WorldWideScience

Sample records for general acid-base catalyst

  1. The glmS ribozyme cofactor is a general acid-base catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladoms, Júlia; Fedor, Martha J

    2012-11-21

    The glmS ribozyme is the first natural self-cleaving ribozyme known to require a cofactor. The d-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) cofactor has been proposed to serve as a general acid, but its role in the catalytic mechanism has not been established conclusively. We surveyed GlcN6P-like molecules for their ability to support self-cleavage of the glmS ribozyme and found a strong correlation between the pH dependence of the cleavage reaction and the intrinsic acidity of the cofactors. For cofactors with low binding affinities, the contribution to rate enhancement was proportional to their intrinsic acidity. This linear free-energy relationship between cofactor efficiency and acid dissociation constants is consistent with a mechanism in which the cofactors participate directly in the reaction as general acid-base catalysts. A high value for the Brønsted coefficient (β ~ 0.7) indicates that a significant amount of proton transfer has already occurred in the transition state. The glmS ribozyme is the first self-cleaving RNA to use an exogenous acid-base catalyst.

  2. Activities of Heterogeneous Acid-Base Catalysts for Fragrances Synthesis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartati Hartati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews various types of heterogeneous acid-base catalysts for fragrances preparation. Catalytic activities of various types of heterogeneous acid and base catalysts in fragrances preparation, i.e. non-zeolitic, zeolitic, and mesoporous molecular sieves have been reported. Generally, heterogeneous acid catalysts are commonly used in fragrance synthesis as compared to heterogeneous base catalysts. Heteropoly acids and hydrotalcites type catalysts are widely used as heterogeneous acid and base catalysts, respectively. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 20th January 2013; Revised: 31st March 2013; Accepted: 1st April 2013[How to Cite: Hartati, H., Santoso, M., Triwahyono, S., Prasetyoko, D. (2013. Activities of Heterogeneous Acid-Base Catalysts for Fragrances Synthesis: A Review. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (1: 14-33. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4394.14-33][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4394.14-33] | View in  |

  3. A General Simulator for Acid-Base Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-07-01

    General formal expressions are provided to facilitate the automatic computer calculation of acid-base titration curves of arbitrary mixtures of acids, bases, and salts, without and with activity corrections based on the Davies equation. Explicit relations are also given for the buffer strength of mixtures of acids, bases, and salts.

  4. Efficacy of pretreating oil palm fronds with an acid-base mixture catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Park, Yong-Cheol; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2017-07-01

    Oil palm fronds are abundant but recalcitrant to chemical pretreatment. Herein, an acid-base mixture was applied as a catalyst to efficiently pretreat oil palm fronds. Optimized conditions for the pretreatment were a 0.1M acidic acid-base mixture and 3min ramping to 190°C and 12min holding. The oil palm fronds pretreated and washed with the acid-base mixture exhibited an enzymatic digestibility of 85% by 15 FPU Accellerase 1000/g glucan after 72h hydrolysis, which was significantly higher than the enzymatic digestibilities obtained by acid or alkali pretreatment alone. This could be attributed to the synergistic actions of the acid and base, producing an 87% glucose recovery with 100% and 40.3% removal of xylan and lignin, respectively, from the solids. Therefore, an acid-base mixture can be a feasible catalyst to deconstruct oil palm fronds for sugar production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Boehmite-An Efficient and Recyclable Acid-Base Bifunctional Catalyst for Aldol Condensation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshma, P C Rajan; Vikneshvaran, Sekar; Velmathi, Sivan

    2018-06-01

    In this work boehmite was used as an acid-base bifunctional catalyst for aldol condensation reactions of aromatic aldehydes and ketones. The catalyst was prepared by simple sol-gel method using Al(NO3)3·9H2O and NH4OH as precursors. The catalyst has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), UV-visible spectroscopy (DRS), BET surface area analyses. Boehmite is successfully applied as catalyst for the condensation reaction between 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and acetone as a model substrate giving α, β-unsaturated ketones without any side product. The scope of the reaction is extended for various substituted aldehydes. A probable mechanism has been suggested to explain the cooperative behavior of the acidic and basic sites. The catalyst is environmentally friendly and easily recovered from the reaction mixture. Also the catalyst is reusable up to 3 catalytic cycles.

  6. Influence of Catalyst Acid/Base Properties in Acrolein Production by Oxidative Coupling of Ethanol and Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilić, Aleksandra; Bennici, Simona; Devaux, Jean-François; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Auroux, Aline

    2017-05-09

    Oxidative coupling of methanol and ethanol represents a new route to produce acrolein. In this work, the overall reaction was decoupled in two steps, the oxidation and the aldolization, by using two consecutive reactors to investigate the role of the acid/base properties of silica-supported oxide catalysts. The oxidation of a mixture of methanol and ethanol to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde was performed over a FeMoO x catalyst, and then the product mixture was transferred without intermediate separation to a second reactor, in which the aldol condensation and dehydration to acrolein were performed over the supported oxides. The impact of the acid/base properties on the selectivity towards acrolein was investigated under oxidizing conditions for the first time. The acid/base properties of the catalysts were investigated by NH 3 -, SO 2 -, and methanol-adsorption microcalorimetry. A MgO/SiO 2 catalyst was the most active in acrolein production owing to an appropriate ratio of basic to acidic sites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. An additional role for the Brønsted acid-base catalysts of mandelate racemase in transition state stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Mitesh; Bearne, Stephen L

    2015-11-10

    )-atrolactate, and His 297 contributes 2.46 kcal/mol to the binding of (S)-atrolactate. These results are consistent with Lys 166 and His 297 playing dual roles in catalysis: they act as Brønsted acid-base catalysts, and they stabilize both the enolate moiety and phenyl ring of the altered substrate in the TS.

  8. The generalized lewis acid-base titration of palladium and niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, M.; Brewer, L.

    1988-12-01

    The high thermodynamic stability of alloys composed of platinum group metals and group IVB and VB metals has been explained by an electronic interaction analogous to the Lewis acid-base concept for nontransition elements. The analogy is further demonstrated by the titration of palladium by addition of niobium. The activity of niobium in solid palladium was measured as a function of concentration by solid-state galvanic cells and study of the ternary oxide phase diagram. The galvanic cells were of the type Pt/NbO2,Nb2O4.8/YDTJNbOy,Nbpd/Pt where the solid electrolyte is yttria-doped thoria (YDT). Ternary phase diagrams for the Pd-Nb-0 and Rh-Nb-0 systems were obtained by characterizing samples equilibrated at 1000 °C. The phase relationships found in the ternary diagrams were also used to derive thermochemical data for the alloys. Thermochemical quantities for other acid-base stabilized alloys such as Nb-Rh, Ti-Pd, and Ti-Rh were also measured. The excess partial molar ΔGxs/R of niobium at infinite dilution was determined to be -31 kilo-Kelvin at 1000 °C, and the AG°JR of formation of a mole of NbPd3.55 is —21 kilo-Kelvin. These results and those for the other systems are used to assess the importance of valence electron configuration, nuclear charge, and crystal field effects in the context of generalized Lewis acid-base theory. It is concluded that both the nuclear charge of the atom and crystal field splitting of the valence orbitals significantly affect the basicity of the platinum group metals.

  9. Wang-Landau Reaction Ensemble Method: Simulation of Weak Polyelectrolytes and General Acid-Base Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsgesell, Jonas; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2017-02-14

    We present a novel method for the study of weak polyelectrolytes and general acid-base reactions in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The approach combines the advantages of the reaction ensemble and the Wang-Landau sampling method. Deprotonation and protonation reactions are simulated explicitly with the help of the reaction ensemble method, while the accurate sampling of the corresponding phase space is achieved by the Wang-Landau approach. The combination of both techniques provides a sufficient statistical accuracy such that meaningful estimates for the density of states and the partition sum can be obtained. With regard to these estimates, several thermodynamic observables like the heat capacity or reaction free energies can be calculated. We demonstrate that the computation times for the calculation of titration curves with a high statistical accuracy can be significantly decreased when compared to the original reaction ensemble method. The applicability of our approach is validated by the study of weak polyelectrolytes and their thermodynamic properties.

  10. pKa modulation of the acid/base catalyst within GH32 and GH68: a role in substrate/inhibitor specificity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguang Yuan

    Full Text Available Glycoside hydrolases of families 32 (GH32 and 68 (GH68 belong to clan GH-J, containing hydrolytic enzymes (sucrose/fructans as donor substrates and fructosyltransferases (sucrose/fructans as donor and acceptor substrates. In GH32 members, some of the sugar substrates can also function as inhibitors, this regulatory aspect further adding to the complexity in enzyme functionalities within this family. Although 3D structural information becomes increasingly available within this clan and huge progress has been made on structure-function relationships, it is not clear why some sugars bind as inhibitors without being catalyzed. Conserved aspartate and glutamate residues are well known to act as nucleophile and acid/bases within this clan. Based on the available 3D structures of enzymes and enzyme-ligand complexes as well as docking simulations, we calculated the pKa of the acid-base before and after substrate binding. The obtained results strongly suggest that most GH-J members show an acid-base catalyst that is not sufficiently protonated before ligand entrance, while the acid-base can be fully protonated when a substrate, but not an inhibitor, enters the catalytic pocket. This provides a new mechanistic insight aiming at understanding the complex substrate and inhibitor specificities observed within the GH-J clan. Moreover, besides the effect of substrate entrance on its own, we strongly suggest that a highly conserved arginine residue (in the RDP motif rather than the previously proposed Tyr motif (not conserved provides the proton to increase the pKa of the acid-base catalyst.

  11. Role of the acid-base properties of gallium-antimony oxide catalyst in oxidative ammonolysis of propane to acrylonitrile (AN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipova, Z.G.; Sokolovskii, V.D.

    1979-07-01

    The role of the acid-base properties of gallium-antimony oxide catalyst in oxidative ammonolysis of propane to acrylonitrile (AN) was studied in a differential flow reactor at 550/sup 0/C, with the reaction mixture containing 5 3< by vol propane, 6 3< ammonia, and 18.6Vertical Bar3< oxygen diluted in helium, over ebulliated beds of a 5Vertical Bar3< Ga/Sb or a 1:3:1.5:1 Ga/Sb/Ni/P catalysts, the basicity of which was varied by adding 5 mole Vertical Bar3< of an alkaline earth metal (added as the nitrate and calcined). Both the rate of propane conversion and that of AN formation increased with increasing concentration of the basic sites (determined by back titration with benzoic acid) on both types of the catalysts and linearly correlated with the amount of nitrous oxide desorbed from the catalysts after the reaction. The presence of ammonia in the reaction mixture increased the activity and selectivity of the catalysts and the concentration of the active basic sites. Apparently, the reaction rate is limited by proton abstraction from a propane molecule with the formation of a carbanion stabilized on alkaline-earth metal cations. The rate-determining proton abstraction occurs on nucleophile basic sites, formed by dissociative adsorption of ammonia to form species such as NH, NH/sub 2/, and HNO, which are then oxidized to N/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/O.

  12. Liquefaction of kraft lignin by hydrocracking with simultaneous use of a novel dual acid-base catalyst and a hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jindong; Li, Wenzhi; Wang, Huizhen; Ma, Qiaozhi; Li, Song; Chang, Hou-Min; Jameel, Hasan

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a novel catalyst, S 2 O 8 2- -KNO 3 /TiO 2 , which has active acidic and basic sites, was prepared and used in lignin hydrocracking with a co-catalyst, Ru/C. Ru/C is an efficient hydrogenation catalyst and S 2 O 8 2- -KNO 3 /TiO 2 is a dual catalyst, which could efficiently degrade lignin. This catalytic hydrogenation system can reduce solid products to less than 1%, while giving a high liquid product yield of 93%. Catalytic hydrocracking of kraft lignin at 320°C for 6h gave 93% liquid product with 0.5% solid product. Most of this liquid product was soluble in petroleum ether (60% of 93%), which is a clear liquid and comprises mainly of monomeric and dimeric degradation products. These results demonstrated that the combination of the two catalysts is an efficient catalyst for liquefaction of lignin, with little char formation (∼1%). This concept has the potential to produce valuable chemicals and fuels from lignin under moderate conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. General Chemistry Students' Conceptual Understanding and Language Fluency: Acid-Base Neutralization and Conductometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine college general chemistry students' conceptual understanding and language fluency in the context of the topic of acids and bases. 115 students worked in groups of 2-4 to complete an activity on conductometry, where they were given a scenario in which a titration of sodium hydroxide solution and dilute…

  14. Stability range of MoC (hp2). II. Thermodynamic properties of generalized Lewis acid-base intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukouvetakis, J.

    1988-01-01

    The γ-MoC phase with the hexagonal WC structure was prepared without the presence of metal stabilizers at temperatures below 1000 degree C. This phase was found to be thermodynamically stable at low temperatures and decomposed to Mo 2 C and graphite at 1400 K. Using equilibrium and thermodynamic data, the thermodynamic quantities of this phase were calculated. Oxide equilibration and solid-state galvanic cell experiments were used to study thermodynamic properties of binary Lewis acid-base stabilized transition-metal alloys. The activity of vanadium was determined in alloys of vanadium with platinum-group metals such as Rh, Pd, and Ir at 1000 degree C. The activities of titanium in titanium-iridium alloys and of niobium in Nb 3 Ir were determined at 1400 degree C. The ternary phase diagram of V-Pd-O at 1000 degree C was obtained. Based on the vanadium-palladium results, a partial titration curve of palladium by vanadium was constructed. The excess partial molar Gibbs free energy of vanadium at infinite dilution was found to be -36.4 kcal mol -1 at 1000 degree C. Results are in agreement with the predictions of Brewer's theory of transition-metal alloy acid-base behavior

  15. Intermetallic nickel silicide nanocatalyst-A non-noble metal-based general hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchuk, Pavel; Agostini, Giovanni; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Lund, Henrik; Agapova, Anastasiya; Junge, Henrik; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Hydrogenation reactions are essential processes in the chemical industry, giving access to a variety of valuable compounds including fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmachemicals. On an industrial scale, hydrogenations are typically performed with precious metal catalysts or with base metal catalysts, such as Raney nickel, which requires special handling due to its pyrophoric nature. We report a stable and highly active intermetallic nickel silicide catalyst that can be used for hydrogenations of a wide range of unsaturated compounds. The catalyst is prepared via a straightforward procedure using SiO 2 as the silicon atom source. The process involves thermal reduction of Si-O bonds in the presence of Ni nanoparticles at temperatures below 1000°C. The presence of silicon as a secondary component in the nickel metal lattice plays the key role in its properties and is of crucial importance for improved catalytic activity. This novel catalyst allows for efficient reduction of nitroarenes, carbonyls, nitriles, N-containing heterocycles, and unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. Moreover, the reported catalyst can be used for oxidation reactions in the presence of molecular oxygen and is capable of promoting acceptorless dehydrogenation of unsaturated N-containing heterocycles, opening avenues for H 2 storage in organic compounds. The generality of the nickel silicide catalyst is demonstrated in the hydrogenation of over a hundred of structurally diverse unsaturated compounds. The wide application scope and high catalytic activity of this novel catalyst make it a nice alternative to known general hydrogenation catalysts, such as Raney nickel and noble metal-based catalysts.

  16. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  17. A general protocol for the synthesis of Pt-Sn/C catalysts for the ethanol electrooxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B.; Lee, Z.Y.; Cheng, C.H.; Lee, J.Y. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Chia, Z.W. [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), Centre for Life Sciences (CeLS), Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Z.L. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2012-08-15

    A general protocol for the synthesis of Pt-Sn/C catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation by the polyol method is developed after a systematic variation of the preparation variables. This protocol enables the complete transfer of all catalytic elements in the preparation solution to the catalyst support; thereby providing a convenient means of catalyst composition control. Water is a necessary co-solvent for ethylene glycol in the polyol synthesis of Pt-Sn/C catalysts. The best preparation medium for controlling the particle size to small sizes is 0.1 M NaOH solution in a mixture of equal volumes of water and ethylene glycol. With this medium composition Pt-Sn/C catalysts with the optimized target Pt:Sn atomic ratio of 3:1 could be expeditiously prepared for ethanol electrooxidation. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Assessing College Students' Understanding of Acid Base Chemistry Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yanjun Jean

    2014-01-01

    Typically most college curricula include three acid base models: Arrhenius', Bronsted-Lowry's, and Lewis'. Although Lewis' acid base model is generally thought to be the most sophisticated among these three models, and can be further applied in reaction mechanisms, most general chemistry curricula either do not include Lewis' acid base model, or…

  19. "Greening" a Familiar General Chemistry Experiment: Coffee Cup Calorimetry to Determine the Enthalpy of Neutralization of an Acid-Base Reaction and the Specific Heat Capacity of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.; Perera, K. Nishanthi R.

    2017-01-01

    Coffee cup calorimetry, performed with calorimeters made with styrofoam coffee cups, is a familiar experiment in the general chemistry laboratory. These calorimeters are inexpensive, easy to use, and provide good insulation for most thermodynamics experiments. This paper presents the successful substitution of paper coffee cups for styrofoam cups…

  20. Comparison of sodium hypochlorite-based foam and peroxyacetic acid-based fog sanitizing procedures in a salmon smokehouse: Survival of the general microflora and Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Gardshodn, K.; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The effects of fog sanitization with peroxyacetic acid (hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, and acetic acid in combination) on general hygiene (aerobic plate count) and on Listeria monocytogenes were assessed in a slicing area at a salmon smokehouse and compared with the effects of foam sanitization...... sample, and a total of 288 bacterial strains were randomly isolated and tentatively identified to genus level by physiological and biochemical tests. The microflora was dominated by Neisseriaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and lactic acid bacteria during production. Foam sanitization caused a change...

  1. Effect of buffer general acid-base catalysis on the stereoselectivity of ester and thioester H/D exchange in D2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrig, Jerry R; Reiter, Nicholas J; Kirk, Randy; Zawadski, Michelle R; Lamarre-Vincent, Nathan

    2011-04-06

    As part of a comprehensive investigation on the stereochemistry of base-catalyzed 1,2-elimination and H/D exchange reactions of carbonyl compounds, we have found that the stereoselectivity of H/D exchange of 3-hydroxybutyryl N-acetylcysteamine (3) in D(2)O is strongly influenced by the presence of buffers. This buffer effect is also operative with a simple acyclic ester, ethyl 3-methoxybutanoate (7). Buffers whose general-acid components are cyclic tertiary ammonium ions are particularly effective in changing the stereoselectivity. (2)H NMR analysis showed that without buffer, H/D exchange of 3 produces 81-82% of the 2R*, 3R* diastereomer of 2-deuterio 3 (the anti product). In the presence of 0.33 M 3-quinuclidinone buffer, only 44% of the 2R*, 3R* diastereomer was formed. With ester 7, the stereoselectivity went from 93-94% in DO(-)/D(2)O to 60% in the presence of buffer. Phosphate buffer, as well as others, also showed substantial effects. The results are put into the context of what is known about the mechanism of H/D exchange of esters and thioesters, and the relevance of the buffer effect on the mechanism of the enoyl-CoA hydratase reaction is discussed. It is likely that hydrogen bonding in the enolate-buffer acid encounter complex is an important stereochemical determinant in producing a greater amount of the 2R*, 3S* diastereomer (the syn product). Studies that involve the protonation of enolate anions in D(2)O need to include the buffer general acid in any understanding of the stereoselectivity. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. PHYSIOLOGY OF ACID BASE BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid-base, electrolyte, and metabolic disturbances are common in the intensive care unit. Almost all critically ill patients often suffer from compound acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Successful evaluation and management of such patients requires recognition of common patterns (e.g., metabolic acidosis and the ability to dissect one disorder from another. The intensivists needs to identify and correct these condition with the easiest available tools as they are the associated with multiorgan failure. Understanding the elements of normal physiology in these areas is very important so as to diagnose the pathological condition and take adequate measures as early as possible. Arterial blood gas analysis is one such tool for early detection of acid base disorder. Physiology of acid base is complex and here is the attempt to simplify it in our day to day application for the benefit of critically ill patients.

  3. Small P Systems with Catalysts or Anti-Matter Simulating Generalized Register Machines and Generalized Counter Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus on two weak forms of cooperation in P systems, namely, catalytic rules and matter/anti-matter annihilation rules. These variants of P systems both are computationally complete, while the corresponding rule complexity turns out to be of special interest. For establishing considerably small universal P systems in both cases, we found two suitable tools: generalized register machines and generalized counter automata. Depending on the features used in the different variants, we construct several small universal P systems.

  4. The acid/base profile of agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manallack, D T

    2017-08-01

    Drug-likeness has long been studied in the pursuit of finding new medicines. Similarly, in the agrochemical field there is value in exploring the properties of the chemicals involved. Patterns that emerge can potentially influence future discovery campaigns to improve the probability of commercial success. In this study we investigate the acid/base properties and physicochemical characteristics of three classes of compounds: fungicides, herbicides and insecticides. In comparison with FDA-approved drugs, it was noted that the pesticides were generally smaller, possessed a neutral charge state and were more lipophilic. The results are discussed in the light of their intended targets.

  5. pH-dependent release of trace elements including platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucha, Veronika; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Strnad, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    The release of trace metals and platinum group elements (PGEs) from automobile exhaust catalysts represents a remarkable source of higly dispersed environmental contamination. Especially, PGEs have shown increasing research interest due to their possible bioaccessibility. In our research, we focused on leaching behaviour of trace metals from gasoline and diesel automobile catalysts. While catalysts for gasoline engines contain a mixture of Pt-Pd-Rh or Pd-Rh, catalysts for diesel engines are composed only of Pt. We used dust from two crushed gasoline and two crushed diesel catalysts (new and aged). The dust of gasoline catalysts contains significant concentrations of Pt (700 mg.kg-1), Pd (11 000 mg.kg-1) and Rh (700 mg.kg-1). And the dust of diesel catalysts are composed of Pt (3 900 mg.kg-1) and they contains negligible amounts of Pd dan Rh (leaching of trace metals from dust we used pH-stat leaching test according to the European standard CEN/TS 14997. The concentrations of cations: PGEs (Pt, Pd a Rh), K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, La and Ce were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and anions: F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- by high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the dusts from catalysts were relatively stable to acid/base influence, the leaching of trace metals from catalysts showed a dependence on pH. Generally, the highest concentrations were released under acidic conditions. The leaching of PGEs was higher for Pt in diesel catalysts and for Pd and Rh in gasoline catalysts. The highest concentrations of Zn and Pb were observed in old catalysts. The rare earth metals were released more from gasoline catalysts. Catalysts particles represent health risk especially with respect to their PGEs contents.

  6. A General Catalyst for Site-Selective C(sp(3))-H Bond Amination of Activated Secondary over Tertiary Alkyl C(sp(3))-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamp, Ryan J; Jirak, James G; Dolan, Nicholas S; Guzei, Ilia A; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2016-06-17

    The discovery of transition metal complexes capable of promoting general, catalyst-controlled and selective carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond amination of activated secondary C-H bonds over tertiary alkyl C(sp(3))-H bonds is challenging, as substrate control often dominates when reactive nitrene intermediates are involved. In this letter, we report the design of a new silver complex, [(Py5Me2)AgOTf]2, that displays general and good-to-excellent selectivity for nitrene insertion into propargylic, benzylic, and allylic C-H bonds over tertiary alkyl C(sp(3))-H bonds.

  7. Interpretation of pH-activity profiles for acid-base catalysis from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Thakshila; Swails, Jason M; Harris, Michael E; Roitberg, Adrian E; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-17

    The measurement of reaction rate as a function of pH provides essential information about mechanism. These rates are sensitive to the pK(a) values of amino acids directly involved in catalysis that are often shifted by the enzyme active site environment. Experimentally observed pH-rate profiles are usually interpreted using simple kinetic models that allow estimation of "apparent pK(a)" values of presumed general acid and base catalysts. One of the underlying assumptions in these models is that the protonation states are uncorrelated. In this work, we introduce the use of constant pH molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent (CpHMD) with replica exchange in the pH-dimension (pH-REMD) as a tool to aid in the interpretation of pH-activity data of enzymes and to test the validity of different kinetic models. We apply the methods to RNase A, a prototype acid-base catalyst, to predict the macroscopic and microscopic pK(a) values, as well as the shape of the pH-rate profile. Results for apo and cCMP-bound RNase A agree well with available experimental data and suggest that deprotonation of the general acid and protonation of the general base are not strongly coupled in transphosphorylation and hydrolysis steps. Stronger coupling, however, is predicted for the Lys41 and His119 protonation states in apo RNase A, leading to the requirement for a microscopic kinetic model. This type of analysis may be important for other catalytic systems where the active forms of the implicated general acid and base are oppositely charged and more highly correlated. These results suggest a new way for CpHMD/pH-REMD simulations to bridge the gap with experiments to provide a molecular-level interpretation of pH-activity data in studies of enzyme mechanisms.

  8. Using the Logarithmic Concentration Diagram, Log "C", to Teach Acid-Base Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Acid-base equilibrium is one of the most important and most challenging topics in a typical general chemistry course. This article introduces an alternative to the algebraic approach generally used in textbooks, the graphical log "C" method. Log "C" diagrams provide conceptual insight into the behavior of aqueous acid-base systems and allow…

  9. Students' Understanding of Acids/Bases in Organic Chemistry Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartrette, David P.; Mayo, Provi M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding key foundational principles is vital to learning chemistry across different contexts. One such foundational principle is the acid/base behavior of molecules. In the general chemistry sequence, the Bronsted-Lowry theory is stressed, because it lends itself well to studying equilibrium and kinetics. However, the Lewis theory of…

  10. Dynamic Buffer Capacity in Acid-Base Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    The generalized concept of 'dynamic' buffer capacity β V is related to electrolytic systems of different complexity where acid-base equilibria are involved. The resulting formulas are presented in a uniform and consistent form. The detailed calculations are related to two Britton-Robinson buffers, taken as examples.

  11. Dynamic Buffer Capacity in Acid?Base Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Micha?owska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M.; Micha?owski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The generalized concept of ?dynamic? buffer capacity ? V is related to electrolytic systems of different complexity where acid?base equilibria are involved. The resulting formulas are presented in a uniform and consistent form. The detailed calculations are related to two Britton?Robinson buffers, taken as examples.

  12. The Conjugate Acid-Base Chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties that beginning chemistry students have in understanding acid-base chemistry. Describes the use of conjugate acid-base charts in helping students visualize the conjugate relationship. Addresses chart construction, metal ions, buffers and pH titrations, and the organic functional groups and nonaqueous solvents. (TW)

  13. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  14. Canonical Pedagogical Content Knowledge by Cores for Teaching Acid-Base Chemistry at High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Clara; Cañada, Florentina; Garritz, Andoni; Mellado, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The topic of acid-base chemistry is one of the oldest in general chemistry courses and it has been almost continuously in academic discussion. The central purpose of documenting the knowledge and beliefs of a group of ten Mexican teachers with experience in teaching acid-base chemistry in high school was to know how they design, prepare and…

  15. Acid base catalyzed transesterification kinetics of waste cooking oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P.; Rajvanshi, Shalini [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2011-01-15

    The present study reports the results of kinetics study of acid base catalyzed two step transesterification process of waste cooking oil, carried out at pre-determined optimum temperature of 65 C and 50 C for esterification and transesterification process respectively under the optimum condition of methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1%(w/w) for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH and 400 rpm of stirring. The optimum temperature was determined based on the yield of ME at different temperature. Simply, the optimum concentration of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH was determined with respect to ME Yield. The results indicated that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order rate reaction with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min{sup -1} and 0.0078 min{sup -1} respectively showing that the former is a slower process than the later. The maximum yield of 21.50% of ME during esterification and 90.6% from transesterification of pretreated WCO has been obtained. This is the first study of its kind which deals with simplified kinetics of two step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried under the above optimum conditions and took about 6 h for complete conversion of TG to ME with least amount of activation energy. Also various parameters related to experiments are optimized with respect to ME yield. (author)

  16. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  17. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  18. Communicating catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-06-01

    The beauty and activity of enzymes inspire chemists to tailor new and better non-biological catalysts. Now, a study reveals that the active sites within heterogeneous catalysts actively cooperate in a fashion phenomenologically similar to, but mechanistically distinct, from enzymes.

  19. Jigsaw Cooperative Learning: Acid-Base Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Sesen, Burcin Acar

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on investigating the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning instruction on first-year undergraduates' understanding of acid-base theories. Undergraduates' opinions about jigsaw cooperative learning instruction were also investigated. The participants of this study were 38 first-year undergraduates in chemistry education…

  20. Activating catalysts with mechanical force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piermattei, A.; Karthikeyan, S.; Sijbesma, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneously catalysed reactions can be ‘switched on’ by activating latent catalysts. Usually, activation is brought about by heat or an external chemical agent. However, activation of homogeneous catalysts with a mechanical trigger has not been demonstrated. Here, we introduce a general method to

  1. Acid-base equilibrium. A thermodynamic study of formation and stability of the Bi-2223 phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, Z.; Zhou, L.

    1993-01-01

    A general acid-base equilibrium theory was proposed to explain the formation and stability of the Bi-2223 phase based on the Lewis acid base theory and principle of metallurgical physical chemistry. The acid-base nature of oxide was defined according to the electrostatic force between cation and oxygen anion. A series of experimental facts were systematically explained based on the theory: substitution of Bi for Ca in the Pb-free 2223 phase, and the effect of substitution of the high-valent cation for Bi 3+ ; oxygen-pressure atmosphere, and the heat-schocking technique on the formation and stability of the 2223 phase. 14 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Lunar CATALYST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) is a NASA initiative to encourage the development of U.S. private-sector robotic lunar...

  3. Acid-base properties of ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleier, A.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter addresses the fundamental aspects of potentiometric titration, electrokinetics, and conductometric titration in evaluating surface and interfacial thermodynamic behavior. Emphasizes the characterization of aqueous systems which are pertinent to the processing of ceramic powders. Attempts to clarify the role of novel analytical techniques that will increasingly contribute to the advanced characterization of ceramic powders. Evaluates recently developed acid-base and complexation concepts and their applications to the processing of oxide ceramics

  4. DISORDERS OF ACID-BASE STATE

    OpenAIRE

    P. F. Litvitskiy

    2011-01-01

    The lecture describes modern data on disorders of acid-base state (ABS): their types, etiology, key stages of pathogenesis, main symptoms, and principles of treatment. The first part of the lecture in present journal characterizes main conception, parameters of ABS in normal state, buffer systems, common mechanisms of BS shifts elimination, etiology and pathogenesis of gas-induced (respiratory) disorders of ABS. The second part of the lecture in following journal will describe not gas-induced...

  5. Whole body acid-base modeling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-04-01

    The textbook account of whole body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion, and gastrointestinal alkali absorption, which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. To improve understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production were already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption in terms of urine excretions. With a few assumptions it was possible to see that this expression of net acid balance was arithmetically identical to minus urine charge, whereby under the development of acidosis, urine was predicted to acquire a net negative charge. The literature already mentions unexplained negative urine charges so we scrutinized a series of seminal papers and confirmed empirically the theoretical prediction that observed urine charge did acquire negative charge as acidosis developed. Hence, we can conclude that the conventional model is problematic since it predicts what is physiologically impossible. Therefore, we need a new model for whole body acid-base balance, which does not have impossible implications. Furthermore, new experimental studies are needed to account for charge imbalance in urine under development of acidosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Modelling of acid-base titration curves of mineral assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamberg Karel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of acid-base titration curves of mineral assemblages was studied with respect to basic parameters of their surface sites to be obtained. The known modelling approaches, component additivity (CA and generalized composite (GC, and three types of different assemblages (fucoidic sandstones, sedimentary rock-clay and bentonite-magnetite samples were used. In contrary to GC-approach, application of which was without difficulties, the problem of CA-one consisted in the credibility and accessibility of the parameters characterizing the individual mineralogical components.

  7. Structure and functioning of the acid-base system in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliński, Karol; Schneider, Bernd; Szymczycha, Beata; Stokowski, Marcin

    2017-12-01

    The marine acid-base system is relatively well understood for oceanic waters. Its structure and functioning is less obvious for the coastal and shelf seas due to a number of regionally specific anomalies. In this review article we collect and integrate existing knowledge of the acid-base system in the Baltic Sea. Hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics of the Baltic Sea, as manifested in horizontal and vertical salinity gradients, permanent stratification of the water column, eutrophication, high organic-matter concentrations and high anthropogenic pressure, make the acid-base system complex. In this study, we summarize the general knowledge of the marine acid-base system as well as describe the peculiarities identified and reported for the Baltic Sea specifically. In this context we discuss issues such as dissociation constants in brackish water, different chemical alkalinity models including contributions by organic acid-base systems, long-term changes in total alkalinity, anomalies of borate alkalinity, and the acid-base effects of biomass production and mineralization. Finally, we identify research gaps and specify limitations concerning the Baltic Sea acid-base system.

  8. Kinetics of acid base catalyzed transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M P

    2010-10-01

    Out of various non-edible oil resources, Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) is considered as future feedstock for biodiesel production in India. Limited work is reported on the kinetics of transesterification of high free fatty acids containing oil. The present study reports the results of kinetic study of two-step acid base catalyzed transesterification process carried out at an optimum temperature of 65 °C and 50 °C for esterification and transesterification respectively under the optimum methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1% (w/w) for H₂SO₄ and NaOH. The yield of methyl ester (ME) has been used to study the effect of different parameters. The results indicate that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min⁻¹ and 0.008 min⁻¹ respectively. The maximum yield of 21.2% of ME during esterification and 90.1% from transesterification of pretreated JCO has been obtained. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Méthodes générales de synthèse des catalyseurs à base d'oxydes General Synthesis Methods for Mixed Oxide Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courty Ph.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available De nombreux procédés industriels (industrie céramique, électronique, nucléaire catalyse hétérogène utilisent des matériaux constitués d'oxydes mixtes. Les études fondamentales réalisées en catalyse et leurs applications industrielles montrent qu'au-delà des diverses interprétations fines de l'activité catalytique des oxydes mixtes, une notion plus générale se dégage, celle de l'homogénéité de la phase active, donc du premier intermédiaire de fabrication du catalyseur (le précurseur. Les différentes méthodes de synthèse des oxydes mixtes, puis des catalyseurs, sont alors exposées. Pour chacune d'entre elles, il est montré comment l'obtention d'un précurseur homogène peut être favorisée et maintenue. Un exemple illustre le cas de l'oxyde mixte déposé sur support. Finalement, l'étape de mise en forme de l'oxyde mixte est évoquée, l'aspect économique de la fabrication du catalyseur conclut ce texte. A great mony industrial processes (ceramics, electronics, nuclear energy, hererogeneous catalysis use materials made up of mixed oxides. Fundamental research on catalysis and its industrial applications has shown that, over and beyond the various subtle interpretations of the catalytic activity of mixed oxides, a more general concept emerges, i. e. that of the homogeneity of the active phase, hence of the first catalyst-manufacturing intermediate (the precursor. Different synthesis methods for mixed oxides, and then for cotalysts, are described. The demonstration is made for each of them how the production of a homogeneous precursor con be enhanced and maintained. An example illustrotes the case of a mixed oxide deposited on a carrier. To conclude, the shaping of the mixed oxide is described, followed by the economic aspect of catalyst manufacturing.

  10. Mathematical modeling of acid-base physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    pH is one of the most important parameters in life, influencing virtually every biological process at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body level. Thus, for cells, it is critical to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and, for multicellular organisms, to regulate extracellular pH (pHo). pHi regulation depends on the opposing actions of plasma-membrane transporters that tend to increase pHi, and others that tend to decrease pHi. In addition, passive fluxes of uncharged species (e.g., CO2, NH3) and charged species (e.g., HCO3(-), [Formula: see text] ) perturb pHi. These movements not only influence one another, but also perturb the equilibria of a multitude of intracellular and extracellular buffers. Thus, even at the level of a single cell, perturbations in acid-base reactions, diffusion, and transport are so complex that it is impossible to understand them without a quantitative model. Here we summarize some mathematical models developed to shed light onto the complex interconnected events triggered by acids-base movements. We then describe a mathematical model of a spherical cells-which to our knowledge is the first one capable of handling a multitude of buffer reactions-that our team has recently developed to simulate changes in pHi and pHo caused by movements of acid-base equivalents across the plasma membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Finally, we extend our work to a consideration of the effects of simultaneous CO2 and HCO3(-) influx into a cell, and envision how future models might extend to other cell types (e.g., erythrocytes) or tissues (e.g., renal proximal-tubule epithelium) important for whole-body pH homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DISORDERS OF ACID-BASE STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Litvitskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture describes modern data on disorders of acid-base state (ABS: their types, etiology, key stages of pathogenesis, main symptoms, and principles of treatment. The first part of the lecture in present journal characterizes main conception, parameters of ABS in normal state, buffer systems, common mechanisms of BS shifts elimination, etiology and pathogenesis of gas-induced (respiratory disorders of ABS. The second part of the lecture in following journal will describe not gas-induced (metabolic, excretory and exogenous disorders of ABS and principles of their treatment.

  12. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  13. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  14. Teaching Acid/Base Physiology in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Ulla G.; Plovsing, Ronni; Hansen, Klaus; Laursen, Bent G.; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Acid/base homeostasis is one of the most difficult subdisciplines of physiology for medical students to master. A different approach, where theory and practice are linked, might help students develop a deeper understanding of acid/base homeostasis. We therefore set out to develop a laboratory exercise in acid/base physiology that would provide…

  15. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  16. Alkylation of isobutane by butenes on zirconium sulfate catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenov, A.V.; Perelevskij, E.V.; Finevich, V.P.; Zajkovskij, V.I.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Duplyakiv, V.K.; Bal'zhinimaev, B.S.

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of applied zirconium sulfate catalysts obtained by the method of impregnation is investigated. Results of comparative study of structural, acid-base and catalytic properties of sulfated zirconium dioxide applied on silica gel and aluminium oxide are represented. Intervals of values of synthesis basic parameters and characteristics of catalysts properties providing achievement of high activity and selectivity in isobutane alkylation by butenes in liquid phase are determined [ru

  17. [Acid-base equilibrium and the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabary, O; Boussofara, M; Grimaud, D

    1994-01-01

    In physiological conditions, the regulation of acid-base balance in brain maintains a noteworthy stability of cerebral pH. During systemic metabolic acid-base imbalances cerebral pH is well controlled as the blood/brain barrier is slowly and poorly permeable to electrolytes (HCO3- and H+). Cerebral pH is regulated by a modulation of the respiratory drive, triggered by the early alterations of interstitial fluid pH, close to medullary chemoreceptors. As blood/brain barrier is highly permeable to Co2, CSF pH is corrected in a few hours, even in case of severe metabolic acidosis and alkalosis. Conversely, during ventilatory acidosis and alkalosis the cerebral pH varies in the same direction and in the same range than blood pH. Therefore, the brain is better protected against metabolic than ventilatory acid-base imbalances. Ventilatory acidosis and alkalosis are able to impair cerebral blood flow and brain activity through interstitial pH alterations. During respiratory acidosis, [HCO3-] increases in extracellular fluids to control cerebral pH by two main ways: a carbonic anhydrase activation at the blood/brain and blood/CSF barriers level and an increase in chloride shift in glial cells (HCO3- exchanged for Cl-). During respiratory alkalosis, [HCO3-] decreases in extracellular fluids by the opposite changes in HCO3- transport and by an increase in lactic acid synthesis by cerebral cells. The treatment of metabolic acidosis with bicarbonates may induce a cerebral acidosis and worsen a cerebral oedema during ketoacidosis. Moderate hypocapnia carried out to treat intracranial hypertension is mainly effective when cerebral blood flow is high and vascular CO2 reactivity maintained. Hypocapnia may restore an altered cerebral blood flow autoregulation. Instrumental hypocapnia requires a control of cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebral arteriovenous difference for oxygen, to select patients for whom this kind of treatment may be of benefit, to choose the optimal level of

  18. Acid-base catalysis of N-[(morpholine)methylene]daunorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Anna; Jelińska, Anna; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta; Klawitter, Maria; Zalewski, Przemysław; Oszczapowicz, Irena; Wąsowska, Małgorzata

    2012-08-01

    The stability of N-[(morpholine)methylene]-daunorubicin hydrochloride (MMD) was investigated in the pH range 0.44-13.54, at 313, 308, 303 and 298 K. The degradation of MMD as a result of hydrolysis is a pseudo-first-order reaction described by the following equation: ln c = ln c(0) - k(obs)• t. In the solutions of hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, borate, acetate and phosphate buffers, k(obs) = k(pH) because general acid-base catalysis was not observed. Specific acid-base catalysis of MMD comprises the following reactions: hydrolysis of the protonated molecules of MMD catalyzed by hydrogen ions (k(1)) and spontaneous hydrolysis of MMD molecules other than the protonated ones (k(2)) under the influence of water. The total rate of the reaction is equal to the sum of partial reactions: k(pH) = k(1) • a(H)+ • f(1) + k(2) • f(2) where: k(1) is the second-order rate constant (mol(-1) l s(-1)) of the specific hydrogen ion-catalyzed degradation of the protonated molecules of MMD; k(2) is the pseudo-first-order rate constant (s(-1)) of the water-catalyzed degradation of MMD molecules other than the protonated ones, f(1) - f(2) are fractions of the compound. MMD is the most stable at approx. pH 2.5.

  19. Physiological roles of acid-base sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential for life. The macromolecules upon which living organisms depend are sensitive to pH changes, and physiological systems use the equilibrium between carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and protons to buffer their pH. Biological processes and environmental insults are constantly challenging an organism's pH; therefore, to maintain a consistent and proper pH, organisms need sensors that measure pH and that elicit appropriate responses. Mammals use multiple sensors for measuring both intracellular and extracellular pH, and although some mammalian pH sensors directly measure protons, it has recently become apparent that many pH-sensing systems measure pH via bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase.

  20. A general approach for the synthesis of bimetallic M–Sn (M = Ru, Rh and Ir) catalysts for efficient hydrogenolysis of ester

    KAUST Repository

    Samal, Akshaya Kumar

    2016-11-24

    A versatile synthetic method was applied for the preparation of Sn containing bimetallic catalysts. The synthesis was performed by simply mixing the super hydride [LiB(C2H5)(3)H], with a metal (Ru, Rh or Ir) salt and an organotin complex in tetrahydrofuran solvent without using any surfactant. This leads to the formation of monodispersed M-Sn (M = Ru, Rh or Ir) bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs). These bimetallic catalysts show high performances in the hydrogenolysis of ester to the corresponding alcohol.

  1. Sputtered catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyerman, W.J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for preparing a supported catalyst by a sputtering process. A material that is catalytic, or which is a component of a catalytic system, is sputtered on to the surface of refractory oxide particles that are compatible with the sputtered material and the sputtered particles are consolidated into aggregate form. The oxide particles before sputtering should have a diameter in the range 1000A to 50μ and a porosity less than 0.4 ml/g, and may comprise MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 or mixtures of these oxides, including hydraulic cement. The particles may possess catalytic activity by themselves or in combination with the catalytic material deposited on them. Sputtering may be effected epitaxially and consolidation may be effected by compaction pelleting, extrusion or spray drying of a slurry. Examples of the use of such catalysts are given. (U.K.)

  2. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yanqiu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); College of Chemistry, Mudanjiang Normal University, Mudanjiang 157012 (China); Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  3. Synthesis of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials by oxidation and thermolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Zou, Yongcun [State Key Laboratory of Inoranic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistryg, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Shujie; Liu, Heng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst. The obtained sample of SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent catalytic activity in aldol condensation reaction. Research highlights: {yields} Synthesize acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. {yields} Oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. {yields} Exhibit good catalytic performance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. -- Abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. This method was achieved by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and (3-triethoxysilylpropyl) carbamicacid-1-methylcyclohexylester (3TAME) in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), followed by oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron micrographs (TEM) show that the resultant materials keep mesoporous structure. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), back titration, solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR and solid-state {sup 29}Si MAS NMR confirm that the organosiloxanes were condensed as a part of the silica framework. The bifunctional sample (SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}) containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  4. Acid-base status and changes in Swedish forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karltun, Erik; Stendahl, Johan; Lundin, Lars

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use data from the Swedish National Survey of Forest Soils and Vegetation (NSFSV) to evaluate the present acid-base status of forest soils to try to answer the following questions. Which role do anthropogenic and biological acidification play for the present acid-base status of the soil profile? What is the present acid-base status of Swedish forest soils and how large areas may be considered as severely acidified? Do the current tendencies in soil acid-base status correspond with the positive development in surface waters?

  5. Mutagenicity of irradiated solutions of nuclei acid bases and nucleosides in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, J.; Schubert, J.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and a nucleotide, saturated with either N 2 , N 2 O or O 2 , were irradiated and tested for mutagenicity towards Salmonella typhimurium, with and without pre-incubation. Irradiated solutions of the nuclei acid bases were all non-mutagenic. Irradiated solutions of the nucleosides showed mutagenicity in S. typhimurium TA100 (pre-incubation assay). Generally, the mutagenicity followed the order: N 2 O > N 2 > O 2 . The results show that the formation of mutagenic radiolytic products is initiated by attack of mainly solutions of the nucleotide thymidine-5'-monophosphate, no mutagenicity could be detected. (orig.)

