. Simplifying Hill-based muscle models through generalized extensible fuzzy heuristic implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Amy J.

    2006-04-01

    Traditional dynamic muscle models based on work initially published by A. V. Hill in 1938 often rely on high-order systems of differential equations. While such models are very accurate and effective, they do not typically lend themselves to modification by clinicians who are unfamiliar with biomedical engineering and advanced mathematics. However, it is possible to develop a fuzzy heuristic implementation of a Hill-based model-the Fuzzy Logic Implemented HIll-based (FLIHI) muscle model-that offers several advantages over conventional state equation approaches. Because a fuzzy system is oriented by design to describe a model in linguistics rather than ordinary differential equation-based mathematics, the resulting fuzzy model can be more readily modified and extended by medical practitioners. It also stands to reason that a well-designed fuzzy inference system can be implemented with a degree of generalizability not often encountered in traditional state space models. Taking electromyogram (EMG) as one input to muscle, FLIHI is tantamount to a fuzzy EMG-to-muscle force estimator that captures dynamic muscle properties while providing robustness to partial or noisy data. One goal behind this approach is to encourage clinicians to rely on the model rather than assuming that muscle force as an output maps directly to smoothed EMG as an input. FLIHI's force estimate is more accurate than assuming force equal to smoothed EMG because FLIHI provides a transfer function that accounts for muscle's inherent nonlinearity. Furthermore, employing fuzzy logic should provide FLIHI with improved robustness over traditional mathematical approaches.

  12. Selective reversal of muscle relaxation in general anesthesia: focus on sugammadex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin J Brull

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Sorin J Brull1, Mohamed Naguib21Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Jacksonville, FL, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center,  Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Despite the significant improvements in the pharmacology of muscle relaxants in the past six decades, the search for the ideal muscle relaxant continues, mainly because of the incomplete efficacy and persistent side effects associated with their antagonism. Clinical concerns remain about the residual paralysis and hemodynamic side effects associated with the classic pharmacologic reversal agents, the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Although the development of the “ideal muscle relaxant” remains illusory, pharmacologic advancements hold promise for improved clinical care and patient safety. Recent clinical advances include the development of short-acting nondepolarizing muscle relaxant agents that have fast onset and a very rapid metabolism that allows reliable and complete recovery; and the development of selective, “designer” reversal agents that are specific for a single drug or class of drugs. This article reviews recent developments in the pharmacology of these selective reversal agents: plasma cholinesterases, cysteine, and sugammadex. Although each of the selective reversal agents is specific in its substrate, the clinical use of the combination of muscle relaxant with its specific reversal agent will allow much greater intraoperative titrating ability, decreased side effect profile, and may result in a decreased incidence of postoperative residual paralysis and improved patient safety.Keywords: selective reversal agents, cysteine, plasma cholinesterases, sugammadex

  13. Sugammadex for the reversal of muscle relaxation in general anaesthesia: a systematic review and economic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D; Paulden, M; Paton, F; Heirs, M; Duffy, S; Craig, D; Hunter, J; Wilson, J; Sculpher, M; Woolacott, N

    2010-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion) is a newly developed agent for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) induced by rocuronium or vecuronium. Sugammadex can reverse profound blockade and can be given for immediate reversal and its use would avoid the potentially serious adverse effects of the currently used agent, succinylcholine. Also, sugammadex can reverse NMB more quickly and predictably than existing agents. To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of sugammadex for the reversal of muscle relaxation after general anaesthesia in UK practice following routine or rapid induction of NMB. Medical databases [including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Science Citation Index, BIOSIS and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), conference proceedings, internet sites and clinical trials registers] were searched to identify published and unpublished studies. The main searches were carried out in May 2008 and supplemented by current awareness updates up until November 2008. For the clinical effectiveness review, randomised controlled trials of sugammadex against placebo or an active comparator (neostigmine + glycopyrrolate) for the reversal of moderate or profound NMB and for immediate reversal (spontaneous recovery from succinylcholine-induced blockade) were included. The primary effectiveness outcome was speed of recovery from NMB, as measured by objective monitoring of neuromuscular function. For the cost-effectiveness review, a de novo economic assessment considered the routine induction of NMB and the rapid induction and/or reversal of NMB, and threshold analyses were carried out on a series of pairwise comparisons to establish how effective sugammadex needs to be to justify its cost. The review of clinical effectiveness included four randomised active-control trials of sugammadex, nine randomised placebo-controlled trials and five studies in special populations. A total of 2132 titles and abstracts and 265 full-text publications were screened

  14. Leg general muscle moment and power patterns in able-bodied subjects during recumbent cycle ergometry with ankle immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecsi, J; Straube, A; Fornusek, C

    2014-11-01

    Rehabilitation of persons with pareses commonly uses recumbent pedalling and a rigid pedal boot that fixes the ankle joint from moving. This study was performed to provide general muscle moments (GMM) and joint power data from able-bodied subjects performing recumbent cycling at two workloads. Twenty-six able-bodied subjects pedalled a stationary recumbent tricycle at 60 rpm during passive cycling and at two workloads (low 15 W and high 40 W per leg) while leg kinematics and pedal forces were recorded. GMM and power were calculated using inverse dynamic equations. During the high workload, the hip and knee muscles produced extensor/flexor moments throughout the extensions/flexions phases of the joints. For low workload, a prolonged (crank angle 0-258°) hip extension moment and a shortened range (350-150°) of knee extension moment were observed compared to the corresponding extension phases of each joint. The knee and hip joints generated approximately equal power. At the high workload the hip and knee extensors generated increased power in the propulsion phase. For the first time, this study provides GMM and power patterns for able-bodied subjects performing recumbent cycling with an immobilized ankle. The patterns showed greater similarities to upright cycling with a free ankle, than previously supposed.

  15. Homer Wheelon, M.D., physiologist, artist, and poet: origins of the tailpieces in journals of the American Physiological Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Lawrence P; Schramm, Diana C; Jackson, F Wilson

    2006-12-01

    Since 1953, illustrations have been inserted as "tailpieces" at the ends of articles in The American Journal of Physiology and The Journal of Applied Physiology. The drawings were made by Homer Wheelon, a member of the American Physiological Society from 1919 until his death in 1960. Forty-five years after his death, Wheelon is unknown, but he contributed 32 publications to the medical literature and trained J. Earl Thomas, an important 20th century gastrointestinal physiologist. Wheelon was born into poverty in 1883 to itinerant Methodist preachers, circumstances that guided his education and career choices. Throughout his life, Wheelon exhibited a fondness and talent for art and photography and an unusual breadth of intellectual interests and knowledge. Wheelon received a bachelor's degree from the University of Washington, then studied at the University of Oregon, Northwestern University, and St. Louis University. Earning his M.D. from St. Louis University and assuming a faculty position there, Wheelon and his graduate student, Thomas, conducted widely recognized gastrointestinal research. Returning to Seattle in 1921, Wheelon became a highly respected physician and hospital administrator, but he also found time to indulge his interest in visual art and poetry. In 1933, inspired by observing a rabbit being used in a pregnancy test, Wheelon began to write and illustrate an epic, 322-page poem, Rabbit No. 202, illustrations from which became the journals' tailpieces. The present study traces Wheelon's personal life and scientific career in an attempt to understand this complex man and the origins of his unusual poem and its drawings.

  16. A tribute to Italian physiologists of Jewish descent evicted during the persecution ordered by the Fascist Regime in 1938.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Diana; Manni, Ermanno

    2007-06-01

    The present report commemorates the persecution of five renowned Italian physiologists of Jewish descent that lost their chairs in medical schools because of the anti-semitic policies of the fascist regime. In 1938, Mussolini promulgated the Racial Laws, officially with the aim of safeguarding the purity of the Italian race in conquered African colonies. However, their true intent was to persecute the Italian Jewish community in agreement with the policy of Nazi Germany. In accordance with the Racial Laws, all non-Aryans were banished from professional activities and were evicted from public, social, and academic life. As a result, 98 full professors in Italian universities were removed from their academic positions. In medical schools, physiology, more than other discipline, lost the most prominent faculty members. Of the 17 full Professors of Human Physiology, five were of Jewish descent, and all were evicted: they were Camillo Artom from Palermo, Mario Camis from Bologna, Carlo Foà from Milan, Amedeo Herlitzka from Turin, and Ugo Lombroso from Genoa. All were talented and famous scientists who were forced to leave Italy and take refuge in foreign countries. At the end of World War II, Camis, Foà, Herlitzka, and Lombroso returned to Italy and resumed their previous academic positions, whereas Artom remained in the United States. Unfortunately, Camis died later that year. During the postwar period, some of the fascists responsible for the Jewish persecution were killed or committed suicide while the survivors were imprisoned and prosecuted. However, all were soon released and resumed their former positions.

  17. SKELETAL MUSCLE CAPILLARY FUNCTION: CONTEMPORARY OBSERVATIONS AND NOVEL HYPOTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, David C.; Copp, Steven W.; Ferguson, Scott K.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2014-01-01

    The capillary bed constitutes a vast surface facilitating exchange of O2, substrates and metabolites between blood and organs. In contracting skeletal muscle capillary blood flow and O2 diffusing capacity as well as O2 flux may increase two orders of magnitude above resting. Chronic diseases such as heart failure, diabetes and also sepsis impair these processes leading to compromised energetic, metabolic and ultimately contractile function. Among researchers seeking to understand blood-myocyte exchange in health and the bases for dysfunction in disease there is a fundamental disconnect between microcirculation specialists and many physiologists and physiologist clinicians. Whereas the former observe capillaries and capillary function directly (muscle intravital microscopy) the latter generally use indirect methodologies (e.g., post-mortem tissue analysis, 1-methyl xanthine, contrast enhanced ultrasound, permeability surface area product) and interpret their findings based upon August Krogh’s observations made nearly a century ago. “Kroghian” theory holds that only a small fraction of capillaries support red blood cell (RBC) flux in resting muscle leaving the vast majority to be “recruited” (i.e., initiate RBC flux) during contractions which would constitute the basis for increasing capillary exchange surface area and reducing capillary-mitochondrial diffusion distances. Experimental techniques each have their strengths and weaknesses and often the correct or complete answer to a problem emerges from integration across multiple technologies. Today Krogh’s entrenched “capillary recruitment” hypothesis is challenged by direct observations of capillaries in contracting muscle; something that he and his colleagues could not do. Moreover, in the peer-reviewed scientific literature, application of a range of contemporary physiological technologies including intravital microscopy of contracting muscle, magnetic resonance and near infrared spectroscopy and

  18. The effect of core stability and general exercise on abdominal muscle thickness in non-specific chronic low back pain using ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, MohammadBagher; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Jamshidi, Aliashraf; Zarabi, Vida; Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-01

    There is a controversy regarding whether core stability exercise (CSE) is more effective than general exercise (GE) for chronic LBP. To compare different exercises regarding their effect on improving back strength and stability, performance of abdominal muscles is a useful index. Ultrasound imaging for measuring muscle thickness could be used to assess muscle performance. The aim of this study was to compare CSE and GE in chronic LBP using ultrasound imaging for measurement of thickness of the deep stabilizing and main global trunk muscles in non-specific chronic LBP. Each program included 16 training sessions three times a week. Using ultrasound imaging, four transabdominal muscle thickness were measured before and after the intervention. Disability and pain were measured as secondary outcomes. After the intervention on participants (n = 43), a significant increase in muscle thickness (hypertrophy) was seen only in right and left rectus abdominis in the GE group, but significant difference to the CSE group was only on the right side. Disability and pain reduced within the groups without a significant difference in the change between them. The present results provided evidence that only GE increased right and left rectus muscle thickness. The only significant difference between CSE and GE groups was the right rectus thickness. As rectus is a global muscle, the effect of GE on strength improvement (one side stronger than the other) may have a negative effect on motor control of lumbopelvic muscles and possibly increase the risk of back pain occurring or becoming worse, though this was not observed in the present study.

  19. Carnitine deficiency with hyperbilirubinemia, generalized skeletal muscle weakness and reactive hypoglycemia in a patient on long-term total parenteral nutrition: treatment with intravenous L-carnitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthley, L I; Fishlock, R C; Snoswell, A M

    1983-01-01

    Low levels of plasma carnitine and reduced urinary carnitine excretion with persistently elevated plasma bilirubin levels, reactive hypoglycemia and generalized skeletal muscle weakness are described in a patient requiring long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Intravenous administration of L-carnitine at 400 mg/day for 7 days and subsequently a maintenance dose of 60 mg/day corrected the plasma carnitine deficiency and reactive hypoglycemia and was associated with a return to normal plasma bilirubin levels and a restoration of skeletal muscle strength.

  20. Patterns of superficial fibre formation in the European pearlfish (Rutilus frisii meidingeri) provide a general template for slow muscle development in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, W; Haslett, J R; Goldschmid, A; Sänger, A M

    1998-06-01

    The debate about the pattern of muscle formation in teleost fish has recently been heightened in the literature. Here we examine superficial muscle development in the pearlfish, a cyprinid endemic to a small area of Central Europe, and uninfluenced by economic interest and breeding. Using light and electron microscopy, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry techniques, we report that: (1) Superficial fibre precursors originate close to the notochord, are part of the same cell population as the so-called muscle pioneer cells, and are transferred laterally to end up at the surface of the myotome. (2) Superficial fibre maturation is exceptionally rapid. Structural and enzymatic functionality is attained at a time when prospective deep fibres have not passed beyond the early myotube state. This strong contrast weakens as the embryo develops. (3) Apart from the muscle pioneers, the superficial fibres appear to be capable of functioning before they receive any direct innervation, implying that signals are transferred to these fibres via cell-to-cell junctions. We suggest that the capability of rapid superficial fibre maturation is a rather general feature among teleosts and may aid pre-hatch survival under a variable environment. Our results indicate that muscle formation in teleost fish may follow a common basic pattern that is open to considerable ontogenetic and phylogenetic modification in response to habitat conditions.

  1. Using General Anesthesia plus Muscle Relaxant in a Patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type IV: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-Fen; Wang, Dong-Xin; Ma, Daqing

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare genetic disease characterized by degeneration of spinal cord motor neurons, which results in hypotonia and muscle weakness. Patients with type IV SMA often have onset of weakness from adulthood. Anesthetic management is often difficult in these patients as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents as shown by (Lunn and Wang; 2008, Simic; 2008, and Cifuentes-Diaz et al.; 2002). Herein we report a case of anesthetic management of a patient with SMA type IV for mammectomy and review some other cases of SMA patients receiving different kinds of anesthesia.

  2. Unilateral hindlimb casting induced a delayed generalized muscle atrophy during rehabilitation that is prevented by a whey or a high protein diet but not a free leucine-enriched diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Magne

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the general muscle mass and strength loss associated with ageing. Muscle atrophy could be made worse by exposure to acute periods of immobilization, because muscle disuse by itself is a stimulus for atrophy. Using a model of unilateral hindlimb casting in old adult rats, we have already demonstrated that the primary effect of immobilization was atrophy in the casted leg, but was also surprisingly associated with a retarded atrophy in the non-casted leg during rehabilitation. In search of mechanisms involved in this generalized atrophy, we demonstrated in the present study that contrary to pair-fed non-immobilized control animals, muscle protein synthesis in the non-immobilized limb was unable to adapt and to respond positively to food intake. Because pair-fed control rats did not lose muscle mass, this defect in muscle protein synthesis may represent one of the explanation for the muscle mass loss observed in the non-immobilized rats. Nevertheless, in order to stimulate protein turn over and generate a positive nitrogen balance required to maintain the whole muscle mass in immobilized rats, we tested a dietary free leucine supplementation (an amino acid known for its stimulatory effect on protein metabolism during the rehabilitation period. Leucine supplementation was able to overcome the anabolic resistance in the non-immobilized limb. A greater muscle protein synthesis up-regulation associated with a stimulation of the mTOR signalling pathway was indeed recorded but it remained inefficient to prevent the loss of muscle in the non-immobilized limb. By contrast, we demonstrated here that whey protein or high protein diets were able to prevent the muscle mass loss of the non-immobilized limb by sustaining muscle protein synthesis during the entire rehabilitation period.

  3. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  4. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C

    2015-04-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K(+) levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are "channelopathies" caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1), and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, and Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  5. Abstracts of Papers Presented at the Forty-Third Annual Meeting of the Society of General Physiologists Held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts on 6-9 September 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Council Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics Research, Babraham, Cam- bridge, United Kingdom; Institute of Pathophysiology, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia...Human Red Cell Ghosts M. GUERRA,* M. STEINBERG,* and P. B. I)UNHAM, Departamento de Fisiologia , Universidad de la Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands...CPM and EPM and showed an osmotic dependence. The V, for transport was 3.7-fold greater in vesicles from the exercised animals , 3.5 ± 0.4 vs. 13.0 ± 1.4

  6. Abstracts of Papers Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of General Physiologists Held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts on 10-13 September 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-13

    transport responds to both acute and chronic stimuli. GLUTI and GLUT4 glucose transporter isoforms are expressed in differentiated L6 mvotubes. The...acute ( < I h) response to insulin consists of translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. In contrast, the chronic (4-24 h...neither case was the GLUT4 isoform affected, suggesting that the intracellular pools of each isoform are distinct and the isoforms are regulated

  7. Abstracts of Papers Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of General Physiologists (40th) Held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts on 4-7 September 1986,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocytes SERGIO GRIN- STEIN, Department of Cell Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada The relationship between the...Rat Lymphocytes S. JEFFREY DIXON,* SARA COHEN,* EDWARD J. CRAGOE, JR.,* and SERGIO GRINSTEIN, Department of Cell Biology, The Hospital for Sick...LUSTIG,* G. A. WEISMAN,* F. A. GONZALES ,* D.J. GROSS,* and W. W. WEBB, Section of Biochemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, and the School of Applied and

  8. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4 due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rajab

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4 of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT. PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  9. Minimal acupuncture is not a valid placebo control in randomised controlled trials of acupuncture: a physiologist's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundeberg Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Placebo-control of acupuncture is used to evaluate and distinguish between the specific effects and the non-specific ones. During 'true' acupuncture treatment in general, the needles are inserted into acupoints and stimulated until deqi is evoked. In contrast, during placebo acupuncture, the needles are inserted into non-acupoints and/or superficially (so-called minimal acupuncture. A sham acupuncture needle with a blunt tip may be used in placebo acupuncture. Both minimal acupuncture and the placebo acupuncture with the sham acupuncture needle touching the skin would evoke activity in cutaneous afferent nerves. This afferent nerve activity has pronounced effects on the functional connectivity in the brain resulting in a 'limbic touch response'. Clinical studies showed that both acupuncture and minimal acupuncture procedures induced significant alleviation of migraine and that both procedures were equally effective. In other conditions such as low back pain and knee osteoarthritis, acupuncture was found to be more potent than minimal acupuncture and conventional non-acupuncture treatment. It is probable that the responses to 'true' acupuncture and minimal acupuncture are dependent on the aetiology of the pain. Furthermore, patients and healthy individuals may have different responses. In this paper, we argue that minimal acupuncture is not valid as an inert placebo-control despite its conceptual brilliance.

  10. Minimal acupuncture is not a valid placebo control in randomised controlled trials of acupuncture: a physiologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Iréne; Näslund, Jan; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2009-01-30

    Placebo-control of acupuncture is used to evaluate and distinguish between the specific effects and the non-specific ones. During 'true' acupuncture treatment in general, the needles are inserted into acupoints and stimulated until deqi is evoked. In contrast, during placebo acupuncture, the needles are inserted into non-acupoints and/or superficially (so-called minimal acupuncture). A sham acupuncture needle with a blunt tip may be used in placebo acupuncture. Both minimal acupuncture and the placebo acupuncture with the sham acupuncture needle touching the skin would evoke activity in cutaneous afferent nerves. This afferent nerve activity has pronounced effects on the functional connectivity in the brain resulting in a 'limbic touch response'. Clinical studies showed that both acupuncture and minimal acupuncture procedures induced significant alleviation of migraine and that both procedures were equally effective. In other conditions such as low back pain and knee osteoarthritis, acupuncture was found to be more potent than minimal acupuncture and conventional non-acupuncture treatment. It is probable that the responses to 'true' acupuncture and minimal acupuncture are dependent on the aetiology of the pain. Furthermore, patients and healthy individuals may have different responses. In this paper, we argue that minimal acupuncture is not valid as an inert placebo-control despite its conceptual brilliance.

  11. A Physiologist's View of Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of…

  12. Muscle Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  13. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur ... minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  14. Inv(X)(p21.1;q22.1) in a man with mental retardation, short stature, general muscle wasting, and facial dysmorphism: clinical study and mutation analysis of the NXF5 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frints, S.G.; Jun, L.; Fryns, J.P.; Devriendt, K.; Teulingkx, R.; Berghe, L. van den; Vos, B. de; Borghgraef, M.; Chelly, J.; Portes, V. des; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Hamel, B.C.J.; Ropers, H.H.; Kalscheuer, V.M.M.; Raynaud, M.; Moraine, C.; Marynen, P.; Froyen, G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a 59-year-old male (patient A059) with moderate to severe mental retardation (MR) and a pericentric inversion of the X-chromosome: inv(X)(p21.1;q22.1). He had short stature, pectus excavatum, general muscle wasting, and facial dysmorphism. Until now, no other patients with similar clinic

  15. Skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  16. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  17. Muscle disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  18. Reduction in pulmonary complications in high risk patients undergoing surgery for total hip replacement under general anesthesia by preoperative intensive inspiratory muscle training:A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingqiang Ma; Hongguang Bao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the incidence of atelectasis in patients at high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications scheduled for elective total hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia. Methods: Thirty two high-risk paticnts undergoing elective total hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia were chosen from Nanjing Medical University, Affiliated Nanjing First Hospital. In this single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle training or conventional treatment (CT). The major effectiveness outcome variables were atelectasis and duration of postoperative hospitalization. Results: Both groups were comparable prior to surgery. Seven patients in the CT group and 3 in the IMT group developed atelectasis (P = 0.25). Median duration of postoperative hospitalization was 13 days (range, 10~17 days) in the IMT group versus 16 days (range, 11~23 days) in the CT group (Mann-Whitney U statistics, Z =-2.22, P = 0.03). Mean postoperative inspiratory pressure was 5% higher in the IMT group. Conclusion: Preoperative intensive inspiratory muscle training appears to reduce the incidence of atelectasis and duration of postoperative hospitalization in patients at high risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications who were scheduled for elective total hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia.

  19. Muscle biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  20. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy. Exercises may include ones done in a swimming pool to reduce the muscle workload, and other types ... a physical examination and ask about your medical history and symptoms, including: When did the muscle atrophy ...

  1. Your Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develops. There they help to push the baby out of the mother's body when it's time to be born. You'll find smooth muscles at work behind the scenes in your eyes, too. These muscles keep the eyes ... thick muscles of the heart contract to pump blood out and then relax to let blood back in ...

  2. Modeling Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  3. First results about recovery of walking function in patients with intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness from the General Weakness Syndrome Therapy (GymNAST) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Mückel, Simone; Oehmichen, Frank; Pohl, Marcus

    2015-12-23

    To describe the time course of recovery of walking function and other activities of daily living in patients with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired muscle weakness. This is a cohort study. We included critically ill patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Post-acute ICU and rehabilitation units in Germany. We measured walking function, muscle strength, activities in daily living, motor and cognitive function. We recruited 150 patients (30% female) who fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. The primary outcome recovery of walking function was achieved after a median of 28.5 days (IQR=45) after rehabilitation onset and after a median of 81.5 days (IQR=64) after onset of illness. Our final multivariate model for recovery of walking function included two clinical variables from baseline: the Functional Status Score ICU (adjusted HR=1.07 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and the ability to reach forward in cm (adjusted HR=1.02 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.04). All secondary outcomes but not pain improved significantly in the first 8 weeks after study onset. We found good recovery of walking function for most patients and described the recovery of walking function of people with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Sächsische Landesärztekammer EK-BR-32/13-1; DRKS00007181, German Register of Clinical Trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Recovery of sit-to-stand function in patients with intensive-care-unit-acquired muscle weakness: Results from the General Weakness Syndrome Therapy cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Simone; Burridge, Jane H; Pohl, Marcus; Oehmichen, Frank; Mehrholz, Jan

    2016-10-12

    To describe the time course of recovery of sit-to-stand function in patients with intensive-care-unit-acquired muscle weakness and the impact of recovery. A cohort study in post-acute intensive care unit and rehabilitation units. Patients with chronic critical illness and intensive-care-unit-acquired muscle weakness were included. Sit-to-stand function was measured daily, using a standardized chair height, defined as 120% of the individual's knee height. A total of 150 patients were recruited according to the selection criteria. The primary outcome of independent sit-to-stand function was achieved by a median of 56 days (interquartile range Q1-Q3 = 32-90 days) after rehabilitation onset and a median of 113 days (Q1-Q3=70-148 days) after onset of illness. The final multivariate model for recovery of sit-to-stand function included 3 variables: age (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.96 (95% CI 0.94-0.99), duration of ventilation (HR=0.99 (95% CI 0.98-1.00) and Functional Status Score for the Intensive Care Unit (FSS-ICU) (adjusted HR=1.12 (95% CI 1.08-1.16)). Rapid recovery of sit-to-stand function for most patients with intensive-care-unit-acquired muscle weakness were seen. The variables older age and longer duration of ventilation decreased, and higher FSS-ICU increased the chance of regaining independent sit-to-stand function.

  5. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Systematic Review of Muscle Strength Assessment and Muscle Strength Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-02-01

    To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion isokinetic dynamometry. A systematic literature search of 7 databases was performed. Included studies (1) enrolled participants with definite poststroke hemiplegia according to defined criteria; (2) assessed muscle strength or power by criterion isokinetic dynamometry; (3) had undergone peer review; and (4) were available in English or Danish. The psychometric properties of isokinetic dynamometry were reviewed with respect to reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Furthermore, comparisons of strength between paretic, nonparetic, and comparable healthy muscles were reviewed. Twenty studies covering 316 PPSH were included. High intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) inter- and intrasession reliability was reported for isokinetic dynamometry, which was independent of the tested muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Slightly higher ICC values were found for the nonparetic extremity. Standard error of the mean (SEM) values showed that a change of 7% to 20% was required for a real group change to take place for most muscle groups, with the knee extensors showing the smallest SEM% values. The muscle strength of paretic muscles showed deficits when compared with both healthy and nonparetic muscles, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Nonparetic muscles only showed minor strength impairments when compared with healthy muscles. Criterion isokinetic dynamometry is a reliable test in persons with stroke, generally showing marked reductions in muscle strength of paretic and, to a lesser degree, nonparetic muscles when compared with healthy controls, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Copyright

  6. The examination of the musculoskeletal system based only on the evaluation of pelvic-hip complex muscle and trunk flexibility may lead to failure to screen children for generalized joint hypermobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Czaprowski

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the clinical assessment of the pelvic-hip complex muscle and trunk flexibility is sufficient for diagnosing generalized joint hypermobility (GJH.A cross-sectional study.Center of Body Posture in Olsztyn, North East Poland.The study included 136 females and 113 males aged 10-13 years.In order to assess muscle flexibility, the straight leg raise (SLR test (for hamstring and modified Thomas test for one- (O-JHF and two-joint (T-JHF hip flexors were performed. To evaluate trunk flexibility the fingertip-to-floor (FTF and lateral trunk flexion (LTF tests were used. The GJH occurrence was assessed with the use of nine-point Beighton scale (threshold value ≥5 points for females, ≥4 for males. The analysis was carried out separately for females and males.There were no significant differences between females with versus without GJH, and males with versus without GJH regarding SLR (p = 0.86, p = 0.19 for females and males, respectively, O-JHF (p = 0.89, p = 0.35 for females and males, respectively, T-JHF (p = 0.77, p = 0.4 for females and males, respectively, FTF (p = 0.19, p = 0.84 for females and males, respectively and LTF (p = 0.58, p = 0.35 for females and males, respectively tests results.Clinical examination of the pelvic-hip complex muscles and trunk flexibility by use of SLR, O-JHF, T-JHF, FTF and LTF revealed to be insufficient in diagnosing GJH in children aged 10-13 years. Thus, the Beighton scale should be considered a standard element of physiotherapeutic examination of the musculoskeletal system in children and youth.

  7. 喉罩联合无肌松全麻在小儿眼科手术中的应用%The application of LMA combined with general anesthesia without muscle relaxants in the pediatric department of ophthalmology operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺伟忠; 杨义; 范小丽; 李萌

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究无肌松全麻联合喉罩置入对小儿眼科手术围术期应激反应的影响。方法选择全身麻醉下小儿眼科手术患者90例,随机分为A、B两组,每组各45例。 A组使用肌松药插入气管导管,B组采用无肌松药全麻并置入喉罩。对比手术中各时间点的平均动脉压(MAP)、心率(P)、心率收缩压乘积(RPP)、血氧饱和度(SpO2)。观察两组拔管期呛咳、躁动等拔管反应,并记录拔管(喉罩)时间、麻醉药总量。结果A组麻醉诱导及拔管期血流动力学波动高于B组;A组严重呛咳、躁动例数高于B组;A组拔管时间长于B组;A组麻醉药物总量多于B组。结论喉罩联合无肌松全麻应用于小儿眼科手术安全可靠,相较气管插管围术期应激反应更低。%Objective To study without muscle relaxants combined general effect of laryngeal mask insertion on the pe-diatric department of ophthalmology operation perioperative stress responses. Methods Ninety patients with pediatric eye surgery were randomly divided into group A and group B, 45 cases in each group. Group A treated with muscle re-laxants insert the tracheal tube, group B treated with without anesthesia and muscle relaxants into the LMA. Contrast surgery mean arterial pressure at each time point (MAP), heart rate (P), rate pressure product (RPP), oxygen saturation (SpO2). Extubation were observed choking, restlessness, etc. extubation reaction, record extubation (LMA) time, total quantity of using drug. Results A induction of anesthesia and extubation hemodynamic fluctuations was higher than that of group B; Severe cough, agitation of group A were higher than that in B group; The extubation time was longer than that of group B; Drug amount was higher than that of group B. Conclusion LMA Joint no muscle relaxant used in pe-diatric anesthesia eye surgery is safe and reliable, with lower stress response.

  8. Clinical study of OSAHS surgery under general anesthesia without muscle relaxants%无肌松药全身麻醉用于鼾症手术的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉琴; 孟凡民; 王红国; 王高宏; 栾秀坤

    2013-01-01

    目的 尝试在鼾症(OSAHS)手术全身麻醉维持中免用肌松药的可行性,探讨其临床价值.方法 选择ASA Ⅰ~Ⅱ级悬雍垂腭咽成形术(UPPP)鼾症患者180例,随机分为A、B、C三组(每组n=60),均以瑞芬太尼、丙泊酚及氯化琥珀胆碱静脉快诱导,经鼻明视或盲探气管插管,A组以瑞芬太尼、丙泊酚维持麻醉,B、C组分别在A组基础上加用阿曲库铵、维库溴铵维持麻醉.观察记录三组患者各时点循环和呼吸功能指标及术中肌松程度、体动次数、麻醉苏醒时间、拔管时间、不良反应及并发症等.结果 三组气管插管成功率100%,麻醉维持平稳,无体动反应,均顺利完成手术;A组拔管前后清醒彻底,呼吸功能和肌力正常,无麻醉并发症发生,B、C组清醒后有不同程度肌松药残余,须使用新斯的明拮抗,拔管后分泌物增多、出血、心动过缓、低氧血症、舌后坠、喉痉挛、呼吸道梗阻、支气管痉挛发生率明显高于A组(P<0.01).结论 瑞芬太尼-丙泊酚无肌松药全凭静脉麻醉维持用于鼾症手术安全有效,可明显缩短麻醉恢复时间,提高麻醉恢复质量,降低麻醉恢复期风险,减少并发症发生.%Objective To invertigate the feasibilityand clinical efficacy of OSAHS surgery under general anesthesia without muscle relaxants. Methods Totally 180 ASA Ⅰ or Ⅱ OSAHS cases underwent UPPP surgery were randomly divided into 3groups(n =60) , general anesthesia was induced with Remifentanil, Propofol and Succinylcholine, and maintained with Propofol and Remifentanil at group A. Group B, C added atracurium, vecuronium to maintain anesthesia, on the basis of group A. Observed and recorded the three groups of patients at each time point circulatory and respiratory function parameters and the number of intraoperative muscle relaxants degree of body movement, anesthesia time, time to extubation, adverse reactions and complications. Results All patients of the

  9. Molecular Biology and Functions of Carrier Proteins. Annual Symposium (46th) of the Society of General Physiologists held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts on September 10-13, 1992. Volume 48

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-13

    tri-iodothyronine (T3) are of major significance for the intermediarv metabolism of virtually all tissues (DeGroot. 1989: Werner and Ingbar . 1991...evaluation, diagnosis. and treatment of some thyroid pathological conditions (Kendal and Condon. 1969: DeGroot. 1989: Werner and Ingbar . 1991). The 1 TPO...Endocrinology. 114:1090-1098. Werner , S. C., and S. Ingbar . 1991. The Thyroid: A Fundamental and Clinical Text. L. E. Braverman and R. D. Utiger, editors

  10. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical activity, infections, hyper or .... Acupuncture. It is a traditional Chinese-based therapeutic method which ..... and Spinal Mechanisms of Pain and Dry Needling Mediated Analgesia: A Clinical.

  11. 单次肌松药全身麻醉下进行神经外科手术的可行性%The feasibility of neurosurgery under general anesthesia with a single dose of muscle relaxant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉兰; 刘映龙; 徐成明; 吕兴华; 万占海

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of neurosurgery under general anesthesia with single dose of muscle re -laxant. Methods 60 patients with ASA I - II scheduled for neurosurgery were randomly divided into Atracurium (group A) and Succinylcholine (group S), each group had 30 cases. After anesthesia induction and intubation with a single use of Atracuri -um or Succinylcholine, anesthesia was maintained with Propofol and Remifentanil at BIS level. The duration of neuromus -cular blocking, the anesthetics consumption, the presence of unwanted patient movement, the airway pressure, the extuba -tion delay and the rate of residual neuromuscular blockade of two groups were recorded. The surgical conditions were scaled by surgeons after operation. Results No patients' movement was observed during operation, there were 2 patients of control group had cough. The recovery time of muscle tone in group A was longer than group S (P 0.05). Conclusion The feasibility of neurosurgery under general anesthesia with a single dose of muscle relaxant is affirmed, but airway stimulation is not allowed in this condition.%目的 探究单次肌松药全身麻醉下进行神经外科手术的可行性.方法 选取我院ASA Ⅰ~Ⅱ级全身麻醉下进行神经外科手术患者60例,随机分为阿曲库铵组(A组)和琥珀酰胆碱组(S组),每组各30例.麻醉诱导后停用肌松药,全程仅用得普利麻、瑞芬太尼静脉泵注维持电脑双频指数(BIS)麻醉.观察两组麻醉药用量、肌松恢复时间、术中体动次数、气道压、拔管时间、残余肌松发生率、拔管时间及外科麻醉评分.结果 两组患者均无术中体动,S组2例发生呛咳;A组肌松恢复时间较S组长(P0.05).结论单次肌松药全身麻醉下进行神经外科手术是基本可行的,但在这种麻醉状态下不宜进行气管内操作.

  12. An Algorithm for Detecting the Onset of Muscle Contraction Based on Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test%采用广义似然比检测的肌肉收缩起始时刻判断算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐琦; 程俊银; 周慧; 杨磊

    2012-01-01

    The surface electromyography (sEMG) of stump in the amputee is often applied to control the action of myoelectric prosthesis. According to the sEMG signals with low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) recorded from the stump muscle,a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) method was proposed to detect the onset of muscle contraction,where a decision threshold was related with the SNR of sEMG signals,an off-line simulation method was used to determine the relationship between them. For the simulated sEMG signals with a given SNR,the different thresholds were tested,the optimal threshold could be obtained when the detection accuracy was optimized. As a result,the fitted curve was achieved to describe the relationship of the SNR and the decision threshold. Then,the sEMG signals are analyzed on-line by the GLR test for the onset detection of muscle contractions,while the decision threshold corresponding with the SNR was chosen based on the fitted curve. Compared with the classical algorithms,with the simulated sEMG traces,the error mean and standard deviation for estimating the muscle contraction onset were reduced at least 35% and 43% respectively; based on the real EMG signals,the error mean and standard deviation of the onset estimate were separately not less than 29% and 23%. Therefore,the proposed algorithm based on GLR test for the onset detection of muscle contraction was more accurate than other methods,while the SNR of sEMG signals was low.%肌电假肢利用残肢残存肌肉的肌电信号实行对假肢的控制.对于低信噪比的残肢表面肌电,本研究采用广义似然比检测方法判断肌肉收缩起始时刻,其中判别阈值与肌电信号信噪比有关.针对不同信噪比的模拟肌电信号,采用离线仿真方法得到肌肉收缩起始时刻检测误差最小的判别阈值,得到信噪比-经验阈值拟合曲线,确定信噪比与阈值的对应关系;根据肌电信噪比由阈值拟合曲线得到判别阈值,采用似然比检测算法

  13. The Basis of Muscle Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Musarò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle regeneration recapitulates many aspects of embryonic myogenesis and is an important homeostatic process of the adult skeletal muscle, which, after development, retains the capacity to regenerate in response to appropriate stimuli, activating the muscle compartment of stem cells, namely, satellite cells, as well as other precursor cells. Moreover, significant evidence suggests that while stem cells represent an important determinant for tissue regeneration, a “qualified” environment is necessary to guarantee and achieve functional results. It is therefore plausible that the loss of control over these cell fate decisions could lead to a pathological transdifferentiation, leading to pathologic defects in the regenerative process. This review provides an overview about the general aspects of muscle development and discusses the cellular and molecular aspects that characterize the five interrelated and time-dependent phases of muscle regeneration, namely, degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, remodeling, and maturation/functional repair.

  14. Weaning - a challenge to gut physiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalles, J.P.; Bosi, P.; Smidt, H.; Stokes, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the most relevant findings obtained over the last four years on the physiology, microbiology and immunology of the gastrointestinal tract of pigs as influenced by weaning and nutrition in the post-weaning period through the action of feed components or alternative

  15. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and muscle force for maximum isometric tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a classic example of a biological soft matter . At both macro and microscopic levels, skeletal muscle is exquisitely oriented for force generation and movement. In addition to the dynamics of contracting and relaxing muscle which can be monitored with ultrasound, variations in the muscle force are also expected to be monitored. To observe such force and sideways expansion variations synchronously for the skeletal muscle a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion variations of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the monitored muscle. To detect variations of the muscle force, angle of pull of the monitored muscle has been restricted by the mechanical pull of the sonic force sensor. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight (TOF) of the transmitted ultrasonic signals can be introduced by the variation of the path length between the transducers. The observed variations of the TOF are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the muscle dynamics. The general behavior of the muscle dynamics and muscle force shows almost an identical concept. Since muscle force also relates the psychological boosting-up effects, the influence of boosting-up on muscle force and muscle dynamics can also be quantified form this study. Length-tension or force-length and force-velocity relationship can also be derived quantitatively with such monitoring.

  16. Muscle strain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  17. Determining all parameters necessary to build Hill-type muscle models from experiments on single muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümel, Marcus; Hooper, Scott L; Guschlbauerc, Christoph; White, William E; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Characterizing muscle requires measuring such properties as force-length, force-activation, and force-velocity curves. These characterizations require large numbers of data points because both what type of function (e.g., linear, exponential, hyperbolic) best represents each property, and the values of the parameters in the relevant equations, need to be determined. Only a few properties are therefore generally measured in experiments on any one muscle, and complete characterizations are obtained by averaging data across a large number of muscles. Such averaging approaches can work well for muscles that are similar across individuals. However, considerable evidence indicates that large inter-individual variation exists, at least for some muscles. This variation poses difficulties for across-animal averaging approaches. Methods to fully describe all muscle's characteristics in experiments on individual muscles would therefore be useful. Prior work in stick insect extensor muscle has identified what functions describe each of this muscle's properties and shown that these equations apply across animals. Characterizing these muscles on an individual-by-individual basis therefore requires determining only the values of the parameters in these equations, not equation form. We present here techniques that allow determining all these parameter values in experiments on single muscles. This technique will allow us to compare parameter variation across individuals and to model muscles individually. Similar experiments can likely be performed on single muscles in other systems. This approach may thus provide a widely applicable method for characterizing and modeling muscles from single experiments.

  18. The role of skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown for regulation of insulin sensitivity by exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen eJensen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen is the storage form of carbohydrates in mammals. In humans the majority of glycogen is stored in skeletal muscles (~500 g and the liver (~100 g. Food is supplied in larger meals, but the blood glucose concentration has to be kept within narrow limits to survive and stay healthy. Therefore, the body has to cope with periods of excess carbohydrates and periods without supplementation. Healthy persons remove blood glucose rapidly when glucose is in excess, but insulin-stimulated glucose disposal is reduced in insulin resistant and type 2 diabetic subjects. During a hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp, 70-90 % of glucose disposal will be stored as muscle glycogen in healthy subjects. The glycogen stores in skeletal muscles are limited because an efficient feedback-mediated inhibition of glycogen synthase prevents accumulation. De novo lipid synthesis can contribute to glucose disposal when glycogen stores are filled. Exercise physiologists normally consider glycogen’s main function as energy substrate. Glycogen is the main energy substrate during exercise intensity above 70 % of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and fatigue develops when the glycogen stores are depleted in the active muscles. After exercise, the rate of glycogen synthesis is increased to replete glycogen stores, and blood glucose is the substrate. Indeed insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is elevated after exercise, which, from an evolutional point of view, will favour glycogen repletion and preparation for new fight or flight events. In the modern society, the reduced glycogen stores in skeletal muscles after exercise allows carbohydrates to be stored as muscle glycogen and prevents that glucose is channelled to de novo lipid synthesis, which over time will causes ectopic fat accumulation and insulin resistance. The reduction of skeletal muscle glycogen after exercise allows a healthy storage of carbohydrates after meals and prevents development of type

  19. A Case Report of the Angiosarcoma Involving Epicranial Muscle and Fascia : Is the Occipitofrontalis Muscle Composed of Two Different Muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Hui Joong

    2016-01-01

    The occipitofrontalis muscle is generally regarded as one muscle composed of two muscle bellies joined through the galea aponeurotica. However, two muscle bellies have different embryological origin, anatomical function and innervations. We report a case of angiosarcoma of the scalp in a 63-year-old man whose MR showed that the superficial fascia overlying the occipital belly becomes the temporoparietal fascia and ends at the superior end of the frontal belly. Beneath the superficial fascia, the occipital belly of the occipitofrontalis muscle becomes the galea aponeurotica and inserts into the underside of the frontal belly. The presented case report supported the concept of which the occipitofrontalis muscle appears to be composed of two anatomically different muscles.

  20. Inv(X)(p21.1;q22.1) in a man with mental retardation, short stature, general muscle wasting, and facial dysmorphism: clinical study and mutation analysis of the NXF5 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frints, Suzanna G M; Jun, Lin; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Devriendt, Koen; Teulingkx, Rudi; Van den Berghe, Lut; De Vos, Bernice; Borghgraef, Martine; Chelly, Jamel; Des Portes, Vincent; Van Bokhoven, Hans; Hamel, Ben; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kalscheuer, Vera; Raynaud, Martine; Moraine, Claude; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2003-06-15

    We describe a 59-year-old male (patient A059) with moderate to severe mental retardation (MR) and a pericentric inversion of the X-chromosome: inv(X)(p21.1;q22.1). He had short stature, pectus excavatum, general muscle wasting, and facial dysmorphism. Until now, no other patients with similar clinical features have been described in the literature. Molecular analysis of both breakpoints led to the identification of a novel "Nuclear RNA export factor" (NXF) gene cluster on Xq22.1. Within this cluster, the NXF5 gene was interrupted with subsequent loss of gene expression. Hence, mutation analysis of the NXF5 and its neighboring homologue, the NXF2 gene was performed in 45 men with various forms of syndromic X-linked MR (XLMR) and in 70 patients with nonspecific XLMR. In the NXF5 gene four nucleotide changes: one intronic, two silent, and one missense (K23E), were identified. In the NXF2 gene two changes (one intronic and one silent) were found. Although none of these changes were causative mutations, we propose that NXF5 is a good candidate gene for this syndromic form of XLMR, given the suspected role of NXF proteins is within mRNA export/transport in neurons. Therefore, mutation screening of the NXF gene family in phenotypically identical patients is recommended.

