WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene trap mutagenesis

  1. Gene-trap mutagenesis using Mol/MSM-1 embryonic stem cells from MSM/Ms mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Mai; Tateyama, Hiroki; Araki, Masatake; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kimi

    2013-06-01

    The MSM/Ms strain is derived from the Japanese wild mouse Mus musculus molossinus and displays characteristics not observed in common laboratory strains. Functional genomic analyses using genetically engineered MSM/Ms mice will reveal novel phenotypes and gene functions/interactions. We previously reported the establishment of a germline-competent embryonic stem (ES) cell line, Mol/MSM-1, from the MSM/Ms strain. To analyze its usefulness for insertional mutagenesis, we performed gene-trapping using these cells. In the present study, we compared the gene-trap events between Mol/MSM-1 and a conventional ES cell line, KTPU8, derived from the F1 progeny of a C57BL/6 × CBA cross. We introduced a promoter-trap vector carrying the promoterless β-galactosidase/neomycin-resistance fusion gene into Mol/MSM-1 and KTPU8 cells, isolated clones, and identified the trapped genes by rapid amplification of cDNA 5'-ends (5'-RACE), inverse PCR, or plasmid rescue. Unexpectedly, the success rate of 5'-RACE in Mol/MSM trap clones was 47 %, lower than the 87 % observed in KTPU8 clones. Genomic analysis of the 5'-RACE-failed clones revealed that most had trapped ribosomal RNA gene regions. The percentage of ribosomal RNA region trap clones was 41 % in Mol/MSM-1 cells, but less than 10 % in KTPU8 cells. However, within the Mol/MSM-1 5'-RACE-successful clones, the trapping frequency of annotated genes, the chromosomal distribution of vector insertions, the frequency of integration into an intron around the start codon-containing exon, and the functional spectrum of trapped genes were comparable to those in KTPU8 cells. By selecting 5'-RACE-successful clones, it is possible to perform gene-trapping efficiently using Mol/MSM-1 ES cells and promoter-trap vectors.

  2. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase. Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola. In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  3. Gene trap mutagenesis of hnRNP A2/B1: a cryptic 3' splice site in the neomycin resistance gene allows continued expression of the disrupted cellular gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGregori James V

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tagged sequence mutagenesis is a process for constructing libraries of sequenced insertion mutations in embryonic stem cells that can be transmitted into the mouse germline. To better predict the functional consequences of gene entrapment on cellular gene expression, the present study characterized the effects of a U3Neo gene trap retrovirus inserted into an intron of the hnRNP A2/B1 gene. The mutation was selected for analysis because it occurred in a highly expressed gene and yet did not produce obvious phenotypes following germline transmission. Results Sequences flanking the integrated gene trap vector in 1B4 cells were used to isolate a full-length cDNA whose predicted amino acid sequence is identical to the human A2 protein at all but one of 341 amino acid residues. hnRNP A2/B1 transcripts extending into the provirus utilize a cryptic 3' splice site located 28 nucleotides downstream of the neomycin phosphotransferase start codon. The inserted Neo sequence and proviral poly(A site function as an 3' terminal exon that is utilized to produce hnRNP A2/B1-Neo fusion transcripts, or skipped to produce wild-type hnRNP A2/B1 transcripts. This results in only a modest disruption of hnRNPA2/B1 gene expression. Conclusions Expression of the occupied hnRNP A2/B1 gene and utilization of the viral poly(A site are consistent with an exon definition model of pre-mRNA splicing. These results reveal a mechanism by which U3 gene trap vectors can be expressed without disrupting cellular gene expression, thus suggesting ways to improve these vectors for gene trap mutagenesis.

  4. Bidirectional promoter trapping T-DNA for insertional mutagenesis in Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Transfer DNA (T-DNA)-based random insertional mutagenesis is a universal forward genetic approach for gene identification and cloning in many phytopathogenic fungi. In a large number of randomly selected transformants, screening for mutants with a specific phenotype is laborious, especially for pathogenicity-defective mutants. To accelerate mutant screening and gene identification, a bidirectional promoter-trapping Ti binary vector, 1300-bisGFP-hyg, was constructed and deployed in this study. More than 6000 Verticillium dahliae transformants were obtained by the mediation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the vector. One thousand randomly selected transformants were cultured on Czapek-Dox and on Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media plates. The cultured transformants with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression or changes in phenotype were selected and used in virulence or promoter-trapping assays. Based on the virulence assay of 60 transformants, the pathogenicity of 17 of these mutants was compromised. Ten pathogenicity-defective mutants were found with GFP expression, and 6 with expression in Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media specifically. Using TAIL-PCR (thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction), the T-DNA insertion sites were identified in 8 GFP-expressing transformants, including 5 pathogenicity-defective mutants and 3 unaffected transformants. Promoters of 6 genes were successfully trapped using the T-DNA method in this study. The nonpathogenic transformant 24C9 was the subject of additional investigation. It displayed strong GFP expression on water agar medium supplemented with cotton root extracts and on cotton seedling stems. The results obtained by Southern blot and quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that the transcription level of VdUGPU (encoding UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase) was significantly reduced owing to T-DNA insertion in the gene promoter region. These results indicate that the bidirectional

  5. Mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinin, N.P.

    1986-01-01

    Problems on radiation mutagenesis, in particular, data on general factors of genetic radiation effects, dependences of mutation frequencies on radiation dose and threshold in genetic radiation effects, problems of low doses, modification of genetic radiation effects, repauir of injuries of genetic material, photoreactivation, causing structure chromosomal mutations under radiation action, on relative genetic efficiency of different types of radiation are considered besides others

  6. The gene trap resource: a treasure trove for hemopoiesis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrai, Ariel; Robb, Lorraine

    2005-08-01

    The laboratory mouse is an invaluable tool for functional gene discovery because of its genetic malleability and a biological similarity to human systems that facilitates identification of human models of disease. A number of mutagenic technologies are being used to elucidate gene function in the mouse. Gene trapping is an insertional mutagenesis strategy that is being undertaken by multiple research groups, both academic and private, in an effort to introduce mutations across the mouse genome. Large-scale, publicly funded gene trap programs have been initiated in several countries with the International Gene Trap Consortium coordinating certain efforts and resources. We outline the methodology of mammalian gene trapping and how it can be used to identify genes expressed in both primitive and definitive blood cells and to discover hemopoietic regulator genes. Mouse mutants with hematopoietic phenotypes derived using gene trapping are described. The efforts of the large-scale gene trapping consortia have now led to the availability of libraries of mutagenized ES cell clones. The identity of the trapped locus in each of these clones can be identified by sequence-based searching via the world wide web. This resource provides an extraordinary tool for all researchers wishing to use mouse genetics to understand gene function.

  7. Directed mutagenesis affects recombination in Azospirillum brasilense nif genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Nunes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the gene transfer/mutagenesis system for Azospirillum brasilense, gene-cartridge mutagenesis was used to replace the nifD gene with the Tn5 kanamycin resistance gene. The construct was transferred to A. brasilense by electrotransformation. Of the 12 colonies isolated using the suicide plasmid pSUP202 as vector, only four did not show vector integration into the chromosome. Nevertheless, all 12 colonies were deficient in acetylene reduction, indicating an Nif- phenotype. Four Nif- mutants were analyzed by Southern blot, using six different probes spanning the nif and Km r genes and the plasmid vector. Apparently, several recombination events occurred in the mutant genomes, probably caused mainly by gene disruption owing to the mutagenesis technique used: resistance gene-cartridge mutagenesis combined with electrotransformation.Com o objetivo de melhorar os sistemas de transferência gênica e mutagênese para Azospirillum brasilense, a técnica de mutagênese através do uso de um gene marcador ("gene-cartridge mutagenesis" foi utilizada para substituir a região genômica de A. brasilense correspondente ao gene nifD por um segmento de DNA do transposon Tn5 contendo o gene que confere resistência ao antibiótico canamicina. A construção foi transferida para a linhagem de A. brasilense por eletrotransformação. Doze colônias transformantes foram isoladas com o plasmídeo suicida pSUP202 servindo como vetor. Dessas, somente quatro não possuíam o vetor integrado no cromossomo da bactéria. Independentemente da integração ou não do vetor, as 12 colônias foram deficientes na redução do gás acetileno, evidenciando o fenótipo Nif -. Quatro mutantes Nif - foram analisados através da técnica de Southern blot, utilizando-se seis diferentes fragmentos contendo genes nif, de resistência à canamicina e do vetor como sondas. Os resultados sugerem a ocorrência de eventos recombinacionais variados no genoma dos mutantes. A

  8. ENU Mutagenesis in Mice Identifies Candidate Genes For Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeffrey; Hurley, Lisa A.; Harris, Rebecca M.; Finlayson, Courtney; Tong, Minghan; Fisher, Lisa A.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Beier, David R.; Mason, Christopher; Jameson, J. Larry

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis was performed in mice to identify candidate genes for male infertility, for which the predominant causes remain idiopathic. Mice were mutagenized using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), bred, and screened for phenotypes associated with the male urogenital system. Fifteen heritable lines were isolated and chromosomal loci were assigned using low density genome-wide SNP arrays. Ten of the fifteen lines were pursued further using higher resolution SNP analysis to narrow the candidate gene regions. Exon sequencing of candidate genes identified mutations in mice with cystic kidneys (Bicc1), cryptorchidism (Rxfp2), restricted germ cell deficiency (Plk4), and severe germ cell deficiency (Prdm9). In two other lines with severe hypogonadism candidate sequencing failed to identify mutations, suggesting defects in genes with previously undocumented roles in gonadal function. These genomic intervals were sequenced in their entirety and a candidate mutation was identified in SnrpE in one of the two lines. The line harboring the SnrpE variant retains substantial spermatogenesis despite small testis size, an unusual phenotype. In addition to the reproductive defects, heritable phenotypes were observed in mice with ataxia (Myo5a), tremors (Pmp22), growth retardation (unknown gene), and hydrocephalus (unknown gene). These results demonstrate that the ENU screen is an effective tool for identifying potential causes of male infertility. PMID:22258617

  9. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E Westcot

    Full Text Available Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP, an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish. In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes--fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a--had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a-ErbB2/3-AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a-ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity

  10. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcot, Stephanie E; Hatzold, Julia; Urban, Mark D; Richetti, Stefânia K; Skuster, Kimberly J; Harm, Rhianna M; Lopez Cervera, Roberto; Umemoto, Noriko; McNulty, Melissa S; Clark, Karl J; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Ekker, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP), an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish). In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT) mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes--fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a--had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a) revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a)-ErbB2/3-AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF) morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a-ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity and cell shape

  11. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Liu

    Full Text Available Retrovirus (RV is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  12. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Conditional gene expression in the mouse using a Sleeping Beauty gene-trap transposon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackett Perry B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insertional mutagenesis techniques with transposable elements have been popular among geneticists studying model organisms from E. coli to Drosophila and, more recently, the mouse. One such element is the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon that has been shown in several studies to be an effective insertional mutagen in the mouse germline. SB transposon vector studies have employed different functional elements and reporter molecules to disrupt and report the expression of endogenous mouse genes. We sought to generate a transposon system that would be capable of reporting the expression pattern of a mouse gene while allowing for conditional expression of a gene of interest in a tissue- or temporal-specific pattern. Results Here we report the systematic development and testing of a transposon-based gene-trap system incorporating the doxycycline-repressible Tet-Off (tTA system that is capable of activating the expression of genes under control of a Tet response element (TRE promoter. We demonstrate that the gene trap system is fully functional in vitro by introducing the "gene-trap tTA" vector into human cells by transposition and identifying clones that activate expression of a TRE-luciferase transgene in a doxycycline-dependent manner. In transgenic mice, we mobilize gene-trap tTA vectors, discover parameters that can affect germline mobilization rates, and identify candidate gene insertions to demonstrate the in vivo functionality of the vector system. We further demonstrate that the gene-trap can act as a reporter of endogenous gene expression and it can be coupled with bioluminescent imaging to identify genes with tissue-specific expression patterns. Conclusion Akin to the GAL4/UAS system used in the fly, we have made progress developing a tool for mutating and revealing the expression of mouse genes by generating the tTA transactivator in the presence of a secondary TRE-regulated reporter molecule. A vector like the gene-trap

  14. Secretion Trap Tagging of Secreted and Membrane-Spanning Proteins Using Arabidopsis Gene Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Juana M. Arroyo; Cristina Yordan; W. Richard McCombie; Robert A. Martienssen

    2003-01-01

    Secreted and membrane-spanning proteins play fundamental roles in plant development but pose challenges for genetic identification and characterization. We describe a "secretion trap" screen for gene trap insertions in genes encoding proteins routed through the secretory pathway. The gene trap transposon encodes a ß-glucuronidase reporter enzyme...

  15. Generation of a multipurpose Prdm16 mouse allele by targeted gene trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Strassman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene trap mutagenesis is a powerful tool to create loss-of-function mutations in mice and other model organisms. Modifications of traditional gene trap cassettes, including addition of conditional features in the form of Flip-excision (FlEx arrays to enable directional gene trap cassette inversions by Cre and Flpe site-specific recombinases, greatly enhanced their experimental potential. By taking advantage of these conditional gene trap cassettes, we developed a generic strategy for generating conditional mutations and validated this strategy in mice carrying a multipurpose allele of the Prdm16 transcription factor gene. We demonstrate that the gene trap insertion creates a null mutation replicating the Pierre Robin sequence-type cleft palate phenotype of other Prdm16 mutant mice. Consecutive breeding to Flpe and Emx1IREScre deleter mice spatially restricted Prdm16 loss to regions of the forebrain expressing the homeobox gene Emx1, demonstrating the utility of the technology for the analysis of tissue-specific gene functions.

  16. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted gene mutagenesis in Spodoptera litura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hong-Lun; Xu, Jun; Tan, An-Jiang; Huang, Yong-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Custom-designed nuclease technologies such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) system provide attractive genome editing tools for insect functional genetics. The targeted gene mutagenesis mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been achieved in several insect orders including Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. However, little success has been reported in agricultural pests due to the lack of genomic information and embryonic microinjection techniques in these insect species. Here we report that the CRISPR/Cas9 system induced efficient gene mutagenesis in an important Lepidopteran pest Spodoptera litura. We targeted the S. litura Abdominal-A (Slabd-A) gene which is an important embryonic development gene and plays a significant role in determining the identities of the abdominal segments of insects. Direct injection of Cas9 messenger RNA and Slabd-A-specific single guide RNA (sgRNA) into S. litura embryos successfully induced the typical abd-A deficient phenotype, which shows anomalous segmentation and ectopic pigmentation during the larval stage. A polymerase chain reaction-based analysis revealed that the Cas9/sgRNA complex effectively induced a targeted mutagenesis in S. litura. These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for genome manipulation in Lepidopteran pests such as S. litura. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Retroviral insertional mutagenesis identifies genes that collaborate with NUP98-HOXD13 during leukemic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slape, Christopher; Hartung, Helge; Lin, Ying-Wei; Bies, Juraj; Wolff, Linda; Aplan, Peter D

    2007-06-01

    The t(2;11)(q31;p15) chromosomal translocation results in a fusion between the NUP98 and HOXD13 genes and has been observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia. We previously showed that expression of the NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) fusion gene in transgenic mice results in an invariably fatal MDS; approximately one third of mice die due to complications of severe pancytopenia, and about two thirds progress to a fatal acute leukemia. In the present study, we used retroviral insertional mutagenesis to identify genes that might collaborate with NHD13 as the MDS transformed to an acute leukemia. Newborn NHD13 transgenic mice and littermate controls were infected with the MOL4070LTR retrovirus. The onset of leukemia was accelerated, suggesting a synergistic effect between the NHD13 transgene and the genes neighboring retroviral insertion events. We identified numerous common insertion sites located near protein-coding genes and confirmed dysregulation of a subset of these by expression analyses. Among these genes were Meis1, a known collaborator of HOX and NUP98-HOX fusion genes, and Mn1, a transcriptional coactivator involved in human leukemia through fusion with the TEL gene. Other putative collaborators included Gata2, Erg, and Epor. Of note, we identified a common insertion site that was >100 kb from the nearest coding gene, but within 20 kb of the miR29a/miR29b1 microRNA locus. Both of these miRNA were up-regulated, demonstrating that retroviral insertional mutagenesis can target miRNA loci as well as protein-coding loci. Our data provide new insights into NHD13-mediated leukemogenesis as well as retroviral insertional mutagenesis mechanisms.

  18. RET: a poly A-trap retrovirus vector for reversible disruption and expression monitoring of genes in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Y; Leder, P

    1999-01-01

    Gene trapping is a form of insertional mutagenesis that causes disruption of gene function. Here we report the construction and extensive examination of a versatile retrovirus vector, RET (removable exon trap). The RET vector uses an improved poly A-trap strategy for the efficient identification of functional genes regardless of their expression status in target cells. A combination of a potentially very strong splice acceptor and an effective polyadenylation signal assures the complete disruption of the function of trapped genes. Inclusion of a promoterless GFP cDNA in the RET vector allows the expression pattern of the trapped gene to be easily monitored in living cells. Finally, because of loxP-containing LTRs at both ends, the integrated proviruses can be removed from the genome of infected cells by Cre-mediated homologous recombination. Hence, it is possible to attribute the mutant phenotype of gene-trapped cells directly to RET integration by inducing phenotypic reversion after provirus excision. The RET system can be used in conjunction with cell lines with functional heterozygosity, embryonic stem cells, lineage-committed cell lines that differentiate in response to specific inducing factors and other responsive cell lines that can be selected by virtue of their induced green fluorescence protein expression. PMID:10572187

  19. Gene and enhancer trap tagging of vascular-expressed genes in poplar trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Gayle Dupper; Caiping Ma; Robert Martienssen; Steven Strauss; Richard Meilan

    2004-01-01

    We report a gene discovery system for poplar trees based on gene and enhancer traps. Gene and enhancer trap vectors carrying the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were inserted into the poplar genome via Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation, where they reveal the expression pattern of genes at or near the insertion sites. Because GUS...

  20. Insertional mutagenesis reveals genes involved in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 growth at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussolle, Véronique; Pandiani, Franck; Haddad, Nabila; Michaud, Caroline; Carlin, Frédéric; Nguyen-the, Christophe; Brillard, Julien

    2010-05-01

    Transposon mutagenesis of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 yielded cold-sensitive mutants. Mutants of genes encoding enzymes of the central metabolism were affected by cold, but also by other stresses, such as pH or salt, whereas a mutant with transposon insertion in the promoter region of BC0259 gene, encoding a putative DEAD-box RNA helicase displaying homology with Escherichia coli CsdA and Bacillus subtilis CshA RNA helicases, was only cold-sensitive. Expression of the BC0259 gene at 10 degrees C is reduced in the mutant. Analysis of the 5' untranslated region revealed the transcriptional start and putative cold shock-responsive elements. The role of this RNA helicase in the cold-adaptive response of B. cereus is discussed.

  1. A Mutagenesis Assay for Reporter Gene Screening Using Partially Degenerate Oligonucleotides of the Tandems NNT and NNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huifen Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all proteins are tolerable to mutations. Whether a specific protein can be a mutable target is of importance in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. This study reported a novel mutagenesis assay using tandem NNT and NNC oligonucleotides to test the mutability of a candidate gene. These two tandem oligonucleotides avoid the risk of forming nonsense mutations and render flexibility of truncating or expanding the insertion size. As a reporter gene, ZeoR (zeocin resistance gene was confirmed to have a high tolerance for mutagenesis by this new assay.

  2. Rapid cloning of disease-resistance genes in plants using mutagenesis and sequence capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuernagel, Burkhard; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Witek, Kamil; Rouse, Matthew N; Yu, Guotai; Hatta, Asyraf; Ayliffe, Mick; Bariana, Harbans; Jones, Jonathan D G; Lagudah, Evans S; Wulff, Brande B H

    2016-06-01

    Wild relatives of domesticated crop species harbor multiple, diverse, disease resistance (R) genes that could be used to engineer sustainable disease control. However, breeding R genes into crop lines often requires long breeding timelines of 5-15 years to break linkage between R genes and deleterious alleles (linkage drag). Further, when R genes are bred one at a time into crop lines, the protection that they confer is often overcome within a few seasons by pathogen evolution. If several cloned R genes were available, it would be possible to pyramid R genes in a crop, which might provide more durable resistance. We describe a three-step method (MutRenSeq)-that combines chemical mutagenesis with exome capture and sequencing for rapid R gene cloning. We applied MutRenSeq to clone stem rust resistance genes Sr22 and Sr45 from hexaploid bread wheat. MutRenSeq can be applied to other commercially relevant crops and their relatives, including, for example, pea, bean, barley, oat, rye, rice and maize.

  3. Exploring new gene integration sites for gene knock-in by gene-trapping strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchi, Isamu; Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Masago, Yusaku; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Okuda, Tomohiko

    2015-06-01

    The knock-in mouse is a powerful tool for biological research, but the stability of expression of an integrated gene strongly depends on where it is integrated in the mouse genome. At present, there are an insufficient number of loci suitable for gene knock-in, such as the Rosa26 locus. Therefore, in this study, we developed an efficient strategy for identifying genome loci suitable for gene knock-in and characterized the properties of such loci for gene integration. For efficient discovery and characterization, we constructed a new gene-trapping vector that enables monitoring of the expression of both trapped and integrated genes using fluorescence. We successfully obtained fluorescent-positive mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) clones with the vector. Thorough analysis of the expression of fluorescent proteins in chimera embryos generated with the obtained mESC clones, some of the gene-trapped chimera embryos showed stable and ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene. Furthermore, adult mice derived from one of the gene-trapped mESC clones showed ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene in various tissues without any unusual phenotype. This indicated that the identified locus possesses high potential for foreign gene integration. Our strategy allows for efficient discovery and characterization of mouse genome loci for gene integration.

  4. Large-Scale Transposition Mutagenesis of Streptomyces coelicolor Identifies Hundreds of Genes Influencing Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhong; Wang, Yemin; Chater, Keith F.; Ou, Hong-Yu; Xu, H. Howard; Deng, Zixin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gram-positive Streptomyces bacteria produce thousands of bioactive secondary metabolites, including antibiotics. To systematically investigate genes affecting secondary metabolism, we developed a hyperactive transposase-based Tn5 transposition system and employed it to mutagenize the model species Streptomyces coelicolor, leading to the identification of 51,443 transposition insertions. These insertions were distributed randomly along the chromosome except for some preferred regions associated with relatively low GC content in the chromosomal core. The base composition of the insertion site and its flanking sequences compiled from the 51,443 insertions implied a 19-bp expanded target site surrounding the insertion site, with a slight nucleic acid base preference in some positions, suggesting a relative randomness of Tn5 transposition targeting in the high-GC Streptomyces genome. From the mutagenesis library, 724 mutants involving 365 genes had altered levels of production of the tripyrrole antibiotic undecylprodigiosin (RED), including 17 genes in the RED biosynthetic gene cluster. Genetic complementation revealed that most of the insertions (more than two-thirds) were responsible for the changed antibiotic production. Genes associated with branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis, DNA metabolism, and protein modification affected RED production, and genes involved in signaling, stress, and transcriptional regulation were overrepresented. Some insertions caused dramatic changes in RED production, identifying future targets for strain improvement. IMPORTANCE High-GC Gram-positive streptomycetes and related actinomycetes have provided more than 100 clinical drugs used as antibiotics, immunosuppressants, and antitumor drugs. Their genomes harbor biosynthetic genes for many more unknown compounds with potential as future drugs. Here we developed a useful genome-wide mutagenesis tool based on the transposon Tn5 for the study of secondary metabolism and its

  5. ADA1 and NET1 Genes of Yeast Mediate Both Chromosome Maintenance and Mitochondrial $\\rho^{-}$ Mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Koltovaya, N A; Tchekhouta, I A; Devin, A B

    2002-01-01

    An increase in the mitochondrial (mt) rho^- mutagenesis is a well-known respose of yeast cells to mutations in the numerous nuclear genes as well as to various kinds of stress. Notwithstanding the extensive studies during several decades the biological significance of this response is not yet fully understood. The genetic approach to solution of this subject includes the study of genes that are required for the high incidence of spontaneous rho^- mutants. Previously we found that mutations in certain nuclear genes including CDC28, the central cell-cycle regulation gene, may decrease the spontaneous rho^- mutability and simultaneously affect maintenance of the yeast chromosomes and plasmids. The present work provides data on identification of two more genes, resembling CDC28 in this respect. These genes NET1 and ADA1 mediate important regulatory protein-protein interactions in the yeast cell. The effects of net1 and ada1 mutations on the maintenance of yeast mt genome, chromosomes and plasmids as well as on ce...

  6. ADA1 and NET1 genes of yeast mediate both chromosome maintenance and mitochondrial rho- mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltovaya, N.A.; Gerasimova, A.S.; Chekhuta, I.A.; Devin, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    An increase in the mitochondrial (mt) rho - mutagenesis is a well-known response of yeast cells to mutations in the numerous nuclear genes as well as to various kinds of stress. Notwithstanding the extensive studies during several decades the biological significance of this response is not yet fully understood. The genetic approach to solution of this subject includes the study of genes that are required for the high incidence of spontaneous rho - mutants. Previously we found that mutations in certain nuclear genes including CDC28, the central cell-cycle regulation gene, may decrease the spontaneous rho - mutability and simultaneously affect maintenance of the yeast chromosomes and plasmids. The present work provides data on identification of two more genes, resembling CDC28 in this respect. These genes NET1 and ADA1 mediate important regulatory protein-protein interactions in the yeast cell. The effects of net1 and ada1 mutations on the maintenance of yeast mt genome, chromosomes and plasmids as well on cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation are also described. (author)

  7. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation: An efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis and targeted gene disruption in Harpophora oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Chen, Guo-Qing; Ning, Guo-Ao; Shi, Huan-Bin; Zhang, Chu-Long; Lu, Jian-Ping; Mao, Li-Juan; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The endophytic filamentous fungus Harpophora oryzae is a beneficial endosymbiont isolated from the wild rice. H. oryzae could not only effectively improve growth rate and biomass yield of rice crops, but also induce systemic resistance against the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In this study, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was employed and optimized to modify the H. oryzae genes by either random DNA fragment integration or targeted gene replacement. Our results showed that co-cultivation of H. oryzae conidia with A. tumefaciens in the presence of acetosyringone for 48 h at 22 °C could lead to a relatively highest frequency of transformation, and 200 μM acetosyringone (AS) pre-cultivation of A. tumefaciens is also suggested. ATMT-mediated knockout mutagenesis was accomplished with the gene-deletion cassettes using a yeast homologous recombination method with a yeast-Escherichia-Agrobacterium shuttle vector pKOHo. Using the ATMT-mediated knockout mutagenesis, we successfully deleted three genes of H. oryzae (HoATG5, HoATG7, and HoATG8), and then got the null mutants ΔHoatg5, ΔHoatg7, and ΔHoatg8. These results suggest that ATMT is an efficient tool for gene modification including randomly insertional mutagenesis and gene deletion mutagenesis in H. oryzae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  9. Rolling Circle Mutagenesis of GST-mCherry to Understand Mutation, Gene Expression, and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Cole

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduates are often familiar with textbook examples of human mutations that affect coding regions and the subsequent disorders, but they may struggle with understanding the implications of mutations in the regulatory regions of genes. We have designed a laboratory sequence that will allow students to explore the effect random mutagenesis can have on protein function, expression, and ultimately phenotype. Students design and perform a safe and time-efficient random mutagenesis experiment using error-prone rolling circular amplification of a plasmid expressing the inducible fusion protein glutathione S-transferase (GST-mCherry. Mutagenized and wild-type control plasmid DNA, respectively, are then purified and transformed into bacteria to assess phenotypic changes. While bacteria transformed with the wild type control should be pink, some bacterial colonies transformed with mutagenized plasmids will exhibit a different color. Students attempt to identify their mutations by isolating plasmid from these mutant colonies, sequencing, and comparing their mutant sequence to the wild-type sequence. Additionally, students evaluate the potential effects of mutations on protein production by inducing GST-mCherry expression in cultures, generating cell lysates, and analyzing them using SDS-PAGE. Students who have a phenotypic difference but do not obtain a coding region mutation will be able to think critically about plasmid structure and regulation outside of the gene sequence. Students who do not obtain bacterial transformants have the chance to contemplate how mutation of antibiotic resistance genes or replication origins may have contributed to their results. Overall, this series of laboratories exposes students to basic genetic techniques and helps them conceptualize mutation beyond coding regions.

  10. Insertional Mutagenesis for Genes involved in Otic/Vestibular Development and Function in Xenopus Tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrejon, Marcela; Li, Erica; Nguyen, Minh; Winfree, Seth; Wang, Esther; Reinsch, Sigrid; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity to gravity is essential for spatial orientation. Consequently, the gravity receptor system is one of the phylogenetically oldest sensory systems, and the special adaptations that enhance sensitivity to gravity are highly conserved. The main goal of this project is to use Xenopus (frog) to identify genes expressed during vestibular and auditory development. These studies will lead a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in vestibular and auditory development and function. We are using a gene-trap approach in Xenopus tropicalis with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as the transgene reporter. GFP expression occurs only when the GFP gene is correctly integrated in actively transcribed genes. Using the GFP as a tag we can easily identify and clone the mutated gene. In addition, we can study the function of the mutated gene by analyzing the defects generated by insertion of the GFP transgene. To date we have tissue specific GFP expression in X. tropicalis including expression in ear, neural tube, kidney, muscle, eyes and nose. Our transgenic animals will soon reach maturity so that we can outcross them and analyze their progeny. Our next goal is to isolate RNA from our transgenics and clone the tagged genes using RACE-PCR. Currently we are optimizing the RACE-PCR method using transgenics with crystallin GFP expression.

  11. GAL4 enhancer trap strains with reporter gene expression during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. ONLINE RESOURCES. GAL4 enhancer trap strains with reporter gene expression during the development of adult brain in Drosophila melanogaster. C. R. VENKATESH and B. V. SHYAMALA*. Department of Studies in Zoology, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006, India.

  12. Role of the RecF gene product in UV mutagenesis of lambda phage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.D.; Stein, J.

    1986-01-01

    E. coli recF mutants have a greatly reduced capacity for Weigle mutagenesis of ultraviolet light-irradiated lambda phage. A recF 332::Tn3 mutation was introduced into an E. coli recA441 lex A51 strain which constitutively expresses SOS functions. Weigle mutagenesis of phage lambda could occur in the resulting strain in the absence of host cell irradiation, and was increased when the recA441 (tif) allele was activated of recF strains to support Weigle mutagenesis can therefore be ascribed to a defect in expression of SOS functions after irradiation. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of methods for genomic localization of gene trap sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts in a model organism such as mouse provide a valuable resource for the study of basic biology and human disease. Determining which gene has been inactivated by an untargeted gene trapping event poses a challenging annotation problem because gene trap sequence tags, which represent sequence near the vector insertion site of a trapped gene, are typically short and often contain unresolved residues. To understand better the localization of these sequences on the mouse genome, we compared stand-alone versions of the alignment programs BLAT, SSAHA, and MegaBLAST. A set of 3,369 sequence tags was aligned to build 34 of the mouse genome using default parameters for each algorithm. Known genome coordinates for the cognate set of full-length genes (1,659 sequences were used to evaluate localization results. Results In general, all three programs performed well in terms of localizing sequences to a general region of the genome, with only relatively subtle errors identified for a small proportion of the sequence tags. However, large differences in performance were noted with regard to correctly identifying exon boundaries. BLAT correctly identified the vast majority of exon boundaries, while SSAHA and MegaBLAST missed the majority of exon boundaries. SSAHA consistently reported the fewest false positives and is the fastest algorithm. MegaBLAST was comparable to BLAT in speed, but was the most susceptible to localizing sequence tags incorrectly to pseudogenes. Conclusion The differences in performance for sequence tags and full-length reference sequences were surprisingly small. Characteristic variations in localization results for each program were noted that affect the localization of sequence at exon boundaries, in particular.

  14. HTP-OligoDesigner: An Online Primer Design Tool for High-Throughput Gene Cloning and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Cesar M; Lima, Gustavo M A; Maluf, Fernando V; Guido, Rafael V C; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Following burgeoning genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data, biochemical and molecular biology groups worldwide are implementing high-throughput cloning and mutagenesis facilities in order to obtain a large number of soluble proteins for structural and functional characterization. Since manual primer design can be a time-consuming and error-generating step, particularly when working with hundreds of targets, the automation of primer design process becomes highly desirable. HTP-OligoDesigner was created to provide the scientific community with a simple and intuitive online primer design tool for both laboratory-scale and high-throughput projects of sequence-independent gene cloning and site-directed mutagenesis and a Tm calculator for quick queries.

  15. Tol2-mediated transgenesis, gene trapping, enhancer trapping, and Gal4-UAS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, K; Asakawa, K; Muto, A; Wada, H

    2016-01-01

    The Tol2 element is an active transposon that was found from the genome of the Japanese medaka fish. Since the Tol2 transposition system is active in all vertebrate cells tested so far, it has been applied to germ line transgenesis in various model animals including fish, frog, chicken, and mouse, and to gene transfer in culture cells. In zebrafish, the Tol2 system consists of the transposase mRNA and a Tol2 transposon-donor plasmid, and is introduced into fertilized eggs by microinjection. Thus genomic integrations of the Tol2 construct are generated in the germ lineage and transmitted to the offspring very efficiently. By using the Tol2 transposition system, we have developed important genetic methods, such as transgenesis, gene trapping, enhancer trapping, and the Gal4-UAS system in zebrafish and applied to many aspects of biological studies. In this chapter, we describe how these methods are performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of RecA protein in untargeted UV mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda: evidence for the requirement for the dinB gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotcorne-Lannoye, A.; Maenhaut-Michel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Untargeted UV mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda--i.e., the increased recovery of lambda mutants when unirradiated lambda infects UV-irradiated Escherichia coli--is thought to be mediated by a transient decrease in DNA replication fidelity, generating mutations in the newly synthesized strands. Using the bacteriophage lambda cI857----lambda c mutation system, we provide evidence that the RecA protein, shown previously to be required for this mutagenic pathway, is no longer needed when the LexA protein is inactivated by mutation. We suggest that the error-prone DNA replication responsible for UV-induced untargeted mutagenesis is turned on by the presence of replication-blocking lesions in the host cell DNA and that the RecA protein is required only to derepress the relevant din gene(s). This is in contrast to mutagenesis of irradiated bacteria or irradiated phage lambda, in which activated RecA protein has a second role in mutagenesis in addition to the cleavage of the LexA protein. Among the tested din genes, the dinB gene product (in addition to the uvrA and uvrB gene products) was found to be required for untargeted mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda. To our knowledge, a phenotype associated with the dinB gene has not been reported previously

  17. In vivo site-specific mutagenesis and gene collage using the delitto perfetto system in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Samantha; Mukherjee, Kuntal; Storici, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Delitto perfetto is a site-specific in vivo mutagenesis system that has been developed to generate changes at will in the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using this technique, it is possible to rapidly and efficiently engineer yeast strains without requiring several intermediate steps as it functions in only two steps, both of which rely on homologous recombination to drive the changes to the target DNA region. The first step involves the insertion of a cassette containing two markers at or near the locus to be altered. The second step involves complete removal of this cassette with oligonucleotides and/or other genetic material and transfer of the expected genetic modification(s) to the chosen DNA locus. Here we provide a detailed protocol of the delitto perfetto approach and present examples of the most common and useful applications for in vivo mutagenesis to generate base substitutions, deletions, insertions, as well as for precise in vivo assembly and integration of multiple genetic elements, or gene collage.