  6. An introduction to catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hak Je

    1988-11-01

    This book explains basic conception of catalyst such as definition, velocity of chemical reaction and velocity of catalyst reaction, absorption with absorption energy and chemical absorption, pore structure with the role of pore and measurement of pore structure, catalyst activity on solid structure, electrical property on catalyst activity, choice and design of catalyst, catalytic reaction with reaction velocity and chemical equilibrium and reaction velocity model, measurement of reaction velocity and material analysis, catalyst for mixed compound, catalyst for solid acid and catalyst for supported metal.

  7. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  8. Respiratory Acid-Base Disorders in the Critical Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of respiratory acid-base abnormalities in the critical care unit (CCU) is unknown, although respiratory alkalosis is suspected to be common in this population. Abnormal carbon dioxide tension can have many physiologic effects, and changes in Pco 2 may have a significant impact on outcome. Monitoring Pco 2 in CCU patients is an important aspect of critical patient assessment, and identification of respiratory acid-base abnormalities can be valuable as a diagnostic tool. Treatment of respiratory acid-base disorders is largely focused on resolution of the primary disease, although mechanical ventilation may be indicated in cases with severe respiratory acidosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Acid-base imbalance in acute obstructive uropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyĭ, L E

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate impairment of acid-base balance (ABB) in acute obstructive uropathies. Evaluation of acid-base balance was performed by pH, partial carbon dioxide pressure, plasma bicarbonate concentration, buffer bases, basis excess, hydrogen ion concentration. An automatic gas analyzer was used, plasma anion gap was calculated. Characteristic ABB alterations in different acute obstructive uropathies were detected. Acidotic shifts in acute obstruction of the upper urinary tracts and its inflammatory complications were assessed pathophysiologically. A comparative study of pathological acid-base disorders in acute supra- and infravesical obstructive uropathies was performed.

  10. Novel Blend Membranes Based on Acid-Base Interactions for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhu Fu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells hold great promise for wide applications in portable, residential, and large-scale power supplies. For low temperature fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs, proton-exchange membranes (PEMs are a key component determining the fuel cells performance. PEMs with high proton conductivity under anhydrous conditions can allow PEMFCs to be operated above 100 °C, enabling use of hydrogen fuels with high-CO contents and improving the electrocatalytic activity. PEMs with high proton conductivity and low methanol crossover are critical for lowering catalyst loadings at the cathode and improving the performance and long-term stability of DMFCs. This review provides a summary of a number of novel acid-base blend membranes consisting of an acidic polymer and a basic compound containing N-heterocycle groups, which are promising for PEMFCs and DMFCs.

  11. The Incidence of Electrolytes and Acid-Base Abnormalities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic patients with prolonged insulin insufficiency can present in the emergency department with life threatening ketoacidosis,el ectrolyte ... acid-base abnormalities in diabetic emergencies using the I-STAT point of care testing technique.

  12. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  13. Titanium Dioxide as a Catalyst Support in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Bee Abd Hamid, Sharifah

    2014-01-01

    The lack of stability is a challenge for most heterogeneous catalysts. During operations, the agglomeration of particles may block the active sites of the catalyst, which is believed to contribute to its instability. Recently, titanium oxide (TiO2) was introduced as an alternative support material for heterogeneous catalyst due to the effect of its high surface area stabilizing the catalysts in its mesoporous structure. TiO2 supported metal catalysts have attracted interest due to TiO2 nanoparticles high activity for various reduction and oxidation reactions at low pressures and temperatures. Furthermore, TiO2 was found to be a good metal oxide catalyst support due to the strong metal support interaction, chemical stability, and acid-base property. The aforementioned properties make heterogeneous TiO2 supported catalysts show a high potential in photocatalyst-related applications, electrodes for wet solar cells, synthesis of fine chemicals, and others. This review focuses on TiO2 as a support material for heterogeneous catalysts and its potential applications. PMID:25383380

  14. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... catalyst. The results from the screening were experimentally verified for CO hydrogenation, CO2 hydrogenation, and simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation by bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts. These catalysts were found to be highly active and selective. The Co-Ni and Co-Fe systems were investigated for CO...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  15. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  16. Enantioselective small molecule synthesis by carbon dioxide fixation using a dual Brønsted acid/base organocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara, Brandon A; Struble, Thomas J; Wang, Weiwei; Dobish, Mark C; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2015-06-17

    Carbon dioxide exhibits many of the qualities of an ideal reagent: it is nontoxic, plentiful, and inexpensive. Unlike other gaseous reagents, however, it has found limited use in enantioselective synthesis. Moreover, unprecedented is a tool that merges one of the simplest biological approaches to catalysis-Brønsted acid/base activation-with this abundant reagent. We describe a metal-free small molecule catalyst that achieves the three component reaction between a homoallylic alcohol, carbon dioxide, and an electrophilic source of iodine. Cyclic carbonates are formed enantioselectively.

  17. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL) and extrusion (JE). The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3− transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions. PMID:24592239

  18. Direct synthesis of acid-base bifunctionalized hexagonal mesoporous silica and its catalytic activity in cascade reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Fanpeng; Sun, Jianrui; Wu, Shujie; Liu, Heng; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2011-03-01

    A series of efficient acid-base bifunctionalized hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) catalysts contained aminopropyl and propanesulfonic acid have been synthesized through a simple co-condensation by protection of amino group. The results of small-angle XRD, TEM, and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements show that the resultant materials have mesoscopic structures. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, elemental analysis (EA), back titration, (29)Si NMR and (13)C NMR confirm that the organosiloxanes were condensed as a part of the silica framework. The resultant catalysts exhibit excellent acid-basic properties, which make them possess high activity for one-pot deacetalization-Knoevenagel and deacetalization-nitroaldol (Henry) reactions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Immobilization of molecular catalysts in supported ionic liquid phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Charlie; Wahlen, Joos; Mertens, Pascal; Binnemans, Koen; De Vos, Dirk

    2010-09-28

    In a supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalyst system, an ionic liquid (IL) film is immobilized on a high-surface area porous solid and a homogeneous catalyst is dissolved in this supported IL layer, thereby combining the attractive features of homogeneous catalysts with the benefits of heterogeneous catalysts. In this review reliable strategies for the immobilization of molecular catalysts in SILPs are surveyed. In the first part, general aspects concerning the application of SILP catalysts are presented, focusing on the type of catalyst, support, ionic liquid and reaction conditions. Secondly, organic reactions in which SILP technology is applied to improve the performance of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts are presented: hydroformylation, metathesis reactions, carbonylation, hydrogenation, hydroamination, coupling reactions and asymmetric reactions.

  20. Pattern of acid base abnormalities in critically ill patinets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.M.; Mehmood, A.; Malik, T.M.

    2015-01-01

    To find out the pattern of acid base abnormalities in critically ill patients in a tertiary care health facility. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in the department of pathology, Combined Military Hospital Kharian from January 2013 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty patients suffering from various diseases and presenting with exacerbation of their clinical conditions were studied. These patients were hospitalized and managed in acute care units of the hospital. Arterial blood gases were analysed to detect acid base status and their correlation with their clinical condition. Concomitant analysis of electrolytes was carried out. Tests related to concurrent illnesses e.g. renal and liver function tests, cardiac enzymes and plasma glucose were assayed by routine end point and kinetic methods. Standard reference materials were used to ensure internal quantify control of analyses. Results: Two hundred and fifteen patients out of 250 studied suffered from acid base disorders. Gender distribution showed a higher percentage of male patients and the mean age was 70.5 ± 17.4 years. Double acid base disorders were the commonest disorders (34%) followed by metabolic acidosis (30%). Anion gap was calculated to further stratify metabolic acidosis and cases of diabetic ketoacidosis were the commonest in this category (47%). Other simple acid base disorders were relatively less frequent. Delta bicarbonate was calculated to unmask the superimposition of respiratory alkalosis or acidosis with metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis. Though triple acid base disorders were noted in a small percentage of cases (05%), but were found to be the most complicated and challenging. Mixed acid base disorders were associated with high mortality. Conclusion: A large number of critically ill patients manifested acid base abnormalities over the full spectrum of these disorders. Mixed acid base disorders were

  1. Acid-base and ion balance in fishes with bimodal respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shartau, R B; Brauner, C J

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of air breathing during the Devonian provided early fishes with bimodal respiration with a stable O2 supply from air. This was, however, probably associated with challenges and trade-offs in terms of acid-base balance and ionoregulation due to reduced gill:water interaction and changes in gill morphology associated with air breathing. While many aspects of acid-base and ionoregulation in air-breathing fishes are similar to water breathers, the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unstudied. In general, reduced ionic permeability appears to be an important adaptation in the few bimodal fishes investigated but it is not known if this is a general characteristic. The kidney appears to play an important role in minimizing ion loss to the freshwater environment in the few species investigated, and while ion uptake across the gut is probably important, it has been largely unexplored. In general, air breathing in facultative air-breathing fishes is associated with an acid-base disturbance, resulting in an increased partial pressure of arterial CO2 and a reduction in extracellular pH (pHE ); however, several fishes appear to be capable of tightly regulating tissue intracellular pH (pHI ), despite a large sustained reduction in pHE , a trait termed preferential pHI regulation. Further studies are needed to determine whether preferential pHI regulation is a general trait among bimodal fishes and if this confers reduced sensitivity to acid-base disturbances, including those induced by hypercarbia, exhaustive exercise and hypoxia or anoxia. Additionally, elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms may yield insight into whether preferential pHI regulation is a trait ultimately associated with the early evolution of air breathing in vertebrates. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Renal acidification responses to respiratory acid-base disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madias, Nicolaos E

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory acid-base disorders are those abnormalities in acid-base equilibrium that are expressed as primary changes in the arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). An increase in PaCO2 (hypercapnia) acidifies body fluids and initiates the acid-base disturbance known as respiratory acidosis. By contrast, a decrease in PaCO2 (hypocapnia) alkalinizes body fluids and initiates the acid-base disturbance known as respiratory alkalosis. The impact on systemic acidity of these primary changes in PaCO2 is ameliorated by secondary, directional changes in plasma [HCO3¯] that occur in 2 stages. Acutely, hypercapnia or hypocapnia yields relatively small changes in plasma [HCO3¯] that originate virtually exclusively from titration of the body's nonbicarbonate buffers. During sustained hypercapnia or hypocapnia, much larger changes in plasma [HCO3¯] occur that reflect adjustments in renal acidification mechanisms. Consequently, the deviation of systemic acidity from normal is smaller in the chronic forms of these disorders. Here we provide an overview of the renal acidification responses to respiratory acid-base disorders. We also identify gaps in knowledge that require further research.

  3. Assessment of acid-base balance. Stewart's approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fores-Novales, B; Diez-Fores, P; Aguilera-Celorrio, L J

    2016-04-01

    The study of acid-base equilibrium, its regulation and its interpretation have been a source of debate since the beginning of 20th century. Most accepted and commonly used analyses are based on pH, a notion first introduced by Sorensen in 1909, and on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (1916). Since then new concepts have been development in order to complete and make easier the understanding of acid-base disorders. In the early 1980's Peter Stewart brought the traditional interpretation of acid-base disturbances into question and proposed a new method. This innovative approach seems more suitable for studying acid-base abnormalities in critically ill patients. The aim of this paper is to update acid-base concepts, methods, limitations and applications. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. A general chelate-assisted co-assembly to metallic nanoparticles-incorporated ordered mesoporous carbon catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenkun; Sun, Bo; Qiao, Minghua; Wei, Jing; Yue, Qin; Wang, Chun; Deng, Yonghui; Kaliaguine, Serge; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2012-10-24

    The organization of different nano objects with tunable sizes, morphologies, and functions into integrated nanostructures is critical to the development of novel nanosystems that display high performances in sensing, catalysis, and so on. Herein, using acetylacetone as a chelating agent, phenolic resol as a carbon source, metal nitrates as metal sources, and amphiphilic copolymers as a template, we demonstrate a chelate-assisted multicomponent coassembly method to synthesize ordered mesoporous carbon with uniform metal-containing nanoparticles. The obtained nanocomposites have a 2-D hexagonally arranged pore structure, uniform pore size (~4.0 nm), high surface area (~500 m(2)/g), moderate pore volume (~0.30 cm(3)/g), uniform and highly dispersed Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles, and constant Fe(2)O(3) contents around 10 wt %. By adjusting acetylacetone amount, the size of Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles is readily tunable from 8.3 to 22.1 nm. More importantly, it is found that the metal-containing nanoparticles are partially embedded in the carbon framework with the remaining part exposed in the mesopore channels. This unique semiexposure structure not only provides an excellent confinement effect and exposed surface for catalysis but also helps to tightly trap the nanoparticles and prevent aggregating during catalysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis results show that as the size of iron nanoparticles decreases, the mesoporous Fe-carbon nanocomposites exhibit significantly improved catalytic performances with C(5+) selectivity up to 68%, much better than any reported promoter-free Fe-based catalysts due to the unique semiexposure morphology of metal-containing nanoparticles confined in the mesoporous carbon matrix.

  5. Tailoring peritoneal dialysis fluid for optimal acid-base targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Mild derangements of acid-base status are common features in peritoneal dialysis patients, metabolic acidosis being the most frequent alteration. One of the main tasks of dialysis is to correct these derangements and the target is the normalization of the acid-base parameters since they affect several organs and functions. Since factors affecting acid-base homeostasis are intrinsic characteristics of the individual patient (metabolic acid production, distribution space for bicarbonate, dialytic prescription, etc.), it is not surprising that only relatively few patients achieve the normal range. Only a certain modulation of buffer infusion by using different buffer concentrations in the dialysis fluid may ensure a good correction in a large percentage of patients.

  6. Assessing Acid-Base Status: Physiologic Versus Physicochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrogué, Horacio J; Madias, Nicolaos E

    2016-11-01

    The physiologic approach has long been used in assessing acid-base status. This approach considers acids as hydrogen ion donors and bases as hydrogen ion acceptors and the acid-base status of the organism as reflecting the interaction of net hydrogen ion balance with body buffers. In the physiologic approach, the carbonic acid/bicarbonate buffer pair is used for assessing acid-base status and blood pH is determined by carbonic acid (ie, Paco 2 ) and serum bicarbonate levels. More recently, the physicochemical approach was introduced, which has gained popularity, particularly among intensivists and anesthesiologists. This approach posits that the acid-base status of body fluids is determined by changes in the dissociation of water that are driven by the interplay of 3 independent variables: the sum of strong (fully dissociated) cation concentrations minus the sum of strong anion concentrations (strong ion difference); the total concentration of weak acids; and Paco 2 . These 3 independent variables mechanistically determine both hydrogen ion concentration and bicarbonate concentration of body fluids, which are considered as dependent variables. Our experience indicates that the average practitioner is familiar with only one of these approaches and knows very little, if any, about the other approach. In the present Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case, we attempt to bridge this knowledge gap by contrasting the physiologic and physicochemical approaches to assessing acid-base status. We first outline the essential features, advantages, and limitations of each of the 2 approaches and then apply each approach to the same patient presentation. We conclude with our view about the optimal approach. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NaVirCept - Nucleic Acid-Based Anti-Viral Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, E. R.; Wong, J.; Van Loon, D.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines are generally considered to be the most effective countermeasures to bacterial and viral diseases, however, licensed vaccines against many disease agents are either not available or their efficacies have not been demonstrated. Vaccines are generally agent specific in terms of treatment spectrum and are subject to defeat through natural mutation or through directed efforts. With respect to viral therapeutics, one of the major limitations associated with antiviral drugs is acquired drug resistance caused by antigenic shift or drift. A number of next-generation prophylactic and/or therapeutic measures are on the horizon. Of these, nucleic acid-based drugs are showing great antiviral potential. These drugs elicit long-lasting, broad spectrum protective immune responses, especially to respiratory viral pathogens. The Nucleic Acid-Based Antiviral (NaVirCept) project provides the opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of novel medical countermeasures against military-significant endemic and other viral threat agents. This project expands existing DRDC drug delivery capability development, in the form of proprietary liposome intellectual property, by coupling it with leading-edge nucleic acid-based technology to deliver effective medical countermeasures that will protect deployed personnel and the warfighter against a spectrum of viral disease agents. The technology pathway will offer a means to combat emerging viral diseases or modified threat agents such as the bird flu or reconstructed Spanish flu without going down the laborious, time-consuming and expensive paths to develop countermeasures for each new and/or emerging viral disease organism.(author)

  8. Vanadium oxides supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors: the effect of acid-base properties on the oxidation of isopropanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Meira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium oxide supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors was studied in the oxidation of isopropanol. Hydrotalcites with different y = Mg/Al ratios were synthesized by the method of coprecipitation nitrates of Mg and Al cations with K2CO3 as precipitant. The decomposition of these hydrotalcite precursors at 450°C yielded homogeneous MgyAlOx mixed oxides that contain the Al+3 cations totally incorporated into the MgO framework. The materials were characterized by chemical analysis, BET superficial area, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR and the reaction of isopropanol, a probe molecule used to evaluate the acid-base properties. The results of TPR showed that the reducibility of V+5 decreased with the increase in magnesium loading in catalysts. The X-ray diffraction patterns of Al-rich hydrotalcite precursors showed the presence of crystalline phases of brucite and gibbsite. It was shown that chemical composition, texture, acid-base properties of the active sites and also Mg/Al ratio strongly affect the formation of the products in the oxidation of isopropanol. The Al-rich catalysts were much more active than the Mg-rich ones, converting isopropanol mainly to propylene.

  9. Vanadium oxides supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors: the effect of acid base properties on the oxidation of isopropanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meira, D.M.; Cortez, G.G. [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica de Lorena, Lorena, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Catalise II]. E-mail: cortez@dequi.faenquil.br; Monteiro, W.R.; Rodrigues, J.A.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Combustao e Propulsao]. E-mail: jajr@lcp.inpe.br

    2006-07-15

    Vanadium oxide supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors was studied in the oxidation of isopropanol. Hydrotalcites with different y = Mg/Al ratios were synthesized by the method of coprecipitation nitrates of Mg and Al cations with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as precipitant. The decomposition of these hydrotalcite precursors at 450 deg C yielded homogeneous MgyAlOx mixed oxides that contain the Al{sup +3} cations totally incorporated into the MgO framework. The materials were characterized by chemical analysis, BET superficial area, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and the reaction of isopropanol, a probe molecule used to evaluate the acid-base properties. The results of TPR showed that the reducibility of V{sup +5} decreased with the increase in magnesium loading in catalysts. The X-ray diffraction patterns of Al-rich hydrotalcite precursors showed the presence of crystalline phases of brucite and gibbsite. It was shown that chemical composition, texture, acid-base properties of the active sites and also Mg/Al ratio strongly affect the formation of the products in the oxidation of isopropanol. The Al-rich catalysts were much more active than the Mg-rich ones, converting isopropanol mainly to propylene. (author)

  10. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  11. Acid-base equilibrium: The best clinical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Aristizábal-Salazar, Raúl E; Calvo-Torres, L. Felipe; Valencia-Arango, Luis Alfonso; Montoya-Canon, Mauricio; Barbosa-Gantiva, Oscar; Hincapié-Baena, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base balance disorders can be found in a primary or secondary form in patients with a disease process such as Diabetes Mellitus or acute renal failure, among others. The objective of this article is to explain and guide the correlation ship between the clinical findings in the patient and the parameters of arterial blood gases in a simple and precise manner, in order to make the correct acid-base balance diagnosis and adequate therapeutic interventions. A non-systematic review of the sci...

  12. Teaching acid/base physiology in the laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Plovsing, Ronni; Hansen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    exercise in acid/base physiology that would provide students with unambiguous and reproducible data that clearly would illustrate the theory in practice. The laboratory exercise was developed to include both metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. Data were collected from 56 groups of medical...... students that had participated in this laboratory exercise. The acquired data showed very consistent and solid findings after the development of both metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. All results were consistent with the appropriate diagnosis of the acid/base disorder. Not one single group...... failed to obtain data that were compatible with the diagnosis; it was only the degree of acidosis/alkalosis and compensation that varied....

  13. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); LaBarge, W. [General Motors-AC Delco Systems, Flint, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    This has been the second year of a CRADA between General Motors - AC Delco Systems (GM-ACDS) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) aimed at improved performance/lifetime of platinum-rhodium based three-way-catalysts (TWC) for automotive emission control systems. While current formulations meet existing emission standards, higher than optimum Pt-Rh loadings are often required. In additionk, more stringent emission standards have been imposed for the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts.

  14. The influence of calcination temperatures on the acid-based properties and catalytic activity for the 1,3-butadiene synthesis from ethanol/acetaldehyde mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meixiang; Jiang, Haoxi; Zhang, Minhua

    2018-05-01

    The influences of the calcination temperature on the catalysts' acid-based properties and catalytic activity for the 1,3-butadiene synthesis from ethanol are investigated. The results show that the 2 wt% ZrO2/Nano-SiO2 calcined at 773 K shows the best performance with the selectivity of 93.18% and conversion of 58.52% when reacted at 593 K, a WHSV of 1.8 h-1 and 3.5:1 volume ratio ethanol-to-acetaldehyde in an atmospheric fixed-bed reactor. Prepared catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, temperature-programmed desorption of NH3 and CO2, FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine and CO2. Based on the relationship between the catalyst activity and its properties, the fact can be presumed that the formation and strength of Zrsbnd Osbnd Si bond determines the acid-based properties of the catalyst. In addition, moderate-intensity weak acid-basic sites are more suitable for ethanol conversion to BD with the amount of acid and basic sites as close as possible.

  15. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    with the wealthy district of Ipanema. The project, which consists of several public programs, addresses the need to open up districts in Rio and create access and connections in the socially divided city across the formal and informal areas, of which the latter counts for more than half of the population in Rio...... that it is not the intention to bring a debate on economic or more general political topics, how interesting it might seem to be. Among others, the issue of gentrification is very relevant in connection with urban renewal of urban interventions. We are very well aware of that. We mention the problem especially in the cases...... the specific challenges facing Rio de Janeiro - a divided city with the formal city and its wealthy neighborhoods on one side and on the other, the many favelas, which are not included in the regulations and public practices of the formal city. Then the case studies of the projects Cantagalo Elevator, designed...

  16. A dipstick sensor for coulometric acid-base titrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthuis, Wouter; van der Schoot, B.H.; Chavez, F.; Bergveld, Piet

    1989-01-01

    By performing an acid-base titration by coulometric generation of OH− or H+ ions at an inert electrode in close proximity to the pH-sensitive gate of an ISFET, it is possible to determine the acid or base concentration of a solution using the ISFET as an indicator device for the equivalence point in

  17. Using Spreadsheets to Produce Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Martin James; Parkinson, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes two spreadsheets for producing acid-base titration curves, one uses relatively simple cell formulae that can be written into the spreadsheet by inexperienced students and the second uses more complex formulae that are best written by the teacher. (JRH)

  18. Boronic acid-based autoligation of nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbeyron, R.; Vasseur, J.-J.; Smietana, M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The development of synthetic systems displaying dynamic and adaptive characteristics is a formidable challenge with wide applications from biotechnology to therapeutics. Recently, we described a dynamic and programmable nucleic acid-based system relying on the formation of reversible bo....... Evidence suggests that geometric and steric factors are key features for controlling the equilibria. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.]...

  19. Acid-Base Disorders--A Computer Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, David L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes and lists a program for Apple Pascal Version 1.1 which investigates the behavior of the bicarbonate-carbon dioxide buffer system in acid-base disorders. Designed specifically for the preclinical medical student, the program has proven easy to use and enables students to use blood gas parameters to arrive at diagnoses. (DH)

  20. Nucleic acid-based diagnostics for infectious diseases in public health affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Vatcher, Greg; Yue, Xin; Dong, Yan; Li, Mao Hua; Tam, Patrick H K; Tsang, Parker Y L; Wong, April K Y; Hui, Michael H K; Yang, Bin; Tang, Hao; Lau, Lok-Ting

    2012-06-01

    Infectious diseases, mostly caused by bacteria and viruses but also a result of fungal and parasitic infection, have been one of the most important public health concerns throughout human history. The first step in combating these pathogens is to get a timely and accurate diagnosis at an affordable cost. Many kinds of diagnostics have been developed, such as pathogen culture, biochemical tests and serological tests, to help detect and fight against the causative agents of diseases. However, these diagnostic tests are generally unsatisfactory because they are not particularly sensitive and specific and are unable to deliver speedy results. Nucleic acid-based diagnostics, detecting pathogens through the identification of their genomic sequences, have shown promise to overcome the above limitations and become more widely adopted in clinical tests. Here we review some of the most popular nucleic acid-based diagnostics and focus on their adaptability and applicability to routine clinical usage. We also compare and contrast the characteristics of different types of nucleic acid-based diagnostics.

  1. Methods of making textured catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  2. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  3. Metal catalysts fight back

    OpenAIRE

    George Marsh

    1998-01-01

    In recent years organometallic catalysts, especially metallocenes, have been a major focus of attention in terms of polymerisation chemistry. But the news earlier this year of a family of iron-based catalysts able to rival the effectiveness of both conventional and metallocene catalysts in the polymerisation of ethylene has excited the plastics industry. Because of the impact of this discovery and its potential as a route to lower-priced commodity plastics in the future, it may be useful at t...

  4. Basic principles of electrolyte chemistry for microfluidic electrokinetics. Part I: Acid-base equilibria and pH buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Chambers, Robert D; Santiago, Juan G

    2009-09-07

    We review fundamental and applied acid-base equilibrium chemistry useful to microfluidic electrokinetics. We present elements of acid-base equilibrium reactions and derive rules for pH calculation for simple buffers. We also present a general formulation to calculate pH of more complex, arbitrary mixtures of electrolytes, and discuss the effects of ionic strength and temperature on pH calculation. More practically, we offer advice on buffer preparation and on buffer reporting. We also discuss "real world" buffers and likely contamination sources. In particular, we discuss the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on buffer systems, namely, the increase in ionic strength and acidification of typical electrokinetic device buffers. In Part II of this two-paper series, we discuss the coupling of acid-base equilibria with electrolyte dynamics and electrochemistry in typical microfluidic electrokinetic systems.

  5. Multiphase catalysts for selective reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisuls, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    Among the existing proposed solutions to reduce emission of NOx there is a promising alternative, the so-called (HC-SCR) selective catalytic reduction of NOx using hydrocarbons as reductant. This thesis is part of a worldwide effort devoted to gain knowledge on the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons with the final goal to contribute to the development of suitable catalysts for the above mentioned process. Chapter 2 describes the details of the experimental set-up and of the analytical methods employed. Among the catalyst for HC-SCR, Co-based catalyst are known to be active and selective, thus, a study on a series of Co-based catalysts, supported on zeolites, was undertaken and the results are presented in Chapter 3. Correlation between catalytic characteristics and kinetic results are employed to understand the working catalyst and this is used as a basis for catalyst optimization. With the intention to prepare a multi-functional catalyst that will preserve the desired characteristics of the individual components, minimizing their negative aspects, catalysts based on Co-Pt, supported on ZSM-5, were investigated. In Chapter 4 the results of this study are discussed. A bimetallic Co-Pt/ZSM-5 catalysts with low Pt contents (0.1 wt %) showed a synergistic effect by combining high stability and activity of Pt catalysts with the high N2 selectivity of Co catalysts. Furthermore, it was found to be sulfur- and water-tolerant. Its positive qualities brought us to study the mechanism that takes place over this catalyst during HC-SCR. The results of an in-situ i.r mechanistic study over this catalyst is reported in Chapter 5. From the results presented in Chapter 5 a mechanism operating over the Co-Pt/ZSM-5 catalyst is proposed. The modification of Co catalyst with Pt improved the catalysts. However, further improvement was found to be hindered by high selectivity to N2O. Since Rh catalysts are generally less selective to N2O, the modification of Co

  6. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  7. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  8. Oxidation of methyl heterocyclic compounds on vanadium oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimanskaya, M.V.; Lejtis, L.A.; Iovel', I.G.; Gol'dberg, Yu.Sh.; Skolmejstere, R.A.; Golender, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Data on vapor-phase oxidation of methyl derivatives of thiophene, Δ 2 - thiazo line, pyridine, pyrazine and pyramidine on oxide vanadium-molybdenum catalysts to corresponding heterylaldehydes are generalized. The dependence of catalytic properties of oxide vanadium-molybdenum systems in oxidation reactions of methylheterocyclic compounds on V:Mo ratio in the catalyst is revealed. It is shown that heterocyclic compounds are coordinated by a heteroatom on Lewis centres of V-Mo-O-catalyst primarily with partially reduced vanadium ions

  9. Acid-base characteristics of powdered-activated-carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, B.E. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown (United States)); Jensen, J.N.; Matsumoto, M.R. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (United States))

    Adsorption of heavy metals onto activated carbon has been described using the surface-complex-formation (SCF) model, a chemical equilibrium model. The SCF model requires a knowledge of the amphoteric nature of activated carbon prior to metal adsorption modeling. In the past, a single-diprotic-acid-site model had been employed to describe the amphoteric nature of activated-carbon surfaces. During this study, the amphoteric nature of two powdered activated carbons were investigated, and a three-monoprotic site surface model was found to be a plausible alternative. The single-diprotic-acid-site and two-monoprotic-site models did not describe the acid-base behavior of the two carbons studied adequately. The two-diprotic site was acceptable for only one of the study carbons. The acid-base behavior of activated carbon surfaces seem to be best modeled as a series of weak monoprotic acids.

  10. Acid-base disturbance in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2015-01-01

    (r=-0.25, Psodium (r=-0.38, Preduced standard base excess in all patients (P...PURPOSE: Acid-base disturbances were investigated in patients with cirrhosis in relation to hemodynamic derangement to analyze the hyperventilatory effects and the metabolic compensation. METHODS: A total of 66 patients with cirrhosis and 44 controls were investigated during a hemodynamic study......, and effects of unidentified ions (all P

  11. A fully automatic system for acid-base coulometric titrations

    OpenAIRE

    Cladera, A.; Caro, A.; Estela, J. M.; Cerdà, V.

    1990-01-01

    An automatic system for acid-base titrations by electrogeneration of H+ and OH- ions, with potentiometric end-point detection, was developed. The system includes a PC-compatible computer for instrumental control, data acquisition and processing, which allows up to 13 samples to be analysed sequentially with no human intervention. The system performance was tested on the titration of standard solutions, which it carried out with low errors and RSD. It was subsequently applied to the analysis o...

  12. Effects of acid-base imbalance on vascular reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Celotto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Acid-base homeostasis maintains systemic arterial pH within a narrow range. Whereas the normal range of pH for clinical laboratories is 7.35-7.45, in vivo pH is maintained within a much narrower range. In clinical and experimental settings, blood pH can vary in response to respiratory or renal impairment. This altered pH promotes changes in vascular smooth muscle tone with impact on circulation and blood pressure control. Changes in pH can be divided into those occurring in the extracellular space (pHo and those occurring within the intracellular space (pHi, although, extracellular and intracellular compartments influence each other. Consistent with the multiple events involved in the changes in tone produced by altered pHo, including type of vascular bed, several factors and mechanisms, in addition to hydrogen ion concentration, have been suggested to be involved. The scientific literature has many reports concerning acid-base balance and endothelium function, but these concepts are not clear about acid-base disorders and their relations with the three known mechanisms of endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity: nitric oxide (NO/cGMP-dependent, prostacyclin (PGI2/cAMP-dependent and hyperpolarization. During the last decades, many studies have been published and have given rise to confronting data on acid-base disorder and endothelial function. Therefore, the main proposal of this review is to provide a critical analysis of the state of art and incentivate researchers to develop more studies about these issues.

  13. [Acid-base status in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalinić, Lea; Blaslov, Kristina; Pasini, Eva; Kes, Petar; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina

    2014-04-01

    When compared to hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis is very simple yet low cost method of renal replacement therapy. Series of studies have shown its superiority in preserving residual renal function, postponing uremic complications, maintaining the acid-base balance and achieving better post-transplant outcome in patients treated with this method. Despite obvious advantages, its role in the treatment of chronic kidney disease is still not as important as it should be. Metabolic acidosis is an inevitable complication associated with progressive loss of kidney function. Its impact on mineral and muscle metabolism, residual renal function, allograft function and anemia is very complex but can be successfully managed. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficiency in preserving the acid-base balance in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis at Zagreb University Hospital Center. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. The mean time spent on the treatment was 32.39 ± 43.43 months. Only lactate-buffered peritoneal dialysis fluids were used in the treatment. Acid-base balance was completely maintained in 73.07% of patients; 11.54% of patients were found in the state of mild metabolic acidosis, and the same percentage of patients were in the state of mild metabolic alkalosis. In one patient, mixed alkalosis with respiratory and metabolic component was present. The results of this study showed that acid-base balance could be maintained successfully in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, even only with lactate-buffered solutions included in the treatment, although they were continuously proclaimed as inferior in comparison with bicarbonate-buffered ones. In well educated and informed patients who carefully use this method, accompanied by the attentive and thorough care of their physicians, this method can provide quality continuous replacement of lost renal function as well as better quality of life.

  14. Electrochemistry of acid-base reactions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, J.P.; Devynck, J.; Tremillon, B.

    1975-01-01

    Electrochemical studies were made in following media: water-HF mixtures, anhydrous HF and KF solutions in HF, solutions of the SbF5 type in HF. The acidity level of these solutions was evaluated using the R(H) functions based on the strehlow hypotheses. From the pH measurement in anhydrous HF, it was possible to get acid-base titration curves and pH buffers. The behavior of quinones in anhydrous HF is presented [fr

  15. Neurologic complications of electrolyte disturbances and acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espay, Alberto J

    2014-01-01

    Electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are common occurrences in daily clinical practice. Although these abnormalities can be readily ascertained from routine laboratory findings, only specific clinical correlates may attest as to their significance. Among a wide phenotypic spectrum, acute electrolyte and acid-base disturbances may affect the peripheral nervous system as arreflexic weakness (hypermagnesemia, hyperkalemia, and hypophosphatemia), the central nervous system as epileptic encephalopathies (hypomagnesemia, dysnatremias, and hypocalcemia), or both as a mixture of encephalopathy and weakness or paresthesias (hypocalcemia, alkalosis). Disabling complications may develop not only when these derangements are overlooked and left untreated (e.g., visual loss from intracranial hypertension in respiratory or metabolic acidosis; quadriplegia with respiratory insufficiency in hypermagnesemia) but also when they are inappropriately managed (e.g., central pontine myelinolisis when rapidly correcting hyponatremia; cardiac arrhythmias when aggressively correcting hypo- or hyperkalemia). Therefore prompt identification of the specific neurometabolic syndromes is critical to correct the causative electrolyte or acid-base disturbances and prevent permanent central or peripheral nervous system injury. This chapter reviews the pathophysiology, clinical investigations, clinical phenotypes, and current management strategies in disorders resulting from alterations in the plasma concentration of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus as well as from acidemia and alkalemia. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase 5 regulates acid-base homeostasis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Postel

    Full Text Available The regulation of the acid-base balance in cells is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. Disturbed acid-base balance directly affects cellular physiology, which often results in various pathological conditions. In every living organism, the protein family of carbonic anhydrases regulate a broad variety of homeostatic processes. Here we describe the identification, mapping and cloning of a zebrafish carbonic anhydrase 5 (ca5 mutation, collapse of fins (cof, which causes initially a collapse of the medial fins followed by necrosis and rapid degeneration of the embryo. These phenotypical characteristics can be mimicked in wild-type embryos by acetazolamide treatment, suggesting that CA5 activity in zebrafish is essential for a proper development. In addition we show that CA5 regulates acid-base balance during embryonic development, since lowering the pH can compensate for the loss of CA5 activity. Identification of selective modulators of CA5 activity could have a major impact on the development of new therapeutics involved in the treatment of a variety of disorders.

  17. Acid-base transport by the renal proximal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Lara A; Boron, Walter F; Zhou, Yuehan

    2010-01-01

    Each day, the kidneys filter 180 L of blood plasma, equating to some 4,300 mmol of the major blood buffer, bicarbonate (HCO3-). The glomerular filtrate enters the lumen of the proximal tubule (PT), and the majority of filtered HCO3- is reclaimed along the early (S1) and convoluted (S2) portions of the PT in a manner coupled to the secretion of H+ into the lumen. The PT also uses the secreted H+ to titrate non-HCO3- buffers in the lumen, in the process creating "new HCO3-" for transport into the blood. Thus, the PT - along with more distal renal segments - is largely responsible for regulating plasma [HCO3-]. In this review we first focus on the milestone discoveries over the past 50+ years that define the mechanism and regulation of acid-base transport by the proximal tubule. Further on in the review, we will summarize research still in progress from our laboratory, work that addresses the problem of how the PT is able to finely adapt to acid-base disturbances by rapidly sensing changes in basolateral levels of HCO3- and CO2 (but not pH), and thereby to exert tight control over the acid-base composition of the blood plasma.

  18. PMO-immobilized Au(I)-NHC complexes: Heterogeneous catalysts for sustainable processes

    KAUST Repository

    van der Voort, Pascal

    2017-11-08

    A stable Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica (PMO) with accessible sulfonic acid functionalities is prepared via a one-pot-synthesis and is used as solid support for highly active catalysts, consisting of gold(I)-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes. The gold complexes are successfully immobilized on the nanoporous hybrid material via a straightforward acid-base reaction with the corresponding [Au(OH)(NHC)] synthon. This catalyst design strategy results in a boomerang-type catalyst, allowing the active species to detach from the surface to perform the catalysis and then to recombine with the solid after all the starting material is consumed. This boomerang behavior is assessed in the hydration of alkynes. The tested catalysts were found to be active in the latter reaction, and after an acidic work-up, the IPr*-based gold catalyst can be recovered and then reused several times without any loss in efficiency

  19. Hydroprocessing catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.

    1992-08-01

    Co-Mo and Ni-Mo hydroprocessing catalysts were examined for their activity in removal of sulfur from thiophene in model compounds, and in the cracking and hydrocracking of cumene. Three types of support materials were examined: carbon, modified carbon, and carbon covered alumina. The objective of the study was to examine the correlation between catalyst activity in the hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds, and the resistance of the catalyst to nitrogen poisoning during use in the hydroprocessing of gas oils. The use of model compound testing provided information on the individual catalytic reactions promoted by those materials. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study surface species on the catalysts and to explain many of the trends in activity observed, revealing the role of fluoride and phosphorus as a secondary promoter. Testing of the catalysts in hydrotreating of gas oils allowed comparison of model compound results with those from a real feedstock. The gas oil was also spiked with a model nitrogen compound and the results from catalytic hydrotreating of this material were compared with those from unspiked material. A key finding was that the carbon supported catalysts were the most effective in treating high-nitrogen feeds. The very favorable deactivation properties of carbon and carbon-covered alumina supported catalysts make these promising from an industrial point of view where catalyst deactivation is a limiting factor. 171 refs., 25 figs., 43 tabs.

  20. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  1. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  2. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    1999-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the

  3. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  4. Acid-base disorders in calves with chronic diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarski, M; Kupczyński, R; Sobiech, P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze disorders of acid-base balance in calves with chronic diarrhea caused by mixed, viral, bacterial and Cryptosporydium parvum infection. We compared results ob- tained with the classic model (Henderson-Hasselbalch) and strong ion approach (the Steward model). The study included 36 calves aged between 14 and 21 days. The calves were allocated to three groups: I - (control) non-diarrheic calves, group II - animals with compensated acid-base imbalance and group III calves with compensated acid-base disorders and hypoalbuminemia. Plasma concentrations of Na+, K+, Cl-, C12+, Mg2+, P, albumin and lactate were measured. In the classic model, acid-base balance was determined on the basis of blood pH, pCO2, HCO3-, BE and anion gap. In the strong ion model, strong ion difference (SID), effective strong anion difference, total plasma concentration of nonvolatile buffers (A(Tot)) and strong ion gap (SIG) were measured. The control calves and the animals from groups II and III did not differ significantly in terms of their blood pH. The plasma concentration of HCO3-, BE and partial pressure of CO2 in animals from the two groups with chronic diarrhea were significantly higher than those found in the controls. The highest BE (6.03 mmol/l) was documented in calves from group II. The animals from this group presented compensation resulted from activation of metabolic mechanisms. The calves with hypoal- buminemia (group III) showed lower plasma concentrations of albumin (15.37 g/L), Cl (74.94 mmol/L), Mg2+ (0.53 mmol/L), P (1.41 mmol/L) and higher value of anion gap (39.03 mmol/L). This group III presented significantly higher SID3 (71.89 mmol/L), SID7 (72.92 mmol/L) and SIG (43.53 mmol/L) values than animals from the remaining groups (P acid-base disturbance in these cases suggests that classic model have some limitations. This model can not be recommended for use whenever serum albumin or phosphate concentrations are markedly abnormal.

  5. The normal acid-base status of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Nina K; Malte, Hans; Baatrup, Erik; Wang, Tobias

    2012-03-15

    Rodent models are commonly used for various physiological studies including acid-base regulation. Despite the widespread use of especially genetic modified mice, little attention have been made to characterise the normal acid-base status in these animals in order to reveal proper control values. Furthermore, several studies report blood gas values obtained in anaesthetised animals. We, therefore, decided to characterise blood CO(2) binding characteristic of mouse blood in vitro and to characterise normal acid-base status in conscious BALBc mice. In vitro CO(2) dissociation curves, performed on whole blood equilibrated to various PCO₂ levels in rotating tonometers, revealed a typical mammalian pK' (pK'=7.816-0.234 × pH (r=0.34)) and a non-bicarbonate buffer capacity (16.1 ± 2.6 slyke). To measure arterial acid-base status, small blood samples were taken from undisturbed mice with indwelling catheters in the carotid artery. In these animals, pH was 7.391 ± 0.026, plasma [HCO(3)(-)] 18.4 ± 0.83 mM, PCO₂ 30.3 ± 2.1 mm Hg and lactate concentration 4.6 ± 0.7 mM. Our study, therefore, shows that mice have an arterial pH that resembles other mammals, although arterial PCO₂ tends to be lower than in larger mammals. However, pH from arterial blood sampled from mice anaesthetised with isoflurane was significantly lower (pH 7.239 ± 0.021), while plasma [HCO(3)(-)] was 18.5 ± 1.4 mM, PCO₂ 41.9 ± 2.9 mm Hg and lactate concentration 4.48 ± 0.67 mM. Furthermore, we measured metabolism and ventilation (V(E)) in order to determine the ventilation requirements (VE/VO₂) to answer whether small mammals tend to hyperventilate. We recommend, therefore, that studies on acid-base regulation in mice should be based on samples taken for indwelling catheters rather than cardiac puncture of terminally anaesthetised mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. New URJC-1 Material with Remarkable Stability and Acid-Base Catalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Leo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging new metal-organic structures with tunable physicochemical properties is an exciting research field for diverse applications. In this work, a novel metal-organic framework Cu(HIT(DMF0.5, named URJC-1, with a three-dimensional non-interpenetrated utp topological network, has been synthesized. This material exhibits a microporous structure with unsaturated copper centers and imidazole–tetrazole linkages that provide accessible Lewis acid/base sites. These features make URJC-1 an exceptional candidate for catalytic application in acid and base reactions of interest in fine chemistry. The URJC-1 material also displays a noteworthy thermal and chemical stability in different organic solvents of different polarity and boiling water. Its catalytic activity was evaluated in acid-catalyzed Friedel–Crafts acylation of anisole with acetyl chloride and base-catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with malononitrile. In both cases, URJC-1 material showed very good performance, better than other metal organic frameworks and conventional catalysts. In addition, a remarkable structural stability was proven after several consecutive reaction cycles.

  7. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia; El Eter, Mohamad; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  8. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  9. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  10. Acid-base properties of Baltic Sea dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2017-09-01

    Calculations related to the marine CO2 system that are based on alkalinity data may be strongly biased if the contributions of organic compounds are ignored. In coastal seas, concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are frequently high and alkalinity from inorganic compounds is low. In this study, based on measurements of total alkalinity, total CO2, and pH, we determined the organic alkalinity, Aorg, in water from the central Baltic Sea. The maximum Aorg measured in the surface mixed layer during the spring bloom was > 50 μmol/kg-SW but the Aorg decreased with depth and approached zero below the permanent halocline. This behavior could be attributed to the decreased pH of deeper water layers. The data were used to calculate the bulk dissociation constant, KDOM, for marine DOM and the fraction f of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that acts as a carrier for acid-base functional groups. The p KDOM (7.27) agreed well with the value (7.34) previously estimated in a preliminary study of organic alkalinity in the Baltic Sea. The fraction of carbon atoms carrying acid-base groups was 17% and was somewhat higher than previously reported (12%). Spike experiments performed using artificial seawater and three different humic/fulvic substances tested whether the acid-base properties of these substances explain the results of our field study. Specifically, Aorg was determined at different concentrations (DOC) of the added humic/fulvic substances. The relationship between Aorg and the DOC concentrations indicated that humic/fulvic substances are more acidic (p KDOM < 6.5) than the bulk DOC natural occurring in the Baltic Sea.