  1. 鼻内镜手术无肌松药全身麻醉可行性探讨%Application of general anesthesia without muscle relaxant in nasal endoscopic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨戈雄; 袁杰; 高爽; 李滔; 滕煜; 马军令

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and feasibility of anesthesia without muscle relaxant in nasal endoscopic opera-tion.Methods 120 patients with ASAⅠ-Ⅱundergoing nasal endoscopic operation were randomly divided into normal muscle relaxant use group ( group Ⅰ) and intubation without muscle relaxant maintenance group ( groupⅡ) , 60 cases in each.GroupⅠwas treated with vecuronium 0.08-0.1 mg/kg induced, in patients with body movement or per 40min intravenous infusion of 0.05 mg/kg maintai-ning muscle relaxation;group Ⅱtracheal intubation after complex full airway surface anesthesia but without muscle relaxants mainte-nance during operation.Blood pressure ( MAP) , heart rate ( HR) , pulse oxygen saturation ( SpO2 ) , end tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure ( PetCO2 ) were recorded in each time point in the two groups before anesthesia ( T0 ) , 2 min after anesthesia induction ( T1 ) , 2 min after endotracheal intubation ( T2 ) , 2 min after the start of operation ( T3 ) , 20 min after the start of operation ( T4 ) , and 5 min after extubation ( T5) .The body movement frequency intraoperation , recovery time from anesthesia and extubation time, adverse reac-tions and complications and intraoperative additional infusion dosage of remifentanil and propofol were compared between the two groups.Results In both groups, T0 ~T4 each observation point,HR, MAP, SpO2 and PetCO2 changes were not significantly different (P>0.05).Breathing the air after 5 min(T5), SPO2 in group Ⅱwere higher than those in groupⅠ, PetCO2 in groupⅡlower than that in groupⅠ, there were significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05).In groupⅡ,anesthesia recovery time and ex-tubation time were significantly shorter than those in group Ⅰ( P <0.01).There were no adverse reaction and complication. Conclusions The effect of nasal endoscopic surgery under tracheal intubation general anesthesia without muscle relaxant is reliable, safe and feasible.%目的:探讨在无肌

  2. Long-term Outcomes After Bladder-preserving Tri-modality Therapy for Patients with Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: An Updated Analysis of the Massachusetts General Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Nicholas J; Shipley, William U; Clayman, Rebecca H; Niemierko, Andrzej; Drumm, Michael; Heney, Niall M; Michaelson, Marc D; Lee, Richard J; Saylor, Philip J; Wszolek, Matthew F; Feldman, Adam S; Dahl, Douglas M; Zietman, Anthony L; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2017-06-01

    Tri-modality therapy (TMT) is a recognized treatment strategy for selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Report long-term outcomes of patients with MIBC treated by TMT. Four hundred and seventy-five patients with cT2-T4a MIBC were enrolled on protocols or treated as per protocol at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1986 and 2013. Patients underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. Patients with less than a complete response (CR) to chemoradiation or with an invasive recurrence were recommended to undergo salvage radical cystectomy. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 7.21 yr. Five- and 10-yr DSS rates were 66% and 59%, respectively. Five- and 10-yr OS rates were 57% and 39%, respectively. The risk of salvage cystectomy at 5 yr was 29%. In multivariate analyses, T2 disease (OS hazard ratio [HR]: 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44-0.75, DSS HR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.36-0.73), CR to chemoradiation (OS HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.46-0.81, DSS HR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.34-0.71), and presence of tumor-associated carcinoma in situ (OS HR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.17-2.08, DSS HR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03-2.17) were significant predictors for OS and DSS. When evaluating our cohort over treatment eras, rates of CR improved from 66% to 88% and 5-yr DSS improved from 60% to 84% during the eras of 1986-1995 to 2005-2013, while the 5-yr risk of salvage radical cystectomy rate decreased from 42% to 16%. These data demonstrate high rates of CR and bladder preservation in patients receiving TMT, and confirm DSS rates similar to modern cystectomy series. Contemporary results are particularly encouraging, and therefore TMT should be discussed and offered as a treatment option for selected patients. Tri-modality therapy is an alternative to radical cystectomy for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, and

  3. Electrical stimulation and muscle strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehail, P; Duclos, C; Barat, M

    2008-07-01

    To identify the effects of application methods and indications of direct muscle electrostimulation on strength gain. Literature review and analysis of articles from Medline database with the following entries: muscular or neuromuscular, electromyostimulation, electrical stimulation, strengthening, strength training, immobilization, muscle dystrophy, bed-rest, bed-bound, knee or hip surgery, postoperative phase, cachexia, sarcopenia, and their French equivalent. Because of its specific muscle recruitment order, different from that of voluntary contraction, direct muscle electrostimulation is theoretically a complementary tool for muscle strengthening. It can be used in healthy subjects and in several affections associated with muscle function loss. Its interest seems well-established for post-traumatic or postsurgery lower-limb immobilizations but too few controlled studies have clearly shown the overall benefits of its application in other indications. Whatever the indication, superimposed or combined electrostimulation techniques are generally more efficient than electrostimulation alone. Even though widely used, the level of evidence for the efficiency of electromyostimulation is still low. For strength gains, it yielded no higher benefits than traditional strengthening methods. Its interest should be tested in medical affections leading to major muscle deconditioning or in sarcopenia.

  4. 无肌松药全身麻醉下进行骨科手术的临床对照试验%Controlled clinical trials of orthopedic surgery under general anesthesia without muscle relaxants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐成明; 李玉兰; 刘映龙; 吕兴华; 万占海

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较使用和不使用神经肌肉阻滞药全身麻醉下进行部分骨科手术的优缺点.方法 76例ASAⅠ或Ⅱ级骨科手术患者,随机分为试验组(T组)、对照组(C组)各38例.使用琥珀酰胆碱诱导后,T组只用丙泊酚、瑞芬太尼维持麻醉,C组按常规使用阿曲库铵.术中维持脑电双频指数(BIS值)在30~60之间,记录两组患者麻醉前,诱导后,切皮时,术后30、60 min和拔管后的BIS值和四个成串刺激比(T4/T1,TOFr),比较两组丙泊酚和瑞芬太尼用量、睁眼时间、拔管时间、术后20 min警觉与镇静评分(OAA/S)及不良反应,术后请外科医师评价肌松效果.结果 两组患者瑞芬太尼用量、外科肌松评价、术中体动次数、血管活性药使用次数无显著差异;T组插管后各时点TOFr均显著高于C组(P < 0.01),丙泊酚用量多于C组(P < 0.05),睁眼时间、拔管时间明显短于C组(P < 0.05),拔管后BIS值显著高于C组(P < 0.05),术后20 min OAA/S评分明显低于C 组(P < 0.05).结论 无肌松药全身麻醉下进行骨科手术比使用者呼吸恢复早,拔管快,清醒程度好,具有显著优势.%Objective To compare the efficacy of general anesthesia with and without muscle relaxant on orthopedic surgery. Methods 76 ASA I or II adults underwent elective orthopedic surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups: trial group (group T) and control group (group C), with 38 cases in each group. General anesthesia was induced with Midazolam, Fentanyl, Propofol and Succinylcholine, and maintained with Propofol and Remifentanil at BIS level 30 to 60. After induction, Atracurium was used in group C but not in group T. BIS and TOFr at baseline, after induction, at skin incision, 30 min and 60 min after skin incision and at extubation were recorded. The dosage of Propofol and Remifentanil, eye-opening time, extubation time and OAA/S scale 20 min after extubation and possible adverse reaction were compared. The muscle relaxation

  5. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. I. General survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    Parvalbumins from coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) myogen have been isolated by gel filtration of Sephadex G-75 and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Disc electrophoresis and cellulose acetate electrophoresis showed the homogeneity of the three first major parvalbumin peaks (pI = 5.44, pI = 4.95 and pI = 4.52). The fourth component was partially resolved into two more parvalbumins (pI = 3.78 and pI = 3.50) by preparative gel electrophoresis. Amino acid analyses and tryptic peptide maps separated the five components in two major categories. The two less acidic components differ only in the presence or absence of an N-terminal blocking group. The three more acidic components constitute the second category; in spite of this heterogeneity, they share the same amino acid sequence.

  6. Segmental fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovic, Hrvoje; Bazdaric, Ksenija; Marijancic, Verner; Soic-Vranic, Tamara; Malnar, Daniela; Arbanas, Juraj

    2017-01-18

    The iliopsoas of the rat is composed of two muscles - the psoas major muscle and the iliacus muscle. The psoas major muscle arises from all the lumbar vertebrae and the iliacus muscle from the fifth and sixth lumbar vertebrae and ilium. Their common insertion point is the lesser trochanter of the femur, and their common action is the lateral rotation of the femur and flexion of the hip joint. Unlike humans, the rat is a quadruped and only occasionally rises up on its hind legs. Therefore, it is expected that the fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle will be different than that of humans. The iliopsoas muscle of the rat is generally considered to be a fast muscle. However, previous studies of the fibre type composition of the rat psoas muscle showed different results. Moreover, very little is known about the composition of the rat iliacus muscle. The aim of our study was to examine the fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle in order to better understand the complex function of the listed muscle. The psoas major muscle was examined segmentally at four different levels of its origin. Type I, IIA, IIB and IIX muscle fibres were typed using monoclonal antibodies for myosin heavy chain identification. The percentage of muscle fibre types and muscle fibre cross-sectional areas were calculated. In our study we showed that in the rat iliopsoas muscle both the iliacus and the psoas major muscles had a predominance of fast muscle fibre types, with the highest percentage of the fastest IIB muscle fibres. Also, the IIB muscle fibres showed the largest cross-sectional area (CSA) in both muscles. As well, the psoas major muscle showed segmental differences of fibre type composition. Our results showed changes in percentages, as well as the CSAs of muscle fibre types in cranio-caudal direction. The most significant changes were visible in type IIB muscle fibres, where there was a decrease of percentages and the CSAs from the cranial towards the caudal part

  7. Muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, S; Vissing, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by fatigue and fluctuating muscle weakness as a result of impaired neuromuscular transmission (NMT). Although MG is a prototypic fatiguing disorder, little is known about how the condition affects fixed weakness, and if present, whether weakness...... is related to disease duration or gender. The aim of this study was to quantify the strength of patients with MG and investigate whether it is related to disease duration. METHODS: Eight muscle groups were tested by manual muscle testing and with a hand-held dynamometer in 38 patients with generalized MG...... and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The disease duration was recorded and compared with strength measures. RESULTS: On average, muscle strength was decreased by 28% compared with controls (Pmuscle...

  8. Muscle heat: a window into the thermodynamics of a molecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiselle, Denis Scott; Johnston, Callum Michael; Han, June-Chiew; Nielsen, Poul Michael Fønss; Taberner, Andrew James

    2016-02-01

    The contraction of muscle is characterized by the development of force and movement (mechanics) together with the generation of heat (metabolism). Heat represents that component of the enthalpy of ATP hydrolysis that is not captured by the microscopic machinery of the cell for the performance of work. It arises from two conceptually and temporally distinct sources: initial metabolism and recovery metabolism. Initial metabolism comprises the hydrolysis of ATP and its rapid regeneration by hydrolysis of phosphocreatine (PCr) in the processes underlying excitation-contraction coupling and subsequent cross-bridge cycling and sliding of the contractile filaments. Recovery metabolism describes those process, both aerobic (mitochondrial) and anaerobic (cytoplasmic), that produce ATP, thereby allowing the regeneration of PCr from its hydrolysis products. An equivalent partitioning of muscle heat production is often invoked by muscle physiologists. In this formulation, total enthalpy expenditure is separated into external mechanical work (W) and heat (Q). Heat is again partitioned into three conceptually distinct components: basal, activation, and force dependent. In the following mini-review, we trace the development of these ideas in parallel with the development of measurement techniques for separating the various thermal components.

  9. Impact of weightlessness on muscle function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. E.; Slentz, M.

    1995-01-01

    The most studied skeletal muscles which depend on gravity, "antigravity" muscles, are located in the posterior portion of the legs. Antigravity muscles are characterized generally by a different fiber type composition than those which are considered nonpostural. The gravity-dependent function of the antigravity muscles makes them particularly sensitive to weightlessness (unweighting) resulting in a substantial loss of muscle protein, with a relatively greater loss of myofibrillar (structural) proteins. Accordingly alpha-actin mRNA decreases in muscle of rats exposed to microgravity. In the legs, the soleus seems particularly responsive to the lack of weight-bearing associated with space flight. The loss of muscle protein leads to a decreased cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, particularly of the slow-twitch, oxidative (SO) ones compared to fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) or oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers. In some muscles, a shift in fiber composition from SO to FOG has been reported in the adaptation to spaceflight. Changes in muscle composition with spaceflight have been associated with decreased maximal isometric tension (Po) and increased maximal shortening velocity. In terms of fuel metabolism, results varied depending on the pathway considered. Glucose uptake, in the presence of insulin, and activities of glycolytic enzymes are increased by space flight. In contrast, oxidation of fatty acids may be diminished. Oxidation of pyruvate, activity of the citric acid cycle, and ketone metabolism in muscle seem to be unaffected by microgravity.

  10. Impact of weightlessness on muscle function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. E.; Slentz, M.

    1995-01-01

    The most studied skeletal muscles which depend on gravity, "antigravity" muscles, are located in the posterior portion of the legs. Antigravity muscles are characterized generally by a different fiber type composition than those which are considered nonpostural. The gravity-dependent function of the antigravity muscles makes them particularly sensitive to weightlessness (unweighting) resulting in a substantial loss of muscle protein, with a relatively greater loss of myofibrillar (structural) proteins. Accordingly alpha-actin mRNA decreases in muscle of rats exposed to microgravity. In the legs, the soleus seems particularly responsive to the lack of weight-bearing associated with space flight. The loss of muscle protein leads to a decreased cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, particularly of the slow-twitch, oxidative (SO) ones compared to fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) or oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers. In some muscles, a shift in fiber composition from SO to FOG has been reported in the adaptation to spaceflight. Changes in muscle composition with spaceflight have been associated with decreased maximal isometric tension (Po) and increased maximal shortening velocity. In terms of fuel metabolism, results varied depending on the pathway considered. Glucose uptake, in the presence of insulin, and activities of glycolytic enzymes are increased by space flight. In contrast, oxidation of fatty acids may be diminished. Oxidation of pyruvate, activity of the citric acid cycle, and ketone metabolism in muscle seem to be unaffected by microgravity.

  11. Muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chang-Yong

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy, is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by out-of-frame mutations of the dystrophin gene. Thus, it is classified asa dystrophinopathy. The disease onset is before age 5 years. Patients with DMD present with progressive symmetrical limb-girdle muscle weakness and become wheelchair dependent after age 12 years. (2)(3). On the basis of some research evidence,cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are usually seen in the late teens in patients with DMD. Progressive scoliosis and respiratory in sufficiency often develop once wheelchair dependency occurs. Respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy are common causes of death, and few survive beyond the third decade of life. (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7). On the basis of some research evidence, prednisone at 0.75 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 40 mg/d) or deflazacort at 0.9 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 39 mg/d), a derivative of prednisolone (not available in the United States), as a single morning dose is recommended for DMD patients older than 5 years, which may prolong independent walking from a few months to 2 years. (2)(3)(16)(17). Based on some research evidence, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, b-blockers, and diuretics has been reported to be beneficial in DMD patients with cardiac abnormalities. (2)(3)(5)(18). Based on expert opinion, children with muscle weakness and increased serum creatine kinase levels may be associated with either genetic or acquired muscle disorders (Tables 1 and 3). (14)(15)

  12. Muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey; Phillips, Lauren; Trivedi, Jaya R

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare heterogeneous diseases with marked genotypic and phenotypic variability. Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathology of these disorders, the diverse phenotypic manifestations remain a challenge in diagnosis and therapeutics. These disorders can cause lifetime disability and affect quality of life. There is no treatment of these disorders approved by the US Food and Drug Administration at this time. Recognition and treatment of symptoms might reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. This article summarizes the clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, pathophysiology, and treatment options in nondystrophic myotonia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, and periodic paralyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lactate and force production in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Albertsen, Janni; Rentsch, Maria

    2005-01-01

    +-depressed rat soleus muscle. The pH regulation associated with lactate incubation accelerated the Na+-K+ pump. To study whether the protective effect of lactate/lactic acid is a general mechanism, we stimulated muscles to fatigue with and without pre-incubation. None of the incubation solutions improved force...

  14. Variation of the infrahyoid muscle: duplicated omohyoid and appearance of the levator glandulae thyroideae muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Ho-Jeong; Park, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyu-Seok

    2010-11-01

    The embryologic origin of the omohyoid muscle is different from that of the other neck muscles. A number of variations such as the absence of muscle, variable sites of origin and insertion, and multiple bellies have been reported. However, variations in the inferior belly of the omohyoid muscle are rare. There have been no reports of the combined occurrence of the omohyoid muscle variation with the appearance of the levator glandulase thyroideae muscle. Routine dissection of a 51- year-old female cadaver revealed a duplicated omohyoid muscle and the appearance of the levator glandulae thyroideae muscle. In this case, the two inferior bellies of the omohyoid muscle were found to originate inferiorly from the superior border of the scapula. One of the inferior bellies generally continued to the superior belly with the tendinous intersection. The other inferior belly continued into the sternohyoid muscle without the tendinous intersection. In this case, the levator glandulae thyroideae muscle appeared on the left side, which attached from the upper border of the thyroid gland to the inferior border of the thyroid cartilage. These variations are significant for clinicians during endoscopic diagnosis and surgery because of the arterial and nervous damage due to iatrogenic injuries. The embryologic origins of the omohyoid and levator glandulae thyroideae muscles may be similar based on the descriptions in the relevant literature.

  15. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  16. Muscle strain treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  17. MUSCLE POWER, SITTING UNSUPPORTED AND TRUNK ROTATION IN PRETERM INFANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGROOT, L; HOPKINS, B; TOUWEN, B

    1995-01-01

    Discrepancies between active and passive muscle power are often seen in pre-term infants over the first year. Generally of a transient nature, they are most obvious in the extensor muscles of the trunk where there is a high active muscle power relative to the passive component. While high active mus

  18. MUSCLE POWER, SITTING UNSUPPORTED AND TRUNK ROTATION IN PRETERM INFANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGROOT, L; HOPKINS, B; TOUWEN, B

    1995-01-01

    Discrepancies between active and passive muscle power are often seen in pre-term infants over the first year. Generally of a transient nature, they are most obvious in the extensor muscles of the trunk where there is a high active muscle power relative to the passive component. While high active mus

  19. Neural compensation, muscle load distribution and muscle function in control of biped models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarian, B.

    Three aspects of the neuromuscular control of muscle actuators in biped movements were studied: neural compensation, muscle load distribution, and muscle function. A block diagram of a neural control circuit model of the control nervous system is presented. Based on this block diagram a circuit comprised of a dynamic compensator, an inverse plant, and pre-programmed reference trajectory generators is proposed for control of a general n-link biped model. This circuit is used to study the postural stability and point-to-point voluntary movement of a two-link planar biped with two pairs of muscle models. The muscle load distribution, relevant to functional electrical stimulation of paraplegic patients for restoration of limited motor function, is considered. A quantitative analysis of the local controllability of a two-link planar biped model incorporating six major muscles of the lower extremities is presented. A model of the muscle for the lower extremities is presented.

  20. Observational Study on the Occurrence of Muscle Spindles in Human Digastric and Mylohyoideus Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Saverino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the occurrence of muscle spindles (MS is quite high in most skeletal muscles of humans, few MS, or even absence, have been reported in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. Even if this condition is generally accepted and quoted in many papers and books, observational studies are scarce and based on histological sections of a low number of specimens. The aim of the present study is to confirm previous data, assessing MS number in a sample of digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. We investigated 11 digastric and 6 mylohyoideus muscles from 13 donors. Muscle samples were embedded in paraffin wax, cross-sectioned in a rostrocaudal direction, and stained using haematoxylin-eosin. A mean of 5.1 ± 1.1 (range 3–7 MS was found in digastric muscles and mean of 0.5 ± 0.8 (range 0–2 in mylohyoideus muscles. A significant difference (P<0.001 was found with the control sample, confirming the correctness of the histological procedure. Our results support general belief that the absolute number of spindles is sparse in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. External forces, such as food resistance during chewing or gravity, do not counteract jaw-opening muscles. It is conceivable that this condition gives them a limited proprioceptive importance and a reduced need for having specific receptors as MS.

  1. Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  2. Vitamin D and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2017-10-01

    Muscle weakness is a hallmark of severe vitamin D deficiency, but the effect of milder vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency on muscle mass and performance and risk of falling is uncertain. In this presentation, I review the evidence that vitamin D influences muscle mass and performance, balance, and risk of falling in older adults. Special consideration is given to the impact of both the starting 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and the dose administered on the clinical response to supplemental vitamin D in older men and women. Based on available evidence, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels D dose range of 800-1000 IU per day has been effective in many studies; lower doses have generally been ineffective and several doses above this range have increased the risk of falls. In conclusion, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  4. Muscle relaxant use during intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Tod B

    2013-02-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents have generally been avoided during intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) where muscle responses to nerve stimulation or transcranial stimulation are monitored. However, a variety of studies and clinical experience indicate partial neuromuscular blockade is compatible with monitoring in some patients. This review presents these experiences after reviewing the currently used agents and the methods used to assess the blockade. A review was conducted of the published literature regarding neuromuscular blockade during IOM. A variety of articles have been published that give insight into the use of partial pharmacological paralysis during monitoring. Responses have been recorded from facial muscles, vocalis muscles, and peripheral nerve muscles from transcranial or neural stimulation with neuromuscular blockade measured in the muscle tested or in the thenar muscles from ulnar nerve stimulation. Preconditioning of the nervous system with tetanic or sensory stimulation has been used. In patients without neuromuscular pathology intraoperative monitoring using peripheral muscle responses from neural stimulation is possible with partial neuromuscular blockade. Monitoring of muscle responses from cranial nerve stimulation may require a higher degree of stimulation and less neuromuscular blockade. The role of tetanic or sensory conditioning of the nervous system is not fully characterized. The impact of neuromuscular pathology or the effect of partial blockade on monitoring muscle responses from spontaneous neural activity or mechanical nerve stimulation has not been described.

  5. [Asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, L; Corre, P; Khonsari, R H; Mercier, J-M; Piot, B

    2012-06-01

    Hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles most commonly affects the masseter. Less common cases of isolated or associated temporalis hypertrophy are also reported. Parafunctional habits, and more precisely bruxism, can favor the onset of the hypertrophy. This condition is generally idiopathic and can require both medical and/or surgical management. A 29-year-old patient was referred to our department for an asymmetric swelling of the masticatory muscles. Physical examination revealed a bilateral hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles, predominantly affecting the right temporalis and the left masseter. Major bruxism was assessed by premature dental wearing. The additional examinations confirmed the isolated muscle hypertrophy. Benign asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles promoted by bruxism was diagnosed. Treatment with injections of type A botulinum toxin was conducted in association with a splint and relaxation. Its effectiveness has been observed at six months. Few cases of unilateral or bilateral temporalis hypertrophy have been reported, added to the more common isolated masseter muscles hypertrophy. The diagnosis requires to rule out secondary hypertrophies and tumors using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The condition is thought to be favoured by parafunctional habits such as bruxism. The conservative treatment consists in reducing the volume of the masticatory muscles using intramuscular injections of type A botulinum toxin. Other potential conservative treatments are wearing splints and muscle relaxant drugs. Surgical procedures aiming to reduce the muscle volume and/or the bone volume (mandibular gonioplasty) can be proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Laser therapy of muscle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Munqith S; Al-Salihi, Anam Rasheed; Qasim, Amenah Wala'a

    2013-05-01

    Low-level lasers are used in general therapy and healing process due to their good photo-bio-stimulation effects. In this paper, the effects of diode laser and Nd:YAG laser on the healing process of practically managed skeletal muscle trauma has been successfully studied. Standard impact trauma was induced by using a specially designed mechanical device. The impacted muscle was left for 3 days for complete development of blunt trauma. After that it was irradiated by five laser sessions for 5 days. Two types of lasers were used; 785-nm diode laser and 1.064-nm Nd:YAG laser, both in continuous and pulsed modes. A special electronic circuit was designed and implemented to modulate the diode laser for this purpose. Tissue samples of crushed skeletal muscle have been dissected from the injured irradiated muscle then bio-chemically analyzed for the regeneration of contractile and collagenous proteins using Lowry assay for protein determination and Reddy and Enwemeka assay for hydroxyproline determination. The results showed that both lasers stimulate the regeneration capability of traumatized skeletal muscle. The diode laser in CW and pulsed modes showed better results than the Nd:YAG in accelerating the preservation of the normal tissue content of collagenous and contractile proteins beside controlling the regeneration of non-functional fibrous tissue. This study proved that the healing achieved by the laser treatment was faster than the control group by 15-20 days.

  7. Colorectal Surgery in Patients with General Anesthesia the Incidence of Muscle Relaxant Residual after Extubation and its Countermeasures%结直肠手术患者全麻拔管后肌松残余发生率及其应对措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓峰; 刘学连; 王淑荣; 魏玲; 马显亮; 史学梅

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the patients with colorectal surgery the incidence of muscle relaxant residual after general anesthesia and its countermeasures.Methods Our hospital 100 cases of colorectal patients under general anesthesia to collate data analysis colorectal surgery, using neuromuscular monitoring and assessment of the patient monitoring NMB incidence of residual NMB and analyzing the prevention of postoperative residual NMB measures to patients.Results Postoperatively in patients with colorectal surgery anesthesia with objective evaluation method of the incidence of muscle relaxant residual after extubation was 63%, the residual group with the muscle relaxant residual muscle relaxant in patients' body quality, age, type of nondepolarizing agent has more significant difference (P<0.05); should pay attention to during the process of surgery anesthesia management, maximum limit reduce the incidence of postoperative muscle relaxant residual, prevent the occurrence of complications.Conclusion Patients with colorectal surgery anesthesia significantly higher incidence of postoperative residual of muscle relaxant, so pay attention to the patients in the process of surgery anesthesia management, strengthen the monitoring.%目的:探讨结直肠手术患者全麻拔管后肌松残余的发生率及其应对措施。方法将我院100例全身麻醉结直肠手术患者资料进行整理分析,同时使用肌松监测仪监测肌松及评估患者肌松残余的发生率,并分析预防患者出现术后肌松残余的措施。结果结直肠手术全麻患者术后用客观评估法拔管后肌松残余的发生率为63%,肌松残余组与非肌松残余组在患者体质量、年龄、肌松剂类型方面比较有显著差别(P<0.05);手术过程中要注意麻醉管理,最大限度降低术后肌松残余发生率,防止并发症的发生。结论结直肠手术全麻患者术后肌松残余的发生率明显升高,所以要注意患者手术过

  8. Recycle of temporal muscle in combination with free muscle transfer in the treatment of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Masakazu; Takushima, Akihiko; Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Kinoshita, Mikio; Ozaki, Mine; Harii, Kiyonori

    2013-07-01

    We experienced three patients with long-standing unilateral complete facial paralysis who previously underwent temporalis muscle transfer to the cheek for smile reconstruction. All patients complained of insufficient and uncomfortable buccal motion synchronised with masticatory movements and incomplete eyelid closure with ptotic eyebrow. To attain a near-natural smile and reliable eyelid closure, temporalis muscle was displaced from the cheek to the eyelid, and a neurovascular free latissimus dorsi muscle was transferred for the replacement of cheek motion. As a result, cheek motion synchronised with the contralateral cheek upon smiling and sufficient eyelid closure were obtained in all cases. Smile reconstruction using the temporal muscle is an easy and a versatile way in general. However, spontaneous smile is not achieved and peculiar movement of the cheek while eating is conspicuous in some cases. Replacement with neurovascular free latissimus dorsi muscle and recycling previously used temporalis muscle for eyelid closure are considered to be valuable for such cases.

  9. 无肌松维持全麻用于经皮肾镜碎石术的安全性和有效性%Maintenance of general anesthesia without muscle relaxant for percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨戈雄; 袁杰; 毛兰萍; 马军令; 袁超英; 高爽

    2012-01-01

    [目的]探讨无肌松维持全凭静脉麻醉用于经皮肾镜碎石术的安全性和有效性.[方法]将180例择期行经皮肾镜碎石术的患者随机分成插管后肌松维持组(Ⅰ组)及插管后无肌松维持组(Ⅱ组)各90例.Ⅰ组予维库溴铵0.08 ~ 0.1mg/kg诱导、在患者有体动时或每40 min静注0.05 mg/kg维持肌松;Ⅱ组予维库溴铵o.05 mg/kg诱导插管,术中无肌松维持.记录两组麻醉前、气管插管前、气管插管后、手术开始后20 min、拔管前、术后1h各时点血压、心率、sPO2等血流动力学指标并与基础值比较.并记录各组术毕恢复情况.[结果]各组气管插管均一次成功,术中麻醉平稳,无体动反应,均顺利完成手术.无肌松维持组术后苏醒各项指标显著短于对照组.术后意识完全清醒,无须拮抗肌松,无呼吸抑制及呕吐误吸、分泌物阻塞、呼吸道梗阻发生.[结论]无肌松维持下丙泊酚-瑞芬太尼全凭静脉麻醉可满足经皮肾镜碎石术的需要,降低麻醉风险.%[Objective] To investigate the safety and effectiveness! of percutaneous nephrolithotomy without muscle relaxantB to maintain total intravenous anesthesia. [Methods] A total of 180 patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy were randomly divided into muscle relaxants intubation maintenance group ( group I induced 90 cases) and intubation without muscle relaxants maintain group (group II, 90 cases). Group I induced with vecuronium 0.08 - 0.1 mg/kg, when patients moved or ever 40 min 0.05 mg/kg maintain muscle relaxation were given. Group II inducted with vecuronium bromide (0.05 mg/kg ) and tracheal intubated but without muscle relaxants maintenance during operation. Blood pressure, heart rate, sPO: and other hemodynamic parameters of two groups were recorded before anesthesia , before tracheal intubation and after tracheal intubation, 20 min after surgery, before extubation and 1h after operation, compared with basic value

  10. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Emerson Randolph; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in t...

  11. Muscle strain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  12. Neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattjes, Mike P. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, De Boelelaan 1117, HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kley, Rudolf A. [Klinken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University, Department of Neurology, Neuromuscular Centre Ruhrgebiet, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Dirk [University Hospital of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); University Children' s Hospital Basel, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Driven by increasing numbers of newly identified genetic defects and new insights into the field of inherited muscle diseases, neuromuscular imaging in general and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular are increasingly being used to characterise the severity and pattern of muscle involvement. Although muscle biopsy is still the gold standard for the establishment of the definitive diagnosis, muscular imaging is an important diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of dystrophic changes during the clinical workup of patients with hereditary muscle diseases. MRI is frequently used to describe muscle involvement patterns, which aids in narrowing of the differential diagnosis and distinguishing between dystrophic and non-dystrophic diseases. Recent work has demonstrated the usefulness of muscle imaging for the detection of specific congenital myopathies, mainly for the identification of the underlying genetic defect in core and centronuclear myopathies. Muscle imaging demonstrates characteristic patterns, which can be helpful for the differentiation of individual limb girdle muscular dystrophies. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of current methods and applications as well as future perspectives in the field of neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases. We also provide diagnostic algorithms that might guide us through the differential diagnosis in hereditary myopathies. (orig.)

  13. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  14. Extraocular muscle function testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003397.htm Extraocular muscle function testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye ...

  15. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  16. Optical characterization of muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2012-03-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  17. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Emerson Randolph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some muscular dystrophies. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on their embryologic origins and the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  18. Postural and ventilatory functions of intercostal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, B

    1973-01-01

    During spontaneous breathing, the interchondral muscles present a pattern of activity similar to that of the diaphragm. The external intercostals and most of the internal intercostals generally show electrical discharges not related to ventilatory rhythm. Studies of the electrical responses of these muscles in experimental variations of their length show that the external and internal intercostals are readily activated by this category of reflexes while the diaphragm and the interchondrals are not. Bilateral multisegmental sections of spinal dorsal roots do not affect the respiratory activity of the diaphragm and of the interchondral muscles; on the contrary, all types of activity - spontaneous or reflex - disappear from the intercostals. Electrical stimulation of appropriate points in the bulbar pyramids in decerebrate cats can activate at the same time different intercostals and leg muscles without modifying the rhythmic inspiratory activity of the diaphragm and the interchondrals. In preparations with chronically implanted electrodes, the intercostals muscles are chiefly involved in posture. These results fit very well with our histological findings which disclose a much greater density of muscle spindles in external intercostals than in the diaphragm or in the interchondral muscles.

  19. Severely atrophic human muscle fibers with nuclear misplacement survive many years of permanent denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Carraro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI the lower motor neuron (LMN denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001, and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers.

  20. Application of muscle relaxation closed loop monitoring system in general anesthesia for elderly patients and prevention of postoperative pulmonary infections%老年全麻患者肌松闭环监测的应用观察及术后肺部感染的预防

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊; 杜建龙; 包梅芳; 吴纯西

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the clinical effect and safety of the closed-loop muscle relaxation injection system used by the elderly patients during general anesthesia so as to prevent the postoperative pulmonary infections. METHODS A total of 100 elderly patients (with the general anesthesia of AS Ⅰ - Ⅱ class) who underwent upper abdominal surgery from Feb 2010 to Feb 2012 were randomly selected as the study subjects and were divided into the group A (the AEP closed-loop muscle relaxant injection system group) and the group B (traditional experience control group) , with 50 cases in each. The mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate of the two groups were observed, and the total muscle relaxants, induced total recovery time and postoperative adverse reactions, and pulmonary infections were recorded. RESULTS The copper rating, anaesthetists satisfaction rate, and the operation physician satisfaction rate of the group A were all higher than the group B, the difference was statistically significant(P<0. 05). There were 8 cases with pulmonary infections in the group A with the infection rate of 16. 0%, and there were 11 cases with the postoperative pulmonary infections in the group B with the infection rate of 22. 0%. CONCLUSION The closed-loop muscle relaxant injection system used by the elderly patients with general anesthesia can effectively guide the reasonable use of muscle relaxants during anesthesia and reduce the incidence of residual paralysis, thereby improving the safety of elderly patients with general anesthesia.%目的 观察闭环肌松注射系统在老年全麻患者的临床效果及安全性,以预防老年患者术后肺部感染.方法 随机选取2010年2月-2012年2月进行上腹部手术的老年全麻手术(ASA Ⅰ-Ⅱ级)患者100例为研究对象,将其分为A、B两组,每组50例,A组为AEP闭环肌松注射系统组,B组为传统经验对照组,观察两组患者平均动脉压、心率、呼吸频率等数值,记录肌松

  1. Muscles, exercise and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Febbraio, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    . The finding that the muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs, such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones and brain. However, some myokines exert their effects within......During the past decade, skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ. Accordingly, we have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed and released by muscle fibres and exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects should be classified as myokines...... the muscle itself. Thus, myostatin, LIF, IL-6 and IL-7 are involved in muscle hypertrophy and myogenesis, whereas BDNF and IL-6 are involved in AMPK-mediated fat oxidation. IL-6 also appears to have systemic effects on the liver, adipose tissue and the immune system, and mediates crosstalk between intestinal...

  2. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence......, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle...

  3. DRY NEEDLING INCREASES MUSCLE THICKNESS IN A SUBJECT WITH PERSISTENT MUSCLE DYSFUNCTION: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kevin M; McMurray, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Muscle dysfunction is very common following musculoskeletal injury. There is very little evidence to suggest that muscle function may be positively impacted by soft tissue interventions, such as dry needling. The purpose of this case report is to describe the immediate effect of dry needling on muscle thickness in a subject after shoulder surgery. A 22 year-old competitive gymnast presented seven months post shoulder surgery with significant impairments and functional limitations. Previous physical therapy focused on restoration of range of motion and strength using general exercise interventions, but the subject had persistent tightness and weakness of musculature of the shoulder complex. A subject-specific physical therapy program including manual physical therapy resulted in significant initial improvement, but lack of flexibility and weakness of the rotator cuff limited progress. Dry needling was used to address persistent myofascial trigger points. Immediately after dry needling the infraspinatus, the muscle's thickness was significantly improved as measured by rehabilitative ultrasound imaging. There was a corresponding increase in force production of external rotation at 90 degrees of abduction. Minimal research exists that validates the potential of dry needling on muscle function, as assessed by muscle thickness measured using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging. The results of this case report suggest that dry needling contributed to improvement in muscle thickness and strength in a subject with muscle dysfunction following an injury. 4.

  4. Determining all parameters necessary to build Hill-type muscle models from experiments on single muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Blümel, Marcus; Hooper, Scott L.; Guschlbauer, Christoph; White, William E.; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing muscle requires measuring such properties as force–length, force–activation, and force–velocity curves. These characterizations require large numbers of data points because both what type of function (e.g., linear, exponential, hyperbolic) best represents each property, and the values of the parameters in the relevant equations, need to be determined. Only a few properties are therefore generally measured in experiments on any one muscle, and complete characterizations are obta...

  5. The hamstring muscle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Made, A D; Wieldraaijer, T; Kerkhoffs, G M; Kleipool, R P; Engebretsen, L; van Dijk, C N; Golanó, P

    2015-07-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous inscription in the semitendinosus muscle known as the raphe. Fifty-six hamstring muscle groups were dissected in prone position from 29 human cadaveric specimens with a median age of 71.5 (range 45-98). Data pertaining to origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, MTJ length and length as well as width of the raphe were collected. Besides these data, we also encountered interesting findings that might lead to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern. These include overlapping proximal and distal tendons of both the long head of the biceps femoris muscle and the semimembranosus muscle (SM), a twist in the proximal SM tendon and a tendinous inscription (raphe) in the semitendinosus muscle present in 96 % of specimens. No obvious hypothesis can be provided purely based on either muscle length, tendon length or MTJ length. However, it is possible that overlapping proximal and distal tendons as well as muscle architecture leading to a resultant force not in line with the tendon predispose to muscle injury, whereas the presence of a raphe might plays a role in protecting the muscle against gross injury. Apart from these architectural characteristics that may contribute to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern, the provided reference values complement current knowledge on surgically relevant hamstring anatomy. IV.

  6. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2011-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best "treatment".

  7. Accessory piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Develi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis muscle originates from facies pelvica of sacrum and inserts on the trochanter major. It is one of the lateral rotator muscles of the hip and a landmark point in the gluteal region since n. ischiadicus descends to the thigh by passing close to the muscle. This contiguity may be associated with the irritation of the nerve which is known as piriformis syndrome. A rare anatomic variation of the muscle which observed on 74 years old male cadaver is discussed in this case report. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 182-183

  8. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence...

  9. Return to play after thigh muscle injury in elite football players: implementation and validation of the Munich muscle injury classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; Askling, Carl; Magnusson, Henrik; Mithoefer, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Background Owing to the complexity and heterogeneity of muscle injuries, a generally accepted classification system is still lacking. Aims To prospectively implement and validate a novel muscle injury classification and to evaluate its predictive value for return to professional football. Methods The recently described Munich muscle injury classification was prospectively evaluated in 31 European professional male football teams during the 2011/2012 season. Thigh muscle injury types were recorded by team medical staff and correlated to individual player exposure and resultant time-loss. Results In total, 393 thigh muscle injuries occurred. The muscle classification system was well received with a 100% response rate. Two-thirds of thigh muscle injuries were classified as structural and were associated with longer lay-off times compared to functional muscle disorders (pinjuries) with increasing lay-off time associated with more severe structural injury. Median lay-off time of functional disorders was 5–8 days without significant differences between subgroups. There was no significant difference in the absence time between anterior and posterior thigh injuries. Conclusions The Munich muscle classification demonstrates a positive prognostic validity for return to play after thigh muscle injury in professional male football players. Structural injuries are associated with longer average lay-off times than functional muscle disorders. Subclassification of structural injuries correlates with return to play, while subgrouping of functional disorders shows less prognostic relevance. Functional disorders are often underestimated clinically and require further systematic study. PMID:23645834

  10. Skeletal muscle development and regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2007-01-01

    In the late stages of muscle development, a unique cell population emerges that is a key player in postnatal muscle growth and muscle regeneration. The location of these cells next to the muscle fibers triggers their designation as satellite cells. During the healing of injured muscle tissue, satell

  11. Skeletal muscle development and regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2007-01-01

    In the late stages of muscle development, a unique cell population emerges that is a key player in postnatal muscle growth and muscle regeneration. The location of these cells next to the muscle fibers triggers their designation as satellite cells. During the healing of injured muscle tissue,

  12. The adaptive response of jaw muscles to varying functional demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünheid, Thorsten; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Korfage, Joannes A M; Zentner, Andrej; van Eijden, Theo M G J

    2009-12-01

    Jaw muscles are versatile entities that are able to adapt their anatomical characteristics, such as size, cross-sectional area, and fibre properties, to altered functional demands. The dynamic nature of muscle fibres allows them to change their phenotype to optimize the required contractile function while minimizing energy use. Changes in these anatomical parameters are associated with changes in neuromuscular activity as the pattern of muscle activation by the central nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of muscle properties. This review summarizes the adaptive response of jaw muscles to various stimuli or perturbations in the orofacial system and addresses general changes in muscles as they adapt, specific adaptive changes in jaw muscles under various physiologic and pathologic conditions, and their adaptive response to non-surgical and surgical therapeutic interventions. Although the jaw muscles are used concertedly in the masticatory system, their adaptive changes are not always uniform and vary with the nature, intensity, and duration of the stimulus. In general, stretch, increases neuromuscular activity, and resistance training result in hypertrophy, elicits increases in mitochondrial content and cross-sectional area of the fibres, and may change the fibre-type composition of the muscle towards a larger percentage of slow-type fibres. In contrast, changes in the opposite direction occur when neuromuscular activity is reduced, the muscle is immobilized in a shortened position, or paralysed. The broad range of stimuli that affect the properties of jaw muscles might help explain the large variability in the anatomical and physiological characteristics found among individuals, muscles, and muscle portions.

  13. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  14. Swimming and muscle structure in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of studies the relations between swimming behaviour of fish in general and extreme swimming responses in particular (called fast starts or escape responses) and the structure and ontogeny of the muscle system was investigated. Special attention was paid to relate functional difference

  15. Masticatory muscle pain: Causes, consequences, and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutris, M.

    2013-01-01

    Masticatory muscle pain is known as myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain. It has a prevalence of approximately 10% in the general population and affects women more than men. It is usually characterized by a dull, aching pain, which aggravates on function. The etiology of TMD pain is still

  16. Swimming and muscle structure in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of studies the relations between swimming behaviour of fish in general and extreme swimming responses in particular (called fast starts or escape responses) and the structure and ontogeny of the muscle system was investigated. Special attention was paid to relate functional

  17. Swimming and muscle structure in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of studies the relations between swimming behaviour of fish in general and extreme swimming responses in particular (called fast starts or escape responses) and the structure and ontogeny of the muscle system was investigated. Special attention was paid to relate functional d

  18. Healthy Muscles Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower than normal number of red blood cells. Atrophy (A-truh-fee). Wasting away of the body or of an organ or part, as from deficient nutrition, nerve damage, or lack of use. Cardiac (KAR-dee-ak) muscle . The heart muscle. An ...

  19. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A;

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  20. Turning Marrow into Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In unexpected testimony2 to the versatility3 of the body's cells,researchers have found they can make bone marrow cells turn into muscle, causing mice with muscular dystrophy4 to produce correctly working muscle cells. The experiment suggests that a form of bone marrow transplant- - a well established surgical procedure5- - could in principle treat patients with a variety of diseases.

  1. Muscle contraction and force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Risbo, Jens; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction studies often focus solely on myofibres and the proteins known to be involved in the processes of sarcomere shortening and cross-bridge cycling, but skeletal muscle also comprises a very elaborate ancillary network of capillaries, which not only play a vital role in terms...... contributor to force transfer within muscular tissue....

  2. Wave biomechanics of the skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    Results of acoustic measurements in skeletal muscle are generalized. It is shown that assessment of the pathologies and functional condition of the muscular system is possible with the use of shear waves. The velocity of these waves in muscles is much smaller than the velocity of sound; therefore, a higher symmetry type is formed for them. In the presence of a preferential direction (along muscle fibers), it is characterized by only two rather than five (as in usual media with the same anisotropy) moduli of elasticity. A covariant form of the corresponding wave equation is presented. It is shown that dissipation properties of skeletal muscles can be controlled by contracting them isometrically. Pulsed loads (shocks) and vibrations are damped differently, depending on their frequency spectrum. Characteristic frequencies on the order of tens and hundreds of hertz are attenuated due to actin-myosin bridges association/dissociation dynamics in the contracted muscle. At higher (kilohertz) frequencies, when the muscle is tensed, viscosity of the tissue increases by a factor of several tens because of the increase in friction experienced by fibrillar structures as they move relative to the surrounding liquid; the tension of the fibers changes the hydrodynamic conditions of the flow around them. Finally, at higher frequencies, the attenuation is associated with the rheological properties of biological molecules, in particular, with their conformational dynamics in the wave field. Models that describe the controlled shock dissipation mechanisms are proposed. Corresponding solutions are found, including those that allow for nonlinear effects.