  18. Insertional mutagenesis and deep profiling reveals gene hierarchies and a Myc/p53-dependent bottleneck in lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille A Huser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral insertional mutagenesis (RIM is a powerful tool for cancer genomics that was combined in this study with deep sequencing (RIM/DS to facilitate a comprehensive analysis of lymphoma progression. Transgenic mice expressing two potent collaborating oncogenes in the germ line (CD2-MYC, -Runx2 develop rapid onset tumours that can be accelerated and rendered polyclonal by neonatal Moloney murine leukaemia virus (MoMLV infection. RIM/DS analysis of 28 polyclonal lymphomas identified 771 common insertion sites (CISs defining a 'progression network' that encompassed a remarkably large fraction of known MoMLV target genes, with further strong indications of oncogenic selection above the background of MoMLV integration preference. Progression driven by RIM was characterised as a Darwinian process of clonal competition engaging proliferation control networks downstream of cytokine and T-cell receptor signalling. Enhancer mode activation accounted for the most efficiently selected CIS target genes, including Ccr7 as the most prominent of a set of chemokine receptors driving paracrine growth stimulation and lymphoma dissemination. Another large target gene subset including candidate tumour suppressors was disrupted by intragenic insertions. A second RIM/DS screen comparing lymphomas of wild-type and parental transgenics showed that CD2-MYC tumours are virtually dependent on activation of Runx family genes in strong preference to other potent Myc collaborating genes (Gfi1, Notch1. Ikzf1 was identified as a novel collaborating gene for Runx2 and illustrated the interface between integration preference and oncogenic selection. Lymphoma target genes for MoMLV can be classified into (a a small set of master regulators that confer self-renewal; overcoming p53 and other failsafe pathways and (b a large group of progression genes that control autonomous proliferation in transformed cells. These findings provide insights into retroviral biology, human cancer

  19. Mutagenesis of FAD2 genes in peanut with CRISPR/Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is known for its precise and efficient gene-editing of a targeted region in a variety of organisms including plants. We targeted FAD2 gene region to perform CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing in peanut. The FAD2 gene encodes fatty acid desaturase which catalyzes the conversion of oleic ...

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-induced Targeted Mutagenesis and Gene Replacement to Generate Long-shelf Life Tomato Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing-Hui; Wang, Baike; Li, Ning; Tang, Yaping; Yang, Shengbao; Yang, Tao; Xu, Juan; Guo, Chunmiao; Yan, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Asmutola, Patiguli

    2017-09-19

    Quickly and precisely gain genetically enhanced breeding elites with value-adding performance traits is desired by the crop breeders all the time. The present of gene editing technologies, especially the CRISPR/Cas9 system with the capacities of efficiency, versatility and multiplexing provides a reasonable expectation towards breeding goals. For exploiting possible application to accelerate the speed of process at breeding by CRISPR/Cas9 technology, in this study, the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system transformation method was used for obtaining tomato ALC gene mutagenesis and replacement, in absence and presence of the homologous repair template. The average mutation frequency (72.73%) and low replacement efficiency (7.69%) were achieved in T 0 transgenic plants respectively. None of homozygous mutation was detected in T 0 transgenic plants, but one plant carry the heterozygous genes (Cas9/*-ALC/alc) was stably transmitted to T 1 generations for segregation and genotyping. Finally, the desired alc homozygous mutants without T-DNA insertion (*/*-alc/alc) in T 1 generations were acquired and further confirmed by genotype and phenotype characterization, with highlight of excellent storage performance, thus the recessive homozygous breeding elites with the character of long-shelf life were generated. Our results support that CRISPR/Cas9-induced gene replacement via HDR provides a valuable method for breeding elite innovation in tomato.

  1. Gene knockouts, in vivo site-directed mutagenesis and other modifications using the delitto perfetto system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Samantha; Storici, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    (Storici et al., 1999; Sauer, 1987). The presence of such scars can threaten the genomic stability of the strain and/or limit the number of successive genetic manipulations for that strain. Here, we describe the delitto perfetto approach for in vivo mutagenesis that combines the practicality of a general selection system with the versatility of synthetic oligonucleotides for targeting (Storici et al., 2001). It provides for generation of gene knockouts and almost any sort of mutation and genome rearrangement via HR. The delitto perfetto in vivo mutagenesis technique is designed for efficient and precise manipulation of yeast strains in a two-step process spanning ~2 weeks. Here, we present the theory and procedures of the delitto perfetto technique. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transposon mutagenesis identifies candidate genes that cooperate with loss of Transforming Growth Factor-beta signaling in mouse intestinal neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Shelli M.; Davison, Jerry; Carter, Kelly T.; O’Leary, Rachele M.; Trobridge, Patty; Knoblaugh, Sue E.; Myeroff, Lois L.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Brett, Benjamin T.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Starr, Timothy K.; Grady, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the accumulation of gene mutations and epigenetic alterations in colon epithelial cells, which promotes CRC formation through deregulating signaling pathways. One of the most commonly deregulated signaling pathways in CRC is the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway. Importantly, the effects of TGF-β signaling inactivation in CRC are modified by concurrent mutations in the tumor cell, and these concurrent mutations determine the ultimate biological effects of impaired TGF-β signaling in the tumor. However, many of the mutations that cooperate with the deregulated TGF-β signaling pathway in CRC remain unknown. Therefore, we sought to identify candidate driver genes that promote the formation of CRC in the setting of TGF-β signaling inactivation. We performed a forward genetic screen in mice carrying conditionally inactivated alleles of the TGF-β receptor, type II (Tgfbr2) using Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mediated mutagenesis. We used TAPDANCE and Gene-centric statistical methods to identify common insertion sites (CIS) and, thus, candidate tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes within the tumor genome. CIS analysis of multiple neoplasms from these mice identified many candidate Tgfbr2 cooperating genes and the Wnt/β-catenin, Hippo and MAPK pathways as the most commonly affected pathways. Importantly, the majority of candidate genes were also found to be mutated in human CRC. The SB transposon system provides an unbiased method to identify Tgfbr2 cooperating genes in mouse CRC that are functionally relevant and that may provide further insight into the pathogenesis of human CRC. PMID:27790711

  3. Identification of novel genes in the carotenogenic and oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula toruloides through genome-wide insertional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbin; Koh, Chong Mei John; Yap, Sihui Amy; Du, Minge; Hlaing, Mya Myintzu; Ji, Lianghui

    2018-02-21

    Rhodotorula toruloides is an outstanding producer of lipids and carotenoids. Currently, information on the key metabolic pathways and their molecular basis of regulation remains scarce, severely limiting efforts to engineer it as an industrial host. We have adapted Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) as a gene-tagging tool for the identification of novel genes in R. toruloides. Multiple factors affecting transformation efficiency in several species in the Pucciniomycotina subphylum were optimized. The Agrobacterium transfer DNA (T-DNA) showed predominantly single-copy chromosomal integrations in R. toruloides, which were trackable by high efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (hiTAIL-PCR). To demonstrate the application of random T-DNA insertions for strain improvement and gene hunting, 3 T-DNA insertional libraries were screened against cerulenin, nile red and tetrazolium violet respectively, resulting in the identification of 22 mutants with obvious phenotypes in fatty acid or lipid metabolism. Similarly, 5 carotenoid biosynthetic mutants were obtained through visual screening of the transformants. To further validate the gene tagging strategy, one of the carotenoid production mutants, RAM5, was analyzed in detail. The mutant had a T-DNA inserted at the putative phytoene desaturase gene CAR1. Deletion of CAR1 by homologous recombination led to a phenotype similar to RAM5 and it could be genetically complemented by re-introduction of the wild-type CAR1 genome sequence. T-DNA insertional mutagenesis is an efficient forward genetic tool for gene discovery in R. toruloides and related oleaginous yeast species. It is also valuable for metabolic engineering in these hosts. Further analysis of the 27 mutants identified in this study should augment our knowledge of the lipid and carotenoid biosynthesis, which may be exploited for oil and isoprenoid metabolic engineering.

  4. Rapid cloning of disease-resistance genes in plants using mutagenesis and sequence capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic solutions to protect crops against pests and pathogens are preferable to agrichemicals 1. Wild crop relatives carry immense diversity of disease resistance (R) genes that could enable more sustainable disease control. However, recruiting R genes for crop improvement typically involves long b...

  5. Finding cancer genes in copy number data and insertional mutagenesis data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease. Step-wise alteration of genes that have a normal function in the cell can lead to the transformation of a healthy cell into a malignant cancer cell. Cancer genes provide several traits to the cell that allow it to become malignant. These traits have been researched for

  6. uvsI mutants defective in UV mutagenesis define a fourth epistatic group of uvs genes in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, S K; Kafer, E

    1993-01-01

    Three UV-sensitive mutations of A. nidulans, uvsI, uvsJ and uvsA, were tested for epistatic relationships with members of the previously established groups, here called the "UvsF", "UvsC", and "UvsB" groups. uvsI mutants are defective for spontaneous and induced reversion of certain point mutations and differ also for other properties from previously analyzed uvs types. They are very sensitive to the killing effects of UV-light and 4-NQO (4-nitro-quinoline-N-oxide) but not to MMS (methylmethane sulfonate). When double- and single-mutant uvs strains were compared for sensitivity to these three agents, synergistic or additive effects were found for uvsI with all members of the three groups. The uvsI gene may therefore represent a fourth epistatic group, possibly involved in mutagenic repair. On the other hand, uvsJ was clearly epistatic with members of the UvsF group and fitted well into this group also by phenotype. The uvsA gene was tentatively assigned to the UvsC group. uvsA showed epistatic interactions with uvsC in all tests, and like UvsC-group mutants is UV-sensitive mainly in dividing cells. However, the uvsA mutation does not cause the defects in recombination and UV mutagenesis typical for this group.

  7. Identifying pathogenicity genes in the rubber tree anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides through random insertional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiying; Li, Guohua; Lin, Chunhua; Shi, Tao; Zhai, Ligang; Chen, Yipeng; Huang, Guixiu

    2013-07-19

    To gain more insight into the molecular mechanisms of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides pathogenesis, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was used to identify mutants of C. gloeosporioides impaired in pathogenicity. An ATMT library of 4128 C. gloeosporioides transformants was generated. Transformants were screened for defects in pathogenicity with a detached copper brown leaf assay. 32 mutants showing reproducible pathogenicity defects were obtained. Southern blot analysis showed 60.4% of the transformants had single-site T-DNA integrations. 16 Genomic sequences flanking T-DNA were recovered from mutants by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and were used to isolate the tagged genes from the genome sequence of wild-type C. gloeosporioides by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool searches against the local genome database of the wild-type C. gloeosporioides. One potential pathogenicity genes encoded calcium-translocating P-type ATPase. Six potential pathogenicity genes had no known homologs in filamentous fungi and were likely to be novel fungal virulence factors. Two putative genes encoded Glycosyltransferase family 28 domain-containing protein and Mov34/MPN/PAD-1 family protein, respectively. Five potential pathogenicity genes had putative function matched with putative protein of other Colletotrichum species. Two known C. gloeosporioides pathogenicity genes were also identified, the encoding Glomerella cingulata hard-surface induced protein and C. gloeosporioides regulatory subunit of protein kinase A gene involved in cAMP-dependent PKA signal transduction pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. New Genes Involved in Mild Stress Response Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis in Lactobacillus paracasei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Palud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are associated with various plant, animal, and human niches and are also present in many fermented foods and beverages. Thus, they are subjected to several stress conditions and have developed advanced response mechanisms to resist, adapt, and grow. This work aimed to identify the genes involved in some stress adaptation mechanisms in LAB. For this purpose, global reverse genetics was applied by screening a library of 1287 Lactobacillus paracasei transposon mutants for mild monofactorial stresses. This library was submitted independently to heat (52°C, 30 min, ethanol (170 g.L−1, 30 min, salt (NaCl 0.8 M, 24 h, acid (pH 4.5, 24 h, and oxidative (2 mM H2O2, 24 h perturbations which trigger mild monofactorial stresses compatible with bacterial adaptation. Stress sensitivity of mutants was determined either by evaluating viability using propidium iodide (PI staining, or by following growth inhibition through turbidity measurement. The screening for heat and ethanol stresses lead respectively to the identification of 63 and 27 genes/putative promoters whose disruption lead to an increased sensitivity. Among them, 14 genes or putative promoters were common for both stresses. For salt, acid and oxidative stresses, respectively 8, 6, and 9 genes or putative promoters were identified as essential for adaptation to these unfavorable conditions, with only three genes common to at least two stresses. Then, RT-qPCR was performed on selected stress response genes identified by mutant screenings in order to evaluate if their expression was modified in response to stresses in the parental strain. Eleven genes (membrane, transposase, chaperone, nucleotide and carbohydrate metabolism, and hypothetical protein genes were upregulated during stress adaptation for at least two stresses. Seven genes, encoding membrane functions, were upregulated in response to a specific stress and thus could represent potential transcriptomic biomarkers

  9. Directed mutagenesis in Candida albicans: one-step gene disruption to isolate ura3 mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.; Miller, S.M.; Kurtz, M.B.; Kirsch, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for introducing specific mutations into the diploid Candida albicans by one-step gene disruption and subsequent UV-induced recombination was developed. The cloned C. albicans URA3 gene was disrupted with the C. albicans ADE2 gene, and the linearized DNA was used for transformation of two ade2 mutants, SGY-129 and A81-Pu. Both an insertional inactivation of the URA3 gene and a disruption which results in a 4.0-kilobase deletion were made. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that the URA3 gene was disrupted on one of the chromosomal homologs in 15 of the 18 transformants analyzed. These analyses also revealed restriction site dimorphism of EcoRI at the URA3 locus which provides a unique marker to distinguish between chromosomal homologs. This enabled us to show that either homolog could be disrupted and that disrupted transformants of SGY-129 contained more than two copies of the URA3 locus. The A81-Pu transformants heterozygous for the ura3 mutations were rendered homozygous and Ura- by UV-induced recombination. The homozygosity of a deletion mutant and an insertion mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Both mutants were transformed to Ura+ with plasmids containing the URA3 gene and in addition, were resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, a characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 mutants as well as of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase mutants of other organisms

  10. Construction of Nontoxigenic Mutants of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum NCTC 11219 by Insertional Mutagenesis and Gene Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauwers, Charlien; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Michiels, Chris W

    2016-05-15

    Group II nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum (gIICb) strains are an important concern for the safety of minimally processed ready-to-eat foods, because they can grow and produce botulinum neurotoxin during refrigerated storage. The principles of control of gIICb by conventional food processing and preservation methods have been well investigated and translated into guidelines for the food industry; in contrast, the effectiveness of emerging processing and preservation techniques has been poorly documented. The reason is that experimental studies with C. botulinum are cumbersome because of biosafety and biosecurity concerns. In the present work, we report the construction of two nontoxigenic derivatives of the type E gIICb strain NCTC 11219. In the first strain, the botulinum toxin gene (bont/E) was insertionally inactivated with a retargeted intron using the ClosTron system. In the second strain, bont/E was exchanged for an erythromycin resistance gene using a new gene replacement strategy that makes use of pyrE as a bidirectional selection marker. Growth under optimal and stressed conditions, sporulation efficiency, and spore heat resistance of the mutants were unaltered, except for small differences in spore heat resistance at 70°C and in growth at 2.3% NaCl. The mutants described in this work provide a safe alternative for basic research as well as for food challenge and process validation studies with gIICb. In addition, this work expands the clostridial genetic toolbox with a new gene replacement method that can be applied to replace any gene in gIICb and other clostridia. The nontoxigenic mutants described in this work provide a safe alternative for basic research as well as for food challenge and process validation studies with psychrotrophic Clostridium botulinum In addition, this work expands the clostridial genetic toolbox with a new gene replacement method that can be applied to replace any gene in clostridia. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  11. Induced Mutagenesis in UGT74S1 Gene Leads to Stable New Flax Lines with Altered Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (SDG Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourlaye Fofana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flax secoisolariciresinol (SECO diglucoside (SDG lignan is an emerging natural product purported to prevent chronic diseases in humans. SECO, the aglycone form of SDG, has shown higher intestinal cell absorption but it is not accumulated naturally in planta. Recently, we have identified and characterized a UDP-glucosyltransferase gene, UGT74S1, that glucosylates SECO into its monoglucoside (SMG and SDG forms when expressed in yeast. However, whether this gene is unique in controlling SECO glucosylation into SDG in planta is unclear. Here, we report on the use of UGT74S1 in reverse and forward genetics to characterize an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS mutagenized flax population from cultivar CDC Bethune and consisting of 1996 M2 families. EMS mutagenesis generated 73 SNP variants causing 79 mutational events in the UGT74S1 exonic regions of 93 M2 families. The mutation frequency in the exonic regions was determined to be one per 28 Kb. Of these mutations, 13 homozygous missense mutations and two homozygous nonsense mutations were observed and all were transmitted into the M3 and M4 generations. Forward genetics screening of the population showed homozygous nonsense mutants completely lacking SDG biosynthesis while the production of SMG was observed only in a subset of the M4 lines. Heterozygous or homozygous M4 missense mutants displayed a wide range of SDG levels, some being greater than those of CDC Bethune. No additional deleterious mutations were detected in these mutant lines using a panel of 10 other genes potentially involved in the lignan biosynthesis. This study provides further evidence that UGT74S1 is unique in controlling SDG formation from SECO and this is the first report of non-transgenic flax germplasm with simultaneous knockout of SDG and presence of SMG in planta.

  12. Efficient target-selected mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans : toward a knockout for every gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuppen, Edwin; Gort, Eelke; Hazendonk, Esther; Mudde, Josine; van de Belt, José; Nijman, Isaäc J; Guryev, Victor; Plasterk, Ronald H A

    Reverse genetic or gene-driven knockout approaches have contributed significantly to the success of model organisms for fundamental and biomedical research. Although various technologies are available for C. elegans, none of them scale very well for genome-wide application. To address this, we

  13. Transposon mutagenesis identifies novel genes associated with Staphylococcus aureus persister formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ewenjie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacterial persisters are responsible for the recalcitrance of chronic and persistent infections to antimicrobial therapy. Although the mechanisms of persister formation and survival have been widely studied in Escherichia coli, persistence mechanisms in S. aureus remain largely unknown. Here, we screened a transposon mutant library of a clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)strain, USA500 (ST8, under antibiotic pressure and identified 13 genes whose insertion mutations resulted in a defect in persistence. These candidate genes were further confirmed by evaluating the survival of the mutants upon exposure to levofloxacin and several other stress conditions. We found 13 insertion mutants with significantly lower persister numbers under several stress conditions, including sdhA, sdhB, ureG, mnhG1, fbaA, ctaB, clpX, parE, HOU_0223, HOU_0587, HOU_2091, HOU_2315 and HOU_2346, which mapped into pathways of oxidative phosphorylation, TCA cycle, glycolysis, cell cycle and ABC transporters, suggesting that these genes and pathways may play an important role in persister formation and survival. The newly constructed knockout strains of ureG, sdhA and sdhB and their complemented strains were also tested for defect in persisters following exposure to levofloxacin and several other stress conditions. The results from these experiments were consistent with the screening results, which indicated that deletion of these genes in MRSA USA500 leads to persister defect. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of persister formation and survival in S. aureus and offer new targets for the development of persister-directed antibiotics for the improved treatment of chronic and persistent infections.

  14. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power of mutant approaches in combination with molecular techniques to investigate the molecular nature of the genes became fully appreciated

  15. Sequence specificity of mutagenesis in the cI gene of bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopek, T.R.; Wood, R.D.; Hutchinson, F.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of DNA base sequence alterations have shown that for every agent the mutagenic process is specific with respect to the types of base changes induced and the location of the changes in the DNA. Analysis of the types of mutations produced by mutagenic agents can provide insight into the mechanism of mutation and can suggest which DNA lesions may be involved in the actual mutagenic event. We have developed a system for the analysis of chemically induced base sequence alterations in the cI repressor gene of bacteriophage lambda using DNA sequencing techniques. To illustrate the utility of this type of analysis, we present the results obtained with ultraviolet light (UV). Irradiation of target DNA with UV alone, or UV followed by photoreactivating light (which removes dimers), produces mostly transitions at pyrimidine-pyrimidine sites. Conversely, irradiation with 313 nm light plus acetophenone (which produces only thymine dimers) produces mostly transversions at low efficiency. This and other evidence suggests that the actual premutagenic UV lesion in E. coli may not be pyrimidine-pyrimidine dimers, but rather pyr(6-4)pyo photoproducts

  16. A human haploid gene trap collection to study lncRNAs with unusual RNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, Aleksandra E; Vlatkovic, Irena; Neesen, Jürgen; Barlow, Denise P; Pauler, Florian M

    2016-01-01

    Many thousand long non-coding (lnc) RNAs are mapped in the human genome. Time consuming studies using reverse genetic approaches by post-transcriptional knock-down or genetic modification of the locus demonstrated diverse biological functions for a few of these transcripts. The Human Gene Trap Mutant Collection in haploid KBM7 cells is a ready-to-use tool for studying protein-coding gene function. As lncRNAs show remarkable differences in RNA biology compared to protein-coding genes, it is unclear if this gene trap collection is useful for functional analysis of lncRNAs. Here we use the uncharacterized LOC100288798 lncRNA as a model to answer this question. Using public RNA-seq data we show that LOC100288798 is ubiquitously expressed, but inefficiently spliced. The minor spliced LOC100288798 isoforms are exported to the cytoplasm, whereas the major unspliced isoform is nuclear localized. This shows that LOC100288798 RNA biology differs markedly from typical mRNAs. De novo assembly from RNA-seq data suggests that LOC100288798 extends 289kb beyond its annotated 3' end and overlaps the downstream SLC38A4 gene. Three cell lines with independent gene trap insertions in LOC100288798 were available from the KBM7 gene trap collection. RT-qPCR and RNA-seq confirmed successful lncRNA truncation and its extended length. Expression analysis from RNA-seq data shows significant deregulation of 41 protein-coding genes upon LOC100288798 truncation. Our data shows that gene trap collections in human haploid cell lines are useful tools to study lncRNAs, and identifies the previously uncharacterized LOC100288798 as a potential gene regulator.

  17. Differential expression of SOS genes in an E. coli mutant producing unstable lexA protein enhances excision repair but inhibits mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.R.; Ganesan, A.K.; Mount, D.W.; Stanford Univ., CA)

    1986-01-01

    The SOS response is displayed following treatments which damage DNA or inhibit DNA replication. Two associated activities include enhanced capacity for DNA repair resulting from derepression of the recA, uvrA, uvrB and uvrD genes and increased mutagenesis due to derepression of recA, umuC and umuD. These changes are the consequence of the derepression of at least seventeen unlinked operons negatively regulated by LexA repressor. Following treatments that induce the SOS response, a signal molecule interacts with RecA protein, converting it to an activated form. Activated RecA protein facilitates the proteolytic cleavage of LexA repressor, which results in derepression of the regulon. The cell then enters a new physiological state during which time DNA repair processes are augmented. The lexA41 mutant of E. coli is a uv-resistant derivative of another mutant, lexA3, which produces a repressor that is not cleaved following inducing treatments. The resultant protein is unstable. Lac operon fusions to most of the genes in the SOS regulon were used to show that the various damage-inducible genes were derepressed to different extents. uvrA, B, and D were almost fully derepressed. Consistent with this finding, the rate of removal of T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites was more rapid in the uv-irradiated lexA41 mutant than in normal cells, suggesting a more active excision repair system. We propose that the instability of the LexA41 protein reduces the intracellular concentration of repressor to a level that allows a high level of excision repair. The additional observation that SOS mutagenesis was only weakly induced in a lexA41 uvrA - mutant implies that the mutant protein partially represses one or more genes whose products promote SOS mutagenesis. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. CRISPR-Trap: a clean approach for the generation of gene knockouts and gene replacements in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Stefan; Mechtersheimer, Jonas; Nasif, Sofia; Benitez, Julio Aguila; Colombo, Martino; Domanski, Michal; Jutzi, Daniel; Hedlund, Eva; Ruepp, Marc-David

    2018-01-15

    CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing offers the possibility to knock out almost any gene of interest in an affordable and simple manner. The most common strategy is the introduction of a frameshift into the open reading frame (ORF) of the target gene which truncates the coding sequence (CDS) and targets the corresponding transcript for degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). However, we show that transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs) are not always degraded efficiently and can generate C-terminally truncated proteins which might have residual or dominant negative functions. Therefore, we recommend an alternative approach for knocking out genes, which combines CRISPR/Cas9 with gene traps (CRISPR-Trap) and is applicable to ∼50% of all spliced human protein-coding genes and a large subset of lncRNAs. CRISPR-Trap completely prevents the expression of the ORF and avoids expression of C-terminal truncated proteins. We demonstrate the feasibility of CRISPR-Trap by utilizing it to knock out several genes in different human cell lines. Finally, we also show that this approach can be used to efficiently generate gene replacements allowing for modulation of protein levels for otherwise lethal knockouts (KOs). Thus, CRISPR-Trap offers several advantages over conventional KO approaches and allows for generation of clean CRISPR/Cas9-based KOs. © 2018 Reber, Mechtersheimer, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Changes in transcript levels of starch hydrolysis genes and raising citric acid production via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Li, Wenjian; Chen, Hao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuyang; Chen, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to accumulate citric acid for the hydrolysis of starchy materials. To improve citric acid productivity, heavy ion beam mutagenesis was utilized to produce mutant A.niger strains with enhanced production of citric acid in this work. It was demonstrated that a mutant HW2 with high concentration of citric acid was isolated after carbon ion irradiation with the energy of 80Mev/μ, which was obvious increase higher than the original strain from liquefied corn starch as a feedstock. More importantly, with the evidence from the expression profiles of key genes and enzyme activity involved in the starch hydrolysis process between original strain and various phenotype mutants, our results confirmed that different transcript levels of key genes involving in starch hydrolysis process between original strain and mutants could be a significant contributor to different citric acid concentration in A.niger, such as, amyR and glaA, which therefore opened a new avenue for constructing genetically engineered A.niger mutants for high-yield citric acid accumulation in the future. As such, this work demonstrated that heavy ion beam mutagenesis presented an efficient alternative strategy to be developed to generate various phenotype microbe species mutants for functional genes research.

  1. Changes in transcript levels of starch hydrolysis genes and raising citric acid production via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to accumulate citric acid for the hydrolysis of starchy materials. To improve citric acid productivity, heavy ion beam mutagenesis was utilized to produce mutant A.niger strains with enhanced production of citric acid in this work. It was demonstrated that a mutant HW2 with high concentration of citric acid was isolated after carbon ion irradiation with the energy of 80Mev/μ, which was obvious increase higher than the original strain from liquefied corn starch as a feedstock. More importantly, with the evidence from the expression profiles of key genes and enzyme activity involved in the starch hydrolysis process between original strain and various phenotype mutants, our results confirmed that different transcript levels of key genes involving in starch hydrolysis process between original strain and mutants could be a significant contributor to different citric acid concentration in A.niger, such as, amyR and glaA, which therefore opened a new avenue for constructing genetically engineered A.niger mutants for high-yield citric acid accumulation in the future. As such, this work demonstrated that heavy ion beam mutagenesis presented an efficient alternative strategy to be developed to generate various phenotype microbe species mutants for functional genes research.

  2. Changes in transcript levels of starch hydrolysis genes and raising citric acid production via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjian; Chen, Hao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuyang; Chen, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to accumulate citric acid for the hydrolysis of starchy materials. To improve citric acid productivity, heavy ion beam mutagenesis was utilized to produce mutant A.niger strains with enhanced production of citric acid in this work. It was demonstrated that a mutant HW2 with high concentration of citric acid was isolated after carbon ion irradiation with the energy of 80Mev/μ, which was obvious increase higher than the original strain from liquefied corn starch as a feedstock. More importantly, with the evidence from the expression profiles of key genes and enzyme activity involved in the starch hydrolysis process between original strain and various phenotype mutants, our results confirmed that different transcript levels of key genes involving in starch hydrolysis process between original strain and mutants could be a significant contributor to different citric acid concentration in A.niger, such as, amyR and glaA, which therefore opened a new avenue for constructing genetically engineered A.niger mutants for high-yield citric acid accumulation in the future. As such, this work demonstrated that heavy ion beam mutagenesis presented an efficient alternative strategy to be developed to generate various phenotype microbe species mutants for functional genes research. PMID:28650980

  3. GAL4 enhancer trap strains with reporter gene expression during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding the molecular regulation of adult brain development has remained difficult even in a genetically tractable system like Drosophila. An important reason for this is that the same genes are deployed repeatedly several times at different stages to carry out different functions in a developmental programme.

  4. Direct random insertion mutagenesis of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Ramon; Bakker, Dennis; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Kusters, Johannes G.

    2003-01-01

    Random insertion mutagenesis is a widely used technique for the identification of bacterial virulence genes. Most strategies for random mutagenesis involve cloning in Escherichia coli for passage of plasmids or for phenotypic selection. This can result in biased selection due to restriction or

  5. Multi-target trapping in constrained environments using gene regulatory network-based pattern formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingguang Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the morphogenesis of biological organisms, gene regulatory network-based methods have been used in complex pattern formation of swarm robotic systems. In this article, obstacle information was embedded into the gene regulatory network model to make the robots trap targets with an expected pattern while avoiding obstacles in a distributed manner. Based on the modified gene regulatory network model, an implicit function method was adopted to represent the expected pattern which is easily adjusted by adding extra feature points. Considering environmental constraints (e.g. tunnels or gaps in which robots must adjust their pattern to conduct trapping task, a pattern adaptation strategy was proposed for the pattern modeler to adaptively adjust the expected pattern. Also to trap multiple targets, a splitting pattern adaptation strategy was proposed for diffusively moving targets so that the robots can trap each target separately with split sub-patterns. The proposed model and strategies were verified through a set of simulation with complex environmental constraints and non-consensus movements of targets.

  6. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data.

  7. Efficient methods for targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish using zinc-finger nucleases: data from targeting of nine genes using CompoZr or CoDA ZFNs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Sood

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been shown that targeted mutagenesis using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs can be used to generate knockout zebrafish lines for analysis of their function and/or developing disease models. A number of different methods have been developed for the design and assembly of gene-specific ZFNs and TALENs, making them easily available to most zebrafish researchers. Regardless of the choice of targeting nuclease, the process of generating mutant fish is similar. It is a time-consuming and multi-step process that can benefit significantly from development of efficient high throughput methods. In this study, we used ZFNs assembled through either the CompoZr (Sigma-Aldrich or the CoDA (context-dependent assembly platforms to generate mutant zebrafish for nine genes. We report our improved high throughput methods for 1 evaluation of ZFNs activity by somatic lesion analysis using colony PCR, eliminating the need for plasmid DNA extractions from a large number of clones, and 2 a sensitive founder screening strategy using fluorescent PCR with PIG-tailed primers that eliminates the stutter bands and accurately identifies even single nucleotide insertions and deletions. Using these protocols, we have generated multiple mutant alleles for seven genes, five of which were targeted with CompoZr ZFNs and two with CoDA ZFNs. Our data also revealed that at least five-fold higher mRNA dose was required to achieve mutagenesis with CoDA ZFNs than with CompoZr ZFNs, and their somatic lesion frequency was lower (<5% when compared to CopmoZr ZFNs (9-98%. This work provides high throughput protocols for efficient generation of zebrafish mutants using ZFNs and TALENs.

  8. Genome-wide investigation of the genes involved in nicotine metabolism in Pseudomonas putida J5 by Tn5 transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wei; Lei, Liping; Liu, Xingzhong; Wei, Hai-Lei

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas putida J5 is an efficient nicotine-degrading bacterial strain isolated from the tobacco rhizosphere. We successfully performed a comprehensive whole-genome analysis of nicotine metabolism-associated genes by Tn5 transposon mutagenesis in P. putida J5. A total of 18 mutants with unique insertions screened from 16,324 Tn5-transformants failed to use nicotine as the sole carbon source. Flanking sequences of the Tn5 transposon were cloned with a shotgun method from all of the nicotine-growth-deficient mutants. The potentially essential products of mutated gene were classified as follows: oxidoreductases, protein and metal transport systems, proteases and peptidases, transcriptional and translational regulators, and unknown proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the Tn5 insertion sites indicated that the nicotine metabolic genes were separated and widely distributed in the genome. One of the mutants, M2022, was a Tn5 insert into a gene encoding a homolog of 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase, the second enzyme of nicotine metabolism in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans. Genetic and biochemical analysis confirmed that three open reading frames (ORFs) from an approximately 13-kb fragment recovered from the mutant M2022 were responsible for the transformation of nicotine to 3-succinoyl-pyridine via pseudooxynicotine and 3-succinoyl semialdehyde-pyridine, the first three steps of nicotine degradation. Further research on these mutants and the Tn5-inserted genes will help us characterize nicotine metabolic processes in P. putida J5.