  11. History of Medical Understanding and Misunderstanding of Acid Base Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Christopher Geoffrey Alexander

    2013-01-01

    To establish how controversies in understanding acid base balance arose, the literature on acid base balance was reviewed from 1909, when Henderson described how the neutral reaction of blood is determined by carbonic and organic acids being in equilibrium with an excess of mineral bases over mineral acids. From 1914 to 1930, Van Slyke and others established our acid base principles. They recognised that carbonic acid converts into bicarbonate all non-volatile mineral bases not bound by mineral acids and determined therefore that bicarbonate represents the alkaline reserve of the body and should be a physiological constant. They showed that standard bicarbonate is a good measure of acidosis caused by increased production or decreased elimination of organic acids. However, they recognised that bicarbonate improved low plasma bicarbonate but not high urine acid excretion in diabetic ketoacidosis, and that increasing pCO2 caused chloride to shift into cells raising plasma titratable alkali. Both indicate that minerals influence pH. In 1945 Darrow showed that hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in preterm infants fed milk with 5.7 mmol of chloride and 2.0 mmol of sodium per 100 kcal was caused by retention of chloride in excess of sodium. Similar findings were made but not recognised in later studies of metabolic acidosis in preterm infants. Shohl in 1921 and Kildeberg in 1978 presented the theory that carbonic and organic acids are neutralised by mineral base, where mineral base is the excess of mineral cations over anions and organic acid is the difference between mineral base, bicarbonate and protein anion. The degree of metabolic acidosis measured as base excess is determined by deviation in both mineral base and organic acid from normal. PMID:24179938

  12. Developing nucleic acid-based electrical detection systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabig-Ciminska Magdalena

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development of nucleic acid-based detection systems is the main focus of many research groups and high technology companies. The enormous work done in this field is particularly due to the broad versatility and variety of these sensing devices. From optical to electrical systems, from label-dependent to label-free approaches, from single to multi-analyte and array formats, this wide range of possibilities makes the research field very diversified and competitive. New challenges and requirements for an ideal detector suitable for nucleic acid analysis include high sensitivity and high specificity protocol that can be completed in a relatively short time offering at the same time low detection limit. Moreover, systems that can be miniaturized and automated present a significant advantage over conventional technology, especially if detection is needed in the field. Electrical system technology for nucleic acid-based detection is an enabling mode for making miniaturized to micro- and nanometer scale bio-monitoring devices via the fusion of modern micro- and nanofabrication technology and molecular biotechnology. The electrical biosensors that rely on the conversion of the Watson-Crick base-pair recognition event into a useful electrical signal are advancing rapidly, and recently are receiving much attention as a valuable tool for microbial pathogen detection. Pathogens may pose a serious threat to humans, animal and plants, thus their detection and analysis is a significant element of public health. Although different conventional methods for detection of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxins exist and are currently being applied, improvements of molecular-based detection methodologies have changed these traditional detection techniques and introduced a new era of rapid, miniaturized and automated electrical chip detection technologies into pathogen identification sector. In this review some developments and current directions in

  13. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  14. Acid-base transport in pancreas-new challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Along the gastrointestinal tract a number of epithelia contribute with acid or basic secretions in order to aid digestive processes. The stomach and pancreas are the most extreme examples of acid (H+) and base (HCO-3) transporters, respectively. Nevertheless, they share the same challenges...... to consider in pancreas are the proton pumps (H-K-ATPases), as well as the calcium-activated K and Cl channels, such as K3.1 and TMEM16A/ANO1. Local regulators, such as purinergic signaling, fine-tune, and coordinate pancreatic secretion. Lastly, we speculate whether dys-regulation of acid-base transport...

  15. Advances in nucleic acid-based diagnostics of bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Kim Bundvig; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Methods for rapid detection of infectious bacteria and antimicrobial-resistant pathogens have evolved significantly over the last decade. Many of the new procedures are nucleic acid-based and replace conventional diagnostic methods like culturing which is time consuming especially with fastidious...... of these pathogens is important to isolate patients and prevent further spreading of the diseases. Newly developed diagnostic procedures are superior with respect to turnaround time, sensitivity and specificity. Methods like multiplex real time PCR and different array-based technologies offer the possibility...

  16. Itaconic acid based potential sorbent for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan, Y.; Naidu, G.R.K.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-linked hydrogels and adsorptive membranes containing Itaconic acid, Acrylamide, Penta erythritol tetra acrylate and α, α-dimethyl- α-phenyl aceto phenone were prepared by UV-initiated bulk polymerization. These hydrogels and adsorptive membranes were characterized for pH uptake, sorption and desorption kinetics and selectivity towards uranium. The sorption ability of the sorbents towards uranyl ion was thoroughly examined. The developed itaconic acid based sorbents were evaluated for the recovery of uranium from lean sources like sea water. (author)

  17. Acid-base equilibria inside amine-functionalized mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Namekawa, Manato; Kamijo, Toshio; Itoh, Tetsuji; Teramae, Norio

    2011-04-15

    Acid-base equilibria and effective proton concentration inside a silica mesopore modified with a trimethyl ammonium (TMAP) layer were studied by steady-state fluorescence experiments. The mesoporous silica with a dense TMAP layer (1.4 molecules/nm(2)) was prepared by a post grafting of N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium at surfactant-templated mesoporous silica (diameter of silica framework =3.1 nm). The resulting TMAP-modified mesoporous silica strongly adsorbed of anionic fluorescence indicator dyes (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (pyranine), 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS), 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinetetrasulfonic acid disulfuric acid (TPPS), 2-naphthol-3,6-disulfonate (2NT)) and fluorescence excitation spectra of these dyes within TMAP-modified mesoporous silica were measured by varying the solution pH. The fluorescence experiments revealed that the acid-base equilibrium reactions of all pH indicator dyes within the TMAP-modified silica mesopore were quite different from those in bulk water. From the analysis of the acid-base equilibrium of pyranine, the following relationships between solution pH (pH(bulk)) and the effective proton concentration inside the pore (pH(pore)) were obtained: (1) shift of pH(pore) was 1.8 (ΔpH(pore)=1.8) for the pH(bulk) change from 2.1 to 9.1 (ΔpH(bulk)=7.0); (2) pH(pore) was not simply proportional to pH(bulk); (3) the inside of the TMAP-modified silica mesopore was suggested to be in a weak acidic or neutral condition when pH(bulk) was changed from 2.0 to 9.1. Since these relationships between pH(bulk) and pH(pore) could explain the acid-base equilibria of other pH indicator dyes (APTS, TPPS, 2NT), these relationships were inferred to describe the effective proton concentration inside the TMAP-modified silica mesopore. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. [Acid-base homeostasis: metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussol, Bertrand

    2014-07-01

    Acid-base homeostasis ensured by the kidneys, which maintain the equilibrium between proton generation by cellular metabolism and proton excretion in urine. This requirement is lifesaving because of the protons' ability to bind to anionic proteins in the extracellular space, modifying their structure and functions. The kidneys also regenerate bicarbonates. The kidney is not the sole organ in charge of maintaining blood pH in a very narrow range; lungs are also involved since they allow a large amount of volatile acid generated by cellular respiration to be eliminated. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous KIT-6 (KIT: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and its catalytic performance in Knoevenagel reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Chunhua; Guan, Jingqi

    2014-01-01

    Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous catalysts Al-KIT-6-NH 2 containing different aluminum content have been synthesized through post synthetic grafting method. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), IR spectra of pyridine adsorption, NH 3 -TPD and TG analysis. The characterization results indicated that the pore structure of KIT-6 was well kept after the addition of aluminum and grafting of aminopropyl groups. The acid amount of Al-KIT-6 increased with enhancing aluminum content. Catalytic results showed that weak acid and weak base favor the Knoevenagel reaction, while catalysts with strong acid and weak base exhibited worse catalytic behavior. - Graphical abstract: The postulated steps of mechanism for the acid-base catalyzed process are as follows: (1) the aldehyde gets activated by the surface acidic sites which allow the amine undergoes nucleophilic to attack the carbonyl carbon of benzaldehyde. (2) Water is released in the formation of imine intermediate. (3) The ethyl cyanoacetate reacts with the intermediate. (4) The benzylidene ethyl cyanoacetate is formed and the amine is regenerated. - Highlights: • KIT-6 and Al-KIT-6-NH 2 with different Si/Al ratios has been successfully prepared. • 79.4% Yield was obtained over 46-Al-KIT-6-NH 2 within 20 min in Knoevenagel reaction. • Low Al-content Al-KIT-6-NH 2 shows better catalytic stability than high Al-content catalysts. • There is acid-base synergistic effect in Knoevenagel reaction

  20. Preparation of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous KIT-6 (KIT: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and its catalytic performance in Knoevenagel reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ling [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University for Nationalities, Tongliao 028000 (China); Wang, Chunhua [Key Laboratory of Surface and Interface Chemistry of Jilin Province, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Surface and Interface Chemistry of Jilin Province, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous catalysts Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} containing different aluminum content have been synthesized through post synthetic grafting method. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), IR spectra of pyridine adsorption, NH{sub 3}-TPD and TG analysis. The characterization results indicated that the pore structure of KIT-6 was well kept after the addition of aluminum and grafting of aminopropyl groups. The acid amount of Al-KIT-6 increased with enhancing aluminum content. Catalytic results showed that weak acid and weak base favor the Knoevenagel reaction, while catalysts with strong acid and weak base exhibited worse catalytic behavior. - Graphical abstract: The postulated steps of mechanism for the acid-base catalyzed process are as follows: (1) the aldehyde gets activated by the surface acidic sites which allow the amine undergoes nucleophilic to attack the carbonyl carbon of benzaldehyde. (2) Water is released in the formation of imine intermediate. (3) The ethyl cyanoacetate reacts with the intermediate. (4) The benzylidene ethyl cyanoacetate is formed and the amine is regenerated. - Highlights: • KIT-6 and Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} with different Si/Al ratios has been successfully prepared. • 79.4% Yield was obtained over 46-Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} within 20 min in Knoevenagel reaction. • Low Al-content Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} shows better catalytic stability than high Al-content catalysts. • There is acid-base synergistic effect in Knoevenagel reaction.

  1. A Computer-Based Simulation of an Acid-Base Titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boblick, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews the advantages of computer simulated environments for experiments, referring in particular to acid-base titrations. Includes pre-lab instructions and a sample computer printout of a student's use of an acid-base simulation. Ten references. (PR)

  2. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  3. Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Fruit Extract as Natural Indicator in Acid-Base Titration

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj A. Suva

    2014-01-01

    In routine experiments synthetic indicators are the choice of acid base titrations. But there are some limitations like environmental pollution, availability and higher cost which leads to search for natural compounds as an acid base indicator was started. The present work highlights theexploit of the methanolic and aqueous extract of the fruit of Opuntia ficus indica plants as a natural acid base indicator in acid base titrations. Opuntia ficus indica plant was identified and fruits were was...

  4. An extremely sensitive monoboronic acid based fluorescent sensor for glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiangying; Liu Bin; Jiang Yunbao

    2004-01-01

    An extremely sensitive monoboronic acid based fluorescent sensor for glucose was developed. This was carried out by assembling a fluorescent monoboronic acid, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (PBA) indirectly onto gold surface via its electrostatic interaction with cysteine (Cys) that was directly assembled on the gold surface. The formation of self-assembled bilayers (SAB) was confirmed and primarily characterized by cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The SAB containing PBA was found fluorescent and its fluorescence showed an extremely high sensitivity to the presence of glucose and other monosaccharides such as galactose and fructose with quenching constants at 10 8 M -1 order of magnitude compared to those at 10 2 M -1 in bulk solutions. The quenching constants were found to vary in the order of D-glucose>D-galactose>D-fructose>D-mannose that is different from that in bulk solution which shows the highest binding affinity toward D-fructose and very low sensitivity toward glucose. The reported monoboronic acid based SAB fluorescent sensor showed the highest sensitivity towards glucose with the capacity of detecting saccharides of concentration down to nanomolar level. It was also demonstrated that the fluorescence from PBA/Cys/Au can be easily recovered after each measurement event and therefore also represents a new reusable method for immobilizing reagent in fabricating chemosensors

  5. Molecular polarization potential maps of the nucleic acid bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkorta, I.; Perez, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ab initio calculations at the SCF level were carried out to compute the polarization potential map NM of the nucleic acid bases: cytosine, thymine, uracil, adedine, and guanine. For this purpose, the Dunning's 9s5p basis set contracted to a split-valence, was selected to perform the calculations. The molecular polarization potential (MPP) at each point was evaluated by the difference between the interaction energy of the molecule with a unit point charge and the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) at that point. MEPS and MPPS for the different molecules were computed with a density of 5 points/Angstrom 2 on the van der Waals surface of each molecule, defined using the van der Waals radii. Due to the symmetry of the molecules, only half the points were computed. The total number of points calculated was 558 for cytosine, 621 for thymine, 526 for uracil, 666 for adenine, and 699 for guanine. The results of these calculations are analyzed in terms of their implications on the molecular interactions between pairs of nucleic acid bases. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  7. Acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion to hexadecane and chloroform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, R; Busscher, HJ; Geertsema-Doornbusch, GI; Van Der Mei, HC; Mittal, KL

    2000-01-01

    Acid-base interactions play an important role in adhesion, including microbial adhesion to surfaces. Qualitatively acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion can be demonstrated by comparing adhesion to hexadecane (a negatively charged interface in aqueous solutions, unable to exert acid-base

  8. How Do Undergraduate Students Conceptualize Acid-Base Chemistry? Measurement of a Concept Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, William L.; Todd, Amber N.; Clark, Travis B.

    2016-01-01

    We developed and validated a new instrument, called "Measuring Concept progressions in Acid-Base chemistry" (MCAB) and used it to better understand the progression of undergraduate students' understandings about acid-base chemistry. Items were developed based on an existing learning progression for acid-base chemistry. We used the Rasch…

  9. High capacity for extracellular acid-base regulation in the air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong; Tuong, Dang Diem; Thinh, Phan Vinh; Huong Thanh, Do Thi; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of accessory air-breathing structures is typically associated with reduction of the gills, although branchial ion transport remains pivotal for acid-base and ion regulation. Therefore, air-breathing fishes are believed to have a low capacity for extracellular pH regulation during a respiratory acidosis. In the present study, we investigated acid-base regulation during hypercapnia in the air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus in normoxic and hypoxic water at 28-30°C. Contrary to previous studies, we show that this air-breathing fish has a pronounced ability to regulate extracellular pH (pHe) during hypercapnia, with complete metabolic compensation of pHe within 72 h of exposure to hypoxic hypercapnia with CO2 levels above 34 mmHg. The high capacity for pHe regulation relies on a pronounced ability to increase levels of HCO3(-) in the plasma. Our study illustrates the diversity in the physiology of air-breathing fishes, such that generalizations across phylogenies may be difficult. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Evaluating Interest in Acids-Bases: Development of an Acid-Base Interest Scale (ABIS) and Assessment of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, Ö.; Ilhan, N.

    2017-01-01

    Students are more likely to be successful in topics they are interested in than others. This study aims to develop an Acid-Base Interest Scale (ABIS) and subsequently evaluate the interest of pre-service science teachers in acids-bases according to gender, years at the university, type of high school the pre-service science teachers attended, and…

  11. Boronic acid-based chemical sensors for saccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Tai; Liu, Guang-Jian; Ning, Zhang-Wei; Xing, Guo-Wen

    2017-11-27

    During the past decades, the interaction between boronic acids-functionalized sensors and saccharides is of great interest in the frontier domain of the interdiscipline concerning both biology and chemistry. Various boronic acid-based sensing systems have been developed to detect saccharides and corresponding derivatives in vitro as well as in vivo, which embrace unimolecular sensors, two-component sensing ensembles, functional assemblies, and boronic acid-loaded nanomaterials or surfaces. New sensing strategies emerge in endlessly with excellent selectivity and sensitivity. In this review, several typical sensing systems were introduced and some promising examples were highlighted to enable the deep insight of saccharides sensing on the basis of boronic acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasonic and densimetric titration applied for acid-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakowski, Andrzej; Gliński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Classical acoustic acid-base titration was monitored using sound speed and density measurements. Plots of these parameters, as well as of the adiabatic compressibility coefficient calculated from them, exhibit changes with the volume of added titrant. Compressibility changes can be explained and quantitatively predicted theoretically in terms of Pasynski theory of non-compressible hydrates combined with that of the additivity of the hydration numbers with the amount and type of ions and molecules present in solution. It also seems that this development could be applied in chemical engineering for monitoring the course of chemical processes, since the applied experimental methods can be carried out almost independently on the medium under test (harmful, aggressive, etc.).

  13. Nucleic Acid-Based Therapy Approaches for Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Vagner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is caused by a dominant mutation that results in an unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene leading to a toxic gain of function in huntingtin protein which causes massive neurodegeneration mainly in the striatum and clinical symptoms associated with the disease. Since the mutation has multiple effects in the cell and the precise mechanism of the disease remains to be elucidated, gene therapy approaches have been developed that intervene in different aspects of the condition. These approaches include increasing expression of growth factors, decreasing levels of mutant huntingtin, and restoring cell metabolism and transcriptional balance. The aim of this paper is to outline the nucleic acid-based therapeutic strategies that have been tested to date.

  14. Physicochemical properties of fatty acid based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Marisa A.A.; Bruinhorst, Adriaan van den; Schröer, Wolffram; Rathke, Bernd; Kroon, Maaike C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of a branched anion and a mono-unsaturated anion on the physicochemical properties have been explored. • Fatty acid based ionic liquids were synthesized and characterized. • Densities and viscosities at different temperatures have been measured. • The thermal operating window and thermal phase behavior have been evaluated. - Abstract: In this work a series of fatty acid based ionic liquids has been synthesized and characterized. Densities and viscosities at different temperatures have been measured in the temperature range from (293.15 to 363.15) K. The thermal operating window and thermal phase behavior have been evaluated. The effects of a branched anion and a mono-unsaturated anion on the physicochemical properties have been explored. It has been observed that the density (T = 298.15 K) decreases with the following sequence: methyltrioctylammonium 4-ethyloctanoate > methyltrioctylammonium oleate ≈ tetrahexylammonium oleate > tetraoctylammonium oleate, with no detectable dependency of the thermal expansion coefficients on the total number of carbons in the ionic liquid. An almost linear correlation between the molar volumes and the total number of carbons of the alkanes together with the studied ionic liquids was found. The experimental viscosity data were correlated using the Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann (VFT) equation, where a maximum relative deviation of 1.4% was achieved. The ionic liquid with branched alkyl chains on the anion presents the highest viscosity, and methyltrioctylammonium oleate has the highest viscosity compared to the rest of the oleate based ionic liquids. The short and long-term stability were evaluated for all ionic liquids, their long-term decomposition temperatures were found to be significantly lower than their short-term decomposition temperatures. From the long-term thermal analysis was concluded that the highest temperature at which these ionic liquids can be kept is 363 K. In addition, the thermal

  15. Surface acid-base behaviors of Chinese loess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhaosheng; Liu, Wenxin; Tang, Hongxiao; Qian, Tianwei; Li, Shushen; Li, Zhentang; Wu, Guibin

    2002-08-15

    Acid-base titration was applied to investigate the surface acid-base properties of a Chinese loess sample at different ionic strengths. The acidimetric supernatant was regarded as the system blank of titration to correct the influence of particle dissolution on the estimation of proton consumption. The titration behavior of the system blank could be described by the hydrolysis of Al3+ and Si(OH)4 in aqueous solution as well as the production of hydroxyaluminosilicates. The formation of Al-Si species on homogeneous surface sites by hydrous aluminum and silicic acid, released from solid substrate during the acidic titration, was considered in the model description of the back-titration procedure. A surface reaction model was suggested as follows: >SOHSO(-)+H+, pK(a)(int)=3.48-3.98;>SOH+Al(3+)+H4SiO4SOAl(OSi(OH)3(+)+2H+, pK(SC)=3.48-4.04. Two simple surface complexation models accounted for the interfacial structure, i.e., the constant capacitance model (CCM) and the diffuse layer model (DLM), and gave a satisfactory description of the experimental data. Considering the effect of ionic strength on the electrostatic profile at the solid-aqueous interface, the DLM was appropriate at the low concentrations (0.01 and 0.005 mol/L) of background electrolyte (NaNO3 in this study), while the CCM was preferable in the case of high ionic strength (0.1 mol/L).

  16. Incidence of Postoperative Acid-Base Disturbances in Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghavi Gilani M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Respiratory and blood pressure changes as well as fluid administration alter the acid-base balance during the perioperative period which may cause consciousness disturbance and additional hemodynamic disorders. The aim of this study was to identify frequent postoperative acid-base disturbances in order to control postoperative complications. Materials and Methods:This prospective, observational study design was used on patients who underwent abdominal surgery during a six-month period. Gasometry was performed immediately after the patients’ admittion to ICU and six and 12 hours postoperatively. SPSS v13 software was used, and PResults: 213 patients (123 male and 90 female aged 14-85 years (51.7± 22.4 were evaluated. During admission, PH and PaCO2 were (7.29±0.13 and (38.3±11.9, respectively; however, although PH increased gradually (P=0.001, PaCO2 was reduced (P=0.03. Bicarbonate and base excess had opposite effects; bicarbonate initially decreased but increased after 12 hours (P=0.001, whereas base excess initially increased (-6.3±11.6 and then decreased gradually (P=0.003. The arterial oxygen pressure was reduced for 22.5% of the patients throughout the admission period, and this did not significantly change (P=0.57. Conclusion: According to the results, in admission, 65.7% had metabolic acidosis, but metabolic alkalosis was the least. Gradually, metabolic acidosis was modified, but metabolic alkalosis increased. Intraoperative hypotension and fluid infusion may be the main factors of early metabolic acidosis and control of hypotension, or correction of acidosis may increase metabolic alkalosis.

  17. Mechanisms of acid-base regulation in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Amadou; Morelle, Johann; Hautem, Nicolas; Bettoni, Carla; Wagner, Carsten A; Devuyst, Olivier

    2017-11-22

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) contributes to restore acid-base homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal disease. The transport pathways for buffers and carbon dioxide (CO2) across the peritoneal membrane remain poorly understood. Combining well-established PD protocols, whole-body plethysmography and renal function studies in mice, we investigated molecular mechanisms of acid-base regulation in PD, including the potential role of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). After instillation in peritoneal cavity, the pH of acidic dialysis solutions increased within minutes to rapidly equilibrate with blood pH, whereas the neutral pH of biocompatible solutions remained constant. Predictions from the three-pore model of peritoneal transport suggested that local production of HCO3- accounts at least in part for the changes in intraperitoneal pH observed with acidic solutions. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms were evidenced in the peritoneal membrane and their inhibition with acetazolamide significantly decreased local production of HCO3- and delayed changes in intraperitoneal pH. On the contrary, genetic deletion of AQP1 had no effect on peritoneal transport of buffers and diffusion of CO2. Besides intraperitoneal modifications, the use of acidic dialysis solutions enhanced acid excretion both at pulmonary and renal levels. These findings suggest that changes in intraperitoneal pH during PD are mediated by bidirectional buffer transport and by CA-mediated production of HCO3- in the membrane. The use of acidic solutions enhances acid excretion through respiratory and renal responses, which should be considered in patients with renal failure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. Process intensification of biodiesel production by using microwave and ionic liquids as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handayani, Prima Astuti; Abdullah; Hadiyanto, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The energy crisis pushes the development and intensification of biodiesel production process. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats and conventionally produced by using acid/base catalyst. However, the conventional method requires longer processing time and obtains lower yield of biodiesel. The microwave has been intensively used to accelerate production process and ionic liquids has been introduced as source of catalyst. This paper discusses the overview of the development of biodiesel production through innovation using microwave irradiation and ionic liquids catalyst to increase the yield of biodiesel. The potential microwave to reduce the processing time will be discussed and compared with other energy power, while the ionic liquids as a new generation of catalysts in the chemical industry will be also discussed for its use. The ionic liquids has potential to enhance the economic and environmental aspects because it has a low corrosion effect, can be recycled, and low waste form

  19. Process intensification of biodiesel production by using microwave and ionic liquids as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayani, Prima Astuti [Department of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, Semarang State University (Indonesia); Abdullah; Hadiyanto, Dan, E-mail: hadiyanto@live.undip.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    The energy crisis pushes the development and intensification of biodiesel production process. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats and conventionally produced by using acid/base catalyst. However, the conventional method requires longer processing time and obtains lower yield of biodiesel. The microwave has been intensively used to accelerate production process and ionic liquids has been introduced as source of catalyst. This paper discusses the overview of the development of biodiesel production through innovation using microwave irradiation and ionic liquids catalyst to increase the yield of biodiesel. The potential microwave to reduce the processing time will be discussed and compared with other energy power, while the ionic liquids as a new generation of catalysts in the chemical industry will be also discussed for its use. The ionic liquids has potential to enhance the economic and environmental aspects because it has a low corrosion effect, can be recycled, and low waste form.

  20. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); LaBarge, W. [Delphi Automotive Systems, Flint, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The CRADA between Delphi Automotive Systems (Delphi; formerly General Motors - AC Delco, Systems) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER) on automotive catalysts was completed at the end of FY96, after a ten month, no-cost extension. The CRADA was aimed at improved performance and lifetime of noble metal based three-way-catalysts (TWC), which are the primary catalytic system for automotive emission control systems. While these TWC can meet the currently required emission standards, higher than optimum noble metal loadings are often required to meet lifetime requirements. In addition, more stringent emission standards will be imposed in the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts. Initially in a fresh catalyst, the active material is often distributed on a very fine scale, approaching single atoms or small atomic clusters. As such, a wide range of analytical techniques have been employed to provide high spatial resolution characterization of the evolving state of the catalytic material.

  1. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  2. Effect of temperature on the acid-base properties of the alumina surface: microcalorimetry and acid-base titration experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Jean-Pierre; Marmier, Nicolas; Hurel, Charlotte; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole

    2006-06-15

    Sorption reactions on natural or synthetic materials that can attenuate the migration of pollutants in the geosphere could be affected by temperature variations. Nevertheless, most of the theoretical models describing sorption reactions are at 25 degrees C. To check these models at different temperatures, experimental data such as the enthalpies of sorption are thus required. Highly sensitive microcalorimeters can now be used to determine the heat effects accompanying the sorption of radionuclides on oxide-water interfaces, but enthalpies of sorption cannot be extracted from microcalorimetric data without a clear knowledge of the thermodynamics of protonation and deprotonation of the oxide surface. However, the values reported in the literature show large discrepancies and one must conclude that, amazingly, this fundamental problem of proton binding is not yet resolved. We have thus undertaken to measure by titration microcalorimetry the heat effects accompanying proton exchange at the alumina-water interface at 25 degrees C. Based on (i) the surface sites speciation provided by a surface complexation model (built from acid-base titrations at 25 degrees C) and (ii) results of the microcalorimetric experiments, calculations have been made to extract the enthalpic variations associated respectively to first and second deprotonation of the alumina surface. Values obtained are deltaH1 = 80+/-10 kJ mol(-1) and deltaH2 = 5+/-3 kJ mol(-1). In a second step, these enthalpy values were used to calculate the alumina surface acidity constants at 50 degrees C via the van't Hoff equation. Then a theoretical titration curve at 50 degrees C was calculated and compared to the experimental alumina surface titration curve. Good agreement between the predicted acid-base titration curve and the experimental one was observed.

  3. Magnetism for understanding catalyst analysis of purified carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellouard, Christine; Mercier, Guillaume; Cahen, Sébastien; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Medjahdi, Ghouti [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gleize, Jérôme [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Approche Multi-échelle de Milieux Complexes-Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz (France); Lamura, Gianrico [CNR-SPIN – Dipartimento di Fisica, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Hérold, Claire [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Vigolo, Brigitte, E-mail: Brigitte.Vigolo@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2016-08-01

    The precise quantification of catalyst residues in purified carbon nanotubes is often a major issue in view of any fundamental and/or applicative studies. More importantly, since the best CNTs are successfully grown with magnetic catalysts, their quantification becomes strictly necessary to better understand intrinsic properties of CNT. For these reasons, we have deeply analyzed the catalyst content remained in nickel–yttrium arc-discharge single walled carbon nanotubes purified by both a chlorine-gas phase and a standard acid-based treatment. The study focuses on Ni analysis which has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, and magnetic measurements. In the case of the acid-based treatment, all quantifications result in a decrease of the nanocrystallized Ni by a factor of two. In the case of the halogen gas treatment, analysis and quantification of Ni content is less straightforward: a huge difference appears between X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry results. Thanks to magnetic measurements, this disagreement is explained by the presence of Ni{sup 2+} ions, belonging to NiCl{sub 2} formed during the Cl-based purification process. In particular, NiCl{sub 2} compound appears under different magnetic/crystalline phases: paramagnetic or diamagnetic, or well intercalated in between carbon sheets with an ordered magnetic phase at low temperature. - Highlights: • Cl-gas treatment of Ni catalyst of carbon nanotubes leads to NiCl{sub 2} residue. • Magnetic measurements show the transformation of Ni{sup 0} in Ni{sup 2+}through a purification process. • High temperature Cl treatment removes 75% of metallic impurities. • Cl-purification yields to an amount of metal of 1.5% in arc-discharge CNT samples.

  4. Development of polylactic acid-based materials through reactive modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlks, Alison Camille

    2009-12-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA)-based systems have shown to be of great potential for the development of materials requiring biobased content, biodegradation, and sufficient properties. The efforts in this study are directed toward addressing the current research need to overcome some of the inherent drawbacks of PLA. To meet this need, reactive extrusion was employed to develop new materials based on PLA by grafting, compounding, and polymer blending. In the first part of this work, maleic anhydride (MA) was grafted onto PLA by reactive extrusion. Two structurally different peroxides were used to initiate grafting and results were reported on the basis of grafting, molecular weight, and thermal behavior. An inverse relationship between degree of grafting and molecular weight was established. It was also found that, regardless of peroxide type, there is an optimum peroxid-to-MA ratio of 0.5:2 that promotes maximum grafting, beyond which degradation reactions become predominant. Overall, it was found that the maleated copolymer (MAPLA) could be used as an interfacial modifier in PLA-based composites. Therefore, MAPLA was incorporated into PLA-talc composites in varying concentrations. The influence of the MAPLA addition on the mechanical and thermal behavior was investigated. When added in an optimum concentration, MAPLA improved the tensile strength and crystallization of the composite. Furthermore, microscopic observation confirmed the compatibilization effect of MAPLA in PLA-talc composites. Vinyltrimethoxysilane was free-radically grafted onto the backbone of PLA and subsequently moisture crosslinked. The effects of monomer, initiator, and catalyst concentration on the degree of crosslinking and the mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The presence of a small amount of catalyst showed to be a major contributor to the crosslinking formation in the time frame investigated, shown by an increase in gel content and decrease in crystallinity. Furthermore

  5. Potential application of palladium nanoparticles as selective recyclable hydrogenation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, DebKumar

    2008-01-01

    The search for more efficient catalytic systems that might combine the advantages of both homogeneous (catalyst modulation) and heterogeneous (catalyst recycling) catalysis is one of the most exciting challenges of modern chemistry. More recently with the advances of nanochemistry, it has been possible to prepare soluble analogues of heterogeneous catalysts. These nanoparticles are generally stabilized against aggregation into larger particles by electrostatic or steric protection. Herein we demonstrate the use of room temperature ionic liquid for the stabilization of palladium nanoparticles that are recyclable catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon-carbon double bonds and application of these catalysts to the selective hydrogenation of internal or terminal C=C bonds in unsaturated primary alcohols. The particles suspended in room temperature ionic liquid show no metal aggregation or loss of catalytic activity even on prolonged use

  6. Hydrodenitrogenation of heavy oil--1. Survey of hydrodenitrogenation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M.; Ono, T.; Togari, O.

    1979-11-01

    Forty catalysts consisting of binary oxides of silica/alumina, zirconium dioxide, titanium dioxide, or magnesium oxide or alumina/boron oxide, titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, or phosphorus pentoxide in various proportions, or of alumina alone, were screened for their activity for hydrodenitrogenation (kn) and hydrodesulfurization (ks) of a Gach Saran vacuum gas oil containing 0.16Vertical Bar3< nitrogen and 2.0Vertical Bar3< sulfur. The activities were correlated with the acid amount and acid strength of the catalysts as measured by temperature-programed desorption of ammonia. The mixed oxides of silica had low kn and low ks, and the kn was proportional to the acidity. The unmixed alumina catalysts showed low kn and high ks and no obvious relationship between activity and acidity. The binary alumina catalysts showed high kn and high ks and no obvious correlation between acidity and activity. Generally, catalysts with high acid strength had the lowest kn, especially the unmixed alumina.

  7. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...... under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...

  8. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  9. Bicarbonate Concentration, Acid-Base Status, and Mortality in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Kalani L; Murphy, Rachel A; Shlipak, Michael G; Satterfield, Suzanne; Huston, Hunter K; Sebastian, Anthony; Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Patel, Kushang V; Newman, Anne B; Sarnak, Mark J; Ix, Joachim H; Fried, Linda F

    2016-02-05

    Low serum bicarbonate associates with mortality in CKD. This study investigated the associations of bicarbonate and acid-base status with mortality in healthy older individuals. We analyzed data from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study, a prospective study of well functioning black and white adults ages 70-79 years old from 1997. Participants with arterialized venous blood gas measurements (n=2287) were grouped into respiratory alkalosis, and 1.35 (95% CI, 1.08 to 1.69) for metabolic alkalosis categories. Respiratory acidosis did not associate with mortality. In generally healthy older individuals, low serum bicarbonate associated with higher mortality independent of systemic pH and potential confounders. This association seemed to be present regardless of whether the cause of low bicarbonate was metabolic acidosis or respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis also associated with higher mortality. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Neural networks applied to determine the thermophysical properties of amino acid based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancilla, John C; Perez, Ana; Wierzchoś, Kacper; Torrecilla, José S

    2016-03-14

    A series of models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been designed to estimate the thermophysical properties of different amino acid-based ionic liquids (AAILs). Three different databases of AAILs were modeled using these algorithms with the goal set to estimate the density, viscosity, refractive index, ionic conductivity, and thermal expansion coefficient, and requiring only data regarding temperature and electronic polarizability of the chemicals. Additionally, a global model was designed combining all of the databases to determine the robustness of the method. In general, the results were successful, reaching mean prediction errors below 1% in many cases, as well as a statistically reliable and accurate global model. Attaining these successful models is a relevant fact as AAILs are novel biodegradable and biocompatible compounds which may soon make their way into the health sector forming a part of useful biomedical applications. Therefore, understanding the behavior and being able to estimate their thermophysical properties becomes crucial.

  11. Some comments upon acid-base balance in teleost fishes and its relationship to environmental temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, A.H.

    1971-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that acid-base regulation in mammalian species is directed toward stabilization of body fluid pH, whereas among the poikilotherms control centers upon the maintenance of relative alkalinity. Consequently, given the known relationship between temperature and the dissociation constant of water reductions in mammalian body temperature should be accompanied by decreases in the OH/sup -//H/sup +/ ratio while, under similar circumstances, the pH of the poikilothermic tetrapods, extension of the concept of relative alkalinity regulation to teleost fishes is not wholly consistent with the data presently available. Recorded blood and plasma pH values for teleost fishes are generally below those reported for amphibians and reptiles, tending to fall within or below the levels observed in mammals under comparable thermal conditions. Moreover, they seemingly display little tendency to vary in an inverse fashion wth temperature.

  12. Metal Phosphate-Supported Pt Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshuang Qian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxides (such as SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CeO2 have often been used to prepare supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation and other reactions, whereas metal phosphate-supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation were rarely reported. Metal phosphates are a family of metal salts with high thermal stability and acid-base properties. Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO46(OH2, denoted as Ca-P-O here also has rich hydroxyls. Here we report a series of metal phosphate-supported Pt (Pt/M-P-O, M = Mg, Al, Ca, Fe, Co, Zn, La catalysts for CO oxidation. Pt/Ca-P-O shows the highest activity. Relevant characterization was conducted using N2 adsorption-desorption, inductively coupled plasma (ICP atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (CO2-TPD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR. This work furnishes a new catalyst system for CO oxidation and other possible reactions.

  13. Relationships among oxidation-reduction and acid-base properties of the actinides in high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morss, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    The first chemical identification of plutonium, its subsequent isolation on the macroscopic scale, and more recent chemical separation schemes were achieved by taking advantage of the differences among the oxidation states of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. Many acid-base properties modify the relative stabilities of oxidation states of the actinides. In the solid state, strongly basic compounds such as Cs 2 O yield complex oxides with oxidation states of Np(VII), Pu(VI), and Am(VI) whereas more acidic compounds such as CsF yield complex fluorides with lower oxidation states. In aqueous solution, high basicity and strongly covalent complexes favor high oxidation states. In nonaqueous solvent systems, high acidity generally favors low oxidation states. This paper elucidates and attempts to interpret the effects of these acid-base properties in a systematic fashion

  14. Chemoselective Oxidation of Bio-Glycerol with Nano-Sized Metal Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hu; Kotni, Ramakrishna; Zhang, Qiuyun

    2015-01-01

    to selectively oxidize glycerol and yield products with good selectivity is the use of nano-sized metal particles as heterogeneous catalysts. In this short review, recent developments in chemoselective oxidation of glycerol to specific products over nano-sized metal catalysts are described. Attention is drawn...... to various reaction parameters such as the type of the support, the size of the metal particles, and the acid/base properties of the reaction medium which were illustrated to largely influence the activity of the nanocatalyst and selectivity to the target product. - See more at: http...

  15. [Deeper understanding of fetal acid-base equilibrium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, V M

    1993-01-01

    variables of the fetal acid-base-balance is demonstrated in 738 newborns sharing Apgar-scores of 8 after one minute. The diagnostic potential of acid-base-variables in UV-blood as a mirror of placental function is outlined.

  16. General chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yeong Sik; Lee, Dong Seop; Ryu, Haung Ryong; Jang, Cheol Hyeon; Choi, Bong Jong; Choi, Sang Won

    1993-07-01

    The book concentrates on the latest general chemistry, which is divided int twenty-three chapters. It deals with basic conception and stoichiometry, nature of gas, structure of atoms, quantum mechanics, symbol and structure of an electron of ion and molecule, chemical thermodynamics, nature of solid, change of state and liquid, properties of solution, chemical equilibrium, solution and acid-base, equilibrium of aqueous solution, electrochemistry, chemical reaction speed, molecule spectroscopy, hydrogen, oxygen and water, metallic atom; 1A, IIA, IIIA, carbon and atom IVA, nonmetal atom and an inert gas, transition metals, lanthanons, and actinoids, nuclear properties and radioactivity, biochemistry and environment chemistry.

  17. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  18. Bimetallic catalysts for continuous catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, A; Bengoa, C; Font, J; Fabregat, A

    1999-01-29

    Catalytic wet oxidation has proved to be effective at eliminating hazardous organic compounds, such as phenol, from waste waters. However, the lack of active long-life oxidation catalysts which can perform in aqueous phase is its main drawback. This study explores the ability of bimetallic supported catalysts to oxidize aqueous phenol solutions using air as oxidant. Combinations of 2% of CoO, Fe2O3, MnO or ZnO with 10% CuO were supported on gamma-alumina by pore filling, calcined and later tested. The oxidation was carried out in a packed bed reactor operating in trickle flow regime at 140 degrees C and 900 kPa of oxygen partial pressure. Lifetime tests were conducted for 8 days. The pH of the feed solution was also varied. The results show that all the catalysts tested undergo severe deactivation during the first 2 days of operation. Later, the catalysts present steady activity until the end of the test. The highest residual phenol conversion was obtained for the ZnO-CuO, which was significantly higher than that obtained with the 10% CuO catalyst used as reference. The catalyst deactivation is related to the dissolution of the metal oxides from the catalyst surface due to the acidic reaction conditions. Generally, the performance of the catalysts was better when the pH of the feed solution was increased.

  19. Acid-base transport in pancreas – new challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eNovak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Along the gastrointestinal tract a number of epithelia contribute with acid or basic secretions in order to aid digestive processes. The stomach and pancreas are the most extreme examples of acid (H+ and base (HCO3- transporters, respectively. Nevertheless, they share the same challenges of transporting acid and bases across epithelia and effectively regulating their intracellular pH. In this review, we will make use of comparative physiology to enlighten the cellular mechanisms of pancreatic HCO3- and fluid secretion, which is still challenging physiologists. Some of the novel transporters to consider in pancreas are the proton pumps (H+-K+-ATPases, as well as the calcium-activated K+ and Cl- channels, such as KCa3.1 and TMEM16A/ANO1. Local regulators, such as purinergic signalling, fine-tune and coordinate pancreatic secretion. Lastly, we speculate whether dys-regulation of acid-base transport contributes to pancreatic diseases including cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis and cancer.

  20. Modeling the Acid-Base Properties of Montmorillonite Edge Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournassat, Christophe; Davis, James A; Chiaberge, Christophe; Grangeon, Sylvain; Bourg, Ian C

    2016-12-20

    The surface reactivity of clay minerals remains challenging to characterize because of a duality of adsorption surfaces and mechanisms that does not exist in the case of simple oxide surfaces: edge surfaces of clay minerals have a variable proton surface charge arising from hydroxyl functional groups, whereas basal surfaces have a permanent negative charge arising from isomorphic substitutions. Hence, the relationship between surface charge and surface potential on edge surfaces cannot be described using the Gouy-Chapman relation, because of a spillover of negative electrostatic potential from the basal surface onto the edge surface. While surface complexation models can be modified to account for these features, a predictive fit of experimental data was not possible until recently, because of uncertainty regarding the densities and intrinsic pK a values of edge functional groups. Here, we reexamine this problem in light of new knowledge on intrinsic pK a values obtained over the past decade using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, and we propose a new formalism to describe edge functional groups. Our simulation results yield reasonable predictions of the best available experimental acid-base titration data.

  1. Acid/base titrations of simulated PWR crevice environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, J.; Macdonald, D.D.; Millett, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The construction and operation of a titration system that is capable of exploring the acid/base properties of aqueous systems at temperatures solution is measured using YSZ sensors of the type Hg/HgO/ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 )/Solution in conjunction with a suitable reference electrode. The use of the system for measuring the pH of the titrated solutions (NaOH/H 2 SO 4 ) is discussed, and we show that the YSZ pH sensor is capable of consistent and precise pH measurements at elevated temperature (275-325 degrees C) and pressures (100-150 bars). However, the accuracy of the measured pH depends critically on the performance of the reference electrode. In the present work, we ensure the viability of the reference electrode. In the present work, we ensure the viability of the reference electrode by periodically calibrating it in situ using the pH sensor and a standard solution of known pH versus temperature characteristics. The titration data obtained in this study are compared with predictions from EPRI's MULTEQ code, and are found to be in satisfactory agreement in the alkaline pH region. Observed discrepancies in the acidic pH region between the two sets of data are attributed to corrosion of the alloys used to fabricate the titration system

  2. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  3. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  4. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  5. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  6. History of the application of the generalized Lewis acid-base theory to metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, L.

    1988-11-01

    The history of my experiences with intermetallics has been found useful by students seeking my advice on which directions in science they should be emphasizing. In response to their question, I point to a mobile in my office consisting of seven hands pointing in different directions. Science comes up with so many unexpected developments that one's education should have a broad enough base to allow one to branch out in any direction to take advantage of unexpected opportunities. My historical presentation will be a personal account that I hope will serve as a guide to students. There have been many unexpected abrupt changes in my research

  7. A general strategy for the in situ decoration of porous Mn-Co bi-metal oxides on metal mesh/foam for high performance de-NOx monolith catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Sixiang; Liu, Jie; Zha, Kaiwen; Li, Hongrui; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Dengsong

    2017-05-04

    Owing to their advantages of strong mechanical stability, plasticity, thermal conductivity and mass transfer ability, metal foam or meshes are considered promising monolith supports for de-NO x application. In this work, we developed a facile method for the decoration of porous Mn-Co bi-metal oxides on Fe meshes. The block-like structure was derived from in situ coating, and simultaneous nucleation and growth of the Mn-Co hydroxide precursor, while the porous Mn-Co oxides were formed via the calcination process. Moreover, the decoration of the high-purity Co 2 MnO 4 spinel could lead to enhanced reducibility and adsorption behaviors, which are crucial to the catalytic process. Of note is the fact that the Fe mesh used in the synthesis procedure could be substituted by various metal supports including Ti mesh, Cu foam and Ni foam. Driven by the above motivations, metal supports decorated with Mn-Co oxides were evaluated as monolith de-NO x catalysts for the first time. Inspiringly, these catalysts demonstrate outstanding low-temperature catalytic activity, desirable stability and excellent H 2 O resistance. This work might open up a new path for the design and development of high performance de-NO x monolith catalysts.