  3. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase in glyco......Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase...... oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular...... exercise program has the potential to improve general health and fitness and improve quality of life, if executed properly. In this review, we describe skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise in GSDs, and how blocks in metabolic pathways affect exercise tolerance in GSDs. We review the studies...

  4. General Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some general dentists work in government health services, research programs, higher education, corporations and even the military. ?xml:namespace> What kind of procedures do general dentists provide? ?xml:namespace> Many general dentists are ...

  5. Onion artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  6. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  7. Three-dimensional representation of complex muscle architectures and geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blemker, Silvia S; Delp, Scott L

    2005-05-01

    Almost all computer models of the musculoskeletal system represent muscle geometry using a series of line segments. This simplification (i) limits the ability of models to accurately represent the paths of muscles with complex geometry and (ii) assumes that moment arms are equivalent for all fibers within a muscle (or muscle compartment). The goal of this work was to develop and evaluate a new method for creating three-dimensional (3D) finite-element models that represent complex muscle geometry and the variation in moment arms across fibers within a muscle. We created 3D models of the psoas, iliacus, gluteus maximus, and gluteus medius muscles from magnetic resonance (MR) images. Peak fiber moment arms varied substantially among fibers within each muscle (e.g., for the psoas the peak fiber hip flexion moment arms varied from 2 to 3 cm, and for the gluteus maximus the peak fiber hip extension moment arms varied from 1 to 7 cm). Moment arms from the literature were generally within the range of fiber moment arms predicted by the 3D models. The models accurately predicted changes in muscle surface geometry over a 55 degrees range of hip flexion, as compared to changes in shape predicted from MR images (average errors between the model and measured surfaces were between 1.7 and 5.2 mm). This new framework for representing muscle will enhance the accuracy of computer models of the musculoskeletal system.

  8. A muscle model for hybrid muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klauer Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop model-based control strategies for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES in order to support weak voluntary muscle contractions, a hybrid model for describing joint motions induced by concurrent voluntary-and FES induced muscle activation is proposed. It is based on a Hammerstein model – as commonly used in feedback controlled FES – and exemplarily applied to describe the shoulder abduction joint angle. Main component of a Hammerstein muscle model is usually a static input nonlinearity depending on the stimulation intensity. To additionally incorporate voluntary contributions, we extended the static non-linearity by a second input describing the intensity of the voluntary contribution that is estimated by electromyography (EMG measurements – even during active FES. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN is used to describe the static input non-linearity. The output of the ANN drives a second-order linear dynamical system that describes the combined muscle activation and joint angle dynamics. The tunable parameters are adapted to the individual subject by a system identification approach using previously recorded I/O-data. The model has been validated in two healthy subjects yielding RMS values for the joint angle error of 3.56° and 3.44°, respectively.

  9. An examination of cross-talk among surface mechanomyographic signals from the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles during isometric muscle actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Travis W; DeFreitas, Jason M; Stock, Matt S

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cross-talk among the mechanomyographic (MMG) signals from the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles during submaximal to maximal isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors. Eleven healthy men (age=20.1+/-1.1yr, mean+/-SD) volunteered to randomly perform isometric muscle actions in 10% increments from 10% to 90% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). During each muscle action, MMG signals were detected from the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and vastus medialis with three separate accelerometers. Cross-correlation was used to quantify cross-talk among the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and vastus medialis during each muscle action. The results showed cross-correlation coefficients that ranged from R(x,y)=.124-.714, but generally speaking, the coefficients were between .1 and .3. In addition, there were no consistent differences among the cross-talk levels for the three muscles, and the cross-correlation coefficients generally did not increase with isometric torque. Thus, MMG can be used to examine muscle function from each of the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles during isometric muscle actions.

  10. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study was to quantify the potential presence of muscle weakness among patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). The influence of gender, treatment intensity and disease duration on muscle strength and disease progression was also assessed. Methods Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. Results Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (p<0.05). Women with gMG were stronger than men (decrease in strength 22.6% vs. 32.7% in men, P<0.05). Regional differences in muscle weakness were also evident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG. PMID:27741232

  11. Muscle Bioenergetic Considerations for Intrinsic Laryngeal Skeletal Muscle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandage, Mary J.; Smith, Audrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Intrinsic laryngeal skeletal muscle bioenergetics, the means by which muscles produce fuel for muscle metabolism, is an understudied aspect of laryngeal physiology with direct implications for voice habilitation and rehabilitation. The purpose of this review is to describe bioenergetic pathways identified in limb skeletal muscle and…

  12. Hyper-elastic properties of the human sternocleidomastoideus muscle in tension

    OpenAIRE

    Gras, Laure-Lise; MITTON, David; VIOT, Philippe; Laporte, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Numerical models of the human body require realistic mechanical properties of the muscles as input, but, generally, such data are available only for animals’ muscles. As a consequence, the aim of this study was to identify the hyper-elastic behavior of the human sternocleidomastoideus muscle in tension using different constitutive laws. Ten sternocleidomastoideus muscles were tested in vitro. The hyper-elastic behavior was modeled with an exponential law and a hyper-elastic constitutive...

  13. Polymer artificial muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tissaphern Mirfakhrai

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The various types of natural muscle are incredible material systems that enable the production of large deformations by repetitive molecular motions. Polymer artificial muscle technologies are being developed that produce similar strains and higher stresses using electrostatic forces, electrostriction, ion insertion, and molecular conformational changes. Materials used include elastomers, conducting polymers, ionically conducting polymers, and carbon nanotubes. The mechanisms, performance, and remaining challenges associated with these technologies are described. Initial applications are being developed, but further work by the materials community should help make these technologies applicable in a wide range of devices where muscle-like motion is desirable.

  14. Acquired smooth muscle hamartoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bari Arfan ul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle hamartoma is an uncommon, usually congenital, cutaneous hyperplasia of the arrectores pilorum muscles. When it is acquired, it may be confused with Becker′s nevus. We report a case of this rare tumor in a 19-year-old man. The disease started several years ago as multiple small skin-colored papules that subsequently coalesced to form a large soft plaque on the back of the left shoulder. The diagnosis of acquired smooth muscle hamartoma was confirmed on histopathology. The patient was reassured about the benign nature of the lesion and was not advised any treatment.

  15. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  16. Exercise-induced muscle damage and the potential protective role of estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Becky; Eston, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage is a well documented phenomenon that often follows unaccustomed and sustained metabolically demanding activities. This is a well researched, but poorly understood area, including the actual mechanisms involved in the muscle damage and repair cycle. An integrated model of muscle damage has been proposed by Armstrong and is generally accepted. A more recent aspect of exercise-induced muscle damage to be investigated is the potential of estrogen to have a protective effect against skeletal muscle damage. Estrogen has been demonstrated to have a potent antioxidant capacity that plays a protective role in cardiac muscle, but whether this antioxidant capacity has the ability to protect skeletal muscle is not fully understood. In both human and rat studies, females have been shown to have lower creatine kinase (CK) activity following both eccentric and sustained exercise compared with males. As CK is often used as an indirect marker of muscle damage, it has been suggested that female muscle may sustain less damage. However, these findings may be more indicative of the membrane stabilising effect of estrogen as some studies have shown no histological differences in male and female muscle following a damaging protocol. More recently, investigations into the potential effect of estrogen on muscle damage have explored the possible role that estrogen may play in the inflammatory response following muscle damage. In light of these studies, it may be suggested that if estrogen inhibits the vital inflammatory response process associated with the muscle damage and repair cycle, it has a negative role in restoring normal muscle function after muscle damage has occurred. This review is presented in two sections: firstly, the processes involved in the muscle damage and repair cycle are reviewed; and secondly, the possible effects that estrogen has upon these processes and muscle damage in general is discussed. The muscle damage and repair cycle is

  17. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gizzi

    Full Text Available A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies. In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14; the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain. Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  18. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Leonardo; Muceli, Silvia; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies). In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side) in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain) and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14); the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain). Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus) influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  19. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  20. Muscle Cramp - A Common Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Muscle Cramp – A Common Pain Page Content Has a muscle ... body’s natural tendency toward self-healing. Causes of Muscle Cramps Muscle cramps can occur anywhere, anytime to anyone. “ ...

  1. Muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Gavras, H

    1982-01-01

    glycogenolysis during exercise: contractions principally stimulate glycogenolysis early in exercise, and a direct effect of epinephrine on muscle is needed for continued glycogenolysis. In addition, epinephrine increased oxygen consumption and glucose uptake in both resting and electrically stimulated...

  2. Muscles and their myokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-01-01

    In the past, the role of physical activity as a life-style modulating factor has been considered as that of a tool to balance energy intake. Although it is important to avoid obesity, physical inactivity should be discussed in a much broader context. There is accumulating epidemiological evidence...... or endocrine effects should be classified as 'myokines'. Given that skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the human body, our discovery that contracting skeletal muscle secretes proteins sets a novel paradigm: skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ producing and releasing myokines, which work in a hormone...... that a physically active life plays an independent role in the protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, dementia and even depression. For most of the last century, researchers sought a link between muscle contraction and humoral changes in the form of an 'exercise factor', which could...

  3. smooth-muscle activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with atropine could not abolish the effect of the venom on smooth muscle. ... cholenergic factor with acetylcholine was confirmed using radioimmunoassay of ... peripheral nervous antagonists on the venom action are still uncertain. The present.

  4. Muscle biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  5. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bach, A. D; Beier, J. P; Stern‐Staeter, J; Horch, R. E

    2004-01-01

    The reconstruction of skeletal muscle tissue either lost by traumatic injury or tumor ablation or functional damage due to myopathies is hampered by the lack of availability of functional substitution...

  6. Lipolysis in Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Annette Karen Lundbeck

    and especially the energy sensor 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is activated during exercise, has received increased attention. However, whether AMPK is an activator or inhibitor of lipolysis in skeletal muscle is not clear. Therefore, we in study I aimed to identify the role...... contraction. Accordingly, AMPK is suggested to be an important regulator of basal IMTG and lipid handling in skeletal muscle as well as an important activator of lipolysis by phosphorylation of ATGL and HSL during muscle contractions. Oversupply of energy and dietary fat leads to obesity and accumulation...... chemical structure of DAG. We took advantage of the fact that insulin sensitivity is increased after exercise, and that mice knocked out (KO) of HSL accumulate DAG after exercise, and measured insulin stimulated glucose uptake after treadmill running in skeletal muscle from HSL KO mice and wildtype control...

  7. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  8. Muscle as a secretory organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise.

  9. Microanatomy of adult zebrafish extraocular muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Kasprick

    Full Text Available Binocular vision requires intricate control of eye movement to align overlapping visual fields for fusion in the visual cortex, and each eye is controlled by 6 extraocular muscles (EOMs. Disorders of EOMs are an important cause of symptomatic vision loss. Importantly, EOMs represent specialized skeletal muscles with distinct gene expression profile and susceptibility to neuromuscular disorders. We aim to investigate and describe the anatomy of adult zebrafish extraocular muscles (EOMs to enable comparison with human EOM anatomy and facilitate the use of zebrafish as a model for EOM research. Using differential interference contrast (DIC, epifluorescence microscopy, and precise sectioning techniques, we evaluate the anatomy of zebrafish EOM origin, muscle course, and insertion on the eye. Immunofluorescence is used to identify components of tendons, basement membrane and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, and to analyze myofiber characteristics. We find that adult zebrafish EOM insertions on the globe parallel the organization of human EOMs, including the close proximity of specific EOM insertions to one another. However, analysis of EOM origins reveals important differences between human and zebrafish, such as the common rostral origin of both oblique muscles and the caudal origin of the lateral rectus muscles. Thrombospondin 4 marks the EOM tendons in regions that are highly innervated, and laminin marks the basement membrane, enabling evaluation of myofiber size and distribution. The NMJs appear to include both en plaque and en grappe synapses, while NMJ density is much higher in EOMs than in somatic muscles. In conclusion, zebrafish and human EOM anatomy are generally homologous, supporting the use of zebrafish for studying EOM biology. However, anatomic differences exist, revealing divergent evolutionary pressures.

  10. Borderlines between sarcopenia and mild late-onset muscle disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna ePalmio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerous natural or disease-related alterations occur in different tissues of the body with advancing age. Sarcopenia is defined as age-related decrease of muscle mass and strength beginning in mid-adulthood and accelerating in people older than 60 years. Pathophysiology of sarcopenia involves both neural and muscle dependent mechanisms and is enhanced by multiple factors. Aged muscles show loss in fiber number, fiber atrophy and gradual increase in the number of ragged red fibers and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. Generalized loss of muscle tissue and increased amount of intramuscular fat is seen on muscle imaging. However, the degree of these changes vary greatly between individuals and the distinction between normal age-related weakening of muscle strength and clinically significant muscle disease is not always obvious. Because some of the genetic myopathies can present at a very late age and be mild in severity, the correct diagnosis is easily missed. We highlight this difficult borderline zone between sarcopenia and muscle disease by two examples: LGMD1D and myotonic dystrophy type 2. Muscle MRI is a useful tool to help differentiate myopathies from sarcopenia and to reach the correct diagnosis also in the elderly.

  11. Anxiety and personality traits in patients with muscle related temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallegama, R W; Ranasinghe, A W; Weerasinghe, V S; Sitheeque, M A M

    2005-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients with cervical muscle pain exhibit greater degree of psychological distress compared with patients without cervical muscle pain and controls. Thirty-eight muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients including 10 patients with cervical muscle pain and 41 healthy individuals as controls participated in the study. State and trait anxiety levels were assessed with the Spielberger's state and trait anxiety inventory. Personality traits (extroversion, neuroticism, psychoticism and social desirability) were assessed using the Eysenck's personality questionnaire, and the pain intensities described over the muscles were recorded using a 100 mm visual analogue scale. The muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients, in general, exhibited significantly higher degrees of neuroticism and trait anxiety. The patients with cervical muscle pain demonstrated a significantly higher level of psychoticism compared with the patients without cervical muscle pain and the controls and a significantly higher state anxiety level than the controls. They also demonstrated higher pain intensities in masseter and temporalis muscles compared with patients without cervical muscle pain. It has been suggested that either subjects with psychological distress are prone to temporomandibular disorders, or psychological distress is a manifestation of existing chronic pain conditions. The present findings demand further investigations and broader approach in management, as muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients with cervical muscle pain were both physically and psychologically compromised to a greater degree compared with patients without cervical muscle pain.

  12. On the thermodynamics of smooth muscle contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhand, Jonas; McMeeking, Robert M.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2016-09-01

    Cell function is based on many dynamically complex networks of interacting biochemical reactions. Enzymes may increase the rate of only those reactions that are thermodynamically consistent. In this paper we specifically treat the contraction of smooth muscle cells from the continuum thermodynamics point of view by considering them as an open system where matter passes through the cell membrane. We systematically set up a well-known four-state kinetic model for the cross-bridge interaction of actin and myosin in smooth muscle, where the transition between each state is driven by forward and reverse reactions. Chemical, mechanical and energy balance laws are provided in local forms, while energy balance is also formulated in the more convenient temperature form. We derive the local (non-negative) production of entropy from which we deduce the reduced entropy inequality and the constitutive equations for the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor, the heat flux, the ion and molecular flux and the entropy. One example for smooth muscle contraction is analyzed in more detail in order to provide orientation within the established general thermodynamic framework. In particular the stress evolution, heat generation, muscle shorting rate and a condition for muscle cooling are derived.

  13. Changes in T2-weighted MRI of supinator muscle, pronator teres muscle, and extensor indicis muscle with manual muscle testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Akiyama, Sumikazu; Takamori, Masayoshi; Otsuka, D. Eng, Hiroshi; Seo, Yoshiteru

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] In order to detect muscle activity with manual muscle testing, T2-weighted magnetic resonance (T2w-MR) images were detected by a 0.2 T compact MRI system. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 3 adult males. Transverse T2-weighted multi-slice spin-echo images of the left forearm were measured by a 39 ms echo-time with a 2,000 ms repetition time, a 9.5 mm slice thickness, 1 accumulation and a total image acquisition time of 4 min 16 s. First, T2w-MR images in the resting condition were measured. Then, manipulative isometric contraction exercise (5 sec duration) to the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle or the extensor indicis muscle was performed using Borg’s rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale of 15–17. The T2w-MR images were measured immediately after the exercise. [Results] T2w-MR image intensities increased significantly in the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle and the extensor indicis muscle after the exercise. However, the image intensities in the rest of the muscle did not change. [Conclusion] Using T2w-MR images, we could detect muscle activity in a deep muscle, the supinator muscle, and a small muscle, the extensor indicis muscle. These results also support the reliability of the manual muscle testing method. PMID:28356621

  14. Histological and histochemical characterisation of the equine soft palate muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, C S; Hahn, C N; Dixon, P M

    2010-07-01

    Dysfunction of the muscles is implicated in the pathogenesis of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP) in exercising horses. The histological features of normal equine soft palate muscles have not been previously described. To describe the histological and morphometric features of normal equine soft palate muscles. The palatinus, palatopharyngeus, levator veli palatini and tensor veli palatini muscles of 6 Thoroughbred type horses were examined histologically and histochemically to assess their general morphology, fibre-type distribution and mean fibre diameter. The muscles of all 6 specimens showed very similar characteristics, including a low proportion of type 1 muscle fibres in the 4 different muscles examined, with the 3 muscles innervated by the pharyngeal branch of the vagus (i.e. palatopharyngeus, palatinus and levator veli palatini) having significantly fewer (Pmuscle fibres compared to the tensor veli palatini. The mean fibre diameters were significantly (Pmuscles except the palatinus. Considerable variability in mean fibre size diameter was evident in all muscles examined, with type 1 fibres in the levator veli palatini and rostral fasciculus of the palatopharyngeus and both fibre types in the caudal fasciculus of the palatopharyngeus having the most marked variation, with coefficients of variation >250 and the latter also having high levels of endomysial connective tissue. The palatinus had least variation in fibre size. Morphological characterisation of the normal soft palate muscles may provide reference values for future comparative studies with samples obtained from horses with palatal dysfunction. The palatinus appears to be the best muscle to histologically examine for evidence of muscle abnormality.

  15. Muscle weakness in respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscles in a mouse model for nebulin-based nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joureau, Barbara; de Winter, Josine M; Stam, Kelly; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A C

    2017-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is among the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathies, and is characterized by the presence of nemaline rods in skeletal muscles fibers, general muscle weakness, and hypotonia. Although respiratory failure is the main cause of death in nemaline myopathy, only little is known regarding the contractile strength of the diaphragm, the main muscle of inspiration. To investigate diaphragm contractility, in the present study we took advantage of a mouse model for nebulin-based nemaline myopathy that we recently developed. In this mouse model, exon 55 of Neb is deleted (Neb(ΔExon55)), a mutation frequently found in patients. Diaphragm contractility was determined in permeabilized muscle fibers and was compared to the contractility of permeabilized fibers from three peripheral skeletal muscles: soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and gastrocnemius. The force generating capacity of diaphragm muscle fibers of Neb(ΔExon55) mice was reduced to 25% of wildtype levels, indicating severe contractile weakness. The contractile weakness of diaphragm fibers was more pronounced than that observed in soleus muscle, but not more pronounced than that observed in extensor digitorum longus and gastrocnemius muscles. The reduced muscle contractility was at least partly caused by changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics which reduced the number of bound cross-bridges. The severe diaphragm weakness likely contributes to the development of respiratory failure in Neb(ΔExon55) mice and might explain their early, postnatal death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Role of Physiologists in Health Care Delivery Through Exercise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    always bursting with good health and a zest for life; other people are ... elderly, to avoid injuries; healthy ageing involving eating a ... people; try and get 7 – 8 hours of good quality sleep .... pressure, heart disease, osteoporosis and depression.

  17. Robert Hooke: early respiratory physiologist, polymath, and mechanical genius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B

    2014-07-01

    Robert Hooke (1635-1703) was a polymath who made important contributions to respiratory physiology and many other scientific areas. With Robert Boyle, he constructed the first air pump that allowed measurements on small animals at a reduced atmospheric pressure, and this started the discipline of high-altitude physiology. He also built the first human low-pressure chamber and described his experiences when the pressure was reduced to the equivalent of an altitude of ∼2,400 m. Using artificial ventilation in an animal preparation, he demonstrated that movement of the lung was not essential for life. His book Micrographia describing early studies with a microscope remains a classic. He produced an exquisite drawing of the head of a fly, showing the elaborate compound eye. There is also a detailed drawing of a flea, and Hooke noted how the long, many-jointed legs enable the insect to jump so high. For 40 years, he was the curator of experiments for the newly founded Royal Society in London and contributed greatly to its intellectual ferment. His mechanical inventions covered an enormous range, including the watch spring, the wheel barometer, and the universal joint. Following the Great Fire of London in 1666, he designed many of the new buildings in conjunction with Christopher Wren. Unfortunately, Hooke had an abrasive personality, which was partly responsible for a lack of recognition of his work for many years. However, during the last 25 years, there has been renewed interest, and he is now recognized as a brilliant scientist and innovator.

  18. Study on preoperative gradual muscles relaxation training to reduce restlessness of patients in analepsia period of general anesthesia%术前渐进性肌肉放松训练减轻全身麻醉病人苏醒期躁动程度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢珍; 李瑞英; 向承红

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of gradual muscles relaxation training to reduce restlessness of patients in analepsia period of general Anesthesia.Methods: A total of 60 patients selected from general surgery, five sense organs, gynecology , liver and gall department who were scheduled for accepting tracheal intubation and combined intravenous and inhalation anesthesia were randomly divided into test group and control group.Patients of control group wcre just received routine visiting.Patients of test group were received preoperative visiting on the day before operation and were carried out gradual muscles relaxation training.Then heart rate, blood pressure.blood oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) , scoring of restless - sedation in analepsia period,and incidence of restless of the two group patients had recorded before the induction, right after operation, on the time of extubation,5 minutes and 10 minutes after the extubation respectively.Results : In terms of heart rate and blood pressure, there were statistical significant differences between the two group patients (P<0.05).The score of restless - sedation in test group patients was 0.65±0.34 and was 1.98 ± 0.38 in control group cases.There was statistical significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05).The incidence of restless in test group patients was 13.3% and was 46.7% in control group.There was statistical significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05).Conclusion: The gradual muscles relaxation training was helpful to decrease the incidence and the degree of restlessess of patients in analepsia period of general anesthesia.%[目的]探讨渐进性肌肉放松训练对减轻全身麻醉病人苏醒期躁动程度的影响.[方法]选择普外科、五官科、妇科、肝胆科拟行气管插管静脉吸入复合麻醉的手术病人60例,随机分为实验组和对照组.实验组术前1d访视并进行渐进性肌肉放松训练,对照组常规术前访视.记录两组病人诱

  19. EFNS review on the role of muscle biopsy in the investigation of myalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakides, T; Angelini, Cinzia; Schaefer, J

    2013-01-01

    Myalgia, defined as any pain perceived in muscle, is very common in the general population and a frequent cause for referral to neurologists, rheumatologists and internists in general. It is however only rarely due to primary muscle disease and often referred from ligaments, joints, bones...

  20. The skeletal muscle arachidonic acid cascade in health and inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, Marina; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-05-01

    Muscle atrophy and weakness are often observed in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, and are the major clinical features of the autoimmune myopathies, polymyositis and dermatomyositis. A general understanding of the pathogenesis of muscle atrophy and the impaired muscle function associated with chronic inflammatory diseases has not been clarified. In this context, arachidonic acid metabolites, such as the prostaglandin and leukotriene subfamilies, are of interest because they contribute to immune and nonimmune processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that prostaglandins and leukotrienes are involved in causing muscular pain and inflammation, and also in myogenesis and the repair of muscles. In this Review, we summarize novel findings that implicate prostaglandins and leukotrienes in the muscle atrophy and weakness that occur in inflammatory diseases of the muscles, with a focus on inflammatory myopathies. We discuss the role of the arachidonic acid cascade in skeletal muscle growth and function, and individual metabolites as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory muscle diseases.

  1. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume.

  2. Generalized product

    OpenAIRE

    Greco,Salvatore; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation functions on [0,1] with annihilator 0 can be seen as a generalized product on [0,1]. We study the generalized product on the bipolar scale [–1,1], stressing the axiomatic point of view. Based on newly introduced bipolar properties, such as the bipolar increasingness, bipolar unit element, bipolar idempotent element, several kinds of generalized bipolar product are introduced and studied. A special stress is put on bipolar semicopulas, bipolar quasi-copulas and bipolar copulas.

  3. Generalized product

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, Salvatore; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation functions on [0,1] with annihilator 0 can be seen as a generalized product on [0,1]. We study the generalized product on the bipolar scale [–1,1], stressing the axiomatic point of view. Based on newly introduced bipolar properties, such as the bipolar increasingness, bipolar unit element, bipolar idempotent element, several kinds of generalized bipolar product are introduced and studied. A special stress is put on bipolar semicopulas, bipolar quasi-copulas and bipolar copulas.

  4. Artificial muscles on heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  5. Signaling in muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ivana Y; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2015-02-02

    Signaling pathways regulate contraction of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. Although these are similar, there are striking differences in the pathways that can be attributed to the distinct functional roles of the different muscle types. Muscles contract in response to depolarization, activation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other stimuli. The actomyosin fibers responsible for contraction require an increase in the cytosolic levels of calcium, which signaling pathways induce by promoting influx from extracellular sources or release from intracellular stores. Rises in cytosolic calcium stimulate numerous downstream calcium-dependent signaling pathways, which can also regulate contraction. Alterations to the signaling pathways that initiate and sustain contraction and relaxation occur as a consequence of exercise and pathophysiological conditions.

  6. Foot muscles strengthener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris T. Glavač

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous experience in the correction of flat feet consisted of the use of insoles for shoes and exercises with toys, balls, rollers, inclined planes, etc. A device for strengthening foot muscles is designed for the correction of flat feet in children and, as its name suggests, for strengthening foot muscles in adults. The device is made of wood and metal, with a mechanism and technical solutions, enabling the implementation of specific exercises to activate muscles responsible for the formation of the foot arch. It is suitable for home use with controlled load quantities since it has calibrated springs. The device is patented with the Intellectual Property Office, Republic of Serbia, as a petty patent.

  7. Deux Physiologistes et un Linguiste Resume d'un Entretien (Two Physiologists and a Linguist. A Resume of an Interview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez de la Lastra, Carlos; Gracia Vives, Miguel

    1977-01-01

    A resume of an interview between the authors and Andre Martinet on the book "Les reflexes linguistiques." The topics discussed are: rambling discourse, the necessity of unifying efforts of specialists in human sciences, and consideration of human communication processes from the physiological point of view. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  8. Automated muscle wrapping using finite element contact detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Philippe; Gerber, Christian; Snedeker, Jess G

    2010-07-20

    Realistic muscle path representation is essential to musculoskeletal modeling of joint function. Algorithms predicting these muscle paths typically rely on a labor intensive predefinition of via points or underlying geometries to guide wrapping for given joint positions. While muscle wrapping using anatomically precise three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of bone and muscle has been achieved, computational expense and pre-processing associated with this approach exclude its use in applications such as subject-specific modeling. With the intention of combining advantageous features of both approaches, an intermediate technique relying on contact detection capabilities of commercial FE packages is presented. We applied the approach to the glenohumeral joint, and validated the method by comparison against existing experimental data. Individual muscles were modeled as a straight series of deformable beam elements and bones as anatomically precise 3D rigid bodies. Only the attachment locations and a default orientation of the undeformed muscle segment were pre-defined. The joint was then oriented in a static position of interest. The muscle segment free end was then moved along the shortest Euclidean path to its origin on the scapula, wrapping the muscle along bone surfaces by relying on software contact detection. After wrapping for a given position, the resulting moment arm was computed as the perpendicular distance from the line of action vector to the humeral head center of rotation. This approach reasonably predicted muscle length and moment arm for 27 muscle segments when compared to experimental measurements over a wide range of shoulder motion. Artificial via points or underlying contact geometries were avoided, contact detection and multiobject wrapping on the bone surfaces were automatic, and low computational cost permitted wrapping of individual muscles within seconds on a standard desktop PC. These advantages may be valuable for both general

  9. Muscle function in avian flight: achieving power and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewener, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    Flapping flight places strenuous requirements on the physiological performance of an animal. Bird flight muscles, particularly at smaller body sizes, generally contract at high frequencies and do substantial work in order to produce the aerodynamic power needed to support the animal's weight in the air and to overcome drag. This is in contrast to terrestrial locomotion, which offers mechanisms for minimizing energy losses associated with body movement combined with elastic energy savings to reduce the skeletal muscles' work requirements. Muscles also produce substantial power during swimming, but this is mainly to overcome body drag rather than to support the animal's weight. Here, I review the function and architecture of key flight muscles related to how these muscles contribute to producing the power required for flapping flight, how the muscles are recruited to control wing motion and how they are used in manoeuvring. An emergent property of the primary flight muscles, consistent with their need to produce considerable work by moving the wings through large excursions during each wing stroke, is that the pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscles shorten over a large fraction of their resting fibre length (33–42%). Both muscles are activated while being lengthened or undergoing nearly isometric force development, enhancing the work they perform during subsequent shortening. Two smaller muscles, the triceps and biceps, operate over a smaller range of contractile strains (12–23%), reflecting their role in controlling wing shape through elbow flexion and extension. Remarkably, pigeons adjust their wing stroke plane mainly via changes in whole-body pitch during take-off and landing, relative to level flight, allowing their wing muscles to operate with little change in activation timing, strain magnitude and pattern. PMID:21502121

  10. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    torque increased 18-29% (P muscle fibers hypertrophied 20% (P muscles is highly responsive......Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings. Our objective was to investigate the effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on rapid force capacity, as well...... as neural and muscular adaptations in women with chronic neck muscle pain. A group of employed women (n = 42) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia participated in a 10-wk randomized controlled trial; specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles, general fitness training performed as leg...

  11. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  12. Lifelong physical exercise delays age-associated skeletal muscle decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, S; Pietrangelo, L; Loefler, S; Fruhmann, H; Vogelauer, M; Burggraf, S; Pond, A; Grim-Stieger, M; Cvecka, J; Sedliak, M; Tirpáková, V; Mayr, W; Sarabon, N; Rossini, K; Barberi, L; De Rossi, M; Romanello, V; Boncompagni, S; Musarò, A; Sandri, M; Protasi, F; Carraro, U; Kern, H

    2015-02-01

    Aging is usually accompanied by a significant reduction in muscle mass and force. To determine the relative contribution of inactivity and aging per se to this decay, we compared muscle function and structure in (a) male participants belonging to a group of well-trained seniors (average of 70 years) who exercised regularly in their previous 30 years and (b) age-matched healthy sedentary seniors with (c) active young men (average of 27 years). The results collected show that relative to their sedentary cohorts, muscle from senior sportsmen have: (a) greater maximal isometric force and function, (b) better preserved fiber morphology and ultrastructure of intracellular organelles involved in Ca(2+) handling and ATP production, (c) preserved muscle fibers size resulting from fiber rescue by reinnervation, and (d) lowered expression of genes related to autophagy and reactive oxygen species detoxification. All together, our results indicate that: (a) skeletal muscle of senior sportsmen is actually more similar to that of adults than to that of age-matched sedentaries and (b) signaling pathways controlling muscle mass and metabolism are differently modulated in senior sportsmen to guarantee maintenance of skeletal muscle structure, function, bioenergetic characteristics, and phenotype. Thus, regular physical activity is a good strategy to attenuate age-related general decay of muscle structure and function (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01679977).

  13. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  14. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Human muscle proteins: analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, C.S.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1983-09-01

    Proteins from single frozen sections of human muscle were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and detected by fluorography or Coomassie Blue staining. The major proteins were identical in different normal muscles obtained from either sex at different ages, and in Duchenne and myotonic dystrophy samples. Congenital myopathy denervation atrophy, polymyositis, and Becker's muscular dystrophy samples, however, showed abnormal myosin light chain compositions, some with a decrease of fast-fiber myosin light chains and others with a decrease of slow-fiber light chains. These protein alterations did not correlate with any specific disease, and may be cause by generalized muscle-fiber damage.

  16. Implicit Generalized Predictive Control of Hip-joint Rehabilitation Training Device Driven by Pneumatic Muscle Actuator%气动肌肉驱动的髋关节康复训练装置隐式广义预测控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何凡; 李笑; 夏虹; 关婷

    2011-01-01

    To slove the problem of the delay, nonlinear and time-variable characteristics of hip-joint rehabilitation training device driven by pneumatic muscle actuator, a implicit generalized predictive controller was designed based on parameter model. It was applied to the isokinetic continuous passive motion control of the hip-joint rehabilitation training device. The experimental results prove that the controller has the property of high control accuracy, anti-disturbance capability and excellent adaptive abilities for the changes of system model parameters. This control method provides reference for improving the control performance of such system.%针对气动肌肉驱动的髋关节康复训练装置存在时延、非线性和时变特性,设计基于参数模型的隐式广义预测控制器,并将其应用于髋关节康复训练装置的等速持续被动运动控制中.实验研究表明:在负载干扰变化下,隐式广义预测控制器具有控制精度高、抗干扰能力强等特点,同时对系统模型参数的变化有较好的适应能力,对提高类似医疗器械的控制性能有借鉴意义.

  17. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  18. MRI appearance of muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N.; Walsh, M.A.; Hughes, P.M. [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Muscle denervation results from a variety of causes including trauma, neoplasia, neuropathies, infections, autoimmune processes and vasculitis. Traditionally, the diagnosis of muscle denervation was based on clinical examination and electromyography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a distinct advantage over electromyography, not only in diagnosing muscle denervation, but also in determining its aetiology. MRI demonstrates characteristic signal intensity patterns depending on the stage of muscle denervation. The acute and subacutely denervated muscle shows a high signal intensity pattern on fluid sensitive sequences and normal signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI images. In chronic denervation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration demonstrate high signal changes on T1-weighted sequences in association with volume loss. The purpose of this review is to summarise the MRI appearance of denervated muscle, with special emphasis on the signal intensity patterns in acute and subacute muscle denervation. (orig.)

  19. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003975.htm Pelvic floor muscle training exercises To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises ...

  20. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  1. Active vs. inactive muscle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may lose 20 to 40 percent of their muscle -- and, along with it, their strength -- as they ... have found that a major reason people lose muscle is because they stop doing everyday activities that ...

  2. Physics in muscle research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwazumi, T

    2000-01-01

    Muscle is one of few organs whose performance can be measured by physical quantities. However, very few attempts have been made to apply theoretical physics to muscle. In this paper we will see how physical principles can be applied by taking advantage of unique properties of muscle structure. The first topic is to establish the stability conditions of sarcomere structure. The conclusions are then compared to some experimental facts. Next, we move on to the field theory fundamentals. The concept of energy density as a stress tensor is shown to be a powerful tool for the dielectric force theory to understand how proteins move under electric fields. By combining the structural stability theory and the dielectric force theory we arrive at a helical dipole array. We discuss the source of strong dipole fields and how the dipole strength could be controlled by Ca ions. The behavior of water and ions under electric fields is briefly discussed. The third topic is the mechanical stiffness of muscle in longitudinal and lateral directions. Some experimental data are shown and the physics of anisotropic stiffness is discussed. An appendix is provided to explain the pitfalls of experimenting with isolated components rather than organized structures (sarcomere).

  3. Calpains in muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Marc; Richard, Isabelle

    2005-10-01

    Calpains are intracellular nonlysosomal Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases. They mediate regulatory cleavages of specific substrates in a large number of processes during the differentiation, life and death of the cell. The purpose of this review is to synthesize our current understanding of the participation of calpains in muscle atrophy. Muscle tissue expresses mainly three different calpains: the ubiquitous calpains and calpain 3. The participation of the ubiquitous calpains in the initial degradation of myofibrillar proteins occurring in muscle atrophy as well as in the necrosis process accompanying muscular dystrophies has been well characterized. Inactivating mutations in the calpain 3 gene are responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A and calpain 3 has been found to be downregulated in different atrophic situations, suggesting that it has to be absent for the atrophy to occur. The fact that similar regulations of calpain activities occur during exercise as well as in atrophy led us to propose that the calpains control cytoskeletal modifications needed for muscle plasticity.

  4. Inflammatory muscle diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastaglia F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The three major immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies, dermatomyositis (DM, polymyositis (PM and inclusion body myositis (IBM, each have their own distinctive clinical features, underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and patterns of muscle gene expression. In DM a complement-dependent humoral process thought to be initiated by antibodies to endothelial cells results in a microangiopathy with secondary ischemic changes in muscles. On the other hand, in PM and IBM there is a T-cell response with invasion of muscle fibers by CD8+ lymphocytes and perforin-mediated cytotoxic necrosis. In IBM degenerative changes are also a feature and comprise autophagia with rimmed vacuole formation and inclusions containing β-amyloid and other proteins whose accumulation may be linked to impaired proteasomal function. The relationship between the inflammatory and degenerative component remains unclear, as does the basis for the selective vulnerability of certain muscles and the resistance to conventional forms of immunotherapy in most cases of IBM. Patients with DM or PM usually respond to treatment with glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents but their use remains largely empirical. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy can be used to achieve disease control in patients with severe weakness or dysphagia, or in patients with immunodeficiency, but its use is limited by expense. Emerging therapies for resistant cases include TNFα inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab and monoclonal antibodies (rituximab, alemtuzumab. However, experience with these therapies is still limited and there is a need for randomized trials to test their efficacy and establish guidelines for their use in clinical practice.

  5. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside the cells, pro- ducing energy (ATP) for muscle contraction and other cellular functions. In meta- bolic myopathies, ... after exercising. The exercise-induced cramps (actually sharp contractions that may seem to ... Muscular Dystrophy Association offers a vast array of services ...

  6. General Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  7. General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unconscious and unable to feel pain during medical procedures. General anesthesia usually uses a combination of intravenous drugs ... 1998-2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved.

  8. Electrical muscle stimulation for deep stabilizing muscles in abdominal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Simon; Crowe, Louis; McCarthyPersson, Ulrik; Minogue, Conor; Caulfield, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with dysfunction in recruitment of muscles in the lumbopelvic region. Effective rehabilitation requires preferential activation of deep stabilizing muscle groups. This study was carried out in order to quantify the response of deep stabilizing muscles (transverses abdominis) and superficial muscle in the abdominal wall (external oblique) to electrical muscle stimulation (EMS). Results demonstrate that EMS can preferentially stimulate contractions in the deep stabilizers and may have significant potential as a therapeutic intervention in this area, pending further refinements to the technology.

  9. Effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Kjær, Michael; Søgaard, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of neck muscle pain has steadily increased and especially pain from the descending part of the trapezius muscle has been associated with monotonous work tasks such as computer work. Physical exercise is generally recommended as treatment, but it is unclear which type...... for the affected muscle, general fitness training performed as leg bicycling with relaxed shoulders, or a reference intervention without physical activity. The main outcome measure was an acute and prolonged change in intensity of neck muscle pain (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]). Results. A decrease of 35 mm...

  10. Effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Søgaard, Karen

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of neck muscle pain has steadily increased and especially pain from the descending part of the trapezius muscle has been associated with monotonous work tasks such as computer work. Physical exercise is generally recommended as treatment, but it is unclear which type...... for the affected muscle, general fitness training performed as leg bicycling with relaxed shoulders, or a reference intervention without physical activity. The main outcome measure was an acute and prolonged change in intensity of neck muscle pain (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]). RESULTS: A decrease of 35 mm...

  11. Glycerol kinase activities in muscles from vertebrates and invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsholme, E A; Taylor, K

    1969-05-01

    1. Glycerol kinase (EC 2.7.1.30) activity was measured in crude extracts of skeletal muscles by a radiochemical method. The properties of the enzyme from a number of different muscles are very similar to those of the enzyme from rat liver. Glycerol kinase from locust flight muscle was inhibited competitively by l-3-glycerophosphate with a K(i) of 4.0x10(-4)m. 2. The activity of glycerol kinase was measured in a variety of muscles from vertebrates and invertebrates in an attempt to explain the large variation in the activity of this enzyme in different muscles. 3. In vertebrates glycerol kinase activities were generally higher in red muscle than in white muscle; the highest activities (approx. 0.2mumole/min./g. fresh wt.) were found in the red breast muscle of some birds (e.g. pigeon, duck, blue tit) whereas the activities in the white breast muscle of the pheasant and domestic fowl were very low (approx. 0.02mumole/min./g.). 4. On the basis of glycerol kinase activities, muscles from insects can be classified into three groups: muscles that have a low enzyme activity, i.e. muscles of all insects studied and the flight muscles of cockroaches and the tsetse fly); muscles that have an intermediate enzyme activity, i.e. 0.3-1.5mumoles/min./g. (e.g. locusts, cockchafers, moths, water-bugs); and muscles that have a high enzyme activity, i.e. >1.5mumoles/min./g. (e.g. bees, wasps, some blowflies). 5. The function of glycerol kinase in vertebrate and insect muscles that possess a low or intermediate activity is considered to be the removal of glycerol that is produced from lipolysis of triglyceride or diglyceride by the muscle. Therefore in these muscles the activity of glycerol kinase is related to the metabolism of fat, which is used to support sustained muscular activity. A possible regulatory role of glycerol kinase in the initiation of triglyceride or diglyceride lipolysis is discussed. 6. The function of glycerol kinase in the insect muscles that possess a high

  12. Muscle spindles in the human bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peikert, Kevin; May, Christian Albrecht

    2015-07-01

    Muscle spindles are crucial for neuronal regulation of striated muscles, but their presence and involvement in the superficial perineal muscles is not known. Bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscle specimens were obtained from 31 human cadavers. Serial sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Sirius red, antibodies against Podocalyxin, myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC-slow tonic, S46; MyHC-2a/2x, A4.74), and neurofilament for the purpose of muscle spindle screening, counting, and characterization. A low but consistent number of spindles were detected in both muscles. The muscles contained few intrafusal fibers, but otherwise showed normal spindle morphology. The extrafusal fibers of both muscles were small in diameter. The presence of muscle spindles in bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles supports physiological models of pelvic floor regulation and may provide a basis for further clinical observations regarding sexual function and micturition. The small number of muscle spindles points to a minor level of proprioceptive regulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nerve-muscle interactions during flight muscle development in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J. J.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    During Drosophila pupal metamorphosis, the motoneurons and muscles differentiate synchronously, providing an opportunity for extensive intercellular regulation during synapse formation. We examined the existence of such interactions by developmentally delaying or permanently eliminating synaptic partners during the formation of indirect flight muscles. When we experimentally delayed muscle development, we found that although adult-specific primary motoneuron branching still occurred, the higher order (synaptic) branching was suspended until the delayed muscle fibers reached a favourable developmental state. In reciprocal experiments we found that denervation caused a decrease in the myoblast pool. Furthermore, the formation of certain muscle fibers (dorsoventral muscles) was specifically blocked. Exceptions were the adult muscles that use larval muscle fibers as myoblast fusion targets (dorsal longitudinal muscles). However, when these muscles were experimentally compelled to develop without their larval precursors, they showed an absolute dependence on the motoneurons for their formation. These data show that the size of the myoblast pool and early events in fiber formation depend on the presence of the nerve, and that, conversely, peripheral arbor development and synaptogenesis is closely synchronized with the developmental state of the muscle.

  14. The scaling of postcranial muscles in cats (Felidae) II: hindlimb and lumbosacral muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Andrew R; Sparkes, Emily L; Randau, Marcela; Pierce, Stephanie E; Kitchener, Andrew C; Goswami, Anjali; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-07-01

    relatively weaker hindlimb and lumbosacral muscles in general. This decrease in power may be reflected in relative decreases in running speeds and is consistent with prevailing evidence that behavioural changes may be the primary mode of compensation for a consistently crouched limb posture in larger cats.