  9. Targeted mutagenesis of the Sap47 gene of Drosophila: Flies lacking the synapse associated protein of 47 kDa are viable and fertile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Saskia

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved proteins preferentially expressed in synaptic terminals of the nervous system are likely to play a significant role in brain function. We have previously identified and molecularly characterized the Sap47 gene which codes for a novel synapse associated protein of 47 kDa in Drosophila. Sequence comparison identifies homologous proteins in numerous species including C. elegans, fish, mouse and human. First hints as to the function of this novel protein family can be obtained by generating mutants for the Sap47 gene in Drosophila. Results Attempts to eliminate the Sap47 gene through targeted mutagenesis by homologous recombination were unsuccessful. However, several mutants were generated by transposon remobilization after an appropriate insertion line had become available from the Drosophila P-element screen of the Bellen/Hoskins/Rubin/Spradling labs. Characterization of various deletions in the Sap47 gene due to imprecise excision of the P-element identified three null mutants and three hypomorphic mutants. Null mutants are viable and fertile and show no gross structural or obvious behavioural deficits. For cell-specific over-expression and "rescue" of the knock-out flies a transgenic line was generated which expresses the most abundant transcript under the control of the yeast enhancer UAS. In addition, knock-down of the Sap47 gene was achieved by generating 31 transgenic lines expressing Sap47 RNAi constructs, again under UAS control. When driven by a ubiquitously expressed yeast transcription factor (GAL4, Sap47 gene suppression in several of these lines is highly efficient resulting in residual SAP47 protein concentrations in heads as low as 6% of wild type levels. Conclusion The conserved synaptic protein SAP47 of Drosophila is not essential for basic synaptic function. The Sap47 gene region may be refractory to targeted mutagenesis by homologous recombination. RNAi using a construct linking genomic DNA to anti

  10. Genomic saturation mutagenesis and polygenic analysis identify novel yeast genes affecting ethyl acetate production, a non-selectable polygenic trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Tom Den; Souffriau, Ben; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Duitama, Jorge; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of mutants in populations of microorganisms has been a valuable tool in experimental genetics for decades. The main disadvantage, however, is the inability of isolating mutants in non-selectable polygenic traits. Most traits of organisms, however, are non-selectable and polygenic, including industrially important properties of microorganisms. The advent of powerful technologies for polygenic analysis of complex traits has allowed simultaneous identification of multiple causative mutations among many thousands of irrelevant mutations. We now show that this also applies to haploid strains of which the genome has been loaded with induced mutations so as to affect as many non-selectable, polygenic traits as possible. We have introduced about 900 mutations into single haploid yeast strains using multiple rounds of EMS mutagenesis, while maintaining the mating capacity required for genetic mapping. We screened the strains for defects in flavor production, an important non-selectable, polygenic trait in yeast alcoholic beverage production. A haploid strain with multiple induced mutations showing reduced ethyl acetate production in semi-anaerobic fermentation, was selected and the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis after crossing with an unrelated haploid strain. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and allele exchange identified PMA1 and CEM1 as causative mutant alleles and TPS1 as a causative genetic background allele. The case of CEM1 revealed that relevant mutations without observable effect in the haploid strain with multiple induced mutations (in this case due to defective mitochondria) can be identified by polygenic analysis as long as the mutations have an effect in part of the segregants (in this case those that regained fully functional mitochondria). Our results show that genomic saturation mutagenesis combined with complex trait polygenic analysis could be used successfully to

  11. Genomic saturation mutagenesis and polygenic analysis identify novel yeast genes affecting ethyl acetate production, a non-selectable polygenic trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Den Abt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of mutants in populations of microorganisms has been a valuable tool in experimental genetics for decades. The main disadvantage, however, is the inability of isolating mutants in non-selectable polygenic traits. Most traits of organisms, however, are non-selectable and polygenic, including industrially important properties of microorganisms. The advent of powerful technologies for polygenic analysis of complex traits has allowed simultaneous identification of multiple causative mutations among many thousands of irrelevant mutations. We now show that this also applies to haploid strains of which the genome has been loaded with induced mutations so as to affect as many non-selectable, polygenic traits as possible. We have introduced about 900 mutations into single haploid yeast strains using multiple rounds of EMS mutagenesis, while maintaining the mating capacity required for genetic mapping. We screened the strains for defects in flavor production, an important non-selectable, polygenic trait in yeast alcoholic beverage production. A haploid strain with multiple induced mutations showing reduced ethyl acetate production in semi-anaerobic fermentation, was selected and the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs were mapped using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis after crossing with an unrelated haploid strain. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and allele exchange identified PMA1 and CEM1 as causative mutant alleles and TPS1 as a causative genetic background allele. The case of CEM1 revealed that relevant mutations without observable effect in the haploid strain with multiple induced mutations (in this case due to defective mitochondria can be identified by polygenic analysis as long as the mutations have an effect in part of the segregants (in this case those that regained fully functional mitochondria. Our results show that genomic saturation mutagenesis combined with complex trait polygenic analysis could be used

  12. Targeted mutagenesis of the Hira gene results in gastrulation defects and patterning abnormalities of mesoendodermal derivatives prior to early embryonic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Catherine; Sutherland, Helen F; Farmer, Hannah; Kimber, Wendy; Halford, Stephanie; Carey, Alisoun; Brickman, Joshua M; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Scambler, Peter J

    2002-04-01

    The Hira gene encodes a nuclear WD40 domain protein homologous to the yeast transcriptional corepressors Hir1p and Hir2p. Using targeted mutagenesis we demonstrate that Hira is essential for murine embryogenesis. Analysis of inbred 129Sv embryos carrying the null mutation revealed an initial requirement during gastrulation, with many mutant embryos having a distorted primitive streak. Mutant embryos recovered at later stages have a range of malformations with axial and paraxial mesendoderm being particularly affected, a finding consistent with the disruption of gastrulation seen earlier in development. This phenotype could be partially rescued by a CD1 genetic background, although the homozygous mutation was always lethal by embryonic day 11, with death probably resulting from abnormal placentation and failure of cardiac morphogenesis.

  13. Insertional Mutagenesis by a Hybrid PiggyBac and Sleeping Beauty Transposon in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W.; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A.; Behringer, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat. PMID:23023007

  14. Cellular dissection of the spinal cord motor column by BAC transgenesis and gene trapping in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Kazuhide; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis and gene/enhancer trapping are effective approaches for identification of genetically defined neuronal populations in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we applied these techniques to zebrafish (Danio rerio) in order to obtain insights into the cellular architecture of the axial motor column in vertebrates. First, by using the BAC for the Mnx class homeodomain protein gene mnr2b/mnx2b, we established the mnGFF7 transgenic line expressing the Gal4FF transcriptional activator in a large part of the motor column. Single cell labeling of Gal4FF-expressing cells in the mnGFF7 line enabled a detailed investigation of the morphological characteristics of individual spinal motoneurons, as well as the overall organization of the motor column in a spinal segment. Secondly, from a large-scale gene trap screen, we identified transgenic lines that marked discrete subpopulations of spinal motoneurons with Gal4FF. Molecular characterization of these lines led to the identification of the ADAMTS3 gene, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved ADAMTS family of peptidases and is dynamically expressed in the ventral spinal cord. The transgenic fish established here, along with the identified gene, should facilitate an understanding of the cellular and molecular architecture of the spinal cord motor column and its connection to muscles in vertebrates.

  15. Nitrilase in biosynthesis of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid from indole-3-acetonitrile: cloning of the Alcaligenes gene and site-directed mutagenesis of cysteine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Izui, H; Nagasawa, T; Yamada, H

    1993-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is the major auxin in most plants. In Cruciferae, including Brassicaceae, indole-3-acetic acid is synthesized from indole-3-acetonitrile by nitrilase, after indole-3-acetonitrile is formed from tryptophan via indole-3-acetaldoxime or indole glycosinolates as the intermediate. We cloned and sequenced the gene for nitrilase (EC 3.5.5.1), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of indole-3-acetonitrile to indole-3-acetic acid, from Alcaligenes faecalis JM3. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the nitrilase gene shows 34.7% identity with that of Klebsiella ozaenae nitrilase. A DNA clone containing the nitrilase gene expressed the active enzyme in Escherichia coli with excellent yield. Among five cysteine residues (Cys-40, Cys-115, Cys-162, Cys-163, and Cys-218) in the Alcaligenes nitrilase, only Cys-163 was conserved at the corresponding position in the Klebsiella nitrilase. Two mutant enzymes, in which Cys-162 and Cys-163 were replaced with Asn and Ala, respectively, were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. A 35% increase of the specific activity and a large reduction of the Km for thiophene-2-acetonitrile (which was used as a standard substrate for the nitrilase) were observed in the Cys-162-->Asn mutant enzyme. The Cys-163-->Ala mutation resulted in complete loss of nitrilase activity, clearly indicating that Cys-163 is crucial for the activity and Cys-162 could not provide the catalytic function of Cys-163. Images PMID:8419930

  16. Improvement of Alcaligenes faecalis nitrilase by gene site saturation mutagenesis and its application in stereospecific biosynthesis of (R)-(-)-mandelic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Xin-Hong; Xue, Ya-Ping; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2014-05-21

    Nitrilases have recently received considerable attention as the biocatalysts for stereospecific production of carboxylic acids. To improve the activity, the nitrilase from Alcaligenes faecalis was selected for further modification by the gene site saturation mutagenesis method (GSSM), based on homology modeling and previous reports about mutations. After mutagenesis, the positive mutants were selected using a convenient two-step high-throughput screening method based on product formation and pH indicator combined with the HPLC method. After three rounds of GSSM, Mut3 (Gln196Ser/Ala284Ile) with the highest activity and ability of tolerance to the substrate was selected. As compared to the wild-type A. faecalis nitrilase, Mut3 showed 154% higher specific activity. Mut3 could retain 91.6% of its residual activity after incubation at pH 6.5 for 6 h. In a fed-batch reaction with 800 mM mandelonitrile as the substrate, the cumulative production of (R)-(-)-mandelic acid after 7.5 h of conversion reached 693 mM with an enantiomeric excess of 99%, and the space-time productivity of Mut3 was 21.50-fold higher than that of wild-type nitrilase. The Km, Vmax, and k(cat) of wild-type and Mut3 for mandelonitrile were 20.64 mM, 33.74 μmol mg(-1) min(-1), 24.45 s(-1), and 9.24 mM, 47.68 μmol mg(-1) min(-1), and 34.55 s(-1), respectively. A homology modeling and molecular docking study showed that the diameter of the catalytic tunnel of Mut3 became longer and that the tunnel volume was smaller. These structural changes are proposed to improve the hydrolytic activity and pH stability of Mut3. Mut3 has the potential for industrial applications in the upscale production of (R)-(-)-mandelic acid.

  17. Identification of Escherichia coli O157 : H7 genes influencing colonization of the bovine gastrointestinal tract using signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziva, Francis; van Diemen, Pauline M; Stevens, Mark P; Smith, Amanda J; Wallis, Timothy S

    2004-11-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause acute gastroenteritis in humans that may be complicated by life-threatening systemic sequelae. The predominant EHEC serotype affecting humans in the UK and North America is O157 : H7 and infections are frequently associated with contact with ruminant faeces. Strategies to reduce the carriage of EHEC in ruminants are expected to lower the incidence of human EHEC infections; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying persistence of EHEC in ruminants are poorly understood. This paper reports the first comprehensive survey for EHEC factors mediating colonization of the bovine intestines by using signature-tagged transposon mutagenesis. Seventy-nine E. coli O157 : H7 mutants impaired in their ability to colonize calves were isolated and 59 different genes required for intestinal colonization were identified by cloning and sequencing of the transposon insertion sites. Thirteen transposon insertions were clustered in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which encodes a type III protein secretion system required for the formation of attaching and effacing lesions on intestinal epithelia. A putative structural component of the apparatus (EscN) is essential for intestinal colonization; however, the type III secreted effector protein Map plays only a minor role. Other Type III secretion-associated genes were implicated in colonization of calves by E. coli O157 : H7, including z0990 (ecs0850), which encodes the non-LEE-encoded type III secreted effector NleD and the closely related z3023 (ecs2672) and z3026 (ecs2674) genes which encode homologues of Shigella IpaH proteins. We also identified a novel fimbrial locus required for intestinal colonization in calves by E. coli O157 : H7 (z2199-z2206; ecs2114-ecs2107/locus 8) and demonstrated that a mutant harbouring a deletion of the putative major fimbrial subunit gene is rapidly out-competed by the parent strain in co-infection studies. Our data provide valuable new

  18. Identification of novel genes in the carotenogenic and oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula toruloides through genome-wide insertional mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yanbin; Koh, Chong Mei John; Yap, Sihui Amy; Du, Minge; Hlaing, Mya Myintzu; Ji, Lianghui

    2018-01-01

    Background Rhodotorula toruloides is an outstanding producer of lipids and carotenoids. Currently, information on the key metabolic pathways and their molecular basis of regulation remains scarce, severely limiting efforts to engineer it as an industrial host. Results We have adapted Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) as a gene-tagging tool for the identification of novel genes in R. toruloides. Multiple factors affecting transformation efficiency in several species in t...

  19. Induced Mutagenesis inUGT74S1Gene Leads to Stable New Flax Lines with Altered Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (SDG) Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fofana, Bourlaye; Ghose, Kaushik; Somalraju, Ashok; McCallum, Jason; Main, David; Deyholos, Michael K; Rowland, Gordon G; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Flax secoisolariciresinol (SECO) diglucoside (SDG) lignan is an emerging natural product purported to prevent chronic diseases in humans. SECO, the aglycone form of SDG, has shown higher intestinal cell absorption but it is not accumulated naturally in planta . Recently, we have identified and characterized a UDP-glucosyltransferase gene, UGT74S1 , that glucosylates SECO into its monoglucoside (SMG) and SDG forms when expressed in yeast. However, whether this gene is unique in controlling SECO glucosylation into SDG in planta is unclear. Here, we report on the use of UGT74S1 in reverse and forward genetics to characterize an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenized flax population from cultivar CDC Bethune and consisting of 1996 M2 families. EMS mutagenesis generated 73 SNP variants causing 79 mutational events in the UGT74S1 exonic regions of 93 M2 families. The mutation frequency in the exonic regions was determined to be one per 28 Kb. Of these mutations, 13 homozygous missense mutations and two homozygous nonsense mutations were observed and all were transmitted into the M3 and M4 generations. Forward genetics screening of the population showed homozygous nonsense mutants completely lacking SDG biosynthesis while the production of SMG was observed only in a subset of the M4 lines. Heterozygous or homozygous M4 missense mutants displayed a wide range of SDG levels, some being greater than those of CDC Bethune. No additional deleterious mutations were detected in these mutant lines using a panel of 10 other genes potentially involved in the lignan biosynthesis. This study provides further evidence that UGT74S1 is unique in controlling SDG formation from SECO and this is the first report of non-transgenic flax germplasm with simultaneous knockout of SDG and presence of SMG in planta .

  20. Identification of novel genes responsible for ethanol and/or thermotolerance by transposon mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Life Sciences; Kim, Na-Rae [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Yang, Jungwoo [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Microbial Resources Research Center; Choi, Wonja [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Life Sciences; Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Microbial Resources Research Center

    2011-08-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains tolerant to ethanol and heat stresses are important for industrial ethanol production. In this study, five strains (Tn 1-5) tolerant to up to 15% ethanol were isolated by screening a transposon-mediated mutant library. Two of them displayed tolerance to heat (42 C). The determination of transposon insertion sites and Northern blot analysis identified seven putative genes (CMP2, IMD4, SSK2, PPG1, DLD3, PAM1, and MSN2) and revealed simultaneous down-regulations of CMP2 and IMD4, and SSK2 and PPG1, down-regulation of DLD3, and disruptions of the open reading frame of PAM1 and MSN2, indicating that ethanol and/or heat tolerance can be conferred. Knockout mutants of these seven individual genes were ethanol tolerant and three of them (SSK2, PPG1, and PAM1) were tolerant to heat. Such tolerant phenotypes reverted to sensitive phenotypes by the autologous or overexpression of each gene. Five transposon mutants showed higher ethanol production and grew faster than the control strain when cultured in rich media containing 30% glucose and initial 6% ethanol at 30 C. Of those, two thermotolerant transposon mutants (Tn 2 and Tn 3) exhibited significantly enhanced growth and ethanol production compared to the control at 42 C. The genes identified in this study may provide a basis for the application in developing industrial yeast strains. (orig.)

  1. Large-Scale Mutagenesis in p19ARF- and p53-Deficient Mice Identifies Cancer Genes and Their Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren, Anthony G.; Kool, Jaap; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; de Ridder, Jeroen; Mattison, Jenny; van Uitert, Miranda; Lagcher, Wendy; Sie, Daoud; Tanger, Ellen; Cox, Tony; Reinders, Marcel; Hubbard, Tim J.; Rogers, Jane; Jonkers, Jos; Wessels, Lodewyk; Adams, David J.; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Berns, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Summary p53 and p19ARF are tumor suppressors frequently mutated in human tumors. In a high-throughput screen in mice for mutations collaborating with either p53 or p19ARF deficiency, we identified 10,806 retroviral insertion sites, implicating over 300 loci in tumorigenesis. This dataset reveals 20 genes that are specifically mutated in either p19ARF-deficient, p53-deficient or wild-type mice (including Flt3, mmu-mir-106a-363, Smg6, and Ccnd3), as well as networks of significant collaborative and mutually exclusive interactions between cancer genes. Furthermore, we found candidate tumor suppressor genes, as well as distinct clusters of insertions within genes like Flt3 and Notch1 that induce mutants with different spectra of genetic interactions. Cross species comparative analysis with aCGH data of human cancer cell lines revealed known and candidate oncogenes (Mmp13, Slamf6, and Rreb1) and tumor suppressors (Wwox and Arfrp2). This dataset should prove to be a rich resource for the study of genetic interactions that underlie tumorigenesis. PMID:18485879

  2. Large-scale mutagenesis in p19(ARF)- and p53-deficient mice identifies cancer genes and their collaborative networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren, Anthony G; Kool, Jaap; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; de Ridder, Jeroen; Mattison, Jenny; van Uitert, Miranda; Lagcher, Wendy; Sie, Daoud; Tanger, Ellen; Cox, Tony; Reinders, Marcel; Hubbard, Tim J; Rogers, Jane; Jonkers, Jos; Wessels, Lodewyk; Adams, David J; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Berns, Anton

    2008-05-16

    p53 and p19(ARF) are tumor suppressors frequently mutated in human tumors. In a high-throughput screen in mice for mutations collaborating with either p53 or p19(ARF) deficiency, we identified 10,806 retroviral insertion sites, implicating over 300 loci in tumorigenesis. This dataset reveals 20 genes that are specifically mutated in either p19(ARF)-deficient, p53-deficient or wild-type mice (including Flt3, mmu-mir-106a-363, Smg6, and Ccnd3), as well as networks of significant collaborative and mutually exclusive interactions between cancer genes. Furthermore, we found candidate tumor suppressor genes, as well as distinct clusters of insertions within genes like Flt3 and Notch1 that induce mutants with different spectra of genetic interactions. Cross species comparative analysis with aCGH data of human cancer cell lines revealed known and candidate oncogenes (Mmp13, Slamf6, and Rreb1) and tumor suppressors (Wwox and Arfrp2). This dataset should prove to be a rich resource for the study of genetic interactions that underlie tumorigenesis.

  3. Identification of Pathogenicity-Related Genes in Biofilm-Defective Acidovorax citrulli by Transposon Tn5 Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Luo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation is important for virulence of a large number of plant pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, some virulence genes have been found to be involved in the formation of biofilm in bacterial fruit blotch pathogen Acidovorax citrulli. However, some virulent strains of A. citrulli were unable to format biofilm, indicating the complexity between biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, virulence-related genes were identified in the biofilm-defective strain A1 of A. citrulli by using Tn5 insertion, pathogenicity test, and high-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (hiTAIL-PCR. Results from this study indicated that 22 out of the obtained 301 mutants significantly decreased the virulence of strain A1 compared to the wild-type. Furthermore, sequence analysis indicated that the obtained 22 mutants were due to the insertion of Tn5 into eight genes, including Aave 4244 (cation diffusion facilitator family transporter, Aave 4286 (hypothetical protein, Aave 4189 (alpha/beta hydrolase fold, Aave 1911 (IMP dehydrogenase/GMP reductase domain, Aave 4383 (bacterial export proteins, family 1, Aave 4256 (Hsp70 protein, Aave 0003 (histidine kinase, DNA gyrase B, and HSP90-like ATPase, and Aave 2428 (pyridoxal-phosphate dependent enzyme. Furthermore, the growth of mutant Aave 2428 was unaffected and even increased by the change in incubation temperature, NaCl concentration and the pH of the LB broth, indicating that this gene may be directly involved in the bacterial virulence. Overall, the determination of the eight pathogenicity-related genes in strain A1 will be helpful to elucidate the pathogenesis of biofilm-defective A. citrulli.

  4. Identification of a novel gene, Vin-1, in murine leukemia virus-induced T-cell leukemias by provirus insertional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, P J; Kozak, C A; Jolicoeur, P

    1992-01-01

    The BL/VL3 radiation leukemia virus is a nondefective retrovirus which induces clonal or oligoclonal T-cell leukemia in mice. To study the role of provirus insertional mutagenesis in the development of these neoplasias, we searched for common provirus integration sites in BL/VL3 radiation leukemia virus-induced tumors. Using cellular sequences flanking a provirus cloned from one of these thymomas, we found that the viral genome was integrated into a common region, designated Vin-1, in a low percentage (5%) of these tumors. The proviruses found in this locus were integrated in the same orientation, close to a CpG-rich island, at proximity of a transcriptional unit encoding a 6-kb RNA. Vin-1 RNA was detected in several organs of the adult mouse. Vin-1 RNA levels were high in tumors having a provirus inserted within the Vin-1 region but were also high in some other tumors whose Vin-1 region was not found to be rearranged. Vin-1 was found to be well conserved among mammalian species and was mapped to mouse chromosome 6, between raf and K-ras-2. Vin-1 appears to be a novel gene which may be involved in tumor development. Images PMID:1738193

  5. Gene knockout by targeted mutagenesis in a hemimetabolous insect, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, using TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takahito; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2014-08-15

    Hemimetabolous, or incompletely metamorphosing, insects are phylogenetically basal. These insects include many deleterious species. The cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, is an emerging model for hemimetabolous insects, based on the success of RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene-functional analyses and transgenic technology. Taking advantage of genome-editing technologies in this species would greatly promote functional genomics studies. Genome editing using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has proven to be an effective method for site-specific genome manipulation in various species. TALENs are artificial nucleases that are capable of inducing DNA double-strand breaks into specified target sequences. Here, we describe a protocol for TALEN-based gene knockout in G. bimaculatus, including a mutant selection scheme via mutation detection assays, for generating homozygous knockout organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene in 11 Japanese patients with Treacher Collins Syndrome and mechanism of mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Katsumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Fujioka, Hirotaka; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Igawa, Hiroharu; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Sakiyama, Yukio

    2005-05-01

    Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS) (OMIM 154500) is a congenital, craniofacial disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The responsible gene for TCS, TCOF1, was mapped to 5q32-33.1 and identified in 1996. Since then, TCOF1 mutations in patients with TCS have been reported from Europe, North and South America, however, no TCS cases from an Asian country have been molecularly characterized. Here we report mutational analysis for 11 Japanese patients with TCS for the first time, and have identified TCOF1 mutations in 9 of them. The mutations detected were various, but most likely all the mutations are predicted to result in a truncated gene product, known as treacle. One mutation frequently reported was included in our cases, but no missense mutations were detected. These findings are similar to those for the previous studies for TCS in other races. We have speculated about the molecular mechanisms of the mutations in most cases. Collectively, we have defined some of the characteristic molecular features commonly observed in TCS patients, irrespective of racial difference. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Site-specific mutagenesis in Enterobacter agglomerans: construction of nif B mutants and analysis of the gene's structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddavattam, D; Nickles, A; Herterich, S; Steibl, H D; Kreutzer, R; Klingmüller, W

    1995-12-15

    A novel technique was developed which may be generally well suited to the site-specific construction of mutations in Enterobacter agglomerans. The method is based on the observation that E. agglomerans can be cured of a plasmid of the incompatibility group IncQ by cultivation on citrate-containing medium. To test the applicability of this technique, we inserted a kanamycin cassette into the cloned nifB gene, transferred it into E. agglomerans, and selected for recombinants in which the wild-type nifB was replaced by the mutated gene by growing transformants on citrate medium with kanamycin. The nifB- mutants with the kanamycin cassette inserted in either orientation showed a nif- phenotype. Further, we determined the nucleotide sequence of nifB. A typical sigma 54-dependent promoter and a consensus NifA binding site were found upstream of nifB. Activation of this promoter by both heterologous and homologous NifA proteins was observed in vivo. The predicted amino acid sequence of the NifB protein showed strong similarity to the NifB sequences of other diazotrophic bacteria. The typical clustering of cysteine residues at the N-terminal end indicates its involvement in Fe-Mo cofactor biosynthesis.

  8. A gene-trap strategy identifies quiescence-induced genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    domain protein. Our results demonstrate that expression of chromatin modulatory genes is induced in G0, providing support to the notion that this reversibly arrested state is actively ... Abbreviations used: βgal, βgalactosidase; CFU, colony forming units; ENT, EMSY N-terminus; FACS, fluorescent activated cell sorting;.

  9. Radiation mutagenesis of subtropic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerkadze, I.G.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of expansion of subtropic plant changeability and development of new gene bank for future selection-genetic studies are detected. New trends of radiation mutagenesis of subtropic plants are formulated as results of studies during many years. A lot of mutants is subjected to sufficient tests, and concrete results are obtained with the help of these tests for definite species. Summing genetic and selection estimations of the results, it is possible to make the conclusion that mutant selection represents one of the powerful methods of preparation of productive and qualitative species of subtropic plants, which are successfully introduced into practice

  10. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. [Screening of high taxol producing fungi by mutagenesis and construction of subtracted cDNA library by suppression subtracted hybridization for differentially expressed genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Xuan; Li, Xiuliang; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Dongpo

    2011-07-01

    To screen mutants with high yield of taxol, and construct cDNA subtractive library of obtained mutant and primary strain HD(1-3). The spores of taxol-producing fungus HD(1-3) were treated by diethyl sulphate (DES), ultraviolet radiation and diethyl sulphate (UV + DES). cDNA subtractive library of taxol producing fungi from the mRNA of obtained mutant with high yield of taxol tester and HD(1-3) driver was constructed by using suppression subtracted hybridization (SSH). The optimal conditions for mutagenesis of strain HD(1-3) were as follows: the spore suspension was treated with 8% DES for 15 min, followed by UV irradiation (30 w, 30 cm distance) for 45 sec under magnetic stirring, a mutant UD(14-1) which was able to produce taxol with high yield and could be stably passed on genetics was found. Its ability to produce taxol was improved from 232.73 +/- 4.61 microg/L (strain HD(1-3)) to 312.81 +/- 7.51 microg/L (strain UD(14-1)). The tilter of the constructed cDNA library was 1.2 x 10(7) cfu/mL, the recombinant rate reached to 75.3% and the length of the inserted fragments was mostly 300 bp-1.0 kb. A mutant UD(14-11) with high yield was obtained, and cDNA subtractive library of the mutant UD(14-11) and strain HD(1-3) was constructed. The study laid solid foundation for isolation of taxol biosynthesis related genes and construction of engineering strains with high yield of taxol by genetic techniques.

  12. In Vitro Transduction and Target-Mutagenesis Efficiency of HIV-1 pol Gene Targeting ZFN and CRISPR/Cas9 Delivered by Various Plasmids and/or Vectors: Toward an HIV Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okee, Moses; Bayiyana, Alice; Musubika, Carol; Joloba, Moses L; Ashaba-Katabazi, Fred; Bagaya, Bernard; Wayengera, Misaki

    2018-01-01

    Efficiency of artificial restriction enzymes toward curing HIV has only been separately examined, using differing delivery vehicles. We compared the in vitro transduction and target-mutagenesis efficiency of consortium plasmid and adenoviral vector delivered HIV-1 pol gene targeting zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) with CRISPR/Cas, Custom-ZFN, CRISPR-Cas-9, and plasmids and vectors (murCTSD_pZFN, pGS-U-gRNA, pCMV-Cas-D01A, Ad5-RGD); cell lines (TZM-bl and ACH-2/J-Lat cells); and the latency reversing agents prostratin, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, and phorbol myristate acetate. Cell lines were grown in either Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium or Roswell Park Memorial Institute with the antibiotics kanamycin, zeocin, and efavirenz. Efficiency was assayed by GFP/luciferase activity and/or validated by yeast MEL1 reporter assay, CEL1 restriction fragment assay, and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Ad5-RGD vectors had better transduction efficiency than murCTSD and pGS-U-gRNA/pCMV-Cas-D01A plasmids. CRISPR/Cas9 exhibited better target-mutagenesis efficiency relative to ZFN (delivered by either plasmid or Ad5 vector) based on gel electrophoresis of pol gene amplicons within ACH-2 and J-Lat cells. Ad-5-RGD vectors enhanced target mutagenesis of ZFN, relative to murCTSD_pZFN plasmids, to levels of CRISPR/Cas9 plasmids. Similar reduction of luciferase activity among TZM-bl treated with Ad5-ZFN vectors relative to CRISPR/Cas-9 and murCTSD_pZFN plasmids was observed on challenge with HIV-1. qRT-PCR of HIV-1 pol gene transcripts affirmed that Ad5 (RGD) vectors enhanced target mutagenesis of ZFN. Whereas CRISPR/Cas-9 may possess inherent superior target-mutagenesis efficiency; the efficiency of ZFN (off-target toxicity withstanding) can be enhanced by altering delivery vehicle from plasmid to Ad5 (RGD) vectors.

  13. Cellular components required for mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elledge, S.J.; Perry, K.L.; Krueger, J.H.; Mitchell, B.B.; Walker, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    We have cloned the umuD and umuC genes of Escherichia coli and have shown that they code for two proteins of 16,000 and 45,000 daltons respectively; the two genes are organized in an operon that is repressed by the LexA protein. Similarly, we have shown that the mucA and mucB genes of the mutagenesis-enhancing plasmid pKM101 code for proteins of 16,000 and 45,000 daltons respectively and, like umuD/C, the genes are organized in an operon. Preliminary sequencing studies have indicated that the umuD/C and mucA/B loci are approximately 50% homologous at both the nucleic acid and deduced protein sequence levels and that the umuD gene is preceeded by two putative LexA binding sites separated by 4 basepairs. Like umuD/C, the mucA/B genes of pKM101 are induced by DNA damage and are repressed by LexA. In addition to inducing recA + lexA + -regulated din genes, DNA damaging agents such as uv and nalidixic acid also induce the heat shock proteins GroEL and DnaK in an htpR-dependent fashion. 22 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  14. Mutagenesis of RpoE-like sigma factor genes in Bdellovibrio reveals differential control of groEL and two groES genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Carey

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100 must regulate genes in response to a variety of environmental conditions as it enters, preys upon and leaves other bacteria, or grows axenically without prey. In addition to “housekeeping” sigma factors, its genome encodes several alternate sigma factors, including 2 Group IV-RpoE-like proteins, which may be involved in the complex regulation of its predatory lifestyle. Results We find that one sigma factor gene, bd3314, cannot be deleted from Bdellovibrio in either predatory or prey-independent growth states, and is therefore possibly essential, likely being an alternate sigma 70. Deletion of one of two Group IV-like sigma factor genes, bd0881, affects flagellar gene regulation and results in less efficient predation, although not due to motility changes; deletion of the second, bd0743, showed that it normally represses chaperone gene expression and intriguingly we find an alternative groES gene is expressed at timepoints in the predatory cycle where intensive protein synthesis at Bdellovibrio septation, prior to prey lysis, will be occurring. Conclusions We have taken the first step in understanding how alternate sigma factors regulate different processes in the predatory lifecycle of Bdellovibrio and discovered that alternate chaperones regulated by one of them are expressed at different stages of the lifecycle.

  15. Mutagenesis in bacteriophage T 7. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.; Witte, W.

    1976-01-01

    UV induced mutagenesis of bacteriophage T 7 was investigated by using a forward mutation system (host range system) and a back mutation system (amber system). The results indicate a dependence of mutation of T 7 after UV irradiation only on the rec gene controlled functions of the bacterial host. The functions controlled by pol and uvr genes have no influence. Among other types of mutations UV irradiation leads to transitions from AT to GC. (author)

  16. Gamma-ray mutagenesis studies in a new human-hamster hybrid, A(L)CD59(+/-), which has two human chromosomes 11 but is hemizygous for the CD59 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Kronenberg, A.; Ueno, A.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Kraemer, S. M., Vannais, D. B., Kronenberg, A., Ueno, A. and Waldren, C. A. Gamma-Ray Mutagenesis Studies in a New Human-Hamster Hybrid, A(L)CD59(+/-), which has Two Human Chromosomes 11 but is Hemizygous for the CD59 Gene. Radiat. Res. 156, 10-19 (2001).We have developed a human-CHO hybrid cell line, named A(L)CD59(+/-), which has two copies of human chromosome 11 but is hemizygous for the CD59 gene and the CD59 cell surface antigen that it encodes. Our previous studies used the A(L) and A(L)C hybrids that respectively contain one or two sets of CHO chromosomes plus a single copy of human chromosome 11. The CD59 gene at 11p13.5 and the CD59 antigen encoded by it are the principal markers used in our mutagenesis studies. The hybrid A(L)CD59(+/-) contains two copies of human chromosome 11, only one of which carries the CD59 gene. The incidence of CD59 (-) mutants (formerly called S1(-)) induced by (137)Cs gamma rays is about fivefold greater in A(L)CD59(+/-) cells than in A(L) cells. Evidence is presented that this increase in mutant yield is due to the increased induction of certain classes of large chromosomal mutations that are lethal to A(L) cells but are tolerated in the A(L)CD59(+/-) hybrid. In addition, significantly more of the CD59 (-) mutants induced by (137)Cs gamma rays in A(L)CD59(+/-) cells display chromosomal instability than in A(L) cells. On the other hand, the yield of gamma-ray-induced CD59 (-) mutants in A(L)CD59(+/-) cells is half that of the A(L)C hybrid, which also tolerates very large mutations but has only one copy of human chromosome 11. We interpret the difference in mutability as evidence that repair processes involving the homologous chromosomes 11 play a role in determining mutant yields. The A(L)CD59(+/-) hybrid provides a useful new tool for quantifying mutagenesis and shedding light on mechanisms of genetic instability and mutagenesis.