  8. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  9. Steam Reforming of Acetic Acid over Co-Supported Catalysts: Coupling Ketonization for Greater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Stephen D. [Energy and Environmental; Spies, Kurt A. [Energy and Environmental; Mei, Donghai [Energy and Environmental; Kovarik, Libor [Energy and Environmental; Kutnyakov, Igor [Energy and Environmental; Li, Xiaohong S. [Energy and Environmental; Lebarbier Dagle, Vanessa [Energy and Environmental; Albrecht, Karl O. [Energy and Environmental; Dagle, Robert A. [Energy and Environmental

    2017-09-11

    We report on the markedly improved stability of a novel 2-bed catalytic system, as compared to a conventional 1-bed steam reforming catalyst, for the production of H2 from acetic acid. The 2-bed catalytic system comprises of i) a basic oxide ketonization catalyst for the conversion of acetic acid to acetone, and a ii) Co-based steam reforming catalyst, both catalytic beds placed in sequence within the same unit operation. Steam reforming catalysts are particularly prone to catalytic deactivation when steam reforming acetic acid, used here as a model compound for the aqueous fraction of bio-oil. Catalysts comprising MgAl2O4, ZnO, CeO2, and activated carbon (AC) both with and without Co-addition were evaluated for conversion of acetic acid and acetone, its ketonization product, in the presence of steam. It was found that over the bare oxide support only ketonization activity was observed and coke deposition was minimal. With addition of Co to the oxide support steam reforming activity was facilitated and coke deposition was significantly increased. Acetone steam reforming over the same Co-supported catalysts demonstrated more stable performance and with less coke deposition than with acetic acid feedstock. DFT analysis suggests that over Co surface CHxCOO species are more favorably formed from acetic acid versus acetone. These CHxCOO species are strongly bound to the Co catalyst surface and could explain the higher propensity for coke formation from acetic acid. Based on these findings, in order to enhance stability of the steam reforming catalyst a dual-bed (2-bed) catalyst system was implemented. Comparing the 2-bed and 1-bed (Co-supported catalyst only) systems under otherwise identical reaction conditions the 2-bed demonstrated significantly improved stability and coke deposition was decreased by a factor of 4.

  10. Catalysts for synthetic liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, L.A.; Turney, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts have been designed, characterized and tested for the selective production of hydrocarbons suitable as synthetic liquid transport fuels from synthesis gas (i.e., by the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen). It was found that hydrocarbons in the middle distillate range, or suitable for conversion to that range, could be produced over several of the new catalyst systems. The various catalysts examined included: (1) synthetic cobalt clays, mainly cobalt chlorites; (2) cobalt hydrotalcites; (3) ruthenium metal supported on rare earth oxides of high surface area; and (4) a novel promoted cobalt catalyst. Active and selective catalysts have been obtained, in each category. With the exception of the clays, reproducibility of catalyst performance has been good. Catalysts in groups 2 and 4 have exhibited very high activity, with long lifetimes and easy regeneration.

  11. Use of ionic liquids as coordination ligands for organometallic catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zaiwei [Moreno Valley, CA; Tang, Yongchun [Walnut, CA; Cheng,; Jihong, [Arcadia, CA

    2009-11-10

    Aspects of the present invention relate to compositions and methods for the use of ionic liquids with dissolved metal compounds as catalysts for a variety of chemical reactions. Ionic liquids are salts that generally are liquids at room temperature, and are capable of dissolving a many types of compounds that are relatively insoluble in aqueous or organic solvent systems. Specifically, ionic liquids may dissolve metal compounds to produce homogeneous and heterogeneous organometallic catalysts. One industrially-important chemical reaction that may be catalyzed by metal-containing ionic liquid catalysts is the conversion of methane to methanol.

  12. Acid-base status at birth, spontaneous motor behaviour at term and 3 months and neurodevelopmental outcome at age 4 years in full-term infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J; Feron, FJM; Hendriksen, JGM; van Hall, M; Gavilanes-Jiminez, DWD; Hadders-Algra, M; Vles, JSH

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between acid-base status and quality and quantity of General Movements (GMs) at birth and quality of GMs at age 3 months and motor, cognitive and behavioural functioning at the age of 4 years. Methods: From a cohort of 84 term children

  13. Vibration measurements of automobile catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatola, Seppo

    1994-09-01

    Vibration of catalyst cell, which is inside the casing of the catalyst, is difficult to measure with usual measuring instrumentation. When catalyst is in use, there is hot exhaust gas flow though the catalyst cell and temperature of the cell is approximately +900 degree(s)C. Therefore non-contact Laser- Doppler-Vibrometer was used to measure vibration velocity of the catalyst cell. The laser beam was directed towards the cell through pipe which was put through and welded to the casing of the catalyst. The outer end of the pipe was screw down with a tempered class to prevent exhaust gas flow from the pipe. The inner end of the pipe was open and few millimeters away from the measuring point. Catalyst was attached to the engine with two ways, rigidly close to the engine and flexible under the engine. The engine was running in test bench under controlled conditions. Vibration measurements were carried out during constant running speeds of the engine. Vibration signals were captured and analyzed with FFT-analyzer. Vibration of catalyst cell was strongest at running speed of 5000 rpm, from 10 to 20 g (1 g equals 9.81 ms-2), when catalyst was attached rigidly close to the engine. At running speed of 3000 rpm, vibration of catalyst cell was from 2 to 3 g in most cases, when catalyst was attached either rigidly or flexible to the engine. It is estimated that in real life, i.e. when catalyst is attached to car with same engine, vibration of catalyst cell at running speed of 5000 rpm is somewhere between 1 and 10 g. At running speed of 3000 rpm, which may be more often used when driving car (car speed approximately 100 kmh-1), vibration of catalyst cell is probably few g's.

  14. Acid-base thermochemistry of gaseous aliphatic α-aminoacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoux, Guy; Huang, Sihua; Inda, Bhawani Singh

    2011-01-14

    Acid-base thermochemistry of isolated aliphatic amino acids (denoted AAA): glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine and proline has been examined theoretically by quantum chemical computations at the G3MP2B3 level. Conformational analysis on neutral, protonated and deprotonated species has been used to identify the lowest energy conformers and to estimate the population of conformers expected to be present at thermal equilibrium at 298 K. Comparison of the G3MP2B3 theoretical proton affinities, PA, and ΔH(acid) with experimental results is shown to be correct if experimental thermochemistry is re-evaluated and adapted to the most recent acidity-basicity scales. From this point of view, a set of evaluated proton affinities of 887, 902, 915, 916, 919 and 941 kJ mol(-1), and a set of evaluated ΔH(acid) of 1433, 1430, 1423, 1423, 1422 and 1426 kJ mol(-1), is proposed for glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine and proline, respectively. Correlations with structural parameters (Taft's σ(α) polarizability parameter and molecular size) suggest that polarizability of the side chain is the major origin of the increase in PA and decrease in ΔH(acid) along the homologous series glycine, alanine, valine and leucine/isoleucine. Heats of formation of gaseous species AAA, AAAH(+) and [AAA-H](-) were computed at the G3MP2B3 level. The present study provides previously unavailable Δ(f)H°(298) for the ionized species AAAH(+) and [AAA-H](-). Comparison with Benson's estimate, and correlation with molecular size, show that several experimental Δ(f)H°(298) values of neutral or gaseous AAA might be erroneous.

  15. Pathophysiological aspect of metabolic acid-base disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešović-Ostojić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaing the arterial pH values (in normal range of 7,35-7,45 is one of the main principles of homeostasis. Regulatory responses, including chemical buffering (extracellular, intracellular, sceletal, the regulation of pCO2 by the respiratory system, and the regulation of [HCO3-] by the kidneys, act in concert to maintain normal arterial pH value. The main extracellular chemical buffer is bicarbonate-carbonic acid buffer system. The kidneys contribute to the regulation of hydrogen (and bicarbonate in body fluids in two ways. Proximal tubules are important in bicarbonate reabsorption and distal tubules excrete hydrogen ion (as ammonium ion or titratable acid. There are four simple acid-base disorders: metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis; respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic acidosis can occur because of an increase in endogenous acid production (such as lactate and ketoacids, loss of bicarbonate (as in diarrhea, or accumulation of endogenous acids (as in renal failure. Metabolic acidosis can also be with high and normal (hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis anion gap. Renal tubular acidosis (RTA is a form of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis which occurs when the renal damage primarily affects tubular function. The main problem in distal RTA is reduced H+ excretion in distal tubule. Type 2 RTA is also called proximal RTA because the main problem is greatly impaired reabsorption of bicarbonate in proximal tubule. Impaired cation exchange in distal tubule is the main problem in RTA type 4. Metabolic alkalosis occurs as a result of net gain of [HCO3-] or loss of nonvolatile acid from extracellular fluids. Metabolic alkalosis can be associated with reduced or increased extracellular volume.

  16. Equivalence-point electromigration acid-base titration via moving neutralization boundary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Fan, Liu-Yin; Huang, Shan-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a novel method of acid-base titration, viz. the electromigration acid-base titration (EABT), via a moving neutralization boundary (MNR). With HCl and NaOH as the model strong acid and base, respectively, we conducted the experiments on the EABT via the method of moving neutralization boundary for the first time. The experiments revealed that (i) the concentration of agarose gel, the voltage used and the content of background electrolyte (KCl) had evident influence on the boundary movement; (ii) the movement length was a function of the running time under the constant acid and base concentrations; and (iii) there was a good linearity between the length and natural logarithmic concentration of HCl under the optimized conditions, and the linearity could be used to detect the concentration of acid. The experiments further manifested that (i) the RSD values of intra-day and inter-day runs were less than 1.59 and 3.76%, respectively, indicating similar precision and stability in capillary electrophoresis or HPLC; (ii) the indicators with different pK(a) values had no obvious effect on EABT, distinguishing strong influence on the judgment of equivalence-point titration in the classic one; and (iii) the constant equivalence-point titration always existed in the EABT, rather than the classic volumetric analysis. Additionally, the EABT could be put to good use for the determination of actual acid concentrations. The experimental results achieved herein showed a new general guidance for the development of classic volumetric analysis and element (e.g. nitrogen) content analysis in protein chemistry. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Development of Molecular Catalysts to Bridge the Gap between Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong

    Catalysts, heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic, are comprised of nanometer-sized inorganic and/or organic components. They share molecular factors including charge, coordination, interatomic distance, bonding, and orientation of catalytically active atoms. By controlling the governing catalytic components and molecular factors, catalytic processes of a multichannel and multiproduct nature could be run in all three catalytic platforms to create unique end-products. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis. Recyclable catalysts, especially those that display selective reactivity, are vital for the development of sustainable chemical processes. Among available catalyst platforms, heterogeneous catalysts are particularly well-disposed toward separation from the reaction mixture via filtration methods, which renders them readily recyclable. Furthermore, heterogeneous catalysts offer numerous handles - some without homogeneous analogues - for performance and selectivity optimization. These handles include nanoparticle size, pore profile of porous supports, surface ligands and interface with oxide supports, and flow rate through a solid catalyst bed. Despite these available handles, however, conventional heterogeneous catalysts are themselves often structurally heterogeneous compared to homogeneous catalysts, which complicates efforts to optimize and expand the scope of their reactivity and selectivity. Ongoing efforts are aimed to address the above challenge by heterogenizing homogeneous catalysts, which can be defined as the modification of homogeneous catalysts to render them in a separable (solid) phase from the starting materials and products. Specifically, we grow the small nanoclusters in dendrimers, a class of uniform polymers with the connectivity of fractal trees and generally radial symmetry. Thanks to their dense multivalency, shape persistence and structural uniformity, dendrimers have proven to

  18. A Catalyst for Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    This case study of a team in an international workplace investigates processes of language socialization in a transient multilingual setting. Using interview and observational data, the analysis shows how social and linguistic norms are negotiated, with the newcomer positioned as a catalyst...... for changing language practices toward more English, with the ultimate aim of creating a 'global mindset' in the organization. Language socialization in a transient multilingual setting is shown to focus on and assign positive value to new linguistic norms that experienced members are socialized...... into in a process that hinges on new members functioning as tools for management to bring about the desired change. The article shows that while the newcomer is used as a catalyst for increased use of English and for the creation of a 'global mindset,' she is at the same time socialized into the existing Danish...

  19. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  20. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  1. Stewart analysis of apparently normal acid-base state in the critically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moviat, M.; Boogaard, M. van den; Intven, F.; Voort, P. van der; Hoeven, H. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to describe Stewart parameters in critically ill patients with an apparently normal acid-base state and to determine the incidence of mixed metabolic acid-base disorders in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational multicenter study of

  2. The acid-base resistant zone in three dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-11-01

    An acid-base resistant zone has been found to exist after acid-base challenge adjacent to the hybrid layer using SEM. The aim of this study was to examine the acid-base resistant zone using three different bonding systems. Dentin disks were applied with three different bonding systems, and then a resin composite was light-cured to make dentin disk sandwiches. After acid-base challenge, the polished surfaces were observed using SEM. For both one- and two-step self-etching primer systems, an acid-base resistant zone was clearly observed adjacent to the hybrid layer - but with differing appearances. For the wet bonding system, the presence of an acid-base resistant zone was unclear. This was because the self-etching primer systems etched the dentin surface mildly, such that the remaining mineral phase of dentin and the bonding agent yielded clear acid-base resistant zones. In conclusion, the acid-base resistant zone was clearly observed when self-etching primer systems were used, but not so for the wet bonding system.

  3. A knowledge based advisory system for acid/base titrations in non-aqueous solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    A computer program was developed that could advice on the choice of solvent and titrant for acid/base titrations in nonaqueous media. It is shown that the feasibility of a titration in a given solvent can be calculated from solvent properties and intrinsic acid/base properties of the sample

  4. Acid-base properties of the surface of the α-Al2O3 suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazanov, M. A.; Dudkin, B. N.

    2009-12-01

    The distribution of the acid-base centers on the surface of α-Al2O3 suspension particles was studied by potentiometric titration, and the corresponding p K spectra were constructed. It was inferred that the double electric layer created by the supporting electrolyte substantially affected the screening of the acid-base centers on the particle surface of the suspension.

  5. Mixed acid-base disorder secondary to topiramate use in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Golla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a man with traumatic brain injury. He was started on to prophylactic topiramate which led to a mixed acid-base disorder. He had severe metabolic acidosis secondary to renal tubular acidification defect and respiratory alkalosis secondary to hyperventilation. Withdrawal of the offending drug led to the prompt resolution of the acid-base disturbance.

  6. A Comparative Study of French and Turkish Students' Ideas on Acid-Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this comparative study was to determine the knowledge that French and Turkish upper secondary-school students (grades 11 and 12) acquire on the concept of acid-base reactions. Following an examination of the relevant curricula and textbooks in the two countries, 528 students answered six written questions about the acid-base concept.…

  7. Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Common Acid-Base Disorders to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Marie Warrer; Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Berg, Ronan M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize and diagnose acid-base disorders is of the utmost importance in the clinical setting. However, it has been the experience of the authors that medical students often have difficulties learning the basic principles of acid-base physiology in the respiratory physiology curriculum, particularly when applying this knowledge to…

  8. High School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts: An Ongoing Challenge for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanhuri, Muhd Ibrahim Muhamad; Treagust, David F.; Won, Mihye; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Using a quantitative case study design, the "Acids-Bases Chemistry Achievement Test" ("ABCAT") was developed to evaluate the extent to which students in Malaysian secondary schools achieved the intended curriculum on acid-base concepts. Responses were obtained from 260 Form 5 (Grade 11) students from five schools to initially…

  9. Thai Grade 11 Students' Alternative Conceptions for Acid-Base Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artdej, Romklao; Ratanaroutai, Thasaneeya; Coll, Richard Kevin; Thongpanchang, Tienthong

    2010-01-01

    This study involved the development of a two-tier diagnostic instrument to assess Thai high school students' understanding of acid-base chemistry. The acid-base diagnostic test (ABDT) comprising 18 items was administered to 55 Grade 11 students in a science and mathematics programme during the second semester of the 2008 academic year. Analysis of…

  10. General entanglement-assisted transformation for bipartite pure quantum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Huang, Yan; Nai-LeLiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the general catalysts for pure entanglement transformations under local operations and classical communications in such a way that we disregard the profit and loss of entanglement of the catalysts per se. As such, the possibilities of pure entanglement transformations are greatly expanded. We also design an efficient algorithm to detect whether a k × k general catalyst exists for a given entanglement transformation. This algorithm can also be exploited to witness the existence of standard catalysts.

  11. Oleic Acid Based Polyesters of Trimethylolpropane and Pentaerythritol for Bio lubricant Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamizah Ammarah Mahmud; Nadia Salih; Jumat Salimon

    2015-01-01

    The production of polyesters based on oleic acid and trimethylolpropane (TMP) or pentaerythritol (PE) as potential bio lubricant were carried out. The esterification processes between oleic acid with TMP or PE were carried out using sulfuric acid as a catalyst. The esterification process produced high yield between 92 %-94 % w/w respectively. The formation of polyesters was confirmed using gas chromatography (GC-FID), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The polyesters were analyzed for basic lubrication physicochemical properties. The results showed that polyesters of both TMP and PE having high viscosity index between 200-309, good pour points ranging from -42 to -59 degree Celsius and high flash points of 280 - 300 degree Celsius respectively. The polyesters also showed good thermal oxidative stability with TGA onset temperatures above 180 degree Celsius. In general both products are plausible to be used as bio lubricant for industrial application. (author)

  12. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef C. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3–4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1–2 nm and 3–4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS. All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested.

  13. Non-PGM cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States); Ganesan, P. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-27

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFCs. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into a variety of catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of high surface area catalysts were synthesized and the impact of the chemical structure on the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties was investigated. Elemental and surface analyses of the prepared catalysts reveal the incorporation of iron in a targeted and controlled manner. A high surface area framework catalyst was prepared that shows exceptional activity, comparable to state-of-the-art materials. The results of this research project provided critical seed data for the newly awarded ElectroCat project, which focuses on rationally designed framework catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  14. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  15. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Umit S [Worthington, OH; Holmgreen, Erik M [Columbus, OH; Yung, Matthew M [Columbus, OH

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  16. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  17. Preparation of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for decontamination of nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionita, Gh.; Popescu, I.; Retegan, T.; Stefanescu, I.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: (1) to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes, (2) to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation (3) to asses and to find a new procedure for preparation a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. The merits of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. As results of the review some general conclusions about the applications of hydrophobic catalysts in environmental field are as follow: (1) the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed reactors showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; (2) the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluent in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; (3) the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in other new processes, which take place in presence of liquid water or high humidity are subjected to testing. (author)

  18. Preparation of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for decontamination of nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionita, Gh.; Popescu, I.; Retegan, T.; Stefanescu, I.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: - to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; - to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation; - to assess and to find a new procedure for preparation a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. The merits of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. As results of the review some general conclusions about the applications of hydrophobic catalysts in environmental field are as follows: - the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed reactors showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; - the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluent in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; - the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in other new processes, which take place in presence of liquid water or high humidity are subject to testing. (authors)

  19. Current status for applications of hydrophobic platinum catalysts in tritium removal from nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagner, Irina; Ionita, Gheorghe; Varlam, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D results on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: 1. to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; 2. to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation; 3. to assess and find a new procedure for preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. The merits of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. As results of the review some general conclusions about the applications of hydrophobic catalysts in environmental field are as follow: 1. the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed reactors showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; 2. the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluent in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; 3. the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts to other new processes, which take place in presence of liquid water or high humidity, like VOCs oxidation from wastewater or H 2 -O 2 catalytic recombination, are subject to testing

  20. Reuse of Hydrotreating Spent Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, A.M.; Menoufy, M.F.; Amhed, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    All hydro treating catalysts used in petroleum refining processes gradually lose activity through coking, poisoning by metal, sulfur or halides or lose surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Waste hydrotreating catalyst, which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company (after 5 years lifetime) compared with the same fresh catalyst were used in the present work. Studies are conducted on partial extraction of the active metals of spent catalyst (Mo and Ni) using three leaching solvents,4% oxidized oxalic acid, 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide and 10% citric acid. The leaching experiments are conducting on the de coked extrude [un crushed] spent catalyst samples. These steps are carried out in order to rejuvenate the spent catalyst to be reused in other reactions. The results indicated that 4% oxidized oxalic acid leaching solution gave total metal removal 45.6 for de coked catalyst samples while NaOH gave 35% and citric acid gave 31.9 % The oxidized leaching agent was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate the metal removal, and the rejuvenated catalyst was characterized by the unchanged crystalline phase The rejuvenated catalyst was applied for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of vacuum gas oil as a feedstock, under different hydrogen pressure 20-80 bar in order to compare its HDS activity

  1. Metabolic Effects of a Succinic Acid Substrate Antihypoxant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Shakh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses promises for clinical use of substrate antihypoxants.Objective: to investigate the efficacy of succinate containing  substrate  antihypoxants  on  systemic  oxygen  consumption,  blood  buffer  capacity,  and  changes  in  the  mixed venous blood level of lactate when they are used in gravely sick patients and victims with marked metabolic posthypoxic disorders.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 30 patients and victims who had sustained an episode of severe hypoxia of mixed genesis, the severity of which was evaluated by the APACHE II scale and amounted to 23 to 30 scores with a 46 to 70.3% risk of death. The standard infusion program in this group involved the succinate-containing drug 1.5% reamberin solution  in  a  total  dose  of  800  ml.  A  comparison  group  included  15  patients  who  had  undergone  emergency  extensive surgery for abdominal diseases. 400 ml of 10% glucose solution was used as an infusion medium. Oxygen consumption (VO2ml/min and carbon dioxide production (VCO2ml/min were measured before infusion and monitored for 2 hours. Arterial blood gases and acid-base balance (ABB parameters and mixed venous blood lactate levels were examined. Measurements were made before and 30 minutes after the infusion of reamberin or glucose solution.Results. Infusion of 1.5% reamberin solution was followed by a significant increase in minute oxygen consumption from 281.5±21.2 to 310.4±24.4 ml/min. CO2 production declined (on average, from 223.3±6.5 to 206.5±7.59 ml/min. During infusion of 10% glucose solution, all the patients of the comparison group showed a rise in oxygen consumption from 303.6±33.86 to 443.13±32.1 ml/min, i.e. about 1.5-fold. VCO2 changed similarly. The intravenous infusion of 800 ml of 1.5% reamberin solution raised arterial blood buffer capacity, which was reflected by changes in pH, BE, and HCO3. There was a clear trend for lactate values to drop in the

  2. EXAFS characterization of supported metal catalysts in chemically dynamic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robota, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Characterization of catalysts focuses on the identification of an active site responsible for accelerating desirable chemical reactions. The identification, characterization, and selective modification of such sites is fundamental to the development of structure-function relationships. Unfortunately, this goal is far from realized in nearly all catalysts, and particularly in catalysts comprised of small supported metal particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has had a dramatic effect on our understanding of supported metal particles in their resting state. However, the performance of a catalyst can not be assessed from such simple resting state measurements. Among the factors which influence catalyst performance are the exact catalyst composition, including the support and any modifiers; particle size; catalyst finishing and pretreatment conditions; pressure, composition, and temperature of the operating environment; time. Gaining an understanding of how the structure of a catalytic site can change with such an array of variables requires that we begin to develop measurement methods which are effective under chemically dynamic conditions. Ideally, it should be possible to obtain a full X-ray absorption spectrum of each element thought to have a causal relationship with observed catalyst properties. From these spectra, we can optimally extract only a relatively limited amount of information which we must then piece together with information derived from other characterization methods and intuition to arrive at a hypothetical structure of the operating catalyst. Information about crystallinity, homogeneity, and general disorder can be obtained from the Debye-Waller factor. Finally, through analogy with known compounds, the electronic structure of the active atoms can be inferred from near edge absorption features

  3. Investigation and development of heavy oil upgrading catalysts. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.K.; Lee, I.C.; Yoon, W.L.; Lee, H.T.; Chung, H.; Hwang, Y.J.; Park, S.H. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This study aimed at the domestic development of HDS catalysts which are most fundamental and wide-used in the petroleum refinery. In this year, some experimental works were conducted for developing the effective utilization technology of the novel dispersed-catalysts in the hydro-desulfurization of heavy oils, and improving the reaction performance of alumina-supported Mo-based hydro-treating catalysts conventionally used in most of refineries. First, it was experimentally proved that the dispersed catalysts of Co-Mo could be employed for the hydro-desulfurization of a heavy atmospheric residual oil excluding the catalyst deactivation. The utilization of a carbon-expanded reactor in combination with this dispersed catalyst system exhibited an enhanced reaction performance and provided an efficient way for the separation and recovery of the dispersed catalytic component from oils. Second, the tungsten-incorporated WCoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst revealed the improved catalytic performance in the various hydro-treating reactions and in the initial deactivation rates for the high pressure hydro-treatment of a heavy oil as compared with the commercial CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. This new experimental finding for the promoting role of the monomeric WO{sub 3} species in CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst may be generally applicable to the Mo-based alumina-sulfide phase, higher catalytic activity, and more extended service life. (author). 101 refs., 33 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  5. Catalysts for petroleum desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.; Diemann, E.; Baumann, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain marketable products from low-quality oils, efficient hydrogenation processes are required for removing sulfur (hydrodesulfurization, HDS), nitrogen (hydrodenitrification, HDN), and oxygen (hydrodeoxygenation, HDO), which would poison the noble metal catalysts of the downstream petrochemical processes. Hydrogenation will produce low-sulfur, low-nitrogen fuels and thus contribute to the reduction of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions which is long overdue from the ecological point of view (forest decline, acidification of surface bodies of water, etc.).

  6. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  7. An Alternative to Synthetic Acid Base Indicator-Tagetes Erecta Linn

    OpenAIRE

    *A. Elumalai; M. C. Eswariah; M. K. Chinna; B. A. Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The present work highlights the use of the methanolic extract of the flowers of Tagetes erecta as an acid-base indicator in acid-base titrations. This natural indicator is easy to extract as well as easily available. Indicators used in titration show well marked changes of colour in certain intervals of pH. Most of these indicators are organic dyes and are of synthetic origin. Today synthetic indicators are the choice of acid-base titrations. But due to environmental pollution, availability a...

  8. Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disorders in Patients with and without Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondup, Tsering; Qian, Qi

    2017-12-01

    Kidneys play a pivotal role in the maintenance and regulation of acid-base and electrolyte homeostasis, which is the prerequisite for numerous metabolic processes and organ functions in the human body. Chronic kidney diseases compromise the regulatory functions, resulting in alterations in electrolyte and acid-base balance that can be life-threatening. In this review, we discuss the renal regulations of electrolyte and acid-base balance and several common disorders including metabolic acidosis, alkalosis, dysnatremia, dyskalemia, and dysmagnesemia. Common disorders in chronic kidney disease are also discussed. The most recent and relevant advances on pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management of these conditions have been incorporated.

  9. A REVIEW ON ACID BASE STATUS IN DAIRY COWS: IMPLICATIONS OF DIETARY CATION-ANION BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Afzaal, M. Nisa, M. A. Khan and M. Sarwar

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The acid base status of a dairy cow is maintained within a narrow range. The key mechanisms involving blood, cells and lungs, perform this function. Although other minerals have an impact on acid base metabolism, the minerals used in dietary cation-anion balance (DCAB namely sodium (Na, potassium (K and chloride (Cl have the greatest effect. Hence, acid base status implicates other biological functions of dairy cows. Low DCAB prepartum reduces the incidence of milk fever and increases the productivity by simmering down the severity of hypocalcaemia. High DCAB diets have proved to increase dry mater and water intake and production and to mitigate the effects of heat stress.

  10. Abridged acid-base wet-milling synthesis of high purity hydroyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi Carolina Ruiz-Mendoza

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a plethora of routes to produce hydroxyapatite(HA and in general calcium phosphates(CP but production usually leads to a mixture of several phases. Besides ionic contamination, most of these methods are cumbersome, restricted to small volumes of product and require a lot of thermal energy. The acid-base route eliminates foreign ions or additives and its only byproduct is water. Heterogeneous reaction drawback is that solid reactants do not easily come in contact with each other and therefore addition and stirring times become very lengthy and still the product is a mixture. The synthesis started from calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid (PA. Ball milling was used to favor kinetics and stoichiometry. Six sets of PA addition, paddle stirring and ball milling times were used. Products were evaluated by X ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X ray fluorescence (XRF and Ca/P ratio. Chemical analysis for calcium proceeded through oxalate precipitate and phosphorus by the phosphomolibdate technique. A set of conditions yielding high purity HA was established.

  11. Production of Biodiesel by Esterification of Free Fatty Acid over Solid Catalyst from Biomass Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukti, N. I. F.; Sutrisno, B.; Hidayat, A.

    2018-05-01

    Recently, low cost feedstocks have been utilized to replace vegetable oils in order to improve the economic feasibility of biodiesel. The esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) on Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) with methanol using solid catalyst generated from bagasse fly ash is a promising method to convert FFA into biodiesel. In this research, the esterification of FFA on PFAD using the sulfonated bagasse fly ash catalyst was studied. The performances of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of the reaction temperatures, the molar ratios of methanol to PFAD, and the catalyst loading. The effects of the mass ratio of catalyst to oil (1-10%), the molar ratio of methanol to oil (6:1-12:1), and the reaction temperature (40-60°C) were studied for the conversion of PFAD to optimize the reaction conditions. The results showed that the optimum conditions were methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 12:1, the amount of catalyst of 10%wt. of PFAD, and reaction temperature of 6°C. The reusability of the solid acid carbon catalysts was also studied in this work. The catalytic activity decreased up to 38% after third cycle. The significant decline in catalyst esterification activity was due to acid site leaching. The physico-characteristics and acid site densities were analyzed by Nitrogen gas adsorption, surface functional groups by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis using X-ray fluorescent (XRF), and acid-base back titration methods for determination of acid density.

  12. When acid-base titrations are carried out in unusual conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico De Marco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncommon aspects in acid-base titrations are presented, which occur in titrations between both mono- and/or poly-functional acid and bases but are rarely introduced in ordinary analytical chemistry courses.

  13. Going Beyond, Going Further: The Preparation of Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a simple technique for generating mechanically plotted acid-base titration curves. The method is suitable for second-year high school chemistry students. (JN)

  14. A mathematical model of pH, based on the total stoichiometric concentration of acids, bases and ampholytes dissolved in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioni, Roberto; Mioni, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    In chemistry and in acid-base physiology, the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation plays a pivotal role in studying the behaviour of the buffer solutions. However, it seems that the general function to calculate the valence of acids, bases and ampholytes, N = f(pH), at any pH, has only been provided by Kildeberg. This equation can be applied to strong acids and bases, pluriprotic weak acids, bases and ampholytes, with an arbitrary number of acid strength constants, pKA, including water. By differentiating this function with respect to pH, we obtain the general equation for the buffer value. In addition, by integrating the titration curve, TA, proposed by Kildeberg, and calculating its Legendre transform, we obtain the Gibbs free energy of pH (or pOH)-dependent titratable acid. Starting from the law of electroneutrality and applying suitable simplifications, it is possible to calculate the pH of the buffer solutions by numerical methods, available in software packages such as Excel. The concept of buffer capacity has also been clarified by Urbansky, but, at variance with our approach, not in an organic manner. In fact, for each set of monobasic, dibasic, tribasic acids, etc., various equations are presented which independently fit each individual acid-base category. Consequently, with the increase in acid groups (pKA), the equations become more and more difficult, both in practice and in theory. Some examples are proposed to highlight the boundary that exists between acid-base physiology and the thermodynamic concepts of energy, chemical potential, amount of substance and acid resistance.

  15. Complexity in Acid?Base Titrations: Multimer Formation Between Phosphoric Acids and Imines

    OpenAIRE

    Malm, Christian; Kim, Heejae; Wagner, Manfred; Hunger, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Solutions of Br?nsted acids with bases in aprotic solvents are not only common model systems to study the fundamentals of proton transfer pathways but are also highly relevant to Br?nsted acid catalysis. Despite their importance the light nature of the proton makes characterization of acid?base aggregates challenging. Here, we track such acid?base interactions over a broad range of relative compositions between diphenyl phosphoric acid and the base quinaldine in dichloromethane, by u...

  16. Amino acid-based dithiazines: synthesis and photofragmentation of their benzaldehyde adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurchan, Alexei N; Kutateladze, Andrei G

    2002-11-14

    Alpha-amino acids and GABA are functionalized with dithiazine rings via reaction with sodium hydrosulfide in aqueous formaldehyde. The resulting dithiazines are lithiated at -78 degrees C and reacted with benzaldehyde furnishing amino acid-based 2,5-bis-substituted dithiazines. These adducts undergo externally sensitized photofragmentation with quantum efficiency comparable to that of the parent dithiane adducts, thus offering a novel approach to amino acid-based photolabile tethers. [reaction: see text

  17. Respiratory Adaptations in Acid-base Disturbances: Role of Cerebral Fluids,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-19

    The respiratory and metabolic components of acid-base homeostasis are defined. A quantitative empirical description of the (incomplete) mutual...literature. Respiratory adaptations in steady acid-base disturbances of metabolic origin (hyperventilation with hypocapnia in primary metabolic acidosis, and...hypoventilation with hypercapnia in metabolic alkalosis ) are analyzed as a function of the acidity of the cerebral fluids (cerebrospinal and cerebral interstitial fluid). (Author)

  18. A Clinical Approach to the Diagnosis of Acid-Base Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bear, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to diagnose and manage acid-base disorders rapidly and effectively is essential to the care of critically ill patients. This article presents an approach to the diagnosis of pure and mixed acid-base disorders, metabolic or respiratory. The approach taken is based on using the law of mass-action equation as it applies to the bicarbonate buffer system (Henderson equation), using sub-classifications for diagnostic purposes of causes of metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis, and ...

  19. Atomic-Level Organization of Vicinal Acid-Base Pairs through the Chemisorption of Aniline and Derivatives onto Mesoporous SBA15

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-06-09

    The design of novel heterogeneous catalysts with multiple adjacent functionalities is of high interest for heterogeneous catalysis. Herein, we report a method to obtain a majority bifunctional acid-base pairs on SBA15. Aniline reacts with SBA15 by opening siloxane bridges leading to N-phenylsilanamine-silanol pairs. In contrast with ammonia treated surfaces, the material is stable under air/moisture. Advanced solid state MAS NMR: 2D ¹H-¹H double-quantum, ¹H-¹³C HETCOR experiments and dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced ²⁹Si and ¹⁵N spectra demonstrate both the close proximity between the two moieties and the formation of a covalent Si-N surface bond and confirm the design of vicinal acid-base pairs. This approach was successfully applied to the design of a series of aniline derivatives bifunctional SBA15. A correlation of the substituents effects on the aromatic ring (Hammet parameters) on the kinetics of the model reaction of Knoevenagel is observed.

  20. Influence of different storage times and temperatures on blood gas and acid-base balance in ovine venous blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effects of storage temperature and time on blood gas and acid-base balance of ovine venous blood. Ten clinically healthy sheep were used in this study. A total number of 30 blood samples, were divided into three different groups, and were stored in a refrigerator adjusted to +4 ºC (Group I, n = 10, at RT of about 22-25 ºC (Group II, n = 10 and in an incubator adjusted to 37 ºC (Group III, n = 10 for up to 48 h. Blood samples were analysed for blood gas and acid-base indices at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of storage. In comparison to the baseline value (0, there were significant decreases of blood pH of samples stored at RT and in the incubator after 1 h (p<0.05, the pH value of refrigerated blood samples exhibited insignificant changes during the study (p<0.05. Mean values of pCO2 showed a significant increase in Group I and Group III after 1 h then a progressive decrease after 12 h in all Groups. Mean pO2 values were significantly higher for Group I after 2 h and for Groups II and III after 1 h (p<0.05. In general, base excess decreased significantly for all the groups during the study especially in Groups II and III. In comparison with baseline values, in all groups, bicarbonate (HCO3 increased between 1 h and 6 h (p<0.05, and later decreased at the end of the study (p<0.05. In conclusion, status of acid-base indices of the samples stored at refrigerator and RT were found within normal reference range and it may be of clinical diagnostic use for up to 6 h.

  1. Selective deposition of catalyst nanoparticles using the gravitational force for carbon nanotubes interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do-Yoon; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Hak; Park, Jae-Hong; Alegaonkar, Prashant S. [Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composites, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ji-Beom [Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composites, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jbyoo@skku.ac.kr; Han, In-Taek; Kim, Ha-Jin; Jin, Yong-Wan; Kim, Jong-Min [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Mt. 14-1, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Younggin-si Gyunggi-do, 449-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kee-Won [Department of Semiconducting System, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-01

    The photolithography process has generally been used for the making of catalyst layers used for the synthesis of CNTs due to its comparative ease. However, this method results in the formation of undesirable catalyst particles, which deteriorate the quality of the devices. Therefore, we tried to form a catalyst layer without using any lift-off or wet etching process, especially for the formation of carbon nanotube interconnects. After spin coating the samples, which were previously fabricated with several vias, with an iron-acetate solution, the catalyst layer was pulled down into the bottom of the holes through the force of gravity. We were able to remove the catalyst layer which was coated over undesirable areas, by TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}OH) treatment. After the catalyst deposition process, we synthesized CNTs and observed them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  2. Recent progress of ordered mesoporous silica-supported chiral metallic catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Rui

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently,ordered silica-based mesoporous chiral organometallics-functionalized heterogeneous catalysts have attracted extensive research interest due to their excellent properties,such as easy preparation,high activity and convenient recycle.This review mainly summarizesthe generally prepared strategy and the silica-based organometallics-functionalized heterogeneous catalysts reported in the literatures.

  3. Cobalt supported on carbon nanofibers as catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, G.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts synthesis gas (H2/CO) over a heterogeneous catalyst into hydrocarbons. Generally, cobalt catalysts supported on oxidic carriers are used for the FT process, however it appears to be difficult to obtain and maintain fully reduced cobalt particles. To overcome

  4. Quantitative acid-base physiology using the Stewart model. Does it improve our understanding of what is really wrong?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R.; Scheffer, G.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2006-01-01

    Traditional theories of acid-base balance are based on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation to calculate proton concentration. The recent revival of quantitative acid-base physiology using the Stewart model has increased our understanding of complicated acid-base disorders, but has also led to several

  5. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Thermal and Electrical Investigation of Conductive Polylactic Acid Based Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, R. A.; Marcu, A. E.; Drumea, A.; Vlădescu, M.

    2018-06-01

    Printed electronics gain momentum as the involved technologies become affordable. The ability to shape electrostatic dissipative materials in almost any form is useful. The idea to use a general-purpose 3D printer to manufacture the electrical interconnections for a circuit is very attractive. The advantage of using a 3D printed structure over other technologies are mainly the lower price, less requirements concerning storage and use conditions, and the capability to build thicker traces while maintaining flexibility. The main element allowing this to happen is a printing filament with conductive properties. The paper shows the experiments that were performed to determine the thermal and electrical properties of polylactic acid (PLA) based ESD dissipative filament. Quantitative results regarding the thermal behavior of the DC resistance and the variation of the equivalent parallel impedance model parameters (losses resistance, capacitance, impedance magnitude and phase angle) with frequency are shown.. Using these results, new applications like printed temperature sensors can be imagined.

  7. The possibility of determining the activity coefficients of individual ions from acid-base titration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jano, I.; Hardcastle, J. E.

    1998-07-01

    A method is described for obtaining the activity coefficients of individual ions from experimental titration data. For this purpose, a general polyprotic acid-base-titration-curve equation is derived. The equation allows obtaining the dissociation equilibrium constants of the acid and the ratio of the activity coefficient of each ion to the activity coefficient of the undissociated acid directly from the titration data. Results obtained are compared with coefficients calculated using Debye-Hückel equation. A general equation relating the ionic strength to the pH of the titration medium is also established. Une méthode pour l'obtention des coefficients d'activité des ions individuels à partir des données expérimentales de titrage est établie. À ce but, une équation générale est dérivée pour représenter la courbe de titrage d'un acide avec une base. Cette équation permet d'obtenir les constants d'équilibre de dissociation de l'acide et le rapport de coefficient d'activité de chaque ion au coefficient d'activité de l'acide non-dissocié à partir des données de titrage. Les résultats ainsi obtenus sont comparés avec les coefficients calculés à l'aide de l'équation de Debye-Hückel. Une équation liant la force ionique au pH du milieu est établie aussi.

  8. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  9. Deactivation and regeneration of refinery catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1979-08-01

    A discussion covers the mechanisms of catalyst aging, poisoning, coke deposition, and metals deposition; feedstock pretreatment to extend catalyst life; the effects of operating conditions; the effects of catalyst composition and structure on its stability; nonchemical deactivation processes; and methods of catalyst regeneration, including coke burn-off and solvent extraction.

  10. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  11. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  12. A Comparative Study of Basic, Amphoteric, and Acidic Catalysts in the Oxidative Coupling of Methanol and Ethanol for Acrolein Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilić, Aleksandra; Wei, Tiantian; Bennici, Simona; Devaux, Jean-François; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Auroux, Aline

    2017-09-11

    The impact of acid/base properties (determined by adsorption microcalorimetry) of various catalysts on the cross-aldolization of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde leading to acrolein was methodically studied in oxidizing conditions starting from a mixture of methanol and ethanol. The aldol condensation and further dehydration to acrolein were carried out on catalysts presenting various acid/base properties (MgO, Mg-Al oxides, Mg/SiO 2 , NbP, and heteropolyanions on silica, HPA/SiO 2 ). Thermodynamic calculations revealed that cross-aldolization is always favored compared with self-aldolization of acetaldehyde, which leads to crotonaldehyde formation. The presence of strong basic sites is shown to be necessary, but a too high amount drastically increases CO x production. On strong acid sites, production of acrolein and carbon oxides (CO x ) does not increase with temperature. The optimal catalyst for this process should be amphoteric with a balanced acid/base cooperation of medium strength sites and a small amount (150 kJ mol -1 ). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Overcoming the Instability of Nanoparticle-Based Catalyst Films in Alkaline Electrolyzers by using Self-Assembling and Self-Healing Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barwe, Stefan; Masa, Justus; Andronescu, Corina; Mei, Bastian; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Ventosa, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    Engineering stable electrodes using highly active catalyst nanopowders for electrochemical water splitting remains a challenge. We report an innovative and general approach for attaining highly stable catalyst films with self-healing capability based on the in situ self-assembly of catalyst

  14. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinjoh, Hirohumi

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of inclusion of rare earth metals in automotive catalysts are discussed

  15. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds derived from cellulose, hemicelluloses, and woody biomass extractives. Since gold catalysts possess high stability under oxidative conditions, selective oxidation reactions were discussed more thoroughly than other critical reactions such as partial hydrogenation, acetalization, and isomerization. The influence of reaction conditions, the role of the catalyst, and the advantages and disadvantages of using gold are pre...

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of zirconia based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillot, T.; Salama, Z.; Chanut, N.; Cadete Santos Aires, F. J.; Bennici, S.; Auroux, A.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, three equimolar mixed oxides ZrO2/CeO2, ZrO2/TiO2, ZrO2/La2O3 and a reference ZrO2 have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. The structural and surface properties of these materials have been fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, surface area measurement, chemical analysis, XPS, infrared spectroscopy after adsorption of pyridine and adsorption microcalorimetry of NH3 and SO2 probe molecules. All investigated mixed oxides are amphoteric and possess redox centers on their surface. Moreover, hydrothermal synthesis leads to catalysts with higher surface area and with better acid-base properties than classical coprecipitation method. Both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites are present on the surface of the mixed oxides. Compared to the other samples, the ZrO2/TiO2 material appears to be the best candidate for further application in acid-base catalysis.