  15. Muscle growth and poultry meat quality issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracci, Massimiliano; Cavani, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 50 years the worldwide growing demand of poultry meat has resulted in pressure on breeders, nutritionists and growers to increase the growth rate of birds, feed efficiency, size of breast muscle and reduction in abdominal fatness. Moreover, the shift toward further processed products has emphasized the necessity for higher standards in poultry meat to improve sensory characteristics and functional properties. It is believed that genetic progress has put more stress on the growing bird and it has resulted in histological and biochemical modifications of the muscle tissue by impairing some meat quality traits. The most current poultry meat quality concerns are associated with deep pectoral muscle disease and white striping which impair product appearance, and increased occurrence of problems related with the meat's poor ability to hold water during processing and storage (PSE-like condition) as well as poor toughness and cohesiveness related to immaturity of intramuscular connective tissue. This paper is aimed at making a general statement of recent studies focusing on the relationship between muscle growth and meat quality issues in poultry.

  16. Muscle Growth and Poultry Meat Quality Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Petracci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years the worldwide growing demand of poultry meat has resulted in pressure on breeders, nutritionists and growers to increase the growth rate of birds, feed efficiency, size of breast muscle and reduction in abdominal fatness. Moreover, the shift toward further processed products has emphasized the necessity for higher standards in poultry meat to improve sensory characteristics and functional properties. It is believed that genetic progress has put more stress on the growing bird and it has resulted in histological and biochemical modifications of the muscle tissue by impairing some meat quality traits. The most current poultry meat quality concerns are associated with deep pectoral muscle disease and white striping which impair product appearance, and increased occurrence of problems related with the meat’s poor ability to hold water during processing and storage (PSE-like condition as well as poor toughness and cohesiveness related to immaturity of intramuscular connective tissue. This paper is aimed at making a general statement of recent studies focusing on the relationship between muscle growth and meat quality issues in poultry.

  17. Muscle Growth and Poultry Meat Quality Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracci, Massimiliano; Cavani, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 50 years the worldwide growing demand of poultry meat has resulted in pressure on breeders, nutritionists and growers to increase the growth rate of birds, feed efficiency, size of breast muscle and reduction in abdominal fatness. Moreover, the shift toward further processed products has emphasized the necessity for higher standards in poultry meat to improve sensory characteristics and functional properties. It is believed that genetic progress has put more stress on the growing bird and it has resulted in histological and biochemical modifications of the muscle tissue by impairing some meat quality traits. The most current poultry meat quality concerns are associated with deep pectoral muscle disease and white striping which impair product appearance, and increased occurrence of problems related with the meat’s poor ability to hold water during processing and storage (PSE-like condition) as well as poor toughness and cohesiveness related to immaturity of intramuscular connective tissue. This paper is aimed at making a general statement of recent studies focusing on the relationship between muscle growth and meat quality issues in poultry. PMID:22347614

  18. Ultrasonographic evaluation of normal canine iliopsoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Matthew S; Puchalski, Sarah M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the normal ultrasonographic appearance of the iliopsoas muscle and related landmarks. Hind limbs of five dog cadavers with no history of lameness were evaluated. The origin and mid-body of the psoas major and the common insertion of the iliacus and psoas major on the lesser trochanter of the femur were identified and evaluated. New methylene blue was injected under ultrasonographic guidance at the three sites. Dissection was performed to confirm placement of the dye. The L3 origin, mid-body, and insertion of the muscle were identified in all dogs and were consistent in appearance and compatible with the general appearance of muscle and tendons. The L2 origin was consistently difficult to image. The same ultrasound technique was subsequently applied to four healthy dogs, and consistent images of the iliopsoas muscle and associated landmarks were obtained. In this study, the major structures of the iliopsoas could be identified and in all dogs had a similar appearance. Ultrasound is an important tool for the diagnosis of musculotendinous injury and may be useful for identification of ilipsoas injury as a cause of lameness in the dog.

  19. Relationship between cortisone and muscle work in determining muscle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A. L.; Goodman, H. M.

    1969-01-01

    1. Large doses of cortisone caused marked atrophy of the plantaris muscle and other pale muscles of hind limbs of hypophysectomized rats, but hormone treatment had little effect on the size of the red soleus muscle. 2. Denervation increased the sensitivity of the soleus and plantaris to the catabolic effects of cortisone. 3. Increased work induced by tenotomy of the synergistic gastrocnemius made the plantaris muscle less sensitive to cortisone-induced atrophy. 4. Since the catabolic effects of cortisone are more pronounced in the less active muscles, it is suggested that in mobilizing body protein for gluconeogenesis the hormone spares those muscles physiologically most active. 5. The rapidity with which muscles lose weight in response to cortisone indicates that the hormone must decrease protein half-lives as well as decrease protein synthesis. PMID:5765854

  20. Muscle biopsy as a tool in the study of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggan, A R

    1995-11-01

    The needle biopsy procedure provides a minimally invasive means of obtaining small samples of skeletal muscle from human volunteers. Such samples can be used to examine a variety of structural and functional characteristics of muscle, including fiber type and size, capillarization, enzymatic capacities, energy substrate or protein/mRNA concentrations, metabolic responses, and contractile properties. In conjunction with other methods, biopsy sampling can also be used to estimate total muscle mass and fiber number, and to determine rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Optimal handling and storage conditions vary widely, but in general, most of the above measurements can be made using frozen tissue, so that samples can be stored almost indefinitely. The procedure is also safe and generally well-tolerated, making it possible to perform longitudinal studies of the same person. The biopsy technique is therefore well suited for examining the underlying physiological mechanisms responsible for muscle wasting in the elderly, as well as for assessing the effects of nutritional, hormonal, and/or lifestyle (e.g., exercise) interventions intended to combat this problem. Although sample size limitations have been largely overcome by the development of microtechniques, more information is needed on how to minimize the variability introduced by studying only a small fraction of the whole muscle. Studies are also required to determine whether it is sufficient to biopsy only one muscle (and if so, which is optimal), or whether there are differential effects of aging in various muscle groups that would preclude extrapolating from one muscle to all muscles in the body.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect.

  2. Awareness under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Petra; Rundshagen, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Awareness while under general anesthesia, and the later recall of what happened during surgery, can be experienced by patients as horrific events that leave lasting mental trauma behind. Patients may have both auditory and tactile perception, potentially accompanied by feelings of helplessness, inability to move, pain, and panic ranging to an acute fear of death. For some patients, the experience of awareness under anesthesia has no sequelae; for others, however, it can lead to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder, consisting of complex psychopathological phenomena such as anxiety, insomnia, nightmares, irritability, and depression possibly leading to suicidality. The literature on the subject was selectively reviewed. In the absence of risk factors awareness phenomena occur in one to two per 1000 operations under general anesthesia (0.1% to 0.2%) and are thus classed as an occasionally occurring critical event. In children, the risk of such phenomena occurring is 8 to 10 times higher. These phenomena are due to an inadequate depth of anesthesia with incomplete unconsciousness. They can be promoted by a number of risk factors that are either patient-related (ASA class III or above, medication abuse), surgery-related (Caesarean section, emergency procedures, surgery at night), or anesthesia-related (anesthesia without benzodiazepines, use of muscle relaxants). Strategies for avoiding awareness phenomena under anesthesia include the training of staff to know about the problem and, specifically, the use of benzodiazepines, the avoidance of muscle relaxants if possible, and shielding the patient from excessive noise. EEG monitoring is effective but provides no guarantee against awareness. If awareness under anesthesia occurs despite these measures, the patient must be given expert, interdisciplinary treatment as soon after the event as possible in order to minimize its potential sequelae.

  3. Influence of muscle length on muscle atrophy in the mouse tibialis anterior and soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoto; Fujimoto, Taro; Tasaki, Hiromitsu; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Matsubara, Takako; Miki, Akinori

    2009-02-01

    The tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were fixed at the stretched or shortened positions to examine the influence of muscle length on muscle atrophy. Mice were divided into control (C), hindlimb suspension (HS), hindlimb suspension with ankle joint fixation at the maximum dorsiflexion (HSD), and hindlimb suspension with ankle joint fixation at the maximum plantarflexion (HSP). During the hindlimb suspension, the length of these muscles in the HS and HSP groups was very similar. Fourteen days after the hindlimb suspension, the atrophy of the tibialis anterior muscle in the HS and HSP groups was evidently milder than that in the HSD group, and that in the HS and HSP groups was very similar, suggesting that atrophy of the tibialis anterior muscle might largely depend on muscle length. Atrophy of the soleus muscle in the HSD group was milder than that in the HS and HSP groups, indicating that atrophy of the soleus muscle might also depend on muscle length. But atrophy of this muscle in the HSP group was milder than that in the HS group. These results demonstrate that some factors induced by the joint immobilization might be effective in preventing atrophy of the soleus muscle.

  4. Muscle glycogen stores and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan; Nielsen, Joachim

    2013-01-01

      Studies performed at the beginning of the last century revealed the importance of carbohydrate as a fuel during exercise, and the importance of muscle glycogen on performance has subsequently been confirmed in numerous studies. However, the link between glycogen depletion and impaired muscle...... function during fatigue is not well understood and a direct cause-and-effect relationship between glycogen and muscle function remains to be established. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not homogeneously distributed in skeletal muscle fibres, but rather localized in distinct...... pools being of key importance for SR Ca2+ release and thereby affecting muscle contractility and fatigability....

  5. Iliopsoas muscle injury in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabon, Quentin; Bolliger, Christian

    2013-05-01

    The iliopsoas muscle is formed by the psoas major and iliacus muscles. Due to its length and diameter, the iliopsoas muscle is an important flexor and stabilizer of the hip joint and the vertebral column. Traumatic acute and chronic myopathies of the iliopsoas muscle are commonly diagnosed by digital palpation during the orthopedic examination. Clinical presentations range from gait abnormalities, lameness, and decreased hip joint extension to irreversible fibrotic contracture of the muscle. Rehabilitation of canine patients has to take into account the inciting cause, the severity of pathology and the presence of muscular imbalances.

  6. Grb2-associated binder-1 is required for extrafusal and intrafusal muscle fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Y; Jang, So Y; Shin, Yoon K; Yoon, Byeol A; Lee, Hye J; Park, Hwan T

    2017-07-05

    The neuregulin-1 (NRG1) signaling pathway plays an important role in the development of the peripheral neuromuscular system, including in muscle spindle and postnatal myelination. We previously showed that NRG1 on the axonal membrane regulates peripheral nerve myelination through Grb2-associated binder 1 (Gab1), a scaffolding mediator of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Here, we determined the role of Gab1 in the development of muscles and the muscle spindle using muscle-specific conditional Gab1 knockout mice. The mutant mice showed general retardation in muscular growth and hypotrophy of extrafusal muscle fibers. In addition, the muscle-specific Gab1 knockout mutant exhibited significant underdevelopment of muscle spindles, which are normally regulated by NRG1, and abnormal proprioceptive behavior. Furthermore, the selective knockdown of Gab1 in C2C12 muscle cells reduced NRG1-induced expression of Egr3, a critical transcription factor for muscle spindle development. However, Gab2 knockout mice did not show any defects in the development of muscles or muscle spindles. Our findings suggest that Gab1 is an essential signaling molecule in mediating axonal NRG1 signaling for the development of both extrafusal and intrafusal muscle fibers.

  7. Generalized polygons

    CERN Document Server

    Van Maldeghem, Hendrik

    1998-01-01

    Generalized Polygons is the first book to cover, in a coherent manner, the theory of polygons from scratch. In particular, it fills elementary gaps in the literature and gives an up-to-date account of current research in this area, including most proofs, which are often unified and streamlined in comparison to the versions generally known. Generalized Polygons will be welcomed both by the student seeking an introduction to the subject as well as the researcher who will value the work as a reference. In particular, it will be of great value for specialists working in the field of generalized polygons (which are, incidentally, the rank 2 Tits-buildings) or in fields directly related to Tits-buildings, incidence geometry and finite geometry. The approach taken in the book is of geometric nature, but algebraic results are included and proven (in a geometric way!). A noteworthy feature is that the book unifies and generalizes notions, definitions and results that exist for quadrangles, hexagons, octagons - in the ...

  8. Intramuscular architecture of the autochthonous back muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Heiko; Fröber, Rosemarie; Schilling, Nadja

    2013-02-01

    Many training concepts take muscle properties such as contraction speed or muscle topography into account to achieve an optimal training outcome. Thus far, the internal architecture of muscles has largely been neglected, although it is well known that parameters such as pennation angles or the lengths of fascicles but also the proportions of fleshy and tendinous fascicle parts have a major impact on the contraction behaviour of a muscle. Here, we present the most detailed description of the intramuscular fascicle architecture of the human perivertebral muscles available so far. For this, one adult male cadaver was studied. Our general approach was to digitize the geometry of each fascicle of the muscles of back proper (Erector spinae) - the Spinalis thoracis, Iliocostalis lumborum, Longissimus thoracis and the Multifidus thoracis et lumborum - and of the deep muscles of the abdomen - Psoas minor, Psoas major and Quadratus lumborum - during a layerwise dissection. Architectural parameters such as fascicle angles to the sagittal and the frontal planes as well as fascicle lengths were determined for each fascicle, and are discussed regarding their consequences for the function of the muscle. For example, compared with the other dorsovertebral muscles, the Longissimus thoracis can produce greater shortening distances because of its relatively long fleshy portions, and it can store more elastic energy due to both its relatively long fleshy and tendinous fascicle portions. The Quadratus lumborum was outstanding because of its many architectural subunits defined by distinct attachment sites and fascicle lengths. The presented database will improve biomechanical models of the human trunk by allowing the incorporation of anisotropic muscle properties such as the fascicle direction into finite element models. This information will help to increase our understanding of the functionality of the human back musculature, and may thereby improve future training concepts.

  9. Generalized derivations and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, M; Pysiak, L; Sasin, W

    2013-01-01

    We construct differential geometry (connection, curvature, etc.) based on generalized derivations of an algebra A. Such a derivation, introduced by Bresar in 1991, is given by a linear mapping u: A -> A such that there exists a usual derivation d of A satisfying the generalized Leibniz rule u(a b) = u(a) b + a d(b) for all a,b in A. The generalized geometry "is tested" in the case of the algebra of smooth functions on a manifold. We then apply this machinery to study the generalized general relativity. We define the Einstein-Hilbert action and deduce from it Einstein's field equations. We show that for a special class of metrics containing, besides the usual metric components, only one non-zero term, the action reduces to O'Hanlon action that is a Brans-Dicke action with potential and with the parameter \\omega equal to zero. We also show that the generalized Einstein equations (with zero energy-stress tensor) are equivalent to those of the Kaluza-Klein theory satisfying a "modified cylinder condition" and hav...

  10. GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Florenzano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available General equilibrium is a central concept of economic theory. Unlike partial equilibrium analysis which study the equilibrium of a particular market under the clause “ceteris paribus” that revenues and prices on the other markets stay approximately unaffected, the ambition of a general equilibrium model is to analyze the simultaneous equilibrium in all markets of a competitive economy. Definition of the abstract model, some of its basic results and insights are presented. The important issues of uniqueness and local uniqueness of equilibrium are sketched; they are the condition for a predictive power of the theory and its ability to allow for statics comparisons. Finally, we review the main extensions of the general equilibrium model. Besides the natural extensions to infinitely many commodities and to a continuum of agents, some examples show how economic theory can accommodate the main ideas in order to study some contexts which were not thought of by the initial model

  11. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  12. Use It or Lose It: Skeletal Muscle Function and Performance Results from Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program provided a wealth of valuable information regarding the adaptations of skeletal muscle to weightlessness. Studies conducted during the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) represented ground breaking work on the effects of spaceflight on muscle form and function from applied human research to cellular adaptations. Results from detailed supplementary objective (DSO) 477 demonstrated that muscle strength losses could occur rapidly in response to short-duration spaceflight. The effects of spaceflight-induced unloading were primarily restricted to postural muscles such as those of the back as well as the knee extensors. DSO 606 provided evidence from MRI that the observed strength losses were partially accounted for by a reduction in the size of the individual muscles. Muscle biopsy studies conducted during DSO 475 were able to show muscle atrophy in individual muscle fibers from the quadriceps muscles. Reduced quadriceps muscle size and strength was also observed during the 17-d Life and Microgravity Spacelab mission aboard STS-78. Multiple maximal strength tests were conducted in flight on the calf muscles and it has been hypothesized that these high force contractions may have acted as a countermeasure. Muscle fiber mechanics were studied on calf muscle samples pre- and postflight. While some responses were crewmember specific, the general trend was that muscle fiber force production dropped and shortening velocity increased. The increased shortening velocity helped to maintain muscle fiber power. Numerous rodent studies performed during Shuttle missions suggest that many of the effects reported in Shuttle crewmembers could be due to lesions in the cellular signaling pathways that stimulate protein synthesis as well as an increase in the mechanisms that up-regulate protein breakdown. The results have important implications regarding the overall health and performance capabilities of future crewmembers that will venture beyond

  13. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Canuto, V

    2015-01-01

    This is an English translation of the Italian version of an encyclopedia chapter that appeared in the Italian Encyclopedia of the Physical Sciences, edited by Bruno Bertotti (1994). Following requests from colleagues we have decided to make it available to a more general readership. We present the motivation for constructing General Relativity, provide a short discussion of tensor algebra, and follow the set up of Einstein equations. We discuss briefly the initial value problem, the linear approximation and how should non gravitational physics be described in curved spacetime.

  14. 肌松闭环注射系统联合听觉诱发电位指数在老年人全身麻醉中的应用研究%The application research in the close-loop muscle relaxant injection system combined with auditory evoked potentials index for monitoring in elderly patients during general anesthesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜建龙; 吴纯西; 孙翼; 刘俊

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察肌松闭环注射系统(CLMRIS)联合听觉诱发电位指数监测在老年人全身麻醉中的临床效果及安全性. 方法 选取我院2012年2月至2012年10月期间收治的美国麻醉医师协会(ASA)Ⅰ~Ⅱ级腹部手术麻醉老年患者100例.随机将其分为两组,经验组和CLMRIS组,每组50例.经验组根据麻醉师临床经验判断用药实施麻醉;CLMRIS组依据肌松闭环注射系统指导肌松药使用.在入室、诱导即刻、插管、切皮、进腹、探查、关腹、缝皮、意识恢复、气管拔管、出室11个时间点(T0~T10),观察记录听觉诱发电位指数及各项生命指标;记录肌松药总量、诱导苏醒时间、术中体动反应率;不良反应. 结果 所有患者生命体征均平稳,经验组T8~T10各时点RR最低(P<0.05).组内与T0~T1比较,T8~T10各时点平均动脉压、心率未见升高(P>0.05).CLMRIS组插管时间为(268±30.4)min、拔管时间为(14±6.4)min,经验组插管时间为(172±23.7)min、拔管时间为(18±7.9)min,CLMRIS组均短于经验组(t=3.277,6.341.P<0.05); CLMRIS组苏醒时间(8.8±2.9)min较经验组(12.2±4.6)min时间短(t=3.346,P<0.05);两组基础值比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),意识消失时差异明显,CLMRIS组优于经验组. 结论 肌松闭环注射系统的应用提高了老年人全身麻醉安全性,可减少术后残余肌松的发生率,同时配合听觉诱发电位监测麻醉深度,防止及减少了术中知晓的发生率,使老年人全身麻醉可控性强,麻醉诱导平稳,达到减少麻醉药物达到最佳麻醉效果.%Objective To observe the clinical efficacy and safety of close-loop muscle relaxant injcction system (CLMRIS) combined with auditory evoked potentials index for monitoring in elderly patients during general anesthesia.Methods A total of 100 patients undergong abdominal operation with ASA Ⅰ-Ⅱ anesthesia in our hospital from February 2012 to October 2012 were selected

  15. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects.

  16. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  17. Acquired muscle contractures in the dog and cat. A review of the literature and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J; Tangner, C H

    2007-01-01

    Canine and feline muscle contracture is reported to affect several different muscles, is associated with a number of predisposing factors, and a varying prognosis depending upon which muscle is affected. Most patients suffer some form of trauma weeks to months before the contracture is present. The clinical signs include: lameness, pain, weakness, decreased range of motion, a firmness noted throughout the entire muscle, and usually a characteristic gait. Pre-disposing factors for muscle contracture include: compartment syndrome, infection, trauma, repetitive strains, fractures, infectious diseases, immune-mediated diseases, neoplasia, and ischaemia. There does appear to be some breed and age predilection, however, the sex of the animal does not have an appreciable influence. In general, muscle contractures of the forelimb respond better to treatment and carry a better prognosis than muscle contractures of the hindlimb.

  18. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  19. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  20. Generalized Parabolas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dan; Hartman, Gregory; Gibson, Caleb

    2011-01-01

    In this article we explore the consequences of modifying the common definition of a parabola by considering the locus of all points equidistant from a focus and (not necessarily linear) directrix. The resulting derived curves, which we call "generalized parabolas," are often quite beautiful and possess many interesting properties. We show that…

  1. General discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagers op Akkerhuis, Gerard A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The general discussion focuses on some aspects that are of overarching relevance for all the preceding chapters. The fi rst subject that is discussed is the relationship between systems theory and the philosophy of science. After a short summary of the principles of system science and the

  2. Generale preventie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1949-01-01

    In part I of this study a survey has veen given of what Dutch authors have written since 1870, when capital punishment was abolished, on subjects concerning the general preventive effect of punishment. This historical survey ends where, during the years 1940-1945, under the stress of the occupation

  3. Dismorfia muscular Muscle dysmorphia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Seleri Marques Assunção

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Preocupações mórbidas com a imagem corporal eram tidas até recentemente como problemas eminentemente femininos. Atualmente estas preocupações também têm sido encontradas no sexo masculino. A dismorfia muscular é um subtipo do transtorno dismórfico corporal que ocorre principalmente em homens que, apesar da grande hipertrofia muscular, consideram-se pequenos e fracos. Além de estar associada a prejuízos sociais, ocupacionais, recreativos e em outras áreas do funcionamento do indivíduo, a dismorfia muscular é também um fator de risco para o abuso de esteróides anabolizantes. Este artigo aborda aspectos epidemiológicos, etiológicos e padrões clínicos da dismorfia muscular, além de tecer comentários sobre estratégias de tratamento para este transtorno.Morbid concern over body image was considered, until recently, a female issue. Nowadays, it has been viewed as a common male disorder. Muscle dysmorphia, a subtype of a body dysmorphic disorder, affects men who, despite having clear muscular hypertroph,y see themselves as frail and small. Besides being associated to major social, leisure and occupational dysfunction, muscle dysmorphia is also a risk factor for the abuse of steroids. This article describes epidemiological, etiological and clinical characteristics of muscle dysmorphia and comments on its treatment strategy.

  4. Creating an Artificial Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Katherine; Krause, Sonja

    1997-03-01

    Striated skeletal muscle responds to a nerve impulse in less than 100 ms. In the past, polymeric gels and conducting polymers have been investigated for use as artificial muscle. However, the main problem with these materials is their relatively slow response (>3 seconds). On the other hand, electrorheological (ER) fluids are materials that change from a liquid to a solid upon application of an electric field. These fluids have a response on the order of a millisecond. A novel approach to artificial muscle utilizing the fast time response of ER fluids and the elasticity of polymeric gels has been investigated. A commercial sample of a two-part poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) dielectric gel was used. The PDMS was cured around two flexible electrodes 5 mm apart while a mixture of PDMS with solvent was cured between the electrodes. The solvents were either silicone oil or an ER fluid composed of crosslinked poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) particles in silicone oil. The mixtures investigated were 90/10, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60, 10/90 PDMS/solvent. Upon application of a 6.2 kV/cm DC electric field the gel was reversibly compressed. The time response of the gel was actuator has been created using the 60/40 PDMS/ER fluid mixture.

  5. Preliminary observations on the microarchitecture of the human abdominal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Stephanie J; Duxson, Marilyn J; Mercer, Susan R

    2007-10-01

    Precise knowledge of muscle architecture and innervation patterns is essential for the development of accurate clinical and biomechanical models. Although the gross anatomy of the human abdominal muscles has been investigated, the finer details of their microanatomy are not well described. Fascicles were systematically sampled from each of the human abdominal muscles, and small fiber bundles from selected fascicles stained with acetylcholinesterase to determine the location of motor endplate bands, myomyonal junctions, and myotendinous junctions. Statistical analysis was used to ascertain the association between fascicular length and number of endplate bands. The number of endplate bands along a fascicle was variable between different portions of each muscle, but was strongly correlated with fascicular length (r = 0.814). In fascicles less than 50 millimeters (mm) in length, only a single endplate band was generally present, while multiple endplate bands (usually two or three) were found in fascicles longer than 50 mm. The presence of myomyonal junctions throughout the longer (>50 mm) fascicles verified that they were composed of short, intrafascicularly terminating fibers, while shorter fascicles comprised fibers spanning the entire fascicular length. This preliminary study provides evidence that multiple endplate bands are contained in some regions of the abdominal muscles, an arrangement that differs from most human appendicular muscles. It is not clear whether the variations in the described fine architectural features reflect regional differences in muscle function.

  6. Descending control of muscles in patients with cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijssen, Marina A J; Münchau, Alex; Marsden, John F; Lees, Andrew; Bhatia, Kailash P; Brown, Peter

    2002-05-01

    It was reported recently that specific features in the frequency analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and splenius (SPL) muscles were able to distinguish between rotational idiopathic cervical dystonia (CD) and voluntary torticollis in individual subjects. Those with CD showed an abnormal drive to muscles at 5 to 7 Hz and an absence of the normal 10 to 12 Hz peak in the autospectrum of SPL. We sought to determine whether the same abnormalities in the frequency domain are found in complex CD, in which the head is displaced in more than two planes. EMG activity was recorded in the SCM, SPL, trapezius, and levator scapulae muscles bilaterally in 10 patients with complex CD. Frequency analysis of EMG was compared with conventional clinical and polymyographic assessment. The autospectrum of SPL during free dystonic contraction showed an absence of a significant peak at 10 to 12 Hz in 8 of the 10 patients. The presence of a 5 to 7 Hz frequency drive showed a significant association with muscle pairs determined as dystonic by means of polymyography (P analysis correlated, suggesting that a low-frequency drive to neck muscle may be a general feature of simple rotational and more complex cervical dystonia. The pattern of coherence between the EMG in different neck muscles may provide a means of identifying leading dystonic muscles, especially in patients with complex cervical dystonia.

  7. Changes in skeletal muscle gene expression following clenbuterol administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Lauren M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists (BA induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy, yet specific mechanisms that lead to this effect are not well understood. The objective of this research was to identify novel genes and physiological pathways that potentially facilitate BA induced skeletal muscle growth. The Affymetrix platform was utilized to identify gene expression changes in mouse skeletal muscle 24 hours and 10 days after administration of the BA clenbuterol. Results Administration of clenbuterol stimulated anabolic activity, as indicated by decreased blood urea nitrogen (BUN; P P Conclusion Global evaluation of gene expression after administration of clenbuterol identified changes in gene expression and overrepresented functional categories of genes that may regulate BA-induced muscle hypertrophy. Changes in mRNA abundance of multiple genes associated with myogenic differentiation may indicate an important effect of BA on proliferation, differentiation, and/or recruitment of satellite cells into muscle fibers to promote muscle hypertrophy. Increased mRNA abundance of genes involved in the initiation of translation suggests that increased levels of protein synthesis often associated with BA administration may result from a general up-regulation of translational initiators. Additionally, numerous other genes and physiological pathways were identified that will be important targets for further investigations of the hypertrophic effect of BA on skeletal muscle.

  8. Effects of combined general anesthesia and thoracic epidural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-02

    Nov 2, 2015 ... general anesthesia could dampen stress response to surgical trauma and cause ... anesthetics or opioids, active infection, thoracic vertebra anomaly, and ... Intraoperative muscle relaxation was facilitated by vecuronium.

  9. Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lise A.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that can restore some degree of motor function in individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury or stroke. One way to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of muscle stimulation needed to elicit complex upper limb movements is to use electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from able-bodied subjects as a template for electrical stimulation. However, this requires a transfer function to convert the recorded (or predicted) EMG signals into an appropriate pattern of electrical stimulation. Here we develop a generalized transfer function that maps EMG activity into a stimulation pattern that modulates muscle output by varying both the pulse frequency and the pulse amplitude. We show that the stimulation patterns produced by this transfer function mimic the active state measured by EMG insofar as they reproduce with good fidelity the complex patterns of joint torque and joint displacement.

  10. Muscle-specific integrins in masseter muscle fibers of chimpanzees: an immunohistochemical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Vaccarino

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Most notably, recent comparative genomic analyses strongly indicate that the marked differences between modern human and chimpanzees are likely due more to changes in gene regulation than to modifications of the genes. The most peculiar aspect of hominoid karyotypes is that human have 46 chromosomes whereas gorillas and chimpanzees have 48. Interestingly, human and chimpanzees do share identical inversions on chromosome 7 and 9 that are not evident in the gorilla karyotype. Thus, the general phylogeny suggests that humans and chimpanzees are sister taxa; based on this, it seems that human-chimpanzee sequence similarity is an astonishing 99%. At this purpose, of particular interest is the inactivation of the myosin heavy chain 16 (MYH16 gene, most prominently expressed in the masticatory muscle of mammals. It has been showed that the loss of this gene in humans may have resulted in smaller masticatory muscle and consequential changes to cranio-facial morphology and expansion of the human brain case. Powerful masticatory muscles are found in most primates; contrarily, in both modern and fossil member Homo, these muscles are considerably smaller. The evolving hominid masticatory apparatus shifted towards a pattern of gracilization nearly simultaneously with accelerated encephalization in early Homo. To better comprehend the real role of the MYH16 gene, we studied the primary proteins present in the muscle fibers of humans and non-humans, in order to understand if they really can be influenced by MYH16 gene. At this aim we examined the muscle-specific integrins, alpha 7B and beta 1D-integrins, and their relative fetal isoforms, alpha 7A and beta 1A-integrins, analyzing, by immunohistochemistry, muscle biopsies of two components of a chimpanzee's group in captivity, an alpha male and a non-alpha male subjects; all these integrins participate in vital biological processes such as maintenance of tissue integrity, embryonic development, cell

  11. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  12. [Delayed post effort muscle soreness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudreuse, J M; Dupont, P; Nicol, C

    2004-08-01

    Muscle intolerance to exercise may result from different processes. Diagnosis involves confirming first the source of pain, then potential pathological myalgia. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), commonly referred as tiredness, occurs frequently in sport. DOMS usually develops 12-48 h after intensive and/or unusual eccentric muscle action. Symptoms usually involve the quadriceps muscle group but may also affect the hamstring and triceps surae groups. The muscles are sensitive to palpation, contraction and passive stretch. Acidosis, muscle spasm and microlesions in both connective and muscle tissues may explain the symptoms. However, inflammation appears to be the most common explanation. Interestingly, there is strong evidence that the progression of the exercise-induced muscle injury proceeds no further in the absence of inflammation. Even though unpleasant, DOMS should not be considered as an indicator of muscle damage but, rather, a sign of the regenerative process, which is well known to contribute to the increased muscle mass. DOMS can be associated with decreased proprioception and range of motion, as well as maximal force and activation. DOMS disappears 2-10 days before complete functional recovery. This painless period is ripe for additional joint injuries. Similarly, if some treatments are well known to attenuate DOMS, none has been demonstrated to accelerate either structural or functional recovery. In terms of the role of the inflammatory process, these treatments might even delay overall recovery.

  13. Biochemical and histochemical changes in energy supply enzyme pattern of muscles of the rat during old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, A; Gutmann, E; Hanzlíková, V

    1975-01-01

    Senile muscles of the rat (28-36 months) show loss of overall activity of glycolytic and aerobic enzymes. However, there is a differential loss and shift of enzyme activity pattern in the three types of muscles. The extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm show a decrease of ratios of glycolytic to aerobic-oxidative enzymes. This shift to a more oxidative type of metabolism is not observed in the soleus muscle. Decrease of enzyme activities is least marked in the diaphragm muscle. Biochemical analysis shows a trend to levelling out of metabolic differences between the different muscle types. This trend of 'dedifferentiation' is most marked when comparing EDL and soleus, least marked when comparing EDL and diaphragm muscle. The histochemical analysis shows a shift from the original mixed to a more uniform pattern of muscle fibres in the EDL and soleus muscle; this levelling-out of differences between enzymatic activities of different muscle fibres is not observed in the diaphragm muscle. Preferential atrophy and loss of ATPase activity in II muscle fibres in the soleus muscle and the occurrence of 'type grouping' are further characteristic features of senile muscle change. The findings show general (i.e. loss of enzyme activities) and differential trends of biochemical and histochemical enzyme changes in different types of muscles.

  14. NEW APPROACHES OF MUSCL SCHEMES FOR COMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The MUSCL scheme for compressible gas dynamics is studied in this paper. We propose a new type of Eulerian MUSCL scheme, which evaluates the intercell flux at half time step. The intercell flux is comptuted from characteristic equations with the data which traced back through the approximate characteristic from the edge at half time step. The data is classified in several different types, depending on the characteristic directions of data.We also present a general procedure of oscillation-free algorithm for the MUSCL scheme. This procedure provides a class of limiters which includes the existing limiter. The new MUSCL scheme and the oscillation-free algorithm are validated through simulations for test problems.``

  15. Relationship between Human Aging Muscle and Oxidative System Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Doria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a complex process that in muscle is usually associated with a decrease in mass, strength, and velocity of contraction. One of the most striking effects of ageing on muscle is known as sarcopenia. This inevitable biological process is characterized by a general decline in the physiological and biochemical functions of the major systems. At the cellular level, aging is caused by a progressive decline in mitochondrial function that results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by the addition of a single electron to the oxygen molecule. The aging process is characterized by an imbalance between an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species in the organism and the antioxidant defences as a whole. The goal of this review is to examine the results of existing studies on oxidative stress in aging human skeletal muscles, taking into account different physiological factors (sex, fibre composition, muscle type, and function.

  16. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans....... Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth...... factor beta (TGF-beta)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular...

  17. Skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during exercise: methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; González-Alonso, J; Sacchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    and metabolites may be both taken up and released by muscle at rest and during exercise, isotopes can be used to determine uptake and/or release and also fractional uptake can be accounted for. Furthermore, the use of isotopes opens up further possibilities for the estimation of oxidation rates of various......The aim of the present article is to evaluate critically the various methods employed in studies designed to quantify precisely skeletal muscle substrate utilization during exercise. In general, the pattern of substrate utilization during exercise can be described well from O2 uptake measurements...... and the respiratory exchange ratio. However, if the aim is to quantify limb or muscle metabolism, invasive measurements have to be carried out, such as the determination of blood flow, arterio-venous (a-v) difference measurements for O2 and relevant substrates, and biopsies of the active muscle. As many substrates...

  18. Reinnervation of Paralyzed Muscle by Nerve Muscle Endplate Band Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    reinnervation of paralyzed laryngeal and facial muscles11,12 as well as the extremities.8,10 However, further studies are needed to determine the...noninnervated endplates of the operated and unoperated SMmuscles in each rat were computed. The variables of the reinnervated SM muscles were expressed as...Brunelli G, Brunelli LM. Direct neurotization of severely damaged denervated muscles. Int Surg 1980;65(6):529–531 11 Hall SJ, Trachy RE, Cummings CW. Facial

  19. Painful Unilateral Temporalis Muscle Enlargement: Reactive Masticatory Muscle Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Katsetos, Christos D.; Bianchi, Michael A.; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptoma...

  20. Muscle power is an important measure to detect deficits in muscle function in hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, Theresa; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Christensen, Helle Elisabeth;

    2016-01-01

    : The symptomatic extremity in patients was significantly (p extremity for five hip muscles (8-17%), knee extensors (11%) and leg extensor power (19%). Healthy older adults had asymmetry in knee extensor strength (6%, p ... in patients, but had no asymmetry in leg extensor power. CONCLUSIONS: Patients had generalized weakening of the affected lower extremity and numerically the largest asymmetry was evident for leg extensor power. In contrast, healthy peers had no asymmetry in leg extensor power. These results indicate...... that exercise interventions focusing on improving leg extensor power of the symptomatic lower extremity and reducing asymmetry may be beneficial for patients with hip osteoarthritis. Implications for Rehabilitation Even in patients with mild symptoms not awaiting hip replacement a generalized muscle weakening...

  1. [General psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymetal, J

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays a theoretical psychotherapeutical thinking develops from the eclectic practice and uses particularly the research of the effective factors of the therapy. Best they can be characterized as differentiate, synthetic, integrative and exceeding other approaches. The development in question goes on with attempts of creating a general model of the psychotherapy that could be a basis for models of special psychotherapies. The aim of such a model is to describe all that is present as important factor for inducing a desirable change of a human in all psychotherapeutical approaches. Among general models we can mention the generic model of D. E. Orlinski and K. I. Howard, Grawe's cube (the author is K. Grawe) and the equation of the psychotherapy.

  2. The effect of temperature on proliferation and differentiation of chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells isolated from different muscle types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Rachel L; Halevy, Orna; Yahav, Shlomo; Velleman, Sandra G

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are a muscle stem cell population that mediate posthatch muscle growth and repair. Satellite cells respond differentially to environmental stimuli based upon their fiber-type of origin. The objective of this study was to determine how temperatures below and above the in vitro control of 38°C affected the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells isolated from the chicken anaerobic pectoralis major (p. major) or mixed fiber biceps femoris (b.femoris) muscles. The satellite cells isolated from the p. major muscle were more sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures compared to the b.femoris satellite cells during both proliferation and differentiation. The expressions of myogenic regulatory transcription factors were also different between satellite cells from different fiber types. MyoD expression, which partially regulates proliferation, was generally expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells compared to the b.femoris satellite cells from 33 to 43°C during proliferation and differentiation. Similarly, myogenin expression, which is required for differentiation, was also expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells in response to both cold and hot temperatures during proliferation and differentiation than b. femoris satellite cells. These data demonstrate that satellite cells from the anaerobic p. major muscle are more sensitive than satellite cells from the aerobic b. femoris muscle to both hot and cold thermal stress during myogenic proliferation and differentiation.

  3. General Anesthesia for a Patient With Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kamekura, Nobuhito; Nitta, Yukie; Takuma, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful management of general anesthesia for a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is one of a group of progressive, degenerative disorders of the cerebral white matter. The typical clinical manifestations of PMD include psychomotor retardation, nystagmus, abnormal muscle tone, seizures, and cognitive impairment. General anesthesia for a patient with PMD may be difficult mainly because of seizures and airway complications related to poor pharyngeal muscle con...

  4. Generalized polygons

    CERN Document Server

    Maldeghem, Hendrik

    1998-01-01

    This book is intended to be an introduction to the fascinating theory ofgeneralized polygons for both the graduate student and the specialized researcher in the field. It gathers together a lot of basic properties (some of which are usually referred to in research papers as belonging to folklore) and very recent and sometimes deep results. I have chosen a fairly strict geometrical approach, which requires some knowledge of basic projective geometry. Yet, it enables one to prove some typically group-theoretical results such as the determination of the automorphism groups of certain Moufang polygons. As such, some basic group-theoretical knowledge is required of the reader. The notion of a generalized polygon is a relatively recent one. But it is one of the most important concepts in incidence geometry. Generalized polygons are the building bricks of Tits buildings. They are the prototypes and precursors of more general geometries such as partial geometries, partial quadrangles, semi-partial ge­ ometries, near...

  5. Muscle as a secretory organ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many...... evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists...... proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise....

  6. PDH regulation in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian

    is determined by the overall content / activity of the regulatory proteins PDH kinase (PDK), of which there are 4 isoforms, and PDH phosphatase (PDP), of which there are 2 isoforms. The overall aim of the PhD project was to elucidate 4 issues. 1: Role of muscle type in resting and exercise-induced PDH...... in arm than leg muscles during exercise in humans may be the result of lower PDH-E1? content and not a muscle type dependent difference in PDH regulation. Both low muscle glycogen and increased plasma FFA are associated with upregulation of PDK4 protein and less exercise-induced increase in PDHa activity...... in human skeletal muscle. It may be noted that the increased PDK4 protein associated with elevated plasma FFA occurs already 2 hours after different dietary intake. A week of physical inactivity (bed rest), leading to whole body glucose intolerance, does not affect muscle PDH-E1? content, or the exercise...

  7. Muscle dysfunction in male hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A K; Katiyar, B C; Misra, S; Thacker, A K; Singh, N K

    1986-05-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive male patients with primary and secondary hypogonadism (14 each) were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically for muscle dysfunction. Although generalised muscle weakness was initially reported by only 9 patients, on direct questioning, it was recorded in 19. Objective weakness was found in 13 patients and it involved both the proximal and distal limb muscles. Quantitative electromyography showed evidence of myopathy in the proximal muscle in 25 patients, i.e., reduced MUP duration and amplitude with increased polyphasia in the deltoid and the gluteus maximus. There were no denervation potentials. None of the patients showed clinical neuropathy or NCV abnormalities. Thus, the profile of muscle involvement in hypogonadism closely simulates limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and other endocrine myopathies. The incidence of muscle involvement was higher in secondary hypogonadism. Diminished androgens in primary hypogonadism and diminished growth hormone in the secondary hypogonadism are probably responsible for the myopathy.

  8. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle aging and sarcopenia and effects of electrical stimulation in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Barberi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers, alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors.

  9. A Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Skeletal Muscle During Hindlimb Unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Laura; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    During hindlimb unloading (HU) dramatic fluid shifts occur within minutes of the suspension, leading to a less precise matching of blood flow to O2 demands of skeletal muscle. Vascular resistance directs blood away from certain muscles, such as the soleus (SOL). The muscle volume gradually reduces in these muscles so that eventually the relative blood flow returns to normal. It is generally believed that muscle volume change is not due to O2 depletion, but a consequence of disuse. However, the volume of the unloaded rat muscle declines over the course of weeks, whereas the redistribution of blood flow occurs immediately. Using a Krogh Cylinder Model, the distribution of O2 was predicted in two skeletal muscles: SOL and gastrocnemius (GAS). Effects of the muscle blood flow, volume, capillary density, and O2 uptake, are included to calculate the pO2 at rest and after 10 min and 15 days of unloading. The model predicts that 32 percent of the SOL muscle tissue has a pO2 1.25 mm Hg within 10 min, whereas the GAS maintains normal O2 levels, and that equilibrium is reached only as the SOL muscle cells degenerate. The results provide evidence that there is an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria in the SOL muscle after 10 min HU.

  10. Importance of sarcomere length when determining muscle physiological cross-sectional area: a spine example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen H M; Gerling, Michael E

    2012-05-01

    Muscle physiological cross-sectional area predicts the maximum capability of a muscle to generate isometric force. Biomechanical models often use estimates of individual muscle physiological cross-sectional area to partition internal forces among different muscles and predict joint forces and stability. In the spine literature, these physiological cross-sectional area values are generally obtained from imaging or cadaveric studies that have not accounted for a potential lengthened or shortened (and thus thinned or thickened, respectively) state of the muscles in question. Sarcomere length measurements can be used to normalize muscle lengths and correct for these length discrepancies. This article was designed to demonstrate potential effects of not accounting for instantaneous sarcomere length when calculating the physiological cross-sectional area of muscles of the spine region. Because some muscles of the spine region appear to be shortened and others lengthened in the neutral spine posture, both over- and under-estimations of physiological cross-sectional area are possible. Specifically, it is shown that the muscle physiological cross-sectional area could be over-estimated or under-estimated by as much as + 36% (multifidus) and -21% (rectus abdominis), respectively. This differential error effect poses difficulties in accurately estimating individual muscle forces and subsequent spine forces and stability that result from biomechanical models incorporating physiological cross-sectional area data obtained in the absence of sarcomere length measurements. Future work is needed to measure the dynamic range of sarcomere lengths of all spinal muscles to ensure correct inputs to biomechanical models.

  11. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Muscle Aging and Sarcopenia and Effects of Electrical Stimulation in Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Laura; Scicchitano, Bianca Maria; Musaro, Antonio

    2015-08-24

    The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers), alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors..

  12. [Myoma of the breast muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteiro, M C; Fernández-Redondo, V; Zulaica, A; Toribio, J

    1985-01-01

    A female patient presented with a tumoral lesion of the areola of the left breast; the lesion surrounded the nipple. Histopathologically there was proliferation of smooth muscle fibers of the middle and deep layers of the dermis; the papillary dermis was not affected. Myomas in this site do not present the typical characteristics of other kinds of leiomyomas, including those of the scrotum. Therefore, mamillary muscle myomas should not be considered authentic tumors, but rather smooth muscle hyperplasias.