  17. Mutagenesis and Teratogenesis Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on research with mice in the areas of radioinduced and chemical mutagenesis, cytologic studies, radiation effects on DNA synthesis, radiation effects on germ cells, mutagenicity of coal-conversion products, and others. Research on Drosophila was concerned with mutagenesis and genetics of nucleases. Studies were conducted on hamster cells with regard to cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of alkylating agents, modification of the microtubule system, protein kinase activity, and others. Research on bacteria was concerned with effects of x radiation on bacteriophage of Haemophilus influenzae, x-ray induced DNA polymerase I-directed repair synthesis in Escherichia coli, transformation by DNA polymerase II in Bacillus subtilis, and others. Research on xenopus laevis was conducted in the areas of calcium-induced cleavage of oocytes, yolk degradation in explants, and others

  18. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance by mutagenesis of the TATA-binding protein gene and identification of novel genes associated with ethanol tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jungwoo; Bae, Ju Yun; Lee, Young Mi; Kwon, Hyeji; Moon, Hye-Yun; Kang, Hyun Ah; Yee, Su-Bog; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2011-08-01

    Since elevated ethanol is a major stress during ethanol fermentation, yeast strains tolerant to ethanol are highly desirable for the industrial scale ethanol production. A technology called global transcriptional machinery engineering (gTME), which exploits a mutant library of SPT15 encoding the TATA-binding protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Alper et al., 2006; Science 314: 1565-1568), seems to a powerful tool for creating ethanol-tolerant strains. However, the ability of created strains to tolerate high ethanol on rich media remains unproven. In this study, a similar strategy was used to obtain five strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance (ETS1-5) of S. cerevisiae. Comparing global transcriptional profiles of two selected strains ETS2 and ETS3 with that of the control identified 42 genes that were commonly regulated with twofold change. Out of 34 deletion mutants available from a gene knockout library, 18 were ethanol sensitive, suggesting that these genes were closely associated with ethanol tolerance. Eight of them were novel with most being functionally unknown. To establish a basis for future industrial applications, strains iETS2 and iETS3 were created by integrating the SPT15 mutant alleles of ETS2 and ETS3 into the chromosomes, which also exhibited enhanced ethanol tolerance and survival upon ethanol shock on a rich medium. Fermentation with 20% glucose for 24 h in a bioreactor revealed that iETS2 and iETS3 grew better and produced approximately 25% more ethanol than a control strain. The ethanol yield and productivity were also substantially enhanced: 0.31 g/g and 2.6 g/L/h, respectively, for control and 0.39 g/g and 3.2 g/L/h, respectively, for iETS2 and iETS3. Thus, our study demonstrates the utility of gTME in generating strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance that resulted in increase of ethanol production. Strains with enhanced tolerance to other stresses such as heat, fermentation inhibitors, osmotic pressure, and so on, may be further created by

  19. Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S.; Griswold, Karl E.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    Protein engineering by combinatorial site-directed mutagenesis evaluates a portion of the sequence space near a target protein, seeking variants with improved properties (stability, activity, immunogenicity, etc.). In order to improve the hit-rate of beneficial variants in such mutagenesis libraries, we develop methods to select optimal positions and corresponding sets of the mutations that will be used, in all combinations, in constructing a library for experimental evaluation. Our approach, OCoM (Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis), encompasses both degenerate oligonucleotides and specified point mutations, and can be directed accordingly by requirements of experimental cost and library size. It evaluates the quality of the resulting library by one- and two-body sequence potentials, averaged over the variants. To ensure that it is not simply recapitulating extant sequences, it balances the quality of a library with an explicit evaluation of the novelty of its members. We show that, despite dealing with a combinatorial set of variants, in our approach the resulting library optimization problem is actually isomorphic to single-variant optimization. By the same token, this means that the two-body sequence potential results in an NP-hard optimization problem. We present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm for the one-body case and a practically-efficient integer programming approach for the general two-body case. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in designing libraries for three different case study proteins targeted by previous combinatorial libraries - a green fluorescent protein, a cytochrome P450, and a beta lactamase. We found that OCoM worked quite efficiently in practice, requiring only 1 hour even for the massive design problem of selecting 18 mutations to generate 107 variants of a 443-residue P450. We demonstrate the general ability of OCoM in enabling the protein engineer to explore and evaluate trade-offs between quality and

  20. Increased anxiety and impaired pain response in puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase gene-deficient mice obtained by a mouse gene-trap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, T; Ikegami, S; Takiguchi-Hayashi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Katoh-Fukui, Y; Higashinakagawa, T; Sakaki, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1999-07-15

    A mouse mutation, termed goku, was generated by a gene-trap strategy. goku homozygous mice showed dwarfism, a marked increase in anxiety, and an analgesic effect. Molecular analysis indicated that the mutated gene encodes a puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (Psa; EC 3. 4.11.14), whose functions in vivo are unknown. Transcriptional arrest of the Psa gene and a drastic decrease of aminopeptidase activity indicated that the function of Psa is disrupted in homozygous mice. Together with the finding that the Psa gene is strongly expressed in the brain, especially in the striatum and hippocampus, these results suggest that the Psa gene is required for normal growth and the behavior associated with anxiety and pain.

  1. Effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis by heavy ion beam-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.Y.; Saito, H.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Yoshida, S.; Abe, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Arabidopsis researches frequently include the genetic approach, so efficient, convenient, and safe methods for mutagenesis are required. Currently, the most popular method for in house mutagenesis is application of EMS. Although this method is very effective, its base substitution-type mutations often gives leaky mutants with residual gene functions, leading some difficulty in understanding the corresponding gene functions. Heavy ion beam generated by accelerators gives highest energy transfer rates among known radiation-based mutagenesis methods including X ray, gamma ray, fast neutron, electron and proton irradiation. This feature is thought to give high frequency of the double strand break of genomic DNA and resultant short deletions, resulting frame shift-type mutations. At RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF, http://www.rarf.riken.go.jp/index-e.html), we have optimized conditions for effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis regarding to ion species and irradiation dose, and achieved comparable mutation rates to the method with EMS. (author)

  2. A Mutant Mouse with a Highly Specific Contextual Fear-Conditioning Deficit Found in an N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU) Mutagenesis Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Mathew T.; Wiltshire, Tim; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Mayford, Mark; Reijmers, Leon G.; Coats, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis in mice has shown that genes from a wide variety of gene families are involved in memory formation. The efficient identification of genes involved in learning and memory could be achieved by random mutagenesis combined with high-throughput phenotyping. Here, we provide the first report of a mutagenesis screen that has…

  3. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power

  4. A mariner transposon vector adapted for mutagenesis in oral streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Christiansen, Natalia; Høiby, Niels

    2014-01-01

    ATs-pWV01, a selectable kanamycin resistance gene, a Himar1 transposase gene regulated by a xylose-inducible promoter, and an erythromycin resistance gene flanked by himar inverted repeats. The pMN100 plasmid was transformed into Streptococcus mutans UA159 and transposon mutagenesis was performed via...... a protocol established to perform high numbers of separate transpositions despite a low frequency of transposition. The distribution of transposon inserts in 30 randomly picked mutants suggested that mariner transposon mutagenesis is unbiased in S. mutans. A generated transposon mutant library containing...

  5. The Roles of UmuD in Regulating Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaylene N. Ollivierre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All organisms are subject to DNA damage from both endogenous and environmental sources. DNA damage that is not fully repaired can lead to mutations. Mutagenesis is now understood to be an active process, in part facilitated by lower-fidelity DNA polymerases that replicate DNA in an error-prone manner. Y-family DNA polymerases, found throughout all domains of life, are characterized by their lower fidelity on undamaged DNA and their specialized ability to copy damaged DNA. Two E. coli Y-family DNA polymerases are responsible for copying damaged DNA as well as for mutagenesis. These DNA polymerases interact with different forms of UmuD, a dynamic protein that regulates mutagenesis. The UmuD gene products, regulated by the SOS response, exist in two principal forms: UmuD2, which prevents mutagenesis, and UmuD2′, which facilitates UV-induced mutagenesis. This paper focuses on the multiple conformations of the UmuD gene products and how their protein interactions regulate mutagenesis.

  6. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  7. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  8. Transposon Mutagenesis of the Plant-Associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 Revealed That the nfrA and RBAM17410 Genes Are Involved in Plant-Microbe-Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Dolgova, Olga; Fan, Ben; Bleiss, Wilfrid; Ziegler, Jörg; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Borriss, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 represents the prototype of Gram-positive plant growth promoting and biocontrol bacteria. In this study, we applied transposon mutagenesis to generate a transposon library, which was screened for genes involved in multicellular behavior and biofilm formation on roots as a prerequisite of plant growth promoting activity. Transposon insertion sites were determined by rescue-cloning followed by DNA sequencing. As in B. subtilis, the global transcriptional regulator DegU was identified as an activator of genes necessary for swarming and biofilm formation, and the DegU-mutant of FZB42 was found impaired in efficient root colonization. Direct screening of 3,000 transposon insertion mutants for plant-growth-promotion revealed the gene products of nfrA and RBAM_017140 to be essential for beneficial effects exerted by FZB42 on plants. We analyzed the performance of GFP-labeled wild-type and transposon mutants in the colonization of lettuce roots using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While the wild-type strain heavily colonized root surfaces, the nfrA mutant did not colonize lettuce roots, although it was not impaired in growth in laboratory cultures, biofilm formation and swarming motility on agar plates. The RBAM17410 gene, occurring in only a few members of the B. subtilis species complex, was directly involved in plant growth promotion. None of the mutant strains were affected in producing the plant growth hormone auxin. We hypothesize that the nfrA gene product is essential for overcoming the stress caused by plant response towards bacterial root colonization. PMID:24847778

  9. Involvement of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Galacturonate Tripartite ATP-Independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporter GaaPQM in Virulence Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinlei; Binns, Andrew N

    2016-02-15

    Monosaccharides capable of serving as nutrients for the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens are also inducers of the vir regulon present in the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of this plant pathogen. One such monosaccharide is galacturonate, the predominant monomer of pectin found in plant cell walls. This ligand is recognized by the periplasmic sugar binding protein ChvE, which interacts with the VirA histidine kinase that controls vir gene expression. Although ChvE is also a member of the ChvE-MmsAB ABC transporter involved in the utilization of many neutral sugars, it is not involved in galacturonate utilization. In this study, a putative tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter, GaaPQM, is shown to be essential for the utilization of galacturonic acid; we show that residue R169 in the predicted sugar binding site of the GaaP is required for activity. The gene upstream of gaaPQM (gaaR) encodes a member of the GntR family of regulators. GaaR is shown to repress the expression of gaaPQM, and the repression is relieved in the presence of the substrate for GaaPQM. Moreover, GaaR is shown to bind putative promoter regions in the sequences required for galacturonic acid utilization. Finally, A. tumefaciens strains carrying a deletion of gaaPQM are more sensitive to galacturonate as an inducer of vir gene expression, while the overexpression of gaaPQM results in strains being less sensitive to this vir inducer. This supports a model in which transporter activity is crucial in ensuring that vir gene expression occurs only at sites of high ligand concentration, such as those at a plant wound site. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Identification of pathogenicity-related genes in the vascular wilt fungus verticillium dahliae by agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated t-DNA insertional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of vascular wilt in many economically important crops worldwide. Identification of genes that underpin pathogenicity or virulence may suggest targets for alternative control methods for this fungus. In this study, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transform...

  11. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Gould, Michael N; Cuppen, Edwin; Smits, Bart M G

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach for generating genetically modified rats has been the target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis-based technology. Here, we describe the detailed protocols for ENU mutagenesis and mutant retrieval in the rat model organism.

  12. Nitrilase in biosynthesis of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid from indole-3-acetonitrile: cloning of the Alcaligenes gene and site-directed mutagenesis of cysteine residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, M; Izui, H; Nagasawa, T; Yamada, H

    1993-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is the major auxin in most plants. In Cruciferae, including Brassicaceae, indole-3-acetic acid is synthesized from indole-3-acetonitrile by nitrilase, after indole-3-acetonitrile is formed from tryptophan via indole-3-acetaldoxime or indole glycosinolates as the intermediate. We cloned and sequenced the gene for nitrilase (EC 3.5.5.1), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of indole-3-acetonitrile to indole-3-acetic acid, from Alcaligenes faecalis JM3. The amino acid sequence de...

  13. Silencing of end-joining repair for efficient site-specific gene insertion after TALEN/CRISPR mutagenesis in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Aryan, Azadeh; Overcash, Justin M; Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Anderson, Michelle A E; Dahlem, Timothy J; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2015-03-31

    Conventional control strategies for mosquito-borne pathogens such as malaria and dengue are now being complemented by the development of transgenic mosquito strains reprogrammed to generate beneficial phenotypes such as conditional sterility or pathogen resistance. The widespread success of site-specific nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 in model organisms also suggests that reprogrammable gene drive systems based on these nucleases may be capable of spreading such beneficial phenotypes in wild mosquito populations. Using the mosquito Aedes aegypti, we determined that mutations in the FokI domain used in TALENs to generate obligate heterodimeric complexes substantially and significantly reduce gene editing rates. We found that CRISPR/Cas9-based editing in the mosquito Ae. aegypti is also highly variable, with the majority of guide RNAs unable to generate detectable editing. By first evaluating candidate guide RNAs using a transient embryo assay, we were able to rapidly identify highly effective guide RNAs; focusing germ line-based experiments only on this cohort resulted in consistently high editing rates of 24-90%. Microinjection of double-stranded RNAs targeting ku70 or lig4, both essential components of the end-joining response, increased recombination-based repair in early embryos as determined by plasmid-based reporters. RNAi-based suppression of Ku70 concurrent with embryonic microinjection of site-specific nucleases yielded consistent gene insertion frequencies of 2-3%, similar to traditional transposon- or ΦC31-based integration methods but without the requirement for an initial docking step. These studies should greatly accelerate investigations into mosquito biology, streamline development of transgenic strains for field releases, and simplify the evaluation of novel Cas9-based gene drive systems.

  14. Laboratory of Mutagenesis and DNA Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Two main lines of research were continued: the first one concerned the mechanisms controlling the fidelity of DNA replication in Escherichia coli; the second concerned cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA damaging agents. We have been investigating the question whether during chromosomal DNA replication in Escherichia coli the two DNA strands may be replicated with differential accuracy. To address this question we set up a new system that allows the examination of mutagenesis either of the leading strand or the lagging strand. Our results suggest that the lagging strand replication of the E. coli chromosome may be more accurate than leading strand replication. More recently, we studied mutagenesis of the two strands in recA730 strains which exhibit constitutive expression of the SOS system. Our results clearly indicate that in recA730 strains there is a significant difference in the fidelity of replication between the two replicating strands. Based on our data we propose a model describing a possible mechanism of SOS mutagenesis. To get more insight into cellular responses to DNA damage we have isolated several novel genes of S. cerevisiae, the transcription of which is induced by DNA lesions. Main effort was concentrated on the characterization of the DIN7 gene. We found that Din7p specifically affects the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The elevated level of Din7p results in an increased frequency of mitochondrial petite mutants, as well as in a higher frequency of mitochondrial point mutations. Din7p affects also the stability of microsatellite sequences present in the mitochondrial genome. As expected, Din7p was found to be located in mitochondria. In another project, we found that the DIN8 gene isolated in our laboratory is identical with the UMP1 gene encoding a chaperone-like protein involved in 20S proteasome maturation. Interestingly, induction of UMP1 expression in response to DNA damage is subject to regulation

  15. Systematic mutagenesis of all predicted gntR genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris reveals a GntR family transcriptional regulator controlling hypersensitive response and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shi-Qi; Lu, Guang-Tao; Su, Hui-Zhao; Li, Rui-Fang; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The GntR family is one of the most abundant and widely distributed groups of helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators in bacteria. Six open reading frames in the genome of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris were predicted to encode GntR regulators. All six of the predicted GntR-encoding genes were individually mutagenized and mutants from five of them were successfully obtained. Plant disease response assays revealed that one, whose product belongs to the YtrA subfamily and has been named HpaR1, is involved in the hypersensitive response (HR) and virulence. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and in vitro transcription assays revealed that HpaR1 could repress its own transcription level through binding to its promoter sequence, indicating an autoregulatory feedback inhibition mechanism for HpaR1 expression. Promoter-gusA reporter and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that HpaR1 positively and negatively affects the expression of HR and pathogenicity (hrp) genes in host plant and standard media, respectively. Constitutive expression of the key hrp regulator, hrpG, in the hpaR1 mutant could bypass the requirement of HpaR1 for the induction of wild-type HR, suggesting that HpaR1 regulates the expression of hrp genes that encode the type III secretion system via hrpG.

  16. Enhanced Rice Blast Resistance by CRISPR/Cas9-Targeted Mutagenesis of the ERF Transcription Factor Gene OsERF922.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Wang

    Full Text Available Rice blast is one of the most destructive diseases affecting rice worldwide. The adoption of host resistance has proven to be the most economical and effective approach to control rice blast. In recent years, sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs have been demonstrated to be powerful tools for the improvement of crops via gene-specific genome editing, and CRISPR/Cas9 is thought to be the most effective SSN. Here, we report the improvement of rice blast resistance by engineering a CRISPR/Cas9 SSN (C-ERF922 targeting the OsERF922 gene in rice. Twenty-one C-ERF922-induced mutant plants (42.0% were identified from 50 T0 transgenic plants. Sanger sequencing revealed that these plants harbored various insertion or deletion (InDel mutations at the target site. We showed that all of the C-ERF922-induced allele mutations were transmitted to subsequent generations. Mutant plants harboring the desired gene modification but not containing the transferred DNA were obtained by segregation in the T1 and T2 generations. Six T2 homozygous mutant lines were further examined for a blast resistance phenotype and agronomic traits, such as plant height, flag leaf length and width, number of productive panicles, panicle length, number of grains per panicle, seed setting percentage and thousand seed weight. The results revealed that the number of blast lesions formed following pathogen infection was significantly decreased in all 6 mutant lines compared with wild-type plants at both the seedling and tillering stages. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between any of the 6 T2 mutant lines and the wild-type plants with regard to the agronomic traits tested. We also simultaneously targeted multiple sites within OsERF922 by using Cas9/Multi-target-sgRNAs (C-ERF922S1S2 and C-ERF922S1S2S3 to obtain plants harboring mutations at two or three sites. Our results indicate that gene modification via CRISPR/Cas9 is a useful approach for enhancing blast resistance in

  17. The VP1 structural protein of enterovirus 71 interacts with human ornithine decarboxylase and gene trap ankyrin repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Wee M; Chow, Vincent T K

    2007-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Several outbreaks in East Asia were associated with neurological complications and numerous deaths. EV71 possesses four structural proteins VP1-VP4 that are necessary in the formation of the pentameric icosahedral capsid. The viral capsid contributes to virulence, and VP1 is a prime target for EV71 vaccine development. Using yeast two-hybrid analysis, we demonstrated binding affinity between VP1 and three human proteins, i.e. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC1), gene trap ankyrin repeat (GTAR), and KIAA0697 expressed in brain tissue. These interactions were authenticated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, and by indirect immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of transfected and EV71-infected Vero cells. The significant interaction between VP1 and ODC1 may compromise the latter's activity, and interfere with polyamine biosynthesis, growth and proliferation of EV71-infected cells. The interaction between VP1 and GTAR is noteworthy, since ankyrin proteins are associated with certain neural cell adhesion molecules and with the CRASH neurological syndrome. Given that VP1 is synthesized in large amounts during productive infection, these viral-host protein interactions may provide insights into the role of VP1 in the pathogenesis of EV71 disease and its neurological complications such as acute flaccid paralysis and encephalitis.

  18. Analysis of Ig gene hypermutation in Ung(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice suggests that UNG and A:T mutagenesis pathway target different U:G lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyin; Zhao, Yaofeng; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2013-03-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ig gene hypermutation by converting cytosine to uracil (U) and generating a U:G lesion. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the AID-triggered U:G lesions are processed by three mutagenic pathways to induce mutations at both C:G and A:T pairs. First, direct replication of the U:G lesion leads to C to T and G to A transitions. Second, U can be excised by the uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) and the replication/processing of the resulting abasic site leads to transversions and transitions at C:G pairs. Third, the U:G lesion is recognized by an atypical mismatch repair (MMR) pathway which generates mutations at A:T pairs in a DNA polymerase η (POLH)-dependent manner. To further explore whether these three mutagenic pathways function competitively or independently, we have analyzed Ig gene hypermutation in mice deficient in both UNG and POLH. Compared with WT mice, UNG deficiency caused elevated frequency of C:G mutations, suggesting that UNG-mediated U excision led to error-free as well as error-prone repair. In contrast, UNG deficiency did not affect the frequency and patterns of A:T mutations, suggesting that the MMR did not target U:G lesions normally recognized and processed by UNG. In addition, POLH deficiency did not affect the frequency and patterns of C:G mutations and UNG POLH double deficiency showed an additive effect of single deficiency. Based on these observations and previous results, along with the recent finding that UNG excises AID-triggered U predominantly during G1 phase of the cell cycle, it appears that UNG and MMR targets U:G lesions generated during G1 and S phases of the cell cycle, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comments on mutagenesis risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    Several hypotheses and concepts have tended to oversimplify the problem of mutagenesis and can be misleading when used for genetic risk estimation. These include: the hypothesis that radiation-induced mutation frequency depends primarily on the DNA content per haploid genome, the extension of this concept to chemical mutagenesis, the view that, since DNA is DNA, mutational effects can be expected to be qualitatively similar in all organisms, the REC unit, and the view that mutation rates from chronic irradiation can be theoretically and accurately predicted from acute irradiation data. Therefore, direct determination of frequencies of transmitted mutations in mammals continues to be important for risk estimation, and the specific-locus method in mice is shown to be not as expensive as is commonly supposed for many of the chemical testing requirements

  20. Gene trap mutation of murine Outer dense fiber protein-2 gene can result in sperm tail abnormalities in mice with high percentage chimaerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oko Richard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outer dense fiber protein 2, Odf2, is a major component of the outer dense fibers, ODF, in the flagellum of spermatozoa. ODF are associated with microtubule doublets that form the axoneme. We recently demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of Odf2 is important for sperm motility. In the course of a study of Odf2 using Odf2 mouse knockout lines we observed that males of a high percentage chimaerism, made using XL169 embryonic stem cells, were infertile, whereas mice of low-medium percentage chimaerism were fertile. Results XL169 ES cells have a β-geo gene trap cassette inserted in the Odf2 gene. To determine possible underlying mechanisms resulting in infertility we analyzed epididymal sperm and observed that >50% displayed bent tails. We next performed ultrastructural analyses on testis of high percentage XL169 chimaeric mice. This analysis showed that high percentage XL169 chimaeric mice produce elongating spermatids that miss one or more entire outer dense fibers in their midpiece and principal piece. In addition, we observed elongating spermatids that show thinning of outer dense fibers. No other obvious abnormalities or defects are present in elongating spermatids. Spermatozoa from the caput and cauda epididymis of XL169 mice of high percentage chimaerism show additional tail defects, including absence of one or more axonemal microtubule doublets and bent tails. Sperm with bent tails display abnormal motility. Conclusions Our results document the possible impact of loss of one Odf2 allele on sperm tail structure and function, resulting in a novel sperm tail phenotype.

  1. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sommer, Steve S

    2005-01-01

    .... The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p53 mutagensis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to different amounts and/or types of diverse environmental mutagens...

  2. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    American population samples (P : 0.02). Furthermore, a epithelial cells to xenobiotics [El-Bayoumy, 1992]. standard statistical comparison of mutation...from vegetables specific effects on germline mutation that causes human and from meat products (which may well derive from the genetic disease. No

  3. Targeted mutagenesis in sea urchin embryos using TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Sayaka; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered nucleases such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has been reported in various animals. We previously described ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis and insertion of reporter genes in sea urchin embryos. In this study, we demonstrate that TALENs can induce mutagenesis at specific genomic loci of sea urchin embryos. Injection of TALEN mRNAs targeting the HpEts transcription factor into fertilized eggs resulted in the impairment of skeletogenesis. Sequence analyses of the mutations showed that deletions and/or insertions occurred at the HpEts target site in the TALEN mRNAs-injected embryos. The results suggest that targeted gene disruption using TALENs is feasible in sea urchin embryos. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  4. Insertional mutagenesis in mice deficient for p15Ink4b, p16Ink4a, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1 reveals cancer gene interactions and correlations with tumor phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kool, Jaap; Uren, Anthony G; Martins, Carla P

    2010-01-01

    -throughput murine leukemia virus insertional mutagenesis screens in mice that are deficient for one or two CDK inhibitors. We retrieved 9,117 retroviral insertions from 476 lymphomas to define hundreds of loci that are mutated more frequently than expected by chance. Many of these loci are skewed toward a specific...

  5. COLD TRAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  6. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 and T7 DNA by alkylation damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Masker, W E; Dodson, L A; Maupin, M

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a new assay for in vitro mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 DNA that measures the generation of mutations in the specific T7 gene that codes for the phage ligase. This assay was used to examine mutagenesis caused by in vitro DNA synthesis in the presence of O6-methylguanosine triphosphate. Reversion of one of the newly generated ligase mutants by ethyl methanesulfonate was also tested.

  7. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 and T7 DNA by alkylation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masker, W E; Dodson, L A; Maupin, M

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a new assay for in vitro mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 DNA that measures the generation of mutations in the specific T7 gene that codes for the phage ligase. This assay was used to examine mutagenesis caused by in vitro DNA synthesis in the presence of O6-methylguanosine triphosphate. Reversion of one of the newly generated ligase mutants by ethyl methanesulfonate was also tested. PMID:3903213

  8. Mutagenesis in Newts: Protocol for Iberian Ribbed Newts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Newts have the remarkable capability of organ/tissue regeneration, and have been used as a unique experimental model for regenerative biology. The Iberian ribbed newt (Pleurodeles waltl) is suitable as a model animal. We have established methods for artificial insemination and efficient transgenesis using P. waltl newts. In addition to the transgenic technique, development of TALENs enables targeting mutagenesis in the newts. We have reported that TALENs efficiently disrupted targeted genes in newt embryos. In this chapter, we introduce a protocol for TALEN-mediated gene targeting in Iberian ribbed newts.

  9. Screening for improved activity of a transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis created by a novel rational mutagenesis and random mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keiichi; Utsumi, Hiroe; Nakamura, Takefumi; Ogaya, Daisuke; Shimba, Nobuhisa; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2010-08-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTG) has been used extensively in academic research and the food industries through its cross-linking or posttranslational modification of proteins. Two enzyme engineering approaches were applied to improve MTG activity. One is a novel method of rational mutagenesis, called water-accessible surface hot-space region-oriented mutagenesis (WASH-ROM). One hundred and fifty-one point mutations were selected at 40 residues, bearing high solvent-accessibility surface area, within a 15 A space from the active site Cys64. Among them, 32 mutants showed higher specific activity than the wild type. The other is a random mutagenesis of the whole region of the MTG gene, coupled with a new plate assay screening system, using Corynebacterium Expression System CORYNEX. This in vivo system allowed us to readily distinguish the change in enzymatic activity by monitoring the intensity of enzymatic reaction-derived color zones surrounding recombinant cells. From the library of 24,000 mutants, ten were finally selected as beneficial mutants exhibiting higher specific activity than the wild type. Furthermore, we found that Ser199Ala mutant with additional N-terminal tetrapeptide showed the highest specific activity (1.7 times higher than the wild type). These various beneficial positions leading to increased specific activity of MTG were identified to achieve further enzyme improvements.

  10. DNA repair and mutagenesis of singlestranded bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubleday, O.P.; Brandenburger, A.; Wagner, R. Jr.; Radman, M. (Brussels Univ. (Belgium)); Godson, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    Virtually all radiation-induced mutagenesis is believed to result from an error-prone repair activity (SOS repair) and to involve mutations occurring both at the site of radiation-induced lesions (targeted mutations) and in undamaged DNA (untargeted mutations). To examine the relative contributions of targeted and untargeted mutations to ..gamma.. and ultraviolet (UV) radiation mutagenesis we have determined the DNA sequences of 174 M13 revertant phages isolated from stocks of irradiated or unirradiated amber mutants grown in irradiated or unirradiated host bacteria. We have detected no obvious specificity of mutagenesis and find no evidence of a predominance of targeted mutations associated with either UV- or ..gamma..-irradiation of the phages or with the induction of the host SOS repair system. In particular, pyrimidine dimers do not appear to be the principal sites of UV-induced bare substitution mutagenesis, suggesting that such UV-induced mutagenesis may be untargeted or occur at sites of lesions other than pyrimidine dimers.

  11. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  12. Analysis of the trap gene provides evidence for the role of elevation and vector abundance in the genetic diversity of Plasmodium relictum in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farias Margaret E M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The avian disease system in Hawaii offers an ideal opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions in a natural setting. Previous studies have recognized only a single mitochondrial lineage of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum in the Hawaiian Islands, but cloning and sequencing of nuclear genes suggest a higher degree of genetic diversity. Methods In order to evaluate genetic diversity of P. relictum at the population level and further understand host-parasite interactions, a modified single-base extension (SBE method was used to explore spatial and temporal distribution patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (trap gene of P. relictum infections from 121 hatch-year amakihi (Hemignathus virens on the east side of Hawaii Island. Results Rare alleles and mixed infections were documented at three of eight SNP loci; this is the first documentation of genetically diverse infections of P. relictum at the population level in Hawaii. Logistic regression revealed that the likelihood of infection with a rare allele increased at low-elevation, but decreased as mosquito capture rates increased. The inverse relationship between vector capture rates and probability of infection with a rare allele is unexpected given current theories of epidemiology developed in human malarias. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that pathogen diversity in Hawaii may be driven by a complex interaction of factors including transmission rates, host immune pressures, and parasite-parasite competition.

  13. Workshop on ENU Mutagenesis: Planning for Saturation, July 25-28, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, Joseph H

    2002-07-25

    The goal of the conference is to enhance the development of improved technologies and new approaches to the identification of genes underlying chemically-induced mutant phenotypes. The conference brings together ENU mutagenesis experts from the United States and aborad for a small, intensive workshop to consider these issues.

  14. VACUUM TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  15. Development of a high-efficient transformation system of Bacillus pumilus strain DX01 to facilitate gene isolation via gfp-tagged insertional mutagenesis and visualize bacterial colonization of rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinqian; Chen, Yunpeng; Liu, Tong; Hu, Xiaolu; Gu, Zhenfang

    2013-09-01

    A Tn5 transposition vector, pMOD-tet-egfp, was constructed and used for the random insertional mutagenesis of Bacillus pumilus. Various parameters were investigated to increase the transformation efficiency B. pumilus DX01 via Tn5 transposition complexes (transposome): bacterial growth phase, type of electroporation buffer, electric field strength, and recovery medium. Transformation efficiency was up to 3 × 10(4) transformants/μg of DNA under the optimized electroporation conditions, and a total of 1,467 gfp-tagged transformants were obtained. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that all gfp-tagged bacterial cells expressed GFP, indicating that foreign DNA has been successfully integrated into the genome of B. pumilus and expressed. Finally, flanking DNA sequences were isolated from several transformants and colonization of rice roots by B. pumilus DX01 was also studied. The method developed here will be useful for creating an insertion mutant library of gram-positive bacteria, thus facilitating their molecular genetic and cytological studies.

  16. Photodynamic action of the methylene blue: mutagenesis and sinergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capella, M.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two aspects of photodynamic therapy were studied: the associated mutagenesis and the interactions with physical agents, in order to increase its biological effects. The photodynamic action with methylene blue in the mutagenesis and sinergism is studied. (L.M.J.)

  17. Effect of umuC mutations on targeted and untargeted ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenhaut-Michel, G.; Caillet-Fauquet, P.

    1984-01-01

    Mutagenesis of phage lambda towards clear-plaque (c + → c) results in two classes of mutants that can be distinguished genetically and morphologically. Indirect mutagenesis, i.e. mutagenesis of unirradiated phage lambdac + stimulated by the ultraviolet irradiation of the Escherichia coli host, results in mixed bursts (c/c + ) of turbid wild-type and clear=plaque mutant phages. Pure bursts of lambdac mutants are induced by irradiation of the phage genome. Irradiation of both phages and host bacteria stimulates the production of the two classes of mutant clones. It is shown that three different mutant alleles of the E. coli umuC gene only prevent the appearance of pure bursts of clear-plaque mutants, while mixed bursts are produced at least as frequently in umuC mutants as in the umuC + parent. (author)

  18. Tripartite ATP-Independent Periplasmic (TRAP Transporters and Tripartite Tricarboxylate Transporters (TTT: From Uptake to Pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo T. Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to efficiently scavenge nutrients in the host is essential for the viability of any pathogen. All catabolic pathways must begin with the transport of substrate from the environment through the cytoplasmic membrane, a role executed by membrane transporters. Although several classes of cytoplasmic membrane transporters are described, high-affinity uptake of substrates occurs through Solute Binding-Protein (SBP dependent systems. Three families of SBP dependant transporters are known; the primary ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, and the secondary Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP transporters and Tripartite Tricarboxylate Transporters (TTT. Far less well understood than the ABC family, the TRAP transporters are found to be abundant among bacteria from marine environments, and the TTT transporters are the most abundant family of proteins in many species of β-proteobacteria. In this review, recent knowledge about these families is covered, with emphasis on their physiological and structural mechanisms, relating to several examples of relevant uptake systems in pathogenicity and colonization, using the SiaPQM sialic acid uptake system from Haemophilus influenzae and the TctCBA citrate uptake system of Salmonella typhimurium as the prototypes for the TRAP and TTT transporters, respectively. High-throughput analysis of SBPs has recently expanded considerably the range of putative substrates known for TRAP transporters, while the repertoire for the TTT family has yet to be fully explored but both types of systems most commonly transport carboxylates. Specialized spectroscopic techniques and site-directed mutagenesis have enriched our knowledge of the way TRAP binding proteins capture their substrate, while structural comparisons show conserved regions for substrate coordination in both families. Genomic and protein sequence analyses show TTT SBP genes are strikingly overrepresented in some bacteria, especially in the

  19. Stationary-State Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stationary-phase mutagenesis in nondividing E. coli cells exposed to a nonlethal stress was, a few years ago, claimed to be a likely case of a Lamarckian mechanism capable of producing exclusively useful mutations in a directed manner. After a heated debate over the last decade it now appears to involve a Darwinian ...

  20. Studies on radioisotope mutagenesis in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddi, O.S.; Naidu, N.V.; Reddy, P.P.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on radioisotope mutagenesis are important from the point of view of the possible genetic hazards of their increasing use in medical and industrial applications and their concentration in man through environmental contamination. This paper reviews a series of studies undertaken on the genetic consequences of internal administation of certain selected radioisotopes, namely, 32 P, 131 I and 90 Sr in mammalian systems. (author)

  1. Complex epidemiological approach to human mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czeizel, A.

    1980-01-01

    The main characteristics of the epidemiological approach are summarised and the criteria discussed for the adoption of this approach for the detection of human mutagenesis. Mutation monitoring systems are described and results of epidemiological studies of higher risk populations are presented. (C.F.)