  17. Complexity in Acid-Base Titrations: Multimer Formation Between Phosphoric Acids and Imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christian; Kim, Heejae; Wagner, Manfred; Hunger, Johannes

    2017-08-10

    Solutions of Brønsted acids with bases in aprotic solvents are not only common model systems to study the fundamentals of proton transfer pathways but are also highly relevant to Brønsted acid catalysis. Despite their importance the light nature of the proton makes characterization of acid-base aggregates challenging. Here, we track such acid-base interactions over a broad range of relative compositions between diphenyl phosphoric acid and the base quinaldine in dichloromethane, by using a combination of dielectric relaxation and NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to what one would expect for an acid-base titration, we find strong deviations from quantitative proton transfer from the acid to the base. Even for an excess of the base, multimers consisting of one base and at least two acid molecules are formed, in addition to the occurrence of proton transfer from the acid to the base and simultaneous formation of ion pairs. For equimolar mixtures such multimers constitute about one third of all intermolecular aggregates. Quantitative analysis of our results shows that the acid-base association constant is only around six times larger than that for the acid binding to an acid-base dimer, that is, to an already protonated base. Our findings have implications for the interpretation of previous studies of reactive intermediates in organocatalysis and provide a rationale for previously observed nonlinear effects in phosphoric acid catalysis. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  18. Electrolyte and Acid-Base Disturbances in End-Stage Liver Disease: A Physiopathological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José Víctor; Carrillo-Pérez, Diego Luis; Rosado-Canto, Rodrigo; García-Juárez, Ignacio; Torre, Aldo; Kershenobich, David; Carrillo-Maravilla, Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    Electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are frequent in patients with end-stage liver disease; the underlying physiopathological mechanisms are often complex and represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the physician. Usually, these disorders do not develop in compensated cirrhotic patients, but with the onset of the classic complications of cirrhosis such as ascites, renal failure, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and variceal bleeding, multiple electrolyte, and acid-base disturbances emerge. Hyponatremia parallels ascites formation and is a well-known trigger of hepatic encephalopathy; its management in this particular population poses a risky challenge due to the high susceptibility of cirrhotic patients to osmotic demyelination. Hypokalemia is common in the setting of cirrhosis: multiple potassium wasting mechanisms both inherent to the disease and resulting from its management make these patients particularly susceptible to potassium depletion even in the setting of normokalemia. Acid-base disturbances range from classical respiratory alkalosis to high anion gap metabolic acidosis, almost comprising the full acid-base spectrum. Because most electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are managed in terms of their underlying trigger factors, a systematic physiopathological approach to their diagnosis and treatment is required.

  19. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  20. Neonatal Acid-Base Status in Fetuses with Abnormal Vertebro- and Cerebro-Placental Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Roselló, José; Khalil, Asma; Ferri-Folch, Blanca; Perales-Marín, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    A low cerebro-placental ratio (CPR) at term suggests the existence of failure to reach growth potential (FRGP) with a higher risk of poor neonatal acid-base status. This study aimed to evaluate whether similar findings were also seen in the vertebral artery (vertebro-placental ratio, VPR), supplying 30% of the cerebral flow. We studied term fetuses classified into groups according to birth weight (BW), CPR and VPR. BW was expressed in centiles and ratios in multiples of the median (MoM). Subsequently, associations with neonatal pH values were evaluated by means of regression curves and Mann-Whitney tests. VPR MoM correlated with BW centiles (p < 0.0001, R2 = 0.042) and its distribution resembled that of CPR MoM (p < 0.001). When both arteries were compared, adequate-for-gestational-age (AGA) fetuses with either low CPR or low VPR had lower neonatal venous pH values (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively). However, in case of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) fetuses, only those with low VPR had significantly lower neonatal arterial and venous pH values (p < 0.05). Blood flow in the vertebral artery mimics that in the middle cerebral artery supporting the FRGP model. Both CPR and VPR identify AGA fetuses with lower neonatal pH values, but only VPR identifies SGA with lower pH values. Hypoxemia might be reflected as a generalized cerebral vasodilation demonstrated as low CPR and VPR.

  1. Delayed Awakening from Anesthesia Following Electrolyte and Acid-Base Disorders, Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Delayed awakening from anesthesia remains one of the biggest challenges that involve anesthesiologists. Most commonly, delayed awakening is due to drugs effects persistence. Metabolic (like hypo- hyperglycemia, electrolyte, acid-base disorders and hypothermia may cause delayed emergence from anesthesia. Structural disorders of cerebral nervous system (like increase in intracranial pressure, brain ischemia and psychological disorders can be regarded as other uncommon causes of this condition. Hypokalemia is induced by low potassium intake, excessive excretion from gastrointestinal (GI and kidneys (like using diuretics or a shift from extracellular space into intracellular space. Cases:  In these two reported cases, although proper measures had been taken to reverse the effects of anesthetic drugs, the patients did not regain their consciousness as fast as expected. The only significant finding in postoperative tests, along with respiratory alkalosis, was low serum potassium level (K=2.5 and K=2.9 in the first and the second patients, respectively. Correction of serum potassium (to K=3.3 and K=3.2 in the first and the second, respectively improved patients level of consciousness, and they were discharged from intensive care unit (ICU with good general condition. Conclusion: During surgery; pain, stress, sympathetic increase, catecholamine release and the consequent β-stimulation, certain drugs, and respiratory alkalosis due to hyperventilation may cause acute shift of potassium into the cells, which will be intensified in the patients with preoperative hypokalemia. Hypokalemia induces consciousness impairment and increases muscle relaxation, both of which affect patient awakening. Serum potassium evaluation is recommended in cases of delayed emergence from anesthesia.

  2. Cirrus cloud mimic surfaces in the laboratory: organic acids, bases and NOx heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodeau, J.; Oriordan, B.

    2003-04-01

    CIRRUS CLOUD MIMIC SURFACES IN THE LABORATORY:ORGANIC ACIDS, BASES AND NOX HETEROGENEOUS REACTIONS. B. ORiordan, J. Sodeau Department of Chemistry and Environment Research Institute, University College Cork, Ireland j.sodeau@ucc.ie /Fax: +353-21-4902680 There are a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources for the simple carboxylic acids to be found in the troposphere giving rise to levels as high as 45 ppb in certain urban areas. In this regard it is of note that ants of genus Formica produce some 10Tg of formic acid each year; some ten times that produced by industry. The expected sinks are those generally associated with tropospheric chemistry: the major routes studied, to date, being wet and dry deposition. No studies have been carried out hitherto on the role of water-ice surfaces in the atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids and the purpose of this paper is to indicate their potential function in the heterogeneous release of atmospheric species such as HONO. The deposition of formic acid on a water-ice surface was studied using FT-RAIR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures between 100 and 165K. In all cases ionization to the formate (and oxonium) ions was observed. The results were confirmed by TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) measurements, which indicated that two distinct surface species adsorb to the ice. Potential reactions between the formic acid/formate ion surface and nitrogen dioxide were subsequently investigated by FT-RAIRS. Co-deposition experiments showed that N2O3 and the NO+ ion (associated with water) were formed as products. A mechanism is proposed to explain these results, which involves direct reaction between the organic acid and nitrogen dioxide. Similar experiments involving acetic acid also indicate ionization on a water-ice surface. The results are put into the context of atmospheric chemistry potentially occuring on cirrus cloud surfaces.

  3. Suitability of some promising soot combustion catalysts for application in diesel exhaust treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badini, Claudio; Saracco, Guido; Serra, Valentina; Specchia, Vito [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24-10129 Torino (Italy)

    1998-09-21

    In this work, the effect of thermal treatment at 380C and 600C, under gaseous atmospheres containing some typical components of diesel emissions (SO{sub 2} and water), was studied on some promising catalysts for diesel particulate combustion. In particular, the ageing behaviour of two novel catalysts (based on CsVO{sub 3}+KCl and KVO{sub 3}+KCl, respectively) and of a more widely studied Cu-K-V-Cl catalyst was investigated. The catalytic activities of these novel catalysts were lower than that of the Cu-K-V-Cl one, but, contrary to this last counterpart, they almost completely maintained their activity during ageing treatments in dry or humid air at 380C and 600C, respectively. Moreover, after prolonged thermal exposure in wet air, the activity of the Cu-K-V-Cl catalyst became comparable with that of the CsVO{sub 3}+KCl one, while remaining still slightly higher than that of the KVO{sub 3}+KCl catalyst. The thermal treatments of all the catalysts under investigation in an atmosphere containing SO{sub 2} did not cause an activity decrease. X-ray diffraction analyses showed the formation of new phases (sulphates and vanadates with a K/V ratio different from that of metavanadates) which could also improve the catalytic activity, counterbalancing the loss of active components due to evaporation at high temperatures. Furthermore, the catalyst activity was evaluated after employing repeatedly these catalysts in carbon combustion. The catalytic activities were generally slightly lowered by the repeated use, even though, from this viewpoint, that of Cu-K-V-Cl was more affected than those of the other catalysts. On the basis of the obtained results the CsVO{sub 3}+KCl catalyst was found to allow the best compromise between satisfactory catalyst activity and stability

  4. Effect of acute acid loading on acid-base and calcium metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acid-base and calcium metabolic responses to acute non-carbonic acid loading in idiopathic calcium stone-formers and healthy males using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h ammonium chloride loading studies were performed in 12...... male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone-formers and 12 matched healthy men using a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Arterialized capillary blood, serum and urine were collected hourly for measurement of electrolytes, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and acid-base...... status. Concentrations of non-metabolizable base (NB) and acid (NA) were calculated from measured concentrations of non-metabolizable ions. RESULTS: The extracellular acid-base status in the stone-formers during basal conditions and acid loading was comparable to the levels in the healthy controls...

  5. Potentiometric Measurement of Transition Ranges and Titration Errors for Acid/Base Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Paul A.

    1997-07-01

    Sophomore analytical chemistry courses typically devote a substantial amount of lecture time to acid/base equilibrium theory, and usually include at least one laboratory project employing potentiometric titrations. In an effort to provide students a laboratory experience that more directly supports their classroom discussions on this important topic, an experiment involving potentiometric measurement of transition ranges and titration errors for common acid/base indicators has been developed. The pH and visually-assessed color of a millimolar strong acid/base system are monitored as a function of added titrant volume, and the resultant data plotted to permit determination of the indicator's transition range and associated titration error. Student response is typically quite positive, and the measured quantities correlate reasonably well to literature values.

  6. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  7. Hydroprocessing catalysts utilization and regeneration schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    The catalyst reactor inventory represents an important part of the cost of hydroprocessing operation. The selection of a suitable catalyst and reactor is influenced by feedstock properties. Processes ensuring an uninterrupted operation during catalyst addition and withdrawal are preferred for processing high asphaltene and metal content feedstocks. The spent catalyst can be regenerated and returned to the operation if the extent of its deactivation is not high. The regeneration may be performed either in-situ or off-site. The former is suitable for fixed bed reactors whereas the catalyst from ebullated bed reactors must be regenerated off-site. The regeneration of spent catalysts heavily loaded with metals such as V, Ni and Fe may not be economic. Such catalysts may be suitable for metal reclamation. An environmentally safe method for catalyst disposal must be found if neither regeneration nor metal reclamation from spent catalysts can be performed.

  8. Acid-Base Properties of Azo Dyes in Solution Studied Using Spectrophotometry and Colorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigur, D. V.; Chebotarev, A. N.; Bevziuk, K. V.

    2018-03-01

    Colorimetry and spectrophotometry with chemometric data processing were used to study the acid-base properties of azo dyes in aqueous solution. The capabilities of both methods were compared. Ionization constants of all the functional groups of the azo compounds studied could be determined relative to the change in the specific color difference depending on the acidity of the medium. The colorimetric functions of ion-molecular forms of azo compounds used as an analytical signal allow us to obtain complete information on the acid-base equilibrium in a wide acidity range.

  9. Design, synthesis and structure of new potential electrochemically active boronic acid-based glucose sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.; Søtofte, Inger

    2002-01-01

    In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report the synthe......In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report...

  10. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  11. Acid-base safety during the course of a very low-calorie-ketogenic diet

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Arbelaez, Diego; Crujeiras, Ana B.; Castro, Ana I.; Goday Arno, Alberto; Mas-Lorenzo, Antonio; Bellon, Ana; Tejera, Cristina; Bellido, Diego; Galban, Cristobal; Sajoux, Ignacio; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Casanueva, Felipe F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Very low-calorie ketogenic (VLCK) diets have been consistently shown to be an effective obesity treatment, but the current evidence for its acid-base safety is limited. The aim of the current work was to evaluate the acid-base status of obese patients during the course of a VLCK diet. METHOD: Twenty obese participants undertook a VLCK diet for 4 months. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters, and venous blood gases were obtained on four subsequent visits: visit C-1 (ba...

  12. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A. Batt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform.

  13. Acid-base status after whole-body irradiation in dairy cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, M.; Koch, F.; Dyrba, W.; Kirbach, M.

    1989-01-01

    Whole-body irradiation using 9 MeV X-rays of a linear accelerator of 10 clinically healthy lactating cows aged between 3.5 and 8 years produced an acute radiation syndrome in the LD 100/30 range. Blood analysis 1 day after irradiation showed a compensated metabolic acidosis with a low renal net acid-base excretion and hyerphosphaturia. Later the acid-base status indicated a differently marked metabolic alkalosis. In the main reaction period acidotic disturbances occurred, which partially were camouflaged by respiratory alkalosis. (author)

  14. [Disorders of the acid-base balance and the anion gap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Martin; Alscher, Mark Dominik

    2016-10-01

    The regulation of the acid-base balance and pH is critical for the organism. The most important buffer system is CO 2 / HCO 3 - . The kidney controls systemic bicarbonate and therefore the metabolic regulation and the lung is relevant for respiratory regulation by an effective CO 2 elimination. There are four acid-base disorders with two metabolic and two respiratory disorders (acidosis and alkalosis). The anion gap enables a further workup of metabolic acidosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Essentials in the diagnosis of acid-base disorders and their high altitude application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulev, P E; Zubieta-Calleja, G R

    2005-09-01

    This report describes the historical development in the clinical application of chemical variables for the interpretation of acid-base disturbances. The pH concept was already introduced in 1909. Following World War II, disagreements concerning the definition of acids and bases occurred, and since then two strategies have been competing. Danish scientists in 1923 defined an acid as a substance able to give off a proton at a given pH, and a base as a substance that could bind a proton, whereas the North American Singer-Hasting school in 1948 defined acids as strong non-buffer anions and bases as non-buffer cations. As a consequence of this last definition, electrolyte disturbances were mixed up with real acid-base disorders and the variable, strong ion difference (SID), was introduced as a measure of non-respiratory acid-base disturbances. However, the SID concept is only an empirical approximation. In contrast, the Astrup/Siggaard-Andersen school of scientists, using computer strategies and the Acid-base Chart, has made diagnosis of acid-base disorders possible at a glance on the Chart, when the data are considered in context with the clinical development. Siggaard-Andersen introduced Base Excess (BE) or Standard Base Excess (SBE) in the extracellular fluid volume (ECF), extended to include the red cell volume (eECF), as a measure of metabolic acid-base disturbances and recently replaced it by the term Concentration of Titratable Hydrogen Ion (ctH). These two concepts (SBE and ctH) represent the same concentration difference, but with opposite signs. Three charts modified from the Siggaard-Andersen Acid-Base Chart are presented for use at low, medium and high altitudes of 2500 m, 3500 m, and 4000 m, respectively. In this context, the authors suggest the use of Titratable Hydrogen Ion concentration Difference (THID) in the extended extracellular fluid volume, finding it efficient and better than any other determination of the metabolic component in acid-base

  16. Studies on recycling and utilization of spent catalysts. Preparation of active hydrodemetallization catalyst compositions from spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, Meena; Stanislaus, Antony [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, Safat (Kuwait)

    2007-02-15

    Spent catalysts form a major source of solid wastes in the petroleum refining industries. Due to environmental concerns, increasing emphasis has been placed on the development of recycling processes for the waste catalyst materials as much as possible. In the present study the potential reuse of spent catalysts in the preparation of active new catalysts for residual oil hydrotreating was examined. A series of catalysts were prepared by mixing and extruding spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts that contained C, V, Mo, Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with boehmite in different proportions. All prepared catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis and by surface area, pore volume, pore size and crushing strength measurements. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) activities of the catalysts were evaluated by testing in a high pressure fixed-bed microreactor unit using Kuwait atmospheric residue as feed. A commercial HDM catalyst was also tested under similar operating conditions and their HDS and HDM activities were compared with that of the prepared catalysts. The results revealed that catalyst prepared with addition of up to 40 wt% spent catalyst to boehmite had fairly high surface area and pore volume together with large pores. The catalyst prepared by mixing and extruding about 40 wt% spent catalyst with boehmite was relatively more active for promoting HDM and HDS reactions than a reference commercial HDM catalyst. The formation of some kind of new active sites from the metals (V, Mo and Ni) present in the spent catalyst is suggested to be responsible for the high HDM activity of the prepared catalyst. (author)

  17. Laser Ablation Increases PEM/Catalyst Interfacial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; Yalisove, Steve

    2009-01-01

    An investigational method of improving the performance of a fuel cell that contains a polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) is based on the concept of roughening the surface of the PEM, prior to deposition of a thin layer of catalyst, in order to increase the PEM/catalyst interfacial area and thereby increase the degree of utilization of the catalyst. The roughening is done by means of laser ablation under carefully controlled conditions. Next, the roughened membrane surface is coated with the thin layer of catalyst (which is typically platinum), then sandwiched between two electrode/catalyst structures to form a membrane/ele c t - rode assembly. The feasibility of the roughening technique was demonstrated in experiments in which proton-conducting membranes made of a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, protonconducting polymer were ablated by use of femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that when proper combinations of the pulse intensity, pulse-repetition rate, and number of repetitions was chosen, the initially flat, smooth membrane surfaces became roughened to such an extent as to be converted to networks of nodules interconnected by filaments (see Figure 1). In further experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on a pristine (smooth) membrane and on two laser-roughened membranes after the membranes were coated with platinum on both sides. Some preliminary EIS data were interpreted as showing that notwithstanding the potential for laser-induced damage, the bulk conductivities of the membranes were not diminished in the roughening process. Other preliminary EIS data (see Figure 2) were interpreted as signifying that the surface areas of the laser-roughened membranes were significantly greater than those of the smooth membrane. Moreover, elemental analyses showed that the sulfur-containing molecular groups necessary for proton conduction remained intact, even near the laser-roughened surfaces. These preliminary results can be taken

  18. In silico search for novel methane steam reforming catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yue; Lausche, Adam C; Khan, Tuhin S; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix; Nørskov, Jens K; Bligaard, Thomas; Wang, Shengguang

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a method for screening transition metal and metal alloy catalysts based on their predicted rates and stabilities for a given catalytic reaction. This method involves combining reaction and activation energies (available to the public via a web-based application ‘CatApp’) with a microkinetic modeling technique to predict the rates and selectivities of a prospective material. This paper illustrates this screening technique using the steam reforming of methane to carbon monoxide and hydrogen as a test reaction. While catalysts are already commercially available for this process, the method demonstrated in this paper is very general and could be applied to a wide range of catalytic reactions. Following the steps outlined herein, such an analysis could potentially enable researchers to understand reaction mechanisms on a fundamental level and, on this basis, develop leads for new metal alloy catalysts. (paper)

  19. Bimetallic Catalysts Containing Gold and Palladium for Environmentally Important Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alshammari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Supported bimetallic nanoparticles (SBN are extensively used as efficient redox catalysts. This kind of catalysis particularly using SBN has attracted immense research interest compared to their parent metals due to their unique physico-chemical properties. The primary objective of this contribution is to provide comprehensive overview about SBN and their application as promising catalysts. The present review contains four sections in total. Section 1 starts with a general introduction, recent progress, and brief summary of the application of SBN as promising catalysts for different applications. Section 2 reviews the preparation and characterization methods of SBN for a wide range of catalytic reactions. Section 3 concentrates on our own results related to the application of SBN in heterogeneous catalysis. In this section, the oxidation of cyclohexane to adipic acid (an eco-friendly and novel approach will be discussed. In addition, the application of bimetallic Pd catalysts for vapor phase toluene acetoxylation in a fixed bed reactor will also be highlighted. Acetoxylation of toluene to benzyl acetate is another green route to synthesize benzyl acetate in one step. Finally, Section 4 describes the summary of the main points and also presents an outlook on the application of SBN as promising catalysts for the production of valuable products.

  20. Direct conversion of cellulose to glycolic acid with a phosphomolybdic acid catalyst in a water medium

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2012-08-03

    Direct conversion of cellulose to fine chemicals has rarely been achieved. We describe here an eco-benign route for directly converting various cellulose-based biomasses to glycolic acid in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere in which heteromolybdic acids act as multifunctional catalysts to catalyze the hydrolysis of cellulose, the fragmentation of monosaccharides, and the selective oxidation of fragmentation products. With commercial α-cellulose powder as the substrate, the yield of glycolic acid reaches 49.3%. This catalytic system is also effective with raw cellulosic biomass, such as bagasse or hay, as the starting materials, giving rise to remarkable glycolic acid yields of ∼30%. Our heteropoly acid-based catalyst can be recovered in solid form after reaction by distilling out the products and solvent for reuse, and it exhibits consistently high performance in multiple reaction runs. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare

  2. The determination of acid-base properties of polymer surfaces by XPS: Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehimi, M.M.; Delamar, M.; Shahidzadeh-Ahmadi, N.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.; Amouroux, J.; Watts, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    The use of the molecular probe technique in conjunction with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the assessment of acid-base properties of polymer surfaces is reviewed. The method is based on the determination of the concentration and chemical shifts of Lewis acids (bases) sorbed in polymers of basic (acidic) character. In the case of chloroform (Lewis acid) sorbed in polymers of Lewis basic character, C12p binding energy is linearly correlated with ΔH AB , the heat of acid-base complex formation chloroform-polymer. This relationship has been used to determine the acid-base properties of poly(phenylene oxide), a homopolymer, and ammonia plasma-treated polypropylene. This work shows that XPS can now indeed be used to quantitatively assess the acid-base properties of modified polymer surfaces and perhaps be extended to map acid-base properties of polymer surfaces at the micron or submicron scale. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Prepared by Solvent-Deficient Precipitation (SDP: Effects of Washing, Promoter Addition Step, and Drying Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M. Brunner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel, solvent-deficient precipitation (SDP method for catalyst preparation in general and for preparation of iron FT catalysts in particular is reported. Eight catalysts using a 23 factorial design of experiments to identify the key preparation variables were prepared. The catalysts were characterized by electron microprobe, N2 adsorption, TEM, XRD, and ICP. Results show that the morphology of the catalysts, i.e., surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, crystallite sizes, and promoter distribution are significantly influenced by (1 whether or not the precursor catalyst is washed, (2 the promoter addition step, and (3 the drying condition (temperature. Consequently, the activity, selectivity, and stability of the catalysts determined from fixed-bed testing are also affected by these three variables. Unwashed catalysts prepared by a one-step method and dried at 100 °C produced the most active catalysts for FT synthesis. The catalysts of this study prepared by SDP compared favorably in activity, productivity, and stability with Fe FT catalysts reported in the literature. It is believed that this facile SDP approach has promise for development of future FT catalysts, and also offers a potential alternate route for the preparation of other catalysts for various other applications.

  4. General Base-General Acid Catalysis in Human Histone Deacetylase 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Sister M Lucy; Decroos, Christophe; Lee, Matthew S; Gullett, Laura E; Bowman, Christine M; Christianson, David W; Fierke, Carol A

    2016-02-09

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate cellular processes such as differentiation and apoptosis and are targeted by anticancer therapeutics in development and in the clinic. HDAC8 is a metal-dependent class I HDAC and is proposed to use a general acid-base catalytic pair in the mechanism of amide bond hydrolysis. Here, we report site-directed mutagenesis and enzymological measurements to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of HDAC8. Specifically, we focus on the catalytic function of Y306 and the histidine-aspartate dyads H142-D176 and H143-D183. Additionally, we report X-ray crystal structures of four representative HDAC8 mutants: D176N, D176N/Y306F, D176A/Y306F, and H142A/Y306F. These structures provide a useful framework for understanding enzymological measurements. The pH dependence of kcat/KM for wild-type Co(II)-HDAC8 is bell-shaped with two pKa values of 7.4 and 10.0. The upper pKa reflects the ionization of the metal-bound water molecule and shifts to 9.1 in Zn(II)-HDAC8. The H142A mutant has activity 230-fold lower than that of wild-type HDAC8, but the pKa1 value is not altered. Y306F HDAC8 is 150-fold less active than the wild-type enzyme; crystal structures show that Y306 hydrogen bonds with the zinc-bound substrate carbonyl, poised for transition state stabilization. The H143A and H142A/H143A mutants exhibit activity that is >80000-fold lower than that of wild-type HDAC8; the buried D176N and D176A mutants have significant catalytic effects, with more subtle effects caused by D183N and D183A. These enzymological and structural studies strongly suggest that H143 functions as a single general base-general acid catalyst, while H142 remains positively charged and serves as an electrostatic catalyst for transition state stabilization.

  5. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  6. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  7. Re-Evaluation of Acid-Base Prediction Rules in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Martinu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The prediction rules for the evaluation of the acid-base status in patients with chronic respiratory acidosis, derived primarily from an experimental canine model, suggest that complete compensation should not occur. This appears to contradict frequent observations of normal or near-normal pH levels in patients with chronic hypercapnia.

  8. The Effect of Voluntary Ventilation on Acid-base Responses to a Moo Duk Tkow Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a study that investigated the acid-base and lactate reponses to voluntary integration of breathing and exercise movements during beginning level form Ki Cho I, performed at competitive intensities. Findings suggest that respiratory compensation does not occur and that respiratory acidosis may contribute to metabolic…

  9. Approach to acid-base disorders – a clinical chemistry perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Table 1. Simple acid-base disorders. Disorder. pH. pCO2. HCO3. -. Clinical examples. Respiratory acidosis ... Lactic acidosis or diabetic ketoacidosis and vomiting. Triple disorder: .... Renal tubular acidosis type 1 and 2. Ureteral diversion to ...

  10. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is an acid-base sensor in epithelial base-secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Blood acid-base regulation by specialized epithelia, such as gills and kidney, requires the ability to sense blood acid-base status. Here, we developed primary cultures of ray (Urolophus halleri) gill cells to study mechanisms for acid-base sensing without the interference of whole animal hormonal regulation. Ray gills have abundant base-secreting cells, identified by their noticeable expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), and also express the evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Exposure of cultured cells to extracellular alkalosis (pH 8.0, 40 mM HCO3 (-)) triggered VHA translocation to the cell membrane, similar to previous reports in live animals experiencing blood alkalosis. VHA translocation was dependent on sAC, as it was blocked by the sAC-specific inhibitor KH7. Ray gill base-secreting cells also express transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); however, tmAC inhibition by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine did not prevent alkalosis-dependent VHA translocation, and tmAC activation by forskolin reduced the abundance of VHA at the cell membrane. This study demonstrates that sAC is a necessary and sufficient sensor of extracellular alkalosis in ray gill base-secreting cells. In addition, this study indicates that different sources of cAMP differentially modulate cell biology. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Characterization of Brønsted acid-base complexes by ¹⁹F DOSY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hariharaputhiran; Jasperse, Craig P; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-03-20

    A (19)F DOSY protocol for the determination of formula weights for acid-base complexes in solution has been developed. (19)F internal standards were chosen and were used to evaluate the formula weights of complexes in solution using simple diffusion coefficient (D)-formula weight (FW) analysis. This method has potential applications in characterization of reactive intermediates in catalytic asymmetric reactions.

  12. Evaluation of the number of ionogenic groups of inulinase by acid-base titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, T A; Holyavka, M G; Rezvan, S G; Kozhedub, S V

    2008-06-01

    Acid base titration showed that Aspergillus awamori inulinase includes 178 asparaginic and glutamic acid residues, 20 histidine, 10 serine, and 34 lysine and tyrosine residues. Denaturation temperature for this enzyme was calculated using analysis of the proportion of stabilizing and destabilizing amino acids in the molecule.

  13. Acid-base titration curves in an integrated computer learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.; Kędzierska, E.; Rodgers, L.; Chmurska, M.

    2008-01-01

    The topic of acid-base reactions is a regular component of many chemistry curricula that requires integrated understanding of various areas of introductory chemistry. Many students have considerable difficulties understanding the concepts and processes involved. It has been suggested and confirmed

  14. Determining surface areas of marine alga cells by acid-base titration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Ma, Y; Su, Y

    1997-09-01

    A new method for determining the surface area of living marine alga cells was described. The method uses acid-base titration to measure the surface acid/base amount on the surface of alga cells and uses the BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) equation to estimate the maximum surface acid/base amount, assuming that hydrous cell walls have carbohydrates or other structural compounds which can behave like surface Brönsted acid-base sites due to coordination of environmental H2O molecules. The method was applied to 18 diverse alga species (including 7 diatoms, 2 flagellates, 8 green algae and 1 red alga) maintained in seawater cultures. For the species examined, the surface areas of individual cells ranged from 2.8 x 10(-8) m2 for Nannochloropsis oculata to 690 x 10(-8) m2 for Dunaliella viridis, specific surface areas from 1,030 m2.g-1 for Dunaliella salina to 28,900 m2.g-1 for Pyramidomonas sp. Measurement accuracy was 15.2%. Preliminary studies show that the method may be more promising and accurate than light/electron microscopic measurements for coarse estimation of the surface area of living algae.

  15. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  16. Effects of Propanidid and Thiopentone on the Acid-Base Status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of propanidid and thiopentone on the acidbase status of babies delivered by elective Caesarean section have been compared. The only significant difference between the 2 groups was the lower umbilical cord venous blood pCO) levels in the propanidid group. The acid-base status in both these groups of ...

  17. The incidence of electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities in critically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Electrolytes and acid-base disorders are common challenges seen in the intensive care unit (ICU) resulting in difficulty in weaning patients off the ventilator, prolonged admission periods, preventable cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. These require prompt lab results most of which are done serially, ...

  18. Maternal and Fetal Acid-Base Chemistry: A Major Determinant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Very small changes in pH may significantly affect the function of various fetal organ systems, such as the central nervous system, and the cardiovascular system with associated fetal distress and poor Apgar score. Review of existing data on maternal-fetal acid-base balance in pregnancy highlight the factors that are ...

  19. Lewis Acid-Base Properties of a Low Carbon Aluminium Killed Steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important factor in achieving maximum adhesion of a particular coating system to the substrate lies in the proper preparation of the substrate prior to the application of paint. The Lewis acid-base properties of the outer metal surface play a determinant role in many of these applications, and the chemical reactions involved ...

  20. Nutrient intake, acid base status and weight gain in water buffalo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of different dietary levels of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on nutrient intake, acid-base status, nitrogen balance and weight gain was examined in growing male buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves exposed to hot summer conditions. In a complete randomized block design 60 animals of similar age and weight ...

  1. 78 FR 36698 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    .... FDA-2013-N-0544] Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for... workshop, FDA agreed to consider this issue further and subsequently convened a meeting of the Microbiology... Health After considering the information discussed by the Microbiology Devices Panel during the June 29...

  2. 77 FR 16126 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    .... FDA-2012-N-0159] Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for... convened a meeting of the Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee (Microbiology Devices Panel) on June 29, 2011 (Ref. 2). Although not a formal reclassification meeting, panel...

  3. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  4. Stereoselective assembly of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Tian, Chunyong; Zhang, Yufei; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Songping; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2015-04-14

    A series of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers are fabricated through a coordination-directed assembly process. The chirality and carbon chain length of the amino acids exert a pronounced influence on the assembly process. This study may be extended to design diverse kinds of 1-D metal-biomolecule frameworks (MBioFs).

  5. Effect of acute metabolic acid/base shifts on the human airway calibre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijker, F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Heijdra, Y.F.; Bosch, F.H.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Acute metabolic alkalosis (NaHCO(3)), acidosis (NH(4)Cl), and placebo (NaCl) were induced in 15 healthy volunteers (12 females, median age 34 (range 24-56) years) in a double blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the presence of the effects on airway calibre. Acid-base shifts were determined

  6. Acid-base indicator properties of dyes from local plants I: Dyes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    Acid-base indicator properties of dyes from local plants I: Dyes from Basella alba. (Indian spinach) and ... solution, which change colour immediately after the equivalence point has .... The pH ranges over which the dyes change colour were ...

  7. Interactive Computer-Assisted Instruction in Acid-Base Physiology for Mobile Computer Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmuir, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ~20 screens of information, on the subjects…

  8. [Development and practice evaluation of blood acid-base imbalance analysis software].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Haiying; Zhou, Qiang; Peng, Shan; Jia, Hongyu; Ji, Tianxing

    2014-11-01

    To develop a blood gas, acid-base imbalance analysis computer software to diagnose systematically, rapidly, accurately and automatically determine acid-base imbalance type, and evaluate the clinical application. Using VBA programming language, a computer aided diagnostic software for the judgment of acid-base balance was developed. The clinical data of 220 patients admitted to the Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University were retrospectively analyzed. The arterial blood gas [pH value, HCO(3)(-), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO₂)] and electrolytes included data (Na⁺ and Cl⁻) were collected. Data were entered into the software for acid-base imbalances judgment. At the same time the data generation was calculated manually by H-H compensation formula for determining the type of acid-base imbalance. The consistency of judgment results from software and manual calculation was evaluated, and the judgment time of two methods was compared. The clinical diagnosis of the types of acid-base imbalance for the 220 patients: 65 cases were normal, 90 cases with simple type, mixed type in 41 cases, and triplex type in 24 cases. The accuracy of the judgment results of the normal and triplex types from computer software compared with which were calculated manually was 100%, the accuracy of the simple type judgment was 98.9% and 78.0% for the mixed type, and the total accuracy was 95.5%. The Kappa value of judgment result from software and manual judgment was 0.935, P=0.000. It was demonstrated that the consistency was very good. The time for software to determine acid-base imbalances was significantly shorter than the manual judgment (seconds:18.14 ± 3.80 vs. 43.79 ± 23.86, t=7.466, P=0.000), so the method of software was much faster than the manual method. Software judgment can replace manual judgment with the characteristics of rapid, accurate and convenient, can improve work efficiency and quality of clinical doctors and has great

  9. Recovery of vanadium (V) from used catalysts in sulfuric acid production units by oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulbaki, M.; Shino, O.

    2009-07-01

    Vanadium penta oxide (V 2 O 5 ), is used, in large quantities as a catalyst for the oxidation of SO 2 to SO 3 in sulfuric acid production units, during the oxidation process the level of the oxidation declines with the time because of catalyst poisoning. So the spent catalyst is usually through out in a specified special places by General Fertilizer Company which causes a pollution of the land. The present paper, studies the recovery of vanadium from the spent catalyst by using the oxalic acid. The optimal conditions of spent catalyst leaching have been studied. It has been shown that 2%(w/w) of oxalic acid is the most suitable for leaching process at 70 degree centigrade. The precipitation of vanadium using some alkaline media NH 4 OH has been also studied, it has been shown that ammonium hydroxide was the best at 50 degree centigrade. (author)

  10. exchanged Mg-Al hydrotalcite catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) catalysts, ... The catalyst can be easily separated by simple filtration ... surface area by the single-point N2 adsorption method ... concentration of carbonate anions (by treating the cat- .... hydrotalcite phase along with copper hydroxide and.

  11. Use of lanthanide catalysts in air electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Parente, L.T. de

    1982-01-01

    A review on the lanthanide catalysts suitable for the reduction catalysis of oxygen in air electrodes is presented. The kinds of lanthanide indicated to be used as catalysts of oxygen reduction are shown. (A.R.H.) [pt

  12. Polymer-bound rhodium hydroformylation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Tjeerd

    1992-01-01

    Homogeneous catalysts are superior in activity, selectivity as well as specificity, but heterogeneous catalyst are often preferred in industrial processes, because of their good recoverability and their applicability in continuous flow reactors. It would be of great environmental, commercial and

  13. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  14. A novel magnetically recyclable heterogeneous catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    propanesultone. 1. Introduction ... O. Scheme 2. The reaction of benzaldehyde with 1-phenyl-3- ... (2 mmol), catalyst (2 mol%, except for entries 7 and 9), room temperature. bCatalyst = 1 .... The electronic supporting information can be seen in.

  15. Rhenium Nanochemistry for Catalyst Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Kessler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, rhenium oxides and the molecules of alkyltrioxorhenium, and their insertion into porous structure of zeolites, ordered mesoporous MCM matrices, anodic mesoporous alumina, and porous transition metal oxides are considered. Structure-property relationships are traced for these catalysts in relation to such processes as alkylation and isomerization, olefin metathesis, selective oxidation of olefins, methanol to formaldehyde conversion, etc.

  16. Hydrothermal performance of catalyst supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Libera, Joseph A.; Dumesic, James A.; Pagan-Torres, Yomaira J.

    2018-04-10

    A high surface area catalyst with a mesoporous support structure and a thin conformal coating over the surface of the support structure. The high surface area catalyst support is adapted for carrying out a reaction in a reaction environment where the thin conformal coating protects the support structure within the reaction environment. In various embodiments, the support structure is a mesoporous silica catalytic support and the thin conformal coating comprises a layer of metal oxide resistant to the reaction environment which may be a hydrothermal environment.

  17. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  18. Preparation of inorganic hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi; Du, Yang

    2009-04-01

    In order to catalyse the oxidation of tritium gas, two inorganic hydrophobic catalysts are prepared. Under room temperature, the catalysed oxidation ratio of 0.3%-1% (V/V) hydrogen gas in air is higher than 95%. Pt-II inorganic hydrophobic catalysts has obviously better catalysing ability than Pt-PTFE and lower ability than Pt-SDB in H 2 -HTO isotopic exchange, because the pressure resistence of Pt-II is much higher than Pt-SDB, it can be used to the CECE cell of heavy water detritium system. (authors)

  19. Paraffin Alkylation Using Zeolite Catalysts in a slurry reactor: Chemical Engineering Principles to Extend Catalyst Lifetime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Peferoen, D.G.R.; Brugge, P.T.M. van; Groot, C. de

    1996-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene is carried out using a zeolitic catalyst in a well stirred slurry reactor. Whereas application of fixed bed technology using a solid acid alkylation catalyst has in the led to catalysts lifetimes in the range of minutes, in this work we report catalyst

  20. Rare behaviour of a catalyst pellet catalyst dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Loonen, R.A.; Martens, A.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature overshoots and undershoots were found for a Pd on alumina catalyst pellet in its course towards a new steady state after a change in concentration of one of the reactants ethylene or hydrogen. When cooling the pellet, after heat-up by reaction, with pure hydrogen a sudden temperature

  1. Colloidal nanoparticles as catalysts and catalyst precursors for nitrite hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yingnan

    2015-01-01

    The most distinguished advantage to use colloidal methods for catalyst preparation is that the size and the shape of nanoparticles can be manipulated easily under good control, which is normally difficult to achieve by using traditional methods, such as impregnation and precipitation. This

  2. Catalysts and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a catalyst including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle and a catalytic material comprising iron. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the catalyst. In some examples, the catalyst can be used to hydrotreat fatty acids or to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks.

  3. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  4. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  5. The Stability of Supported Gold Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masoud, Nazila

    2018-01-01

    Gold has supreme cultural and financial value and, in form of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm, is a unique catalyst for different industrially relevant reactions. Intriguing properties of the gold catalysts have spurred demand in the chemical industry for Au catalysts, the application of which

  6. Low platinum catalyst and method of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Chong, Lina

    2017-11-21

    A low platinum catalyst and method for making same. The catalyst comprises platinum-transition metal bimetallic alloy microcrystallites over a transition metal-nitrogen-carbon composite. A method of making a catalyst comprises preparation of transition metal organic frameworks, infusion of platinum, thermal treatment, and reduction to form the microcrystallites and composite.

  7. Embryonic common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) preferentially regulate intracellular tissue pH during acid-base challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shartau, Ryan B; Crossley, Dane A; Kohl, Zachary F; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-07-01

    The nests of embryonic turtles naturally experience elevated CO2 (hypercarbia), which leads to increased blood PCO2  and a respiratory acidosis, resulting in reduced blood pH [extracellular pH (pHe)]. Some fishes preferentially regulate tissue pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] against changes in pHe; this has been proposed to be associated with exceptional CO2 tolerance and has never been identified in amniotes. As embryonic turtles may be CO2 tolerant based on nesting strategy, we hypothesized that they preferentially regulate pHi, conferring tolerance to severe acute acid-base challenges. This hypothesis was tested by investigating pH regulation in common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) reared in normoxia then exposed to hypercarbia (13 kPa PCO2 ) for 1 h at three developmental ages: 70% and 90% of incubation, and yearlings. Hypercarbia reduced pHe but not pHi, at all developmental ages. At 70% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.324 pH units while pHi of brain, white muscle and lung increased; heart, liver and kidney pHi remained unchanged. At 90% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.352 pH units but heart pHi increased with no change in pHi of other tissues. Yearlings exhibited a pHe reduction of 0.235 pH units but had no changes in pHi of any tissues. The results indicate common snapping turtles preferentially regulate pHi during development, but the degree of response is reduced throughout development. This is the first time preferential pHi regulation has been identified in an amniote. These findings may provide insight into the evolution of acid-base homeostasis during development of amniotes, and vertebrates in general. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HALGREN DL

    2008-01-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation

  9. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called intimacy criterion has dictated the maximum distance between the two types of site, beyond which catalytic activity decreases. A lack of synthesis and material-characterization methods with nanometre precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the intimacy criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst—comprising an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder, and with platinum metal controllably deposited on either the zeolite or the binder—that closest proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental. Specifically, the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains platinum on the binder, that is, with a nanoscale rather than closest intimacy of the metal and acid sites. Thus, cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules that are typically derived from alternative sources, such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil, should benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating platinum on the zeolite (the traditionally assumed optimal location). More generally, we anticipate that the ability demonstrated here to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale will benefit the further development and optimization of the emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts.

  10. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  11. Ethanolysis conversion of spent frying oils over aluminium, calcium-phosphate based bi-functional formulated catalysts. Catalytic activity assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Zaini, Essam O.; Chesterfield, Dean; Adesina, Adesoji A. [The Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). Reactor Engineering and Technology Group; Olsen, John [The Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

    2013-06-01

    The current study compares the catalytic performance of two bi-functional solid catalysts for the transesterification of waste cooking vegetable oil in presence of bio-ethanol acyl-acceptor. The two catalysts were aluminum oxide and seashell-derived calcium oxide supported K{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The catalytic activity of the produced catalyst samples were assessed and evaluated in terms of their textural and surface chemical properties. Evaluative runs showed that increased amounts of K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} have differently controlled the textural and surface chemical property of the finally synthesised catalyst samples. The behaviour revealed a strong correlation between the percentage yield of ethyl esters EEY% and acid-base site density and strength between the two types of catalysts. Possible leaching test of the catalysts was also used as a measure of performance and as a result, the optimum catalyst, on the basis of both ester yield and resistance to leaching was identified as the sample containing between 10 and 15wt% of K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} on AlO{sub 3} and CaO respectively. (orig.)

  12. Cerebral (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and systemic acid-base balance during hypoxia in fetal sheep.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Heerschap, A.; Oeseburg, B.; Nijhuis, J.G.; Jongsma, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebral energy metabolism and acid-base homeostasis during impaired oxygen supply in fetal sheep. Systemic acid-base balance was correlated with the sequence in changes of cerebral phosphorus metabolite ratios and intracellular pH. Phosphorus magnetic

  13. Automotive Catalyst State Diagnosis Using Microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moos Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of catalysts plays a key role in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment. The soot or ash loading of Diesel particulate filters, the oxygen loading degree in three-way catalysts, the amount of stored ammonia in SCR catalysts, or the NOx loading degree in NOx storage catalysts are important parameters that are today determined indirectly and in a model-based manner with gas sensors installed upstream and/or downstream of the catalysts. This contribution gives an overview on a novel approach to determine the catalyst state directly by a microwave-based technique. The method exploits the fact that the catalyst housing acts as a microwave cavity resonator. As “sensing” elements, one or two simple antennas are mounted inside the catalyst canning. The electrical properties of the catalyst device (ceramic honeycomb plus coating and storage material can be measured. Preferably, the resonance characteristics, e.g., the resonance frequencies, of selected cavity modes are observed. The information on the catalyst interior obtained in such a contactless manner is very well correlated with the catalyst state as will be demonstrated for different exhaust gas aftertreatment systems.