  13. Responses of muscle spindles in feline dorsal neck muscles to electrical stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, F; Roatta, S; Thunberg, J; Passatore, M; Djupsjöbacka, M

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies performed in jaw muscles of rabbits and rats have demonstrated that sympathetic outflow may affect the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The resulting impairment of MSA information has been suggested to be involved in the genesis and spread of chronic muscle pain. The present study was designed to investigate sympathetic influences on muscle spindles in feline trapezius and splenius muscles (TrSp), as these muscles are commonly affected by chronic pain in humans. Experiments were carried out in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. The effect of electrical stimulation (10 Hz for 90 s or 3 Hz for 5 min) of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was investigated on the discharge of TrSp MSAs (units classified as Ia-like and II-like) and on their responses to sinusoidal stretching of these muscles. In some of the experiments, the local microcirculation of the muscles was monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry. In total, 46 MSAs were recorded. Stimulation of the CSN at 10 Hz powerfully depressed the mean discharge rate of the majority of the tested MSAs (73%) and also affected the sensitivity of MSAs to sinusoidal changes of muscle length, which were evaluated in terms of amplitude and phase of the sinusoidal fitting of unitary activity. The amplitude was significantly reduced in Ia-like units and variably affected in II-like units, while in general the phase was affected little and not changed significantly in either group. The discharge of a smaller percentage of tested units was also modulated by 3-Hz CSN stimulation. Blockade of the neuromuscular junctions by pancuronium did not induce any changes in MSA responses to CSN stimulation, showing that these responses were not secondary to changes in extrafusal or fusimotor activity. Further data showed that the sympathetically induced modulation of MSA discharge was not secondary to the concomitant reduction of muscle blood flow induced by the stimulation. Hence

  14. [Reconstruction of quadriceps femoris muscle function with muscle transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Meric, C

    2010-08-01

    Femoral nerve palsy, mostly of iatrogen cause, leads to paresis of quadriceps muscle with complete loss of knee extension. Therapeutical options include neurolysis, nerve reconstruction or functional muscle transplantations. Another concept is the transfer of hamstring muscles as described in post polio surgery. We describe our experience of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscle transfer for reconstruction of knee extension. From 2003 to 2007 seven patients (mean age 43) with complete loss of knee extension after femoral nerve lesion were treated. Nerve palsy was caused by direct lesion, traction, hematoma after collapse, lesion of lumbosacral plexus and an unclear muscle dystrophy. Indication for muscle transfer was due to long standing muscle paresis. All patients received a transfer of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscle/tendon into the quadriceps tendon. Patients were immobilised in a cast for 6 weeks in extended knee position. Weight bearing started after 8 weeks. Operations went uneventfully. All patients were able to extend the knee postoperatively against gravity and were able to climb stairs without help. 4 Patients had complete knee extension, 2 had a lack of 20 degrees , one of 30 degrees. Daily routine was possible in all cases. No instability of knee joints occurred postoperatively. In a nerve lesion close to the muscle a nerve reconstruction should be aimed. If not performed or with unsuccessful outcome, muscle transfer is a good option to restore function. All recent studies describe good to excellent results with stable knees, allowing the patient to manage daily routine without assistance and to climb stairs up and down. Long term complications such as dislocation of patella or genu recurvatum were not observed in our patients. The latter results as typical complication in polio from weakening knee flexion through biceps femoris transfer, if the gastrocnemius muscle is not forceful enough. However in an isolated femoral nerve lesion this

  15. Electrical stimulation and muscle strengthening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dehail, P; Duclos, C; Barat, M

    2008-01-01

    ...: muscular or neuromuscular, electromyostimulation, electrical stimulation, strengthening, strength training, immobilization, muscle dystrophy, bed-rest, bed-bound, knee or hip surgery, postoperative...

  16. New twist on artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Carter S.; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Aliev, Ali E.; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy. PMID:27671626

  17. Reduced quantitative muscle function in tenascin-X deficient Ehlers-Danlos patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Altenburg, T.M.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Haan, A. de; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2007-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders. Skeletal muscle features belong to the clinical criteria of EDS and are generally interpreted to result from increased tendon distensibility or exercise avoidance. However, muscle function in EDS has

  18. Myosin heavy chain expression can vary over the length of jaw and leg muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, J.A.M.; Kwee, K.E.; Everts, V.; Langenbach, G.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber type classification can be determined by its myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition based on a few consecutive sections. It is generally assumed that the MyHC expression of a muscle fiber is the same over its length since neural stimulation and systemic influences are supposed to be the

  19. Muscle differentiation after sciatic nerve transection and reinnervation in adult rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijkema-Paassen, J; Meek, MF; Gramsbergen, A

    Reinnervation after peripheral nerve transections generally leads to poor functional recovery. In order to study whether changes in muscles might be a contributing factor in this phenomenon we studied muscle morphology and fibre type distributions after sciatic nerve transection in the rat hind

  20. A comparison of hamstring muscle activity during different screening tests for non-contact ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus S; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscles during a sports-specific sidecutting movement has been found to be a potential risk factor for non-contact ACL injury. However, whether a reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscle is a general neuromuscular phenome...

  1. Relationship Between Muscle Dissection Method and Postoperative Muscle Atrophy in the Lateral Suboccipital Approach to Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Toshihiro; Goto, Tetsuya; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Hara, Yosuke; Nagm, Alhusain; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Various techniques are available for occipital skull exposure with muscle dissection, as well as different types of skin incisions in the lateral suboccipital approach to vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. The skin incisions are generally classified as S-shaped, J-shaped, or C-shaped. In each method, the technique used for muscle dissection differs in terms of cut, single layer, and multiple layers. This study was performed to identify the relationships among muscle dissection method, skin incision type, and muscle atrophy in the lateral suboccipital approach to surgery for VS. Between 2002 and 2011, we performed surgical resection in 53 patients with VS at Shinshu University Hospital. Of these 53 patients, 35 with radiographic annual follow-up for >3 years after surgery were evaluated retrospectively. These patients included 14 who underwent an S-shaped incision, 6 with a J-shaped incision, and 15 with a C-shaped incision. Bilateral areas of the skin and occipital muscles were measured, and rates of atrophy were calculated and compared among the 3 methods. Postoperative muscle atrophy was significantly advanced in the second postoperative year, but did not tend to develop further after the third year. The postoperative muscle atrophy ratio was significantly lower in the C-shaped incision group (mean ± SD, 4.0% ± 6.9%) compared with the S-shaped (17.1% ± 9.8%) and J-shaped (17.6% ± 10.0%) incision groups within 2 years after surgery (P muscle dissection was associated with significantly reduced postoperative muscle atrophy compared with the other methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nutritional interventions to preserve skeletal muscle mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, Evelien M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle mass is the main predictor for muscle strength and physical function. The amount of muscle mass can decline rapidly during periods of reduced physical activity or during periods of energy intake restriction. For athletes, it is important to maintain muscle mass, since the loss of muscle is

  3. Nutritional interventions to preserve skeletal muscle mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, Evelien M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle mass is the main predictor for muscle strength and physical function. The amount of muscle mass can decline rapidly during periods of reduced physical activity or during periods of energy intake restriction. For athletes, it is important to maintain muscle mass, since the loss of muscle is as

  4. Trunk extensor muscle fatigue influences trunk muscle activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinpoor, Tahere Seyed; Kahrizi, Sedighe; Mobini, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Trunk muscles fatigue is one of the risk factors in workplaces and daily activities. Loads would be redistributed among active and passive tissues in a non-optimal manner in fatigue conditions. Therefore, a single tissue might be overloaded with minimal loads and as a result the risk of injury would increase. The goal of this paper was to assess the electromyographic response of trunk extensor and abdominal muscles after trunk extensor muscles fatigue induced by cyclic lifting task. This was an experimental study that twenty healthy women participated. For assessing automatic response of trunk extensor and abdominal muscles before and after the fatigue task, electromyographic activities of 6 muscles: thorasic erector spine (TES), lumbar erector spine (LES), lumbar multifidus (LMF), transverse abdominis/ internal oblique (TrA/IO), rectus abdominis (RA) and external oblique (EO) were recorded in standing position with no load and symmetric axial loads equal to 25% of their body weights. Statistical analysis showed that all the abdominal muscles activity decreased with axial loads after performing fatigue task but trunk extensor activity remained constant. Results of the current study indicated that muscle recruitment strategies changed with muscle fatigue and load bearing, therefore risks of tissue injury may increase in fatigue conditions.

  5. Skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Fontaine, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    This is an update on skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies since knowledge in the field have dramatically increased in the past years. The relationship between two phenotypes and SCN4A has been confirmed with additional cases that remain extremely rare: severe neonatal episodic laryngospasm mimicking encephalopathy, which should be actively searched for since patients respond well to sodium channel blockers; congenital myasthenic syndromes, which have the particularity to be the first recessive Nav1.4 channelopathy. Deep DNA sequencing suggests the contribution of other ion channels in the clinical expressivity of sodium channelopathies, which may be one of the factors modulating the latter. The increased knowledge of channel molecular structure, the quantity of sodium channel blockers, and the availability of preclinical models would permit a most personalized choice of medication for patients suffering from these debilitating neuromuscular diseases. Advances in the understanding of the molecular structure of voltage-gated sodium channels, as well as availability of preclinical models, would lead to improved medical care of patients suffering from skeletal muscle, as well as other sodium channelopathies.

  6. Elicitability of muscle cramps in different leg and foot muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Botter, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of muscle motor point stimulation in eliciting muscle cramps, 11 subjects underwent eight sessions of electrical stimulation of the following muscles bilaterally: abductor hallucis flexor hallucis brevis, and both heads of the gastrocnemius muscles. Bursts of 150 square wave stimuli (duration: 152 micros; current intensity: 30% supramaximal) were applied. The stimulation frequency was increased from 4 pulses per second (pps) at increments of 2 pps until a cramp was induced. The number of cramps that could be elicited was smaller in flexor hallucis brevis than in abductor hallucis (16 vs. 22 out of 22 trials each; P muscles have different cramp susceptibility, and the intermuscle variability in the elicitability profile for electrically induced cramps supports the use of the proposed method for cramp research.

  7. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Khriplovich, I. B

    2005-01-01

    This book offers an alternative to other textbooks on the subject, providing a more specific discussion of numerous general relativistic effects for readers who have knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, including special relativity. Coverage includes gravitational lensing, signal retardation in the gravitational field of the Sun, the Reissner-Nordström solution, selected spin effects, the resonance transformation of an electromagnetic wave into a gravitational one, and the entropy and temperature of black holes. The book includes numerous problems at various levels of difficulty, making it ideal also for independent study by a broad readership of advanced students and researchers. I.B. Khriplovich is Chief Researcher, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, and Chair of Theoretical Physics at Novosibirsk University. Dr. Khriplovich is a Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He has been awarded the Dirac Medal ``For the advancement of theoretical physics'' by Univ...

  8. [General anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiss, P

    2001-04-30

    General anaesthesia is a reversible loss of consciousness induced and maintained with a hypnotic drug given either by venous injection and infusion, or by inhalation. A potent opioid is usually associated to inhibit the transmission of pain and thus to lessen sympathetic and endocrine reactions to nociceptive stimuli. Myorelaxation is used to facilitate tracheal intubation and surgery. Whatever the anaesthetic protocol use, the patient and anaesthesia machine require close monitoring. In addition to vital signs, the depth of anaesthesia may be monitored using automated electroencephalographic analysis and myorelaxation should always be monitored using a nerve stimulator, but pain or analgesia evaluation is only based on clinical signs of sympathetic stimulation. Because anaesthesia-related death and morbidity have decreased considerably, future improvements in outcome should concern perioperative comfort, i.e. prevention of cognitive disturbances, nausea, vomiting and pain.

  9. Muscle force compensation among synergistic muscles after fatigue of a single muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzig, Norman; Siebert, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine control strategies among synergistic muscles after fatigue of a single muscle. It was hypothesized that the compensating mechanism is specific for each fatigued muscle. The soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and medialis (GM) were fatigued in separate sessions on different days. In each experiment, subjects (n = 11) performed maximal voluntary contractions prior to and after fatiguing a single muscle (SOL, GL or GM) while the voluntary muscle activity and torque were measured. Additionally, the maximal single twitch torque of the plantarflexors and the maximal spinal reflex activity (H-reflex) of the SOL, GL and GM were determined. Fatigue was evoked using neuromuscular stimulation. Following fatigue the single twitch torque decreased by -20.1%, -19.5%, and -23.0% when the SOL, GL, or GM, have been fatigued. The maximal voluntary torque did not decrease in any session but the synergistic voluntary muscle activity increased significantly. Moreover, we found no alterations in spinal reflex activity. It is concluded that synergistic muscles compensate each other. Furthermore, it seems that self-compensating mechanism of the fatigued muscles occurred additionally. The force compensation does not depend on the function of the fatigued muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Stoichiometry of cytochromes and oxygen tension in skeletal muscles of marine fish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A A; Parfenova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The character of oxygen tension distribution and peculiarities of cytochromes stoichiometry in skeletal muscles of bottom and pelagic species of marine fish were compared. It is shown, that the limitation of muscle activity increases the number of hypoxic zones in the muscle tissue. The mitochondrial electron-transporting chain then obtain the uncompensated type of organization, expressed in the increase of the share of the terminal complex aa3 on the background of general reduction of cytochromes content in the muscles. The reaction is of an adaptive character and can be implemented by pelagic fish species in conditions of experimental hypokinesia.

  11. Anesthesia for trans-sternal thymectomy: modified non-muscle relaxant technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baftiu, Nehat; Hadri, Burhan; Morina, Muharrem; Mustafa, Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Anesthesia for thymectomy in myasthenia gravis is challenging. Early surgical management is now considered to be an important therapeutic intervention for most of the patients of myasthenia gravis. The anesthetic experience of that technique is quite large. It involves either muscle relaxant or non-muscle relaxant techniques. However, the literature is deficient of standard anesthetic technique for thymectomy. Therefore we present in this report a modified non-muscle relaxant technique for thymectomy. We report one case with thymectomy under general anesthesia using fentanyl and propofol for induction and endotracheal intubation using non-muscle relaxant technique. The intubating, intraoperative and postoperative conditions were excellent.

  12. Building Muscles, Keeping Muscles: Protein Turnover During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Arny; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As we age we lose muscle mass and strength. The problem is a matter of use it or lose it and more - a fact to which any active senior can attest. An imbalance in the natural cycle of protein turnover may be a contributing factor to decreased muscle mass. But the answer is not so simple, since aging is associated with changes in hormones, activity levels, nutrition, and often, disease. The human body constantly uses amino acids to build muscle protein, which then breaks down and must be replaced. When protein turnover gets out of balance, so that more protein breaks down than the body can replace, the result is muscle loss. This is not just the bane of aging, however. Severely burned people may have difficulty building new muscle long after the burned skin has been repaired. Answers to why we lose muscle mass and strength - and how doctors can fix it - may come from space. Astronauts usually eat a well-balanced diet and maintain an exercise routine to stay in top health. During long-duration flight, they exercise regularly to reduce the muscle loss that results from being in a near-weightless environment. Despite these precautions, astronauts lose muscle mass and strength during most missions. They quickly recover after returning to Earth - this is a temporary condition in an otherwise healthy population. Members of the STS-107 crew are participating in a study of the effects of space flight, hormone levels, and stress on protein turnover. When we are under stress, the body responds with a change in hormone levels. Researchers hypothesize that this stress-induced change in hormones along with the near-weightlessness might result in the body synthesizing less muscle protein, causing muscles to lose their strength and size. Astronauts, who must perform numerous duties in a confined and unusual environment, experience some stress during their flight, making them excellent candidates for testing the researchers' hypothesis.

  13. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  14. Trichinella spiralis in human muscle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the parasite Trichinella spiralis in human muscle tissue. The parasite is transmitted by eating undercooked ... produce large numbers of larvae that migrate into muscle tissue. The cysts may cause muscle pain and ...

  15. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy from suprascapular nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Christopher B; Owens, Brett D

    2014-02-01

    Muscle weakness without pain may signal a nerve compression injury. Because these injuries should be identified and treated early to prevent permanent muscle weakness and atrophy, providers should consider suprascapular nerve compression in patients with shoulder muscle weakness.

  16. Muscle Dysmorphia: A New Form of Eating Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Kimberly R.; Watkins, Patti Lou; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD), a variation of the eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia, among college students. Surveys indicated that MD symptomatology appears in the general population and among both sexes. MD significantly related to eating disorder pathology and depression, and to some degree to impaired social support.…

  17. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in

  18. Sternalis muscle: a mystery still.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Bowers, Maggi; Hullett, Joel

    2004-05-01

    Despite intensive anatomical research during the last century, anatomical structures or variations of these structures may still cause confusion or even iatrogenic injury. A matter of debate is the sternalis muscle. We present a review of the literature of the sternalis muscle with special emphasis on its clinical anatomy.

  19. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in th

  20. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in th

  1. Functional anatomy of the human lateral pterygoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haddioui, A; Laison, F; Zouaoui, A; Bravetti, P; Gaudy, J F

    2005-11-01

    The authors studied the lateral pterygoid muscle of 179 fresh cadavers by both anatomical dissection and magnetic resonance imaging. The aim was to define the general morphology and the architectural organisation of the lateral pterygoid muscle. Dissection plane by plane, anatomical sections in different planes of space and dissections via multiple approaches on harvested blocks allowed the demonstration that the lateral pterygoid shows an architectural arrangement different from that which is usually described but similar to that, from its typically penniform structure of the masseter and the medial pterygoid. The anatomical situation of this muscle gives rise to numerous differences in opinion much to its morphology as to its functional examination. This study has shown that one part of the muscle has a typical penniform structure made up of alternating musculo-aponeurotic layers and by the absence of individual muscle bellies. In addition the particular shape of this muscle makes it useless to insert intramuscular electrodes in its only accessible portion, which makes the results of electromyographic studies debatable.

  2. Phonation related rate coding and recruitment in the genioglossus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, K.R.; Porfirio, D.J.; Bailey, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Motor unit (MU) recruitment was assessed in two muscles with similar muscle fiber type compositions and that participate in skilled movements: the tongue muscle, genioglossus (GG) and the hand muscle, first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Our primary objectives were to determine in the framework of a voluntary movement whether muscle force is regulated in tongue as it is in limb i.e., via processes of rate coding and recruitment. Recruitment in the two muscles was assessed within each subject in the context of ramp force (FDI) and in the tongue (GG) during vowel production and specifically, in the context of ramp increases in loudness, and subsequently expressed relative to the maximal. The principle findings of the study are that the general rules of recruitment and rate coding hold true for both GG and FDI and second, that average firing rates, firing rates at recruitment and peak firing rates in GG are significantly higher than for FDI (P role as (prime) mover and hydrostatic support element. PMID:25899868

  3. Persistent orofacial muscle pain: Its synonymous terminology and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Mulder, Maxim J H L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe the presentation of persistent orofacial muscle pain, also commonly referred to as myofascial temporomandibular disorder. In this practice survey, the authors reviewed the demographic and clinical features of 34 patients who were evaluated and diagnosed personally. The majority of the 34 patients were women (82.4%), and their age at consultation averaged 44.6 ± 12.6 (SD) years. The median pain duration was 4.0 years (range: 0.2-34 years). In 97.1% of patients, the pain occurred daily and continuously, and in 51.9% it was unilateral. Chewing or eating made the pain worse in 50% of the patients, and talking in 29.4%. On examination, tightness of the masseter muscle(s) was present in 58.8%, and tenderness in 58.8%. Persistent orofacial muscle pain mostly affects women, generally occurs daily and continuously, and is equally often unilateral and bilateral. Chewing, eating, and talking are the most common aggravating factors, and tightness or tenderness of the masseter muscle(s) is often found on examination.

  4. Breast size impacts spine motion and postural muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Drake, Janessa D M

    2016-11-21

    While it is generally accepted that large breast sizes in females contribute to back pain and poor posture, the effects of breast size on spinal motion and muscle activation characteristics are poorly understood. This study examined the relationship between breast size, spine motion, and trunk muscle activation. Fifteen university-aged females, free of back pain symptoms, were tested. Breast sizes were calculated, and three-dimensional spine motion and activation from five trunk muscles bilaterally were measured during standing and trunk flexion movements. Correlations between breast size and motion and muscle activation measures were assessed. Head and trunk angles were strongly, negatively correlated to breast size during upright standing; thoracic angles were moderately, positively correlated to breast size during thoracic flexion movements. Trunk muscles showed positive, moderate-strength relationships with breast size during upright standing and some trunk movements. These findings provide a preliminary indication that increasing breast sizes are associated with altered postures and increased muscle activation in a non-clinical population, and constitute a baseline for the study of females with a full range of breast sizes. Further research is required to confirm the generalizability of these findings to other sizes, in order to inform strategies for the prevention or reduction of back pain, as well as diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation techniques associated with breast size and back pain.

  5. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    implications of muscle dysfunction in cancer patients. The efficacy of exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate cancer-related muscle dysfunction is also discussed. DESIGN: We identified 194 studies examining muscular outcomes in cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. RESULTS: Muscle...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...... dysfunction in cancer patients lies in the correlation to vital clinical end points such as cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, therapy complications and quality of life (QoL). Such associations strongly emphasize the need for effective therapeutic countermeasures to be developed and implemented...

  6. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... myopathies. We investigated regeneration in muscle biopsies from 61 genetically well-defined patients affected by mitochondrial myopathy. Our results show that the perturbed energy metabolism in mitochondrial myopathies causes ongoing muscle regeneration in a majority of patients, and some were even affected...... by a dystrophic morphology. The results add to the complexity of the pathogenesis underlying mitochondrial myopathies, and expand the knowledge about the impact of energy deficiency on another aspect of muscle structure and function....

  7. Tenderization potential of Hanwoo beef muscles from carcasses with differed genders and loin intramuscular fat content levels during post mortem ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Beom Young; Seong, Pil Nam; Ba, Hoa Van; Park, Kyoung Mi; Cho, Soo Hyun; Moon, Sung Sil; Kang, Geun Ho

    2015-06-01

    Carcasses from Hanwoo steers (n = 15) and cows (n = 15) were classified into three groups: group 1 (G1), the carcasses had 10% to muscles; group 2 (G2), the carcasses had 13% to muscles; and group 3(G3), the carcasses had 17% to muscles. These were used to evaluate the effects of gender and carcass group on quality traits and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) of Psoas major (PM), Longissimus thoracis (LT), Longissimus lumborum (LL), Longus colli (LC), Supraspinatus (SS), Latissimus dorsi (LAD), Semimembranosus (SM), Quadriceps femoris (QF), Biceps femoris (BF) and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles. Our results showed that pH values of LT, LL, LC, BF and QF muscles were lower in steers than in cows (P muscles of steers (P muscles in G1, and QF muscle in G3; however, with additional ageing, the gender effect was observed for most of the muscles. Most muscles showed ageing responses; however, the rates of ageing response significantly varied depending on gender and carcass groups. The muscles of G1 and G2 had generally higher tenderization potentials than those of G3. Furthermore, most muscles in G3 had generally lower WBSF values than in G1 and G2. These results clearly indicate that ageing has a significant effect on quality and WBSF of beef muscles, and the classification by loin IMF level may be useful for prediction of the tenderness of other muscles.

  8. Comparative studies on troponin, a Ca²⁺-dependent regulator of muscle contraction, in striated and smooth muscles of protochordates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Takashi; Sato, Naruki

    2012-01-01

    Troponin is well known as a Ca(2+)-dependent regulator of striated muscle contraction and it has been generally accepted that troponin functions as an inhibitor of muscle contraction or actin-myosin interaction at low Ca(2+) concentrations, and Ca(2+) at higher concentrations removes the inhibitory action of troponin. Recently, however, troponin became detectable in non-striated muscles of several invertebrates and in addition, unique troponin that functions as a Ca(2+)-dependent activator of muscle contraction has been detected in protochordate animals, although troponin in vertebrate striated muscle is known as an inhibitor of the contraction in the absence of a Ca(2+). Further studies on troponin in invertebrate muscle, especially in non-striated muscle, would provide new insight into the evolution of regulatory systems for muscle contraction and diverse function of troponin and related proteins. The methodology used for preparation and characterization of functional properties of protochordate striated and smooth muscles will be helpful for further studies of troponin in other invertebrate animals.

  9. Regional variation in muscle metabolic enzymes in individual American shad (Alosa sapidissima)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J.B.K.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the activity of metabolic enzymes is often used to asses metabolic capacity at the tissue level, but the amount of regional variability within a tissue in an individual fish of a given species is frequently unknown. The activities of four enzymes (citrate synthase (CS), phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and ??-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD) were assayed in red and white muscle at 10 sites along the body of adult American shad (Alosa sapidissima). Red and white muscle HOAD and white muscle CS and LDH varied significantly, generally increasing posteriorly. Maximal variation occurs in red muscle HOAD (~450%) and white muscle LDH (~60%) activity. Differences between the sexes also vary with sampling location. This study suggests that the variability in enzyme activity may be linked to functional differences in the muscle at different locations, and also provides guidelines for sample collection in this species.

  10. Neck and shoulder muscle strength in patients with tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjarne K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Lars L.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tension-type headache (TTH) is highly prevalent in the general population, and it is characterized by increased muscle tenderness with increasing headache frequency and intensity. AIM: The aim of this case-control study was to compare muscle strength in neck and shoulder muscles....... Patients were included if they had TTH ≥8 days per month. The MVC neck extensor and flexor muscles were tested with the participant seated upright. MVC shoulder abduction was tested with the individual lying supine. RESULTS: Compared to controls TTH patients had significantly weaker muscle strength in neck...... extension (p = 0.02), resulting in a significantly lower extension/flexion moment ratio (p = 0.03). TTH patients also showed a tendency toward significantly lower muscle strength in shoulder abduction (p = 0.05). Among the 60 TTH patients, 25 had frequent episodic TTH (FETTH), and 35 had chronic TTH (CTTH...

  11. Selenoprotein N in skeletal muscle: from diseases to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castets, Perrine; Lescure, Alain; Guicheney, Pascale; Allamand, Valérie

    2012-10-01

    Selenoprotein N (SelN) deficiency causes several inherited neuromuscular disorders collectively termed SEPN1-related myopathies, characterized by early onset, generalized muscle atrophy, and muscle weakness affecting especially axial muscles and leading to spine rigidity, severe scoliosis, and respiratory insufficiency. SelN is ubiquitously expressed and is located in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum; however, its function remains elusive. The predominant expression of SelN in human fetal tissues and the embryonic muscle phenotype reported in mutant zebrafish suggest that it is involved in myogenesis. In mice, SelN is also mostly expressed during embryogenesis and especially in the myotome, but no defect was detected in muscle development and growth in the Sepn1 knock-out mouse model. By contrast, we recently demonstrated that SelN is essential for muscle regeneration and satellite cell maintenance in mice and humans, hence opening new avenues regarding the pathomechanism(s) leading to SEPN1-related myopathies. At the cellular level, recent data suggested that SelN participates in oxidative and calcium homeostasis, with a potential role in the regulation of the ryanodine receptor activity. Despite the recent and exciting progress regarding the physiological function(s) of SelN in muscle tissue, the pathogenesis leading to SEPN1-related myopathies remains largely unknown, with several unsolved questions, and no treatment available. In this review, we introduce SelN, its properties and expression pattern in zebrafish, mice, and humans, and we discuss its potential roles in muscle tissue and the ensuing clues for the development of therapeutic options.

  12. Dimensionality of joint torques and muscle patterns for reaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eRusso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle activities underlying many motor behaviors can be generated by a small number of basic activation patterns with specific features shared across movement conditions. Such low-dimensionality suggests that the central nervous system (CNS relies on a modular organization to simplify control. However, the relationship between the dimensionality of muscle patterns and that of joint torques is not fixed, because of redundancy and non-linearity in mapping the former into the latter, and needs to be investigated. We compared the torques acting at four arm joints during fast reaching movements in different directions in the frontal and sagittal planes and the underlying muscle patterns. The dimensionality of the non-gravitational components of torques and muscle patterns in the spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal domains was estimated by multidimensional decomposition techniques. The spatial organization of torques was captured by two or three generators, indicating that not all the available coordination patterns are employed by the CNS. A single temporal generator with a biphasic profile was identified, generalizing previous observations on a single plane. The number of spatiotemporal generators was equal to the product of the spatial and temporal dimensionalities and their organization was essentially synchronous. Muscle pattern dimensionalities were higher than torques dimensionalities but also higher than the minimum imposed by the inherent non-negativity of muscle activations. The spatiotemporal dimensionality of the muscle patterns was lower than the product of their spatial and temporal dimensionality, indicating the existence of specific asynchronous coordination patterns. Thus, the larger dimensionalities of the muscle patterns may be required for CNS to overcome the non-linearities of the musculoskeletal system and to flexibly generate endpoint trajectories with simple kinematic features using a limited number of building blocks.

  13. Modeling and simulation of fish swimming with active muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatolo, Michele; Teresi, Luciano

    2016-11-21

    Our goal is to reproduce the key features of carangiform swimming by modeling muscle functioning using the notion of active distortions, thus emphasizing the kinematical role of muscle, the generation of movement, rather than the dynamical one, the production of force. This approach, already proposed to model the action of muscles in different contexts, is here tested again for the problem of developing an effective and reliable framework to model and simulate swimming. A proper undulatory movement of a fish-like body is reproduced by defining a pattern of distortions, tuned in both space and time, meant to model the muscles activation which produce the flexural motion of body fish; eventually, interactions with the surrounding water yields the desired thrust. Carangiform swimmers have a relatively inflexible anterior body section and a generally flat, flexible posterior section. Because of this configuration, undulations sent rearward along the body attain a significant amplitude only in the posterior section. We compare the performances of different swimming gaits, and we are able to find some important relations between key parameters such as frequencies, wavelength, tail amplitude, and the achieved swim velocity, or the generated thrust, which summarize the swimming performance. In particular, an interesting relation is found between the Strouhal number and the wavelength of muscles activation. We highlight the muscle function during fish locomotion describing the activation of muscles and the relation between the force production and the shortening-lengthening cycle of muscle. We found a great accordance between results and empirical relations, giving an implicit validation of our models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity, Muscle Fiber Composition, and Power Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Karandreas, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV), fiber type composition, and power performance in participants with different training background. Thirty-eight young males with different training background participated: sedentary (n = 10), endurance runners (n = 9), power trained (n = 10), and strength trained (n = 9). They performed maximal countermovement jumps (CMJ) and maximal isometric leg press for the measurement of the rate of force development (RFD). Resting vastus lateralis MFCV was measured with intramuscular microelectrodes on a different occasion, whereas muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area (CSA) of vastus lateralis were evaluated through muscle biopsies 1wk later. MFCV, CMJ power, RFD, and % CSA of type II and type IIx fibers were higher for the power-trained group (P power participants. Close correlations were found between MFCV and fiber CSA as well as the % CSA of all fiber types as well as with RFD and CMJ power (r = 0.712-0.943, P power performance. Significant models for the prediction of the % CSA of type IIa and type II as well as the CSA of all muscle fibers based upon MFCV, RFD, and CMJ were revealed (P = 0.000). MFCV is closely associated with muscle fiber % CSA. RFD and jumping power are associated with the propagation of the action potentials along the muscle fibers. This link is regulated by the size and the distribution of type II, and especially type IIx muscle fibers.

  15. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  16. Intermuscular pressure between synergistic muscles correlates with muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Lars; Siebert, Tobias; Leichsenring, Kay; Blickhan, Reinhard; Böl, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between muscle force generated during isometric contractions (i.e. at a constant muscle-tendon unit length) and the intermuscular (between adjacent muscles) pressure in synergistic muscles. Therefore, the pressure at the contact area of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscle was measured synchronously to the force of the whole calf musculature in the rabbit species Oryctolagus cuniculus Similar results were obtained when using a conductive pressure sensor, or a fibre-optic pressure transducer connected to a water-filled balloon. Both methods revealed a strong linear relationship between force and pressure in the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. The shape of the measured force-time and pressure-time traces was almost identical for each contraction (r=0.97). Intermuscular pressure ranged between 100 and 700 mbar (70,000 Pa) for forces up to 287 N. These pressures are similar to previous (intramuscular) recordings within skeletal muscles of different vertebrate species. Furthermore, our results suggest that the rise in intermuscular pressure during contraction may reduce the force production in muscle packages (compartments).

  17. Skeletal muscle connective tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline

      The connective tissue content of skeletal muscle is believed to be the major factor responsible for defining the eating quality of different meat cuts, although attempts to correlate quantifications based on traditional histological methods have not as yet been able to prove this relation....... Collagen, being the major protein in connective tissue, has been extensively investigated with regard to its relation to meat tenderness, but the results have been rather conflicting. Meat from older animals is tougher than that from younger animals, and changes in the properties of the collagen due...... that collagen plays a significant role in determining the tenderness of meat. What are we missing? Therefore, fundamental aspects of connective tissue research have been the centre of attention throughout this thesis. A holistic view has been applied, glancing at this complex tissue which has many facets...

  18. Electrical stimulation counteracts muscle decline in seniors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kern, Helmut; Barberi, Laura; Löfler, Stefan; Sbardella, Simona; Burggraf, Samantha; Fruhmann, Hannah; Carraro, Ugo; Mosole, Simone; Sarabon, Nejc; Vogelauer, Michael; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Cvecka, Jan; Romanello, Vanina; Pietrangelo, Laura; Protasi, Feliciano; Sandri, Marco; Zampieri, Sandra; Musaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    .... We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES) is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function...

  19. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  20. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  1. Validation of Hill-type muscle models in relation to neuromuscular recruitment and force-velocity properties: predicting patterns of in vivo muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewener, Andrew A; Wakeling, James M; Lee, Sabrina S; Arnold, Allison S

    2014-12-01

    We review here the use and reliability of Hill-type muscle models to predict muscle performance under varying conditions, ranging from in situ production of isometric force to in vivo dynamics of muscle length change and force in response to activation. Muscle models are frequently used in musculoskeletal simulations of movement, particularly when applied to studies of human motor performance in which surgically implanted transducers have limited use. Musculoskeletal simulations of different animal species also are being developed to evaluate comparative and evolutionary aspects of locomotor performance. However, such models are rarely validated against direct measures of fascicle strain or recordings of muscle-tendon force. Historically, Hill-type models simplify properties of whole muscle by scaling salient properties of single fibers to whole muscles, typically accounting for a muscle's architecture and series elasticity. Activation of the model's single contractile element (assigned the properties of homogenous fibers) is also simplified and is often based on temporal features of myoelectric (EMG) activation recorded from the muscle. Comparison of standard one-element models with a novel two-element model and with in situ and in vivo measures of EMG, fascicle strain, and force recorded from the gastrocnemius muscles of goats shows that a two-element Hill-type model, which allows independent recruitment of slow and fast units, better predicts temporal patterns of in situ and in vivo force. Recruitment patterns of slow/fast units based on wavelet decomposition of EMG activity in frequency-time space are generally correlated with the intensity spectra of the EMG signals, the strain rates of the fascicles, and the muscle-tendon forces measured in vivo, with faster units linked to greater strain rates and to more rapid forces. Using direct measures of muscle performance to further test Hill-type models, whether traditional or more complex, remains critical for

  2. Stretching skeletal muscle: chronic muscle lengthening through sarcomerogenesis.

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    Alexander M Zöllner

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle responds to passive overstretch through sarcomerogenesis, the creation and serial deposition of new sarcomere units. Sarcomerogenesis is critical to muscle function: It gradually re-positions the muscle back into its optimal operating regime. Animal models of immobilization, limb lengthening, and tendon transfer have provided significant insight into muscle adaptation in vivo. Yet, to date, there is no mathematical model that allows us to predict how skeletal muscle adapts to mechanical stretch in silico. Here we propose a novel mechanistic model for chronic longitudinal muscle growth in response to passive mechanical stretch. We characterize growth through a single scalar-valued internal variable, the serial sarcomere number. Sarcomerogenesis, the evolution of this variable, is driven by the elastic mechanical stretch. To analyze realistic three-dimensional muscle geometries, we embed our model into a nonlinear finite element framework. In a chronic limb lengthening study with a muscle stretch of 1.14, the model predicts an acute sarcomere lengthening from 3.09[Formula: see text]m to 3.51[Formula: see text]m, and a chronic gradual return to the initial sarcomere length within two weeks. Compared to the experiment, the acute model error was 0.00% by design of the model; the chronic model error was 2.13%, which lies within the rage of the experimental standard deviation. Our model explains, from a mechanistic point of view, why gradual multi-step muscle lengthening is less invasive than single-step lengthening. It also explains regional variations in sarcomere length, shorter close to and longer away from the muscle-tendon interface. Once calibrated with a richer data set, our model may help surgeons to prevent muscle overstretch and make informed decisions about optimal stretch increments, stretch timing, and stretch amplitudes. We anticipate our study to open new avenues in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery and enhance

  3. Adenotomy under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokurka, J; Jakoubková, S; Vít, Z; Drahokoupilová, M

    1989-01-01

    Experience obtained from adenotomy (AT) under general anesthesia using Ketamin hydrochloride (Ketalar, Narkamon) in children are presented in this paper. The authors had used intramuscular premedication with Prothazin, Dolsin and Atropin at the first stage, then they shifted to oral administration of a combination of Diazepam, Theadryl and Atropin. Ketamin may be applied intravenously in the dosage of 1.0 to 1.5 mg/kg of body weight in most children. Where it is not possible, a triple dose into the muscle is used. A total of 2,266 AT were performed. About 70% of patients were calm during the operation, once a suspected aspiration was considered but it was not confirmed. The main contribution of the method is 100% amnesia of the surgery made. The procedure is a compromise between a requirement for minimal traumatization of the child's psyche by the intervention and the resources available, particularly the need of personnel at the majority of otorhinolaryngo-logical departments nowadays.

  4. Biomechanical considerations in the modeling of muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J G; Hay, J G

    1983-09-01

    The instantaneous functional role of a voluntary muscle in the neighborhood of a joint is often described in clinical terms (e.g. flexor; abductor; external rotator; agonist; contracting concentrically and isokinetically) that seen sufficiently explicit and clear in certain simple situations, but have not yet been carefully defined in precise biomechanical terminology for the general case. In order to describe the functional role of a voluntary muscle as its acts to change and/or maintain the configuration of a joint, it is necessary to make certain modeling assumptions. These include modeling the joint, modeling the muscle force line of action in the joint neighborhood, and establishing the location and orientation of the three joint axes for all possible joint configurations. Modeling the joint as a point leads to simple and sensible definitions which are consistent with clinical practice. The straight line model is most conveniently used to establish the muscle force line of action. A RHO coordinate system embedded in the distal joint segment with origin at the joint center point, and with intersecting axes coincident with the F/E, A/A and I/XR axes when the joint is in the anatomical position, is the joint coordinate system of choice to describe the turning effects of the muscle about the joint. Sensible and simple biomechanical definitions for clinical terms describing muscular contractions (i.e. concentric; eccentric; isometric; isokinetic; isotonic) were presented and appear to be relatively uncontroversial. Alternative biomechanical definitions for agonistic and antagonistic muscular activity were also presented, as were arguments for choosing a simple definition based on using the joint resultant moment as the criterion measure relative to which the individual muscle's moment about J should be compared. Biomechanical definitions for determining when a muscle functions as a joint flexor or extensor, abductor or adductor, and internal or external rotator

  5. A Generalization of Generalized Fibonacci and Generalized Pell Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elhameed, W. M.; Zeyada, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with developing a new class of generalized numbers. The main advantage of this class is that it generalizes the two classes of generalized Fibonacci numbers and generalized Pell numbers. Some new identities involving these generalized numbers are obtained. In addition, the two well-known identities of Sury and Marques which…

  6. Development of Postural Muscles and Their Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. IJkema-Paassen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of posture is a prerequisite for efficient motor performance. Posture depends on muscles capable of enduring contractions, whereas movements often require quick, forceful muscle actions. To serve these different goals, muscles contain fibers that meet these different tasks. Muscles with strong postural functions mainly consist of slow muscle fibers with a great resistance against fatigue. Flexor muscles in the leg and arm muscles are mainly composed of fast muscle fibers producing relatively large forces that are rapidly fatigable. Development of the neuromuscular system continues after birth. We discuss in the human baby and in animal experiments changes in muscle fiber properties, regression from polyneural into mononeural innervation, and developmental changes in the motoneurons of postural muscles during that period. The regression of poly-neural innervation in postural muscles and the development of dendrite bundles of their motoneurons seem to be linked to the transition from the immature into the adult-like patterns of moving and postural control.

  7. Factors in delayed muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, W M

    1977-01-01

    The possible causes of delayed muscle soreness which occur 24 to 48 hr after exercise were examined from three different approaches, each designed to test an existing hypothesis. Surface electromyograms were used to evaluate the muscle spasm theory; the possibility of actual muscle cell damage was monitored by the presence of myoglobinuria, while the ratio of hydroxyproline/creatinine (OHP/Cr) in 24 hr urine collection was used as a marker for connective tissue involvement. In the first study, although all volunteers developed muscle soreness 24 and 48 hr after exercise, no change in the EMG activity of the sore muscles was observed. Myoglobin excretion was found in 88% of the subjects who developed soreness. However, in a second study, 92% of the subject who performed both moderate and heavy exercise but did not develop muscle soreness had myoglobinuria. In contrast, during a third experiment subjects on gelatin-free diets showed an increase (P less than .1) in the OHP/Cr between control (.020+/-.001) and 48 hr post-exercise (.002+/-.001, X+/-SE). Soreness resulted in all cases. When the OHP/Cr value is taken for the day of maximal soreness, the post-exercise mean increases to .024+/-.001 and the level of significance rises (P less than .005). These observations support the concept that exercise induced soreness may be related to disruption of the connective tissue elements in the muscle and/or their attachments.

  8. Muscle channelopathies and electrophysiological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Ajith; Baheti, Neeraj N.; Kuruvilla, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Myotonic syndromes and periodic paralyses are rare disorders of skeletal muscle characterized mainly by muscle stiffness or episodic attacks of weakness. Familial forms are caused by mutation in genes coding for skeletal muscle voltage ionic channels. Familial periodic paralysis and nondystrophic myotonias are disorders of skeletal muscle excitability caused by mutations in genes coding for voltage-gated ion channels. These diseases are characterized by episodic failure of motor activity due to muscle weakness (paralysis) or stiffness (myotonia). Clinical studies have identified two forms of periodic paralyses: hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP), based on changes in serum potassium levels during the attacks, and three distinct forms of myotonias: paramyotonia congenita (PC), potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM), and myotonia congenita (MC). PC and PAM have been linked to missense mutations in the SCN4A gene, which encodes α subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, whereas MC is caused by mutations in the chloride channel gene (CLCN1). Exercise is known to trigger, aggravate, or relieve symptoms. Therefore, exercise can be used as a functional test in electromyography to improve the diagnosis of these muscle disorders. Abnormal changes in the compound muscle action potential can be disclosed using different exercise tests. Five electromyographic (EMG) patterns (I-V) that may be used in clinical practice as guides for molecular diagnosis are discussed. PMID:19966974

  9. Muscle channelopathies and electrophysiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherian Ajith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic syndromes and periodic paralyses are rare disorders of skeletal muscle characterized mainly by muscle stiffness or episodic attacks of weakness. Familial forms are caused by mutation in genes coding for skeletal muscle voltage ionic channels. Familial periodic paralysis and nondystrophic myotonias are disorders of skeletal muscle excitability caused by mutations in genes coding for voltage-gated ion channels. These diseases are characterized by episodic failure of motor activity due to muscle weakness (paralysis or stiffness (myotonia. Clinical studies have identified two forms of periodic paralyses: hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP, based on changes in serum potassium levels during the attacks, and three distinct forms of myotonias: paramyotonia congenita (PC, potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM, and myotonia congenita (MC. PC and PAM have been linked to missense mutations in the SCN4A gene, which encodes α subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, whereas MC is caused by mutations in the chloride channel gene (CLCN1. Exercise is known to trigger, aggravate, or relieve symptoms. Therefore, exercise can be used as a functional test in electromyography to improve the diagnosis of these muscle disorders. Abnormal changes in the compound muscle action potential can be disclosed using different exercise tests. Five electromyographic (EMG patterns (I-V that may be used in clinical practice as guides for molecular diagnosis are discussed.