  2. Seed mutagenesis in Portulaca grandiflora (Hook)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennani, F.; Rossi-Hassani, B.D.

    2001-01-01

    Betalain pigments have been used as natural additives. Despite their importance, the biochemistry and genetics of betalain synthesis remain relatively undetermined. Portulaca grandiflora represents an ideal material for genetic analysis. In the present work, seed mutagenesis was examined with a view to enhance the chance of detection of new genetic markers in this species

  3. Candidate gene analysis and identification of TRAP and SSR markers linked to the Or5 gene, which confers sunflower resistance to race E of broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunflower broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) is a root holoparasitic angiosperm considered as being one of the major constraints for sunflower production in Mediterranean areas. Breeding for resistance has been crucial for protecting sunflowers from broomrape damage. The Or5 gene, which confers re...

  4. A Novel Murine Gene, Sickle tail, Linked to the Danforth's short tail Locus, Is Required for Normal Development of the Intervertebral Disc

    OpenAIRE

    Semba, Kei; Araki, Kimi; Li, Zhengzhe; Matsumoto, Ken-ichirou; Suzuki, Misao; Nakagata, Naoki; Takagi, Katsumasa; Takeya, Motohiro; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Araki, Masatake; Imai, Kenji; Abe, Kuniya; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2006-01-01

    We established the mutant mouse line, B6;CB-SktGtAyu8021IMEG (SktGt), through gene-trap mutagenesis in embryonic stem cells. The novel gene identified, called Sickle tail (Skt), is composed of 19 exons and encodes a protein of 1352 amino acids. Expression of a reporter gene was detected in the notochord during embryogenesis and in the nucleus pulposus of mice. Compression of some of the nuclei pulposi in the intervertebral discs (IVDs) appeared at embryonic day (E) 17.5, resulting in a kinky-...

  5. Mechanisms of Base Substitution Mutagenesis in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Bacolla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs. Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules.

  6. Mechanisms of base substitution mutagenesis in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacolla, Albino; Cooper, David N; Vasquez, Karen M

    2014-03-05

    Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs). Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules.

  7. Tradescantia bioassays as monitoring systems for environmental mutagenesis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, G.S.; Ma, T.H.; Pimentel, D.; Weinstein, L.H.

    1997-01-01

    Since the early studies on the genetic effects of chemical and physical agents, species and clones of Tradescantia have been used as experimental subjects, by virtue of a series of favorable genetic characteristics. Bearing just six pairs (2n = 12) of large, easily observable chromosomes, cells from almost every part of the plant, from the root tips to the developing pollen tube, yield excellent material for cytogenetic studies. As a consequence of the intensive use of Tradescantia in genetic studies, a series of genetic characteristics have been found that offer opportunities for the detection of agents affecting the stability of the genome. At least five such characteristics have been selected as endpoints for the establishment of assays to evaluate mutagenesis. Three of these, root-tip mitosis, pollen-tube, and microspore mitosis are essentially chromosome aberration assays, wherein one observes and evaluates the visible damage in the chromosomes. A fourth, the stamen-hair mutation assay (Trad-SHM), is a point mutation mitotic assay based on the expression of a recessive gene for flower color in heterozygous plants. The fifth assay is a cytogenetic test based on the formation of micronuclei (Trad-MCN) that result from chromosome breakage in the meiotic pollen mother cells. This article examines the characteristics and fundamentals of the Trad-MCN and the Trad-SHM assays and reviews the results obtained to date with these systems in the assessment of environmental mutagenesis. (author)

  8. Globalisation Trapped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Caraça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled away from curiosity-driven science was able to grow enormously, erecting a formidable structure of networks of institutions that impacted decisively on the economy. It is a paradox, or maybe a trap, that the fulfillment of science’s solemn promise of ‘transforming nature’ means seeing ourselves and our Western societies entangled in crises after crises with no clear outcome in view. A redistribution of geopolitical power is under way, along with the deployment of information and communication technologies, forcing dominant structures to oscillate, as knowledge about organization and methods, marketing, design, and software begins to challenge the role of technoscience as the main vector of economic growth and wealth accumulation. What ought to be done?

  9. Retroviral Vectors for Analysis of Viral Mutagenesis and Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M.O. Rawson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  10. CRISPR/Cas-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakanishi

    Full Text Available The water flea Daphnia magna has been used as an animal model in ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences. Thanks to the recent progress in Daphnia genomics, genetic information such as the draft genome sequence and expressed sequence tags (ESTs is now available. To investigate the relationship between phenotypes and the available genetic information about Daphnia, some gene manipulation methods have been developed. However, a technique to induce targeted mutagenesis into Daphnia genome remains elusive. To overcome this problem, we focused on an emerging genome editing technique mediated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas system to introduce genomic mutations. In this study, we targeted a functionally conserved regulator of eye development, the eyeless gene in D. magna. When we injected Cas9 mRNAs and eyeless-targeting guide RNAs into eggs, 18-47% of the survived juveniles exhibited abnormal eye morphology. After maturation, up to 8.2% of the adults produced progenies with deformed eyes, which carried mutations in the eyeless loci. These results showed that CRISPR/Cas system could introduce heritable mutations into the endogenous eyeless gene in D. magna. This is the first report of a targeted gene knockout technique in Daphnia and will be useful in uncovering Daphnia gene functions.

  11. Sistematización de imágenes obtenidas por fototrampeo: una propuesta de ficha Systematic images from camera-traps: a proposal of data card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Botello

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Las colecciones científicas desempeñan un papel fundamental en la acumulación del conocimiento biológico. Recientemente, el uso de fototrampas para realizar inventarios y estudios ecológicos en mamíferos se ha incrementando notablemente. Sin embargo, la información básica asociada a las imágenes no se ha organizado de manera formal y sistemática, como en el caso de los especímenes en una colección científica. Aquí, se propone un formato para producir fichas digitales de fotocolecta en donde la imagen de la especie fotografiada esté asociada a la misma información básica que se registra en una colecta tradicional, lo que permitirá que éstas sean fácilmente incluidas en colecciones científicas, con lo que se documentará la información disponible proveniente de todos aquellos sitios que actualmente estén monitoreándose mediante este método.The main objective of biological collections is to accumulate biological data. The use of camera-traps for inventories and ecological studies of mammals has shown a noteworthy recent increase. However, the basic information associated with the images is not organized in a formal or systematic way, like the specimens of a scientific collection. Here, we propose a format to produce digital photosampling cards where the image of the photographed species is associated with the same basic information that is recorded for a traditional sample; in this way, they can be easily inorporated in scientific collections, thus documenting the available information for the sites that are sampled by this method.

  12. Use of CRISPR/Cas Genome Editing Technology for Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rongfang; Wei, Pengcheng; Yang, Jianbo

    2017-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system is a newly emerging mutagenesis (gene-editing) tool in genetic engineering. Among the agriculturally important crops, several genes have been successfully mutated by the system, and some agronomic important traits have been rapidly generated, which indicates the potential applications in both scientific research and plant breeding. In this chapter, we describe a standard gene-editing procedure to effectively target rice genes and to make specific rice mutants using the CRISPR/Cas9 system mediated by Agrobacterium transformation.

  13. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  14. Reverse genetics through random mutagenesis in Histoplasma capsulatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rappleye Chad A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and systemic disease in humans and other mammals. Progress in understanding the mechanisms underlying the biology and the pathogenesis of Histoplasma has been hindered by a shortage of methodologies for mutating a gene of interest. Results We describe a reverse genetics process that combines the random mutagenesis of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with screening techniques to identify targeted gene disruptions in a collection of insertion mutants. Isolation of the desired mutant is accomplished by arraying individual clones from a pool and employing a PCR-addressing method. Application of this procedure facilitated the isolation of a cbp1 mutant in a North American type 2 strain, a Histoplasma strain recalcitrant to gene knock-outs through homologous recombination. Optimization of cryopreservation conditions allows pools of mutants to be banked for later analysis and recovery of targeted mutants. Conclusion This methodology improves our ability to isolate mutants in targeted genes, thereby facilitating the molecular genetic analysis of Histoplasma biology. The procedures described are widely applicable to many fungal systems and will be of particular interest to those for which homologous recombination techniques are inefficient or do not currently exist.

  15. UNTAGGED MUTATION IN RICE GAL4/VP16 TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATOR FACILITATED-ENHANCER TRAP LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Koerniati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An enhancer trap system is an insertional mutagenesis based upon gene expression, instead of gene knock-out, so its insertion in genome is  expected not linked to any dramatic changes in plant phenotypes. Gene  knock-out, leading to lossof- function (LoF mutation, is a dominant  approach for rice functional genomic studies. The objective of this study was to find out whether Transcriptional Activator-Facilitated Enhancer Trap (TAFET T-DNA insertion inducing mutant phenotypes in rice TAFET population. Materials used in this experiment were T1 generation of 270 rice TAFET lines. Eight plants of each were grown in the greenhouse and observed for any mutant phenotypes. Phenotypic, histochemical, Southernblot analyses were carried out to define a mutant of pSKC66.1- 8e. Result showed that about 10% of the 270 lines produced chlorophyll-deficient  leaves, ranged from yellowish green (viridis, white stripe green zebra-like stripe to completely white (albino. Albino plants died after two weeks,  whilst white stripe or viridis mutants became normal in the next generation(T2. Another mutant was pSKC66.1-8e line which had floral dramatic phenotype change with various spikelet shapes and number of organs, and had a single twisted culm. The flower of mutant also had gus gene expression. Plants with wild type did not express gus gene and had six or more straight culms. Molecular, histochemical and phenotypic analyses of this particular line for three generations indicated that mutant phenotype was not due to the T-DNA insertion. Since there was approved that Tos17 is activated during tissue culture and induced mutant phenotype, this line might relate to Tos17 insertion, but it needs further investigation to gain such conclusion.

  16. Two approaches for induction and isolation of starch mutants in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.): random versus gene targeted mutagenesis = Twee benaderingen voor de inductie en isolatie van zetmeelmutanten in aardappel (Solanum tuberosum L.): ongerichte versus gen gerichte mutagenese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogkamp, T.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis two approaches were used to induce structural mutations in potato starch biosynthesis genes in potato. First production of new monoploid amf genotypes through parthenogenesis made it possible to initiate mutation breeding for amfae

  17. Functional analysis of Botrytis cinerea pectin methylesterase genes by PCR-based targeted mutagenesis: Bcpme1 and Bcpme2 are dispensable for virulence of strain B05.10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, I.; McCalman, M.; Wagemakers, L.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic pathogen that produces an array of enzymes capable of attacking the plant cell wall components. We have previously shown that growth of the fungus in planta is accompanied by the degradation of pectin and that endopolygalacturonase (Bcpg) genes are expressed during

  18. The uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans required for UV-mutagenesis encodes a homolog to REV3, a subunit of the DNA polymerase zeta of yeast involved in translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K Y; Chae, S K; Han, D M

    1998-07-01

    Defects in the uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans resulted in high UV sensitivity and reductions of spontaneous and UV-induced reversion of certain alleles, uvsl;uvsA double mutants exhibited high methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitivity in contrast to the slight sensitivity of the component single mutants. Using such a double mutant as recipient, a clone complementing uvsI501 has been isolated from a chromosome III specific library. The deduced amino acid sequence from the 1.1-kb sequenced region, a part of the 5.2-kb DNA fragment showing uvsI-complementing activity, had a 62% identity with REV3 of yeast. Disruptants of the cloned gene demonstrated the same level of sensitivity to UV light as uvsI and failed to complement uvsI501 in heterozygous diploids.

  19. Two approaches for induction and isolation of starch mutants in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.): random versus gene targeted mutagenesis = Twee benaderingen voor de inductie en isolatie van zetmeelmutanten in aardappel (Solanum tuberosum L.): ongerichte versus gen gerichte mutagenese

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogkamp, T.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis two approaches were used to induce structural mutations in potato starch biosynthesis genes in potato. First production of new monoploid amf genotypes through parthenogenesis made it possible to initiate mutation breeding for amfae double mutants. Two amf monoploids were selected which fulfilled most of the prerequisites. By inducing a mutation in one of the branching enzymes in an amf -mutant it is possibl...

  20. Cloning-Independent and Counterselectable Markerless Mutagenesis System in Streptococcus mutans▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhoujie; Okinaga, Toshinori; Qi, Fengxia; Zhang, Zhijun; Merritt, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Insertion duplication mutagenesis and allelic replacement mutagenesis are among the most commonly utilized approaches for targeted mutagenesis in bacteria. However, both techniques are limited by a variety of factors that can complicate mutant phenotypic studies. To circumvent these limitations, multiple markerless mutagenesis techniques have been developed that utilize either temperature-sensitive plasmids or counterselectable suicide vectors containing both positive- and negative-selection markers. For many species, these techniques are not especially useful due to difficulties of cloning with Escherichia coli and/or a lack of functional negative-selection markers. In this study, we describe the development of a novel approach for the creation of markerless mutations. This system employs a cloning-independent methodology and should be easily adaptable to a wide array of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species. The entire process of creating both the counterselection cassette and mutation constructs can be completed using overlapping PCR protocols, which allows extremely quick assembly and eliminates the requirement for either temperature-sensitive replicons or suicide vectors. As a proof of principle, we used Streptococcus mutans reference strain UA159 to create markerless in-frame deletions of 3 separate bacteriocin genes as well as triple mutants containing all 3 deletions. Using a panel of 5 separate wild-type S. mutans strains, we further demonstrated that the procedure is nearly 100% efficient at generating clones with the desired markerless mutation, which is a considerable improvement in yield compared to existing approaches. PMID:21948849

  1. Cloning-independent and counterselectable markerless mutagenesis system in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhoujie; Okinaga, Toshinori; Qi, Fengxia; Zhang, Zhijun; Merritt, Justin

    2011-11-01

    Insertion duplication mutagenesis and allelic replacement mutagenesis are among the most commonly utilized approaches for targeted mutagenesis in bacteria. However, both techniques are limited by a variety of factors that can complicate mutant phenotypic studies. To circumvent these limitations, multiple markerless mutagenesis techniques have been developed that utilize either temperature-sensitive plasmids or counterselectable suicide vectors containing both positive- and negative-selection markers. For many species, these techniques are not especially useful due to difficulties of cloning with Escherichia coli and/or a lack of functional negative-selection markers. In this study, we describe the development of a novel approach for the creation of markerless mutations. This system employs a cloning-independent methodology and should be easily adaptable to a wide array of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species. The entire process of creating both the counterselection cassette and mutation constructs can be completed using overlapping PCR protocols, which allows extremely quick assembly and eliminates the requirement for either temperature-sensitive replicons or suicide vectors. As a proof of principle, we used Streptococcus mutans reference strain UA159 to create markerless in-frame deletions of 3 separate bacteriocin genes as well as triple mutants containing all 3 deletions. Using a panel of 5 separate wild-type S. mutans strains, we further demonstrated that the procedure is nearly 100% efficient at generating clones with the desired markerless mutation, which is a considerable improvement in yield compared to existing approaches.

  2. DNA polymerase III of Escherichia coli is required for UV and ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagensee, M.E.; Timme, T.L.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-06-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli possessing the pcbA1 mutation, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive mutation in DNA polymerase III can survive at the restrictive temperature (43 degrees C) for DNA polymerase III. The mutation rate of the bacterial genome of such strains after exposure to either UV light or ethyl methanesulfonate was measured by its rifampicin resistance or amino acid requirements. In addition, Weigle mutagenesis of preirradiated lambda phage was also measured. In all cases, no increase in mutagenesis was noted at the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III. Introduction of a cloned DNA polymerase III gene returned the mutation rate of the bacterial genome as well as the Weigle mutagenesis to normal at 43 degrees C. Using a recA-lacZ fusion, the SOS response after UV irradiation was measured and found to be normal at the restrictive and permissive temperature for DNA polymerase III, as was induction of lambda prophage. Recombination was also normal at either temperature. Our studies demonstrate that a functional DNA polymerase III is strictly required for mutagenesis at a step other than SOS induction.

  3. An In Vitro Single-Primer Site-Directed Mutagenesis Method for Use in Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanchao; Zhang, Likui

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a powerful method to introduce mutation(s) into DNA sequences. A number of methods have been developed over the years with a main goal being to create a high number of mutant genes. The single-mutagenic primer method for site-directed mutagenesis is the most direct method that yields mutant genes in about 25-50 % of transformants in a robust, low-cost reaction. The supercompetent XL10-Gold bacteria used in the Stratagene protocol carry a phage, which may be a problem for some applications; however, in our single-mutagenic primer method the supercompetent bacteria are not needed. A thermostable DNA polymerase with high fidelity and processivity, such as Phusion DNA polymerase, is required for our optimized procedure to avoid extra mutation(s) and enhance mutagenic efficiency.

  4. An efficient method for multiple site-directed mutagenesis using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Kun; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-05-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) methods are very important in modern molecular biology, biochemistry, and protein engineering. Here, we present a novel SDM method that can be used for multiple mutation generation using type IIs restriction enzymes. This approach is faster and more convenient than the overlap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method due to its having fewer reaction steps and being cheaper than, but as convenient as, enzymatic assembly. We illustrate the usefulness of our method by introducing three mutations into the bacterial Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (bStCas9) gene, converting the humanized S. thermophilus Cas9 (hStCas9) gene into nuclease dead or H847A nickase mutants and generating sunnyTALEN mutagenesis from a wild-type TALEN backbone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of radiation mutagenesis in cotton selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamedov, K.M.; Shamaeva, N.N.

    1987-01-01

    Experimantal mutagenesis in combination with the classical methods: hybridization and selection, are shown to be one of the effective methods for developing new species of cotton plants. Taking into account the character of mutant difference inheritance during hybridization of lines as well as the degree of correlative bonds, 10 most perspective lines from 198 ones are separated. They differ from the initial species by a complex of favorable hereditary changes according to the quantitative selectively useful features, that makes them advantageous for application of the existing ones and for the development of new species of fine-fiber cotton plants

  6. In vitro Inactivation of Latent HSV by Targeted Mutagenesis Using an HSV-specific Homing Endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Aubert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following acute infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV establishes latency in sensory neurons, from which it can reactivate and cause recurrent disease. Available antiviral therapies do not affect latent viral genomes; therefore, they do not prevent reactivation following therapy cessation. One possible curative approach involves the introduction of DNA double strand breaks in latent HSV genomes by rare-cutting endonucleases, leading to mutagenesis of essential viral genes. We tested this approach in an in vitro HSV latency model using the engineered homing endonuclease (HE HSV1m5, which recognizes a sequence in the HSV-1 gene UL19, encoding the virion protein VP5. Coexpression of the 3′-exonuclease Trex2 with HEs increased HE-mediated mutagenesis frequencies up to sixfold. Following HSV1m5/Trex2 delivery with adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, the target site was mutated in latent HSV genomes with no detectable cell toxicity. Importantly, HSV production by latently infected cells after reactivation was decreased after HSV1m5/Trex2 exposure. Exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors prior to HSV1m5/Trex2 treatment increased mutagenesis frequencies of latent HSV genomes another two- to fivefold, suggesting that chromatin modification may be a useful adjunct to gene-targeting approaches. These results support the continuing development of HEs and other nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs for cure of chronic viral infections.

  7. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses.

  8. [Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro]. Progress report, January 1-December 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Annual progress report is made on project focusing on the comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro. The study employs the HGPRT gene to explore the changes in nucleotide sequence which has occurred in spontaneous mutations or mutations induced by MNNG or ICR191. Reports on the individual projects have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base. (DT)

  9. High throughput mutagenesis for identification of residues regulating human prostacyclin (hIP receptor expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Bill

    Full Text Available The human prostacyclin receptor (hIP receptor is a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that plays a critical role in vascular smooth muscle relaxation and platelet aggregation. hIP receptor dysfunction has been implicated in numerous cardiovascular abnormalities, including myocardial infarction, hypertension, thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Genomic sequencing has discovered several genetic variations in the PTGIR gene coding for hIP receptor, however, its structure-function relationship has not been sufficiently explored. Here we set out to investigate the applicability of high throughput random mutagenesis to study the structure-function relationship of hIP receptor. While chemical mutagenesis was not suitable to generate a mutagenesis library with sufficient coverage, our data demonstrate error-prone PCR (epPCR mediated mutagenesis as a valuable method for the unbiased screening of residues regulating hIP receptor function and expression. Here we describe the generation and functional characterization of an epPCR derived mutagenesis library compromising >4000 mutants of the hIP receptor. We introduce next generation sequencing as a useful tool to validate the quality of mutagenesis libraries by providing information about the coverage, mutation rate and mutational bias. We identified 18 mutants of the hIP receptor that were expressed at the cell surface, but demonstrated impaired receptor function. A total of 38 non-synonymous mutations were identified within the coding region of the hIP receptor, mapping to 36 distinct residues, including several mutations previously reported to affect the signaling of the hIP receptor. Thus, our data demonstrates epPCR mediated random mutagenesis as a valuable and practical method to study the structure-function relationship of GPCRs.

  10. Use of a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector to analyze enhanced mutagenesis in mitomycin C-treated monkey cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roilides, E.; Munson, P.J.; Levine, A.S.; Dixon, K.

    1988-01-01

    When monkey cells were treated with mitomycin C 24 h before transfection with UV-irradiated pZ189 (a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector), there was a twofold increase in the frequency of mutations in the supF gene of the vector. These results suggest the existence of an enhancible mutagenesis pathway in mammalian cells. However, DNA sequence analysis of the SupF- mutants suggested no dramatic changes in the mechanisms of mutagenesis due to mitomycin C treatment of the cells

  11. A wheat cold resistance mutant derived from space mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Sun Mingzhu; Zhang Fengyun; Gao Guoqiang; Qiu Denglin; Li Xinhua

    2012-01-01

    A cold resistance mutant, obtained by spaceflight mutagenesis on the seeds of wheat variety Han6172, and the DNA of cold resistance mutant and contrast Han6172 were compared by SRAP technique. 380 pairs of primers were screened, 6 pairs of them had polymorphisms between mutant and contrast, the rate was 1.58%, and this data indicated that there are no obvious DNA differences between mutant and contrast Six specific fragments were obtained, 3 fragments of them were amplified in mutant. Homology analysis in GenBank showed that Me3-Em7-Mt, Me4-Em11-CK, Me7-Em19-CK and Me6-Em9-Mt all had homologous sequences with wheat chromosome 3B-specific BAC library, and this result indicated that the gene and regulator sequences associated with mutant cold resistance might locate on 3B chromosome. It was speculated that space mutation induced the mutation of 3B chromosome primary structure, and influenced the expressions of cold resistance genes, which resulted in the mutation of cold resistance ability. (authors)

  12. Directed combinatorial mutagenesis of Escherichia coli for complex phenotype engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rongming; Liang, Liya; Garst, Andrew D.; Choudhury, Alaksh; Nogué, Violeta Sànchez i.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Gill, Ryan T.

    2018-05-01

    Strain engineering for industrial production requires a targeted improvement of multiple complex traits, which range from pathway flux to tolerance to mixed sugar utilization. Here, we report the use of an iterative CRISPR EnAbled Trackable genome Engineering (iCREATE) method to engineer rapid glucose and xylose co-consumption and tolerance to hydrolysate inhibitors in E. coli. Deep mutagenesis libraries were rationally designed, constructed, and screened to target ~40,000 mutations across 30 genes. These libraries included global and high-level regulators that regulate global gene expression, transcription factors that play important roles in genome-level transcription, enzymes that function in the sugar transport system, NAD(P)H metabolism, and the aldehyde reduction system. Specific mutants that conferred increased growth in mixed sugars and hydrolysate tolerance conditions were isolated, confirmed, and evaluated for changes in genome-wide expression levels. We tested the strain with positive combinatorial mutations for 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) production under high furfural and high acetate hydrolysate fermentation, which demonstrated a 7- and 8-fold increase in 3HP productivity relative to the parent strain, respectively.

  13. Recurrent AAV2-related insertional mutagenesis in human hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nault, Jean-Charles; Datta, Shalini; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Franconi, Andrea; Mallet, Maxime; Couchy, Gabrielle; Letouzé, Eric; Pilati, Camilla; Verret, Benjamin; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Balabaud, Charles; Calderaro, Julien; Laurent, Alexis; Letexier, Mélanie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Calvo, Fabien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are liver tumors related to various etiologies, including alcohol intake and infection with hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV) virus. Additional risk factors remain to be identified, particularly in patients who develop HCC without cirrhosis. We found clonal integration of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) in 11 of 193 HCCs. These AAV2 integrations occurred in known cancer driver genes, namely CCNA2 (cyclin A2; four cases), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase; one case), CCNE1 (cyclin E1; three cases), TNFSF10 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 10; two cases) and KMT2B (lysine-specific methyltransferase 2B; one case), leading to overexpression of the target genes. Tumors with viral integration mainly developed in non-cirrhotic liver (9 of 11 cases) and without known risk factors (6 of 11 cases), suggesting a pathogenic role for AAV2 in these patients. In conclusion, AAV2 is a DNA virus associated with oncogenic insertional mutagenesis in human HCC.

  14. Radiation mutagenesis in selection of apple trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolontaev, V.M.; Kolontaev, Yu.V.

    1977-01-01

    After X-radiation of grafts of antonovka apple trees, three groups of morphological mutants, namely, weak-, average- and violently-growing, have been revealed. Although the mutation spectrum has some indefinite character a dose of 6 kR causes, more frequently and in a greater number, the weak-growing mutants, and a dose of 2 kR, the violently-growing ones. Mutants of each group differ in the precociousness (precocious and latefruiting), type of fruiting (nospur and spur) and yield (high- and low-yielding). Using the method of radiation mutagenesis it is possible to rise the frequency and spectrum of somatic mutability of antonovka apple trees and to induce forms having valuable features

  15. Scoring function to predict solubility mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Christopher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutagenesis is commonly used to engineer proteins with desirable properties not present in the wild type (WT protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility. Experimentalists often have to choose a small subset of mutations from a large number of candidates to obtain the desired change, and computational techniques are invaluable to make the choices. While several such methods have been proposed to predict stability and reactivity mutagenesis, solubility has not received much attention. Results We use concepts from computational geometry to define a three body scoring function that predicts the change in protein solubility due to mutations. The scoring function captures both sequence and structure information. By exploring the literature, we have assembled a substantial database of 137 single- and multiple-point solubility mutations. Our database is the largest such collection with structural information known so far. We optimize the scoring function using linear programming (LP methods to derive its weights based on training. Starting with default values of 1, we find weights in the range [0,2] so that predictions of increase or decrease in solubility are optimized. We compare the LP method to the standard machine learning techniques of support vector machines (SVM and the Lasso. Using statistics for leave-one-out (LOO, 10-fold, and 3-fold cross validations (CV for training and prediction, we demonstrate that the LP method performs the best overall. For the LOOCV, the LP method has an overall accuracy of 81%. Availability Executables of programs, tables of weights, and datasets of mutants are available from the following web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/OptSolMut.html.

  16. Regulation of mutagenesis by exogenous biological factors in the eukaryotic cell systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukash L. L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The representations of the mutations and the nature of spontaneous mutation process and mutagenesis induced by exogenous oncoviruses, DNAs and proteins-mitogens are analysed. Exogenous biological factors induce DNA damages in regulatory-informational way, acting on the cellular systems for maintenance of genetical stability. Molecular mechanisms are the same as at spontaneous mutagenesis but they are realized with the participation of alien genetical material. Among biological mutagens, the oncoviruses and mobile genetic elements (MGEs are distinguished as the strongest destabilizing factors which direct tumor transformation of somatic mammalian cells. Genetical reprogramming or changing the programs of gene expression at the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells under growth factors and citokines is probably followed by mutations and recombinations as well.

  17. A mutagenesis-derived broad-spectrum disease resistance locus in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jackie; Zhang, Hongtao; Giroux, Michael J; Feiz, Leila; Jin, Yue; Wang, Meinan; Chen, Xianming; Huang, Li

    2012-07-01

    Wheat leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew caused by the fungal pathogens Puccinia triticina, P. graminis f. sp. tritici, P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, and Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, respectively, are destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. Breeding durable disease resistance cultivars rely largely on continually introgressing new resistance genes, especially the genes with different defense mechanisms, into adapted varieties. Here, we describe a new resistance gene obtained by mutagenesis. The mutant, MNR220 (mutagenesis-derived new resistance), enhances resistance to three rusts and powdery mildew, with the characteristics of delayed disease development at the seedling stage and completed resistance at the adult plant stage. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the resistance in MNR220 is conferred by a single semidominant gene mapped on the short arm of chromosome 2B. Gene expression profiling of several pathogenesis-related genes indicated that MNR220 has an elevated and rapid pathogen-induced response. In addition to its potential use in breeding for resistance to multiple diseases, high-resolution mapping and cloning of the disease resistance locus in MNR220 may lead to a better understanding of the regulation of defense responses in wheat.

  18. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  19. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P

    2007-05-14

    Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  20. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap......-nights for the pitfall, Sherman, Victor and Museum Special traps, respectively. In total, we captured 366 shrews. The use of pitfall traps yielded the highest trapping success (4.1) with at least 18 shrew species identified. Trapping success and the number of species collected was lower for the Sherman (0.6, at least 11...... species), Victor (0.6, at least 8 species) and Museum Special (0.5, at least 6 species) traps. Although Crocidura olivieri and C. denti were caught using all four trap types, captures with different trap types did not produce a sample with the same taxonomic composition. In agreement with previous studies...

  1. Targeted mutagenesis in tetraploid switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Merrick, Paul; Zhang, Zhengzhi; Ji, Chonghui; Yang, Bing; Fei, Shui-Zhang

    2018-02-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has become a powerful tool for targeted mutagenesis. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a high yielding perennial grass species that has been designated as a model biomass crop by the U.S. Department of Energy. The self-infertility and high ploidy level make it difficult to study gene function or improve germplasm. To overcome these constraints, we explored the feasibility of using CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted mutagenesis in a tetraploid cultivar 'Alamo' switchgrass. We first developed a transient assay by which a non-functional green-fluorescent protein gene containing a 1-bp frameshift insertion in its 5' coding region was successfully mutated by a Cas9/sgRNA complex resulting in its restored function. Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation of embryogenic calli derived from mature caryopses averaged a 3.0% transformation efficiency targeting the genes of teosinte branched 1(tb1)a and b and phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM). With a single construct containing two sgRNAs targeting different regions of tb1a and tb1b genes, primary transformants (T0) containing CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations were obtained at frequencies of 95.5% (tb1a) and 11% (tb1b), respectively, with T0 mutants exhibiting increased tiller production. Meanwhile, a mutation frequency of 13.7% was obtained for the PGM gene with a CRISPR/Cas9 construct containing a single sgRNA. Among the PGM T0 mutants, six are heterozygous and one is homozygous for a 1-bp deletion in the target region with no apparent phenotypical alterations. We show that CRISPR/Cas9 system can generate targeted mutagenesis effectively and obtain targeted homozygous mutants in T0 generation in switchgrass, circumventing the need of inbreeding. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Development of in vitro transposon assisted signal sequence trapping and its use in screening Bacillus halodurans C125 and Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 gene libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, F.; Schnorr, K.; Wilting, R.

    2004-01-01

    minitransposon enabling translational fusions between 'bla and target genes. Fusion of TnSig in the correct reading frame to a protein carrying transmembrane domains or signal peptides resulted in ampicillin resistance of the corresponding clone. Prokaryotic gene libraries from the alkaliphilic bacterium...... in the cell. Genes for secreted proteins, transmembrane proteins and lipoproteins were successfully identified by this method. In contrast to previous transposon based identification strategies, the method described here is fast and versatile and essentially enables any selectable marker compatible library...... to be tagged. It is suited for identifying genes encoding extracytosolic proteins in gene libraries of a wide range of prokaryotic organisms....

  3. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation

  4. Targeted mutagenesis using CRISPR/Cas system in medaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ansai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas system-based RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN has recently emerged as a simple and efficient tool for targeted genome editing. In this study, we showed successful targeted mutagenesis using RGENs in medaka, Oryzias latipes. Somatic and heritable mutations were induced with high efficiency at the targeted genomic sequence on the DJ-1 gene in embryos that had been injected with the single guide RNA (sgRNA transcribed by a T7 promoter and capped RNA encoding a Cas9 nuclease. The sgRNAs that were designed for the target genomic sequences without the 5′ end of GG required by the T7 promoter induced the targeted mutations. This suggests that the RGEN can target any sequence adjacent to an NGG protospacer adjacent motif (PAM sequence, which occurs once every 8 bp. The off-target alterations at 2 genomic loci harboring double mismatches in the 18-bp targeting sequences were induced in the RGEN-injected embryos. However, we also found that the off-target effects could be reduced by lower dosages of sgRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CRISPR/Cas-mediated RGENs may be an efficient and flexible tool for genome editing in medaka.

  5. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  6. Yeasts acquire resistance secondary to antifungal drug treatment by adaptive mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Quinto-Alemany

    Full Text Available Acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment both by microorganisms and by tumor cells is a major public health concern. Several species of bacteria acquire resistance to various antibiotics through stress-induced responses that have an adaptive mutagenesis effect. So far, adaptive mutagenesis in yeast has only been described when the stress is nutrient deprivation. Here, we hypothesized that adaptive mutagenesis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans as model organisms would also take place in response to antifungal agents (5-fluorocytosine or flucytosine, 5-FC, and caspofungin, CSP, giving rise to resistance secondary to treatment with these agents. We have developed a clinically relevant model where both yeasts acquire resistance when exposed to these agents. Stressful lifestyle associated mutation (SLAM experiments show that the adaptive mutation frequencies are 20 (S. cerevisiae -5-FC, 600 (C. albicans -5-FC or 1000 (S. cerevisiae--CSP fold higher than the spontaneous mutation frequency, the experimental data for C. albicans -5-FC being in agreement with the clinical data of acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment. The spectrum of mutations in the S. cerevisiae -5-FC model differs between spontaneous and acquired, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that generate them are different. Remarkably, in the acquired mutations, an ectopic intrachromosomal recombination with an 87% homologous gene takes place with a high frequency. In conclusion, we present here a clinically relevant adaptive mutation model that fulfils the conditions reported previously.