  14. Rejuvenation of the SCR catalyst at Mehrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Y.; Inatsume, Y.; Morita, I.; Kato, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, K. [Babcock Hitachi K.K., Kure-shi, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Babcock Hitachi K.K. (BHK) received the contract of the rejuvenation of the SCR catalyst at the 750 MW coal-fired Mehrum Power Station (in Hohenhameln, Germany) in March 2003. The contractual coverage was 160 m{sup 3} of the entire catalyst layer. The catalyst, which had been in operation for 16 years since 1987, was originally supplied by BHK. The rejuvenation process developed for the Mehrum project consisted of two major steps: the first is to dust off the catalyst and remove the catalyst poison, and the second step is to add active material to enhance the catalyst activity. The catalyst must be dried after each washing. In order to minimize transportation cost and time, the rejuvenation work was done at the Mehrum station site. The scope of the rejuvenation work was shared between the owner and BHK. It took about one and a half months to complete the (total) on-site rejuvenation worked. The performance of the rejuvenated catalyst was superior to show the same level of activity as the unused catalyst and maintain the same SO{sub 2} conversion rate as the spent catalyst. This paper gives the details of the spent coal-fired SCR catalyst rejuvenation work. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Hydroprocessing using regenerated spent heavy hydrocarbon catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, F.T.; Hensley, A.L. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for hydroprocessing a hydrocarbon feedstock. It comprises: contacting the feedstock with hydrogen under hydroprocessing conditions with a hydroprocessing catalyst wherein the hydroprocessing catalyst contains a total contaminant metals build-up of greater than about 4 wt. % nickel plus vanadium, a hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of Group VIB metals and Group VIII metals and is regenerated spent hydroprocessing catalyst regenerated by a process comprising the steps: partially decoking the spent catalyst in an initial coke-burning step; impregnating the partially decoked catalyst with a Group IIA metal-containing impregnation solution; and decoking the impregnated catalyst in a final coke-burning step wherein the impregnated catalyst is contacted with an oxygen-containing gas at a temperature of about 600 degrees F to about 1400 degrees F

  16. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpel, Michael [Naperville, IL; Liu, Di-Jia [Naperville, IL

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  17. Isotope exchange in oxide-containing catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Hoyt, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of exchanging rare-isotope oxygen for common-isotope oxygen in the top several layers of an oxide-containing catalyst is disclosed. A sample of an oxide-containing catalyst is exposed to a flowing stream of reducing gas in an inert carrier gas at a temperature suitable for the removal of the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms from the surface layer or layers of the catalyst without damaging the catalyst structure. The reduction temperature must be higher than any at which the catalyst will subsequently operate. Sufficient reducing gas is used to allow removal of all the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms in the top several layers of the catalyst. The catalyst is then reoxidized with the desired rare-isotope oxygen in sufficient quantity to replace all of the common-isotope oxygen that was removed.

  18. Acid-Base Behavior in Hydrothermal Processing of Wastes - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, K.; Rossky, P.

    2000-01-01

    A major obstacle to development of hydrothermal oxidation technology has been a lack of scientific knowledge of chemistry in hydrothermal solution above 350 C, particularly acid-base behavior, and transport phenomena, which is needed to understand corrosion, metal-ion complexation, and salt precipitation and recovery. Our objective has been to provide this knowledge with in situ UV-visible spectroscopic measurements and fully molecular computer simulation. Our recent development of relatively stable organic UV-visible pH indicators for supercritical water oxidation offers the opportunity to characterize buffers and to monitor acid-base titrations. These results have important implications for understanding reaction pathways and yields for decomposition of wastes in supercritical water

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING APPROACHES IN IMPROVING LEARNING OUTCOMES IN ACID-BASE SUBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachmat Sahputra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning in the understanding of acid-base chemistry in schools needs to be improved so research to determine differences in learning outcomes between students taught using environmental approaches and methods lectures in class XI SMA on acid-base subject needs to be done. In this study, using a quasi-experimental method using a data collection tool achievement test essay form. The test statistic results of the post-test learning has been obtained Asymp value. Sig (2-tailed 0,026 that showed the differences between students' learning outcomes with a control experimental class with effect size of 0.63 or much influence difference with the percentage 23.57% which indicated that the learning environment approach can improve learning outcomes of high school students.

  20. Bicarbonate sensing in mouse cortical astrocytes during extracellular acid/base disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoshin, Zinnia; Defren, Sabrina; Schmaelzle, Jana; Weber, Tobias; Schneider, Hans‐Peter

    2017-01-01

    Key points The present study suggests that the electrogenic sodium–bicarbonate cotransporter, NBCe1, supported by carbonic anhydrase II, CAII, provides an efficient mechanism of bicarbonate sensing in cortical astrocytes. This mechanism is proposed to play a major role in setting the pHi responses to extracellular acid/base challenges in astrocytes.A decrease in extracellular [HCO3 −] during isocapnic acidosis and isohydric hypocapnia, or an increase in intracellular [HCO3 −] during hypercapnic acidosis, was effectively sensed by NBCe1, which carried bicarbonate out of the cells under these conditions, and caused an acidification and sodium fall in WT astrocytes, but not in NBCe1‐knockout astrocytes.Isocapnic acidosis, hypercapnic acidosis and isohydric hypocapnia evoked inward currents in NBCe1‐ and CAII‐expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes, but not in native oocytes, suggesting that NBCe1 operates in the outwardly directed mode under these conditions consistent with our findings in astrocytes.We propose that bicarbonate sensing of astrocytes may have functional significance during extracellular acid/base disturbances in the brain, as it not only alters intracellular pH/[HCO3 −]‐dependent functions of astrocytes, but also modulates the extracellular pH/[HCO3 −] in brain tissue. Abstract Extracellular acid/base status of the mammalian brain undergoes dynamic changes during many physiological and pathological events. Although intracellular pH (pHi) of astrocytes responds to extracellular acid/base changes, the mechanisms mediating these changes have remained unresolved. We have previously shown that the electrogenic sodium–bicarbonate cotransporter, NBCe1, is a high‐affinity bicarbonate carrier in cortical astrocytes. In the present study, we investigated whether NBCe1 plays a role in bicarbonate sensing in astrocytes, and in determining the pHi responses to extracellular acid/base challenges. We measured changes in intracellular H+ and Na+ in

  1. Optical Absorption and Electron Injection of 4-(Cyanomethylbenzoic Acid Based Dyes: A DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT calculations were carried out to study the ground state geometries, electronic structures, and absorption spectra of 4-(cyanomethylbenzoic acid based dyes (AG1 and AG2 used for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. The excited states properties and the thermodynamical parameters of electron injection were studied. The results showed that (a two dyes have uncoplanar structures along the donor unit and conjugated bridge space, (b two sensitizers exhibited intense absorption in the UV-Vis region, and (c the excited state oxidation potential was higher than the conduction band edge of TiO2 photoanode. As a result, a solar cell based on the 4-(cyanomethylbenzoic acid based dyes exhibited well photovoltaic performance. Furthermore, nine dyes were designed on the basis of AG1 and AG2 to improve optical response and electron injection.

  2. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  3. Acid-Base Disorders in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pathophysiological Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Marcello Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to development of acidosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its deleterious effects on outcome and mortality rate. Renal compensatory adjustments consequent to acidosis are also described in detail with emphasis on differences between acute and chronic respiratory acidosis. Mixed acid-base disturbances due to comorbidity and side effects of some drugs in these patients are also examined, and practical considerations for a correct diagnosis are provided.

  4. The discovery of glycine and related amino acid-based factor Xa inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Filipski, Kevin J.; Cody, Wayne L.; Bigge, Christopher F.; La, Frances; Welch, Kathleen; Dahring, Tawny; Bryant, John W.; Leonard, Daniele; Bolton, Gary; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Zhang, Erli; Peterson, J. Thomas; Haarer, Staci; Sahasrabudhe, Vaishali; Janiczek, Nancy; Desiraju, Shrilakshmi; Hena, Mostofa; Fiakpui, Charles; Saraswat, Neerja; Sharma, Raman; Sun, Shaoyi; Maiti, Samarendra N.; Leadley, Robert; Edmunds, Jeremy J. (Naeja); (Pfizer)

    2010-12-03

    Herein, we report on the identification of three potent glycine and related amino acid-based series of FXa inhibitors containing a neutral P1 chlorophenyl pharmacophore. A X-ray crystal structure has shown that constrained glycine derivatives with optimized N-substitution can greatly increase hydrophobic interactions in the FXa active site. Also, the substitution of a pyridone ring for a phenylsulfone ring in the P4 sidechain resulted in an inhibitor with enhanced oral bioavailability.

  5. TREATMENT WITH AMINO-ACID-BASED FORMULA OF CHILDREN WITH ALIMENTARY ALLERGY TO COW MILK PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Vishneva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of alimentary allergy in children of the 1st year of life is increasing overall. This kind of disorders involves different organs and tissues, and its clinical manifestations are not pathognomic. Among the most important allergens one of the key roles play cow milk proteins. Hypoallergenic formulas are recommended for the non-invasive dietary diagnostics and treatment. Amino-acid-based formulas meet the criteria of being hypoallergenic.

  6. Acid-base properties of 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid, an antitumor agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozhilova, N. E.; Kutina, N. N.; Petukhova, O. A.; Kharitonov, Yu. Ya.

    2013-07-01

    The acid-base properties of the 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid (PET) substance belonging to the class of isothiocyanates and capable of inhibiting the development of tumors on many experimental models were studied. The acidity and hydrolysis constants of the PET substance in ethanol, acetone, aqueous ethanol, and aqueous acetone solutions were determined from the data of potentiometric (pH-metric) titration of ethanol and acetone solutions of PET with aqueous solidum hydroxide at room temperature.

  7. Acid base imbalances in ill neonatal foals and their association with survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viu, J; Armengou, L; Ríos, J; Cesarini, C; Jose-Cunilleras, E

    2017-01-01

    Acid-base imbalances observed in human paediatric patients are associated with outcome. Likewise, neonatal foals may have different acid-base imbalances associated with diagnosis or prognosis. To determine acid-base imbalances by the quantitative method in ill neonatal foals and assess their association with diagnosis and prognosis. Observational prospective clinical study. This study included 65 ill neonatal foals (32 septic, 33 nonseptic) admitted to an equine referral hospital from 2005 to 2011with acid-base parameters determined on admission and a control group of 33 healthy neonatal foals. Blood pH, pCO 2 , sodium, potassium, chloride, L-lactate, albumin and phosphate concentrations were determined. Bicarbonate, globulin, measured strong ion difference (SID m ), nonvolatile weak buffer concentrations (A tot ), base excess and its components were calculated. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and multiple linear regression statistical analyses were performed. Results are summarised as mean ± s.d. for normally distributed variables and median [25-75th percentiles] for non-normally distributed ones. A total of 63% of ill foals had respiratory alkalosis and 58.5% had SID m acidosis. The combination of both alterations was detected in 21 of 65 ill foals and abnormal pH was found in 24 of 65. Compared with healthy foals, ill foals had significantly lower SID m (nonseptic 31.6 ± 6.3 [Pacid-base imbalances observed in ill foals were respiratory alkalosis, SID m acidosis or mixed respiratory alkalosis with strong ion acidosis. Increased venous pCO 2 and blood L-lactate concentration were associated with poor outcome. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Influence of Cobalt Precursor on Efficient Production of Commercial Fuels over FTS Co/SiC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel de la Osa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available β-SiC-supported cobalt catalysts have been prepared from nitrate, acetate, chloride and citrate salts to study the dependence of Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS on the type of precursor. Com/SiC catalysts were synthetized by vacuum-assisted impregnation while N2 adsorption/desorption, XRD, TEM, TPR, O2 pulses and acid/base titrations were used as characterization techniques. FTS catalytic performance was carried out at 220 °C and 250 °C while keeping constant the pressure (20 bar, space velocity (6000 Ncm3/g·h and syngas composition (H2/CO:2. The nature of cobalt precursor was found to influence basic behavior, extent of reduction and metallic particle size. For β-SiC-supported catalysts, the use of cobalt nitrate resulted in big Co crystallites, an enhanced degree of reduction and higher basicity compared to acetate, chloride and citrate-based catalysts. Consequently, cobalt nitrate provided a better activity and selectivity to C5+ (less than 10% methane was formed, which was centered in kerosene-diesel fraction (α = 0.90. On the contrary, catalyst from cobalt citrate, characterized by the highest viscosity and acidity values, presented a highly dispersed distribution of Co nanoparticles leading to a lower reducibility. Therefore, a lower FTS activity was obtained and chain growth probability was shortened as observed from methane and gasoline-kerosene (α = 0.76 production when using cobalt citrate.

  9. Acid-base chemistry of white wine: analytical characterisation and chemical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenesti, Enrico; Berto, Silvia; Toso, Simona; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria). Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of carboxylic acids and of other acid-base active substances was used as input, with the total acidity, for the chemical modelling step of the study based on the contemporary treatment of overlapped protonation equilibria. New protonation constants were refined (L-lactic and succinic acids) with respect to our previous investigation on red wines. Attention was paid for mixed solvent (ethanol-water mixture), ionic strength, and temperature to ensure a thermodynamic level to the study. Validation of the chemical model optimized is achieved by way of conductometric measurements and using a synthetic "wine" especially adapted for testing.

  10. Elucidating the hard/soft acid/base principle: A perspective based on half-reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, Paul W.; Parr, Robert G.; Pearson, Ralph G.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis is presented for the acid-base double-exchange reaction as well as the associated acid-displacement and base-displacement 'half-reactions' with the goal of elucidating the meaning of the hard/soft acid/base (HSAB) principle and the conditions for its validity. When electron-transfer effects are important and other effects are negligible, the HSAB principle is driven by the surpassing stability of the soft acid/soft base product. When electrostatic effects dominate the reactivity, the HSAB principle is driven by the surpassing stability of the hard acid/hard base product. Because electron-transfer effects favor soft/soft interactions, while electrostatic effects favor hard/hard interactions, acid-base exchange reactions may be used to determine whether a reagent's reactivity is dominated by electron-transfer or by electrostatic effects. Because electron-transfer and electrostatic considerations separately favor the HSAB principle whenever the electronic chemical potentials of the acids and bases involved in the reaction are similar, our analysis provides strong support for the HSAB principle. The electronic chemical potential measures the intrinsic strength of acids and bases

  11. Biodegradation and Osteosarcoma Cell Cultivation on Poly(aspartic acid) Based Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juriga, Dávid; Nagy, Krisztina; Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Perczel-Kovách, Katalin; Chen, Yong Mei; Varga, Gábor; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2016-09-14

    Development of novel biodegradable and biocompatible scaffold materials with optimal characteristics is important for both preclinical and clinical applications. The aim of the present study was to analyze the biodegradability of poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels, and to test their usability as scaffolds for MG-63 osteoblast-like cells. Poly(aspartic acid) was fabricated from poly(succinimide) and hydrogels were prepared using natural amines as cross-linkers (diaminobutane and cystamine). Disulfide bridges were cleaved to thiol groups and the polymer backbone was further modified with RGD sequence. Biodegradability of the hydrogels was evaluated by experiments on the base of enzymes and cell culture medium. Poly(aspartic acid) hydrogels possessing only disulfide bridges as cross-links proved to be degradable by collagenase I. The MG-63 cells showed healthy, fibroblast-like morphology on the double cross-linked and RGD modified hydrogels. Thiolated poly(aspartic acid) based hydrogels provide ideal conditions for adhesion, survival, proliferation, and migration of osteoblast-like cells. The highest viability was found on the thiolated PASP gels while the RGD motif had influence on compacted cluster formation of the cells. These biodegradable and biocompatible poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels are promising scaffolds for cell cultivation.

  12. Acid-Base Chemistry of White Wine: Analytical Characterisation and Chemical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Prenesti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria. Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of carboxylic acids and of other acid-base active substances was used as input, with the total acidity, for the chemical modelling step of the study based on the contemporary treatment of overlapped protonation equilibria. New protonation constants were refined (L-lactic and succinic acids with respect to our previous investigation on red wines. Attention was paid for mixed solvent (ethanol-water mixture, ionic strength, and temperature to ensure a thermodynamic level to the study. Validation of the chemical model optimized is achieved by way of conductometric measurements and using a synthetic “wine” especially adapted for testing.

  13. Acid-Base Chemistry of White Wine: Analytical Characterisation and Chemical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenesti, Enrico; Berto, Silvia; Toso, Simona; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria). Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of carboxylic acids and of other acid-base active substances was used as input, with the total acidity, for the chemical modelling step of the study based on the contemporary treatment of overlapped protonation equilibria. New protonation constants were refined (L-lactic and succinic acids) with respect to our previous investigation on red wines. Attention was paid for mixed solvent (ethanol-water mixture), ionic strength, and temperature to ensure a thermodynamic level to the study. Validation of the chemical model optimized is achieved by way of conductometric measurements and using a synthetic “wine” especially adapted for testing. PMID:22566762

  14. Error causes in the determination of the acid-base reactivity of oxi-hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, M.; Lefevre, G.; Fedoroff, M.

    2004-01-01

    The long term safety of radioactive waste depositories is based on the sorption of radionuclides from underground water onto engineered and natural barriers. For a quantitative prediction of the migration in such barriers, we need accurate sorption data. Models should be in agreement with the sorption mechanism. Surface complexation is the most often used model for oxides and hydroxides. In fact, there are several types of surface complexation models such as 1-pK and 2-pK monosite, 1-pK and 2-pK multisite, pK-distribution models. Furthermore, there are several ways to describe the distribution of the electrostatic potential in the vicinity of the solid surface (CCM, DLM, BSM, TLM,..). However, all these models are based on the acid-base properties of superficial hydroxide or oxide groups of the solid. It is necessary to determine the surface charge versus pH (titration curves), the point of zero charge (pzc), the surface density of sites active towards protons and hydroxides in aqueous solutions, the acid-base constants of these sites. These parameters are then used for calculating the sorption constants of ions other than protons and hydroxide ions. It is therefore important to determine these parameters very accurately. A comparison of acid-base parameters published in the literature shows a large scatter for the ''same'' oxides [1,2]. Several causes could explain this scatter. One reason is the use of different models, each electrostatic models leading to different values of site density and constants. However, titration curves and pzc are independent of the model chosen. Another reason may be uncontrolled differences in the composition and purity of oxides. Finally, other causes could be found in the titration procedure, in the solubility and the stability of the solid. In order to understand more about the acid-base properties of oxides and about the origin of the discrepancies between measurements, we have performed a systematic experimental study of several

  15. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  16. Catalyst for Expanding Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    History supplies us with many models of how and how not to commercialize an industry. This presentation draws parallels between industries with government roots, like the railroad, air transport, communications and the internet, and NASAs Commercial Crew Program. In these examples, government served as a catalyst for what became a booming industry. The building block approach the Commercial Crew Program is taking is very simple -- establish a need, laying the groundwork, enabling industry and legal framework.

  17. Photosystem Inspired Peptide Hybrid Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    materials defined at the molecular level. We propose a novel way to make hybrid catalyst composed of inorganic nanomaterials and peptides. The...Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research Laboratory Air...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY SNUR&DB FOUNDATION RESEARCH PARK CENTER SEOUL, 151742 KR 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  18. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    by onepot sol–gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD and NH3-TPD. Initial SCR activities of 8 out of 9 catalysts showed higher NO conversion at least at one temperature in the temperature range 300–500 ◦C compared to the conventional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. After potassium poisoning (100......Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared......–130 µmol of K/g of catalyst) the relative drop in SCR activity and acidity was lower for all the alternative catalysts compared to the industrial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Furthermore, Cu/MOR and Nano-V2O5/Sul-TiO2 catalysts showed 8–16 times higher SCR activities than the conventional even after high...

  19. A generalized approach for the calculation and automation of potentiometric titrations Part 1. Acid-Base Titrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stur, J.; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    Fast and accurate calculation procedures for pH and redox potentials are required for optimum control of automatic titrations. The procedure suggested is based on a three-dimensional titration curve V = f(pH, redox potential). All possible interactions between species in the solution, e.g., changes

  20. Chemical Feasibility of the General Acid/Base Mechanism of glmS Ribozyme Self-Cleavage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubecký, M.; Walter, Nils G.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, M.; Banáš, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 10 (2015), s. 550-562 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1878 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * ACTIVE-SITE GUANINE * HAIRPIN RIBOZYME Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.248, year: 2015

  1. Synthesis of a nano-crystalline solid acid catalyst from fly ash and its catalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitralekha Khatri; Ashu Rani [Government P.G. College, Kota (India). Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    2008-10-15

    The synthesis of nano-crystalline activated fly ash catalyst (AFAC) with crystallite size of 12 nm was carried out by chemical and thermal treatment of fly ash, a waste material generated from coal-burning power plants. Fly ash was chemically activated using sulfuric acid followed by thermal activation at 600{sup o}C. The variation of surface and physico-chemical properties of the fly ash by activation methods resulted in improved acidity and therefore, catalytic activity for acid catalyzed reactions. The AFAC was characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, N{sub 2}-adsorption-desorption isotherm, scanning electron microscopy, flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and sulfur content by CHNS/O elemental analysis. It showed amorphous nature due to high silica content (81%) and possessed high BET surface area (120 m{sup 2}/g). The catalyst was found to be highly active solid acid catalyst for liquid phase esterification of salicylic acid with acetic anhydride and methanol giving acetylsalicylic acid and methyl salicylate respectively. A maximum yield of 97% with high purity of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and a very high conversion 87% of salicylic acid to methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) was obtained with AFAC. The surface acidity and therefore, catalytic activity in AFAC was originated by increased silica content, hydroxyl content and higher surface area as compared to fly ash. The study shows that coal generated fly ash can be converted into potential solid acid catalyst for acid catalyzed reactions. Furthermore, this catalyst may replace conventional environmentally hazardous homogeneous liquid acids making an ecofriendly; solvent free, atom efficient, solid acid based catalytic process. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The latest general chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Geun Bae; Choi, Se Yeong; Kim, Chin Yeong; Yoon, Gil Jung; Lee, Eun Seok; Seo, Moon Gyu

    1995-02-01

    This book deals with the latest general chemistry, which is comprised of twenty-three chapters, the contents of this book are introduction, theory of atoms and molecule, chemical formula and a chemical reaction formula, structure of atoms, nature of atoms and the periodic table, structure of molecule and spectrum, gas, solution, solid, chemical combination, chemical reaction speed, chemical equilibrium, thermal chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, acid-base, complex, aquatic chemistry, air chemistry, nuclear chemistry, metal and nonmetal, organic chemistry and biochemistry. It has exercise in the end of each chapter.

  3. Synthesis of a molecularly defined single-active site heterogeneous catalyst for selective oxidation of N-heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujing; Pang, Shaofeng; Wei, Zhihong; Jiao, Haijun; Dai, Xingchao; Wang, Hongli; Shi, Feng

    2018-04-13

    Generally, a homogeneous catalyst exhibits good activity and defined active sites but it is difficult to recycle. Meanwhile, a heterogeneous catalyst can easily be reused but its active site is difficult to reveal. It is interesting to bridge the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis via controllable construction of a heterogeneous catalyst containing defined active sites. Here, we report that a molecularly defined, single-active site heterogeneous catalyst has been designed and prepared via the oxidative polymerization of maleimide derivatives. These polymaleimide derivatives can be active catalysts for the selective oxidation of heterocyclic compounds to quinoline and indole via the recycling of -C=O and -C-OH groups, which was confirmed by tracing the reaction with GC-MS using maleimide as the catalyst and by FT-IR analysis with polymaleimide as the catalyst. These results might promote the development of heterogeneous catalysts with molecularly defined single active sites exhibiting a comparable activity to homogeneous catalysts.

  4. Reduction of nanowire diameter beyond lithography limits by controlled catalyst dewetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Kerlich, Alexander; Gavrilov, Arkady; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan; Amram, Dor

    2016-01-01

    Catalyst assisted vapour-liquid–solid is the most common method to realize bottom-up nanowire growth; establishing a parallel process for obtaining nanoscale catalysts at pre-defined locations is paramount for further advancement towards commercial nanowire applications. Herein, the effect of a selective area mask on the dewetting of metallic nanowire catalysts, deposited within lithography-defined mask pinholes, is reported. It was found that thin disc-like catalysts, with diameters of 120–450 nm, were transformed through dewetting into hemisphere-like catalysts, having diameters 2–3 fold smaller; the process was optimized to about 95% yield in preventing catalyst splitting, as would otherwise be expected due to their thickness-to-diameter ratio, which was as low as 1/60. The catalysts subsequently facilitated InP and InAs nanowire growth. We suggest that the mask edges prevent surface migration mediated spreading of the dewetted metal, and therefore induce its agglomeration into a single particle. This result presents a general strategy to diminish lithography-set dimensions for NW growth, and may answer a fundamental challenge faced by bottom-up nanowire technology. (paper)

  5. Reduction of nanowire diameter beyond lithography limits by controlled catalyst dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Kerlich, Alexander; Amram, Dor; Gavrilov, Arkady; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Catalyst assisted vapour-liquid-solid is the most common method to realize bottom-up nanowire growth; establishing a parallel process for obtaining nanoscale catalysts at pre-defined locations is paramount for further advancement towards commercial nanowire applications. Herein, the effect of a selective area mask on the dewetting of metallic nanowire catalysts, deposited within lithography-defined mask pinholes, is reported. It was found that thin disc-like catalysts, with diameters of 120-450 nm, were transformed through dewetting into hemisphere-like catalysts, having diameters 2-3 fold smaller; the process was optimized to about 95% yield in preventing catalyst splitting, as would otherwise be expected due to their thickness-to-diameter ratio, which was as low as 1/60. The catalysts subsequently facilitated InP and InAs nanowire growth. We suggest that the mask edges prevent surface migration mediated spreading of the dewetted metal, and therefore induce its agglomeration into a single particle. This result presents a general strategy to diminish lithography-set dimensions for NW growth, and may answer a fundamental challenge faced by bottom-up nanowire technology.

  6. Carbonaceous deposits on naptha reforming catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redwan, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    Carbonaceous deposits on naphtha reforming catalysts play a decisive role in limiting process performance. The deposits negatively after catalyst activity, selectivity and the production cycle of a semi regenerative reformer. The magnitude of negative effect of those deposits is directly proportional to their amounts and complexity. Investigations on used reforming catalysts samples reveal that the amount and type (complexity of the chemical nature) of carbonaceous deposits are directly proportional to the catalysts life on stream and the severity of operating conditions. In addition, the combustibility behavior of carbonaceous deposits on the catalyst samples taken from different reformers are found to be different. Optimal carbon removal, for in situ catalyst regeneration, requires the specific conditions be developed, based on the results of well designed and properly performed investigations of the amount and type of carbonaceous deposits. (author)

  7. Hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.; Stohl, F.V.; Richardson, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Catalysts were prepared on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) supports by ion exchange of an active metal for Na + ions incorporated in the HTO support during preparation by reaction with the parent Ti alkoxide. Strong active metal-HTO interactions as a result of the ion exchange reaction can require significantly different conditions for activation as compared to catalysts prepared by more widely used incipient wetness methods. The latter catalysts typically involve conversion or while the HTO catalysts require the alteration of electrostatic bonds between the metal and support with subsequent alteration of the support itself. In this paper, the authors discuss the activation, via sulfidation or reduction, of catalysts consisting of Co, Mo, or Ni-Mo dispersed on HTO supports by ion exchange. Correlations between the activation process and the hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation, and hydrodesulfurization activities of the catalysts are presented

  8. Optimization of catalyst system reaps economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, C.F.; Hanshaw, M.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Malik, T.; Kooiman, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc. is learning to optimize its catalyst systems for hydrotreating Venezuelan gas oils through a program of research, pilot plant testing, and commercial unit operation. The economic results of this project have been evaluated, and the benefits are most evident in improvements in product yields and qualities. The project has involved six commercial test runs, to date (Runs 10-15), with a seventh run planned. A summary of the different types of catalyst systems used in the test runs, and the catalyst philosophy that developed is given. Runs 10 and 11 used standard CoMo and NiMo catalysts for heavy gas oils hydrotreating. These catalysts had small pore sizes and suffered high deactivation rates because of metals contamination. When it was discovered that metals contamination was a problem, catalyst options were reviewed

  9. Biodiesel production using calcium manganese oxide as catalyst and different raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Joana Maia; Conceição Machado Alvim-Ferraz, Maria; Fonseca Almeida, Manuel; Méndez Díaz, José Diego; Sánchez Polo, Manuel; Rivera Utrilla, José

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Biodiesel production using a calcium manganese oxide catalyst was studied. ► The active specie was Ca 0.9 Mn 0.1 O and its deactivation occurred by hydration. ► The studied catalyst presented lower activation temperature than CaO. ► Biodiesel production and quality using different raw materials is reported. ► Compared to the conventional process, biodiesel water content improved. - Abstract: The use of heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production aims to simplify the production process as well as to reduce purification costs and related environmental impacts. Calcium manganese oxide was recently identified by the authors as an interesting heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production from animal fat; however, the difference between this and other catalysts, the catalyst activation/deactivation mechanisms, its behaviour in the synthesis using different raw materials as well as the impacts of its use on product quality remained unclear. Therefore, the present work: (i) compared biodiesel production using calcium manganese oxide and other catalysts (CaO and NaOH); (ii) studied the reasons leading to activation/deactivation of the heterogeneous catalyst; (iii) analysed biodiesel heterogeneous synthesis using calcium manganese oxide and different raw materials (lard, waste frying oil and a mixture); and (iv) evaluated raw material and catalyst impact on the product quality. Considering the use of different catalysts, the results showed that, after 8 h of reaction, product purity was similar using the different catalysts, being 92.5 wt.% using both NaOH and calcium manganese oxide and 93.8 wt.% using CaO. The active species of the heterogeneous catalysts were CaO, in the case of calcinated calcium carbonate, and Ca 0.9 Mn 0.1 O, in the case of calcinated calcium manganese oxide. Because the deactivating species were different for both catalysts, the calcium manganese oxide required lower activation temperature, which should be an advantage

  10. Molecular catalysts structure and functional design

    CERN Document Server

    Gade, Lutz H

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the key aspects and latest advances in the rapidly developing field of molecular catalysis, this book covers new strategies to investigate reaction mechanisms, the enhancement of the catalysts' selectivity and efficiency, as well as the rational design of well-defined molecular catalysts. The interdisciplinary author team with an excellent reputation within the community discusses experimental and theoretical studies, along with examples of improved catalysts, and their application in organic synthesis, biocatalysis, and supported organometallic catalysis. As a result, readers wil

  11. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  12. Chemical processes at the surface of various clays on acid-base titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Park, Y. S.; Jung, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical reaction of radionuclides at the interface between groundwater and geological mineral is an important process determining their retardation of transport through groundwater flow in a nuclear waste disposal. Clay minerals are major components of soil and argillaceous rock, and some of them are considered to be important base materials in the design of high-level nuclear waste repository due to their large swelling, low-permeability, large surface area, and strong and large sorption of radionuclides. Clay materials are phyllosilicates containing accessory minerals such as metal oxides, hydroxides, oxyhydroxides. Their structures are condensed 1:1 or 2:1 layers of tetrahedral SiO 3/2 OH and octahedral Al(OH) 6/2 sheets. An accurate knowledge about the properties of clay surface is required as a parameter for a long-term estimation of radionuclide retardation effects. Electric surface charge is a primary property determining ion exchange and surface complexation of radionuclides on its surface. The sources of electric surface charge are a permanent structural negative charge on a basal plane and a dissociable charge at an edge surface. Investigation of proton sorption is a prerequisite to the understanding of radionuclide sorption. The reactions on a permanently charged site and on an edge site are measured by an electrokinetic measurement and by potentiometric titration, respectively. However, side reactions such as complexation, proton/cation exchange, dissolution, hydrolysis, precipitation and re adsorption, and the reaction of secondary minerals hinder an experimental measurement of accurate acid-base properties. This presentation describes the pH change on dispersing various clays in water and adding acid, base or Eu(III) ion to these solutions, and the effect of Eu(III) ion on acid-base titration of clay solutions

  13. Chemical processes at the surface of various clays on acid-base titration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. K.; Park, Y. S.; Jung, E. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The chemical reaction of radionuclides at the interface between groundwater and geological mineral is an important process determining their retardation of transport through groundwater flow in a nuclear waste disposal. Clay minerals are major components of soil and argillaceous rock, and some of them are considered to be important base materials in the design of high-level nuclear waste repository due to their large swelling, low-permeability, large surface area, and strong and large sorption of radionuclides. Clay materials are phyllosilicates containing accessory minerals such as metal oxides, hydroxides, oxyhydroxides. Their structures are condensed 1:1 or 2:1 layers of tetrahedral SiO{sub 3/2}OH and octahedral Al(OH){sub 6/2} sheets. An accurate knowledge about the properties of clay surface is required as a parameter for a long-term estimation of radionuclide retardation effects. Electric surface charge is a primary property determining ion exchange and surface complexation of radionuclides on its surface. The sources of electric surface charge are a permanent structural negative charge on a basal plane and a dissociable charge at an edge surface. Investigation of proton sorption is a prerequisite to the understanding of radionuclide sorption. The reactions on a permanently charged site and on an edge site are measured by an electrokinetic measurement and by potentiometric titration, respectively. However, side reactions such as complexation, proton/cation exchange, dissolution, hydrolysis, precipitation and re adsorption, and the reaction of secondary minerals hinder an experimental measurement of accurate acid-base properties. This presentation describes the pH change on dispersing various clays in water and adding acid, base or Eu(III) ion to these solutions, and the effect of Eu(III) ion on acid-base titration of clay solutions

  14. Roles of renal ammonia metabolism other than in acid-base homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, I David

    2017-06-01

    The importance of renal ammonia metabolism in acid-base homeostasis is well known. However, the effects of renal ammonia metabolism other than in acid-base homeostasis are not as widely recognized. First, ammonia differs from almost all other solutes in the urine in that it does not result from arterial delivery. Instead, ammonia is produced by the kidney, and only a portion of the ammonia produced is excreted in the urine, with the remainder returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. In normal individuals, systemic ammonia addition is metabolized efficiently by the liver, but in patients with either acute or chronic liver disease, conditions that increase the addition of ammonia of renal origin to the systemic circulation can result in precipitation and/or worsening of hyperammonemia. Second, ammonia appears to serve as an intrarenal paracrine signaling molecule. Hypokalemia increases proximal tubule ammonia production and secretion as well as reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, thereby increasing delivery to the renal interstitium and the collecting duct. In the collecting duct, ammonia decreases potassium secretion and stimulates potassium reabsorption, thereby decreasing urinary potassium excretion and enabling feedback correction of the initiating hypokalemia. Finally, the stimulation of renal ammonia metabolism by hypokalemia may contribute to the development of metabolic alkalosis, which in turn can stimulate NaCl reabsorption and contribute to the intravascular volume expansion, increased blood pressure and diuretic resistance that can develop with hypokalemia. The evidence supporting these novel non-acid-base roles of renal ammonia metabolism is discussed in this review.

  15. A comparison of traditional and quantitative analysis of acid-base imbalances in hypoalbuminemic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Carlos; Manzanilla, Edgar G; de Gopegui, Rafael Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    To compare the traditional (HH) and quantitative approaches used for the evaluation of the acid-base balance in hypoalbuminemic dogs. Prospective observational study. ICU of a veterinary teaching hospital. One hundred and five client-owned dogs. Jugular venous blood samples were collected from each patient on admission to determine: total plasma protein (TP), albumin (Alb), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), glucose (Glu), hematocrit (HCT), Na(+) , Cl(-) , K(+) , phosphate (Pi ), pH, PvCO2, bicarbonate (HCO3 (-) ), anion gap (AG), adjusted anion gap for albumin (AGalb ) or phosphate (AGalb-phos ), standardized base excess (SBE), strong ion difference (SID), concentration of nonvolatile weak buffers (Atot ), and strong ion gap (SIG). Patients were divided in 2 groups according to the severity of the hypoalbuminemia: mild (Alb = 21-25 g/L) and severe (Alb ≤20 g/L). All parameters were compared among groups. Patients with severe hypoalbuminemia showed significant decrease in TP (P = 0.011), Atot (P = 0.050), and a significant increase in adjusted AG (P = 0.048) and the magnitude of SIG (P = 0.011) compared to animals with mild hypoalbuminemia. According to the HH approach, the most frequent imbalances were simple disorders (51.4%), primarily metabolic acidosis (84.7%) associated with a high AG acidosis. However, when using the quantitative method, 58.1% of patients had complex disorders, with SIG acidosis (74.3%) and Atot alkalosis (33.3%) as the most frequent acid-base imbalances. Agreement between methods only matched in 32 cases (kappa acid-base balance was poor and many imbalances detected using the quantitative approach were missed using the HH approach. Further studies are necessary to confirm the clinical utility of using the quantitative approach in the decision-making process of the severely ill hypoalbuminemic patients. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  16. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  17. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which...... the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...

  18. Bifunctional cobalt F-T catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.G.; Coughlin, P.K.; Yang, C.L.; Rabo, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results on the catalytic screening of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts containing shape selective components are reported. Catalysts consist of promoted cobalt intimately contacted with Union Carbide molecular sieves and were tested using a Berty type internally recycled reactor. Methods of preparation, promoters and shape selective components were varied and aimed at improving catalyst performance. Catalysts were developed demonstrating high C/sub 5/ + yields with high olefin content and low methane production while maintaining stability under both low and high H/sub 2/:CO ratio conditions.

  19. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  20. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of CO{sub 2} over polyacid chromium oxide catalysts modified by Mo, W and Mn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Davydov, P.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    Effective chromium oxide catalysts without additions and with addition of Mo, W and Mn were prepared and tested in long-duration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of metals were found. It was shown that the best combination of acid-base and redox properties necessary for a decrease of aggregation of chromium-oxide particles was observed over the following catalyst: (3.0 wt.%Cr-1.5 wt.% Mn)/SiO{sub 2}. This catalyst worked stably in durable tests (500 h). Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied using unstationary response method. It was shown that the process mechanism was similar over all studied catalysts but the catalysts were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO{sub 2} was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over Cr and Cr-Mn, C{sub 3}H{sub 6} was tied more strongly than CO{sub 2} over Cr-W. The reverse water-gas shift reaction proceeded in more extent over chromium-oxide catalysts without additions. (orig.)

  1. [Investigation of reference intervals of blood gas and acid-base analysis assays in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the upper and lower limits and their sources of reference intervals in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays. The data of reference intervals were collected, which come from the first run of 2014 External Quality Assessment (EQA) program in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays performed by National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL). All the abnormal values and errors were eliminated. Data statistics was performed by SPSS 13.0 and Excel 2007 referring to upper and lower limits of reference intervals and sources of 7 blood gas and acid-base analysis assays, i.e. pH value, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. Values were further grouped based on instrument system and the difference between each group were analyzed. There were 225 laboratories submitting the information on the reference intervals they had been using. The three main sources of reference intervals were National Guide to Clinical Laboratory Procedures [37.07% (400/1 079)], instructions of instrument manufactures [31.23% (337/1 079)] and instructions of reagent manufactures [23.26% (251/1 079)]. Approximately 35.1% (79/225) of the laboratories had validated the reference intervals they used. The difference of upper and lower limits in most assays among 7 laboratories was moderate, both minimum and maximum (i.e. the upper limits of pH value was 7.00-7.45, the lower limits of Na+ was 130.00-156.00 mmol/L), and mean and median (i.e. the upper limits of K+ was 5.04 mmol/L and 5.10 mmol/L, the upper limits of PCO2 was 45.65 mmHg and 45.00 mmHg, 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), as well as the difference in P2.5 and P97.5 between each instrument system group. It was shown by Kruskal-Wallis method that the P values of upper and lower limits of all the parameters were lower than 0.001, expecting the lower limits of Na+ with P value 0.029. It was shown by Mann-Whitney that the statistic differences were found among instrument

  2. Electrodeposited Fe-Co films prepared from a citric-acid-based plating bath

    OpenAIRE

    Yanai, Takeshi; Uto, H.; Shimokawa, Takaya; Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposited Fe-Co films are commonly prepared in a boric-acid-based bath. In this research, we applied citric acid instead of boric acid for the plating of Fe-Co films because boron in the waste bath is restricted by environmental-protection regulations in Japan. We evaluated the effect of citric acid on the magnetic and structural properties of the films. The saturation magnetization of the Fe-Co films slightly increased while the Fe content in the Fe-Co films decreased with increasing ...

  3. The scaled-charge additive force field for amino acid based ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fileti, E. E.; Chaban, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) constitute an emerging research field. New ILs involve more and more organic and inorganic ions. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to their evolutional connection to proteins. We report a new non-polarizable force field (FF) for the eight AAILs...... comprising 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and amino acid anions. The anions were obtained via deprotonation of carboxyl group. Specific cation-anion non-covalent interactions were taken into account by computing electrostatic potential for ion pairs. The van der Waals interactions were adopted from...

  4. The role of acid-base imbalance in statin-induced myotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Dhiaa A; De Moor, Cornelia H; Barrett, David A; Lee, Jong Bong; Gandhi, Raj D; Hoo, Chee Wei; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances in acid-base balance, such as acidosis and alkalosis, have potential to alter the pharmacologic and toxicologic outcomes of statin therapy. Statins are commonly prescribed for elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, and renal diseases. These patients are at risk of developing acid-base imbalance. In the present study, the effect of disturbances in acid-base balance on the interconversion of simvastatin and pravastatin between lactone and hydroxy acid forms have been investigated in physiological buffers, human plasma, and cell culture medium over pH ranging from 6.8-7.8. The effects of such interconversion on cellular uptake and myotoxicity of statins were assessed in vitro using C2C12 skeletal muscle cells under conditions relevant to acidosis, alkalosis, and physiological pH. Results indicate that the conversion of the lactone forms of simvastatin and pravastatin to the corresponding hydroxy acid is strongly pH dependent. At physiological and alkaline pH, substantial proportions of simvastatin lactone (SVL; ∼87% and 99%, respectively) and pravastatin lactone (PVL; ∼98% and 99%, respectively) were converted to the active hydroxy acid forms after 24 hours of incubation at 37°C. At acidic pH, conversion occurs to a lower extent, resulting in greater proportion of statin remaining in the more lipophilic lactone form. However, pH alteration did not influence the conversion of the hydroxy acid forms of simvastatin and pravastatin to the corresponding lactones. Furthermore, acidosis has been shown to hinder the metabolism of the lactone form of statins by inhibiting hepatic microsomal enzyme activities. Lipophilic SVL was found to be more cytotoxic to undifferentiated and differentiated skeletal muscle cells compared with more hydrophilic simvastatin hydroxy acid, PVL, and pravastatin hydroxy acid. Enhanced cytotoxicity of statins was observed under acidic conditions and is attributed to increased

  5. Characterization of Polymer Surfaces by the Use of Different Wetting Theories Regarding Acid-Base Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Kraus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing wetting methods for the determination of acid-base properties on solid surfaces are discussed. Striving for a better understanding of the adhesive polymer interactions in adhesively joined polymers, the methods of Berger and van Oss-Chaudhury-Good were found as the most suitable methods for the investigation of wetting on solid polymer surfaces. Methods of nonlinear systems by Della Volpe and Siboni were adapted and evaluated on plastic surfaces. In the context of these investigations various data of the surface free energy as well as its components have been identified for a number of polymer surfaces by application of spatial equation solutions.

  6. Has Stewart approach improved our ability to diagnose acid-base disorders in critically ill patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masevicius, Fabio D; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2015-02-04

    The Stewart approach-the application of basic physical-chemical principles of aqueous solutions to blood-is an appealing method for analyzing acid-base disorders. These principles mainly dictate that pH is determined by three independent variables, which change primarily and independently of one other. In blood plasma in vivo these variables are: (1) the PCO2; (2) the strong ion difference (SID)-the difference between the sums of all the strong (i.e., fully dissociated, chemically nonreacting) cations and all the strong anions; and (3) the nonvolatile weak acids (Atot). Accordingly, the pH and the bicarbonate levels (dependent variables) are only altered when one or more of the independent variables change. Moreover, the source of H(+) is the dissociation of water to maintain electroneutrality when the independent variables are modified. The basic principles of the Stewart approach in blood, however, have been challenged in different ways. First, the presumed independent variables are actually interdependent as occurs in situations such as: (1) the Hamburger effect (a chloride shift when CO2 is added to venous blood from the tissues); (2) the loss of Donnan equilibrium (a chloride shift from the interstitium to the intravascular compartment to balance the decrease of Atot secondary to capillary leak; and (3) the compensatory response to a primary disturbance in either independent variable. Second, the concept of water dissociation in response to changes in SID is controversial and lacks experimental evidence. In addition, the Stewart approach is not better than the conventional method for understanding acid-base disorders such as hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis secondary to a chloride-rich-fluid load. Finally, several attempts were performed to demonstrate the clinical superiority of the Stewart approach. These studies, however, have severe methodological drawbacks. In contrast, the largest study on this issue indicated the interchangeability of the Stewart and

  7. Acid-base regulation in tadpoles of Rana catesbeiana exposed to environmental hypercapnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Morten; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Jensen, Frank B.

    1997-01-01

    Tadpoles of Rana catesbeiana were exposed to different levels of environmental hypercapnia. The acid-base regulatory response differed from that in adult amphibians in showing a high degree of pH compensation in the extracellular fluid (65-85%) and complete compensation in the intracellular fluid......-base equivalents marginally, suggesting that mobilisable CaCO3 stores were depleted during the first exposure to hypercapnia and that they were not refilled. The CaCO3 stores may normally be mobilised during the slowly developing internal hypercapnia that occurs during metamorphosis....