  10. [Muscles and connective tissue: histology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage, J-P

    2012-10-01

    Here, we give some comments about the DVD movies "Muscle Attitudes" from Endovivo productions, the movies up lighting some loss in the attention given to studies on the connective tissue, and especially them into muscles. The main characteristics of the different components in the intra-muscular connective tissue (perimysium, endomysium, epimysium) are shown here with special references to their ordered architecture and special references to their spatial distributions. This connective tissue is abundant into the muscles and is in continuity with the muscles in vicinity, with their tendons and their sheath, sticking the whole on skin. This connective tissue has also very abundant connections on the muscles fibres. It is then assumed that the connective tissue sticks every organs or cells of the locomotion system. Considering the elastic properties of the collagen fibres which are the most abundant component of connective tissue, it is possible to up light a panel of connective tissue associated functions such as the transmission of muscle contractions or the regulation of protein and energetic muscles metabolism.

  11. Muscle strength in athletes-hand kettlebell sport for different meteorological situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulthickiy Z.I.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered indicators of the strength of muscles of hands of students of general physical training and weightlifting athletes. The study involved 16 students of general physical training, 16 weightlifting athletes (III level and 16 athletes (II level. Age 18-23 years of study (men. Investigations were carried out at meteorological situations I and type III. It is established that muscle strength depends on the athletes and sports category varies for different types of weather. When the type III weather in all surveyed groups of athletes, a decrease of muscle strength.

  12. Muscle MR imaging in tubular aggregate myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Beltrame

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate with Magnetic Resonance (MR the degree of fatty replacement and edematous involvement in skeletal muscles in patients with Tubular Aggregate Myopathy (TAM. To asses the inter-observer agreement in evaluating muscle involvement and the symmetry index of fatty replacement. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 13 patients were evaluated by MR to ascertain the degree of fatty replacement (T1W sequences according to Mercuri's scale, and edema score (STIR sequences according to extent and site. RESULTS: Fatty replacement mainly affects the posterior superficial compartment of the leg; the anterior compartment is generally spared. Edema was generally poor and almost only in the superficial compartment of the leg. The inter-observer agreement is very good with a Krippendorff's coefficient >0.9. Data show a total symmetry in the muscular replacement (McNemar-Bowker test with p = 1. CONCLUSIONS: MR reveals characteristic muscular involvement, and is a reproducible technique for evaluation of TAM. There may also be a characteristic involvement of the long and short heads of the biceps femoris. It is useful for aimed biopsies, diagnostic hypotheses and evaluation of disease progression.

  13. Variation in palatability and biochemical traits within and among eleven beef muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, M S; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent of variation in, and relationships among, biochemical and palatability traits within and among 11 major beef muscles. Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LD), psoas major (PM), gluteus medius (GM), semimembranosus (SM), adductor (AD), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), rectus femoris (RF), triceps brachii (TB), infraspinatus (IS), and supraspinatus (SS) from one side of 31 Charolais x MARC III steer carcasses were vacuum-packaged, stored at 2 degrees C until 14 d postmortem, and then frozen at -30 degrees C. The 2.54-cm-thick steaks were obtained from two or three locations within muscles in order to assess biochemical traits and Warner-Bratzler shear force, and from near the center for sensory trait evaluation. The PM was most tender and was followed by IS in both shear force and tenderness rating (P muscles were not ranked the same by shear force and tenderness rating. The BF had the lowest (P muscle) than muscles from the chuck and round (5.9 to 9.0 mg/g), except for the AD (4.9 mg/g). Desmin proteolysis was highest (P 2.1 microm), whereas the GM had the shortest (P muscles, tenderness rating was highly correlated (r > 0.60) with shear force, connective tissue rating, sarcomere length, and collagen content. Within a muscle, correlations among all traits were generally highest in LD and lowest in AD. Within muscle, location effects were detected (P muscles except SS and AD). There is a large amount of variation within and among muscles for tenderness traits and tenderness-related biochemical traits. These results increase our understanding of the sources of variation in tenderness in different muscles and provide a basis for the development of muscle-specific strategies for improving the quality and value of muscles.

  14. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in limb and extraocular muscles of mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid M Harandi

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is currently an incurable fatal motor neuron syndrome characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting and death ensuing 3-5 years after diagnosis. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs are known to be important in both nervous system development and maintenance. However, the attempt to translate the potential of NTFs into the therapeutic options remains limited despite substantial number of approaches, which have been tested clinically. Using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR technique, the present study investigated mRNA expression of four different NTFs: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF in limb muscles and extraocular muscles (EOMs from SOD1G93A transgenic mice at early and terminal stages of ALS. General morphological examination revealed that muscle fibres were well preserved in both limb muscles and EOMs in early stage ALS mice. However, in terminal ALS mice, most muscle fibres were either atrophied or hypertrophied in limb muscles but unaffected in EOMs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in early stage ALS mice, NT-4 was significantly down-regulated in limb muscles whereas NT-3 and GDNF were markedly up-regulated in EOMs. In terminal ALS mice, only GDNF was significantly up-regulated in limb muscles. We concluded that the early down-regulation of NT-4 in limb muscles is closely associated with muscle dystrophy and dysfunction at late stage, whereas the early up-regulations of GDNF and NT-3 in EOMs are closely associated with the relatively well-preserved muscle morphology at late stage. Collectively, the data suggested that comparing NTFs expression between limb muscles and EOMs from different stages of ALS animal models is a useful method in revealing the patho-physiology and progression of ALS, and eventually rescuing motor neuron in ALS patients.

  15. Shoulder muscle imbalance and subacromial impingement syndrome in overhead athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Phil

    2011-03-01

    Subacromial impingement is a frequent and painful condition among athletes, particularly those involved in overhead sports such as baseball and swimming. There are generally two types of subacromial impingement: structural and functional. While structural impingement is caused by a physical loss of area in the subacromial space due to bony growth or inflammation, functional impingement is a relative loss of subacromial space secondary to altered scapulohumeral mechanics resulting from glenohumeral instability and muscle imbalance. The purpose of this review is to describe the role of muscle imbalance in subacromial impingement in order to guide sports physical therapy evaluation and interventions.

  16. Fish fins as non-lethal surrogates for muscle tissues in freshwater food web studies using stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hette Tronquart, Nicolas; Mazeas, Laurent; Reuilly-Manenti, Liana; Zahm, Amandine; Belliard, Jérôme

    2012-07-30

    Dorsal white muscle is the standard tissue analysed in fish trophic studies using stable isotope analyses. However, sampling white muscle often implies the sacrifice of fish. Thus, we examined whether the non-lethal sampling of fin tissue can substitute muscle sampling in food web studies. Analysing muscle and fin δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of 466 European freshwater fish (14 species) with an elemental analyser coupled with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, we compared the isotope values of the two tissues. Correlations between fin and muscle isotope ratios were examined for all fish together and specifically for 12 species. We further proposed four methods of assessing muscle from fin isotope ratios and estimated the errors made using these muscle surrogates. Despite significant differences between isotope values of the two tissues, fin and muscle isotopic signals are strongly correlated. Muscle values, estimated with raw fin isotope ratios (1st method), induce an error of ca. 1‰ for both isotopes. In comparison, specific (2nd method) or general (3rd method) correlations provide meaningful corrections of fin isotope ratios (errors muscle estimates (errors >0.8‰). There is little chance that a global model can be created. However, the 2nd and 3rd methods of estimating muscle values from fin isotope ratios should provide an acceptable level of error for the studies of European freshwater food web. We thus recommend that future studies use fin tissue as a non-lethal surrogate for muscle. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Bigorexia: bodybuilding and muscle dysmorphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Philip E

    2009-05-01

    Muscle dysmorphia is an emerging condition that primarily affects male bodybuilders. Such individuals obsess about being inadequately muscular. Compulsions include spending hours in the gym, squandering excessive amounts of money on ineffectual sports supplements, abnormal eating patterns or even substance abuse. In this essay, I illustrate the features of muscle dysmorphia by employing the first-person account of a male bodybuilder afflicted by this condition. I briefly outline the history of bodybuilding and examine whether the growth of this sport is linked to a growing concern with body image amongst males. I suggest that muscle dysmorphia may be a new expression of a common pathology shared with the eating disorders.

  18. Skeletal Muscle Na+ Channel Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina eSimkin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Five inherited human disorders affecting skeletal muscle contraction have been traced to mutations in the gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.4. The main symptoms of these disorders are myotonia or periodic paralysis caused by changes in skeletal muscle fiber excitability. Symptoms of these disorders vary from mild or latent disease to incapacitating or even death in severe cases. As new human sodium channel mutations corresponding to disease states become discovered, the importance of understanding the role of the sodium channel in skeletal muscle function and disease state grows.

  19. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  20. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Nevitt, M.C.; Rubin, S.M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    .05). Among men and women, associations were similar for blacks and whites. CONCLUSION: Lower muscle mass (smaller cross-sectional thigh muscle area), greater fat infiltration into the muscle, and lower knee extensor muscle strength are associated with increased risk of mobility loss in older men

  1. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Nevitt, M.C.; Rubin, S.M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    .05). Among men and women, associations were similar for blacks and whites. CONCLUSION: Lower muscle mass (smaller cross-sectional thigh muscle area), greater fat infiltration into the muscle, and lower knee extensor muscle strength are associated with increased risk of mobility loss in older men an

  2. Physical Rehabilitation Improves Muscle Function Following Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Seene T, Kaasik P: Role of exercise therapy in prevention of decline in aging muscle function : glucocorticoid myopathy and unloading. J Aging Res...Combination of exercise training and diet restriction normalizes limited exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function in diet-induced diabetic mice... exercise . Int J Sports Med 2014, 35(1):19–27. 25. Hourdé C, Joanne P, Medja F, Mougenot N, Jacquet A, Mouisel E, Pannerec A, Hatem S, Butler-Browne G

  3. Relative contributions of animal and muscle effects to variation in beef lean color stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D A; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L

    2011-05-01

    Muscles from beef carcasses (n = 100) were selected from a commercial processor and aged for 14 d. Longissimus lumborum (LL), semimembranosus (SM), biceps femoris (BF), gluteus medius (GM), triceps brachii (TB), rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, adductor, semitendinosus, infraspinatus, teres major, biceps femoris ischiatic head, biceps femoris sirloin cap, and gracillus steaks were placed in display for 9 d. Instrumental color variables [lightness (L*), redness (a*), yellowness (b*), hue angle, chroma, and overall color change from d 0 (E)] were determined on d 0, 1, 3, 6, and 9 of display. Muscle pH and myoglobin content were determined for LL, SM, BF, GM, and TB. Muscles differed (P muscles. Relationships between color variables measured in LL steaks and those measured in steaks from other muscles differed across days of display with the strongest relationships being observed earlier in the display period for labile muscles and later in stable muscles. Lightness of LL steaks was correlated with lightness of all of other muscles evaluated, regardless of display day (r = 0.27 to 0.79). For a*, hue angle, chroma, and E values, the strongest relationships between LL values and those of other muscles were detected between d 9 LL values and those of other muscles on d 3, 6, or 9, depending on the relative stability of the muscle. Correlation coefficients between d 9 a*, hue angle, chroma, and E values in LL and those of other muscles were 0.50, 0.65, 0.28, and 0.43 (P muscles included in the study. Myoglobin content of SM, BF, GM, and TB was highly correlated with that of LL (r = 0.83, 0.82, 0.72, and 0.67, respectively; P Muscle pH of LL was correlated with pH of SM and GM (r = 0.44 and 0.53; P 0.05) pH of BF or TB. Muscle effects generally explained more variation in a*, b*, hue angle, chroma, and E than animal effects. However, the relative importance of animal effects increased as display continued. These data indicate that animal effects were consistent across

  4. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  5. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  6. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... next step in treatment. During surgery, the lower abdominal muscles and connective tissues are released and reattached. Some ... a Training Program Postdoctoral Training OPTI Clearinghouse OGME Development Physician Profiles Order Physician Credentialing Reports Professional Development ...

  7. Knitting and weaving artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziz, Ali; Concas, Alessandro; Khaldi, Alexandre; Stålhand, Jonas; Persson, Nils-Krister; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2017-01-01

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind’s oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices. PMID:28138542

  8. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion...... isokinetic dynamometry. DATA SOURCES: A systematic literature search of 7 databases was performed. STUDY SELECTION: Included studies (1) enrolled participants with definite poststroke hemiplegia according to defined criteria; (2) assessed muscle strength or power by criterion isokinetic dynamometry; (3) had...... undergone peer review; and (4) were available in English or Danish. DATA EXTRACTION: The psychometric properties of isokinetic dynamometry were reviewed with respect to reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Furthermore, comparisons of strength between paretic, nonparetic, and comparable healthy muscles...

  9. Fuel-Powered Artificial Muscles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Von Howard Ebron; Zhiwei Yang; Daniel J. Seyer; Mikhail E. Kozlov; Jiyoung Oh; Hui Xie; Joselito Razal; Lee J. Hall; John P. Ferraris; Alan G. MacDiarmid; Ray H. Baughman

    2006-01-01

    ... long inactivity during battery recharge. To help solve these problems, we demonstrated two types of artificial muscles that convert the chemical energy of high-energy-density fuels to mechanical energy...

  10. Contractile Properties of Esophageal Striated Muscle: Comparison with Cardiac and Skeletal Muscles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Shiina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The external muscle layer of the mammalian esophagus consists of striated muscles. We investigated the contractile properties of esophageal striated muscle by comparison with those of skeletal and cardiac muscles. Electrical field stimulation with single pulses evoked twitch-like contractile responses in esophageal muscle, similar to those in skeletal muscle in duration and similar to those in cardiac muscle in amplitude. The contractions of esophageal muscle were not affected by an inhibitor of gap junctions. Contractile responses induced by high potassium or caffeine in esophageal muscle were analogous to those in skeletal muscle. High-frequency stimulation induced a transient summation of contractions followed by sustained contractions with amplitudes similar to those of twitch-like contractions, although a large summation was observed in skeletal muscle. The results demonstrate that esophageal muscle has properties similar but not identical to those of skeletal muscle and that some specific properties may be beneficial for esophageal peristalsis.

  11. MuscleBuilder:A Modeling Tool for Human Anatomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amaury Aubel; Daniel Thalmann

    2004-01-01

    A traditional multi-layered approach is adopted to human body modeling and deformation. The model is split into three general anatomical structures: the skeleton, musculature and skin. It is shown that each of these layers is modeled and deformed by using fast, procedural, ad-hoc methods that can painlessly be reimplemented. The modeling approach is generic enough to handle muscles of varying shape, size and characteristics and does not break in extreme skeleton poses. It is also described that the integrated MuscleBuilder system whose main features are: i) easy and quick creation of muscle deformation models; ii) automatic deformation of an overlying skin. It is shown that visually realistic results can be obtained at interactive frame rates with very little input from the designer.

  12. Nemaline myopathy in a newborn infant: a rare muscle disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olukman, O; Calkavur, S; Diniz, G; Unalp, A; Atlihan, F

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous muscle disorder, defined by the presence of characteristic nemaline bodies on muscle biopsy. The disease has a wide spectrum of phenotypes, ranging from forms with neonatal onset and fatal outcome to asymptomatic forms. The neonatal form is severe and usually fatal. The clinical variability, with differing age of onset and severity of symptoms makes the diagnosis difficult during infancy. There is no curative treatment. L-tyrosine may prevent aspiration by reducing pharyngeal secretions and drooling. Most of the patients die from respiratory and cardiac failure. This article discusses a newborn infant who presented with generalized weakness and respiratory failure. Partial response to L-tyrosine treatment was noted. The case is worth presenting to remind clinicians of congenital myopathies in the differential diagnosis of floppy infant during neonatal period and to emphasize the importance of muscle biopsy in diagnosis.

  13. Putting muscle in DNA methylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James P Reddington; Richard R Meehan

    2011-01-01

    Over 25 years ago seminal experiments from the labs of Peter Jones and Harold Weintraub demonstrated that alteration in the DNA modification state underlie the myogenic conversion of fibroblast cell lines [1,2].This paved the way for the identification of myogenic helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins in muscle differentiation,but the mechanism by which DNA methylation regulates muscle differentiation has remained elusive [3].

  14. Simvastatin effects on skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Stride, Nis; Hey-Mogensen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) content, mitochondrial density, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity were measured in simvastatin-treated patients (n = 10) and in well-matched control subjects (n = 9).......Glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) content, mitochondrial density, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity were measured in simvastatin-treated patients (n = 10) and in well-matched control subjects (n = 9)....

  15. Biothermal sensing of a torsional artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Tae Hyeob; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-02-01

    Biomolecule responsive materials have been studied intensively for use in biomedical applications as smart systems because of their unique property of responding to specific biomolecules under mild conditions. However, these materials have some challenging drawbacks that limit further practical application, including their speed of response and mechanical properties, because most are based on hydrogels. Here, we present a fast, mechanically robust biscrolled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn as a torsional artificial muscle through entrapping an enzyme linked to a thermally sensitive hydrogel, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), utilizing the exothermic catalytic reaction of the enzyme. The induced rotation reached an equilibrated angle in less than 2 min under mild temperature conditions (25-37 °C) while maintaining the mechanical properties originating from the carbon nanotubes. This biothermal sensing of a torsional artificial muscle offers a versatile platform for the recognition of various types of biomolecules by replacing the enzyme, because an exothermic reaction is a general property accompanying a biochemical transformation.Biomolecule responsive materials have been studied intensively for use in biomedical applications as smart systems because of their unique property of responding to specific biomolecules under mild conditions. However, these materials have some challenging drawbacks that limit further practical application, including their speed of response and mechanical properties, because most are based on hydrogels. Here, we present a fast, mechanically robust biscrolled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn as a torsional artificial muscle through entrapping an enzyme linked to a thermally sensitive hydrogel, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), utilizing the exothermic catalytic reaction of the enzyme. The induced rotation reached an equilibrated angle in less than 2 min under mild temperature conditions (25-37 °C) while maintaining the mechanical properties

  16. Evaluation of muscle hyperactivity of the grimacing muscles by unilateral tight eyelid closure and stapedius muscle tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Masato; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Nagai, Fumio

    2012-10-01

    Muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles, including the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles that cause crow's feet and a glabellar frown line with ageing, cannot be accurately evaluated by surface observation. In 71 subjects, this study investigated the extent to which grimacing muscles are innervated by the bilateral motor cortices, whether the corticofacial projection to the grimacing muscles affects the facially innervated stapedius muscle tone by measuring static compliance of the tympanic membrane, and whether unilateral tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles changes static compliance. Unilateral tight eyelid closure and its subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position revealed that motor neurons of the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles were innervated by the bilateral motor cortices with weak-to-strong contralateral dominance. The orbicularis oculi, corrugator supercilii, and stapedius muscles innervated by the bilateral motor cortices had increased muscle hyperactivity, which lowered the vertical medial eyebrow position and decreased the static compliance of the tympanic membrane more than those innervated by the unilateral motor cortex. Unilateral enhanced tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles in certain subjects ipsilaterally decreased the static compliance with increased contraction of the stapedius muscle, which probably occurs to immobilise the tympanic membrane and protect the inner ear from loud sound. Evaluation of unilateral tight eyelid closure and the subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position as well as a measurement of the static compliance for the stapedius muscle tone has revealed muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles.

  17. Quantitative ultrasound of denervated hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Neil G; Ralph, Jeffrey W; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Poncelet, Ann N; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kliot, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Presentations to the neuromuscular clinic commonly involve hand muscle denervation, but few studies have evaluated hand muscle ultrasound. Ultrasound studies of abductor pollicis brevis, first dorsal interosseous, and abductor digit minimi were prospectively performed in a cohort of 34 patients (77 muscles) with electromyography (EMG)-confirmed denervation, compared with 58 healthy control subjects. In control subjects, muscle thickness was highly reproducible [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.88-0.98], and echogenicity was moderately reproducible (ICC = 0.542-0.686). Age, gender, and body mass index influenced muscle thickness and echogenicity. Ultrasound changes in denervated muscles correlated with the severity of EMG abnormalities. A z-score cutoff of 0 identified denervated muscles with a sensitivity of 100% and 89% for echogenicity and muscle thickness, respectively. Hand muscle ultrasound provides a noninvasive method to quantify muscle denervation and may be useful as a screening tool before EMG studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The cleidosternohyoid: a fifth infrahyoid muscle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a cleidosternohyoid muscle found bilaterally during routine dissection of a cadaver (92 year-old male of Irish descent. On the right side, the muscle originated from the clavicle with a cleidohyoid muscle. On the left side, the muscle originated from the clavicle and accompanied the inferior belly of an omohyoid muscle. On both sides the muscle inserted into the sternohyoid muscle. Since the muscle variant courses with a cleidohyoid on the right and the inferior belly of an omohyoid on the left, it is best described as a distinct fifth infrahyoid muscle rather than an accessory infrahyoid muscle. This is the first definitive case of a bilateral cleidosternohyoid reported in the literature.

  19. Assessment of muscle fatigue using electromygraphm sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Muhammad Hazimin Bin; Ping, Chew Sue; Ishak, Nur Elliza Binti; Saad, Mohd Alimi Bin Mohd; Mokhtar, Anis Shahida Niza Binti

    2017-08-01

    Muscle fatigue is condition of muscle decline in ability after undergoing any physical activity. Observation of the muscle condition of an athlete during training is crucial to prevent or minimize injury and able to achieve optimum performance in actual competition. The aim of this project is to develop a muscle monitoring system to detect muscle fatigue in swimming athlete. This device is capable to measure muscle stress level of the swimmer and at the same time provide indication of muscle fatigue level to trainer. Electromyography signal was recorded from the muscle movement while practicing the front crawl stroke repetitively. The time domain data was processed to frequency spectra in order to study the effect of muscle fatigue. The results show that the recorded EMG signal is able to sense muscle fatigue.

  20. Muscle histochemistry in chronic alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Ferraz

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-two chronic acoholic patients were assessed by neurologic examination and muscle biopsy. The patients manifested proximal muscular weakness to a variable extent. One case presented as an acute bout of myopathy, according to the Manual Muscle Test, MMT. The most prominent histologic feature observed was muscle atrophy (95.3% better evidenced through the ATPase stain with the predominance of type II A fibers (71.4%. Lack of the mosaic pattern (type grouping seen in 76% of the cases and an important mitochondrial proliferation with intrasarcoplasmatic lipid accumulation in 63% of the patients. In case of acute presentation of muscle weakness the. pathological substrate is quite different, i.e. presence of myositis mainly interstitial characterized by lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate and several spots of necrosis like Zencker degeneration. Based on histologic criteria, our data suggest that: the main determinant of muscle weakness seen in chronic alcoholic patients is neurogenic in origin (alcoholic polineuropathy; the direct toxic action of ethanol under the skeletal muscle is closely related to the mitochondrial metabolism; the so-called acute alcoholic myopathy has probably viral etiology.

  1. Artificial muscle: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Marcus C

    2011-12-19

    Mechanical devices are sought to support insufficient or paralysed striated muscles including the failing heart. Nickel-titanium alloys (nitinol) present the following two properties: (i) super-elasticity, and (ii) the potential to assume different crystal structures depending on temperature and/or stress. Starting from the martensite state nitinol is able to resume the austenite form (state of low potential energy and high entropy) even against an external resistance. This one-way shape change is deployed in self-expanding vascular stents. Heating induces the force generating transformation from martensite to the austenite state while cooling induces relaxation back to the martensite state. This two-way shape change oscillating between the two states may be used in cyclically contracting support devices of silicon-coated nitinol wires. Such a contractile device sutured to the right atrium has been tested in vitro in a bench model and in vivo in sheep. The contraction properties of natural muscles, specifically of the myocardium, and the tight correlation with ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria is briefly outlined. Force development by the nitinol device cannot be smoothly regulated as in natural muscle. Its mechanical impact is forced onto the natural muscle regardless of the actual condition with regard to metabolism and Ca2+-homeostasis. The development of artificial muscle on the basis of nitinol wires is still in its infancy. The nitinol artificial muscle will have to prove its viability in the various clinical settings.

  2. Morphology of peroneus tertius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S D; Joshi, S S; Athavale, S A

    2006-10-01

    Peroneus tertius (PT) muscle is peculiar to man, and man is the only member among the primates in whom this muscle occurs. The muscle is variable in its development and attachment. Because of functional demands of bipedal gait and plantigrade foot, part of extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) has migrated upwards into the leg from the dorsum of foot. PT is a muscle that evolution is rendering more important. In a total of 110 cadavers, extensor compartment of leg and dorsum of foot were dissected in both the lower limbs and extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and PT muscles were dissected and displayed. PT was found to be absent in 10.5% limbs, the incidence being greater on the right side. The remaining limbs in which the PT muscle was present had a very extensive origin from lower 3/4th of extensor surface of fibula (20% on right and in 17% on left), and the EDL was very much reduced in size. In approximately 12%, the tendon of PT was thick or even thicker than the tendon of EDL. In 4%, the tendon extended beyond fifth metatarsal up to metatarsophalangeal joint of fifth toe, and in 1.5%, it extended up to the proximal phalanx of little toe. In two cases (both on the right side), where PT was absent, it was replaced by a slip from lateral margin of EDL. We conclude that PT, which is preeminently human, is extending its purchase both proximally and distally.

  3. New insights into muscle function during pivot feeding in seahorses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Van Wassenbergh

    Full Text Available Seahorses, pipefish and their syngnathiform relatives are considered unique amongst fishes in using elastic recoil of post-cranial tendons to pivot the head extremely quickly towards small crustacean prey. It is known that pipefish activate the epaxial muscles for a considerable time before striking, at which rotations of the head and the hyoid are temporarily prevented to allow energy storage in the epaxial tendons. Here, we studied the motor control of this system in seahorses using electromyographic recordings of the epaxial muscles and the sternohyoideus-hypaxial muscles with simultaneous high-speed video recordings of prey capture. In addition we present the results from a stimulation experiment including the muscle hypothesised to be responsible for the locking and triggering of pivot feeding in seahorses (m. adductor arcus palatini. Our data confirmed that the epaxial pre-activation pattern observed previously for pipefish also occurs in seahorses. Similar to the epaxials, the sternohyoideus-hypaxial muscle complex shows prolonged anticipatory activity. Although a considerable variation in displacements of the mouth via head rotation could be observed, it could not be demonstrated that seahorses have control over strike distance. In addition, we could not identify the source of the kinematic variability in the activation patterns of the associated muscles. Finally, the stimulation experiment supported the previously hypothesized role of the m. adductor arcus palatini as the trigger in this elastic recoil system. Our results show that pre-stressing of both the head elevators and the hyoid retractors is taking place. As pre-activation of the main muscles involved in pivot feeding has now been demonstrated for both seahorses and pipefish, this is probably a generalized trait of Syngnathidae.

  4. Skeletal muscle responses to unloading with special reference to man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, G. A.; Hather, B. M.; Buchanan, P.

    1992-01-01

    The limited space flight data suggest that exposure to microgravity decreases muscle strength in humans and muscle mass in lower mammals. Several earth-based models have been used to address the effect of unloading on the human neuromuscular system due to the limited access of biological research to long-term space flight. Bedrest eliminates body weight bearing of both lower limbs. Unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS), where all ambulatory activity is performed on crutches with an elevated sole on the shoe of one foot, has recently been used to unload one lower limb. The results from studies using these two models support their efficacy. The decrease in strength of m. quadriceps femoris, for example, after four to six weeks of bedrest, ULLS or space flight is 20 to 25 percent. The results from the earth-based studies show that this response can be attributed in part to a decrease in the cross-sectional area of the KE which reflects muscle fiber atrophy. The results from the ground based studies also support the limited flight data and show that reductions in strength are larger in lower than upper limbs and in extensor than flexor muscle groups. They also raise issue with the generally held concept that postural muscle is most affected by unweighting. Slow-twitch fibers in lower limb muscles of mixed fiber type composition and muscle composed mainly of slow-twitch fibers do not preferentially atrophy after bedrest or ULLS. Taken together, the data suggest that unloading causes remarkable adaptations in the neuromuscular system of humans. It should be appreciated, however, that this area of research is in its infancy.

  5. Generalized periodic and generalized Boolean rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard E. Bell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove that a generalized periodic, as well as a generalized Boolean, ring is either commutative or periodic. We also prove that a generalized Boolean ring with central idempotents must be nil or commutative. We further consider conditions which imply the commutativity of a generalized periodic, or a generalized Boolean, ring.

  6. Validation of shear wave elastography in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Sarah F; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; Greenleaf, James F; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-09-27

    Skeletal muscle is a very dynamic tissue, thus accurate quantification of skeletal muscle stiffness throughout its functional range is crucial to improve the physical functioning and independence following pathology. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound-based technique that characterizes tissue mechanical properties based on the propagation of remotely induced shear waves. The objective of this study is to validate SWE throughout the functional range of motion of skeletal muscle for three ultrasound transducer orientations. We hypothesized that combining traditional materials testing (MTS) techniques with SWE measurements will show increased stiffness measures with increasing tensile load, and will correlate well with each other for trials in which the transducer is parallel to underlying muscle fibers. To evaluate this hypothesis, we monitored the deformation throughout tensile loading of four porcine brachialis whole-muscle tissue specimens, while simultaneously making SWE measurements of the same specimen. We used regression to examine the correlation between Young's modulus from MTS and shear modulus from SWE for each of the transducer orientations. We applied a generalized linear model to account for repeated testing. Model parameters were estimated via generalized estimating equations. The regression coefficient was 0.1944, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.1463-0.2425) for parallel transducer trials. Shear waves did not propagate well for both the 45° and perpendicular transducer orientations. Both parallel SWE and MTS showed increased stiffness with increasing tensile load. This study provides the necessary first step for additional studies that can evaluate the distribution of stiffness throughout muscle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The transcription factor TEAD1 represses smooth muscle-specific gene expression by abolishing myocardin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiaobo; Hu, Guoqing; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Jiliang

    2014-02-07

    The TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) proteins share an evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding TEA domain, which binds to the MCAT cis-acting regulatory element. Previous studies have shown that TEAD proteins are involved in regulating the expression of smooth muscle α-actin. However, it remains undetermined whether TEAD proteins play a broader role in regulating expression of other genes in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we show that the expression of TEAD1 is significantly induced during smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and negatively correlates with smooth muscle-specific gene expression. We further demonstrate that TEAD1 plays a novel role in suppressing expression of smooth muscle-specific genes, including smooth muscle α-actin, by abolishing the promyogenic function of myocardin, a key mediator of smooth muscle differentiation. Mechanistically, we found that TEAD1 competes with myocardin for binding to serum response factor (SRF), resulting in disruption of myocardin and SRF interactions and thereby attenuating expression of smooth muscle-specific genes. This study provides the first evidence demonstrating that TEAD1 is a novel general repressor of smooth muscle-specific gene expression through interfering with myocardin binding to SRF.

  8. Unlocking Barriers to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity: A Cross-Species Analysis of Cytosolic DNA Sensing in Skeletal Muscle Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal Muscle Myocytes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Gerasimos J. Zaharatos CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital...Immunogenicity: A Cross-Species Analysis of Cytosolic DNA Sensing in Skeletal Muscle Myocytes 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr...humans. The present work is testing the hypothesis that skeletal muscle myocytes sense cytosolic DNA and elaborate an inflammatory response to DNA

  9. Simple technique for maximal thoracic muscle harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, M Blair; Kaiser, Larry R; Kucharczuk, John C

    2004-04-01

    We present a modification of technique for standard muscle flap harvest, the placement of cutaneous traction sutures. This technique allows for maximal dissection of the thoracic muscles even through minimal incisions. Through improved exposure and traction, complete dissection of the muscle bed can be performed and the tissue obtained maximized. Because more muscle bulk is obtained with this technique, the need for a second muscle may be prevented.

  10. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies.

  11. Stature is an essential predictor of muscle strength in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogrel Jean-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with growth retardation or short stature generally present with lower strength than children of the same chronological age. The aim of the study was to establish if strength was dependent on variables related to stature in a population of healthy children and to propose practical predictive models for the muscle functions tested. A secondary aim was to test for any learning effects concerning strength measured at two successive visits by children. Methods Hand grip, elbow flexion and extension, and knee flexion and extension were measured by fixed dynamometry in 96 healthy subjects (47 girls and 49 boys, aged from 5 to 17 years. Results For the present paediatric population, muscle strength was highly dependent on height. Predictive models are proposed for the muscle functions tested. No learning effect between the first and the second visit was detected for any of the muscle functions tested. Conclusions This work shows that strength measurements using fixed dynamometry are reliable in children when using appropriate standardization of operating procedures. It underlines the particular relationship between body stature and muscle strength. Predictive equations may help with assessing the neuromuscular involvement in children suffering from various disorders, particularly those affecting their stature.

  12. Muscle sonography in six patients with hereditary inclusion body myopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Ronald S. [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Division of Ultrasound and Body Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Garolfalo, Giovanna [Ospedale Residenza Sanitaria Riabilitativa, Fermo, AP (Italy); Paget, Stephen; Kagen, Lawrence [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Rheumatology Division, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-01-15

    To evaluate the morphological changes of muscle with sonography in six patients affected by hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM). We studied a group of six Persian Jews diagnosed with HIBM. All were homozygous for the GNE mutation M712T. Ultrasonographic examinations of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle groups were performed. A follow-up ultrasound examination was performed, after an interval of 3 years, in four of these patients. Muscles were assessed subjectively as to echogenicity, determined by gray-scale assessment, and loss of normal muscle morphology. Power Doppler sonography (PDS) was used to assess vascularity. A sonographic finding of central atrophy and peripheral sparing resulting in a target-like appearance was noted in the hamstring compartment of all six patients. The quadriceps compartment also showed involvement of the rectus femoris of all patients, which, in some cases, was the only muscle involved in the quadriceps. Vascularity was markedly reduced in the affected areas, with blood flow demonstrated in the peripherally spared areas. The severity of atrophy increased with disease duration. In this case series, we describe a new sonographic finding as well as document progression of HIBM disease, which has generally been described as quadriceps sparing. The myopathic target lesion, as well as isolated rectus femoris atrophy, may provide a useful adjunct to disease diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. CHANGES IN QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING SUSTAINED RECREATIONAL ALPINE SKIING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Kröll

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During a day of skiing thousands of repeated contractions take place. Previous research on prolonged recreational alpine skiing show that physiological changes occur and hence some level of fatigue is inevitable. In the present paper the effect of prolonged skiing on the recruitment and coordination of the muscle activity was investigated. Six subjects performed 24 standardized runs. Muscle activity during the first two (PREskiing and the last two (POSTskiing runs was measured from the vastus lateralis (VL and rectus femoris (RF using EMG and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF on outside leg. A significant pronounced outside leg loading occurred during POSTskiing and the timing of muscle activity peaks occurred more towards turn completion. Specific EMG frequency changes were observed at certain time points throughout the time windows and not over the whole double turn. It is suggested that general muscular fatigue, where additional specific muscle fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers did not occur. The EMG frequency decrease and intensity changes for RF and VL are caused by altered timing (coordination within the turn towards a most likely more uncontrolled skiing technique. Hence, these data provide evidence to suggest recreational skiers alter their skiing technique before a potential change in muscle fiber recruitment occurs

  14. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitakoji Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle, muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle. Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain.

  15. Ca2+ sparks as a plastic signal for skeletal muscle health, aging, and dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noah WEISLEDER; Jian-jie MA

    2006-01-01

    Ca2+ sparks are the elementary units of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in striated muscle cells revealed as localized Ca2+ release events from sarcoplasmic reticulum(SR)by confocal microscopy.While Ca2+ sparks are well defined in cardiac muscle,there has been a general belief that these localized Ca2+ release events are rare in intact adult mammalian skeletal muscle.Several laboratories determined that Ca2+ sparks in mammalian skeletal muscle could only be observed in large numbers when the sarcolemmal membranes are permeabilized or the SR Ca2+ content is artificially manipulated,thus the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of Ca2+ sparks in skeletal muscle remain largely unexplored.Recently,we discovered that membrane deformation generated by osmotic stress induced a robust Ca2+ spark response confined in close spatial proximity to the sarcolemmal membrane in intact mouse muscle fibers.In addition to Ca2+ sparks,prolonged Ca2+ transients, termed Ca2+ bursts, are also identified in intact skeletal muscle.These induced Ca2+ release events are reversible and repeatable,revealing a plastic nature in young muscle fibers.In contrast, induced Ca2+ sparks in aged muscle are transient and cannot be re-stimulated.Dystrophic muscle fibers display uncontrolled Ca2+ sparks,where osmotic stress-induced Ca2+ sparks are not reversible and they are no longer spatially restricted to the sarcolemmal membrane.An understanding of the mechanisms that underlie generation of osmotic stressinduced Ca2+ sparks in skeletal muscle and how these mechanisms are altered in pathology, will contribute to our understanding of the regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis in muscle physiology and pathophysiology.

  16. Functional electrical stimulation as a safe and effective treatment for equine epaxial muscle spasms: Clinical evaluations and histochemical morphometry of mitochondria in muscle biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ravara

    2015-03-01

    hypothesis of generalized FES-induced muscle fiber damage during epaxial muscle training is not supported by our data since: 3.1 Denervated muscle fibers were also present in the Pre-FES biopsies and 3.2 Only one horse presented with several long-term denervated muscles fibers Post-FES; 4 Preliminary data indicate an increased density and distribution of mitochondria in Post-FES biopsies, suggesting that the clinical improvements in the FES treated horses may be related to daily increased muscle contraction and perfusion induced by FES training. In conclusion, FES in horses is a safe treatment that provides clinical improvements in equine epaxial muscle spasms.

  17. Fetuses of lean and obese swine in late gestation: body composition, plasma hormones and muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, E C; Wangsness, P J; Hagen, D R; Etherton, T D

    1983-09-01

    The development of obesity in porcine fetuses was investigated using a lean and obese strain of pigs at 80, 90, 100 and 110 d of gestation. In absolute terms, fetuses of obese gilts (FO) generally had lower carcass weight and contained less total protein, dry matter and ash than fetuses of lean gilts (FL). In relative terms (percentage of wet carcass weight) FO, compared with FL, generally had decreased percentages of water and increased percentages of protein and lipid. Comparisons based on absolute terms revealed body composition of the strains to be different at 90 d, indicating that factors responsible for obese-type growth were active before that time. Both body composition and hormone concentration differences were most pronounced at later gestation ages. Depressed growth hormone, elevated cortisol, and a tendency toward elevated insulin concentrations in fetal plasma were apparent in late gestation for FO compared with FL. These hormonal patterns are consistent with onset of obesity in FO in late gestation. Greater weights of semitendinosus and longissimus muscles were observed in FL vs FO at 90, 100 and 110 d of gestation (P less than .05). These greater muscle weights were generally accompanied by greater contents of RNA, DNA and protein in FL muscles at these same ages. However, at 80 d, FL had greater absolute DNA content in semitendinosus muscle whereas muscle weight was similar between the strains. This suggests that greater muscle weights for FL than FO were caused by more nuclei in muscle of FL. In general, indices of hypertrophy (protein/DNA) and protein synthetic capacity (RNA/DNA) of muscle were usually similar for both strains at all gestation ages. It is concluded that decreased muscle growth in late gestation of FO compared with FL is more related to fewer total nuclei and perhaps fewer myofibers than to an impaired cellular capacity for protein synthesis.

  18. Sympathetic modulation of muscle spindle afferent sensitivity to stretch in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Ljubisavljevic, M; Johansson, H; Passatore, M

    2002-04-01

    Previous reports showed that sympathetic stimulation affects the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of sympathetic modulation of MSA response to stretch: (i) on the dynamic and static components of the stretch response, and (ii) on group Ia and II MSAs to evaluate potentially different effects. In anaesthetised rabbits, the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was stimulated at 10 impulses s(-1) for 45-90 s. The responses of single MSAs to trapezoidal displacement of the mandible were recorded from the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. The following characteristic parameters were determined from averaged trapezoidal responses: initial frequency (IF), peak frequency at the end of the ramp (PF), and static index (SI). From these, other parameters were derived: dynamic index (DI = PF - SI), dynamic difference (DD = PF - IF) and static difference (SD = SI - IF). The effects of CSN stimulation were also evaluated during changes in the state of intrafusal muscle fibre contraction induced by succinylcholine and curare. In a population of 124 MSAs, 106 units (85.4 %) were affected by sympathetic stimulation. In general, while changes in resting discharge varied among different units (Ia vs. II) and experimental conditions (curarised vs. non-curarised), ranging from enhancement to strong depression of firing, the amplitude of the response to muscle stretches consistently decreased. This was confirmed and detailed in a quantitative analysis performed on 49 muscle spindle afferents. In both the non-curarised (23 units) and curarised (26 units) condition, stimulation of the CSN reduced the response amplitude in terms of DD and SD, but hardly affected DI. The effects were equally present in both Ia and II units; they were shown to be independent from gamma drive and intrafusal muscle tone and not secondary to muscle hypoxia. Sympathetic action on the resting discharge (IF) was less

  19. General(es) remisión de V. escuelas general(es).

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    [ES] Definición del término General(es) remisión de V. escuelas general(es). en el diccionario Dicter. [EN] Definition of the word General(es) remisión de V. escuelas general(es). in the dictionary Dicter.

  20. Motor Unit Characteristics after Targeted Muscle Reinnervation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Kapelner

    Full Text Available Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR is a surgical procedure used to redirect nerves originally controlling muscles of the amputated limb into remaining muscles above the amputation, to treat phantom limb pain and facilitate prosthetic control. While this procedure effectively establishes robust prosthetic control, there is little knowledge on the behavior and characteristics of the reinnervated motor units. In this study we compared the m. pectoralis of five TMR patients to nine able-bodied controls with respect to motor unit action potential (MUAP characteristics. We recorded and decomposed high-density surface EMG signals into individual spike trains of motor unit action potentials. In the TMR patients the MUAP surface area normalized to the electrode grid surface (0.25 ± 0.17 and 0.81 ± 0.46, p < 0.001 and the MUAP duration (10.92 ± 3.89 ms and 14.03 ± 3.91 ms, p < 0.01 were smaller for the TMR group than for the controls. The mean MUAP amplitude (0.19 ± 0.11 mV and 0.14 ± 0.06 mV, p = 0.07 was not significantly different between the two groups. Finally, we observed that MUAP surface representation in TMR generally overlapped, and the surface occupied by motor units corresponding to only one motor task was on average smaller than 12% of the electrode surface. These results suggest that smaller MUAP surface areas in TMR patients do not necessarily facilitate prosthetic control due to a high degree of overlap between these areas, and a neural information-based control could lead to improved performance. Based on the results we also infer that the size of the motor units after reinnervation is influenced by the size of the innervating motor neuron.

  1. Epifascial accessory palmaris longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiengo, Cesare; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Bassetto, Franco; De Caro, Raffaele

    2006-09-01

    In hand reconstructive surgery the palmaris longus muscle is one of the most utilized donor site for tendon reconstruction procedures. However, its anatomic position is variable and anatomic variations may be responsible for median nerve compression. We report the case of a 40-year-old, right-handed woman, who presented with numbness and paresthesias in the palm and in the flexor aspect of the first, second, and third fingers of her right hand for the preceding 5 months, coinciding with increase of office work (typing). The clinical examination and radiological investigations (ultrasound and magnetic resonance) revealed a subcutaneous mass (15 mm x 2.3 mm x 6 cm), with a lenticular shape and definite edges at the level of the volar aspect of the distal third of the forearm. The fine-needle aspiration biopsy revealed the presence of striated muscle fibers. During surgery, a muscle belly was found in the epifascial plane. This muscle originated from subcutaneous septa in the middle forearm and inserted on to the superficial palmar aponeurosis with fine short tendon fibers. Exposure of the antebrachial fascia did not reveal any area of weakness or muscle herniation. The palmaris longus tendon, flexor digitorum superficialis tendons, and flexor carpi radialis tendon showed usual topography under the antebrachial fascia. The accessory muscle was excised and histology revealed unremarkable striated muscle fibers, limited by a thin connective sheath. The presence of an accessory palmaris longus (APL) located in the epifascial plane could be ascribed to an unusual migration of myoblasts during the morphogenesis. Although extremely rare, APL is worth bearing in mind as a possible cause of median nerve compression and etiology of a volar mass in the distal forearm.