  7. Transgenic Chinese hamster V79 cell lines which exhibit variable levels of gpt mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.B.; Rossman, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gpt gene coding for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase has been stably transfected into HPRT - Chinese hamster V79 cells. Several gpt - cell lines have been established, which retain the sequence(s) even after long-term culture without selection for gpt. While spontaneous mutagenesis to gpt - occurs rather frequently for most cell lines, it cannot be correlated with either the number of plasmid integration sites or deletion of the plasmid sequence(s). One transgenic cell line (g12), which continuously maintains a low spontaneous mutation frequency was used in comparative mutagenesis studies with wild-type V79 cells (gpt vs. hprt). Alkylating agents such as N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and β-propiolactone (BPL) are shown to be equally toxic and mutagenic in both g12 and V79 cells. UV and X-rays are also equally toxic to both cell lines. The data presented here suggests that g12 cells may be useful to study mammalian mutagenesis by agents which yield limited response at the hprt locus

  8. piggyBac transposon somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker (PB-SMART for genetic screens in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean F Landrette

    Full Text Available Somatic forward genetic screens have the power to interrogate thousands of genes in a single animal. Retroviral and transposon mutagenesis systems in mice have been designed and deployed in somatic tissues for surveying hematopoietic and solid tumor formation. In the context of cancer, the ability to visually mark mutant cells would present tremendous advantages for identifying tumor formation, monitoring tumor growth over time, and tracking tumor infiltrations and metastases into wild-type tissues. Furthermore, locating mutant clones is a prerequisite for screening and analyzing most other somatic phenotypes. For this purpose, we developed a system using the piggyBac (PB transposon for somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker, called PB-SMART. The PB-SMART mouse genetic screening system can simultaneously induce somatic mutations and mark mutated cells using bioluminescence or fluorescence. The marking of mutant cells enable analyses that are not possible with current somatic mutagenesis systems, such as tracking cell proliferation and tumor growth, detecting tumor cell infiltrations, and reporting tissue mutagenesis levels by a simple ex vivo visual readout. We demonstrate that PB-SMART is highly mutagenic, capable of tumor induction with low copy transposons, which facilitates the mapping and identification of causative insertions. We further integrated a conditional transposase with the PB-SMART system, permitting tissue-specific mutagenesis with a single cross to any available Cre line. Targeting the germline, the system could also be used to conduct F1 screens. With these features, PB-SMART provides an integrated platform for individual investigators to harness the power of somatic mutagenesis and phenotypic screens to decipher the genetic basis of mammalian biology and disease.

  9. piggyBac transposon somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker (PB-SMART) for genetic screens in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrette, Sean F; Cornett, Jonathan C; Ni, Thomas K; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Xu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Somatic forward genetic screens have the power to interrogate thousands of genes in a single animal. Retroviral and transposon mutagenesis systems in mice have been designed and deployed in somatic tissues for surveying hematopoietic and solid tumor formation. In the context of cancer, the ability to visually mark mutant cells would present tremendous advantages for identifying tumor formation, monitoring tumor growth over time, and tracking tumor infiltrations and metastases into wild-type tissues. Furthermore, locating mutant clones is a prerequisite for screening and analyzing most other somatic phenotypes. For this purpose, we developed a system using the piggyBac (PB) transposon for somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker, called PB-SMART. The PB-SMART mouse genetic screening system can simultaneously induce somatic mutations and mark mutated cells using bioluminescence or fluorescence. The marking of mutant cells enable analyses that are not possible with current somatic mutagenesis systems, such as tracking cell proliferation and tumor growth, detecting tumor cell infiltrations, and reporting tissue mutagenesis levels by a simple ex vivo visual readout. We demonstrate that PB-SMART is highly mutagenic, capable of tumor induction with low copy transposons, which facilitates the mapping and identification of causative insertions. We further integrated a conditional transposase with the PB-SMART system, permitting tissue-specific mutagenesis with a single cross to any available Cre line. Targeting the germline, the system could also be used to conduct F1 screens. With these features, PB-SMART provides an integrated platform for individual investigators to harness the power of somatic mutagenesis and phenotypic screens to decipher the genetic basis of mammalian biology and disease.

  10. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  11. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  12. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents

  13. The contribution of Nth and Nei DNA glycosylases to mutagenesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolla, Nabiela; Goosens, Vivianne J; Kana, Bavesh D; Gordhan, Bhavna G

    2014-01-01

    The increased prevalence of drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) indicates that significant mutagenesis occurs during tuberculosis disease in humans. DNA damage by host-derived reactive oxygen/nitrogen species is hypothesized to be critical for the mutagenic process in Mtb thus, highlighting an important role for DNA repair enzymes in maintenance of genome fidelity. Formamidopyrimidine (Fpg/MutM/Fapy) and EndonucleaseVIII (Nei) constitute the Fpg/Nei family of DNA glycosylases and together with EndonucleaseIII (Nth) are central to the base excision repair pathway in bacteria. In this study we assess the contribution of Nei and Nth DNA repair enzymes in Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), which retains a single nth homologue and duplications of the Fpg (fpg1 and fpg2) and Nei (nei1 and nei2) homologues. Using an Escherichia coli nth deletion mutant, we confirm the functionality of the mycobacterial nth gene in the base excision repair pathway. Msm mutants lacking nei1, nei2 and nth individually or in combination did not display aberrant growth in broth culture. Deletion of nth individually results in increased UV-induced mutagenesis and combinatorial deletion with the nei homologues results in reduced survival under oxidative stress conditions and an increase in spontaneous mutagenesis to rifampicin. Deletion of nth together with the fpg homolgues did not result in any growth/survival defects or changes in mutation rate. Furthermore, no differential emergence of the common rifampicin resistance conferring genotypes were noted. Collectively, these data confirm a role for Nth in base excision repair in mycobacteria and further highlight a novel interplay between the Nth and Nei homologues in spontaneous mutagenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis of Drosophila with the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Bassett

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for generating and detecting mutations of any gene in Drosophila melanogaster through the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated. We show that injection of RNA into the Drosophila embryo can induce highly efficient mutagenesis of desired target genes in up to 88% of injected flies. These mutations can be transmitted through the germline to make stable lines. Our system provides at least a 10-fold improvement in efficiency over previously published reports, enabling wider application of this technique. We also describe a simple and highly sensitive method of detecting mutations in the target gene by high-resolution melt analysis and discuss how the new technology enables the study of gene function.

  15. Torque and optical traps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Optical traps are an important tool for research in the field of single molecule biophysics. Recent advances in optical trapping have extended their functionality from simple linear manipulation and measurement of forces, to now the ability to rotate objects and measure torques. This mini review summarizes ...

  16. Versatile electrostatic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhoven, J.; Bethlem, H.L.; Schnell, M.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of ND315 molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to

  17. Quadrupole Ion Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron bound to the gravitational field, the 'geonium atom'. The first atomic hyperfine structure experiment on trapped ions was performed by Dehmelt's group using the stored-ion exchange-collision technique in a Paul trap which paved the way for some of the subsequent experiment for atomic frequency. A single atom at.

  18. Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis of the Pore-Forming Toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Yvonne Jing Mei; Soh, Wai Tuck; Jiemy, William Febry; Hwang, Jung Shan

    2015-01-01

    Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1) has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and teste...

  19. Exploring strategies for protein trapping in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones-Coello, Ana T.; Petrella, Lisa N.; Ayers, Kathleen; Melillo, Anthony; Mazzalupo, Stacy; Hudson, Andrew M.; Wang, Shu; Castiblanco, Claudia; Buszczak, Michael; Hoskins, Roger A.; Cooley, Lynn

    2006-12-18

    The use of fluorescent protein tags has had a huge impact oncell biological studies in virtually every experimental system.Incorporation of coding sequence for fluorescent proteins such as greenfluorescent protein (GFP) into genes at their endogenous chromosomalposition is especially useful for generating GFP-fusion proteins thatprovide accurate cellular and subcellular expression data. We testedmodifications of a transposon-based protein trap screening procedure inDrosophila to optimize the rate of recovering useful protein traps andtheir analysis. Transposons carrying the GFP-coding sequence flanked bysplice acceptor and donor sequences were mobilized, and new insertionsthat resulted in production of GFP were captured using an automatedembryo sorter. Individual stocks were established, GFP expression wasanalyzed during oogenesis, and insertion sites were determined bysequencing genomic DNA flanking the insertions. The resulting collectionincludes lines with protein traps in which GFP was spliced into mRNAs andembedded within endogenous proteins or enhancer traps in which GFPexpression depended on splicing into transposon-derived RNA. We report atotal of 335 genes associated with protein or enhancer traps and aweb-accessible database for viewing molecular information and expressiondata for these genes.

  20. Characterization of a metagenome-derived protease from contaminated agricultural soil microorganisms and its random mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengjian; Zhang, Liang; Li, Fajia; Meng, Can; Zeng, Rong; Deng, Jie; Shen, Peihong; Ou, Qian; Wu, Bo

    2017-11-01

    Proteases are typical key enzymes that hydrolyze proteins into amino acids and peptides. Numerous proteases have been studied, but the discovery of metagenome-derived proteases is still significant for both commercial applications and basic research. An unexplored protease gene sep1A was identified by function-based screening from a plasmid metagenomic library derived from uncultured contaminated agricultural soil microorganisms. The putative protease gene was subcloned into pET-32a (+) vector and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) pLysS, then the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. The detailed biochemical characterization of the Sep1A protein was performed, including its molecular characterization, specific activity, pH-activity profile, metal ion-activity profile, and enzyme kinetic assays. Furthermore, the protein engineering approach of random mutagenesis via error-prone PCR was applied on the original Sep1A protein. Biochemical characterization demonstrated that the purified recombinant Ep48 protein could hydrolyze casein. Compared with the original Sep1A protein, the best variant of Ep48 in the random mutagenesis library, with the Gln307Leu and Asp391Gly changes, exhibited 2.62-fold activity at the optimal reaction conditions of 50 °C and pH 9.0. These results are the first step toward a better understanding of the properties of Sep1A protein. Protein engineering with error-prone PCR paves the way toward the metagenome-derived genes for biotechnological applications.

  1. Methylfolate Trap Promotes Bacterial Thymineless Death by Sulfa Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa B Guzzo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The methylfolate trap, a metabolic blockage associated with anemia, neural tube defects, Alzheimer's dementia, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer, was discovered in the 1960s, linking the metabolism of folate, vitamin B12, methionine and homocysteine. However, the existence or physiological significance of this phenomenon has been unknown in bacteria, which synthesize folate de novo. Here we identify the methylfolate trap as a novel determinant of the bacterial intrinsic death by sulfonamides, antibiotics that block de novo folate synthesis. Genetic mutagenesis, chemical complementation, and metabolomic profiling revealed trap-mediated metabolic imbalances, which induced thymineless death, a phenomenon in which rapidly growing cells succumb to thymine starvation. Restriction of B12 bioavailability, required for preventing trap formation, using an "antivitamin B12" molecule, sensitized intracellular bacteria to sulfonamides. Since boosting the bactericidal activity of sulfonamides through methylfolate trap induction can be achieved in Gram-negative bacteria and mycobacteria, it represents a novel strategy to render these pathogens more susceptible to existing sulfonamides.

  2. RecA-mediated cleavage activates UmuD for mutagenesis: Mechanistic relationship between transcriptional derepression and posttranslational activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohmi, Takehiko; Battista, J.R.; Dodson, L.A.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    The products of the SOS-regulated umuDC operon are required for most UV and chemical mutagenesis in Escherichia coli. It has been shown that the UmuD protein shares homology with LexA, the repressor of the SOS genes. In this paper the authors describe a series of genetic experiments that indicate that the purpose of RecA-mediated cleavage of UmuD at its bond between Cys-24 and Gly-25 is to activate UmuD for its role in mutagenesis and that the COOH-terminal fragment of UmuD is necessary and sufficient for the role of UmuD in UV mutagenesis. Other genetic experiments are presented that (i) support the hypothesis that the primary role of Ser-60 in UmuD function is to act as a nucleophile in the RecA-mediated cleavage reaction and (ii) raise the possibility that RecA has a third role in UV mutagenesis besides mediating the cleavage of LexA and UmuD

  3. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  4. Description of a PCR-based technique for DNA splicing and mutagenesis by producing 5' overhangs with run through stop DNA synthesis utilizing Ara-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Mel

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splicing of DNA molecules is an important task in molecular biology that facilitates cloning, mutagenesis and creation of chimeric genes. Mutagenesis and DNA splicing techniques exist, some requiring restriction enzymes, and others utilize staggered reannealing approaches. Results A method for DNA splicing and mutagenesis without restriction enzymes is described. The method is based on mild template-dependent polymerization arrest with two molecules of cytosine arabinose (Ara-C incorporated into PCR primers. Two rounds of PCR are employed: the first PCR produces 5' overhangs that are utilized for DNA splicing. The second PCR is based on polymerization running through the Ara-C molecules to produce the desired final product. To illustrate application of the run through stop mutagenesis and DNA splicing technique, we have carried out splicing of two segments of the human cofilin 1 gene and introduced a mutational deletion into the product. Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of a new PCR-based method for carrying out DNA splicing and mutagenesis by incorporating Ara-C into the PCR primers.

  5. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Weir Jerry P; Schmeisser Falko

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. Whi...

  6. Somatic mutagenesis with a Sleeping Beauty transposon system leads to solid tumor formation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura McGrail

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes and mouse transposon-induced tumors has identified a vast number of genes mutated in different cancers. One of the outstanding challenges in this field is to determine which genes, when mutated, contribute to cellular transformation and tumor progression. To identify new and conserved genes that drive tumorigenesis we have developed a novel cancer model in a distantly related vertebrate species, the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The Sleeping Beauty (SB T2/Onc transposon system was adapted for somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish. The carp ß-actin promoter was cloned into T2/Onc to create T2/OncZ. Two transgenic zebrafish lines that contain large concatemers of T2/OncZ were isolated by injection of linear DNA into the zebrafish embryo. The T2/OncZ transposons were mobilized throughout the zebrafish genome from the transgene array by injecting SB11 transposase RNA at the 1-cell stage. Alternatively, the T2/OncZ zebrafish were crossed to a transgenic line that constitutively expresses SB11 transposase. T2/OncZ transposon integration sites were cloned by ligation-mediated PCR and sequenced on a Genome Analyzer II. Between 700-6800 unique integration events in individual fish were mapped to the zebrafish genome. The data show that introduction of transposase by transgene expression or RNA injection results in an even distribution of transposon re-integration events across the zebrafish genome. SB11 mRNA injection resulted in neoplasms in 10% of adult fish at ∼10 months of age. T2/OncZ-induced zebrafish tumors contain many mutated genes in common with human and mouse cancer genes. These analyses validate our mutagenesis approach and provide additional support for the involvement of these genes in human cancers. The zebrafish T2/OncZ cancer model will be useful for identifying novel and conserved genetic drivers of human cancers.

  7. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  8. Genetic modifications of established varieties of potato through mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Owing to the high intercrossability of improved clones with primitive cultivars and many wild species there is little justification for use of induced mutations in potato to increase variability per se. Modification of certain traits while leaving the genotype basically intact is a promising use of mutagenesis in potato. The successful curing of defects in clones will depend on the establishment a priori of three principles. First, the clones undergoing mutagenesis should be well established varieties tolerant or resistant to the major biotic and abiotic stresses in the area of cultivation. The yield and culinary quality should also be considered high. Second, there should exist some indication that the variation desired is induceable, either through reports of natural intra-clone variation or previous mutagenesis studies. Third, initial screening should be done in virus-free materials

  9. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    stored ions,” Adv. Atom Mol. Phys., vol. Volume 3, pp. 53–72 1968. [48] P. H. Dawson, Quadrupole Mass Spectometry and Its Applications, Melville, NY... DATE December 2011 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ion trap Quantum Computing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...researcher [30] that introduced the concept of ion traps in the 1950s. His experiments focused on separating atoms with different masses in order to

  10. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented a major obstacle for introducing modifications using conventional genetic engineering strategies. The development of in vivo homologous recombination strategies based on recombineering in E. coli has helped resolve this problem by enabling facile engineering of high molecular weight BAC DNA without dependence on suitably placed restriction enzymes or cloning steps. These techniques have considerably expanded the possibilities for studying functional genetics using BACs in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B.; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D.; Bray, Crystal C.; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L.; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Gill, David R.; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, Walter N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Hayden, Michael E.; Humphries, Andrew J.; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jorgensen, Lars V.; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M.; So, Chukman; Storey, James W.; Thompson, Robert I.; van der Werf, Dirk P.; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  12. Efficient and Heritable Targeted Mutagenesis in Mosses Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Toshihisa; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Osakabe, Yuriko; Osakabe, Keishi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    Targeted genome modification by RNA-guided nucleases derived from the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system has seen rapid development in many organisms, including several plant species. In the present study, we succeeded in introducing the CRISPR/Cas9 system into the non-model organism Scopelophila cataractae, a moss that exhibits heavy metal tolerance, and the model organism Physcomitrella patens Utilizing the process by which moss plants regenerate from protoplasts, we conducted targeted mutagenesis by expression of single-chain guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 in protoplasts. Using this method, the acquisition rate of strains exhibiting phenotypic changes associated with the target genes was approximately 45-69%, and strains with phenotypic changes exhibited various insertion and deletion mutations. In addition, we report that our method is capable of multiplex targeted mutagenesis (two independent genes) and also permits the efficient introduction of large deletions (∼3 kbp). These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to accelerate investigations of bryology and land plant evolution. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

  14. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

  15. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  16. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  17. Mutagenesis during plant responses to UVB radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holá, Marcela; Vágnerová, Radka; Angelis, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 93, SI (2015), s. 29-33 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06595S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13006 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : UV dimers * DNA repair * Error-prone bypass Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.928, year: 2015

  18. Development of in vitro transposon assisted signal sequence trapping and its use in screening Bacillus halodurans C125 and Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 gene libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, F.; Schnorr, K.; Wilting, R.

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus halodurans C125 and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 were tagged with TnSig. The genomic sequences, which are publicly available (EMBL BA000004 and EMBL AE006641), were used for rapid open reading frame (ORF) identification and prediction of protein localisation...... in the cell. Genes for secreted proteins, transmembrane proteins and lipoproteins were successfully identified by this method. In contrast to previous transposon based identification strategies, the method described here is fast and versatile and essentially enables any selectable marker compatible library...

  19. Increased efficiency of targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in plants using heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Chantal; Zhang, Fei; Mendez, Josefina; Lozano, Yamile; Chatpar, Krishna; Irish, Vivian F; Jacob, Yannick

    2018-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has greatly improved our ability to engineer targeted mutations in eukaryotic genomes. While CRISPR/Cas9 appears to work universally, the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis and the adverse generation of off-target mutations vary greatly between different organisms. In this study, we report that Arabidopsis plants subjected to heat stress at 37°C show much higher frequencies of CRISPR-induced mutations compared to plants grown continuously at the standard temperature (22°C). Using quantitative assays relying on green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes, we found that targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis is increased by approximately 5-fold in somatic tissues and up to 100-fold in the germline upon heat treatment. This effect of temperature on the mutation rate is not limited to Arabidopsis, as we observed a similar increase in targeted mutations by CRISPR/Cas9 in Citrus plants exposed to heat stress at 37°C. In vitro assays demonstrate that Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) is more active in creating double-stranded DNA breaks at 37°C than at 22°C, thus indicating a potential contributing mechanism for the in vivo effect of temperature on CRISPR/Cas9. This study reveals the importance of temperature in modulating SpCas9 activity in eukaryotes, and provides a simple method to increase on-target mutagenesis in plants using CRISPR/Cas9. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cationic antimicrobial peptides promote microbial mutagenesis and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique H Limoli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of adaptive mutations is essential for microbial persistence during chronic infections. This is particularly evident during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Thus far, mutagenesis has been attributed to the generation of reactive species by polymorphonucleocytes (PMN and antibiotic treatment. However, our current studies of mutagenesis leading to P. aeruginosa mucoid conversion have revealed a potential new mutagen. Our findings confirmed the current view that reactive oxygen species can promote mucoidy in vitro, but revealed PMNs are proficient at inducing mucoid conversion in the absence of an oxidative burst. This led to the discovery that cationic antimicrobial peptides can be mutagenic and promote mucoidy. Of specific interest was the human cathelicidin LL-37, canonically known to disrupt bacterial membranes leading to cell death. An alternative role was revealed at sub-inhibitory concentrations, where LL-37 was found to induce mutations within the mucA gene encoding a negative regulator of mucoidy and to promote rifampin resistance in both P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mechanism of mutagenesis was found to be dependent upon sub-inhibitory concentrations of LL-37 entering the bacterial cytosol and binding to DNA. LL-37/DNA interactions then promote translesion DNA synthesis by the polymerase DinB, whose error-prone replication potentiates the mutations. A model of LL-37 bound to DNA was generated, which reveals amino termini α-helices of dimerized LL-37 bind the major groove of DNA, with numerous DNA contacts made by LL-37 basic residues. This demonstrates a mutagenic role for antimicrobials previously thought to be insusceptible to resistance by mutation, highlighting a need to further investigate their role in evolution and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Shigeo S; Shirakawa, Makoto; Takagi, Junpei; Matsuda, Yoriko; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    Targeted genome modification technologies are key tools for functional genomics. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 system (CRISPR/Cas9) is an emerging technology for targeted genome modification. The CRISPR/Cas9 system consists of a short guide RNA (gRNA), which specifies the target genome sequence, and the Cas9 protein, which has endonuclease activity. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied to model animals and flowering plants, including rice, sorghum, wheat, tobacco and Arabidopsis. Here, we report the application of CRISPR/Cas9 to targeted mutagenesis in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L., which has emerged as a model species for studying land plant evolution. The U6 promoter of M. polymorpha was identified and cloned to express the gRNA. The target sequence of the gRNA was designed to disrupt the gene encoding auxin response factor 1 (ARF1) in M. polymorpha. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, we isolated stable mutants in the gametophyte generation of M. polymorpha. CRISPR/Cas9-based site-directed mutagenesis in vivo was achieved using either the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S or M. polymorpha EF1α promoter to express Cas9. Isolated mutant individuals showing an auxin-resistant phenotype were not chimeric. Moreover, stable mutants were produced by asexual reproduction of T1 plants. Multiple arf1 alleles were easily established using CRIPSR/Cas9-based targeted mutagenesis. Our results provide a rapid and simple approach for molecular genetics in M. polymorpha, and raise the possibility that CRISPR/Cas9 may be applied to a wide variety of plant species.

  2. Antihydrogen formation and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Antihydrogen, the bound state of a positron and an antiproton, is the only neutral pure antimatter system available to date, and as such provides an excellent testbed for probing fundamental symmetries between matter and antimatter. In this chapter we will concentrate on the physics issues that were addressed in order to achieve the first trapping of antihydrogen. Antihydrogen can be created by merging antiprotons and positrons in a Penning–Malmberg trap. However, traps for antihydrogen are at best about ∼50 μeV deep and, as no readily available cooling techniques exist, the antihydrogen must be formed trapped. Antiprotons are sourced from an accelerator and arrive with a typical energy of 5.3 MeV. The large numbers of positrons needed means that the self-potential of the positrons are of order 2–5 V. With such energetic ingredients a range of plasma control and diagnostic techniques must be brought to bear on the particles to succeed in making any antihydrogen cold enough to be trapped.

  3. Stationary-state mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: a model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here we propose a more detailed version of this model that also takes into account the observed genetic requirements of stationary-state mutagenesis. Briefly, G:T/U mismatches produced at methylatable cytosines are preferentially repaired in nondividing cells by the very short patch mismatch repair (VSPMR) mechanism ...

  4. Efficient multi-site-directed mutagenesis directly from genomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-09-29

    Sep 29, 2012 ... overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR) and Quick-change multi- site-directed mutagenesis systems developed by Stratagene. Company are predominately used owing to their simplicity and efficiency. Quick-change method is simple for MSM, but it requires circular plasmid as an amplification template.

  5. Effect of Colchicine Induced Mutagenesis on Growth and Yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical mutagenesis through the use of colchicine on the seeds of two varieties of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Var. Ex-Sudan and E-8) with the aim of inducing variability that could be exploited in the genetic improvement of its growth and yield was carried out. The sesame seeds were treated with colchicines at four ...

  6. Targeted mutagenesis using CRISPR/Cas in inbred potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeted mutagenesis using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) has been well established in several important crop species, but is in need of improvement in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). For over a century, potatoes have been bred as autotetraploids (2n = 4x = 48), relying on F1 selections and clona...

  7. The European dimension for the mouse genome mutagenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Auwerx, J.; Avner, P.; Baldock, R.; Ballabio, A.; Balling, R.; Barbacid, M.; Berns, A.; Bradley, A.; Brown, S.; Carmeliet, P.; Chambon, P.; Cox, R.; Davidson, D.; Davies, K.; Duboule, D.; Forejt, Jiří; Granucci, F.; Hastie, N.; Angelis, M. H. de; Jackson, I.; Kioussis, D.; Kollias, G.; Lathrop, M.; Lendahl, U.; Malumbres, M.; von Melchner, H.; Müller, W.; Partanen, J.; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P.; Rigby, P.; Rosen, B.; Rosenthal, N.; Skarnes, B.; Stewart, A. F.; Thornton, J.; Tocchini-Valentini, G.; Wagner, E.; Wahli, W.; Wurst, W.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2004), s. 925-927 ISSN 1061-4036 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : The European Mouse Mutagenesis Consortium Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 24.695, year: 2004

  8. [From random mutagenesis to precise genome editing: the development and evolution of genome editing techniques in Drosophila].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fang; Huang, Zong-liang; Guo, Ya-wen; Jiao, Ren-jie; Zi, Li; Chen, Jian-ming; Liu, Ji-yong

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, an important model organism for studying life science, has contributed more to the research of genetics, developmental biology and biomedicine with the development of genome editing techniques. Drosophila genome-editing techniques have evolved from random mutagenesis to precise genome editing and from simple mutant construction to diverse genome editing methods since the 20th century. Chemical mutagenesis, using Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), is an important technique to study gene function in forward genetics, however, the precise knockout of Drosophila genes could not be achieved. The gene targeting technology, based on homologous recombination, has accomplished the precise editing of Drosophila genome for the first time, but with low efficiency. The CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein)-mediated precise genome editing is simple, fast and highly efficient compared with the gene targeting technology in Drosophila. In this review, we focus on Drosophila gene knockout, and summarize the evolution of genome editing techniques in Drosophila, emphasizing the development and applications of gene targeting, zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR/Cas9 techniques.

  9. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheels, Ronald H [Concord, MA

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  10. MtDNA mutagenesis impairs elimination of mitochondria during erythroid maturation leading to enhanced erythrocyte destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlqvist, K.J.; Leoncini, S.; Pecorelli, A.; Wortmann, S.B.; Ahola, S.; Forsstrom, S.; Guerranti, R.; Felice, C. De; Smeitink, J.; Ciccoli, L.; Hamalainen, R.H.; Suomalainen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic progenitor cells show special sensitivity to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis, which suggests that increased mtDNA mutagenesis could underlie anemias. Here we show that elevated mtDNA mutagenesis in mice with a proof-reading deficient mtDNA polymerase (PolG) leads to incomplete

  11. Optimal optical trap for bacterial viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaidov, Utkur; Timp, Winston; Timp, Kaethe; Mir, Mustafa; Matsudaira, Paul; Timp, Gregory

    2008-08-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool for the micromanipulation of living cells—especially bacteria—but photodamage induced by the laser beam can adversely affect viability. We have explored optical trapping conditions in the near infrared (840-930nm) that preserve the viability of E. coli, as measured by gene expression of green fluorescent protein. We have found that time-sharing the optical traps, i.e., dwelling only 10μs-1ms on the cell, improves viability relative to continuous wave (CW) exposure for the same exposure time. We have also observed that similar to CW traps the photodamage in a time-shared trap depends weakly on wavelength, but linearly on peak power, implying an effect induced by single photon absorption. Taken altogether, integrating the exposure time and peak power, the data indicate that there is a lethal energy dose of about 5J for E. coli. Thus a single parameter—the energy—can be used to describe the limitation on viability.

  12. groE mutants of Escherichia coli are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, C.E.; Walker, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    Overexpression of the SOS-inducible umuDC operon of Escherichia coli results in the inability of these cells to grow at 30 degrees C. Mutations in several heat shock genes suppress this cold sensitivity. Suppression of umuD+C+-dependent cold sensitivity appears to occur by two different mechanisms. We show that mutations in lon and dnaK heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity in a lexA-dependent manner. In contrast, mutations in groES, groEL, and rpoH heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity regardless of the transcriptional regulation of the umuDC genes. We have also found that mutations in groES and groEL genes are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis. This defect can be suppressed by increased expression of the umuDC operon. The mechanism by which groE mutations affect umuDC gene product function may be related to the stability of the UmuC protein, since the half-life of this protein is shortened because of mutations at the groE locus

  13. Mutagenesis by damaged deoxyribonucleotides and its prevention by MutT-type hydrolyzing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Satou, Kazuya; Hori, Mika; Iida, Emiko; Ishiguro, Chieko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Oxidized deoxyribonucleotides, 2-hydroxydeoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2-OH-dATP) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-OH-dGTP), were introduced into Escherichia coli strains deficient in DNA polymerase IV (a Y-family DNA polymerase encoded in the dinB gene), and the MutT and Orfl35 proteins to examine their in vivo roles in mutagenesis elicited by 2-OH-dATP and 8-OH-dGTP. 2-OH-dATP elicited mutations less efficiently in the dinB- strain than in the wild type strain, suggesting involvement of DNA polymerase IV in 2-OH-dATP-induced mutations. 8-OH-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP elicited mutations more efficiently in mutT- and orfl35- strains, respectively, than those in their isogenic mutT+ and orfl35+ strains. These results indicate that these proteins play important roles in mutagenesis induced by 2-OH-dATP and 8-OH-dGTP in vivo.

  14. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  15. Trapping metastable chromium atoms in a crossed optical dipole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Q.; Chicireanu, R.; Pouderous, A.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.; Maréchal, E.; Vernac, L.; Keller, J.-C.; Gorceix, O.

    We report the fast accumulation of up to 1 million 52Cr metastable atoms in a mixed trap formed by the superposition of a quadrupolar magnetic trap and a strongly confining optical trap. The cloud is at a temperature of 100 μK with a peak density of 1018 atoms/m3, which is a promising starting point to reach quantum degeneracy by forced evaporation in an optical trap.

  16. A live-trap and trapping technique for fossorial mammals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    injuries, the trauma involved in such capture does not promote acclimatization ... involved in the evolution of trap design for use in various field conditions and live capture of other fossorial mammals are discussed. Materials and Methods. Constructing the .... work of setting traps halved by placing only one trap instead of the ...

  17. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  18. Mutagenesis breeding research of Lactobacillus brevis of nitrite reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zeli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of nitrite in food became one of the focus of food safety issues,the use of biotechnology methods degrading nitrite became hotspot.The primitive strain was Lactobacillus brevis C2,preserved in our laboratory,had the ability to degrade nitrite,through composite mutagenesis of 15 W,254 nm,20 cm ultraviolet mutagenesis (UV for 120 s and 0.8% diethyl sulfate(DES in 37℃ mutation for 40 min,after screening,we successfully obtained high efficient strain of nitrite degradation,named UV6-DS2,relative to the starting strain,under the condition of 400 mg/L nitrite,after 12 h degradation,nitrite degradation rate increased from 92.8% to 97.8%,to explore its application in food was able to effectively reduce concentration of nitrite in food.

  19. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Ishida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs, and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9, hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9.

  20. Feedback trap using optical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonggun; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    Recently, the feedback trap using electrophoretic force (ABEL trap) has been used in the experimental study of non-equilibrium thermodynamics such as Landauer's erasure principle. This trap can trap and manipulate a small particle in solution by canceling the Brownian fluctuations. Here, we propose a simple way to control a bead using optical force with feedback and show the dynamics of a single particle in the virtual potential.

  1. Photodynamic action of methylene blue: mutagenesis and synergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capella, M.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The associated mutagenesis and the interactions with physical agents in order to potencialize its biological effects are studied. The induction of mutation in bacterias due to photodynamic action of methylene blue is presented as well as the induction of single breaks in bacterial DNA and the relationship between the repair systems, especially the SOS one. The interaction of the photodynamic therapy with low intensity electric current is discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-12-01

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Escaping the tolerance trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoudeh, S.; Madan, V.

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the implications of the weakening of OPEC's responsiveness in adjusting its production levels, this paper explicitly incorporates rigidity in the quantity adjustment mechanism, thereby extending previous research which assumed smooth quantity adjustments. The rigidity is manifested in a tolerance range for the discrepancy between the declared target price and that of the market. This environment gives rise to a 'tolerance trap' which impedes the convergence process and inevitably brings the market to a standstill before its reaches the targeted price and revenue objectives. OPEC's reaction to the standstill has important implications for the achievement of the target-based equilibrium and for the potential collapse of the market price. This paper examines OPEC's policy options in the tolerance trap and reveals that the optional policy in order to break this impasse and move closer to the equilibrium point is gradually to reduce output and not to flood the market. (Author)

  4. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  5. Random Transposon Mutagenesis for Cell-Envelope Resistant to Phage Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Arguijo-Hernández, Emma S; Carballo-Ontiveros, Marco A; Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Kameyama, Luis

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify host components involved in the infective process of bacteriophages, we developed a wide-range strategy to obtain cell envelope mutants, using Escherichia coli W3110 and its specific phage mEp213. The strategy consisted in four steps: (1) random mutagenesis using transposon miniTn10Km(r); (2) selection of phage-resistant mutants by replica-plating; (3) electroporation of the phage-resistant mutants with mEp213 genome, followed by selection of those allowing phage development; and (4) sequencing of the transposon-disrupted genes. This strategy allowed us to distinguish the host factors related to phage development or multiplication within the cell, from those involved in phage infection at the level of the cell envelope.

  6. Inducible pathway is required for mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium LT2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orrego, C.; Eisenstadt, E.

    1987-01-01

    UV mutability of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was eliminated in the presence of a multicopy plasmid carrying the Escherichia coli lexA + gene. This result suggests that inducible, SOS-like functions are required for UV mutagenesis in S. typhimurium. S. typhimurium strains carrying either point or deletion mutations in topA had previously been shown to lose their mutability by UV or methyl methanesulfonate. Mitomycin C induction of the Phi(mucB'-lacZ') fusion (a DNA damage-inducible locus carried on plasmid pSE205) in S. typhimurium topA was normal, suggesting that RecA is activated in topA mutants. These observations lead the authors deduce that S. typhimurium has at least one DNA damage-inducible locus in addition to recA that is required for UV mutability

  7. Sediment Trapping in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Ralston, David K.

    2018-01-01

    Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are generated by a large suite of hydrodynamic and sediment dynamic processes, leading to longitudinal convergence of cross-sectionally integrated and tidally averaged transport of cohesive and noncohesive suspended particulate matter (SPM). The relative importance of these processes for SPM trapping varies substantially among estuaries depending on topography, fluvial and tidal forcing, and SPM composition. The high-frequency dynamics of ETMs are constrained by interactions with the low-frequency dynamics of the bottom pool of easily erodible sediments. Here, we use a transport decomposition to present processes that lead to convergent SPM transport, and review trapping mechanisms that lead to ETMs at the landward limit of the salt intrusion, in the freshwater zone, at topographic transitions, and by lateral processes within the cross section. We use model simulations of example estuaries to demonstrate the complex concurrence of ETM formation mechanisms. We also discuss how changes in SPM trapping mechanisms, often caused by direct human interference, can lead to the generation of hyperturbid estuaries.