  8. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid-base neutralization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabing; Wan Jiangling; Wang Yirui; Mou Dongsheng; Liu Hongbin; Xu Huibi; Yang Xiangliang

    2008-01-01

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries

  9. New Trends in Gold Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonarda F. Liotta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold is an element that has fascinated mankind for millennia. The catalytic properties of gold have been a source of debate, due to its complete chemical inertness when in a bulk form, while it can oxidize CO at temperatures as low as ~200 K when in a nanocrystalline state, as discovered by Haruta in the late 1980s [1]. Since then, extensive activity in both applied and fundamental research on gold has been initiated. The importance of the catalysis by gold represents one of the fasted growing fields in science and is proven by the promising applications in several fields, such as green chemistry and environmental catalysis, in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, as modifiers of Ni catalysts for methane steam and dry reforming reactions and in biological and electrochemistry applications. The range of reactions catalyzed by gold, as well as the suitability of different supports and the influence of the preparation conditions have been widely explored and optimized in applied research [2]. Gold catalysts appeared to be very different from the other noble metal-based catalysts, due to their marked dependence on the preparation method, which is crucial for the genesis of the catalytic activity. Several methods, including deposition-precipitation, chemical vapor deposition and cation adsorption, have been applied for the preparation of gold catalysts over reducible oxides, like TiO2. Among these methods, deposition-precipitation has been the most frequently employed method for Au loading, and it involves the use of tetrachloroauric (III acid as a precursor. On the other hand, the number of articles dealing with Au-loaded acidic supports is smaller than that on basic supports, possibly because the deposition of [AuCl4]− or [AuOHxCl4−x]− species on acidic supports is difficult, due to their very low point of zero charge. Despite this challenge, several groups have reported the use of acidic zeolites as supports for gold. Zeolites

  10. Oxygen affinity and acid-base status of human blood during exposure to hypoxia and carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhausen, R.O.; Astrup, P.; Mellemgaard, K.

    1968-01-01

    Eight individuals exposed to hypoxia at altitude or simulated altitude in hypobaric chamber had hemoglobin with a decreased affinity for O/sub 2/ as shown by a shift in the dissociation curve to the right (about 4 mm at 3450 m). Acid-base changes could not explain shift. Intermittent CO doses to maintain approx. 15% carboxyhemoglobin produced the typical shift to the left. Acid-base changes were insignificant. Proposed adaptation mechanism for combating hypoxia does not work for CO poisoning.

  11. Active carbon catalyst for heavy oil upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Hidetsugu; Terai, Satoshi [Technology Research Center, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 1818 Azafujimi, Togo, Mobara-shi, Chiba 297-00017 (Japan); Uchida, Masayuki [Business Planning and Exploring Department, Overseas Business Development and Marketing Division, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 2-8-1 Akanehama, Narashino-shi, Chiba 275-0024 (Japan); Cano, Jose L.; Ancheyta, Jorge [Maya Crude Treatment Project, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-11-24

    The active carbon (AC) catalyst was studied by hydrocracking of Middle Eastern vacuum residue (VR) for heavy oil upgrading. It was observed that the active carbon has the affinity to heavy hydrocarbon compounds and adsorption selectivity to asphaltenes, and exhibits better ability to restrict the coke formation during the hydrocracking reaction of VR. The mesopore of active carbon was thought to play an important role for effective conversion of heavy hydrocarbon compounds into lighter fractions restricting carbon formation. The performance of the AC catalyst was examined by continuous hydrocracking by CSTR for the removal of such impurities as sulfur and heavy metals (nickel and vanadium), which are mostly concentrated in the asphaltenes. The AC catalyst was confirmed to be very effective for the removal of heavy metals from Middle Eastern VR, Maya/Istmo VR and Maya VR. The extruded AC catalysts were produced by industrial manufacturing method. The application test of the extruded AC catalyst for ebullating-bed reactor as one of the commercially applicable reactors was carried out at the ebullating-bed pilot plant for 500h. The ebullition of the extruded AC catalyst was successfully traced and confirmed by existing {gamma}-ray density meter. The extruded AC catalyst showed stable performance with less sediment formation at an equivalent conversion by conventional alumina catalyst at commercial ebullating-bed unit. The degradation of the AC catalyst at the aging test was observed to be less than that of the conventional alumina catalyst. Thus, the AC catalyst was confirmed to be effective and suitable for upgrading of heavy oil, especially such heavy oils as Maya, which contains much heavy metals.

  12. Pt -based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Bibian; Sanchez, Carlos; Gonzalez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is studied the electro-catalytic behavior of pure platinum and platinum-based alloys with Ru, Sn, Ir, and Os supported on carbon to the ethanol electro-oxidation in aims to develop anodic catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells, additionally, porous electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies were built for proton exchange membrane fuel cells in which the electrodes were tested. Catalysts characterization was made by cyclic voltammetry whereas the fuel cells behavior tests were made by current-potential polarization curves. in general, all alloys show a lower on-set reaction potential and a higher catalytic activity than pure platinum. However, in the high over potential zone, pure platinum has higher catalytic activity than the alloys. In agreement with these results, the alloys studied here could be useful in fuel cells operating on moderated and low current

  13. Bismuth( Ⅲ ) Salts: Green Catalysts for Organic Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Le Roux

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Bismuth, the heaviest stable element in the periodic table, stands out from other heavy elements (such as mercury, thallium and lead) due to its relatively non-toxic character which confers on bismuth the enviable status of being an eco-friendly element. Therefore, bismuth and its compounds hold considerable promise as useful catalysts for green chemistry. The research presented in this communication is devoted to the applications of bismuth( Ⅲ ) salts as catalysts for organic transformations.After some general comments about bismuth and a short presentation of the various applications of bismuth( Ⅲ ) salts in organic synthesis, this communication will focus on the works done in our research group during the last several years which deals mainly with electrophilic substitutions. When appropriate, some mechanistic details will be given.

  14. Ammonia production from amino acid-based biomass-like sources by engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Yosuke; Yoneda, Hisanari; Tatsukami, Yohei; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-12-01

    The demand for ammonia is expected to increase in the future because of its importance in agriculture, industry, and hydrogen transportation. Although the Haber-Bosch process is known as an effective way to produce ammonia, the process is energy-intensive. Thus, an environmentally friendly ammonia production process is desired. In this study, we aimed to produce ammonia from amino acids and amino acid-based biomass-like resources by modifying the metabolism of Escherichia coli. By engineering metabolic flux to promote ammonia production using the overexpression of the ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene (kivd), derived from Lactococcus lactis, ammonia production from amino acids was 351 mg/L (36.6% yield). Furthermore, we deleted the glnA gene, responsible for ammonia assimilation. Using yeast extract as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, the resultant strain produced 458 mg/L of ammonia (47.8% yield) from an amino acid-based biomass-like material. The ammonia production yields obtained are the highest reported to date. This study suggests that it will be possible to produce ammonia from waste biomass in an environmentally friendly process.

  15. Manipulation of partially oriented hydroxyapatite building blocks to form flowerlike bundles without acid-base regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenliang; Wang, Zihao; Chen, Jingdi; Zhong, Shengnan; Hu, Yimin; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-06-01

    The application of hydroxyapatite (HAP) in different fields depends greatly on its morphology, composition and structure. Besides, the main inorganic building blocks of human bones and teeth are also HAP. Therefore, accurate shape and aggregation control and of hydroxyapatite particles will be of great interest. Herein, oriented bundles of flowerlike HAP nanorods were successfully prepared through hydrothermal treatment without acid-base regulation, with the mono-alkyl phosphate (MAP) and sodium citrate as surfactant and chelating agent, respectively. The prepared samples were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and zeta potential, the pH value and conductivity value of suspension were characterized by pH meter and conductivity measurement. The results showed that the MAP and citrate play an important role in assembly of HAP nanorods without acid-base regulation. Citrate calcium complex could decompose slowly and release citrate ions at hydrothermal conditions. Besides, the further decomposition of citrate ions could release aconitic acid as the reaction time prolongs. Moreover, the possible scheme for the formation process was discussed in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal runaway reaction hazards and mechanisms of hydroxylamine with acid/base contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Chunyang; Saraf, Sanjeev R.; Rogers, William J.; Sam Mannan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxylamine (HA) has been involved in two incidents since 1999 because of its thermal instability and incompatibility. In this study, thermal runaway reactions of hydroxylamine with various concentrations of KOH and HCl were studied using the reactive system screening tool (RSST) and automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC). The thermokinetic data, such as onset temperature, heat of reaction, maximum self-heat rate, maximum pressure rate, and non-condensable gas pressure, were compared with those of hydroxylamine solution without added impurity. Our study shows that the thermal decomposition behavior of hydroxylamine is affected by the presence of acid/base, and mixing of hydroxylamine with acid/base may cause thermal decomposition at lower temperatures. Different decomposition pathways can be initiated by hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion. The decomposition mechanisms of hydroxylamine in alkaline and acidic solutions are proposed based on the products, information from the literature, and quantum mechanical calculations. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the proposed reaction mechanisms

  17. AMINO ACID-BASED FERTILIZER AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO CALDA VIÇOSA IN ORGANIC AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fontebasso Pelizari Pinto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to propose a mixture of micronutrients with amino acid-based foliar fertilizer as an alternative to calda viçosa for application in organic agriculture. The study was conducted in two simultaneous trials in an experimental field in Ipeúna, SP, Brazil. The test plant was carioca type dry edible bean cv. Pérola. The treatments in trial 1 were: Control 1 = water; FA = JK® amino acid-based foliar fertilizer; and FA+Mi = FA + CuSO4 + ZnSO4 + MnSO4 + H3BO3. In trial 2, the FA treatment was substituted by calda viçosa (CVi. The treatments were through spray application three times. Dry edible bean leaves were sampled for determination of macronutrient and micronutrient concentrations. Platings of the application rates used in the treatments were performed in the laboratory in a mixture with Bacillus thuringiensis and with Beauveria bassiana to compare the degree of compatibility by means of colony forming units (CFU. The FA+Mi and CVi treatments raised the concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Mn in the leaves. The FA+Mi was compatible, the FA was a stimulant, and the CVi was noxious to B. bassiana and to B. thuringiensis when integrated in the spray mixture.

  18. Coefficient of Friction Between Carboxymethylated Hyaluronic Acid-Based Polymer Films and the Ocular Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, Jourdan; Wirostko, Barbara; Coats, Brittany

    2017-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid-based polymer films are emerging as drug-delivery vehicles for local and continuous drug administration to the eye. The highly lubricating hyaluronic acid increases comfort, but displaces films from the eye, reducing drug exposure and efficacy. Previous studies have shown that careful control of the surface interaction of the film with the eye is critical for improved retention. In this study, the frictional interaction of a carboxymethylated, hyaluronic acid-based polymer (CMHA-S) with and without methylcellulose was quantified against ovine and human sclera at three axial loads (0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 N) and four sliding velocities (0.3, 1.0, 10, and 30 mm/s). Static coefficients of friction significantly increased with rate (P Friction became more rate-dependent when methylcellulose was added to CMHA-S. Kinetic coefficient of friction was not affected by rate, and averaged 0.15 ± 0.1. Methylcellulose increased CMHA-S static and kinetic friction by 60% and 80%, respectively, but was also prone to wear during testing. These data suggest that methylcellulose can be used to create a friction differential on the film, but a potentially increased degradation rate with the methylcellulose must be considered in the design.

  19. Acid-base properties of a limed pyritic overburden during simulated weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, J.J.; Hossner, L.R. [South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD (United States). Plant Science Dept.

    1997-11-01

    Surface-mine reclamation is often hindered by the formation of acid mine soil and acid mine drainage from FeS{sub 2} oxidation. Surface soils containing FeS{sub 2} are often treated with crushed limestone (predominately CaCO{sub 3}) to prevent aid minesoil formation. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of liming pyritic minesoil to prevent the formation of acid minesoil and acid mine drainage. Pyritic minesoils that did not receive lime became acidic very rapidly and produced acidic leachate. Almost all of the FeS{sub 2} in this treatment oxidized during the first 200 d. The addition of lime at a rate of 25% of the theoretical acid-base account (ABA) significantly slowed FeS{sub 2} oxidation, but rapid oxidation ensued after the added lime was neutralized. Treatments receiving a liming rate of 50% ABA or greater remained neutral to alkaline throughout the study. Acid-base values and residual FeS{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} data, however, indicate that the lime was dissolving from the system faster than the FeS{sub 2} was oxidizing, and all the treatments would eventually become acidic. The results indicate that the liming of a pyritic overburden to an ABA of 125% is not a sustainable solution to preventing acid minesoil and acid mine drainage. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. An Exact Method to Determine the Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions in Acid-Base Titrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Rodríguez-Laguna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several works in the literature show that it is possible to establish the analytic equations to estimate the volume V of a strong base or a strong acid (Vb and Va, resp. being added to a solution of a substance or a mix of substances during an acid-base titration, as well as the equations to estimate the first derivative of the titration plot dpH/dV, and algebraic expressions to determine the buffer β capacity with dilution βdil. This treatment allows establishing the conditions of thermodynamic equilibria for all species within a system containing a mix of species from one or from various polyacid systems. The present work shows that it is possible to determine exactly the electric conductivity of aqueous solutions for these Brønsted acid-base titrations, because the functional relation between this property and the composition of the system in equilibrium is well known; this is achieved using the equivalent conductivity λi values of each of the ions present in a given system. The model employed for the present work confirms the experimental outcomes with the H2SO4, B(OH3, CH3COOH, and H3PO4 aqueous solutions’ titration.

  1. Spectroscopic study on variations in illite surface properties after acid-base titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-xin; Coveney, R M; Tang, Hong-xiao

    2003-07-01

    FT-IR, Raman microscopy, XRD, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR, were used to investigate changes in surface properties of a natural illite sample after acid-base potentiometric titration. The characteristic XRD lines indicated the presence of surface Al-Si complexes, preferable to Al(OH)3 precipitates. In the microscopic Raman spectra, the vibration peaks of Si-O and Al-O bonds diminished as a result of treatment with acid, then increased after hydroxide back titration. The varied ratio of signal intensity between (IV)Al and (VI)Al species in 27Al MAS NMR spectra, together with the stable BET surface area after acidimetric titration, suggested that edge faces and basal planes in the layer structure of illite participated in dissolution of structural components. The combined spectroscopic evidence demonstrated that the reactions between illite surfaces and acid-leaching silicic acid and aluminum ions should be considered in the model description of surface acid-base properties of the aqueous illite.

  2. Prevention of Ophthalmia Neonatorum Caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae Using a Fatty Acid-Based Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin P. Churchward

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmia neonatorum, also called neonatal conjunctivitis, acquired during delivery can occur in the first 28 days of life. Commonly caused by the bacterial pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, infection can lead to corneal scarring, perforation of the eye, and blindness. One approach that can be taken to prevent the disease is the use of an ophthalmic prophylaxis, which kills the bacteria on the surface of the eye shortly after birth. Current prophylaxes are based on antibiotic ointments. However, N. gonorrhoeae is resistant to many antibiotics and alternative treatments must be developed before the condition becomes untreatable. This study focused on developing a fatty acid-based prophylaxis. For this, 37 fatty acids or fatty acid derivatives were screened in vitro for fast antigonococcal activity. Seven candidates were identified as bactericidal at 1 mM. These seven were subjected to irritation testing using three separate methods: the bovine corneal opacity and permeability (BCOP test; the hen’s egg test—chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM; and the red blood cell (RBC lysis assay. The candidates were also tested in artificial tear fluid to determine whether they were effective in this environment. Four of the candidates remained effective. Among these, two lead candidates, monocaprin and myristoleic acid, displayed the best potential as active compounds in the development of a fatty acid-based prophylaxis for prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum.

  3. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Anna; Czaja, Malgorzata; Chmurzynski, Lech

    2006-01-01

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, K a , anionic, K AHA - , and cationic, K BHB + , homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, K BHA , constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (K AHA - values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgK BHA reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pK a values

  4. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S.; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti4+ to form planar p-type [Ti4+n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B3+, Al3+ and Sn4+) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  5. Design, synthesis and structure of new potential electrochemically active boronic acid-based glucose sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.; Søtofte, Inger

    2002-01-01

    In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report the synthe......In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report...... the synthesis of the compounds and our investigations on glucose complexation as studied by C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of 2,4,6-tris[2-(N-ferrocenylmethyl-N-methylaminomethyl) phenyl] boroxin (13) (boroxin of boronic acid 3) (boroxin = cyclotriboroxane) was obtained and compared...... with structures obtained of 2,4,6-tris[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)phenyl]boroxin (14) and 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-diyl[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)phenyl]boronate (15). The structure of 13 shows the existence of intramolecular B-N bonds in the solid phase....

  6. Competitive/co-operative interactions in acid base sandwich: role of cation vs. substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, Ayyavoo; Akilandeswari, Lakshminarayanan

    2017-11-15

    The cation-π interaction can be envisaged as a lewis acid base interaction, and it is in line with Pearson's acid base concept. The critical examination of interactions between the π-acids (alkali metal cations - Li + , Na + and alkaline earth metal cations Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ ) on one face and tripodal Cr(CO) 3 moiety on the other π face of substituted arenes demonstrates the role of cation and substitutents in manipulating the interactions between them. The interaction of the two π acids on both faces of arene is not expectedly additive, rather it shows either depreciation of interaction energy revealing the competition of acids toward the base or enhancement of interaction energy denoting a cooperative effect. Among the metal cations under study, Mg 2+ shows a cooperative gesture. Although the substituents play a meek role, they unfailingly exert their electronic effects and are amply documented by excellent correlation of various parameters with the Hammett constant σ m . The elusive switching of λ max from the UV to IR region on binding Mg 2+ with substituted arene-Cr(CO) 3 complex is a characteristic clue that TDDFT can help design the ionic sensors for Mg 2+ cations.

  7. Enhanced dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets in aqueous media by using bile acid-based surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ari; Park, Soo-Jin; Min, Byunggak; In, Insik

    2018-01-01

    Facile noncovalent surface functionalization of hydroxylated boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS-OH) was attempted through the sonication-assisted exfoliation of h-BN in aqueous media in the presence of bile acid-based surfactants such as sodium cholic acid (SC) or sodium deoxycholic acid (SDC), resulting in SC- or SDC-BNNS-OH dispersion with high up to 2 mg ml-1 and enhanced dispersion stability due to the increased negative zeta potential. While prepared SC-BNNS-OH revealed multi-layered BNNS structures, the large lateral sizes of hundreds nanometers and clear h-BN lattice structures are very promising for the preparation and application of water-processable BNNS-based nanomaterials. It is regarded that noncovalent functionalization of BNNS-OH based on σ-π interaction between with σ-rich bile acid-based amphiphiles and π-rich BNNS is very effective to formulate multi-functional BNNS-based nanomaterials or hybrids that can be utilized in various applications where both the pristine properties of BNNS and the extra functions are simultaneously required.

  8. Acid-base synergistic flame retardant wood pulp paper with high thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Yuansen; Xu, Changan; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Qi

    2017-12-15

    Acid-catalytic degradation caused by acid source flame retardants is the main reason for a decline in thermal stability of flame-retarded lignocellulosic materials. In the present research, a guanidine phosphate (GP)/borax (BX) flame retardant system based on acid-base synergistic interaction was designed and used in wood pulp paper (WPP) to solve this problem. Results showed that the treated WPP obtained good flame retardancy with a limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of 35.7%. As a basic flame retardant, borax could chemically combine with the acids released by guanidine phosphate, thus decreasing the acidity of the system in the initial heating stage. In this way, acid-catalytic degradation is greatly retarded on the lignocelluloses to improve thermal stability (the temperature of maximum degradation peak from 286°C to 314°C). Meanwhile, borax was also advantageous to form a denser and firmer condensed phase through reinforcement of the acid-base reaction product, borophosphates, allowing it to provide a protective barrier with higher quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acid-base physiology, neurobiology and behaviour in relation to CO2-induced ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Hamilton, Trevor J

    2017-06-15

    Experimental exposure to ocean and freshwater acidification affects the behaviour of multiple aquatic organisms in laboratory tests. One proposed cause involves an imbalance in plasma chloride and bicarbonate ion concentrations as a result of acid-base regulation, causing the reversal of ionic fluxes through GABA A receptors, which leads to altered neuronal function. This model is exclusively based on differential effects of the GABA A receptor antagonist gabazine on control animals and those exposed to elevated CO 2 However, direct measurements of actual chloride and bicarbonate concentrations in neurons and their extracellular fluids and of GABA A receptor properties in aquatic organisms are largely lacking. Similarly, very little is known about potential compensatory mechanisms, and about alternative mechanisms that might lead to ocean acidification-induced behavioural changes. This article reviews the current knowledge on acid-base physiology, neurobiology, pharmacology and behaviour in relation to marine CO 2 -induced acidification, and identifies important topics for future research that will help us to understand the potential effects of predicted levels of aquatic acidification on organisms. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Acid-base equilibria and solubility of loratadine and desloratadine in water and micellar media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Gordana; Cakar, Mira; Agbaba, Danica

    2009-01-15

    Acid-base equilibria in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems of two antihistaminics, loratadine and desloratadine were studied spectrophotometrically in Britton-Robinson's buffer at 25 degrees C. Acidity constant of loratadine was found to be pK(a) 5.25 and those of desloratadine pK(a1) 4.41 and pK(a2) 9.97. The values of intrinsic solubilities of loratadine and desloratadine were 8.65x10(-6) M and 3.82x10(-4) M, respectively. Based on the pK(a) values and intrinsic solubilities, solubility curves of these two drugs as a function of pH were calculated. The effects of anionic, cationic and non-ionic surfactants applied in the concentration exceeding critical micelle concentration (cmc) on acid-base properties of loratadine and desloratadine, as well as on intrinsic solubility of loratadine were also examined. The results revealed a shift of pK(a) values in micellar media comparing to the values obtained in water. These shifts (DeltapK(a)) ranged from -2.24 to +1.24.

  11. Effect of temperature on acid-base equilibria in separation techniques. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Leonardo G; Tascon, Marcos; Castells, Cecilia B

    2015-08-19

    Studies on the theoretical principles of acid-base equilibria are reviewed and the influence of temperature on secondary chemical equilibria within the context of separation techniques, in water and also in aqueous-organic solvent mixtures, is discussed. In order to define the relationships between the retention in liquid chromatography or the migration velocity in capillary electrophoresis and temperature, the main properties of acid-base equilibria have to be taken into account for both, the analytes and the conjugate pairs chosen to control the solution pH. The focus of this review is based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), liquid chromatography (LC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE), with emphasis on the use of temperature as a useful variable to modify selectivity on a predictable basis. Simplified models were evaluated to achieve practical optimizations involving pH and temperature (in LLE and CE) as well as solvent composition in reversed-phase LC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling of the acid base properties of two thermophilic bacteria at different growth times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Hannah T. M.; Bremer, Phil J.; McQuillan, A. James; Daughney, Christopher J.

    2008-09-01

    Acid-base titrations and electrophoretic mobility measurements were conducted on the thermophilic bacteria Anoxybacillus flavithermus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus at two different growth times corresponding to exponential and stationary/death phase. The data showed significant differences between the two investigated growth times for both bacterial species. In stationary/death phase samples, cells were disrupted and their buffering capacity was lower than that of exponential phase cells. For G. stearothermophilus the electrophoretic mobility profiles changed dramatically. Chemical equilibrium models were developed to simultaneously describe the data from the titrations and the electrophoretic mobility measurements. A simple approach was developed to determine confidence intervals for the overall variance between the model and the experimental data, in order to identify statistically significant changes in model fit and thereby select the simplest model that was able to adequately describe each data set. Exponential phase cells of the investigated thermophiles had a higher total site concentration than the average found for mesophilic bacteria (based on a previously published generalised model for the acid-base behaviour of mesophiles), whereas the opposite was true for cells in stationary/death phase. The results of this study indicate that growth phase is an important parameter that can affect ion binding by bacteria, that growth phase should be considered when developing or employing chemical models for bacteria-bearing systems.

  13. Effect of Gamma Radiation on Amino Acid Based Vesicle Carrying Radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Ratasha Alia Mohd Rosli; Faizal Mohamed; Muhammad Amir Syafiq Mohd Sah; Irman Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Vesicles has been developed and studied to be used as a medium to transport radiosensitizer in treating cancer cells by increasing its sensitivity effectively towards the radiation given during radiotherapy. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on amino acid-based vesicle carrying radiosensitizer. Amino acid based vesicles carrying radiosensitizer were synthesized using sonication method with sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate and decanol being the primary surfactant, while hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate as the encapsulated radiosensitizer. The synthesized vesicle was then irradiated at radiation doses equivalent to those given during radiotherapy. Irradiated vesicle carrying radiosensitizer were then characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Polarized Light Microscope. Results obtained shows that there were no significant changes in morphology and molecular conformation of the synthesized vesicle after irradiation. Even at higher radiation dose of 100 Gray and 200 Gray, the results remained unchanged. This indicates that the synthesized vesicle carrying radiosensitizer is morphologically and spectroscopically stable even at high radiation doses. (author)

  14. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anizelli, Pedro R; Baú, João Paulo T; Gomes, Frederico P; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S; Carneiro, Cristine E A; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  15. Influence of an acetate- and a lactate-based balanced infusion solution on acid base physiology and hemodynamics: an observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Kiefer, Klaus F; Chappell, Daniel; Kammerer, Tobias; Jacob, Matthias; Paptistella, Michaela; Conzen, Peter; Rehm, Markus

    2012-07-06

    The current pilot study compares the impact of an intravenous infusion of Ringer's lactate to an acetate-based solution with regard to acid-base balance. The study design included the variables of the Stewart approach and focused on the effective strong ion difference. Because adverse hemodynamic effects have been reported when using acetate buffered solutions in hemodialysis, hemodynamics were also evaluated. Twenty-four women who had undergone abdominal gynecologic surgery and who had received either Ringer's lactate (Strong Ion Difference 28 mmol/L; n = 12) or an acetate-based solution (Strong Ion Difference 36.8 mmol/L; n = 12) according to an established clinical protocol and its precursor were included in the investigation. After induction of general anesthesia, a set of acid-base variables, hemodynamic values and serum electrolytes was measured three times during the next 120 minutes. Patients received a mean dose of 4,054 ± 450 ml of either one or the other of the solutions. In terms of mean arterial blood pressure and norepinephrine requirements there were no differences to observe between the study groups. pH and serum HCO3- concentration decreased slightly but significantly only with Ringer's lactate. In addition, the acetate-based solution kept the plasma effective strong ion difference more stable than Ringer's lactate. Both of the solutions provided hemodynamic stability. Concerning consistency of acid base parameters none of the solutions seemed to be inferior, either. Whether the slight advantages observed for the acetate-buffered solution in terms of stability of pH and plasma HCO3- are clinically relevant, needs to be investigated in a larger randomized controlled trial.

  16. Novel sulfonated poly (ether ether keton)/polyetherimide acid-base blend membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuai; Wang, Lihua; Ding, Yue; Liu, Biqian; Han, Xutong; Song, Yanlin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • SPEEK/PEI acid-base blend membranes are prepared for VRB applications. • The acid-base blend membranes have much lower vanadium ion permeability. • The energy efficiency of SPEEK/PEI maintain around 86.9% after 50 cycles. - Abstract: Novel acid-base blend membranes composed of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyetherimide (PEI) were prepared for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). The blend membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The ion exchange capacity (IEC), proton conductivity, water uptake, vanadium ion permeability and mechanical properties were measured. As a result, the acid-base blend membranes exhibit higher water uptake, IEC and lower vanadium ion permeability compared to Nafion117 membranes and all these properties decrease with the increase of PEI. In VRB single cell test, the VRB with blend membranes shows lower charge capacity loss, higher coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) than Nafion117 membrane. Furthermore, the acid-base blend membranes present stable performance up to 50 cycles with no significant decline in CE and EE. All experimental results indicate that the SPEEK/PEI (S/P) acid-base blend membranes show promising prospects for VRB

  17. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  18. Novel metalloporphyrin catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, M.C.; Nenoff, T.M.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Work was done for developing biomimetic oxidation catalysts. Two classes of metalloporphyrin catalysts were studied. The first class of catalysts studied were a novel series of highly substituted metalloporphyrins, the fluorinated iron dodecaphenylporphyrins. These homogeneous metalloporphyrin catalysts were screened for activity as catalysts in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by dioxygen. Results are discussed with respect to catalyst structural features. The second type of catalysts studied were heterogeneous catalysts consisting of metalloporphyrins applied to inorganic supports. Preliminary catalytic testing results with these materials are presented.

  19. European workshop on spent catalysts. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In 1999 and 2002 two well attended workshops on recycling, regeneration, reuse and disposal of spent catalysts took place in Frankfurt. This series has been continued in Berlin. The workshop was organized in collaboration with DGMK, the German Society for Petroleum and Coal Science and Technology. Contributions were in the following areas of catalyst deactivation: recycling of spent catalysts in chemical and petrochemical industry, recycling of precious metal catalysts and heterogenous base metal catalysts, legal aspects of transboundary movements, catalyst regeneration, quality control, slurry catalysts, commercial reactivation of hydrotreating catalysts. (uke)

  20. Transmission electron microscopy on live catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, G.M.

    2017-01-01

    The dissertation describes TEM experiments on heterogeneous catalysts. Starting with characterization of (Ni/Co)MoS2 on Alumina and the effect of oxidation, and sequential resulfidation. After that, Co-based catalysts are used for high-resolution (S)TEM/EDX caracterization studies, and in situ

  1. Chemical engineering design of CO oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    How a chemical reaction engineer would approach the challenge of designing a CO oxidation catalyst for pulsed CO2 lasers is described. CO oxidation catalysts have a long history of application, of course, so it is instructive to first consider the special requirements of the laser application and then to compare them to the characteristics of existing processes which utilize CO oxidation catalysts. All CO2 laser applications require a CO oxidation catalyst with the following characteristics: (1) active at stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO, (2) no inhibition by CO2 or other components of the laser environment, (3) releases no particulates during vibration or thermal cycling, and (4) long lifetime with a stable activity. In all applications, low consumption of power is desirable, a characteristic especially critical in aerospace applications and, thus, catalyst activity at low temperatures is highly desirable. High power lasers with high pulse repetition rates inherently require circulation of the gas mixture and this forced circulation is available for moving gas past the catalyst. Low repetition rate lasers, however, do not inherently require gas circulation, so a catalyst that did not require such circulation would be favorable from the standpoint of minimum power consumption. Lasers designed for atmospheric penetration of their infrared radiation utilize CO2 formed from rare isotopes of oxygen and this application has the additional constraint that normal abundance oxygen isotopes in the catalyst must not exchange with rare isotopes in the gas mixture.

  2. Carbons and carbon supported catalysts in hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, Edward

    2009-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive summary of recent research in the field and covers all areas of carbons and carbon materials. The potential application of carbon supports, particularly those of carbon black (CB) and activated carbon (AC) in hydroprocessing catalysis are covered. Novel carbon materials such as carbon fibers and carbon nano tubes (CNT) are also covered, including the more recent developments in the use of fullerenes in hydroprocessing applications. Although the primary focus of this book is on carbons and carbon supported catalysts, it also identifies the difference in the effect of carbon supports compared with the oxidic supports, particularly that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference in catalyst activity and stability was estimated using both model compounds and real feeds under variable conditions. The conditions applied during the preparation of carbon supported catalysts are also comprehensively covered and include various methods of pretreatment of carbon supports to enhance catalyst performance. The model compounds results consistently show higher hydrodesulfurization and hydrodeoxygenation activities of carbon supported catalysts than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts. Also, the deactivation of the former catalysts by coke deposition was much less evident. Chapter 6.3.1.3 is on carbon-supported catalysts: coal-derived liquids.

  3. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  4. The strange case of the "oscillating" catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busico, [No Value; Cipullo, R; Kretschmer, W; Talarico, G; Vacatello, M; Castelli, VV

    The field of stereoselective propene polymerization has been dramatically innovated by the discovery of homogeneous metallocene-based catalysts with well-defined and tunable molecular structure. Of all, "oscillating" metallocenes are probably the most ingenious and challenging example of catalyst

  5. New catalysts for clean environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maijanen, A; Hase, A [eds.; VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    VTT launched a Research Programme on Chemical Reaction Mechanisms (CREAM) in 1993. The three-year programme (1993-1995) has focused on reaction mechanisms relevant to process industries and aimed at developing novel catalysts and biocatalysts for forest, food, and specialty chemicals industries as well as for energy production. The preliminary results of this programme have already been presented in the first symposium organized in Espoo in September 1994. To conclude the programme the second symposium is organized in Otaniemi, Espoo on January 29 - 30, 1996. Papers by 19 speakers and 17 poster presentations of the 1996 Symposium are included in this book. The Symposium consists of four sessions: Biotechnology for Natural Fibers Processing, New Biocatalysts, Catalysts for Clean Energy, and New Opportunities for Chemical Industry. The CREAM programme has tried to foresee solutions for the problems challenged by the public concern on environmental aspects, especially dealing with industrial processes and novel use of raw materials and energy. The programme has followed the basic routes that can lead to natural and simple solutions to develop processes in the fields of forest, food fine chemicals, and energy industry. This symposium presents the results of the programme to learn and further discuss together with the international experts that have been invited as keynote speakers. (author)

  6. New catalysts for clean environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maijanen, A.; Hase, A. [eds.] [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    VTT launched a Research Programme on Chemical Reaction Mechanisms (CREAM) in 1993. The three-year programme (1993-1995) has focused on reaction mechanisms relevant to process industries and aimed at developing novel catalysts and biocatalysts for forest, food, and specialty chemicals industries as well as for energy production. The preliminary results of this programme have already been presented in the first symposium organized in Espoo in September 1994. To conclude the programme the second symposium is organized in Otaniemi, Espoo on January 29 - 30, 1996. Papers by 19 speakers and 17 poster presentations of the 1996 Symposium are included in this book. The Symposium consists of four sessions: Biotechnology for Natural Fibers Processing, New Biocatalysts, Catalysts for Clean Energy, and New Opportunities for Chemical Industry. The CREAM programme has tried to foresee solutions for the problems challenged by the public concern on environmental aspects, especially dealing with industrial processes and novel use of raw materials and energy. The programme has followed the basic routes that can lead to natural and simple solutions to develop processes in the fields of forest, food fine chemicals, and energy industry. This symposium presents the results of the programme to learn and further discuss together with the international experts that have been invited as keynote speakers. (author)

  7. Isobutane alkylation over solid catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozorezov, Y.I.; Lisin, V.I.

    1979-05-01

    Commercial alumina modified with 6Vertical Bar3< by wt boron trifluoride was active in isobutane alkylation with ethylene in a flow reactor at 5:1 isobutane-ethylene and 5-20 min reaction time. The reaction rate was first-order in ethylene and increased with increasing temperature (20/sup 0/-80/sup 0/C) and ethylene pressure (0.2-3 atm). The calculated activation energy was 8.4 kj. Kinetic data and the activity of tert.-butyl chloride, but not ethyl chloride as alkylating agents in place of ethylene suggested a carbonium-ion chain mechanism involving both surface and gas-phase reactions. The ethylene-based yield of the alkylate decreased from 132 to 41Vertical Bar3< by wt after nine hours on stream, and its bromine number increased from 0.2 to 1 g Br/sub 2//100 ml. This inhibition was attributed to adsorption on the active acidic sites of the reaction products, particularly C/sub 10//sup +/ olefins. Catalyst stabilization could probably be achieved by selecting an appropriate solvent that would continuously desorb the inhibiting products from the catalyst surface.

  8. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  9. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of nucleic acid-based devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and the genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB-complex) and the genetic mutations associated with MTB-complex antibiotic resistance in respiratory specimens devices into class II (special controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) because special controls, in addition to general controls, will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  10. Hypoxia and Its Acid-Base Consequences: From Mountains to Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Erik R

    Hypoxia, depending upon its magnitude and circumstances, evokes a spectrum of mild to severe acid-base changes ranging from alkalosis to acidosis, which can alter many responses to hypoxia at both non-genomic and genomic levels, in part via altered hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) metabolism. Healthy people at high altitude and persons hyperventilating to non-hypoxic stimuli can become alkalotic and alkalemic with arterial pH acutely rising as high as 7.7. Hypoxia-mediated respiratory alkalosis reduces sympathetic tone, blunts hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and hypoxic cerebral vasodilation, and increases hemoglobin oxygen affinity. These effects and others can be salutary or counterproductive to tissue oxygen delivery and utilization, based upon magnitude of each effect and summation. With severe hypoxia either in the setting of profound arterial hemoglobin desaturation and reduced O2 content or poor perfusion (ischemia) at the global or local level, metabolic and hypercapnic acidosis develop along with considerable lactate formation and pH falling to below 6.8. Although conventionally considered to be injurious and deleterious to cell function and survival, both acidoses may be cytoprotective by various anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms which limit total hypoxic or ischemic-reperfusion injury. Attempts to correct acidosis by giving bicarbonate or other alkaline agents under these circumstances ahead of or concurrent with reoxygenation efforts may be ill advised. Better understanding of this so-called "pH paradox" or permissive acidosis may offer therapeutic possibilities. Rapidly growing cancers often outstrip their vascular supply compromising both oxygen and nutrient delivery and metabolic waste disposal, thus limiting their growth and metastatic potential. However, their excessive glycolysis and lactate formation may not necessarily represent oxygen insufficiency, but rather the Warburg effect-an attempt to provide a large amount

  11. Acid-base behavior in hydrothermal processing of wastes. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    'A major obstacle to the development of hydrothermal technology for treating DOE wastes has been a lack of scientific knowledge of solution chemistry, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. The progress over the last year is highlighted in the following four abstracts from manuscripts which have been submitted to journals. The authors also have made considerable progress on a spectroscopic study of the acid-base equilibria of Cr(VI). They have utilized novel spectroscopic indicators to study acid-base equilibria up to 380 C. Until now, very few systems have been studied at such high temperatures, although this information is vital for hydrothermal processing of wastes. The pH values of aqueous solutions of boric acid and KOH were measured with the optical indicator 2-naphthol at temperatures from 300 to 380 C. The equilibrium constant Kb-l for the reaction B(OH)3 + OH - = B(OH) -4 was determined from the pH measurements and correlated with a modified Born model. The titration curve for the addition of HCl to sodium borate exhibits strong acid-strong base behavior even at 350 C and 24.1 MPa. At these conditions, aqueous solutions of sodium borate buffer the pH at 9.6 t 0.25. submitted to Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. Acetic Acid and HCl Acid-base titrations for the KOH-acetic acid or NH 3 -acetic acid systems were monitored with the optical indicator 2-naphthoic acid at 350 C and 34 MPa, and those for the HCl;Cl- system with acridine at 380 C and up to 34 MPa (5,000 psia ). KOH remains a much stronger base than NH,OH at high temperature. From 298 K to the critical temperature of water, the dissociation constant for HCl decreases by 13 orders of magnitude, and thus, the basicity of Cl - becomes significant. Consequently, the addition of NaCl to HCl raises the pH. The pH titration curves may be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the relevant equilibrium constants and Pitzer''s formulation of the Debye- Htickel equation for the activity coefficients.'

  12. Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of mineral-based alkaline bottled water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heil Daniel P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study sought to determine whether the consumption of a mineral-rich alkalizing (AK bottled water could improve both acid-base balance and hydration status in young healthy adults under free-living conditions. The AK water contains a naturally high mineral content along with Alka-PlexLiquid™, a dissolved supplement that increases the mineral content and gives the water an alkalizing pH of 10.0. Methods Thirty-eight subjects were matched by gender and self-reported physical activity (SRPA, hrs/week and then split into Control (12 women, 7 men; Mean +/- SD: 23 +/- 2 yrs; 7.2 +/- 3.6 hrs/week SRPA and Experimental (13 women, 6 men; 22 +/- 2 yrs; 6.4 +/- 4.0 hrs/week SRPA groups. The Control group consumed non-mineralized placebo bottled water over a 4-week period while the Experimental group consumed the placebo water during the 1st and 4th weeks and the AK water during the middle 2-week treatment period. Fingertip blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected three times each week for subsequent measures of blood and urine osmolality and pH, as well as total urine volume. Dependent variables were analyzed using multivariate repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc focused on evaluating changes over time within Control and Experimental groups (alpha = 0.05. Results There were no significant changes in any of the dependent variables for the Control group. The Experimental group, however, showed significant increases in both the blood and urine pH (6.23 to 7.07 and 7.52 to 7.69, respectively, a decreased blood and increased urine osmolality, and a decreased urine output (2.51 to 2.05 L/day, all during the second week of the treatment period (P Conclusions Consumption of AK water was associated with improved acid-base balance (i.e., an alkalization of the blood and urine and hydration status when consumed under free-living conditions. In contrast, subjects who consumed the placebo bottled water showed no changes over the

  13. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremerey, Peter; Jess, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2015-10-23

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H₂S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  14. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fremerey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  15. Reactivity of Aryl Halides for Reductive Dehalogenation in (Seawater Using Polymer-Supported Terpyridine Palladium Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimasa Suzuka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A polymer-supported terpyridine palladium complex was prepared. The complex was found to promote hydrodechlorination of aryl chlorides with potassium formate in seawater. Generally, reductive cleavage of aryl chlorides using transition metal catalysts is more difficult than that of aryl bromides and iodides (reactivity: I > Br > Cl; however, the results obtained did not follow the general trend. Therefore, we investigated the reaction inhibition agents and found a method to remove these inhibitors. The polymeric catalysts showed high catalytic activity and high reusability for transfer reduction in seawater.

  16. Second harmonic study of acid-base equilibrium at gold nanoparticle/aqueous interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Mandal, Sarthak; Bronsther, Corin; Gao, Zhenghan; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2017-09-01

    Interfacial acid-base equilibrium of the capping molecules is a key factor to stabilize gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in solution. In this study we used Second Harmonic (SH) generation to measure interfacial potential and obtained a surface pKa value of 3.3 ± 0.1 for the carboxyl group in mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) molecule at an AuNP/aqueous interface. This pKa value is smaller than its bulk counterpart and indicates that the charged carboxylate group is favored at the AuNP surface. The SH findings are consistent with the effects of the noble metal (gold) surface on a charge in solution, as predicted by the method of images.

  17. Enabling the Tablet Product Development of 5-Fluorocytosine by Conjugate Acid Base Cocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumalla, Sathyanarayana R; Paul, Shubhajit; Sun, Changquan C

    2016-06-01

    5-Fluorocytosine (FC) is a high-dose antifungal drug that challenges the development of a tablet product due to poor solid-state stability and tabletability. Using 2 pharmaceutically acceptable conjugate acid base (CAB) cocrystals of FC with HCl and acesulfame, we have developed commercially viable high loading FC tablets. The tablets were prepared by direct compression using nano-coated microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH105 as a tablet binder, which provided both excellent tabletability and good flowability. Commercial manufacturability of formulations based on both CAB cocrystals was verified on a compaction simulator. The results from an expedited friability study were used to set the compaction force, which yielded tablets with sufficient mechanical strength and rapid tablet disintegration. This work demonstrates the potential value of CAB cocrystals in drug product development. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of a peracetic acid-based immersion on indirect composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Fracaro, Gisele Baggio; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Campregher, Ulisses Bastos

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of immersion in a 0.2% peracetic acid-based disinfectant on the three-point flexural strength, water sorption and water solubility of an indirect composite resin. Specimens were produced according to ISO 4049:2000 specifications and were divided in two groups: Control group, with no disinfection and Disinfected group, with three 10 min immersions in the peracetic acid intercalated with 10 min immersions in sterile distilled water. All evaluations were conducted in compliance with ISO specifications. Three-point flexural strength, water sorption and solubility of indirect composite resin before and after immersion showed no statistical significant differences (p > 0.05) and met ISO standard requirements. Immersion in peracetic acid solution showed no influence in indirect composite resin tested properties.

  19. Temperature effect on the acid-base behaviour of Na-montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Myriam; Carteret, Cédric; Thomas, Fabien; Gaboriaud, Fabien

    2008-11-15

    We report a study of the acid-base properties of Na-montmorillonite suspensions at temperatures from 25 degrees C to 80 degrees C, by continuous and batch potentiometric methods, combined with analysis of the dissolved and readsorbed species. The batch titration curves reveal that the dissolution processes of Na-montmorillonite and silica-rich secondary phases are increasingly predominant, respectively at acid and basic pH, and according to the temperature. The continuous titration curves are less affected by these side reactions. In the absence of a common intersection point, the thermodynamic analysis of the curves was based on the shift of the PZNPC with the ionic strength. This shift was not significantly altered by the temperature, by comparison with the dissociation product of water in the same conditions. Therefore we concluded that protonation-deprotonation of the dissociable sites at the edges of the clay platelets is not significantly temperature dependent.

  20. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-07

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background.