  2. Recruitment in a heterogeneous population of motor neurons that innervates the depressor muscle of the crayfish walking leg muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew A V; Cattaert, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    According to the size principle the fine control of muscle tension depends on the orderly recruitment of motor neurons from a heterogeneous pool. We took advantage of the small number of excitatory motor neurons (about 12) that innervate the depressor muscle of the crayfish walking leg to determine if the size principle applies to this muscle. We found that in accordance with the size principle, when stimulated by proprioceptive input, neurons with small extracellular spikes were recruited before neurons with medium or large spikes. Because only a small fraction of the motor neurons responded strongly enough to sensory input to be recruited in this way, we extended our analysis to all neurons by characterizing properties that have classically been associated with recruitment order such as speed of axonal conduction and extracellular spike amplitude. Through a combination of physiological and anatomical criteria we were able to identify seven classes of excitatory depressor motor neurons. The majority of these classes responded to proprioceptive input with a resistance reflex, while a few responded with an assistance reflex, and yet others did not respond. Our results are in general agreement with the size principle. However, we found qualitative differences between neuronal classes in terms of synaptic input and neuronal structure that would in theory be unnecessary, according to a strict interpretation of the size principle. We speculate that the qualitative heterogeneity observed may be due to the fact that the depressor is a complex muscle, consisting of two muscle bundles that share a single insertion but have multiple origins.

  3. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Marchetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140° in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL, vastus medialis (VM, rectus femoris (RF, biceps femoris (BF, semitendinosus (ST, and gluteus maximus (GM. In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only.

  4. [Evaluation of muscle relaxant requirement for hospital anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolev, A V; Levshankov, A I; Bogomolov, B N; Pereloma, V I; Dumnov, A G

    2013-03-01

    The rationale for cost-effectiveness of modern muscle relaxants (MR) administration in general anesthesia was evaluated. New MRs are more expensive than traditionally used pipecuronium and succinylcholine. However, the old MRs are often required as a block reversion with anticholinesterase medicines at the end of surgery, the longer artificial lung ventilation and observation in patients during recovery in intensive care unit. It was found that the district military hospital had done an annual average of about 900 general anesthesia assisted with artificial ventilation and muscle relaxation. About 2% of all anesthesias accrue to short-term anesthesia, the 27% to medium-term and 71% to long-term. 81% of the medium-term anesthesia accrue small hospitals. According to cost/effectiveness the most optimal muscle relaxants administration scheme for short-term (up to 30 min) anesthesia was mivacurium, for the operation of medium duration (30-120 min)--rocuronium, for long-term (120 min)--pipecuronium. An electronic form of annual report, which allows to obtain the necessary data for calculation of annual muscle relaxants demand and costs both in hospital and in the whole of the armed forces quickly, was developed.

  5. Generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle tension, upset stomach, sweating, or difficulty breathing. Exams and Tests There is no test that can ... you can help yourself get better by: Reducing caffeine Not using street drugs or large amounts of ...

  6. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability.

  7. Viscoelastic properties of laryngeal posturing muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo

    2003-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of canine laryngeal muscles were measured in a series of in vitro experiments. Laryngeal posturing that controls vocal fold length and adduction/abduction is an essential component of the voice production. The dynamics of posturing depends on the viscoelastic and physiological properties of the laryngeal muscles. The time-dependent and nonlinear behaviors of these tissues are also crucial in the voice production and pitch control theories. The lack of information on some of these muscles such as posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA), lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA), and intraarytenoid muscle (IA) was the major incentive for this study. Samples of PCA and LCA muscles were made from canine larynges and mounted on a dual-servo system (Ergometer) as described in our previous works. Two sets of experiments were conducted on each muscle, a 1-Hz stretch and release experiment that provides stress-strain data and a stress relaxation test. Data from these muscles were fitted to viscoelastic models and Young's modulus and viscoelastic constants are obtained for each muscle. Preliminary data indicates that elastics properties of these muscles are similar to those of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. The relaxation response of these muscles also shows some similarity to other laryngeal muscles in terms of time constants.

  8. Intraoperative length and tension curves of human eye muscles. Including stiffness in passive horizontal eye movement in awake volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G.H. Kolling (Gerold); H. Kaufmann (Herbert); B. van Dijk (Bob)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIntraoperative continuous-registration length and tension curves of attached and detached eye muscles were made in 18 strabismic patients under general anesthesia. For relaxed eye muscles, we found an exponential relation between length and tension. An increased stiffness was quantified

  9. Protein supplementation augments the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to resistance-type exercise training: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cermak, N.M.; Res, P.T.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein ingestion after a single bout of resistance-type exercise stimulates net muscle protein accretion during acute postexercise recovery. Consequently, it is generally accepted that protein supplementation is required to maximize the adaptive response of the skeletal muscle to prolon

  10. Protein supplementation augments the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to resistance-type exercise training: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cermak, N.M.; Res, P.T.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein ingestion after a single bout of resistance-type exercise stimulates net muscle protein accretion during acute postexercise recovery. Consequently, it is generally accepted that protein supplementation is required to maximize the adaptive response of the skeletal muscle to

  11. The masticatory system under varying functional load. Part 1: structural adaptation of rabbit jaw muscles to reduced masticatory load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeke, M.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Korfage, J.A.M.; Zentner, A.; Grünheid, T.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibres can change their myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform and cross-sectional area, which determine their contraction velocity and maximum force generation, respectively, to adapt to varying functional loads. In general, reduced muscle activity induces transition towards faster fibre

  12. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic thymectomy: modified non-muscle relaxant technique--case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dawlatly, Abdelazeem A

    2007-02-01

    Anesthesia for thymectomy in myasthenia gravis is challenging. The anesthetic experience of that technique is quite large. In involves either muscle relaxant or non-muscle relaxant techniques. However, the literature is deficient of standard anesthetic technique for thoracoscopic thymectomy. Therefore we present in this report a modified non-muscle relaxant technique for thoracoscopic thymectomy (TT). We report two cases who underwent TT under general anesthesia using sufentanil and propofol for induction and local anesthesia spray to the vocal cords to facilitate endobronchial intubation using non-muscle relaxant technique. The intubating, operating and postoperative conditions were excellent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on modified non-muscle relaxant technique for TT in myasthenia gravis. Further cases have to be done to verify our technique.

  13. Developmental changes in the protein profiles of human cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, T D; Edwards, Y H; Hopkinson, D A

    1978-05-01

    1. The use of SDS electrophoresis as a tool for the analysis of development processes in man has been evaluated. 2. The protein profiles of cardiac and skeletal muscle from foetal (10--24 weeks gestation) infant and adult specimens have been analysed and striking developmental changes were found which involved all the major proteins. 3. Before 20 weeks gestation the soluble protein profile of skeletal muscle appears to consist largely of extracellular proteins. 4. Myoglobin was found in foetal cardiac muscle from 20 weeks gestation but was not demonstrable in foetal (greater than 24 weeks) skeletal muscle. Foetal and adult myoglobin were indistinguishable. 5. A limited survey of the protein patterns of brain, liver and kidney was carried out. In general these tissues show less developmental change than skeletal or cardiac muscle.

  14. An EMG-to-force processing approach for determining ankle muscle forces during normal human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogey, R A; Perry, J; Gitter, A J

    2005-09-01

    Muscle forces move our limbs. These forces must be estimated with indirect techniques, as direct measurements are neither generally possible nor practical. An electromyography (EMG)-to-force processing technique was developed. Ankle joint moments and, by extension, ankle muscle forces were calculated. The ankle moment obtained by inverse dynamics was calculated for ten normal adults during free speed gait. There was close correlation between inverse dynamics ankle moments and moments determined by the EMG-to-force processing approach. Muscle forces were determined. The gait peak Achilles tendon force occurred in late single limb support. Peak force observed (2.9 kN) closely matched values obtained where force transducers were used to obtain in vivo muscle forces (2.6 kN). The EMG-to-force processing model presented here appears to be a practical means to determine in vivo muscle forces.

  15. Donepezil: A cause of inadequate muscle relaxation and delayed neuromuscular recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Bhardwaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old female with diabetes mellitus type II and Alzheimer′s disease, taking donepezil for 4 months was operated for right modified radical mastectomy under general anesthesia. During the procedure a higher dose of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant was required than those recommended for her age yet the muscle relaxation was inadequate intra-operatively. Residual neuromuscular blockade persisted postoperatively, due to the cumulative effect of large doses of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant, needing post-operative ventilatory assistance. After ruling out other causes of resistance to non-depolarizing muscle relaxants, we concluded that acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil was primarily responsible for inadequate muscle relaxation and delayed post-operative neuromuscular recovery.

  16. Choosing a skeletal muscle relaxant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Sharon; Ginzburg, Regina

    2008-08-01

    Skeletal muscle relaxants are widely used in treating musculoskeletal conditions. However, evidence of their effectiveness consists mainly of studies with poor methodologic design. In addition, these drugs have not been proven to be superior to acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses support using skeletal muscle relaxants for short-term relief of acute low back pain when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen are not effective or tolerated. Comparison studies have not shown one skeletal muscle relaxant to be superior to another. Cyclobenzaprine is the most heavily studied and has been shown to be effective for various musculoskeletal conditions. The sedative properties of tizanidine and cyclobenzaprine may benefit patients with insomnia caused by severe muscle spasms. Methocarbamol and metaxalone are less sedating, although effectiveness evidence is limited. Adverse effects, particularly dizziness and drowsiness, are consistently reported with all skeletal muscle relaxants. The potential adverse effects should be communicated clearly to the patient. Because of limited comparable effectiveness data, choice of agent should be based on side-effect profile, patient preference, abuse potential, and possible drug interactions.

  17. Muscle pathology in juvenile dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenilson Eduardo Calore

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study muscle biopsies, using histochemistry, on ten children with infantile dermatomyositis. DESIGN: Series of ten patients (of whom eight patients had received treatment and two had not were submitted to muscle biopsy in order to diagnose possible inflammatory myopathy or to detect recurrences. PLACE OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE STUDY: Public Health Service of São Paulo State. PARTICIPANTS: children with clinical features of inflammatory myopathy. INTERVENTION: biopsies were performed on the vastus lateralis using local anesthetic. Histochemistry was performed according to standardized methods. RESULTS: Architectural changes of the muscle fibers, necrosis of variable intensity and accentuated evidence of regeneration were observed in patients who had not received treatment (2 cases and in one case where muscular weakness persisted in spite of corticosteroid therapy. Necrosis and regeneration were minimal or absent in cases treated for one year or more (4 cases. In 3 cases with clinical and laboratorial recurrences, muscle necrosis and architectural changes were detected. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that muscle biopsy could aid in diagnosing infantile dermatomyositis as well as in detecting recurrences even in cases without clinical activity of the disease.

  18. Diagnosis of skeletal muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Jennifer; Fialho, Doreen; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare disorders of muscle membrane excitability. Their episodic nature may result in diagnostic difficulty and delays in diagnosis. Advances in diagnostic clinical electrophysiology combined with DNA-based diagnosis have improved diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. Ascribing pathogenic status to identified genetic variants in muscle channel genes may be complex and functional analysis, including molecular expression, may help with this. Accurate clinical and genetic diagnosis enables genetic counselling, advice regarding prognosis and aids treatment selection. An approach to accurate and efficient diagnosis is outlined. The importance of detailed clinical evaluation including careful history, examination and family history is emphasised. The role of specialised electrodiagnostics combined with DNA testing and molecular expression is considered. New potential biomarkers including muscle MRI using MRC Centre protocols are discussed. A combined diagnostic approach using careful clinical assessment, specialised neurophysiology and DNA testing will now achieve a clear diagnosis in most patients with muscle channelopathies. An accurate diagnosis enables genetic counselling and provides information regarding prognosis and treatment selection. Genetic analysis often identifies new variants of uncertain significance. In this situation, functional expression studies as part of a diagnostic service will enable determination of pathogenic status of novel genetic variants.

  19. Muscle channelopathies and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Muscle channelopathies and related disorders are neuromuscular disorders predominantly of genetic origin which are caused by mutations in ion channels or genes that play a role in muscle excitability. They include different forms of periodic paralysis which are characterized by acute and reversible attacks of muscle weakness concomitant to changes in blood potassium levels. These disorders may also present as distinguishable myotonic syndromes (slowed muscle relaxation) which have in common lack of involvement of dystrophic changes of the muscle, in contrast to dystrophia myotonica. Recent advances have been made in the diagnosis of these different disorders, which require, in addition to a careful clinical evaluation, detailed EMG and molecular study. Although these diseases are rare, they deserve attention since patients may benefit from drugs which can dramatically improve their condition. Patients may have atypical presentations, sometimes life-threatening, which may delay a proper diagnosis, mostly in the first months of life. The creation of specialized reference centers in the Western world has greatly benefited the proper recognition of these neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lower Extremity Muscle Activation and Kinematics of Catchers When Throwing Using Various Squatting and Throwing Postures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chien Peng, Kuo-Cheng Lo, Lin-Hwa Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the differences in joint motions and muscle activities of the lower extremities involved in various squatting postures. The motion capture system with thirty-one reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the quadriceps, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles of the pivot and stride leg. The joint extension and flexion in wide squatting are greater than in general squatting (p = 0.005. Knee joint extension and flexion in general squatting are significantly greater than in wide squatting (p = 0.001. The adduction and abduction of the hip joint in stride passing are significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000. Furthermore, the adduction and abduction of the knee joint in stride passing are also significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000. When stride passing is performed, the muscle activation of the hamstring of the pivot foot in general squatting is significantly greater than in wide squatting (p < 0.05, and this difference continues to the stride period. Most catchers use a general or wide squatting width, exclusive of a narrow one. Therefore, the training design for strengthening the lower extremity muscles should consider the appropriateness of the common squat width to enhance squat-up performance. For lower limb muscle activation, wide squatting requires more active gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Baseball players should extend the knee angle of the pivot foot before catching the ball.

  1. Therapeutic effects of massage and electrotherapy on muscle tone, stiffness and muscle contraction following gastrocnemius muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joong-San

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of a combined intervention consisting of massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on gastrocnemius muscle fatigue, assessing whether the intervention improved muscle tone, stiffness, and muscle contraction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 healthy males in their 20s who were equally divided into a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group and a combined therapy group that received a combination of massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Muscle fatigue was triggered on the gastrocnemius muscle, and the effects of intervention method on muscle tone, stiffness, and muscle contraction were examined over time. [Results] Lateral and medial gastrocnemius muscle tone and stiffness significantly increased and gastrocnemius muscle contraction significantly decreased in each group immediately after fatigue was triggered on the gastrocnemius muscle. There was no difference in the effects of the two intervention methods over time. [Conclusion] This study verified that a combined therapy of massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was able to be used effectively in improving muscle tone, stiffness, muscle contraction, thereby reducing gastrocnemius muscle fatigue. PMID:28210061

  2. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MUSCLE MASS, MUSCLE STRENGTH, PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE, AND MUSCLE FATIGUE RESISTANCE IN COMMUNITY-DWELLING ELDERLY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the correlations between muscle mass, muscle strength, physical performance, and muscle fatigue resistance in community-dwelling elderly people in order to elucidate factors which contribute to elderly’s performance of daily activities. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on community-dwelling elderly in Bandung from September to December 2014. One hundred and thirty elderly, 60 years old or above, were evaluated using bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure muscle mass; grip strength to measure muscle strength and muscle fatigue resistance; habitual gait speed to measure physical performance; and Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ to assess physical activity. Results: There were significant positive correlations between muscle mass (r=0,27, p=0,0019, muscle strength (r=0,26, p=0,0024, and physical performance (r=0,32, p=0,0002 with muscle fatigue resistance. Physical performance has the highest correlation based on multiple regression test (p=0,0025. In association with muscle mass, the physical activity showed a significant positive correlation (r=0,42, p=0,0000. Sarcopenia was identified in 19 (14.61% of 130 subjects. Conclusions: It is suggested that muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance influence muscle fatigue resistance.

  3. Evaluation of muscle function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo and tibialis anterior muscle in situ in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Nalinda B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-02-09

    Body movements are mainly provided by mechanical function of skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle is composed of numerous bundles of myofibers that are sheathed by intramuscular connective tissues. Each myofiber contains many myofibrils that run longitudinally along the length of the myofiber. Myofibrils are the contractile apparatus of muscle and they are composed of repeated contractile units known as sarcomeres. A sarcomere unit contains actin and myosin filaments that are spaced by the Z discs and titin protein. Mechanical function of skeletal muscle is defined by the contractile and passive properties of muscle. The contractile properties are used to characterize the amount of force generated during muscle contraction, time of force generation and time of muscle relaxation. Any factor that affects muscle contraction (such as interaction between actin and myosin filaments, homeostasis of calcium, ATP/ADP ratio, etc.) influences the contractile properties. The passive properties refer to the elastic and viscous properties (stiffness and viscosity) of the muscle in the absence of contraction. These properties are determined by the extracellular and the intracellular structural components (such as titin) and connective tissues (mainly collagen) (1-2). The contractile and passive properties are two inseparable aspects of muscle function. For example, elbow flexion is accomplished by contraction of muscles in the anterior compartment of the upper arm and passive stretch of muscles in the posterior compartment of the upper arm. To truly understand muscle function, both contractile and passive properties should be studied. The contractile and/or passive mechanical properties of muscle are often compromised in muscle diseases. A good example is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle wasting disease caused by dystrophin deficiency (3). Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle cell membrane (sarcolemma) during muscle contraction (4). In the

  4. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training.

  5. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles...... from individuals with chronic SCI show less resistance to fatigue, and the speed-related contractile properties change, becoming faster. These findings are also present in animals. Future studies should longitudinally examine changes in muscles from early SCI until steady state is reached in order...

  6. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  7. Developmental changes in the activation properties and ultrastructure of fast- and slow-twitch muscles from fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J M; Barclay, C J; Luff, A R; Walker, D W

    1999-04-01

    At early stages of muscle development, skeletal muscles contract and relax slowly, regardless of whether they are destined to become fast- or slow-twitch. In this study, we have characterised the activation profiles of developing fast- and slow-twitch muscles from a precocial species, the sheep, to determine if the activation profiles of the muscles are characteristically slow when both the fast- and slow-twitch muscles have slow isometric contraction profiles. Single skinned muscle fibres from the fast-twitch flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles from fetal (gestational ages 70, 90, 120 and 140 days; term 147 days) and neonatal (8 weeks old) sheep were used to determine the isometric force-pCa (pCa = -log10[Ca2+]) and force-pSr relations during development. Fast-twitch mammalian muscles generally have a greatly different sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ whereas slow-twitch muscles have a similar sensitivity to these divalent cations. At all ages studied, the force-pCa and force-pSr relations of the FDL muscle were widely separated. The mean separation of the mid-point of the curves (pCa50-pSr50) was approximately 1.1. This is typical of adult fast-twitch muscle. The force-pCa and force-pSr curves for soleus muscle were also widely separated at 70 and 90 days gestation (pCa50-pSr50 approximately 0.75); between 90 days and 140 days this separation decreased significantly to approximately 0.2. This leads to a paradoxical situation whereby at early stages of muscle development the fast muscles have contraction dynamics of slow muscles but the slow muscles have activation profiles more characteristic of fast muscles. The time course for development of the FDL and soleus is different, based on sarcomere structure with the soleus muscle developing clearly defined sarcomere structure earlier in gestation than the FDL. At 70 days gestation the FDL muscle had no clearly defined sarcomeres. Force (N cm-2) increased almost linearly between 70 and 140 days

  8. Repositioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-09-16

    The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This remarkable translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and that translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition.

  9. Relationship of Skeletal Muscle Development and Growth to Breast Muscle Myopathies: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velleman, Sandra G

    2015-12-01

    Selection in meat-type birds has focused on growth rate, muscling, and feed conversion. These strategies have made substantial improvements but have affected muscle structure, repair mechanisms, and meat quality, especially in the breast muscle. The increase in muscle fiber diameters has reduced available connective tissue spacing, reduced blood supply, and altered muscle metabolism in the breast muscle. These changes have increased muscle fiber degeneration and necrosis but have limited muscle repair mechanisms mediated by the adult myoblast (satellite cell) population of cells, likely resulting in the onset of myopathies. This review focuses on muscle growth mechanisms and how changes in the cellular development of the breast muscle may be associated with breast muscle myopathies occurring in meat-type birds.

  10. Resistance training induces qualitative changes in muscle morphology, muscle architecture, and muscle function in elderly postoperative patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Andersen, Jesper L; Dalgas, Ulrik;

    2008-01-01

    beneficial qualitative changes in muscle fiber morphology and muscle architecture in elderly postoperative patients. In contrast, rehabilitation regimes based on functional exercises and neuromuscular electrical stimulation had no effect. The present data emphasize the importance of resistance training...

  11. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia;

    2009-01-01

    storage disease type X and novel mutations in the gene encoding the muscle subunit of PGAM (PGAM2). DESIGN: Clinical, pathological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospitals and academic institutions. Patients A 37-year-old Danish man of Pakistani origin who had...... PGAM deficiency, and molecular studies revealed 2 novel homozygous mutations, a nonsense mutation and a single nucleotide deletion. Pathological studies of muscle showed mild glycogen accumulation but prominent tubular aggregates in both patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found that glycogen storage disease...

  12. No Muscle Is an Island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Jane A; Ørtenblad, Niels; Hogan, Michael C;

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fatigue has been studied with a variety approaches, tools and technologies. The foci of these studies have ranged tremendously, from molecules to the entire organism. Single cell and animal models have been used to gain mechanistic insight into the fatigue process. The theme of this review...... is the concept that the mechanisms of muscle fatigue do not occur in isolation in vivo: muscular work is supported by many complex physiological systems, any of which could fail during exercise and thus contribute to fatigue. To advance our overall understanding of fatigue, a combination of models and approaches...

  13. Muscle GLUT4 in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland-Fischer, Peter; Andersen, Per Heden; Lund, Sten

    2007-01-01

    test and later a muscle biopsy. Levels of GLUT4 total protein and mRNA content were determined in muscle biopsies by polyclonal antibody labelling and RT-PCR, respectively. RESULTS: GLUT4 protein content in the cirrhosis group was not different from that of the controls, but at variance......: In cirrhosis GLUT4 protein content was quantitatively intact, while limiting glucose tolerance. This indicates loss of redundancy of the major glucose transport system, possibly related to the markedly decreased expression of its gene. Hyper-insulinemia may be a primary event. Our findings implicate...

  14. Spontaneous waves in muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten

    2007-11-01

    Mechanical oscillations are important for many cellular processes, e.g. the beating of cilia and flagella or the sensation of sound by hair cells. These dynamic states originate from spontaneous oscillations of molecular motors. A particularly clear example of such oscillations has been observed in muscle fibers under non-physiological conditions. In that case, motor oscillations lead to contraction waves along the fiber. By a macroscopic analysis of muscle fiber dynamics we find that the spontaneous waves involve non-hydrodynamic modes. A simple microscopic model of sarcomere dynamics highlights mechanical aspects of the motor dynamics and fits with the experimental observations.

  15. Muscle cramps in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shivang S; Fallon, Michael B

    2013-11-01

    Muscle cramps are common in patients with liver disease and adversely influence quality of life. The exact mechanisms by which they occur remain unclear, although a number of pathophysiological events unique to liver disease may contribute. Clinical studies have identified alterations in 3 areas: nerve function, energy metabolism, and plasma volume/electrolytes. Treatments have focused on these particular areas with varied results. This review will focus on the clinical features of muscle cramps in patients with liver disease and review potential mechanisms and current therapies.

  16. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force of mouse fast skeletal muscle and ameliorates weakness due to nebulin-deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jeong Lee

    Full Text Available The effect of the fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, on calcium-induced force development was studied in skinned fast skeletal muscle fibers from wildtype (WT and nebulin deficient (NEB KO mice. Nebulin is a sarcomeric protein that when absent (NEB KO mouse or present at low levels (nemaline myopathy (NM patients with NEB mutations causes muscle weakness. We studied the effect of fast skeletal troponin activation on WT muscle and tested whether it might be a therapeutic mechanism to increase muscle strength in nebulin deficient muscle. We measured tension-pCa relations with and without added CK-2066260. Maximal active tension in NEB KO tibialis cranialis fibers in the absence of CK-2066260 was ∼60% less than in WT fibers, consistent with earlier work. CK-2066260 shifted the tension-calcium relationship leftwards, with the largest relative increase (up to 8-fold at low to intermediate calcium levels. This was a general effect that was present in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. At pCa levels above ∼6.0 (i.e., calcium concentrations <1 µM, CK-2066260 increased tension of NEB KO fibers to beyond that of WT fibers. Crossbridge cycling kinetics were studied by measuring k(tr (rate constant of force redevelopment following a rapid shortening/restretch. CK-2066260 greatly increased k(tr at submaximal activation levels in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. We also studied the sarcomere length (SL dependence of the CK-2066260 effect (SL 2.1 µm and 2.6 µm and found that in the NEB KO fibers, CK-2066260 had a larger effect on calcium sensitivity at the long SL. We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force at submaximal activation in both wildtype and NEB KO fiber bundles and, importantly, that this troponin activation is a potential therapeutic mechanism for increasing force in NM and other skeletal muscle diseases with loss of muscle strength.

  17. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles.

  18. Neural effects of muscle stretching on the spinal reflexes in multiple lower-limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugi, Yohei; Obata, Hiroki; Inoue, Daisuke; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2017-01-01

    While previous studies have shown that muscle stretching suppresses monosynaptic spinal reflex excitability in stretched muscles, its effects on non-stretched muscles is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of muscle stretching on monosynaptic spinal reflex in non-stretched muscles. Ten healthy male subjects participated in this study. Muscle stretching of the right triceps surae muscle was performed using a motor torque device for 1 minute. Three different dorsiflexion torques (at approximately 5, 10, and 15 Nm) were applied during muscle stretching. Spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded in both the lower-limb muscles before, during, and at 0 and 5 min following muscle stretching. The amplitudes of the spinal reflexes in both the stretched and non-stretched muscles in the right (ipsilateral) leg were smaller during stretching compared to before, and at 0 and 5 min after stretching. Furthermore, the degree of reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes in the right (ipsilateral) leg muscles increased significantly as the dorsiflexion torque (i.e., stretching of the right triceps surae muscles) increased. In contrast, reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes with increasing dorsiflexion torque was not seen in the left (contralateral) leg muscles. Our results clearly indicate that muscle stretching has inhibitory effects on monosynaptic spinal reflexes, not only in stretched muscles, but also in non-stretched muscles of the ipsilateral leg.

  19. Effects of Growth on Muscle, Tendon, and Aponeurosis Tissues in Rabbit Shank Musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böl, Markus; Leichsenring, Kay; Siebert, Tobias

    2016-12-20

    There exist several studies using morphological analyses of skeletal muscles to obtain a better understanding of muscle structure. The structural information obtained are primarily determined from single muscle components using individual animals of discrete ages. Further, little is known about changing dimensions of the aponeurosis, which is an important load-transferring interface in muscle mechanics. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine how the muscle, tendon, and particularly the aponeurosis geometry of the rabbit shank musculature (M. soleus, M. extensor digitorum longus, and M. plantaris) change during growth. In doing so, morphological studies on muscles of eighty-nine female rabbits aged between 18 and 108 days were conducted. We found an almost linear increase over time in all of the geometrical parameters observed. The aponeurosis of the muscles exhibited lower growth rates in width than in length. The distal and proximal aponeurosis areas were nearly identical. The ratio of aponeurosis area to the physiological cross-sectional area was 2.54, 2.54, and 1.88 for M. soleus, M. extensor digitorum longus, and M. plantaris, respectively. M. extensor digitorum longus and M. soleus exhibited a nearly similar tendon-muscle fascicle length ratio during growth, increasing from 2.86 to 5.30 and 3.48 to 6.16, respectively. Interestingly, the tendon-muscle fascicle length ratio of the M. plantaris started initially with a much higher value (∼8) and increased to ∼18. Taken together, these results provide insight into the structure of the muscle-tendon complex and thus, a general understanding of muscle growth. Anat Rec, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Enantioselective disposition of (R/S)-albuterol in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Glenn A; Yee, Kwang Choon; Premilovac, Dino; Rattigan, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Significant enhancement of skeletal muscle function has been observed with racemic albuterol (salbutamol). There is now general acceptance that the R-albuterol enantiomer elicits the pharmacological response, both in the lungs and extrapulmonary, while S-albuterol is pharmacologically inert. The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of (R/S)-albuterol enantiomers into skeletal and cardiac muscle. Initially oral dosing was undertaken in neonatal mice administered a maximum tolerable dose of racemic albuterol. An in vivo infusion rat model was employed for the investigation of albuterol uptake into skeletal and cardiac muscle over 4 h. Tissue concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). From the oral dosing model, mean (±SD) levels of racemic albuterol after 5 days were 915 (±293) ng/mL in plasma, 2574 (±196) ng/g in muscle, and 53 (±6.6) ng/g in brain with enantioselective partitioning (muscle:plasma ratio of 5.7 and 1.7 for R- and S-albuterol, respectively). In the infusion model, enantioselective disposition was observed in skeletal muscle (muscle:plasma ratio of 1.2-1.7 and 0.6-0.7 for R- and S-albuterol, respectively) and in cardiac muscle (4.1 and 0.5, respectively). In conclusion, there is greater partitioning of active (R)-albuterol than inactive (S)-albuterol into both skeletal and cardiac muscle compared to plasma. These findings have relevance for albuterol sports doping, cardiac effects, and therapeutic use in muscle wasting diseases. Furthermore, the greater muscle partitioning of the active R-albuterol, and the availability of pure R-albuterol formulations highlight shortcomings in doping control measures using non-enantioselective assays.

  1. Muscle differentiation after sciatic nerve transection and reinnervation in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijkema-Paassen, J; Meek, M F; Gramsbergen, A

    2001-07-01

    Reinnervation after peripheral nerve transections generally leads to poor functional recovery. In order to study whether changes in muscles might be a contributing factor in this phenomenon we studied muscle morphology and fibre type distributions after sciatic nerve transection in the rat hind limb. Proximally, before the bifurcation in the tibial and common peroneal nerve, a 12 mm segment of the sciatic nerve was resected, reversed and re-implanted as an autologous nerve graft. After survival periods of 7, 15 and 21 weeks the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were dissected, stained with mATP-ase, and fibre type distributions were studied. In addition, numbers of muscle fibres were counted, and cross sectional areas were calculated. After 7 weeks, cross sectional areas were decreased in all muscles. In the gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles the fibre number remained unaltered but the hypotrophy had been reversed at later ages. The number of muscle fibres in the soleus muscle remained decreased over the entire period of observation. The percentages of type II fibres in the gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles were decreased at 7 and 15 weeks but these again approached normal values at 21 weeks. The type I fibres, however, remained arranged in groups. In the soleus muscle a large increase in the percentage of type II muscle fibres was observed and this remained until 21 weeks. We conclude that a non-selective reinnervation and later readjustments by regression of polyneural innervation may in part explain the changes in distributions of various fibre types.

  2. PLASTICITY OF SKELETAL MUSCLE STUDIED BY STEREOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Eržen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution provides an overview of stereological methods applied in the skeletal muscle research at the Institute of Anatomy of the Medical Faculty in Ljubljana. Interested in skeletal muscle plasticity we studied three different topics: (i expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in slow and fast muscles under experimental conditions, (ii frequency of satellite cells in young and old human and rat muscles and (iii capillary supply of rat fast and slow muscles. We analysed the expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms within slow rat soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles after (i homotopic and heterotopic transplantation of both muscles, (ii low frequency electrical stimulation of the fast muscle and (iii transposition of the fast nerve to the slow muscle. The models applied were able to turn the fast muscle into a completely slow muscle, but not vice versa. One of the indicators for the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles is its satellite cell pool. The estimated parameters, number of satellite cells per unit fibre length, corrected to the reference sarcomere length (Nsc/Lfib and number of satellite cells per number of nuclei (myonuclei and satellite cell nuclei (Nsc/Nnucl indicated that the frequency of M-cadherin stained satellite cells declines in healthy old human and rat muscles compared to young muscles. To access differences in capillary densities among slow and fast muscles and slow and fast muscle fibres, we have introduced Slicer and Fakir methods, and tested them on predominantly slow and fast rat muscles. Discussing three different topics that require different approach, the present paper reflects the three decades of the development of stereological methods: 2D analysis by simple point counting in the 70's, the disector in the 80's and virtual spatial probes in the 90's. In all methods the interactive computer assisted approach was utilised.

  3. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyewon; Jee, Sungju; Park, Soo Ho; Ahn, Seung-Chan; Im, Juneho; Sohn, Min Kyun

    2016-12-01

    To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all pquantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US.

  4. Variations in pectoral girdle muscles in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alić, I; Trbojević Vukičević, T; Đuras, M; Kužir, S; Fazarinc, G; Gjurčević Kantura, V

    2014-02-01

    Muscle variations take the form of additional muscle bundle or belly, unusual muscle origin or termination, as well as complete muscle absence. Knowledge of such variations not only has clinical importance for guiding surgery, but also can help reveal phylogenetic relationships. To improve our understanding of muscle variations in dogs, 57 medium-sized, cross-breed male and female adult animals were dissected as part of a gross anatomy course between 2005 and 2011. Variations in pectoral girdle muscles were observed in 7 (12.3%) dogs and took the form of an additional muscle bundle in the brachiocephalicus muscle (n = 2), in the omotransversarius muscle (n = 2), in the cervical part of the rhomboideus muscle (n = 2) and in the cervical part of the serratus ventralis muscle (n = 1). Muscle variation was bilateral in only one dog; it involved the omotransversarius muscle. The variations did not seem to be sex dependent. Such variations can appear regularly in dogs and should be taken into consideration during anatomical dissection. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Developing cardiac and skeletal muscle share fast-skeletal myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin-I expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly C Clause

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13 and 20 (ED20, neonatal day 0 (ND0 and 4 (ND4, postnatal day 10 (PND10, and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  6. [Muscle-wasting in end stage renal disease in dialysis treatment: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Yuri; Galeano, Dario; Cojocaru, Elena; Fiorini, Fulvio; Forcellini, Silvia; Zanoli, Luca; Storari, Alda; Granata, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass (muscle wasting) is a frequent complication in dialysis patients. Common uremic signs and symptoms such as insulin-resistance, increase in glucocorticoid activity, metabolic acidosis, malnutrition, inflammation and dialysis per se contribute to muscle wasting by modulating proteolytic intracellular mechanisms (ubiquitin-proteasome system, activation of caspase-3 and IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway). Since muscle wasting is associated with an increase in mortality, bone fractures and worsening in life quality, a prompt and personalised diagnostic and therapeutic approach seems to be essential in dialysis patients. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography (CT), dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), impedance analysis, bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometric measurements are the main tools used to assess skeletal muscle mass. Aerobic and anaerobic training programmes and treatment of uremic complications reduce muscle wasting and increase muscle strength in uremic patients. The present review analyses the most recent data about the physiopathology, diagnosis, therapy and future perspectives of treatment of muscle wasting in dialysis patients.

  7. The variability of co-activation pattern of antagonist muscles in human infant crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qi L; Wu, Xiao Y; Nong Xiao; Zeng, Si Y; Zheng, Xiao L; Di Wu; Hou, Wen S

    2016-08-01

    Infant crawling is part of normal human gross motor development, and a 4-beat gait that involves rhythmical flexion and extension of limbs and the underlying muscle co-activation of antagonist muscle around the joint. However, detection the co-activation pattern of antagonist muscle are sparse due to the general difficulty of measuring locomotion in human infants. In this paper, sEMG of antagonist muscles and the corresponding kinematics data of limbs were collected when infants were crawling on hands and knees at their self-selected speed. The infant's gross motor developmental status was assessed by the global Gross Motor Function Measure Scale (GMFM-88) as well. The method based on EMG-EMG plots was used to quantify the variability of co-activation pattern of antagonist muscle. After that, we observed that antagonist muscles of upper limb (triceps brachii and biceps brachii) showed less variability of co-activation pattern of muscles than lower limb(quadriceps femoris and hamstrings) during crawling, and this variability was also varied in different crawling phases (stance and swing). Furthermore, we found some varied behaviors in the co-activation patterns of antagonist muscles when gross motor developmental level increased. The preliminary work suggests that such adaptive changes may be related to the adjustment of neuromuscular in the early stage of gross motor development.

  8. Skeletal Muscle-Specific CPT1 Deficiency Elevates Lipotoxic Intermediates but Preserves Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchun Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. By specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1b (CPT1b in skeletal muscles, we explored the effect of CPT1b deficiency on lipids and insulin sensitivity. Methods. Mice with specific knockout of CPT1b in skeletal muscles (CPT1b M−/− were used for the experiment group, with littermate C57BL/6 as controls (CPT1b. General and metabolic profiles were measured and compared between groups. mRNA expression and CPT1 activity were measured in skeletal muscle tissues and compared between groups. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO, triglycerides (TAGs, diglycerides (DAGs, and ceramides were examined in skeletal muscles in two groups. Phosphorylated AKT (pAkt and glucose transporter 4 (Glut4 were determined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Insulin tolerance test, glucose tolerance test, and pyruvate oxidation were performed in both groups. Results. CPT1b M−/− model was successfully established, with impaired muscle CPT1 activity. Compared with CPT1b mice, CPT1b M−/− mice had similar food intake but lower body weight or fat mass and higher lipids but similar glucose or insulin levels. Their mitochondrial FAO of skeletal muscles was impaired. There were lipids accumulations (TAGs, DAGs, and ceramides in skeletal muscle. However, pAkt and Glut4, insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and pyruvate oxidation were preserved. Conclusion. Skeletal muscle-specific CPT1 deficiency elevates lipotoxic intermediates but preserves insulin sensitivity.

  9. Evaluation of Direct Collocation Optimal Control Problem Formulations for Solving the Muscle Redundancy Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Friedl; Kinney, Allison L; Rao, Anil V; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2016-10-01

    Estimation of muscle forces during motion involves solving an indeterminate problem (more unknown muscle forces than joint moment constraints), frequently via optimization methods. When the dynamics of muscle activation and contraction are modeled for consistency with muscle physiology, the resulting optimization problem is dynamic and challenging to solve. This study sought to identify a robust and computationally efficient formulation for solving these dynamic optimization problems using direct collocation optimal control methods. Four problem formulations were investigated for walking based on both a two and three dimensional model. Formulations differed in the use of either an explicit or implicit representation of contraction dynamics with either muscle length or tendon force as a state variable. The implicit representations introduced additional controls defined as the time derivatives of the states, allowing the nonlinear equations describing contraction dynamics to be imposed as algebraic path constraints, simplifying their evaluation. Problem formulation affected computational speed and robustness to the initial guess. The formulation that used explicit contraction dynamics with muscle length as a state failed to converge in most cases. In contrast, the two formulations that used implicit contraction dynamics converged to an optimal solution in all cases for all initial guesses, with tendon force as a state generally being the fastest. Future work should focus on comparing the present approach to other approaches for computing muscle forces. The present approach lacks some of the major limitations of established methods such as static optimization and computed muscle control while remaining computationally efficient.

  10. Functional Segregation within the Muscles of Aquatic Propulsion in the Asiatic Water Monitor (Varanus salvator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Arthur Young

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Water monitor lizards (Varanus salvator swim using sinusoidal oscillations generated at the base of their long (50% of total body length tail. In an effort to determine which level of the structural/organizational hierarchy of muscle is associated with functional segregation between the muscles of the tail base, an array of muscle features — myosin heavy chain profiles, enzymatic fiber types, twitch and tetanic force production, rates of fatigue, muscle compliance, and electrical activity patterns — were quantitated. The two examined axial muscles, longissimus and iliocaudalis, were generally similar at the molecular, biochemical, and physiological levels, but differed at the biomechanics level and in their activation pattern. The appendicular muscle examined, caudofemoralis, differed from the axial muscles particularly at the molecular and physiological levels, and it exhibited a unique compliance profile and pattern of electrical activation. There were some apparent contradictions between the different structural/organizational levels examined. These contradictions, coupled with a unique myosin heavy chain profile, lead to the hypothesis that there are previously un-described molecular/biochemical specializations within varanid skeletal muscles.

  11. [Effect of thyroidectomy on energetics of isometric muscle contraction in white rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboliev, V I; Moskalets', T V

    2007-01-01

    The effect of thyroidactomia on parameters of energetics of isometric contractions of front shin--bone muscle of white rats is studied in in situ experiments. It is shown that experimental atiriosis lengthen considerably the latent period of muscle contractions (+95%) considerably reduce (in 5.5 times) the speed of it contraction in first phase of contraction act and also considerably increase the time (+37%), which necessery for developing maximum strength of contraction. Thyroidactomia with general negative influence on ergothropic characteristics of isometric muscle contraction decrease considerably the expenditure of thermal energy on maximum strength of contraction unit (-17%) or on middle isometric tension unit (-9.3%).

  12. Episodic Muscle Tremors in a Quarter Horse: Resemblance to Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Steiss, Janet E.; Naylor, Jonathan M.

    1986-01-01

    A three year old Quarter Horse stallion was presented with a one year history of episodes of generalized muscle tremors and stiffness, and spasm of the muscles of facial expression, lasting 10-15 minutes. Between attacks, the horse was either normal or had a localized muscle tremor in the flank region. Episodes appeared unrelated to exercise. The major abnormal findings included 1) a rise in plasma potassium from a resting level of 4.4 to 7.9 mmol/L during an attack and 2) electromyographic f...

  13. Early-onset acquired myasthenia gravis secondary to anti-muscle-specific kinase autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Gokben, Sarenur; Serdaroglu, Gul; Akcay, Ayfer

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is rarely seen during infancy. Similar to adults, 85% to 90% of generalized pediatric myasthenia gravis cases have acetylcholine receptor antibodies. Approximately 30% of the remaining cases have antibodies against muscle-specific kinase. Information on the clinical course, treatment alternatives, and prognosis of pediatric muscle-specific kinase antibody-positive myasthenia gravis is limited because of the small number of cases. Here, we present a 14-month-old girl with muscle-specific kinase antibody-positive myasthenia gravis as one of the youngest patients described so far in the literature.

  14. Alterations in neuromuscular function in girls with generalized joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Melcher, Jesper Sandfeld; Melcher, Pia Grethe Sandfeld

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal joint pain. We investigated neuromuscular performance and muscle activation strategy. METHODS: Girls with GJH and non-GJH (NGJH) performed isometric knee flexions (90°,110°,130°), and extensions...... (90°) at 20 % Maximum Voluntary Contraction, and explosive isometric knee flexions while sitting. EMG was recorded from knee flexor and extensor muscles. RESULTS: Early rate of torque development was 53 % faster for GJH. Reduced hamstring muscle activation in girls with GJH was found while knee...... extensor and calf muscle activation did not differ between groups. Flexion-extension and medial-lateral co-activation ratio during flexions were higher for girls with GJH than NGJH girls. CONCLUSIONS: Girls with GJH had higher capacity to rapidly generate force than NGJH girls which may reflect motor...

  15. Alterations in neuromuscular function in girls with generalized joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Melcher, Jesper Sandfeld; Melcher, Pia Grethe Sandfeld;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal joint pain. We investigated neuromuscular performance and muscle activation strategy. METHODS: Girls with GJH and non-GJH (NGJH) performed isometric knee flexions (90°,110°,130°), and extensions...... (90°) at 20 % Maximum Voluntary Contraction, and explosive isometric knee flexions while sitting. EMG was recorded from knee flexor and extensor muscles. RESULTS: Early rate of torque development was 53 % faster for GJH. Reduced hamstring muscle activation in girls with GJH was found while knee...... adaptation to compensate for hypermobility. Higher medial muscle activation indicated higher levels of medial knee joint compression in girls with GJH. Increased flexion-extension co-activation ratios in GJH were explained by decreased agonist drive to the hamstrings....

  16. Muscle force recovery in relation to muscle oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufland, Pierre; Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Buchheit, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of human muscle reoxygenation on force recovery following a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Ten athletes (22·9 ± 4·0 years) executed a plantar-flexion sequence including two repeated MVCs [i.e. a 30-s MVC (MVC(30)) followed by a 10-s MVC (MVC(10))] separated by 10, 30, 60, 120 or 300 s of passive recovery. A 10-min passive recovery period was allowed between each MVC sequence. This procedure was randomly repeated with two different recovery conditions: without (CON) or with (OCC) arterial occlusion of the medial gastrocnemius. During OCC, the occlusion was maintained from the end of MVC(30) to the end of MVC(10). Muscle oxygenation (Near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS, [Hb(diff) ]) was continuously measured during all MVC sequences and expressed as a percentage of the maximal changes in optical density observed during MVC(30). Maximal Torque was analysed at the start of each contraction. Torque during each MVC(10) was expressed as a percentage of the Torque during the previous MVC(30). Torque recovery was complete within 300 s after MVC(30) during CON (MVC(10) = 101·8 ± 5·0%); 88·6 ± 8·9% of the Torque was recovered during OCC (P = 0·005). There was also a moderate correlation between absolute level of muscle oxygenation and Torque (r = 0·32 (90% CI, 0·09;0·52), P = 0·02). Present findings confirm the role of human muscle oxygenation in muscular force recovery during repeated-maximal efforts. However, the correlation between absolute muscle oxygenation and force level during recovery is only moderate, suggesting that other mechanisms are likely involved in the force recovery process.