  8. Endogenous IL-33 is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, lymphoid organs, brain, embryos, and inflamed tissues: in situ analysis using a novel Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichery, Mélanie; Mirey, Emilie; Mercier, Pascale; Lefrancais, Emma; Dujardin, Arnaud; Ortega, Nathalie; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2012-04-01

    IL-33 (previously known as NF from high endothelial venules) is an IL-1 family cytokine that signals through the ST2 receptor and drives cytokine production in mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, invariant NKT and NK cells, Th2 lymphocytes, and type 2 innate immune cells (natural helper cells, nuocytes, and innate helper 2 cells). Little is known about endogenous IL-33; for instance, the cellular sources of IL-33 in mouse tissues have not yet been defined. In this study, we generated an Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain (Il-33(Gt/Gt)) and used this novel tool to analyze expression of endogenous IL-33 in vivo. We found that the Il-33 promoter exhibits constitutive activity in mouse lymphoid organs, epithelial barrier tissues, brain, and embryos. Immunostaining with anti-IL-33 Abs, using Il-33(Gt/Gt) (Il-33-deficient) mice as control, revealed that endogenous IL-33 protein is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, including stratified squamous epithelia from vagina and skin, as well as cuboidal epithelium from lung, stomach, and salivary gland. Constitutive expression of IL-33 was not detected in blood vessels, revealing the existence of species-specific differences between humans and mice. Importantly, IL-33 protein was always localized in the nucleus of producing cells with no evidence for cytoplasmic localization. Finally, strong expression of the Il-33-LacZ reporter was also observed in inflamed tissues, in the liver during LPS-induced endotoxin shock, and in the lung alveoli during papain-induced allergic airway inflammation. Together, our findings support the possibility that IL-33 may function as a nuclear alarmin to alert the innate immune system after injury or infection in epithelial barrier tissues.

  9. Role of Ribonucleotide Reductase in Bacillus subtilis Stress-Associated Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Cerritos, Karla Viridiana; Yasbin, Ronald E; Robleto, Eduardo A; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2017-02-15

    The Gram-positive microorganism Bacillus subtilis relies on a single class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to generate 2'-deoxyribonucleotides (dNDPs) for DNA replication and repair. In this work, we investigated the influence of RNR levels on B. subtilis stationary-phase-associated mutagenesis (SPM). Since RNR is essential in this bacterium, we engineered a conditional mutant of strain B. subtilis YB955 (hisC952 metB5 leu427) in which expression of the nrdEF operon was modulated by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Moreover, genetic inactivation of ytcG, predicted to encode a repressor (NrdR) of nrdEF in this strain, dramatically increased the expression levels of a transcriptional nrdE-lacZ fusion. The frequencies of mutations conferring amino acid prototrophy in three genes were measured in cultures under conditions that repressed or induced RNR-encoding genes. The results revealed that RNR was necessary for SPM and overexpression of nrdEF promoted growth-dependent mutagenesis and SPM. We also found that nrdEF expression was induced by H 2 O 2 and such induction was dependent on the master regulator PerR. These observations strongly suggest that the metabolic conditions operating in starved B. subtilis cells increase the levels of RNR, which have a direct impact on SPM. Results presented in this study support the concept that the adverse metabolic conditions prevailing in nutritionally stressed bacteria activate an oxidative stress response that disturbs ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) levels. Such an alteration of RNR levels promotes mutagenic events that allow Bacillus subtilis to escape from growth-limited conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Unintentional miRNA ablation is a risk factor in gene knockout studies: a short report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Osokine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most powerful techniques for studying the function of a gene is to disrupt the expression of that gene using genetic engineering strategies such as targeted recombination or viral integration of gene trap cassettes. The tremendous utility of these tools was recognized this year with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Capecchi, Evans, and Smithies for their pioneering work in targeted recombination mutagenesis in mammals. Another noteworthy discovery made nearly a decade ago was the identification of a novel class of non-coding genes called microRNAs. MicroRNAs are among the largest known classes of regulatory elements with more than 1000 predicted to exist in the mouse genome. Over 50% of known microRNAs are located within introns of coding genes. Given that currently about half of the genes in mouse have been knocked out, we investigated the possibility that intronic microRNAs may have been coincidentally deleted or disrupted in some of these mouse models. We searched published murine knockout studies and gene trap embryonic stem cell line databases for cases where a microRNA was located within or near the manipulated genomic loci, finding almost 200 cases where microRNA expression may have been disrupted along with another gene. Our results draw attention to the need for careful planning in future knockout studies to minimize the unintentional disruption of microRNAs. These data also raise the possibility that many knockout studies may need to be reexamined to determine if loss of a microRNA contributes to the phenotypic consequences attributed to loss of a protein-encoding gene.

  11. Trapping the ribosome to control gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2007-09-21

    Protein synthesis is often regulated by structured mRNAs that interact with ribosomes. In this issue of Cell, Marzi et al. (2007) provide insights into the autoregulation of protein S15 by visualizing the folded repressor mRNA on the ribosome stalled in the preinitiation state. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of translation initiation in general.

  12. An Agrobacterium-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 system for high-frequency targeted mutagenesis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Si Nian; Neelakandan, Anjanasree K; Nahampun, Hartinio; Frame, Bronwyn; Main, Marcy; Spalding, Martin H; Becraft, Philip W; Meyers, Blake C; Walbot, Virginia; Wang, Kan; Yang, Bing

    2017-02-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a powerful genome editing tool in many organisms, including a number of monocots and dicots. Although the design and application of CRISPR/Cas9 is simpler compared to other nuclease-based genome editing tools, optimization requires the consideration of the DNA delivery and tissue regeneration methods for a particular species to achieve accuracy and efficiency. Here, we describe a public sector system, ISU Maize CRISPR, utilizing Agrobacterium-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 for high-frequency targeted mutagenesis in maize. This system consists of an Escherichia coli cloning vector and an Agrobacterium binary vector. It can be used to clone up to four guide RNAs for single or multiplex gene targeting. We evaluated this system for its mutagenesis frequency and heritability using four maize genes in two duplicated pairs: Argonaute 18 (ZmAgo18a and ZmAgo18b) and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase or anthocyaninless genes (a1 and a4). T 0 transgenic events carrying mono- or diallelic mutations of one locus and various combinations of allelic mutations of two loci occurred at rates over 70% mutants per transgenic events in both Hi-II and B104 genotypes. Through genetic segregation, null segregants carrying only the desired mutant alleles without the CRISPR transgene could be generated in T 1 progeny. Inheritance of an active CRISPR/Cas9 transgene leads to additional target-specific mutations in subsequent generations. Duplex infection of immature embryos by mixing two individual Agrobacterium strains harbouring different Cas9/gRNA modules can be performed for improved cost efficiency. Together, the findings demonstrate that the ISU Maize CRISPR platform is an effective and robust tool to targeted mutagenesis in maize. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. CRISPR/Cas mutagenesis of soybean and Medicago truncatula using a new web-tool and a modified Cas9 enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michno, Jean-Michel; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Junqi; Curtin, Shaun J; Kono, Thomas Jy; Stupar, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is rapidly becoming the reagent of choice for targeted mutagenesis and gene editing in crop species. There are currently intense research efforts in the crop sciences to identify efficient CRISPR/Cas9 platforms to carry out targeted mutagenesis and gene editing projects. These efforts typically result in the incremental tweaking of various platform components including the identification of crop-specific promoters and terminators for optimal expression of the Cas9 enzyme and identification of promoters for expression of the CRISPR guide RNA. In this report, we demonstrate the development of an online web tool for fast identification of CRISPR/Cas9 target loci within soybean gene models, and generic DNA sequences. The web-tool described in this work can quickly identify a high number of potential CRISPR/Cas9 target sites, including restriction enzyme sites that can facilitate the detection of new mutations. In conjunction with the web tool, a soybean codon-optimized CRISPR/Cas9 platform was designed to direct double-stranded breaks to the targeted loci in hairy root transformed cells. The modified Cas9 enzyme was shown to successfully mutate target genes in somatic cells of 2 legume species, soybean and Medicago truncatula. These new tools may help facilitate targeted mutagenesis in legume and other plant species.

  14. The Honey Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    Michael F. Wagner: The Honey Trap –The democratization of leisure through automobilism The automobile has achieved a central position in modern everyday life as an essential artefact to mobility. This raises the question how automobiles have been mediated for mass consumption? The central thesis...... demonstrates the manner in which automobilism in Denmark was invented, constructed, represented, and appropriated as a leisure culture after 1900 through a mediation and consumption junction that was initiated and promoted by FDM. This is basically the story of unlimited access to Sunday driving or the daytrip...

  15. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  16. Enhancing transglutaminase production ofStreptomyces mobaraensisby iterative mutagenesis breeding with atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Shang, Yue-Peng; Li, Hao; Zhang, Chao; Pan, Jiang; Bai, Yun-Peng; Li, Chun-Xiu; Xu, Jian-He

    2017-01-01

    To improve the fermentation production of transglutaminase (TGase) from Streptomyces mobaraensis for applications in the food industry, the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) mutagenesis was applied to breed S. mobaraensis mutants with increased TGase production. After eight rounds of iterative ARTP mutagenesis, four genetically stable mutants, Sm 5-V1, Sm 6-V13, Sm 2-V10, and Sm 7-V12, were identified, which showed increased TGase production by 27, 24, 24, and 19%, respectively. The best mutant Sm 5-V1 exhibited a maximum TGase activity of 5.85 U/mL during flask fermentation. Compared to the wild-type strain, the transcription levels of the zymogen TGase genes in the mutants increased significantly as indicated by quantitative real-time PCR, while the gene nucleotide sequences of the mutants did not change at all. It was shown that the overexpression of TGase zymogen gene in the mutants contributes to the increase in TGase production. ARTP is a potentially efficient tool for microbial mutation breeding to bring some significant changes required for the industrial applications.

  17. Untargeted viral mutagenesis is not found in X-irradiated monkey cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.; Lee, W.; Bushar, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    The existence of untargeted viral mutagenesis in X-irradiated cells was investigated in a mammalian virus/cell system, where a low level of such viral mutagenesis can be demonstrated in UV-irradiated cells. In the positive control experiment UV-elicited mutagenesis was shown with cell exposures of 5, 10 and 15 J/m 2 and a delay of 24 h between cell irradiation and infection with unirradiated herpes simplex virus. Although X-ray doses of 1, 3 and 10 Gy elicit enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated virus, no untargeted mutagenesis for any X-ray dose at post-irradiation infection times of 0, 24 or 72 h was observed in this study. Thus untargeted mutagenesis of herpes simplex virus was not demonstrated in X-irradiated monkey cells, under conditions where X-ray-enhanced reactivation occurs and where untargeted mutagenesis in UV-irradiated cells occurs. (author)

  18. Magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphasis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasms in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In addition, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps in the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (orig.)

  19. Characteristics of trapped electrons and electron traps in single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzinski, E.E.; Potter, W.R.; Potienko, G.; Box, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two additional carbohydrates are reported whose crystal structures trap electrons intermolecularly in single crystals x irradiated at low temperature, namely sucrose and rhamnose. Five carbohydrate and polyhydroxy compounds are now known which exhibit this phenomenon. The following characteristics of the phenomenon were investigated: (1) the hyperfine couplings of the electron with protons of the polarized hydroxy groups forming the trap; (2) the distances between these protons and the trapped electron; (3) the spin density of the electron at the protons and (4) the relative stabilities of the electron trapped in various crystal structures

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis in the mycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, B I; Alvarez Crespo, M C; Kemppainen, M J; Pardo, A G

    2017-05-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer (AMT) is extensively employed as a tool in fungal functional genomics and accordingly, in previous studies we used AMT on a dikaryotic strain of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The interest in this fungus derives from its capacity to establish a symbiosis with tree roots, thereby playing a major role in nutrient cycling of forest ecosystems. The ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is a highly complex interaction involving many genes from both partners. To advance in the functional characterization of fungal genes, AMT was used on a monokaryotic L. bicolor. A collection of over 1200 transgenic strains was produced, of which 200 randomly selected strains were analyzed for their genomic T-DNA insertion patterns. By means of insertional mutagenesis, a number of transgenic strains were obtained displaying differential growth features. Moreover, mating with a compatible strain resulted in dikaryons that retained altered phenotypic features of the transgenic monokaryon. The analysis of the T-DNA integration pattern revealed mostly similar results to those reported in earlier studies, confirming the usefulness of AMT on different genetic backgrounds of L. bicolor. Taken together, our studies display the great versatility and potentiality of AMT as a tool for the genetic characterization of L. bicolor.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms for High Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Wing Mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Guanjun; Ma, Junfeng; Wang, Bingying; Shen, Sile; Fu, Xueqi; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2015-10-08

    Although High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an important physical and chemical tool has been increasingly applied to research of organism, the response mechanisms of organism to HHP have not been elucidated clearly thus far. To identify mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organisms, here, we treated Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster) eggs with HHP. Approximately 75% of the surviving flies showed significant morphological abnormalities from the egg to the adult stages compared with control flies (p melanogaster induced by HHP were used to investigate the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organism. Thus 285 differentially expressed genes associated with wing mutations were identified using Affymetrix Drosophila Genome Array 2.0 and verified with RT-PCR. We also compared wing development-related central genes in the mutant flies with control flies using DNA sequencing to show two point mutations in the vestigial (vg) gene. This study revealed the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP-induced mutagenesis in D. melanogaster and provided a new model for the study of evolution on organisms.

  2. DNA-reactive protein monoepoxides induce cell death and mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Natalia Y; Michaelson-Richie, Erin D; Gherezghiher, Teshome B; Kurtz, Jamie; Ming, Xun; Wickramaratne, Susith; Campion, Melissa; Kanugula, Sreenivas; Pegg, Anthony E; Campbell, Colin

    2013-05-07

    Although cytotoxic alkylating agents possessing two electrophilic reactive groups are thought to act by cross-linking cellular biomolecules, their exact mechanisms of action have not been established. In cells, these compounds form a mixture of DNA lesions, including nucleobase monoadducts, interstrand and intrastrand cross-links, and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links block replication and transcription by preventing DNA strand separation, contributing to toxicity and mutagenesis. In contrast, potential contributions of drug-induced DPCs are poorly understood. To gain insight into the biological consequences of DPC formation, we generated DNA-reactive protein reagents and examined their toxicity and mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Recombinant human O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) protein or its variants (C145A and K125L) were treated with 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane to yield proteins containing 2-hydroxy-3,4-epoxybutyl groups on cysteine residues. Gel shift and mass spectrometry experiments confirmed that epoxide-functionalized AGT proteins formed covalent DPC but no other types of nucleobase damage when incubated with duplex DNA. Introduction of purified AGT monoepoxides into mammalian cells via electroporation generated AGT-DNA cross-links and induced cell death and mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene. Smaller numbers of DPC lesions and reduced levels of cell death were observed when using protein monoepoxides generated from an AGT variant that fails to accumulate in the cell nucleus (K125L), suggesting that nuclear DNA damage is required for toxicity. Taken together, these results indicate that AGT protein monoepoxides produce cytotoxic and mutagenic DPC lesions within chromosomal DNA. More generally, these data suggest that covalent DPC lesions contribute to the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of bis-electrophiles.

  3. The Origin of Mutants Under Selection: How Natural Selection Mimics Mutagenesis (Adaptive Mutation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Roth, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Selection detects mutants but does not cause mutations. Contrary to this dictum, Cairns and Foster plated a leaky lac mutant of Escherichia coli on lactose medium and saw revertant (Lac+) colonies accumulate with time above a nongrowing lawn. This result suggested that bacteria might mutagenize their own genome when growth is blocked. However, this conclusion is suspect in the light of recent evidence that revertant colonies are initiated by preexisting cells with multiple copies the conjugative F′lac plasmid, which carries the lac mutation. Some plated cells have multiple copies of the simple F′lac plasmid. This provides sufficient LacZ activity to support plasmid replication but not cell division. In nongrowing cells, repeated plasmid replication increases the likelihood of a reversion event. Reversion to lac+ triggers exponential cell growth leading to a stable Lac+ revertant colony. In 10% of these plated cells, the high-copy plasmid includes an internal tandem lac duplication, which provides even more LacZ activity—sufficient to support slow growth and formation of an unstable Lac+ colony. Cells with multiple copies of the F′lac plasmid have an increased mutation rate, because the plasmid encodes the error-prone (mutagenic) DNA polymerase, DinB. Without DinB, unstable and stable Lac+ revertant types form in equal numbers and both types arise with no mutagenesis. Amplification and selection are central to behavior of the Cairns–Foster system, whereas mutagenesis is a system-specific side effect or artifact caused by coamplification of dinB with lac. Study of this system has revealed several broadly applicable principles. In all populations, gene duplications are frequent stable genetic polymorphisms, common near-neutral mutant alleles can gain a positive phenotype when amplified under selection, and natural selection can operate without cell division when variability is generated by overreplication of local genome subregions. PMID:26134316

  4. The Origin of Mutants Under Selection: How Natural Selection Mimics Mutagenesis (Adaptive Mutation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Roth, John R

    2015-07-01

    Selection detects mutants but does not cause mutations. Contrary to this dictum, Cairns and Foster plated a leaky lac mutant of Escherichia coli on lactose medium and saw revertant (Lac(+)) colonies accumulate with time above a nongrowing lawn. This result suggested that bacteria might mutagenize their own genome when growth is blocked. However, this conclusion is suspect in the light of recent evidence that revertant colonies are initiated by preexisting cells with multiple copies the conjugative F'lac plasmid, which carries the lac mutation. Some plated cells have multiple copies of the simple F'lac plasmid. This provides sufficient LacZ activity to support plasmid replication but not cell division. In nongrowing cells, repeated plasmid replication increases the likelihood of a reversion event. Reversion to lac(+) triggers exponential cell growth leading to a stable Lac(+) revertant colony. In 10% of these plated cells, the high-copy plasmid includes an internal tandem lac duplication, which provides even more LacZ activity—sufficient to support slow growth and formation of an unstable Lac(+) colony. Cells with multiple copies of the F'lac plasmid have an increased mutation rate, because the plasmid encodes the error-prone (mutagenic) DNA polymerase, DinB. Without DinB, unstable and stable Lac(+) revertant types form in equal numbers and both types arise with no mutagenesis. Amplification and selection are central to behavior of the Cairns-Foster system, whereas mutagenesis is a system-specific side effect or artifact caused by coamplification of dinB with lac. Study of this system has revealed several broadly applicable principles. In all populations, gene duplications are frequent stable genetic polymorphisms, common near-neutral mutant alleles can gain a positive phenotype when amplified under selection, and natural selection can operate without cell division when variability is generated by overreplication of local genome subregions. Copyright © 2015 Cold

  5. In vitro mutagenesis of commercial fern, Asplenium nidus from spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norazlina Noordin

    2004-01-01

    Asplenium is a largest, most diverse fern genera. One of the common species is Asplenium nidus, well known as Bird's-nest fern, a medium to large fern with erect, stout, unbranched rhizomes. In creating variability of ferns for the benefit of the ornamental plant industry, in vitro mutagenesis is used. In this study, spores of Asplenium nidus were collected from frond bearing mature sporangia. Spores were cultured in modified 1/2 MS basal medium supplemented with various combinations of 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) and Naphtalene Acetic Acid (NAA). Spore cultures were incubated in incubation room at 24 degree C with 16 hours photoperiod (3500 lux). It was found that, the most effective combinations were 1 mg/1 BAP + 0. 1 mg/1 NAA and 2mg/1 BAP + 0. 1 mg/1 NAA. Prothallus was formed after 10 days of cultures and gametophytes were formed 1 month later. These gametophytes were irradiated with Gamma ray at doses of 0, 20, 90, 120, 150 and 180 Gy. From the preliminary result obtained from this study, for generating variations and desired phenotypic expression for Asplenium nidus, recommended doses for in vitro mutagenesis using spores are between 90 Gy to 150 Gy. Gametophytes were subcultured at monthly interval to ensure further development and propagation. Frequent monitoring for any changes in the morphology of the irradiated Asplenium nidus plants were carried out. (Author)

  6. Crowding depression of UV-mutagenesis in E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockrath, R.; Harper, D.; Kristoff, S.; Stanford Univ., CA

    1980-01-01

    Strains of E. coli Br were exposed to UV radiation and assayed for reversion mutation, using a standard selection medium. If more irradiated bacteria were assayed per petri dish, a proportional increase in the number of indicated reversion mutants was oud only up to a limiting plating density. Beyond a density of about 10 8 viable bacteria per petri dish, the number of indicated revertants per viable bacteriy assayed (the mutation frequency) decreased as the plating density was increased. The crowding depression of mutagenesis was more severe for de novo and converted suppressor mutations, the mutation frequency being reduced 100-fold at a plating density of about 6 x 10 9 viable bacteria per plate. The effect on backmutation was 10 times less. Crowding depression of mutagenesis occured in excision-proficient and -deficient strains, with identical effects in the 2 strains on de novo and converted suppressor mutation, but different effects on backmutations. There were no accompanying effects on viability. Irreversible loss of potential mutants during crowded growth was indicated in wash-off experiments. The kinetics suggested a half-life of approximately 1 h. Kinetics for accumulation by the bacteria of the limiting metabolite (tyrosine) on the assay plate indicated a short period of time for protein synthesis, but direct examination of the proteins synthesized during early growth on a crowded plate demonstrated successful induction of recA protein. (orig.)

  7. Breeding of New Strains of Mushroom by Basidiospore Chemical Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia; Kang, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Chang-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Chemical mutagenesis of basidiospores of Hypsizygus marmoreus generated new mushroom strains. The basidospores were treated with methanesulfonate methylester, an alkylating agent, to yield 400 mutant monokaryotic mycelia. Twenty fast-growing mycelia were selected and mated each other by hyphal fusion. Fifty out of the 190 matings were successful (mating rate of 26.3%), judged by the formation of clamp connections. The mutant dikaryons were cultivated to investigate their morphological and cultivation characteristics. Mutant strains No. 3 and No. 5 showed 10% and 6% increase in fruiting body production, respectively. Eight mutant strains showed delayed and reduced primordia formation, resulting in the reduced production yield with prolonged cultivation period. The number of the fruiting bodies of mutant No. 31, which displayed reduced primordial formation, was only 15, compared to the parental number of 65. Another interesting phenotype was a fruiting body with a flattened stipe and pileus. Dikaryons generated by mating with the mutant spore No. 14 produced flat fruiting bodies. Further molecular biological studies will provide details of the mechanism. This work shows that the chemical mutagenesis approach is highly utilizable in the development of mushroom strains as well as in the generation of resources for molecular genetic studies. PMID:22783115

  8. Tissue culture and mutagenesis of rain lily (zephyranthes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Nazir Basiran; Zaiton Ahmad; Shakinah Salleh; Shuhaimi Shamsudin; Aiza Shaliha Jamaludin

    2004-01-01

    There are three varieties of Zephyranthes used widely in landscaping due to their robust growth and attractive flowers in pink, yellow and white. Both in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis are an effective approach to increase the flower colour variations of Zephyranthes. In vitro propagation for the three varieties was attempted by using the induction medium developed by Sachar and Kapoor in 1959. The medium contains I ma of each indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), indole 3-butyric acid (IBA) and kinetin. Following surface sterilization of bulb scales, 17.8%, 10.5% and 10.7% of pink, white and yellow varieties respectively, were able to form small bulblets on the induction media. Further development of these bulblets into plantlets was also achieved on the same medium. Work is now being carried out to improve the efficiency of bulblet regeneration. Mutagenesis of Zephyranthes was initiated from bulbs of the pink varieties to develop new varieties with attractive combinations of flower colour and forms, shelf life and growth habits. These bulbs were irradiated using a gamma cell with a 60 Co source. Three variants with different flower colour and morphology have been achieved so far and are now being propagated in the nursery. (Author)

  9. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  10. Assay of new systems in vivo mutagenesis for determining the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauluz, C.; Sierra, I.; Martin, L.; Real, A.; Vidania, R. de

    1997-01-01

    Ionizing radiation reacts directly and indirectly with the genetic material in living cells and produces DNA damage. Processing of this damage by correcting enzymes may result in appearing of mutations which, in turn, may lead to carcinogenesis. We have focused on the determination of in vivo mutagenesis induced after exposure to X-rays, aiming at establishing methods to evaluate the effect of low doses of radiation. In vivo mutagenesis has been addressed in the Muta Mouse model that carries a lacZ marker gene and provides a relatively simple assay of appearance of mutations. Mutation frequencies were determined in the lacZ gene copies recovered from mice irradiated with 1Gy or 4Gy of X-rays, acute or fractionated. Liver, spleen and bone marrow DNA samples were isolated at different times after irradiation, ranging from 1 day to 2 months, and evolution of mutations was studied. Results showed different responses depending on the organ and especially on the time of analysis, suggesting that the mutagenic process in vivo is much more complex than previously deduced from in vitro experiments. Therefore, determination of the relationship between dose and mutagenic effect in vivo will require additional studies. (author)

  11. Mutagenesis of NosM Leader Peptide Reveals Important Elements in Nosiheptide Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Wu, Xuri; Xue, Yanjiu; Jin, Yue; Wang, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nosiheptide, a typical member of the ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs), exhibits potent activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The precursor peptide of nosiheptide (NosM) is comprised of a leader peptide with 37 amino acids and a core peptide containing 13 amino acids. To pinpoint elements in the leader peptide that are essential for nosiheptide biosynthesis, a collection of mutants with unique sequence features, including N- and C-terminal motifs, peptide length, and specific sites in the leader peptide, was generated by mutagenesis in vivo. The effects of various mutants on nosiheptide biosynthesis were evaluated. In addition to the necessity of a conserved motif LEIS box, native length and the N-terminal 12 amino acid residues were indispensable, and single-site substitutions of these 12 amino acid residues resulted in changes ranging from a greater-than-5-fold decrease to a 2-fold increase of nosiheptide production, depending on the sites and substituted residues. Moreover, although the C-terminal motif is not conservative, significant effects of this portion on nosiheptide production were also evident. Taken together, the present results further highlight the importance of the leader peptide in nosiheptide biosynthesis, and provide new insights into the diversity and specificity of leader peptides in the biosynthesis of various RiPPs. IMPORTANCE As a representative thiopeptide, nosiheptide exhibits excellent antibacterial activity. Although the biosynthetic gene cluster and several modification steps have been revealed, the presence and roles of the leader peptide within the precursor peptide of the nosiheptide gene cluster remain elusive. Thus, identification of specific elements in the leader peptide can significantly facilitate the genetic manipulation of the gene cluster for increasing nosiheptide production or generating diverse analogues. Given the complexity of the

  12. Spontaneous inflammatory pain model from a mouse line with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tsung-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis was used to induce a point mutation in C57BL/6 J mice. Pain-related phenotype screening was performed in 915 G3 mice. We report the detection of a heritable recessive mutant in meiotic recombinant N1F1 mice that caused an abnormal pain sensitivity phenotype with spontaneous skin inflammation in the paws and ears. Methods We investigated abnormal sensory processing, neuronal peptides, and behavioral responses after the induction of autoinflammatory disease. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers and polymerase chain reaction product sequencing were used to identify the mutation site. Results All affected mice developed paw inflammation at 4–8 weeks. Histological examinations revealed hyperplasia of the epidermis in the inflamed paws and increased macrophage expression in the spleen and paw tissues. Mechanical and thermal nociceptive response thresholds were reduced in the affected mice. Locomotor activity was decreased in affected mice with inflamed hindpaws, and this reduction was attributable to the avoidance of contact of the affected paw with the floor. Motor strength and daily activity in the home cage in the affected mice did not show any significant changes. Although Fos immunoreactivity was normal in the dorsal horn of affected mice, calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity significantly increased in the deep layer of the dorsal horn. The number of microglia increased in the spinal cord, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex in affected mice, and the proliferation of microglia was maintained for a couple of months. Two hundred eighty-five SNP markers were used to reveal the affected gene locus, which was found on the distal part of chromosome 18. A point mutation was detected at A to G in exon 8 of the pstpip2 gene, resulting in a conserved tyrosine residue at amino acid 180 replaced by cysteine (Y180 C. Conclusions The data provide definitive evidence that a mutation

  13. Injection into electron plasma traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgadze, Vladimir; Pasquini, Thomas A.; Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    Computational studies and experimental measurements of plasma injection into a Malmberg-Penning trap reveal that the number of trapped particles can be an order of magnitude higher than predicted by a simple estimates based on a ballistic trapping model. Enhanced trapping is associated with a rich nonlinear dynamics generated by the space-charge forces of the evolving trapped electron density. A particle-in-cell simulation is used to identify the physical mechanisms that lead to the increase in trapped electrons. The simulations initially show strong two-stream interactions between the electrons emitted from the cathode and those reflected off the end plug of the trap. This is followed by virtual cathode oscillations near the injection region. As electrons are trapped, the initially hollow longitudinal phase-space is filled, and the transverse radial density profile evolves so that the plasma potential matches that of the cathode. Simple theoretical arguments are given that describe the different dynamical regimes. Good agreement is found between simulation and theory

  14. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  15. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  16. Electromagnetic trapping of cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V.I.; Minogin, V.G.; Letokhov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    This review describes the methods of trapping cold atoms in electromagnetic fields and in the combined electromagnetic and gravity fields. We discuss first the basic types of the dipole radiation forces used for cooling and trapping atoms in the laser fields. We outline next the fundamentals of the laser cooling of atoms and classify the temperature limits for basic laser cooling processes. The main body of the review is devoted to discussion of atom traps based on the dipole radiation forces, dipole magnetic forces, combined dipole radiation-magnetic forces, and the forces combined of the dipole radiation-magnetic and gravity forces. Physical fundamentals of atom traps operating as waveguides and cavities for cold atoms are also considered. The review ends with the applications of cold and trapped atoms in atomic, molecular and optical physics. (author)

  17. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Máté De Gérando, H.; Fayolle-Guichard, F.; Rudant, L.; Millah, S.K.; Monot, F.; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of

  18. Construction of a high-efficiency multi-site-directed mutagenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although site-directed mutagenesis has been used in many fields, it still has low rate of success and high cost because of low-yield target products. A modified method for multi-site-directed mutagenesis was developed with shifted primer design and cold-start polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The developed method was ...

  19. Non-targeted mutagenesis of unirradiated lambda phage in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R.D.; Hutchinson, F. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

    1984-03-05

    Non-targeted mutagenesis of lambda phage by ultraviolet light is the increase over background mutagenesis when non-irradiated phage are grown in irradiated Escherichia coli host cells. Such mutagenesis is caused by different processes from targeted mutagenesis, in which mutations in irradiated phage are correlated with photoproducts in the phage DNA. Non-irradiated phage grown in heavily irradiated uvr/sup +/ host cells showed non-targeted mutations, which were 3/4 frameshifts, whereas targeted mutations were 2/3 transitions. For non-targeted mutagenesis in heavily irradiated host cells, there were one or two mutant phage per mutant burst. From the results of a series of experiments with various mutant host cells, a major pathway of non-targeted mutagenesis by ultraviolet light was proposed which acts in addition to ''SOS induction''. This pathway involves binding of the enzyme DNA polymerase I to damaged genomic DNA, and low polymerase activity leads to frameshift mutations during semiconservative DNA replication. The data suggest that this process will play a much smaller role in ultraviolet mutagenesis of the bacterial genome than it does in the mutagenesis of lambda phage.

  20. Targeted mutagenesis in Zea mays using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Kunling; Gao, Caixia

    2014-02-20

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems have emerged as powerful tools for genome editing in a variety of species. Here, we report, for the first time, targeted mutagenesis in Zea mays using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas system. We designed five TALENs targeting 4 genes, namely ZmPDS, ZmIPK1A, ZmIPK, ZmMRP4, and obtained targeting efficiencies of up to 23.1% in protoplasts, and about 13.3% to 39.1% of the transgenic plants were somatic mutations. Also, we constructed two gRNAs targeting the ZmIPK gene in maize protoplasts, at frequencies of 16.4% and 19.1%, respectively. In addition, the CRISPR/Cas system induced targeted mutations in Z. mays protoplasts with efficiencies (13.1%) similar to those obtained with TALENs (9.1%). Our results show that both TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas system can be used for genome modification in maize. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Molecular properties and enhancement of thermostability by random mutagenesis of glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Iqbal Hassan; Ito, Kousuke; Kim, Hyeung; Ashida, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro

    2005-10-01

    The rocG gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis (Bs-GluDH) was cloned, and expressed at considerable magnitude in Escherichia coli. The recombinant Bs-GluDH was purified to homogeneity and has been determined to have a hexameric structure (M(r) 270 kDa) with strict specificity for 2-oxoglutarate and L-glutamate, requiring NADH and NAD+ as cofactors respectively. The enzyme showed low thermostability with T(m) = 41 degrees C due to dissociation of the hexamer. To improve the thermostability of this enzyme, we performed error-prone PCR, introducing random mutagenesis on cloned GluDH. Two single mutant enzymes, Q144R and E27F, were isolated from the final mutant library. Their T(m) values were 61 degrees C and 49 degrees C respectively. Furthermore, Q144R had a remarkably high k(cat) value (435 s(-1)) for amination reaction at 37 degrees C, 1.3 times higher than that of the wild-type. Thus, Q144R can be used as a template gene to modify the substrate specificity of Bs-GluDH for industrial use.