  1. Lewis-Acid/Base Effects on Gallium Volatility in Molten Chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that GaCl 3 can be removed by direct volatilization from a Pu-Ga alloy that is dissolved in a molten chloride salt. Although pure GaCl 3 is quite volatile (boiling point, 201 C), the behavior of GaCl 3 dissolved in chloride salts is different due to solution effects and is critically dependent on the composition of the solvent salt (i.e., its Lewis-acid/base character). In this report, the behavior of gallium in prototypical Lewis-acid and Lewis-base salts is compared. It was found that gallium volatility is suppressed in basic melts and enhanced in acidic melts. The implications of these results on the potential for simple gallium removal in molten salt systems are significant

  2. NABTIT-a computer program for non-aqueous acid-base titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budevsky, O; Zikolova, T; Tencheva, J

    1988-11-01

    A program NABTIT written in BASIC has been developed for the treatment of data (ml/mV) obtained from potentiometric acid-base titrations in non-aqueous solvents. No preliminary information on equilibrium constants is required for the input. The treatment of the data is based on known equations and uses least-squares procedures. The essence of the method is to determine the equivalence volume (V(e)) accurately, and to use the data acquired by adding titrant after V(e) for the pH*-calibration of the non-aqueous potentiometric cell. As a by-product or the calculations, the pK* value of the substance titrated is also obtained, and in some cases the autoprotolysis constant of the medium (pK*(s)). Good agreement between experiment and theory was found in the treatment of data obtained for water and methanol-water mixtures.

  3. A Review of Hyaluronic Acid and Hyaluronic Acid-based Hydrogels for Vocal Fold Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walimbe, Tanaya; Panitch, Alyssa; Sivasankar, Preeti M

    2017-07-01

    Vocal fold scarring is a common cause of dysphonia. Current treatments involving vocal fold augmentation do not yield satisfactory outcomes in the long term. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine offer an attractive treatment option for vocal fold scarring, with the aim to restore the native extracellular matrix microenvironment and biomechanical properties of the vocal folds by inhibiting progression of scarring and thus leading to restoration of normal vocal function. Hyaluronic acid is a bioactive glycosaminoglycan responsible for maintaining optimum viscoelastic properties of the vocal folds and hence is widely targeted in tissue engineering applications. This review covers advances in hyaluronic acid-based vocal fold tissue engineering and regeneration strategies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Studies on (acid + base) equilibria in substituted (phenol + n-butylamine) systems in acetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, A. [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Czaja, M. [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Chmurzynski, L. [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: lech@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2005-08-15

    (Acid + base) equilibria, including molecular heteroconjugation ones, between n-butylamine and one of the following phenols: 2-nitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2,5-dinitrophenol, 3-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-tribromophenol have been studied potentiometrically in a protophobic polar aprotic solvent, acetonitrile. Among the phenols studied, 2,5-dinitrophenol exhibited the strongest tendency towards formation of asymmetric hydrogen bonds with n-butylamine, whereas a weakest complex was formed with 2-nitrophenol. In the (n-butylamine + 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorophenol) and (n-butylamine + 2,4-dinitrophenol) systems proton transfer reactions occurred.

  5. Acid-base and coordination properties of Meso-substituted porphyrins in nonaqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukhovskaya, S. G.; Nam, Dao Tkhe; Fien, Chan Ding; Domanina, E. N.; Ivanova, Yu. B.; Semeikin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Acid-base and coordination properties of alkyl and aryl meso-substituted porphyrins are studied spectrophotometrically in nonaqueous solutions. It is found that the nature of the substituent greatly affects the basicity of ligands for porphyrins characterized by a flat structure of macrocycle. The electronic effects of substituents have a much weaker influence on the kinetics of complexing. These effects could be due to the opposite orientation of some factors: an increase in the basicity and stability of the N-H bonds of porphyrin reaction centers. Dissociation constants p K b of the cationic forms of meso-substituted derivatives of porphyrin are measured. The values of p K b are in good agreement with classic concepts of the nature of substituents, particularly those indirectly included in the macrocycle through phenyl buffer rings.

  6. Acid-base, optical and extraction properties of Rose Bengal in the presence of surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, J.; Krtil, J.; Kuban, V.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the optical and acid-base characteristics of Rose Bengal in the presence of cationic (Septones - SPX, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide - CTMAB and hexadecylpyridinium bromide - CPB), anionic (sodium dodecylsuulfate - SDS) and nonionic (Triton X-100) surfactants in submicellar and micellar concentrations were studied spectrophotometrically. The conditional dissociation constants of Rose Bengal pK ai * depend on the kind and concentration of cationic surfactant. Changes in pK ai * values are described in terms of formation of ion associates of the dye with the surfactant of the composition QHB and Q 2 B. The extraction constants of the ion associates in chloroform were determined radiometrically with the aid of Rose Bengal labelled with 131 I. (author). 4 figs., 3 tabs., 22 refs

  7. Boronic Acid-Based Approach for Separation and Immobilization of Glycoproteins and Its Application in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Liu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycoproteins influence a broad spectrum of biological processes including cell-cell interaction, host-pathogen interaction, or protection of proteins against proteolytic degradation. The analysis of their glyco-structures and concentration levels are increasingly important in diagnosis and proteomics. Boronic acids can covalently react with cis-diols in the oligosaccharide chains of glycoproteins to form five- or six-membered cyclic esters. Based on this interaction, boronic acid-based ligands and materials have attracted much attention in both chemistry and biology as the recognition motif for enrichment and chemo/biosensing of glycoproteins in recent years. In this work, we reviewed the progress in the separation, immobilization and detection of glycoproteins with boronic acid-functionalized materials and addressed its application in sensing.

  8. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid-Ru/C Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Paraskevi; Martin, Nickolas; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-06-22

    The catalytic performance of homogeneous Lewis acid catalysts and their interaction with Ru/C catalyst are studied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural by using 2-propanol as a solvent and hydrogen donor. We find that Lewis acid catalysts hydrogenate the furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which is then etherified with 2-propanol. The catalytic activity is correlated with an empirical scale of Lewis acid strength and exhibits a volcano behavior. Lanthanides are the most active, with DyCl3 giving complete furfural conversion and a 97 % yield of furfuryl alcohol at 180 °C after 3 h. The combination of Lewis acid and Ru/C catalysts results in synergy for the stronger Lewis acid catalysts, with a significant increase in the furfural conversion and methyl furan yield. Optimum results are obtained by using Ru/C combined with VCl3 , AlCl3 , SnCl4 , YbCl3 , and RuCl3 . Our results indicate that the combination of Lewis acid/metal catalysts is a general strategy for performing tandem reactions in the upgrade of furans. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metal Chlorides Supported Solid Catalysts for F-C Acylations of Arenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阳; 刘云龙; 穆曼曼; 陈立功

    2015-01-01

    A series of metal chlorides supported solid catalysts were prepared by simple wet impregnation method. Their catalytic performances for Friedel-Crafts acylation of toluene with benzoyl chloride were evaluated and the excellent results were obtained over FeCl3/SiO2. These catalysts were characterized by BET, NH3-TPD and FT-IR of pyridine adsorption to clarify the structure-activity relationship. It was found that FeCl3/SiO2 has larger pore size and pore volume than other catalysts, which increased the accessibility of the catalyst. In addition, FeCl3/SiO2 ex-hibited higher molar ratio of Lewis acid sites and Brφnsted acid sites, which might be another reason for the in-crease of toluene conversion. Furthermore, the reaction parameters, including temperature, time and molar ratio, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, 91.2%, conversion and 82.0%, selectivity were obtained. Mean-while, the generality of the catalyst was demonstrated by the acylations of alkyl substituted aromatics. Finally, the catalyst was reused for four runs with slight loss in catalytic activity, which attributed to the drain of the active component.

  10. Investigation of a Pt3Sn/C Electro-Catalyst in a Direct Ethanol Fuel Cell Operating at Low Temperatures for Portable Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zignani, S. C.; Gonzalez, E. R.; Baglio, V.; Siracusano, S.; Arico, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A 20% Pt3Sn/C catalyst was prepared by reduction with formic acid and used in a direct ethanol fuel cell at low temperatures. The electro-catalytic activity of this bimetallic catalyst was compared to that of a commercial 20% Pt/C catalyst. The PtSn catalyst showed better results in the investigated temperature range (30 degrees-70 degrees C). Generally, Sn promotes ethanol oxidation by adsorption of OH species at considerably lower potentials compared to Pt, allowing the occurrence of a bifu...

  11. Photobiological behavior of bacteria and phages supplemented with aza-analogues of nucleic acid bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittler, L; Hradecna, Z; Jacob, H E; Loeber, G

    1975-01-01

    The photochemical stability of anomalous nucleic acid bases of the azatype, 5-azacytosine (1), 5-azacytidine (II), 6-azacytosine (III), 6-azacytidine (IV), 6-azathymine (V), 6-azauracil (VI), and 8-aza-adenine (VII) to uv light of the wavelength 254 nm differs from the uv stability of the normal constituents. Changes of the uv inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 C600, E. coli B, Bacillus cereus, as well as E. coli phages lambda cb/sub 2/ and lambda b/sub 2/b/sub 5/ supplemented with azaderivatives prior to irradiation were investigated. It was found that I, II, III, IV, and VII are more, V and VI less sensitive to uv light compared with corresponding natural nucleic acid bases. Their changed uv sensitivities are reflected in the survival curves after uv irradiation in as far as azabases are incorporated into the nucleic acids in vivo. This explains the increase in uv sensitivity of E. coli K 12 C600, E. coli B, and B. cereus supplemented with I, II, III, IV, and VII and the decrease in uv sensitivity of Streptococcus faecalis supplemented with V (the latter information was taken from Gunther and Prusoff 1967). The lack of any significant influence of inactivation curves of E. coli K 12 C600 by V and VI, and on E. coli phages lambda cb/sub 2/ and lambda c/sub 2/b/sub 5/ by II, is discussed in terms of too small incorporation rates. No discrimination was put forward with respect to DNA and RNA incorporation.

  12. Acid-base status and cardiovascular function in mink (Mustela vison) anaesthetized with ketamine/midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamberg, S; Svendsen, P; Johansen, B

    1996-01-01

    Heart rate, arterial blood pressure and blood acid-base status were determined in 18 adult female mink (mean (+/- SEM) body weight 1052 +/- 34 g) during long-term anaesthesia with either controlled ventilation (n=12) or spontaneous respiration (n=6). Surgical anaesthesia was induced by intramuscular injection of ketamine hydrochloride (Ketaminol Vet, 40.0 +/- 1.7 mg/kg) and midazolam hydrochloride (Dormicum 2.8 +/- 0.1 mg/kg) and maintained for at least 5 h by continuous intravenous infusion of this drug combination in 0.9% saline. For all animals, the mean rates of infusion of ketamine and midazolam were 48.4 +/- 1.6 and 1.61 +/- 0.12 mg/h, respectively. Following continuous infusion of the anaesthetics in isotonic saline, at a rate of 20 ml/h, a moderate 'dilution acidosis' developed, which could be corrected by replacement of part of the saline with sodium bicarbonate to a final concentration of approximately 25 mmol NaHCO3 per litre. However, when the animals were allowed to breathe spontaneously, an increase in heart rate and a combined respiratory and metabolic acidosis occurred, due to severe respiratory depression. Apart from these effects and a few cases of increased salivation, no adverse effects over time were observed on the arterial blood acid-base status and cardiovascular function of the animals during ketamine/midazolam anaesthesia. It is concluded that the procedure described for long-term anaesthesia in mink is convenient and safe for acute physiological experiments in this species, provided normal body temperature and pulmonary gas exchange is sufficiently maintained. Thus, the need for an adequately controlled artificial ventilation is strongly emphasized. Finally, a proposal for the composition of an intravenous solution, containing ketamine and midazolam hydrochloride, and sodium bicarbonate in saline, suitable for long-term anaesthesia in adult mink is presented.

  13. Carbon dioxide induced plasticity of branchial acid-base pathways in an estuarine teleost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmon, Elizabeth B.; Esbaugh, Andrew J.

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is expected to drive ocean pCO2 above 1,000 μatm by 2100 - inducing respiratory acidosis in fish that must be corrected through branchial ion transport. This study examined the time course and plasticity of branchial metabolic compensation in response to varying levels of CO2 in an estuarine fish, the red drum, which regularly encounters elevated CO2 and may therefore have intrinsic resilience. Under control conditions fish exhibited net base excretion; however, CO2 exposure resulted in a dose dependent increase in acid excretion during the initial 2 h. This returned to baseline levels during the second 2 h interval for exposures up to 5,000 μatm, but remained elevated for exposures above 15,000 μatm. Plasticity was assessed via gene expression in three CO2 treatments: environmentally realistic 1,000 and 6,000 μatm exposures, and a proof-of-principle 30,000 μatm exposure. Few differences were observed at 1,000 or 6,000 μatm however, 30,000 μatm stimulated widespread up-regulation. Translocation of V-type ATPase after 1 h of exposure to 30,000 μatm was also assessed; however, no evidence of translocation was found. These results indicate that red drum can quickly compensate to environmentally relevant acid-base disturbances using baseline cellular machinery, yet are capable of plasticity in response to extreme acid-base challenges.

  14. Maternal and fetal Acid-base chemistry: a major determinant of perinatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omo-Aghoja, L

    2014-01-01

    Very small changes in pH may significantly affect the function of various fetal organ systems, such as the central nervous system, and the cardiovascular system with associated fetal distress and poor Apgar score. Review of existing data on maternal-fetal acid-base balance in pregnancy highlight the factors that are associated with derangements of the acid-base status and the impact of the derangements on fetal outcome. Extensive search of electronic databases and manual search of journals for relevant literature on maternal and fetal acid chemistry, clinical studies and case studies were undertaken. There is a substantial reduction in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in pregnancy. Adequate buffering prevents significant changes in maternal arterial pH. Normal fetal metabolism results in the production of acids which are buffered to maintain extracellular pH within a critical range. Fetal hypoxia can occur when maternal oxygenation is compromised, maternal perfusion of the placenta is reduced, or delivery of oxygenated blood from the placenta to the fetus is impeded. When adequate fetal oxygenation does not occur, metabolisms proceed along with an anaerobic pathway with production of organic acids, such as lactic acid. Accumulation of lactic acid can deplete the buffer system and result in metabolic acidosis with associated low fetal pH, fetal distress and poor Apgar score. There is a significant reduction in pCO2 in pregnancy. This change, however, does not result in a corresponding significant reduction in maternal arterial pH, because of adequate buffering. Very small changes in pH may cause significant derangement in fetal function and outcome.

  15. Acid-base properties of 2:1 clays. I. Modeling the role of electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Caillet, Céline; Thomas, Fabien

    2010-06-15

    We present a theoretical investigation of the titratable charge of clays with various structural charge (sigma(b)): pyrophyllite (sigma(b) = 0 e x nm(-2)), montmorillonite (sigma(b) = -0.7 e x nm(-2)) and illite (sigma(b) = -1.2 e x nm(-2)). The calculations were carried out using a Monte Carlo method in the Grand Canonical ensemble and in the framework of the primitive model. The clay particle was modeled as a perfect hexagonal platelet, with an "ideal" crystal structure. The only fitting parameters used are the intrinsic equilibrium constants (pK(0)) for the protonation/deprotonation reactions of the broken-bond sites on the lateral faces of the clay particles, silanol, =SiO(-) + H(+) --> =SiOH, and aluminol, =AlO(-1/2) + H(+) --> =AlOH(+1/2). Simulations are found to give a satisfactory description of the acid-base titration of montmorillonite without any additional fitting parameter. In particular, combining the electrostatics from the crystal substitutions with ionization constants, the simulations satisfactorily catch the shift in the titration curve of montmorillonite according to the ionic strength. Change in the ionic strength modulates the screening of the electrostatic interactions which results in this shift. Accordingly, the PZNPC is found to shift toward alkaline pH upon increasing the permanent basal charge. Unlike previous mean field model results, a significant decrease in PZNPC values is predicted in response to stack formation. Finally, the mean field approach is shown to be inappropriate to study the acid-base properties of clays.

  16. Acid-base titrations using microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karita, Shingo; Kaneta, Takashi

    2014-12-16

    Rapid and simple acid-base titration was accomplished using a novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD). The μPAD was fabricated by wax printing and consisted of ten reservoirs for reaction and detection. The reaction reservoirs contained various amounts of a primary standard substance, potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHPth), whereas a constant amount of phenolphthalein was added to all the detection reservoirs. A sample solution containing NaOH was dropped onto the center of the μPAD and was allowed to spread to the reaction reservoirs where the KHPth neutralized it. When the amount of NaOH exceeded that of the KHPth in the reaction reservoirs, unneutralized hydroxide ion penetrated the detection reservoirs, resulting in a color reaction from the phenolphthalein. Therefore, the number of the detection reservoirs with no color change determined the concentration of the NaOH in the sample solution. The titration was completed within 1 min by visually determining the end point, which required neither instrumentation nor software. The volumes of the KHPth and phenolphthalein solutions added to the corresponding reservoirs were optimized to obtain reproducible and accurate results for the concentration of NaOH. The μPADs determined the concentration of NaOH at orders of magnitude ranging from 0.01 to 1 M. An acid sample, HCl, was also determined using Na2CO3 as a primary standard substance instead of KHPth. Furthermore, the μPAD was applicable to the titrations of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and ammonia solutions. The μPADs were stable for more than 1 month when stored in darkness at room temperature, although this was reduced to only 5 days under daylight conditions. The analysis of acidic hot spring water was also demonstrated in the field using the μPAD, and the results agreed well with those obtained by classic acid-base titration.

  17. Complicated pregnancies in inherited distal renal tubular acidosis: importance of acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Harald; Salfeld, Peter; Eisel, Rüdiger; Wagner, Carsten A; Mohebbi, Nilufar

    2017-06-01

    Inherited distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is caused by impaired urinary acid excretion resulting in hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Although the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is usually preserved, and hypertension and overt proteinuria are absent, it has to be considered that patients with dRTA also suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD) with an increased risk for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes. Typical complications of dRTA include severe hypokalemia leading to cardiac arrhythmias and paralysis, nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. Several physiologic changes occur in normal pregnancy including alterations in acid-base and electrolyte homeostasis as well as in GFR. However, data on pregnancy in women with inherited dRTA are scarce. We report the course of pregnancy in three women with hereditary dRTA. Complications observed were severe metabolic acidosis, profound hypokalemia aggravated by hyperemesis gravidarum, recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and ureteric obstruction leading to renal failure. However, the outcome of all five pregnancies (1 pregnancy each for mothers n. 1 and 2; 3 pregnancies for mother n. 3) was excellent due to timely interventions. Our findings highlight the importance of close nephrologic monitoring of women with inherited dRTA during pregnancy. In addition to routine assessment of creatinine and proteinuria, caregivers should especially focus on acid-base status, plasma potassium and urinary tract infections. Patients should be screened for renal obstruction in the case of typical symptoms, UTI or renal failure. Furthermore, genetic identification of the underlying mutation may (a) support early nephrologic referral during pregnancy and a better management of the affected woman, and (b) help to avoid delayed diagnosis and reduce complications in affected newborns.

  18. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  19. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, Anna [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Czaja, Malgorzata [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Chmurzynski, Lech [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: lech@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2006-05-15

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, K{sub a}, anionic, K{sub AHA{sup -}}, and cationic, K{sub BHB{sup +}}, homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, K{sub BHA}, constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (K{sub AHA{sup -}} values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgK{sub BHA} reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pK{sub a} values.

  20. Interactive computer-assisted instruction in acid-base physiology for mobile computer platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ∼20 screens of information, on the subjects of the CO2-bicarbonate buffer system, other body buffer systems, and acid-base disorders. Five clinical case modules were also developed. For the learning modules, the interactive, active learning activities were primarily step-by-step learner control of explanations of complex physiological concepts, usually presented graphically. For the clinical cases, the active learning activities were primarily question-and-answer exercises that related clinical findings to the relevant basic science concepts. The student response was remarkably positive, with the interactive, active learning aspect of the instruction cited as the most important feature. Also, students cited the self-paced instruction, extensive use of interactive graphics, and side-by-side presentation of text and graphics as positive features. Most students reported that it took less time to study the subject matter with this online instruction compared with subject matter presented in the lecture hall. However, the approach to learning was highly examination driven, with most students delaying the study of the subject matter until a few days before the scheduled examination. Wider implementation of active learning computer-assisted instruction will require that instructors present subject matter interactively, that students fully embrace the responsibilities of independent learning, and that institutional administrations measure instructional effort by criteria other than scheduled hours of instruction.

  1. [ACID-BASE MODULATION OF LYSOZYME ACTIVITY IN MEDIUM FOR CULTIVATION OF ENTEROBACTERIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andryuschenko, S V; Perunova, N B

    2015-01-01

    Determination of modulating effect of acid-base state of medium for cultivation of enterobacteria on activity of C-type lysozyme. Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression, Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 model strain, Escherichia coli No. 242 strain, isolated from intestine biotope; 2 Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, one of those contained plasmid homologue of periplasmatic lysozyme inhibitor gene pliC; 1 typical Salmonella enterica ATCC 14028 strain and a Micrococcus luteus ATCC 15307 strain as a control--served as material for the study. The bacteria were cultivated for 24 hours in 2 ml of liquid medium LB at 37 degrees C, 250 rpm. Determination of antilysozyme activity (ALA) was carried out by a photonepehlometrical method according to O.V. Bukharin et al. (1999) with alterations. All the studied microorganisms, including Micrococcus luteus, at the specified conditions 24 hours after cultivation were established to change the pH of the liquid nutrient medium LB from the initial value of 6.6 ± 0.1 to 8.2 ± 0.2 units. ALA determination in the cultivation medium without buffer correction was accompanied by a decline of lysozyme activity at an order of magnitude. The effect was absent during ALA measurement by a standard technique. The local shift of acid-base state of biotope under the conditions of buffer system insufficiency results in a reversible alteration of antimicrobial activity of muramidase, that among other non-specific factors of the environment determines the background of interactions on the level of associative symbiosis. This aspect should be taken into consideration during development of models, that are close to real conditions of microsymbiocenotical interactions.

  2. Spent catalyst waste management. A review. Part 1. Developments in hydroprocessing catalyst waste reduction and use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, M.; Stanislaus, A. [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, 13109-Safat (Kuwait)

    2008-04-15

    Solid catalysts containing metals, metal oxides or sulfides, which play a key role in the refining of petroleum to clean fuels and many other valuable products, become solid wastes after use. In many refineries, the spent catalysts discarded from hydroprocessing units form a major part of these solid wastes. Disposal of spent hydroprocessing catalysts requires compliance with stringent environmental regulations because of their hazardous nature and toxic chemicals content. Various options such as minimizing spent catalyst waste generation by regeneration and reuse, metals recovery, utilization to produce useful materials and treatment for safe disposal, could be considered to deal with the spent catalyst environmental problem. In this paper, information available in the literature on spent hydroprocessing catalyst waste reduction at source by using improved more active and more stable catalysts, regeneration, rejuvenation and reuse of deactivated catalysts in many cycles, and reusing in other processes are reviewed in detail with focus on recent developments. Available methods for recycling of spent hydroprocessing catalysts by using them as raw materials for the preparation of active new catalysts and many other valuable products are also reviewed. (author)

  3. Theoretical modeling of structure and function of cathode catalyst layers in PEMFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Eikerling, M.; Song, D.; Liu, Z.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' In this work, we first investigate transport and reaction kinetics in single agglomerates of cathode catalyst layers in proton exchange fuel cells. Two types of spherical agglomerates are evaluated, which represent limiting structures that can be obtained by distinct synthetic procedures. One type consists of a mixture of carbon/catalyst particles and proton conducting perfluorosulfonated ionomer (PFSI). The other type consists of carbon/catalyst particles and water-filled pores. Performance of the former type is rationalized on the basis of the well-known Thiele-modulus. Characteristics of the latter type are studied using Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations. Aspects of current conversion, reactant and current distributions, and catalyst utilization are explored. In general, the PFSI-filled agglomerates exhibit more homogeneous distributions of reaction rates. Effectiveness factors for them are close to one. However, it was found that proton penetration depths in waterflooded agglomerates could be quite significant as well under certain conditions, resulting in unexpectedly high catalyst utilization. The effects of agglomerate radius and of boundary conditions at the agglomerate surface are studied. Moreover, using the same approach, we evaluate the performance of a flat PFSI-free catalyst layer with water-filled pore space. Compared with conventional composite catalyst layers impregnated with PFSI, the PFSI-free layer exhibits better performance and high Pt utilization for thicknesses less than 0.1 μm. The significance of these results for the optimization catalyst layers in view of operation conditions and synthesis methods is discussed. (author)

  4. Catalysts, Protection Layers, and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and in this presentation we shall give a short overview of the pros and cons of various tandem devices [1]. The large band gap semiconductor needs to be in front, but apart from that we can chose to have either the anode in front or back using either...... acid or alkaline conditions. Since most relevant semiconductors are very prone to corrosion the advantage of using buried junctions and using protection layers offering shall be discussed [2-4]. Next we shall discuss the availability of various catalysts for being coupled to these protections layers...... and how their stability may be evaluated [5, 6]. Examples of half-cell reaction using protection layers for both cathode and anode will be discussed though some of recent examples under both alkaline and acidic conditions. Si is a very good low band gap semiconductor and by using TiO2 as a protection...

  5. Fundamental investigations of catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Christian Fink

    and economic development in the 20th century. There is however a downside to this development and we are seeing significant pollution and pressure on resources. Catalysis therefore has an increasingly important role in limiting pollution and optimizing the use of resources. This development will depend on our...... fundamental understanding of catalytic processes and our ability to make use of that understanding. This thesis presents fundamental studies of catalyst nanoparticles with particular focus on dynamic processes. Such studies often require atomic-scale characterization, because the catalytic conversion takes...... important that we only study intrinsic structures and phenomena and not those that may be induced by the high energy electrons used to image the specimen. This requires careful consideration of the influence of the electron beam in order to understand, control and minimize that influence. I present four...

  6. Preparation and characterization of Pt-Sn/C and Pt-Ir/C catalysts for the electrochemical oxidation of ethanol in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masombuka, T

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available oxidation is still low. Development of new active catalysts able to break C-C bond and complete oxidation of ethanol into CO 2 is of fundamental importance. Generally, a third metal is added to the best binary Pt-Sn catalyst to improve CO tolerance...

  7. Acid-base equilibrium dynamics in methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide probed by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiho; Son, Hyewon; Park, Sungnam

    2015-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy, which has been proven to be an excellent experimental method for studying thermally-driven chemical processes, was successfully used to investigate the acid dissociation equilibrium of HN3 in methanol (CH3OH) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for the first time. Our 2DIR experimental results indicate that the acid-base equilibrium occurs on picosecond timescales in CH3OH but that it occurs on much longer timescales in DMSO. Our results imply that the different timescales of the acid-base equilibrium originate from different proton transfer mechanisms between the acidic (HN3) and basic (N3(-)) species in CH3OH and DMSO. In CH3OH, the acid-base equilibrium is assisted by the surrounding CH3OH molecules which can directly donate H(+) to N3(-) and accept H(+) from HN3 and the proton migrates through the hydrogen-bonded chain of CH3OH. On the other hand, the acid-base equilibrium in DMSO occurs through the mutual diffusion of HN3 and N3(-) or direct proton transfer. Our 2DIR experimental results corroborate different proton transfer mechanisms in the acid-base equilibrium in protic (CH3OH) and aprotic (DMSO) solvents.

  8. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  9. Synthesis and physical properties of TEOS-based silica aerogels prepared by two step (acid-base) sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswara Rao, A.; Bhagat, S.D.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental results on the synthesis and physical properties of tetra-ethoxy-silane- (TEOS) based silica aerogels produced by two step (acid-base) sol-gel process, are reported. The oxalic acid (A) and NH 4 OH (B) concentrations were varied from 0 to 0.1 M and from 0.4 to 3 M, respectively. Monolithic and transparent aerogels have been obtained for the values of A=0.001 M and B=1 M. The effect of time interval (t) before the base catalyst (NH 4 OH) addition to the acidic sol was studied from 0 to 72 h. The time interval at t=24 h of NH 4 OH addition was found to be the best, in terms of low volume shrinkage, high optical transmission and monolithicity. The molar ratio of EtOH/TEOS (S) was varied from 3 to 7.5. Monolithic and transparent aerogels were obtained for an S value of 6.9. Also, the effects of molar ratio of acidic water, i.e., H 2 O/TEOS (W1) and basic water, i.e., H 2 O/TEOS (W2) on the physical properties of the aerogels have been studied. Highly transparent (about 90%) and monolithic aerogels with lower volume shrinkage ( 2 O):basic (H 2 O). The results are discussed by taking into consideration the hydrolysis and poly-condensation reactions. The aerogels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical transmission, bulk density, volume shrinkage and porosity measurements. (authors)

  10. Catalyst for hydrogen-amine D exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtslander, W.J.; Johnson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for deuterium isotopic enrichment (suitable for use in heavy water production) by amine-hydrogen exchange in which the exchange catalyst comprises a mixture of alkyl amides of two metals selected from the group consisting of the alkali metals. Catalyst mixtures comprising at least one of the alkali amides of lithium and potassium are preferred. At least one of the following benefits are obtained: decreased hydride formation, decreased thermal decomposition of alkyl amide, increased catalyst solubility in the amine phase, and increased exchange efficiency. 11 claims

  11. deNOx catalysts for biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus

    The present thesis revolves around the challenges involved in removal of nitrogen oxides in biomass fired power plants. Nitrogen oxides are unwanted byproducts formed to some extent during almost any combustion. In coal fired plants these byproducts are removed by selective catalytic reduction......, however the alkali in biomass complicate matters. Alkali in biomass severely deactivates the catalyst used for the selective catalytic reduction in matter of weeks, hence a more alkali resistant catalyst is needed. In the thesis a solution to the problem is presented, the nano particle deNOx catalyst...

  12. Towards the computational design of solid catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade the theoretical description of surface reactions has undergone a radical development. Advances in density functional theory mean it is now possible to describe catalytic reactions at surfaces with the detail and accuracy required for computational results to compare favourably...... with experiments. Theoretical methods can be used to describe surface chemical reactions in detail and to understand variations in catalytic activity from one catalyst to another. Here, we review the first steps towards using computational methods to design new catalysts. Examples include screening for catalysts...

  13. Grafting heterogeneous catalyst with gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.; Long, M.A.; Levot, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    A process for the production of a heterogeneous catalyst comprises the steps of: irradiating an organic macromolecular substrate or a metal substrate with ionising or ultra violet radiation in the presence of a monomer selected from the group consisting of o-, m-, or p- styryl diphenyl phosphine and o-, m- or p- phenyl acrylyl diphenyl phosphine, to graft the monomer to the substrate; and reacting the graft copolymer with a homogeneous catalyst selected from the group consisting of catalytic metal salts and catalytic organometallic complexes such that the graft copolymer conjugate becomes a ligand of the catalyst

  14. Designing Pd-based supported bimetallic catalysts for environmental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Nowicka, Ewa; Meenakshisundaram, Sankar

    2018-01-01

    Supported bimetallic nanoparticulate catalysts are an important class of heterogeneous catalysts for many reactions including selective oxidation, hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis, reforming, biomass conversion reactions, and many more. The activity, selectivity, and stability of these catalysts depend on their structural features including particle size, composition, and morphology. In this review, we present important structural features relevant to supported bimetallic catalysts focusing on Pd...

  15. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst by...

  16. Bio-oil hydrodeoxygenation catalysts produced using strong electrostatic adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    We synthesized hydrothermally stable metal catalysts with controlled particle size and distribution, with the goal of determining which catalyst(s) can selectively catalyze the production of aromatics from bio-oil (from pyrolysis of biomass). Both precious and base transition metal catalysts (Ru, Pt...

  17. In-situ hydrodeoxygenation of phenol by supported Ni catalyst-explanation for catalyst performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ze; Zeng, Ying; Lin, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    In-situ hydrodeoxygenation of phenol with aqueous hydrogen donor over supported Ni catalyst was investigated. The supported Ni catalysts exerted very poor performance, if formic acid was used as the hydrogen donor. Catalyst modification by loading K, Na, Mg or La salt could not make the catalyst...... performance improved. If gaseous hydrogen was used as the hydrogen source the activity of Ni/Al2O3 was pretty high. CO2 was found poisonous to the catalysis, due to the competitive adoption of phenol with CO2. If formic acid was replaced by methanol, the catalyst performance improved remarkably, with major...... products of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. The better effect of methanol enlightened the application of the supported Ni catalyst in in-situ hydrodeoxygenation of phenol....

  18. Effect of coke and catalyst structure on oxidative regeneration of hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E. (CANMET, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Energy Research Laboratories)

    1991-04-01

    Two industrial hydroprocessing catalysts used for upgrading an atmospheric residue and a gas oil, respectively were regenerated in a fixed bed using air and 2 vol.% O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} balance mixture. The regeneration in air resulted in a significant sintering of the catalyst's material. The surface area of catalysts regenerated in 2 vol.% O{sub 2} mixture was similar to that of fresh catalysts, whereas a significant loss of surface area was observed after regeneration in air. The X-ray diffraction pattern of catalysts regenerated in 2 vol.% O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} balance mixture was also similar to that of fresh catalysts. 22 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Supported catalyst systems and method of making biodiesel products using such catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Manhoe; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2015-10-20

    A heterogeneous catalyst system, a method of preparing the catalyst system and a method of forming a biodiesel product via transesterification reactions using the catalyst system is disclosed. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of supported mixed metal oxides that include at least calcium oxide and another metal oxide deposited on a lanthanum oxide or cerium oxide support. Preferably, the catalysts include CaO--CeO.sub.2ZLa.sub.2O.sub.3 or CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3/CeO.sub.2. Optionally, the catalyst may further include additional metal oxides, such as CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3--GdOxZLa.sub.2O.sub.3.

  20. Generalized Superconductivity. Generalized Levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, B.; Agop, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the recent papers, the gravitational superconductivity is described. We introduce the concept of generalized superconductivity observing that any nongeodesic motion and, in particular, the motion in an electromagnetic field, can be transformed in a geodesic motion by a suitable choice of the connection. In the present paper, the gravitoelectromagnetic London equations have been obtained from the generalized Helmholtz vortex theorem using the generalized local equivalence principle. In this context, the gravitoelectromagnetic Meissner effect and, implicitly, the gravitoelectromagnetic levitation are given. (authors)

  1. Basic principles of electrolyte chemistry for microfluidic electrokinetics. Part II: Coupling between ion mobility, electrolysis, and acid-base equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Suss, Matthew E; Santiago, Juan G

    2009-09-07

    We present elements of electrolyte dynamics and electrochemistry relevant to microfluidic electrokinetics experiments. In Part I of this two-paper series, we presented a review and introduction to the fundamentals of acid-base chemistry. Here, we first summarize the coupling between acid-base equilibrium chemistry and electrophoretic mobilities of electrolytes, at both infinite and finite dilution. We then discuss the effects of electrode reactions on microfluidic electrokinetic experiments and derive a model for pH changes in microchip reservoirs during typical direct-current electrokinetic experiments. We present a model for the potential drop in typical microchip electrophoresis device. The latter includes finite element simulation to estimate the relative effects of channel and reservoir dimensions. Finally, we summarize effects of electrode and electrolyte characteristics on potential drop in microfluidic devices. As a whole, the discussions highlight the importance of the coupling between electromigration and electrophoresis, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemical reactions.

  2. Controlled synthesis of multi-morphology Te crystals by a convenient Lewis acid/base-assisted solvothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaoping; Yuan Lin; Zhou Shaomin; Lou Shiyun; Wang Yongqiang; Gao Tao; Liu YuBiao; Shi Xiaojing

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the controlled growth of multi-morphology Te crystals by a convenient Lewis acid/base-assisted solvothermal method for the first time. The morphological transformation from one-dimension (1D) nanostructures to 2D hierarchical flowerlike microarchitecture has been observed. The nanorods and nanowires with a well-defined crystallographical structure and the hierarchical flowers microarchitecture were obtained by changing the Lewis acids/bases. Lewis acids/bases were found to be crucial for the formation of the products by not only acting as the pH regulator but also as the shape controller, owing to their hydrolysis in the solvent to in situ form H + /OH − and hydrates. The results suggest that this should be an effective approach to the control the growth of t-Te crystals with interesting multiple morphologies, which are of interest for both theoretical investigations and practical applications.

  3. Acid-base balance of dairy cows and its relationship with alcoholic stability and mineral composition of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fagnani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to associate the occurrence of acid-base disorders with the alcoholic stability of milk from animals in the field, and to evaluate differences between the mineral composition of milk that was both stable and unstable in alcohol. The sample comprised 96 dairy cows, where the milk and blood of each corresponding animal was collected. The mineral composition of stable and unstable milk in alcohol was different and may be related to acid-base disturbances. The average amount of phosphate was lower in the milk that was unstable in alcohol, while potassium was greater. Frequency of the alcoholically unstable milk cases was higher in the cows with acid-base disturbances. Respiratory alkalosis was the disorder that was most observed.

  4. [Facial injections of hyaluronic acid-based fillers for malformations. Preliminary study regarding scar tissue improvement and cosmetic betterment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, G; Neiva-Vaz, C; Picard, A; Vazquez, M-P

    2018-02-02

    Cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers have gained rapid acceptance for treating facial wrinkles, deep tissue folds and sunken areas due to aging. This study evaluates, in addition to space-filling properties, their effects on softness and elasticity as a secondary effect, following injection of 3 commercially available cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers (15mg/mL, 17,5mg/mL and 20mg/mL) in patients presenting with congenital or acquired facial malformations. We started injecting gels of cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers in those cases in 2013; we performed 46 sessions of injections in 32 patients, aged from 13-32. Clinical assessment was performed by the patient himself and by a plastic surgeon, 15 days after injections and 6-18 months later. Cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers offered very subtle cosmetic results and supplemented surgery with a very high level of satisfaction of the patients. When injected in fibrosis, the first session enhanced softness and elasticity; the second session enhanced the volume. Cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers fill sunken areas and better softness and elasticity of scar tissues. In addition to their well-understood space-filling function, as a secondary effect, the authors demonstrate that cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers improve softness and elasticity of scarring tissues. Many experimental studies support our observations, showing that cross-linked hyaluronic acid stimulates the production of several extra-cellular matrix components, including dermal collagen and elastin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

    2014-09-01

    for the C-O bond hydrogenolysis in model compounds, which mimic the b-O-4, a-O-4, and 4-O-5 linkages of natural lignin. The versatile IRMOF-74(n) series is proposed as a platform for creating efficient hydrogenolysis catalysts as it not only displays tunable pore sizes, but also has the required thermal and chemical stability. The catalytic C-O bond cleavage occurs at 10 bar hydrogen pressure and temperatures as low as 120 degC. The conversion efficiency of the aromatic ether substrates into the corresponding hydrocarbons and phenols varies as PhCH 2 CH 2 OPh > PhCH 2 OPh > PhOPh (Ph = phenyl), while the catalytic activity generally follows the following trend Ni@IRMOF-74>Ti@IRMOF-74>IRMOF-74. Conversions as high as 80%, coupled with good selectivity for hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation, highlight the potential of MOF-based catalysts for the selective cleavage of recalcitrant aryl-ether bonds found in lignin and other biopolymers. This project supports the DOE Integrated Biorefinery Program goals, the objective of which is to convert biomass to fuels and high-value chemicals, by addressing an important technology gap: the lack of low-temperature catalysts suitable for industrial lignin degradation. Biomass, which is %7E30 wt% lignin, constitutes a potentially major source of platform chemicals that could improve overall profitability and productivity of all energy-related products, thereby benefiting consumers and reducing national dependence on imported oil. Additionally, DoD has a strong interest in low-cost drop-in fuels (Navy Biofuel Initiative) and has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with DOE and USDA to develop a sustainable biofuels industry.

  6. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  7. In-Situ TEM Study of a Nanoporous Ni–Co Catalyst Used for the Dry Reforming of Methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Fujita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We performed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM on a dealloyed nanoporous NiCo catalyst used for the dry reforming of methane (DRM to investigate the origin of the catalytic activity and structural durability. The in-situ observations and local chemical analysis indicated that the DRM induced chemical demixing of Ni and Co accompanied by grain refinement, implying possible “synergic effects” in a general bimetallic NiCo catalyst when used for the DRM.

  8. Mordenite - Type Zeolite SCR Catalysts with Iron or Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Cu/mordenite catalysts were found to be highly active for the SCR of NO with NH3 and exhibited high resistance to alkali poisoning. Redox and acidic properties of Cu/mordenite were well preserved after poisoning with potassium unlike that of vanadium catalysts. Fe-mordenite catalysts also reveale...... to be essential requirements for the high alkali resistance. Mordenite-type zeolite based catalysts could therefore be attractive alternatives to conventional SCR catalysts for biomass fired power plant flue gas treatment....

  9. Preparative characteristics of hydrophobic polymer catalyst for the tritium removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Suk; Choi, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Paek, S. W.; Paek, S. W.; Kim, J. G.; Chung, H. S.

    2001-05-01

    The optimum method for the fabrication of hydrophobic catalyst was selected and the apparatuses for the preparation of catalyst support with high yield was developed for the large scale production. Also, we summarized the method of improving the physical property of the catalyst support, the loading characteristics of Pt metal as a catalyst, and the characteristics of the apparatus for the fabrication of the catalysts on a large scale

  10. Preparative characteristics of hydrophobic polymer catalyst for the tritium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hee Suk; Choi, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Paek, S. W.; Kim, J. G.; Chung, H. S

    2001-05-01

    The optimum method for the fabrication of hydrophobic catalyst was selected and the apparatuses for the preparation of catalyst support with high yield was developed for the large scale production. Also, we summarized the method of improving the physical property of the catalyst support, the loading characteristics of Pt metal as a catalyst, and the characteristics of the apparatus for the fabrication of the catalysts on a large scale.

  11. Platinum-Bismuth Bimetallic Catalysts: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Saucedo, Jose A, Jr; Xiao, Yang; Varma, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic catalysts have been explored and shown to exhibit unique characteristics which are not present in monometallic catalysts. Platinum is well known as an effective catalyst for oxidation and reduction reactions, and it can be made more effective when bismuth is introduced as a promotor. Thus, the effectiveness of the Pt-Bi catalyst was demonstrated in prior work. What is not clear, however, is the mechanism behind the catalyst function; why addition of bismuth to platinum decreases de...

  12. Bi-metallic catalysts, methods of making, and uses thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-19

    Provided herein are bi-metallic catalysts, methods of making, and uses thereof. In some embodiments, the bi-metallic catalyst contains two different metal catalysts that can be used in hydrocarbon metathesis reactions, in some embodiments, the methods of making the bi-metallic catalysts can include two steps utilizing a surface organometallic chemistry approach in which the two different metal catalysts are sequentially grafted onto a support.

  13. Bi-metallic catalysts, methods of making, and uses thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Samantaray, Manoja K.; Dey, Raju; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Kavitake, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Provided herein are bi-metallic catalysts, methods of making, and uses thereof. In some embodiments, the bi-metallic catalyst contains two different metal catalysts that can be used in hydrocarbon metathesis reactions, in some embodiments, the methods of making the bi-metallic catalysts can include two steps utilizing a surface organometallic chemistry approach in which the two different metal catalysts are sequentially grafted onto a support.

  14. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  15. Environmentally benign catalysts for clean organic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis attracts researchers and industry because it satisfies most of green chemistry's requirements. Emphasizing the development of third generation catalysts, this book surveys trends and opportunities in academic and industrial research.

  16. Oxidation catalysts and process for preparing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Compounds particularly suitable as oxidation catalysis are described, comprising specified amounts of uranium, antimony and tin as oxides. Processes for making and using the catalysts are described. (U.K.)

  17. Selection of catalysts and reactors for hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E. [Imaf Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1998-07-13

    The performance of hydroprocessing units can be influenced by the selection of the catalysts and the type of reactor to suit a particular feed. The catalysts and reactors selected for light feeds differ markedly from those selected for heavy feeds. Fixed-bed reactors have been traditionally used for light feeds. High asphaltene and high metal content feeds are successfully processed using moving-bed and/or ebullated bed reactors. Multi-reactor systems consisting of moving-bed and/or ebullated bed reactors in series with fixed-bed reactors can be used to process difficult feeds. For heavy feeds, the physical properties (e.g. porosity), shape and size of the catalyst particles become crucial parameters. Pretreatment of catalysts by presulfiding improves the performance of the units.

  18. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2009-01-01

    by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model...... catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally......, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 mu m(2) are conveniently characterized with the device. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3270191]...

  19. Finding furfural hydrogenation catalysts via predictive modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Mooijman, M.; Ruijter, E.; Alberts, A.H.; Maldonado, A.G.; Orru, R.V.A.; Rothenberg, G.

    2010-01-01

    We combine multicomponent reactions, catalytic performance studies and predictive modelling to find transfer hydrogenation catalysts. An initial set of 18 ruthenium-carbene complexes were synthesized and screened in the transfer hydrogenation of furfural to furfurol with isopropyl alcohol complexes

  20. Photoexcited iron porphyrin as biomimetic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartocci, C.; Maldotti, A.; Varani, G.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Ferrara

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcited iron porphyrins can be of some interest in both fine and industrial chemistry in view of the preparation of new efficient biomimetic catalysts, working with high selectivity under mild temperature and pressure