  17. Myofascial force transmission between antagonistic rat lower limb muscles: Effects of single muscle or muscle group lengthening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M; Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M.; Huijing, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of lengthening of the whole group of anterior crural muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus muscles (TA + EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)) on myofascial interaction between synergistic EDL and TA + EHL muscles, and on myofascial force transmission between anterior c

  18. Closing the Loop: Integrating Body, Muscle and Environment with Locomotion Central Pattern Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    simple closed-loop model in which a CPG produces a pattern of muscle activation which is modified by sensory feedback related to body curvature . (a...by a complex interaction of the neural circuits in the spinal cord and brain, the body, the muscles, sensory organs and the environment. With- out...feedback related to body curvature . 2.1 Computation of optimal feedback for the control of locomotion We have a developed a general method of computing

  19. Biomechanical implications of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy: a musculoskeletal model

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew D. Vigotsky; Bret Contreras; Chris Beardsley

    2015-01-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and atrophy occur frequently as a result of mechanical loading or unloading, with implications for clinical, general, and athletic populations. The effects of muscle hypertrophy and atrophy on force production and joint moments have been previously described. However, there is a paucity of research showing how hypertrophy and atrophy may affect moment arm (MA) lengths. The purpose of this model was to describe the mathematical relationship between the anatomical cross-secti...

  20. Hoff Mann′s syndrome with unusually long duration: Report on clinical, laboratory and muscle imaging findings in two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atchayaram Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two adult men presented with the rare Hoffmann′s syndrome (HS. Case 1: A 35-year-old male patient had progressive stiffness of lower limbs of 13 years and generalized muscle hypertrophy and myalgia of 3 years duration. Had periorbital edema, dry skin, generalized muscle hypertrophy and spastic dysarthria with hoarseness. Muscle power was normal. Jaw jerk and deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated. Case 2: A 24-year-old male patient presented with muscle hypertrophy from childhood, slowness in motor activities and hearing impairment. For 6 months, he had severe muscle pains, cramps and further increase in hypertrophy. He had yellow tinged, dry skin, hoarseness of voice, gross muscle hypertrophy and minimal weakness. Both had markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK levels and high thyroid stimulating hormone, low free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine levels. Levothyroxine treatment demonstrated remarkable reduction in muscle bulk at 2 months in both and no symptoms at 6 months. Magnetic resonance imaging of lower limbs in both cases revealed almost identical features with involvement of the muscles of posterior and adductor compartment of thighs and posterior and lateral compartments of the legs. Differential diagnosis of long duration muscle pseudohypertrophy and elevated CK levels should include HS.

  1. Inspiratory muscle training protocol for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (IMTCO study): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charususin, N.; Gosselink, R.; Decramer, M.; McConnell, A.; Saey, D.; Maltais, F.; Derom, E.; Vermeersch, S.; Helvoort, H.A. van; Heijdra, Y.F.; Klaassen, M.; Glockl, R.; Kenn, K.; Langer, D.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been applied during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear if the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme leads to additional clinically relevant improvem

  2. Pharmacology of airway smooth muscle proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Reinoud; Roscioni, Sara S.; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Pera, Tonio; Schmidt, Martina; Schaafsma, Dedmer; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman

    2008-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle thickening is a pathological feature that contributes significantly to airflow limitation and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. Ongoing research efforts aimed at identifying the mechanisms responsible for the increased airway smooth muscle mass have indicated that hyperplasi

  3. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William J.

    1987-01-01

    Eccentric exercise, in which the muscles exert force by lengthening, is associated with delayed onset muscle soreness. How soreness occurs, how recovery proceeds, and what precautions athletes should take are described. (Author/MT)

  4. Respiratory Action of the Intercostal Muscles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    André De Troyer; Peter A. Kirkwood; Theodore A. Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical advantages of the external and internal intercostals depend partly on the orientation of the muscle but mostly on interspace number and the position of the muscle within each interspace...

  5. Muscle development in mdx mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangain, J; Vrbova, G

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical and contractile properties of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from X-linked muscular dystrophic (mdx) mutant mice at different stages of development are compared to those of muscles from normal control animals. There is no difference between the tension output, speeds of contraction and relaxation, and weight of TA muscles from mutant adults and normal control animals. However, it is found that in 3-4-week-old mutant animals, tension output and muscle weight are very much reduced, and half relaxation time is prolonged. Thus, during this stage of development, muscles from mdx mice do not function properly. Histological examination of these muscles provides further evidence that, in these animals, rapid muscle destruction occurs at a particular time of development and that it is followed by complete recovery. This new mutant therefore presents an interesting case of muscle destruction and rapid regeneration. However, it is not an adequate model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  6. The characteristics of a pneumatic muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrala, Dawid

    The article presents static and dynamic characteristics of pneumatic muscles. It presents the structure of the laboratory stand used to test pneumatic muscles. It discusses the methodology for determination of static and dynamic characteristics. The paper also illustrates characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles length and operating pressure, at a constant loading force (isotonic characteristics). It presents characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles shortening and values of loading forces, at a constant operational pressure (isobaric characteristics). It also shows the dependence of force generated by the muscle on the operating pressure, at a constant value of pneumatic muscles shortening (isometric characteristics). The paper also presents dynamic characteristics of a pneumatic muscle showing the response of an object to a gradual change in the operating pressure, at a constant loading force acting on the pneumatic muscle.

  7. Esterase profile of human masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D; Vilmann, H

    1988-01-01

    The esterase profile of fresh human masseter muscle was investigated by use of histochemistry and electrophoresis. The histochemical methods included reactions for alpha-naphthyl esterase, myofibrillar ATPase, reverse myofibrillar ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. In frozen sections of the muscl...

  8. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overstretched. Sprains are an overstretching or a partial tear of the ligaments. Strains usually happen when a person takes part in a strenuous activity when the muscles haven't properly warmed up or the muscle ...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  10. The characteristics of a pneumatic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrala Dawid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents static and dynamic characteristics of pneumatic muscles. It presents the structure of the laboratory stand used to test pneumatic muscles. It discusses the methodology for determination of static and dynamic characteristics. The paper also illustrates characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles length and operating pressure, at a constant loading force (isotonic characteristics. It presents characteristics showing the relationship of pneumatic muscles shortening and values of loading forces, at a constant operational pressure (isobaric characteristics. It also shows the dependence of force generated by the muscle on the operating pressure, at a constant value of pneumatic muscles shortening (isometric characteristics. The paper also presents dynamic characteristics of a pneumatic muscle showing the response of an object to a gradual change in the operating pressure, at a constant loading force acting on the pneumatic muscle.

  11. Signaling in Muscle Atrophy and Hypertrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Sandri

    2008-01-01

    Muscle performance is influenced by turnover of contractile proteins. Production of new myofibrils and degradation of existing proteins is a delicate balance, which, depending on the condition, can promote muscle growth or loss...

  12. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powers, Scott K; Wiggs, Michael P; Duarte, Jose A; Zergeroglu, A Murat; Demirel, Haydar A

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals...

  13. Scientists Create Clothing with 'Knitted' Muscle Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163272.html Scientists Create Clothing With 'Knitted' Muscle Power Fabric reacts to low voltage charge and could ... techniques that one day might help provide muscle power to disabled people or seniors who have trouble ...

  14. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    This PhD thesis is based on research conducted at the University of Copenhagen and Helene Elsass Center from 2012 to 2015. Measurements and treatment of passive muscle stiffness in people with cerebral palsy (CP) comprise the focus of the thesis. The thesis summarizes the results from four studies......, which aimed to investigate: 1) The development of a clinical method to evaluate and distinguish neural (reflex mediated stiffness) and non-neural (passive muscle stiffness) components of muscle stiffness in adults with CP by objective and reliable measurements. 2) The association between increased...... passive muscle, muscle strength and gait function in adults with CP 3) The effect of resistance training and gait training accordingly on muscle strength, passive muscle stiffness and functional gait in adults with CP. The first part of the thesis defines reflex mediated stiffness and passive muscle...

  15. Study on distribution of terminal branches of the facial nerve in mimetic muscles (orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Shiozawa, Kei; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-01-01

    There have been many anatomical reports to date regarding the course of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. However, reports are relatively scarce on the detailed distribution of the terminal branches of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. In this study, we performed detailed examination of the terminal facial nerve branches to the mimetic muscles, particularly the branches terminating in the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. Examination was performed on 25 Japanese adult autopsy cases, involving 25 hemifaces. The mean age was 87.4 years (range, 60-102 years). There were 12 men and 13 women (12 left hemifaces and 13 right hemifaces). In each case, the facial nerve was exposed through a preauricular skin incision. The main trunk of the facial nerve was dissected from the stylomastoid foramen. A microscope was used to dissect the terminal branches to the periphery and observe them. The course and distribution were examined for all terminal branches of the facial nerve. However, focus was placed on the course and distribution of the zygomatic branch, buccal branch, and mandibular branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. The temporal branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases and the marginal mandibular branch was distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in all cases. The zygomatic branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases, but it was also distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 10 of 25 cases. The buccal branch was not distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 3 of 25 cases, and it was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in 8 cases. There was no significant difference in the variations. The orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle perform particularly important movements among the facial mimetic muscles. According to textbooks, the temporal branch and zygomatic branch innervate the orbicularis oculi muscle, and the buccal branch

  16. POSTOPERATIVE RECOVERY OF MUSCLE FORCE THROUGH MUSCLE TONING IN ABDOMINAL PARIETAL DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Monica Moacă

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper’s aim is to elaborate a program of postoperative recovery for patients suffering from abdominal parietal defects, and to indicate the beneficial implications, both of the preoperative preparations and of the postoperative physiotherapist actions. The programs of functional postoperative recovery have been elaborated individually for the 254 patients under study – of which 139 belong to lot A (operated under a scheduled regime, after the preoperative preparation and 115 belong to lot B (operated in an emergency regime, in the General Surgery Clinic III of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest, between 1998 and 2009. The postoperative recovery program has been individualized for each patient, depending on his / her pathology and co-morbidities, and the physiotherapist has trained and took care that the patients should execute exercises of respiratory re-education, active mobilization of their limbs, coordinated with the breath, isometric exercises for the toning of their arms and legs and of the abdomen muscles. They started the muscle toning exercises slowly and increased them progressively in duration and intensity. The recovery started with isometric-type exercises and continued with the isotonic-type ones. Though mainly the abdominal muscles are aimed at, respectively the flexor muscles of the torso, the physiotherapy program shall comprise the toning of the other muscle groups of the torso, as well. It has been noticed - for the patients in lot A, compared to those of lot B - an obvious net favorable postoperative evolution, characterized through: a reduction of the respiratory, cardiac and thromboembolic complications, a quick postoperative recovery and the immediate social reintegration. An overview of the two lots proves the importance of the cardio-respiratory and locomotive preparation of the patients suffering from big abdominal parietal defects. The simple gestures of respiratory re-education, of

  17. Muscle fiber hypotrophy with intact neuromuscular junctions. A study of a patient with congenital neuromuscular disease and ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A N; Bender, M B

    1977-03-01

    An infant born with severe but nonprogressive somatic and cranial muscle weakness including bilateral external ophthalmoplegia was studied with a motor-point muscle biopsy. There was a strinking generalized decrease in the size of muscle fibers (hypotrophy), most marked in the type I fibers. Many of the small fibers were immature, resembling myotubes. Neuromuscular junctions on severely hypotrophic fibers were normal with esterase staining and by ultrastructural criteria. Although these are unusual clinical and biopsy characteristics, this infant's condition bears a resemblance to two other congenital nonprogressive neuromuscular diseases:myotubular myopathy and congenital fiber type disproportion. In these conditions and in our patient, there is no primary degenerative process affecting nerve or muscle but, rather, an apparent lack of maturation of fetal muscle fibers, indicating a defective normal trophic interaction between nerve and muscle.

  18. Silk fibroin scaffolds with muscle-like elasticity support in vitro differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Vishal; Naskar, Deboki; Kinnear, Beverley F; Grenik, Elizabeth; Dye, Danielle E; Grounds, Miranda D; Kundu, Subhas C; Coombe, Deirdre R

    2016-11-22

    Human adult skeletal muscle has a limited ability to regenerate after injury and therapeutic options for volumetric muscle loss are few. Technologies to enhance regeneration of tissues generally rely upon bioscaffolds to mimic aspects of the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study, silk fibroins from four Lepidoptera (silkworm) species engineered into three-dimensional scaffolds were examined for their ability to support the differentiation of primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMMs) adhered, spread and deposited extensive ECM on all the scaffolds, but immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression revealed that myotube formation occurred differently on the various scaffolds. Bombyx mori fibroin scaffolds supported formation of long, well-aligned myotubes, whereas on Antheraea mylitta fibroin scaffolds the myotubes were thicker and shorter. Myotubes were oriented in two perpendicular layers on Antheraea assamensis scaffolds, and scaffolds of Philosamia/Samia ricini (S. ricini) fibroin poorly supported myotube formation. These differences were not caused by fibroin composition per se, as HSMMs adhered to, proliferated on and formed striated myotubes on all four fibroins presented as two-dimensional fibroin films. The Young's modulus of A. mylitta and B. mori scaffolds mimicked that of normal skeletal muscle, but A. assamensis and S. ricini scaffolds were more flexible. The present study demonstrates that although myoblasts deposit matrix onto fibroin scaffolds and create a permissive environment for cell proliferation, a scaffold elasticity resembling that of normal muscle is required for optimal myotube length, alignment, and maturation. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Decreased task duration and unchanged trunk muscle activity in low-back pain patients during stair climbing after back extensor muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    2014-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a major problem. Spine control and stability mechanisms are important but the knowledge of these parameters in functions is sparse. 7 healthy / 5 recurrent mild-to-moderate LBP patients participated in assessment of abdominal, lumbar and gluteal muscles' surface EMG and video......- and abdominal muscle activity in healthy than in patients in most phases, but during descend transfer patients activity decreased. In LBP patients back extensor fatigue resulted in decreased muscular activity in the trunk muscles during stair stepping compared to healthy. Decreased duration of the motor tasks...... recording during 10 concurrent stair steps pre / post lumbar extensor muscle exhaustion. Duration of gait tasks were shorter in LBP patients generally and longer during load and shorter during transfer in descend stepping after back extensor fatigue. Back extensor fatigue resulted in higher back...

  20. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartee, Gregory D; Hepple, Russell T; Bamman, Marcas M

    2016-01-01

    caused by diseases and lifestyle factors. Secondary aging can exacerbate deficits in mitochondrial function and muscle mass, concomitant with the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Exercise opposes deleterious effects of secondary aging by preventing the decline in mitochondrial...... respiration, mitigating aging-related loss of muscle mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This review focuses on mechanisms by which exercise promotes "healthy aging" by inducing modifications in skeletal muscle....

  1. STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF SKELETAL MUSCLE IN COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita eMathur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory disease associated with a systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral muscle dysfunction has been well characterized in individuals with COPD and results from a complex interaction between systemic and local factors. Objective: In this narrative review, we will describe muscle wasting in people with COPD, the associated structural changes, muscle regenerative capacity and possible mechanisms for muscle wasting. We will also discuss how structural changes relate to impaired muscle function and mobility in people with COPD. Key Observations: Approximately 30-40% of individuals with COPD experience muscle mass depletion. Furthermore, muscle atrophy is a predictor of physical function and mortality in this population. Associated structural changes include a decreased proportion and size of type-I fibers, reduced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial density mainly in the quadriceps. Observations related to impaired muscle regenerative capacity in individuals with COPD include a lower proportion of central nuclei in the presence or absence of muscle atrophy and decreased maximal telomere length, which has been correlated with reduced muscle cross-sectional area. Potential mechanisms for muscle wasting in COPD may include excessive production of reactive oxygen species, altered amino acid metabolism and lower expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma-coactivator 1-alpha mRNA. Despite a moderate relationship between muscle atrophy and function, impairments in oxidative metabolism only seems weakly related to muscle function. Conclusion: This review article demonstrates the cellular modifications in the peripheral muscle of people with COPD and describes the evidence of its relationship to muscle function. Future research will focus on rehabilitation strategies to improve muscle wasting and maximize function.

  2. Mechanisms of exertional fatigue in muscle glycogenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Haller, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    concentrations of extracellular potassium in exercising muscle and (3) exaggerated accumulation of ADP during exercise that may inhibit sodium-potassium and calcium-ATPases. Disorders of muscle glycogenolysis and glycolysis reveal the crucial role of these metabolic processes for supplying both anaerobic...... and aerobic energy for muscle contraction; and the pathological fatigue that occurs when glycogenolysis and/or glycolysis is blocked imply an important role for theses metabolic pathways in normal muscle fatigue....

  3. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-04-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles.

  4. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Scott K.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Duarte, Jose A.; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; Demirel, Haydar A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals. The idea that mitochondrial damage/dysfunction contributes to disuse muscle atrophy originated over 40 years ago. These early studies were largely descriptive and did not provide unequivocal evidence that mitochondria play a primary role in disuse muscle atrophy. However, recent exp...

  5. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd. Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Existing models (such as bed rest) of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive. We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power, or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre-and postflightastronaut performance data for the same tasks. Splineregression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/BW of 79 J/kg, isokineticknee extension (KE)/BW of 6 Nm/kg, and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg.Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of relative strength has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function, for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant strength thresholds.

  6. [Antisynthetase syndrome without muscle involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júdez Navarro, Enrique; Martínez Carretero, Myriam; Martínez Jiménez, Gonzalo Fidel

    2007-11-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a well defined syndrome characterized by the presence of interstitial lung disease in association with arthritis, miositis, mechanic's hands and Ruynaud's phenomenon in the presence of antisynthetase antibodies, especially Ac anti-Jo1. We described the case of a 68-year-old man with this syndrome in the absence of inflammatory muscle disease.

  7. Engineering vascularized skeletal muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Macdonald, Mara; Garfein, Evan S.; Kohane, Daniel S.; Darland, Diane C.; Marini, Robert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Mulligan, Richard C.; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Langer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in engineering thick, complex tissues such as muscle is the need to vascularize the tissue in vitro. Vascularization in vitro could maintain cell viability during tissue growth, induce structural organization and promote vascularization upon implantation. Here we describe

  8. Muscle mechanics and neuromuscular control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the properties of the mechanical system, especially muscle elasticity and limb mass, to a large degree determine force output and movement. This makes the control demands of the central nervous system simpler and more robust. In human triceps surae, a

  9. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  10. Muscle synergies underlying sit-to-stand tasks in elderly people and their relationship with kinetic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanawa, Hiroki; Kubota, Keisuke; Kokubun, Takanori; Marumo, Tatsuya; Hoshi, Fumihiko; Kobayashi, Akira; Kanemura, Naohiko

    2017-08-24

    Physiological evidence suggests that the nervous system controls motion by using a low-dimensional synergy organization for muscle activation. Because the muscle activation produces joint torques, kinetic changes accompanying aging can be related to changes in muscle synergies. We explored the effects of aging on muscle synergies underlying sit-to-stand tasks, and examined their relationships with kinetic characteristics. Four younger and three older adults performed the sit-to-stand task at two speeds. Subsequently, we extracted the muscle synergies used to perform these tasks. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to classify these synergies. We also calculated kinetic variables to compare the groups. Three independent muscle synergies generally appeared in each subject. The spatial structure of these synergies was similar across age groups. The change in motion speed affected only the temporal structure of these synergies. However, subject-specific muscle synergies and kinetic variables existed. Our results suggest common muscle synergies underlying the sit-to-stand task in both young and elderly adults. People may actively change only the temporal structure of each muscle synergy. The precise subject-specific structuring of each muscle synergy may incorporate knowledge of the musculoskeletal kinetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy and regeneration: interplay between the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanou, Nadège; Gailly, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle can regenerate in response to muscle damage. This ability is conferred by the presence of myogenic stem cells called satellite cells. In response to stimuli such as injury or exercise, these cells become activated and express myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), i.e., transcription factors of the myogenic lineage including Myf5, MyoD, myogenin, and Mrf4 to proliferate and differentiate into myofibers. The MRF family of proteins controls the transcription of important muscle-specific proteins such as myosin heavy chain and muscle creatine kinase. Different growth factors are secreted during muscle repair among which insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are the only ones that promote both muscle cell proliferation and differentiation and that play a key role in muscle regeneration and hypertrophy. Different isoforms of IGFs are expressed during muscle repair: IGF-IEa, IGF-IEb, or IGF-IEc (also known as mechano growth factor, MGF) and IGF-II. MGF is expressed first and is observed in satellite cells and in proliferating myoblasts whereas IGF-Ia and IGF-II expression occurs at the state of muscle fiber formation. Interestingly, several studies report the induction of MRFs in response to IGFs stimulation. Inversely, IGFs expression may also be regulated by MRFs. Various mechanisms are proposed to support these interactions. In this review, we describe the general process of muscle hypertrophy and regeneration and decipher the interactions between the two groups of factors involved in the process.

  12. Quantitative muscle ultrasound and muscle force in healthy children: A 4-year follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.; Jansen, M; Janssen, H.; Raijmann, W.; Alfen, N. van; Pillen, S.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: No longitudinal data on the normal development of muscle thickness (MT), quantitative muscle ultrasound echo intensity (EI), and muscle force (MF) in healthy children are yet available. METHODS: Reference values of MT, EI, and MF of 4 muscles from infancy to age 16 years were establish

  13. Muscle fatigue in fibromyalgia is in the brain, not in the muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Elisabeth; Amris, Kirstine; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    To investigate relationships between perceived and objectively measured muscle fatigue during exhausting muscle contractions in women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with healthy controls (HC).......To investigate relationships between perceived and objectively measured muscle fatigue during exhausting muscle contractions in women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with healthy controls (HC)....

  14. Classification of the intrafusal muscle fibres in the frog muscle spindle: histochemical and immunofluorescent studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, A; Fujitsuka, N; Sokabe, M; Naruse, K; Nomura, K; Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1990-01-01

    Intrafusal muscle fibres from bull-frog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were classified into three types using the histochemical, immunofluorescent and morphological characteristics, with reference to the extrafusal muscle fibres, which were classified into five types in accordance with Rowlerson & Spurway (1988). Immunofluorescent reactions with antibodies against slow or fast myosins obtained from anterior or posterior latissimus dorsi muscles (ALD or PLD), respectively,...

  15. Integrated expression analysis of muscle hypertrophy identifies Asb2 as a negative regulator of muscle mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Jonathan R.; Watt, Kevin I.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Chaudhuri, Rima; Ryall, James G.; Cunningham, Louise; Qian, Hongwei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; James, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling network is a critical regulator of skeletal muscle mass and function and, thus, is an attractive therapeutic target for combating muscle disease, but the underlying mechanisms of action remain undetermined. We report that follistatin-based interventions (which modulate TGF-β network activity) can promote muscle hypertrophy that ameliorates aging-associated muscle wasting. However, the muscles of old sarcopenic mice demonstrate reduced response to follistatin compared with healthy young-adult musculature. Quantitative proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of young-adult muscles identified a transcription/translation signature elicited by follistatin exposure, which included repression of ankyrin repeat and SOCS box protein 2 (Asb2). Increasing expression of ASB2 reduced muscle mass, thereby demonstrating that Asb2 is a TGF-β network–responsive negative regulator of muscle mass. In contrast to young-adult muscles, sarcopenic muscles do not exhibit reduced ASB2 abundance with follistatin exposure. Moreover, preventing repression of ASB2 in young-adult muscles diminished follistatin-induced muscle hypertrophy. These findings provide insight into the program of transcription and translation events governing follistatin-mediated adaptation of skeletal muscle attributes and identify Asb2 as a regulator of muscle mass implicated in the potential mechanistic dysfunction between follistatin-mediated muscle growth in young and old muscles. PMID:27182554

  16. Leucocytes, cytokines and satellite cells: what role do they play in muscle damage and regeneration following eccentric exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Gøran; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Raastad, Truls; Peake, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage is an important topic in exercise physiology. However several aspects of our understanding of how muscles respond to highly stressful exercise remain unclear In the first section of this review we address the evidence that exercise can cause muscle damage and inflammation in otherwise healthy human skeletal muscles. We approach this concept by comparing changes in muscle function (i.e., the force-generating capacity) with the degree of leucocyte accumulation in muscle following exercise. In the second section, we explore the cytokine response to 'muscle-damaging exercise', primarily eccentric exercise. We review the evidence for the notion that the degree of muscle damage is related to the magnitude of the cytokine response. In the third and final section, we look at the satellite cell response to a single bout of eccentric exercise, as well as the role of the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX1 and 2). In summary, we propose that muscle damage as evaluated by changes in muscle function is related to leucocyte accumulation in the exercised muscles. 'Extreme' exercise protocols, encompassing unaccustomed maximal eccentric exercise across a large range of motion, generally inflict severe muscle damage, inflammation and prolonged recovery (> 1 week). By contrast, exercise resembling regular athletic training (resistance exercise and downhill running) typically causes mild muscle damage (myofibrillar disruptions) and full recovery normally occurs within a few days. Large variation in individual responses to a given exercise should, however be expected. The link between cytokine and satellite cell responses and exercise-induced muscle damage is not so clear The systemic cytokine response may be linked more closely to the metabolic demands of exercise rather than muscle damage. With the exception of IL-6, the sources of systemic cytokines following exercise remain unclear The satellite cell response to severe muscle damage is related to

  17. Muscle power is an important measure to detect deficits in muscle function in hip osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Theresa; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Christensen, Helle Elisabeth; Kjaer, Michael; Beyer, Nina

    2017-07-01

    To investigate between-leg differences in hip and thigh muscle strength and leg extensor power in patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis. Further, to compare between-leg differences in knee extensor strength and leg extensor power between patients and healthy peers. Seventy-two patients (60-87 years) with radiographic and symptomatic hip osteoarthritis not awaiting hip replacement and 35 healthy peers (63-82 years) were included. Hip and thigh muscle strength and leg extensor power were measured in patients and knee extensor strength and leg extensor power in healthy. The symptomatic extremity in patients was significantly (p muscles (8-17%), knee extensors (11%) and leg extensor power (19%). Healthy older adults had asymmetry in knee extensor strength (6%, p power. Patients had generalized weakening of the affected lower extremity and numerically the largest asymmetry was evident for leg extensor power. In contrast, healthy peers had no asymmetry in leg extensor power. These results indicate that exercise interventions focusing on improving leg extensor power of the symptomatic lower extremity and reducing asymmetry may be beneficial for patients with hip osteoarthritis. Implications for Rehabilitation Even in patients with mild symptoms not awaiting hip replacement a generalized muscle weakening of the symptomatic lower extremity seems to be present. Between-leg differences in leg extensor power (force × velocity) appears to be relatively large (19%) in patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis in contrast to healthy peers who show no asymmetry. Compared to muscle strength the relationship between functional performance and leg extensor power seems to be stronger, and more strongly related to power of the symptomatic lower extremity. Our results indicate that exercise interventions focusing on improving leg extensor power of the symptomatic lower extremity and reducing asymmetry may be beneficial for patients with mild symptoms not awaiting hip

  18. Differential muscle function between muscle synergists: long and lateral heads of the triceps in jumping and landing goats (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Andrew M; Lee, David V; Biewener, Andrew A

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how the biarticular long head and monoarticular lateral head of the triceps brachii function in goats (Capra hircus) during jumping and landing. Elbow moment and work were measured from high-speed video and ground reaction force (GRF) recordings. Muscle activation and strain were measured via electromyography and sonomicrometry, and muscle stress was estimated from elbow moment and by partitioning stress based on its relative strain rate. Elbow joint and muscle function were compared among three types of limb usage: jump take-off (lead limb), the step prior to jump take-off (lag limb), and landing. We predicted that the strain and work patterns in the monoarticular lateral head would follow the kinematics and work of the elbow more closely than would those of the biarticular long head. In general this prediction was supported. For instance, the lateral head stretched (5 +/- 2%; mean +/- SE) in the lead and lag limbs to absorb work during elbow flexion and joint work absorption, while the long head shortened (-7 +/- 1%) to produce work. During elbow extension, both muscles shortened by similar amounts (-10 +/- 2% long; -13 +/- 4% lateral) in the lead limb to produce work. Both triceps heads functioned similarly in landing, stretching (13 +/- 3% in the long head and 19 +/- 5% in the lateral) to absorb energy. In general, the long head functioned to produce power at the shoulder and elbow, while the lateral head functioned to resist elbow flexion and absorb work, demonstrating that functional diversification can arise between mono- and biarticular muscle agonists operating at the same joint.

  19. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  20. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength

  1. Intramuscular variation in fresh ham muscle color

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experiment was conducted to characterize a defect involving pale muscle tissue in the superficial, ventral portion of ham muscles, resulting in two-toned appearance of cured ham products. Biceps femoris muscles (n = 200), representing 3 production systems, were obtained from the ham-boning lin...

  2. Breast muscle tissue characteristics in growing broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cell development in broilers influences growth rate, breast meat yield, and meat quality. The objective of this study was to characterize muscle tissue changes in breast muscles from two commercial lines of broilers from 21 to 56 days of age. The experiment was designed as a 2×2×6 factorial...

  3. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength measurem

  4. Primary psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Amy; Lau, Kenneth K; Korman, Tony M; Kornman, Tony; Wallace, Euan M; Polyakov, Alex

    2008-12-01

    Primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess formation is very uncommon during pregnancy. We present a case of a primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy causing back pain with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Understanding the clinical presentation of iliacus-psoas muscle abscess helps with considering it in the differential diagnosis of back pain during pregnancy.

  5. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decide to move, the motor cortex sends an electrical signal through the spinal cord and peripheral nerves to the muscles, causing them to contract. The motor cortex on the right side of the brain controls the muscles on the left side of the body and vice versa. The cerebellum coordinates the muscle ...

  6. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  7. Interleukin-6 myokine signaling in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Scheele, Camilla; Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    been associated with stimulation of hypertrophic muscle growth and myogenesis through regulation of the proliferative capacity of muscle stem cells. Additional beneficial effects of IL-6 include regulation of energy metabolism, which is related to the capacity of actively contracting muscle...

  8. Effect of transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation on postoperative muscle mass and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, O; Edvardsen, L; Jensen, F

    1996-01-01

    In an experimental study, 13 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were given postoperative transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation (TEMS) to the quadriceps femoris muscle on one leg; the opposite leg served as control. Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle protein...... muscle protein synthesis and muscle mass after abdominal surgery and should be evaluated in other catabolic states with muscle wasting....... synthesis were assessed by computed tomography and ribosome analysis of percutaneous muscle biopsies before surgery and on the sixth postoperative day. The percentage of polyribosomes in the ribosome suspension decreased significantly (P

  9. Strength training increases the size of the satellite cell pool in type I and II fibres of chronically painful trapezius muscle in females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Andersen, Lars L; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    While strength training has been shown to be effective in mediating hypertrophy and reducing pain in trapezius myalgia, responses at the cellular level have not previously been studied. This study investigated the potential of strength training targeting the affected muscles (SST, n = 18......) and general fitness training (GFT, n = 16) to augment the satellite cell (SC) and macrophage pools in the trapezius muscles of women diagnosed with trapezius myalgia. A group receiving general health information (REF, n = 8) served as a control. Muscle biopsies were collected from the trapezius muscles...... hypertrophy (r = -0.669, P = 0.005). SST also resulted in a 74% enhancement of the trapezius macrophage content (P

  10. Cranial muscle development in the model organism ambystoma mexicanum: implications for tetrapod and vertebrate comparative and evolutionary morphology and notes on ontogeny and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziermann, Janine M; Diogo, Rui

    2013-07-01

    There is still confusion about the homology of several cranial muscles in salamanders with those of other vertebrates. This is true, in part, because of the fact that many muscles present in early ontogeny of amphibians disappear during development and specifically during metamorphosis. Resolving this confusion is important for the understanding of the comparative and evolutionary morphology of vertebrates and tetrapods because amphibians are the phylogenetically most plesiomorphic tetrapods, concerning for example their myology, and include two often used model organisms, Xenopus laevis (anuran) and Ambystoma mexicanum (urodele). Here we provide the first detailed report of the cranial muscle development in axolotl from early ontogenetic stages to the adult stage. We describe different and complementary types of general muscle morphogenetic gradients in the head: from anterior to posterior, from lateral to medial, and from origin to insertion. Furthermore, even during the development of neotenic salamanders such as axolotls, various larval muscles become indistinct, contradicting the commonly accepted view that during ontogeny the tendency is mostly toward the differentiation of muscles. We provide an updated comparison between these muscles and the muscles of other vertebrates, a discussion of the homologies and evolution, and show that the order in which the muscles appear during axolotl ontogeny is in general similar to their appearance in phylogeny (e.g. differentiation of adductor mandibulae muscles from one anlage to four muscles), with only a few remarkable exceptions, as for example the dilatator laryngis that appears evolutionary later but in the development before the intermandibularis.

  11. In cirrhotic patients reduced muscle strength is unrelated to muscle capacity for ATP turnover suggesting a central limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin; Nielsen, H B; Secher, Niels H.

    2011-01-01

      We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria.......  We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria....

  12. The effect of fasting on indicators of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannecker, Erin A; Liu, Ying; Rector, R Scott; Thomas, Tom R; Sayers, Stephen P; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Ray, Bimal K

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have tested the consumption of foods and supplements to reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, but fasting itself is also worthy of investigation due to reports of beneficial effects of caloric restriction and/or intermittent fasting on inflammation and oxidative stress. This preliminary investigation compared indicators of exercise-induced muscle damage between upper-body untrained participants (N=29, 22yrs old (SD=3.34), 12 women) who completed 8h water-only fasts or ate a controlled diet in the 8h prior to five consecutive laboratory sessions. All sessions were conducted in the afternoon hours (i.e., post meridiem) and the women completed the first session while in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycles. Measures of muscle pain, resting elbow extension, upper arm girth, isometric strength, myoglobin (Mb), total nitric oxide (NO), interleukin 1beta (IL1b), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) were collected before and after eccentric contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were completed. The fasting group's loss of elbow extension was less than the post-prandial group (pmuscle damage, but such fasting may generally affect common indirect markers of muscle damage.

  13. Elevated Serum Aminotransferases Secondary to Rippling Muscle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumanan Nalankilli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old man was referred by his general practitioner to the hepatology clinic with deranged serum aminotransferases, discovered as part of routine blood tests. The objective was to identify the cause of elevated serum aminotransferases in this patient in a systematic manner. Thorough history and physical examination revealed a background history of rippling muscle disease secondary to caveolin-3 protein deficiency, with typical clinical signs. There was a positive family history of musculoskeletal disease in the patient's father and brother. Previous diagnostic tests performed to investigate the patient's musculoskeletal symptoms, including muscle biopsies, were revisited. Subsequent systematic investigations such as blood tests, liver ultrasound scan and Fibroscan® were performed to exclude potential causes of the deranged serum aminotransferases. Liver biopsy was not performed. A consistent pattern of chronic low-grade elevations of serum aminotransferases, less than three times the upper limit of the normal range, was found. This was associated with a consistently elevated serum creatine kinase and normal renal function tests. Previous muscle biopsies had revealed chronic degenerative and regenerative changes suggestive of a focal necrotizing myopathy. Liver ultrasound scan and Fibroscan® were normal. With exclusion of other liver diseases and identification of profoundly elevated serum creatine kinase concentration, the deranged aminotransferases were attributed to rippling muscle disease.

  14. Oral Drugs Related with Muscle Wasting and Sarcopenia. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Lluis; Camps, Marcella; Riera, Ariadna; Pleguezuelos, Eulogio; Yebenes, Juan Carlos; Serra-Prat, Mateu

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Reported prevalence of this geriatric syndrome, differs depending on the definition, the population and the method used to identify sarcopenia. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial, and can include genetic influence, immobility or disuse, endocrine factors, inflammation and nutritional deficiencies. These disorders involve an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic pathways that rules muscle mass. Many drugs taken regularly for common conditions may interact with some mechanisms that can alter the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. This may lead to a harmful or a beneficial effect on muscle mass and strength. Widely prescribed drugs could play an important role during the time of onset and development of sarcopenia. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding of how can drugs contribute positively or negatively on sarcopenia and muscle wasting. We decided to focus this review on oral common drugs, which are usually prescribed in older adults, leaving aside other drugs as hormone therapy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the palpebral conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, L Evelyn; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo A; Vera, Ana M; Rubio, Rosa Isela; Mayorquín-Ruiz, Mariana; Salcedo, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Smooth muscle hamartoma is defined as a disorganized focus or an overgrowth of mature smooth muscle, generally with low capacity of autonomous growth and benign behavior. The implicated tissues are mature and proliferate in a disorganized fashion. A healthy 5-day-old Mexican boy was referred to the authors' hospital in México city for evaluation of a "cystic" lesion of the right eye that had been noted since birth. The pregnancy and delivery were unremarkable. On physical examination, there was a reddish-pink soft lesion with a tender "cystic" appearance, which was probably emerging from the upper eyelid conjunctiva, which measured 2.7 cm in its widest diameter and transilluminated. Ultrasound imaging revealed an anterior "cystic" lesion with normally formed phakic eye. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the lesion was dissected from the upper tarsal subconjunctival space. Subsequent histologic and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with the diagnosis of congenital smooth muscle hamartoma (CSMH) of the tarsal conjunctiva. The authors' research revealed that only one case of CSMH localized in the conjunctiva (Roper GJ, Smith MS, Lueder GT. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the conjunctival fornix. Am J Ophthalmol. 1999;128:643-4) has been reported to date in the literature. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this current case would be the second case reported of CSMH in this anatomic location. Therefore, the authors' recommendation is to include CSMH in the differential diagnosis of a cystic mass that presents in the fornix and palpebral conjunctiva.

  16. Quercetin protects rat skeletal muscle from ischemia reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci Akdemir, Fazile Nur; Gülçin, İlhami; Karagöz, Berna; Soslu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of quercetin on skeletal muscle ischemia reperfusion injury. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley type rats were randomly divided into four groups. In the sham group, only gastrocnemius muscle were removed and given no quercetin. In ischemia group, all the femoral artery, vein and collaterals were occluded in the left hindlimb by applying tourniquate under general anaesthesia for three hours but reperfusion was not done. In the Quercetin + Ischemia reperfusion group, quercetin (200 mg kg(-1) dose orally) was given during one-week reoperation and later ischemia reperfusion model was done. Finally, gastrocnemius muscle samples were removed to measure biochemical parameters. The biomarkers, MDA levels, SOD, CAT and GPx activities, were evaluated related to skeletal muscle ischemia reperfusion injury. MDA levels reduced and SOD, CAT and GPx activities increased significantly in Quercetin + Ischemia reperfusion group. Results clearly showed that Quercetin have a protective role against oxidative damage induced by ischemia reperfusion in rats.

  17. Intramuscular EMG from the hip flexor muscles during human locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E A; Nilsson, J; Thorstensson, A

    1997-11-01

    The purpose was to investigate the activation pattern of five major hip flexor muscles and its adaptation to changing speed and mode of progression. A total of 11 healthy subjects performed walking and running on a motor-driven treadmill at speeds ranging from 1.0 to 6.0 m s-1. Intramuscular fine-wire electrodes were used to record myoelectric signals from the iliacus, psoas, sartorius, rectus femoris and tensor fascia latae muscles. The basic pattern, with respect to number of activation periods, remained the same irrespective of speed and mode of progression. However, differences in the relative duration and timing of onset of activation occurred between individual muscles. Over the speed range in walking, a progressively earlier onset was generally seen for the activation period related to hip flexion. Changes in EMG amplitude were measured in the iliacus and psoas muscles and showed a marked increase and difference between walking and running at speeds above 2.0 m s-1. Thus, the alternating flexion-extension movements at the hip during locomotion appear to be governed by a rather fixed 'neural program' which normally only needs minor modulations to accomplish the adjustments accompanying an increase in speed of progression as well as a change from walking to running.

  18. The relationship between exercise-induced muscle fatigue, arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion after 56 days local muscle unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Beijer, Åsa; Herrera, Frankyn; Zange, Jochen; Degens, Hans; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the dynamic nature of habitual plantar flexor activity, we utilized an incremental isokinetic exercise test (IIET) to assess the work-related power deficit (WoRPD) as a measure for exercise-induced muscle fatigue before and after prolonged calf muscle unloading and in relation to arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion. Eleven male subjects (31 ± 6 years) wore the HEPHAISTOS unloading orthosis unilaterally for 56 days. It allows habitual ambulation while greatly reducing plantar flexor activity and torque production. Endpoint measurements encompassed arterial blood flow, measured in the femoral artery using Doppler ultrasound, oxygenation of the soleus muscle assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, lactate concentrations determined in capillary blood and muscle activity using soleus muscle surface electromyography. Furthermore, soleus muscle biopsies were taken to investigate morphological muscle changes. After the intervention, maximal isokinetic torque was reduced by 23·4 ± 8·2% (PBlood flow, tissue oxygenation, lactate concentrations and EMG median frequency kinematics during the exercise test were comparable before and after the intervention, whereas the increase of RMS in response to IIET was less following the intervention (P = 0·03). In conclusion, following submaximal isokinetic muscle work exercise-induced muscle fatigue is unaffected after prolonged local muscle unloading. The observation that arterial blood flow was maintained may underlie the unchanged fatigability.

  19. Muscle damage induced by electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, Kazunori; Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; Chen, Trevor C

    2011-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) induces muscle damage that is characterised by histological alterations of muscle fibres and connective tissue, increases in circulating creatine kinase (CK) activity, decreases in muscle strength and development of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Muscle damage is induced not only by eccentric contractions with ES but also by isometric contractions evoked by ES. Muscle damage profile following 40 isometric contractions of the knee extensors is similar between pulsed current (75 Hz, 400 μs) and alternating current (2.5 kHz delivered at 75 Hz, 400 μs) ES for similar force output. When comparing maximal voluntary and ES-evoked (75 Hz, 200 μs) 50 isometric contractions of the elbow flexors, ES results in greater decreases in maximal voluntary contraction strength, increases in plasma CK activity and DOMS. It appears that the magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES-evoked isometric contractions is comparable to that induced by maximal voluntary eccentric contractions, although the volume of affected muscles in ES is not as large as that of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. It seems likely that the muscle damage in ES is associated with high mechanical stress on the activated muscle fibres due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment (i.e., non-selective, synchronous and spatially fixed manner). The magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES is significantly reduced when the second ES bout is performed 2-4 weeks later. It is possible to attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage by "pre-conditioning" muscles, so that muscle damage should not limit the use of ES in training and rehabilitation.

  20. Functional morphology of the thoracolumbar transversospinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Jon; Stringer, Mark D; Duxson, Marilyn

    2011-07-15

    STUDY DESIGN. A qualitative and semiquantitative study of the morphology of the human thoracolumbar transversospinal (TSP) muscles. OBJECTIVE. To further define the functional morphology of the thoracolumbar TSP muscles. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. The TSP muscle group plays an important role in vertebral function but few studies have rigorously investigated their morphology throughout the thoracolumbar region and details on the location of motor endplates (MEPs) and fiber types are sparse. METHODS. Thoracolumbar TSP muscles were examined by microdissection in five cadavers (seven sides). MEPs were identified using acetylcholinesterase histochemistry in muscles between T5 and S4 unilaterally in two cadavers. The relative proportions of type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers were determined using immunohistochemistry on whole cross sections of every TSP muscle from one side of one cadaver (T5-S4). RESULTS.TSP morphology was homogeneous and consistent throughout the thoracolumbar region. Notable differences to standard descriptions included: (1) consistent attachments between muscles; (2) no discrete cleavage planes between muscles; and (3) attachment sites over the sacrum and to lumbar zygapophysial joints. Previously undescribed small muscles were found attaching to the medial sacrum. All TSP muscles were multipennate, with fibers arranged in parallel having one MEP per muscle fiber. Muscles were highly aerobic (mean proportion of type I fibers 89%), with the proportion of type I fibers decreasing caudally. A significantly greater proportion of type I fibers were found in the midthoracic compared to the low lumbar regions. CONCLUSION. The complex morphology of the TSP muscles indicates that they would be better classified as spinotransverse muscles. They are multipennate, highly aerobic, with fibers organized in parallel, an arrangement lending itself to "fine-tuning" of vertebral movements. Understanding their morphology has implications for investigation