  2. Creation of miniature pig model of human Waardenburg syndrome type 2A by ENU mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Tang; Guo, Weiwei; Yao, Jing; Cao, Chunwei; Luo, Ailing; Qi, Meng; Wang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiao; Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hongyong; Wang, Dayu; Shang, Haitao; Hong, Qianlong; Zhang, Rui; Jia, Qitao; Zheng, Qiantao; Qin, Guosong; Li, Yongshun; Zhang, Tao; Jin, Weiwu; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Wang, Hongmei; Zhou, Qi; Meng, Anming; Wei, Hong; Yang, Shiming; Zhao, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Human Waardenburg syndrome 2A (WS2A) is a dominant hearing loss (HL) syndrome caused by mutations in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene. In mouse models with MITF mutations, WS2A is transmitted in a recessive pattern, which limits the study of hearing loss (HL) pathology. In the current study, we performed ENU (ethylnitrosourea) mutagenesis that resulted in substituting a conserved lysine with a serine (p. L247S) in the DNA-binding domain of the MITF gene to generate a novel miniature pig model of WS2A. The heterozygous mutant pig (MITF +/L247S ) exhibits a dominant form of profound HL and hypopigmentation in skin, hair, and iris, accompanied by degeneration of stria vascularis (SV), fused hair cells, and the absence of endocochlear potential, which indicate the pathology of human WS2A. Besides hypopigmentation and bilateral HL, the homozygous mutant pig (MITF L247S/L247S ) and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated MITF bi-allelic knockout pigs both exhibited anophthalmia. Three WS2 patients carrying MITF mutations adjacent to the corresponding region were also identified. The pig models resemble the clinical symptom and molecular pathology of human WS2A patients perfectly, which will provide new clues for better understanding the etiology and development of novel treatment strategies for human HL.

  3. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  4. Influence of particulate trap oxidizers on emission of mutagenic compounds by diesel automobiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, R E; Devillez, G; Smith, L R

    1989-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are known to contain mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals. The aim of this study was to determine whether, and to what extent, catalytic particulate trap oxidizers on light-duty diesel engines may reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic chemicals into the environment. Exhaust particles were collected from Mercedes Benz and Volkswagen diesel automobiles, equipped with or without the manufacturer's exhaust traps, while running on a chassis dynamometer under specified load conditions. Exhaust particles were collected from a dilution tunnel onto 20" X 20" Teflon-coated fiberglass filters. Mutagenesis tests of dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of the particles were conducted using the Ames Salmonella bacterial test system. The mutation rate was calculated in terms of histidine revertants per mile of travel during a set of standard test cycles. With both vehicles the traps produced an 87-92% reduction in the total amount of particulate material collected by the filters. There was no significant change in the specific mutagenic activity (revertants per microgram of DCM particle extract) with or without the traps. These studies support the notion that installation of exhaust traps which reduce particulate emission on diesel-powered vehicles will also reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic and carcinogenic materials into the environment.

  5. Creating Sunflower Mutant Lines (Helianthus Annuus L.) Using Induced Mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encheva, J.

    2009-01-01

    Immature sunflower zygotic embryos of sunflower fertility restorer line 374 R were treated with ultrasound and gamma radiation before plating embryos to culture medium. All plants were isolated and self-pollinated for several generations. New sunflower forms with inherited morphological and biochemical changes were obtained. The genetic changes occurring during the mutation procedure included fourteen morphological and biochemical characters. In comparison to the check line 374 R, decreasing of the mean value of the indexes was registered for 33 % of the total number of characters and vise verse, significant increasing was observed for 60 %. Mutation for resistance to the local population of Orobanche cumana race A-E was obtained from the susceptible Bulgarian control line 374 R. Two investigated mutant lines possessed 100 % resistance to Orobanche and stable inheritance in the next generations. Our results showed that induced mutagenesis in sunflower can be successfully used to develop new lines useful for heterosis breeding

  6. Radiation induced DNA damage and repair in mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    The central theme in cellular radiobiological research has been the mechanisms of radiation action and the physiological response of cells to this action. Considerable effort has been directed toward the characterization of radiation-induced DNA damage and the correlation of this damage to cellular genetic change that is expressed as mutation or initiating events leading to cellular transformation and ultimately carcinogenesis. In addition, there has been a significant advancement in their understanding of the role of DNA repair in the process of mutation leading to genetic change in cells. There is extensive literature concerning studies that address radiation action in both procaryotic and eucaryotic systems. This brief report will make no attempt to summarize this voluminous data but will focus on recent results from their laboratory of experiments in which they have examined, at both the cellular and molecular levels, the process of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in cultured human cells

  7. Scientific projection paper for mutagenesis, transformation and cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, P.

    1980-01-01

    Our knowledge about mutagenesis, transformation, and cell killing by ionizing radiation consists of large bodies of data, which are potentially useful in terms of application to human risk assessment and to the constructive use of radiation, as in cancer treatment. The three end-points discussed above are united by at least five significant concepts in radiation research strategy: (1) The inter-relationships among the important end-points, mutation, carcinogenesis, and cell killing. Research on one is meaningful only in the context of information about the other two. (2) The interaction of radiations with other agents in producing these end-points. (3) The mechanisms of action of other environmental mutagenic, carcinogenic, and cytotoxic agents. (4) The use of repair deficient human mutant cells. (5) The study of radiation damage mechanisms. There is no better way to extrapolate laboratory data to the clinical and public worlds than to understand the underlying biological mechanisms that produced the data

  8. Results and perspectives of mutagenesis applied to durum wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnara, D.

    1975-01-01

    A review is made of the main aspects and problems of mutagenesis applied to the breeding of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum). Features and type of action of the main physical and chemical mutagens are considered: a comparison is also made between the two classes of mutagens, on the basis of results so far achieved. Mentions is then made of methods of treatment; parts of plant which can be treated; growing of treated material in segregating generations: data to be successively recorded. Methods of estimating mutation frequency and the problem of arising chimerical tissues and its possible overcoming are also discussed. Examination is made of some special effects of mutagens, namely: induction of translocations; diploidization of polyploids; induction of haploids and aneuploids; genetic analysis of specific loci; induction of male sterility. Finally, results are reviewed concerning induction and utilization, either as varieties or in cross breeding programmes, of mutants for characters of agronomic interest. (Bagnara, D.)

  9. Trapped quintessential inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno Sanchez, J.C.; Dimopoulos, K.

    2006-01-01

    Quintessential inflation is studied using a string modulus as the inflaton-quintessence field. The modulus begins its evolution at the steep part of its scalar potential, which is due to non-perturbative effects (e.g. gaugino condensation). It is assumed that the modulus crosses an enhanced symmetry point (ESP) in field space. Particle production at the ESP temporarily traps the modulus resulting in a brief period of inflation. More inflation follows, due to the flatness of the potential, since the ESP generates either an extremum (maximum or minimum) or a flat inflection point in the scalar potential. Eventually, the potential becomes steep again and inflation is terminated. After reheating the modulus freezes due to cosmological friction at a large value, such that its scalar potential is dominated by contributions due to fluxes in the extra dimensions or other effects. The modulus remains frozen until the present, when it can become quintessence and account for the dark energy necessary to explain the observed accelerated expansion

  10. Validation-based insertional mutagenesis for identification of Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bei; Zhang, XiaoYu; Zhao, Zhendong, E-mail: timjszzd@163.com

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •We introduced a new mutagenesis strategy named VBIM to the viral research. •This method can identify either host factors or host restriction factors. •Using VBIM system, we identified Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells. -- Abstract: Lentiviral validation-based insertional mutagenesis (VBIM) is a sophisticated, forward genetic approach that is used for the investigation of signal transduction in mammalian cells. Using VBIM, we conducted function-based genetic screening for host genes that affect enterovirus 71 (EV71) viral replication. This included host factors that are required for the life cycle of EV71 and host restriction factors that inhibit EV71 replication. Several cell clones, resistant to EV71, were produced using EV71 infection as a selection pressure and the nuclear pore protein 214 (Nup214) was identified as a host factor required for EV71 replication. In SD2-2, the corresponding VBIM lentivirus transformed clone, the expression of endogenous Nup214 was significantly down-regulated by the reverse inserted VBIM promoter. After Cre recombinase-mediated excision of the VBIM promoter, the expression of Nup214 recovered and the clone regained sensitivity to the EV71 infection. Furthermore, over-expression of Nup214 in the cells suggested that Nup214 was promoting EV71 replication. Results of this study indicate that a successful mutagenesis strategy has been established for screening host genes related to viral replication.

  11. Validation-based insertional mutagenesis for identification of Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bei; Zhang, XiaoYu; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We introduced a new mutagenesis strategy named VBIM to the viral research. •This method can identify either host factors or host restriction factors. •Using VBIM system, we identified Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells. -- Abstract: Lentiviral validation-based insertional mutagenesis (VBIM) is a sophisticated, forward genetic approach that is used for the investigation of signal transduction in mammalian cells. Using VBIM, we conducted function-based genetic screening for host genes that affect enterovirus 71 (EV71) viral replication. This included host factors that are required for the life cycle of EV71 and host restriction factors that inhibit EV71 replication. Several cell clones, resistant to EV71, were produced using EV71 infection as a selection pressure and the nuclear pore protein 214 (Nup214) was identified as a host factor required for EV71 replication. In SD2-2, the corresponding VBIM lentivirus transformed clone, the expression of endogenous Nup214 was significantly down-regulated by the reverse inserted VBIM promoter. After Cre recombinase-mediated excision of the VBIM promoter, the expression of Nup214 recovered and the clone regained sensitivity to the EV71 infection. Furthermore, over-expression of Nup214 in the cells suggested that Nup214 was promoting EV71 replication. Results of this study indicate that a successful mutagenesis strategy has been established for screening host genes related to viral replication

  12. Cationic Peptides Facilitate Iron-induced Mutagenesis in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative agent of chronic respiratory infections and is an important pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients. Adaptive mutations play an essential role for antimicrobial resistance and persistence. The factors that contribute to bacterial mutagenesis in this environment are not clear. Recently it has been proposed that cationic antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37 could act as mutagens in P. aeruginosa. Here we provide experimental evidence that mutagenesis is the product of a joint action of LL-37 and free iron. By estimating mutation rate, mutant frequencies and assessing mutational spectra in P. aeruginosa treated either with LL-37, iron or a combination of both we demonstrate that mutation rate and mutant frequency were increased only when free iron and LL-37 were present simultaneously. Colistin had the same effect. The addition of an iron chelator completely abolished this mutagenic effect, suggesting that LL-37 enables iron to enter the cells resulting in DNA damage by Fenton reactions. This was also supported by the observation that the mutational spectrum of the bacteria under LL-37-iron regime showed one of the characteristic Fenton reaction fingerprints: C to T transitions. Free iron concentration in nature and within hosts is kept at a very low level, but the situation in infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is different. Intermittent bleeding and damage to the epithelial cells in lungs may contribute to the release of free iron that in turn leads to generation of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of the respiratory tract, making it more susceptible to the infection.

  13. Trap-mulching Argentine ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jules; Sorenson, Clyde E; Waldvogel, Michael G

    2006-10-01

    Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), management is constrained, in large part, by polydomy where nestmates are distributed extensively across urban landscapes, particularly within mulch. Management with trap-mulching is a novel approach derived from trap-cropping where ants are repelled from a broad domain of nest sites to smaller defined areas, which are subsequently treated with insecticide. This concept was field-tested with mulch surrounding ornamental trees replaced with a narrow band of pine (Pinus spp.) needle mulch (trap) within a much larger patch of repellent aromatic cedar (Juniperus spp.) mulch. After ants reestablished around the trees, the pine needle mulch band was treated with 0.06% fipronil (Termidor). Poor results were obtained when the trap extended from the tree trunk to the edge of the mulched area. When the trap was applied as a circular band around the tree trunk reductions in the number of foraging ants were recorded through 14 d compared with an untreated mulch control, but not for longer periods. Reductions in the number of ant nests within mulch were no different between the trap mulch and any of the other treatments. We conclude that trap-mulching offers limited benefits, and that successful management of Argentine ants will require implementation of complementary or perhaps alternative strategies.

  14. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  15. Enhancer trap infidelity in Drosophila optomotor-blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Lisa R; Diegelmann, Sören; Abassi, Yasmin; Eichinger, Fred; Pflugfelder, Gert O

    2013-01-01

    Reporter gene activity in enhancer trap lines is often implicitly assumed to mirror quite faithfully the endogenous expression of the "trapped" gene, even though there are numerous examples of enhancer trap infidelity. optomotor-blind (omb) is a 160 kb gene in which 16 independent P-element enhancer trap insertions of three different types have been mapped in a range of more than 60 kb. We have determined the expression pattern of these elements in wing, eye-antennal and leg imaginal discs as well as in the pupal tergites. We noted that one pGawB insertion (omb (P4) ) selectively failed to report parts of the omb pattern even though the missing pattern elements were apparent in all other 15 lines. We ruled out that omb (P4) was defective in the Gal4 promoter region or had inactivated genomic enhancers in the integration process. We propose that the Gal4 reporter gene in pGawB may be sensitive to orientation or promoter proximity effects.

  16. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  17. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  18. Funnel traps capture a higher proportion of juvenile Great Tits Parus major than automatic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.; Conroy, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared capture rates of Great Tits at funnel traps, where several birds can be captured at once so that some decoy effect may appear, to those obtained at automatic traps, where only one bird can be trapped at a time, at trapping stations in northeastern Spain. Juvenile birds were mainly captured at funnel traps (79% of juvenile captures), whereas adult plumaged birds were captured at both types of traps (51% of captures were at the funnel traps) (test between ages, Pfunnel traps, which may be acting as decoy traps, and thus are vulnerable to the same kinds of biases (eg age or body condition) that have been previously documented for decoy traps.

  19. Trapping Triatominae in Silvatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireau François

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale trials of a trapping system designed to collect silvatic Triatominae are reported. Live-baited adhesive traps were tested in various ecosystems and different triatomine habitats (arboreal and terrestrial. The trials were always successful, with a rate of positive habitats generally over 20% and reaching 48.4% for palm trees of the Amazon basin. Eleven species of Triatominae belonging to the three genera of public health importance (Triatoma, Rhodnius and Panstrongylus were captured. This trapping system provides an effective way to detect the presence of triatomines in terrestrial and arboreal silvatic habitats and represents a promising tool for ecological studies. Various lines of research are contemplated to improve the performance of this trapping system.

  20. Evaporative cooling of trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketterle, W.; Van Druten, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on evaporative cooling of trapped atoms: Theoretical models for evaporative cooling; the role of collisions for real atoms; experimental techniques and summary of evaporative cooling experiments. 166 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  1. High efficiency of targeted mutagenesis in arabidopsis via meiotic promoter-driven expression of Cas9 endonuclease

    KAUST Repository

    Eid, Ayman

    2016-05-28

    Key message: The use of a meiosis I-specific promoter increased the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis and will facilitate the manipulation of homologous recombination. Abstract: The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been harnessed for targeted engineering of eukaryotic genomes, including plants; however, CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency varies considerably in different plant tissues and species. In Arabidopsis, the generation of homozygous or bi-allelic mutants in the first (T1) generation is inefficient. Here, we used specific promoters to drive the expression of Cas9 during meiosis to maximize the efficiency of recovering heritable mutants in T1 plants. Our data reveal that the use of a promoter active in meiosis I resulted in high-efficiency (28 %) recovery of targeted mutants in the T1 generation. Moreover, this method enabled efficient simultaneous targeting of three genes for mutagenesis. Taken together, our results show that the use of meiosis-specific promoters will improve methods for functional genomic analysis and studying the molecular underpinnings of homologous recombination. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae the Causal Agent of Bacterial Leaf Blight of rice: Isolation, Characterization, and Study of Transposon Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdjad Asih Nawangsih

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae the Causal Agent of Bacterial Leaf Blight of rice: Isolation, Characterization, and Study of Transposon Mutagenesis. X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB of rice (Oryza sativa L., a major disease that constrains production of the staple crop in many countries of the world. Identification of X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo was conducted based on the disease symptoms, pathogenicity, morphological, physiological, and genetic characteristics of bacterial cultures isolated from the infected plants. Fifty bacterial isolates predicted as Xoo have been successfully isolated. They are aerobic, rod shaped, and Gram negative bacteria. The isolates were evaluated for their hypersensitivity in tobacco and pathogenicity in rice plant. Fifty isolates induced hypersensitive reaction in tobacco and showed pathogenicity symptom in rice in different length. Based on physiological test, hypersensitivity and pathogenicity reactions, three bacterial isolates strongly predicted as Xoo, i.e. STG21, STG42, and STG46, were non indole formation, non pigment fluorescent, hydrolyzed casein, catalase activity positive, but negative oxidase. Partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes of STG21 and STG42 showed 80% and 82% homology with X. oryzae, respectively, while STG46 showed 84% homology with X. campestris. Mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis of STG21 generated one of the mutants (M5 lossed it’s ability to induce hypersensitive reaction in tobacco plant and deficient in pathogenicity on rice. The lesion length of rice leaf caused by the mutant M5 decreased up to 80%.

  3. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  4. Sensitized mutagenesis screen in Factor V Leiden mice identifies thrombosis suppressor loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Randal J; Tomberg, Kärt; Siebert, Amy E; Zhu, Guojing; Winn, Mary E; Dobies, Sarah L; Manning, Sara L; Brake, Marisa A; Cleuren, Audrey C; Hobbs, Linzi M; Mishack, Lena M; Johnston, Alexander J; Kotnik, Emilee; Siemieniak, David R; Xu, Jishu; Li, Jun Z; Saunders, Thomas L; Ginsburg, David

    2017-09-05

    Factor V Leiden ( F5 L ) is a common genetic risk factor for venous thromboembolism in humans. We conducted a sensitized N -ethyl- N -nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen for dominant thrombosuppressor genes based on perinatal lethal thrombosis in mice homozygous for F5 L ( F5 L/L ) and haploinsufficient for tissue factor pathway inhibitor ( Tfpi +/- ). F8 deficiency enhanced the survival of F5 L/L Tfpi +/- mice, demonstrating that F5 L/L Tfpi +/- lethality is genetically suppressible. ENU-mutagenized F5 L/L males and F5 L/+ Tfpi +/- females were crossed to generate 6,729 progeny, with 98 F5 L/L Tfpi +/- offspring surviving until weaning. Sixteen lines, referred to as "modifier of Factor 5 Leiden ( MF5L1-16 )," exhibited transmission of a putative thrombosuppressor to subsequent generations. Linkage analysis in MF5L6 identified a chromosome 3 locus containing the tissue factor gene ( F3 ). Although no ENU-induced F3 mutation was identified, haploinsufficiency for F3 ( F3 +/- ) suppressed F5 L/L Tfpi +/- lethality. Whole-exome sequencing in MF5L12 identified an Actr2 gene point mutation (p.R258G) as the sole candidate. Inheritance of this variant is associated with suppression of F5 L/L Tfpi +/- lethality ( P = 1.7 × 10 -6 ), suggesting that Actr2 p.R258G is thrombosuppressive. CRISPR/Cas9 experiments to generate an independent Actr2 knockin/knockout demonstrated that Actr2 haploinsufficiency is lethal, supporting a hypomorphic or gain-of-function mechanism of action for Actr2 p.R258G Our findings identify F8 and the Tfpi/F3 axis as key regulators in determining thrombosis balance in the setting of F5 L and also suggest a role for Actr2 in this process.

  5. A regulatory role for NBS1 in strand-specific mutagenesis during somatic hypermutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likun Du

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID is believed to initiate somatic hypermutation (SHM by deamination of deoxycytidines to deoxyuridines within the immunoglobulin variable regions genes. The deaminated bases can subsequently be replicated over, processed by base excision repair or mismatch repair, leading to introduction of different types of point mutations (G/C transitions, G/C transversions and A/T mutations. It is evident that the base excision repair pathway is largely dependent on uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG through its uracil excision activity. It is not known, however, which endonuclease acts in the step immediately downstream of UNG, i.e. that cleaves at the abasic sites generated by the latter. Two candidates have been proposed, an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE and the Mre11-Rad50-NBS1 complex. The latter is intriguing as this might explain how the mutagenic pathway is primed during SHM. We have investigated the latter possibility by studying the in vivo SHM pattern in B cells from ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder (Mre11 deficient and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS1 deficient patients. Our results show that, although the pattern of mutations in the variable heavy chain (V(H genes was altered in NBS1 deficient patients, with a significantly increased number of G (but not C transversions occurring in the SHM and/or AID targeting hotspots, the general pattern of mutations in the V(H genes in Mre11 deficient patients was only slightly altered, with an increased frequency of A to C transversions. The Mre11-Rad50-NBS1 complex is thus unlikely to be the major nuclease involved in cleavage of the abasic sites during SHM, whereas NBS1 might have a specific role in regulating the strand-biased repair during phase Ib mutagenesis.

  6. Use of mutagenesis, genetic mapping and next generation transcriptomics to investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Kalajdzic

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance is a worldwide problem with major impact on agriculture and human health. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms is crucial for the management of the phenomenon; however, this information often comes late with respect to the implementation of efficient counter-measures, particularly in the case of metabolism-based resistance mechanisms. We employed a genome-wide insertional mutagenesis screen to Drosophila melanogaster, using a Minos-based construct, and retrieved a line (MiT[w(-]3R2 resistant to the neonicotinoid insecticide Imidacloprid. Biochemical and bioassay data indicated that resistance was due to increased P450 detoxification. Deep sequencing transcriptomic analysis revealed substantial over- and under-representation of 357 transcripts in the resistant line, including statistically significant changes in mixed function oxidases, peptidases and cuticular proteins. Three P450 genes (Cyp4p2, Cyp6a2 and Cyp6g1 located on the 2R chromosome, are highly up-regulated in mutant flies compared to susceptible Drosophila. One of them (Cyp6g1 has been already described as a major factor for Imidacloprid resistance, which validated the approach. Elevated expression of the Cyp4p2 was not previously documented in Drosophila lines resistant to neonicotinoids. In silico analysis using the Drosophila reference genome failed to detect transcription binding factors or microRNAs associated with the over-expressed Cyp genes. The resistant line did not contain a Minos insertion in its chromosomes, suggesting a hit-and-run event, i.e. an insertion of the transposable element, followed by an excision which caused the mutation. Genetic mapping placed the resistance locus to the right arm of the second chromosome, within a ∼1 Mb region, where the highly up-regulated Cyp6g1 gene is located. The nature of the unknown mutation that causes resistance is discussed on the basis of these results.

  7. Genomic mechanisms accounting for the adaptation to parasitism in nematode-trapping fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejashwari Meerupati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Orbiliomycetes is one of the earliest diverging branches of the filamentous ascomycetes. The class contains nematode-trapping fungi that form unique infection structures, called traps, to capture and kill free-living nematodes. The traps have evolved differently along several lineages and include adhesive traps (knobs, nets or branches and constricting rings. We show, by genome sequencing of the knob-forming species Monacrosporium haptotylum and comparison with the net-forming species Arthrobotrys oligospora, that two genomic mechanisms are likely to have been important for the adaptation to parasitism in these fungi. Firstly, the expansion of protein domain families and the large number of species-specific genes indicated that gene duplication followed by functional diversification had a major role in the evolution of the nematode-trapping fungi. Gene expression indicated that many of these genes are important for pathogenicity. Secondly, gene expression of orthologs between the two fungi during infection indicated that differential regulation was an important mechanism for the evolution of parasitism in nematode-trapping fungi. Many of the highly expressed and highly upregulated M. haptotylum transcripts during the early stages of nematode infection were species-specific and encoded small secreted proteins (SSPs that were affected by repeat-induced point mutations (RIP. An active RIP mechanism was revealed by lack of repeats, dinucleotide bias in repeats and genes, low proportion of recent gene duplicates, and reduction of recent gene family expansions. The high expression and rapid divergence of SSPs indicate a striking similarity in the infection mechanisms of nematode-trapping fungi and plant and insect pathogens from the crown groups of the filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina. The patterns of gene family expansions in the nematode-trapping fungi were more similar to plant pathogens than to insect and animal pathogens. The observation

  8. Enhanced vanillin production from recombinant E. coli using NTG mutagenesis and adsorbent resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sang-Hwal; Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Das, Amitabha; Lee, Sook-Hee; Li, Cui; Ryu, Hee-Kyoung; Choi, Myung-Suk; Seo, Weon-Taek; Kim, Seon-Won

    2007-01-01

    Vanillin production was tested with different concentrations of added ferulic acid in E. coli harboring plasmid pTAHEF containing fcs (feruloyl-CoA synthase) and ech (enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase) genes cloned from Amycolatopsis sp. strain HR104. The maximum production of vanillin from E. coli DH5alpha harboring pTAHEF was found to be 1.0 g/L at 2.0 g/L of ferulic acid for 48 h of culture. To improve the vanillin production by reducing its toxicity, two approaches were followed: (1) generation of vanillin-resistant mutant of NTG-VR1 through NTG mutagenesis and (2) removal of toxic vanillin from the medium by XAD-2 resin absorption. The vanillin production of NTG-VR1 increased to three times at 5 g/L of ferulic acid when compared with its wild-type strain. When 50% (w/v) of XAD-2 resin was employed in culture with 10 g/L of ferulic acid, the vanillin production of NTG-VR1 was 2.9 g/L, which was 2-fold higher than that obtained with no use of the resin.

  9. Color transitions in coral's fluorescent proteins by site-directed mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukyanov Sergey A

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP cloned from jellyfish Aequorea victoria and its homologs from corals Anthozoa have a great practical significance as in vivo markers of gene expression. Also, they are an interesting puzzle of protein science due to an unusual mechanism of chromophore formation and diversity of fluorescent colors. Fluorescent proteins can be subdivided into cyan (~ 485 nm, green (~ 505 nm, yellow (~ 540 nm, and red (>580 nm emitters. Results Here we applied site-directed mutagenesis in order to investigate the structural background of color variety and possibility of shifting between different types of fluorescence. First, a blue-shifted mutant of cyan amFP486 was generated. Second, it was established that cyan and green emitters can be modified so as to produce an intermediate spectrum of fluorescence. Third, the relationship between green and yellow fluorescence was inspected on closely homologous green zFP506 and yellow zFP538 proteins. The following transitions of colors were performed: yellow to green; yellow to dual color (green and yellow; and green to yellow. Fourth, we generated a mutant of cyan emitter dsFP483 that demonstrated dual color (cyan and red fluorescence. Conclusions Several amino acid substitutions were found to strongly affect fluorescence maxima. Some positions primarily found by sequence comparison were proved to be crucial for fluorescence of particular color. These results are the first step towards predicting the color of natural GFP-like proteins corresponding to newly identified cDNAs from corals.

  10. Random mutagenesis identifies factors involved in formate-dependent growth of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Christian; Wolf, Sandro; Fersch, Julia; Goetz, Stefan; Rother, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methane is a key intermediate in the carbon cycle and biologically produced by methanogenic archaea. Most methanogens are able to conserve energy by reducing CO2 to methane using molecular hydrogen as electron donor (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis), but several hydrogenotrophic methanogens can also use formate as electron donor for methanogenesis. Formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) oxidizes formate to CO2 and is involved in funneling reducing equivalents into the methanogenic pathway, but details on other factors relevant for formate-dependent physiology of methanogens are not available. To learn more about the factors involved in formate-dependent growth of Methanococcus maripaludis strain JJ, we used a recently developed system for random in vitro mutagenesis, which is based on a modified insect transposable element to create 2,865 chromosomal transposon mutants and screened them for impaired growth on formate. Of 12 M. maripaludis transposon-induced mutants exhibiting this phenotype, the transposon insertion sites in the chromosome were mapped. Among the genes, apparently affecting formate-dependent growth were those encoding archaeal transcription factor S, a regulator of ion transport, and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase. Interestingly, in seven of the mutants, transposons were localized in a 10.2 kb region where Fdh1, one of two Fdh isoforms in the organism, is encoded. Two transcription start sites within the 10.2 kb region could be mapped, and quantification of transcripts revealed that transposon insertion in this region diminished fdhA1 expression due to polar effects.

  11. Mutagenesis of the repeat regions of herpesviruses cloned as bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuguang; Nair, Venugopal

    2010-01-01

    Cloning of infectious and pathogenic herpesvirus genomes in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector greatly facilitates genetic manipulation of their genomes. BAC-based mutagenesis strategies of viruses can advance our understanding of the viral gene functions and determinants of pathogenicity, and can ultimately help to develop molecularly defined improved vaccines against virus diseases. Unlike the virus stocks, where continuous passage in tissue culture can lead to phenotypic alterations such as loss of virulence or immunogenicity, viral genomes can be stably maintained with high fidelity as BAC clones in bacteria. Thanks to the "RecA" or the inducible phage "lambda Red" homologous recombination systems and a variety of positive and negative selection strategies, viral genomes cloned as BAC can be efficiently manipulated in E. coli. All the manipulations, including DNA fragment deletion or insertion, point mutations, or even multiple modifications in repeat regions can be carried out accurately in E. coli, and the mutated DNA can be used directly to reconstitute mutant viruses in transfected host cells. Furthermore, using self-excision strategies, the non-viral bacterial replicon sequence can be excised automatically during virus reconstitution, thus generating recombinant viruses virtually identical to the wild-type parent viruses. Here, we describe the various technologies of manipulating the infectious BAC clones of a group E herpesvirus as an example through a combination of different approaches.

  12. Mutagenesis and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Yvonne Jing Mei; Soh, Wai Tuck; Jiemy, William Febry; Hwang, Jung Shan

    2015-02-03

    Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1) has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1-4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  13. Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis of the Pore-Forming Toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Jing Mei Liew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1 has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1–4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  14. Transposon mutagenesis in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae using a novel mariner-based system for generating random mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglennon, Gareth A; Cook, Beth S; Deeney, Alannah S; Bossé, Janine T; Peters, Sarah E; Langford, Paul R; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N

    2013-12-21

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the cause of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, a chronic respiratory disease associated with significant economic losses to swine producers worldwide. The molecular pathogenesis of infection is poorly understood due to the lack of genetic tools to allow manipulation of the organism and more generally for the Mycoplasma genus. The objective of this study was to develop a system for generating random transposon insertion mutants in M. hyopneumoniae that could prove a powerful tool in enabling the pathogenesis of infection to be unraveled. A novel delivery vector was constructed containing a hyperactive C9 mutant of the Himar1 transposase along with a mini transposon containing the tetracycline resistance cassette, tetM. M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 was electroporated with the construct and tetM-expressing transformants selected on agar containing tetracycline. Individual transformants contained single transposon insertions that were stable upon serial passages in broth medium. The insertion sites of 44 individual transformants were determined and confirmed disruption of several M. hyopneumoniae genes. A large pool of over 10 000 mutants was generated that should allow saturation of the M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 genome. This is the first time that transposon mutagenesis has been demonstrated in this important pathogen and could be generally applied for other Mycoplasma species that are intractable to genetic manipulation. The ability to generate random mutant libraries is a powerful tool in the further study of the pathogenesis of this important swine pathogen.

  15. Molecular actions of Escherichia coli MutT for control of spontaneous mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoyama, Daiki; Ito, Riyoko; Takagi, Yasumitsu; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2011-02-10

    MutT protein of Escherichia coli hydrolyzes oxidized guanine nucleotides, 8-oxo-dGTP and 8-oxoGTP, to the corresponding monophosphates, thereby preventing misincorporation of 8-oxoguanine into DNA and RNA, respectively. Although the biological significance of the MutT has been established, how MutT protein actually works in vivo remains to be elucidated. The current study shows the molecular behavior of the MutT protein in vivo and in vitro with special reference to control of spontaneous mutagenesis. A single E. coli cell carries about 70-75 molecules of the MutT protein and that this number does not change even when the cells were cultured in anaerobic and hyper-oxidative conditions. Conditional gene silencing analyses revealed that about a half number of MutT molecules are needed for keeping the spontaneous mutation frequency at the normal level. The MutT functions are not needed under anaerobic condition, yet the level of the MutT protein in cell is kept constant, probably for preparing for sudden changes of oxygen pressure. There is a possibility that MutT functions in close association with other proteins, and evidence is presented that MutT protein can interact with some proteins in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. FoxP3 scanning mutagenesis reveals functional variegation and mild mutations with atypical autoimmune phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Chen, Hui-Min; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2018-01-09

    FoxP3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a central element of immunological tolerance. FoxP3 is the key determining transcription factor of the Treg lineage, interacting with numerous cofactors and transcriptional targets to determine the many facets of Treg function. Its absence leads to devastating lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in scurfy mutant mice and immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) patients. To finely map transcriptionally active regions of the protein, with respect to disease-causing variation, we performed a systematic alanine-scan mutagenesis of FoxP3, assessing mutational impacts on DNA binding and transcriptional activation or repression. The mutations affected transcriptional activation and repression in a variegated manner involving multiple regions of the protein and varying between different transcriptional targets of FoxP3. There appeared to be different modalities for target genes related to classic immunosuppressive function vs. those related to atypical or tissue-Treg functions. Relevance to in vivo Treg biology was established by introducing some of the subtle Foxp3 mutations into the mouse germline by CRISPR-based genome editing. The resulting mice showed Treg populations in normal numbers and exhibited no overt autoimmune manifestations. However, Treg functional defects were revealed upon competition or by system stress, manifest as a strikingly heightened susceptibility to provoked colitis, and conversely by greater resistance to tumors. These observations suggest that some of the missense mutations that segregate in human populations, but do not induce IPEX manifestations, may have unappreciated consequences in other diseases.

  17. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  18. Improved thermostability and enzyme activity of a recombinant phyA mutant phytase from Aspergillus niger N25 by directed evolution and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zizhong; Jin, Weiqiong; Sun, Rong; Liao, Yan; Zhen, Tianrun; Chen, Hui; Wu, Qi; Gou, Lin; Li, Chenlei

    2018-01-01

    We previously constructed three recombinant phyA mutant strains (PP-NP m -8, PP-NP ep -6A and I44E/T252R-PhyA), showing improved catalytic efficiency or thermostability of Aspergillus niger N25 phytase, by error-prone PCR or site-directed mutagenesis. In this study, directed evolution and site-directed mutagenesis were further applied to improve the modified phytase properties. After one-round error-prone PCR for phytase gene of PP-NP ep -6A, a single transformant, T195L/Q368E/F376Y, was obtained with the significant improvements in catalytic efficiency and thermostability. The phytase gene of T195L/Q368E/F376Y, combined with the previous mutant phytase genes of PP-NP ep -6A, PP-NP m -8 and I44E/T252R-PhyA, was then sequentially modified by DNA shuffling. Three genetically engineered strains with desirable properties were then obtained, namedQ172R, Q172R/K432R andQ368E/K432R. Among them, Q172R/K432R showed the highest thermostability with the longest half-life and the greatest remaining phytase activity after heat treatment, while Q368E/K432R showed the highest catalytic activity. Five substitutions (Q172R, T195L, Q368E, F376Y, K432R) identified from random mutagenesis were added sequentially to the phytase gene of PP-NP ep -6A to investigate how the mutant sites influence the properties of phytase. Characterization and structural analysis demonstrated that these mutations could produce cumulative or synergistic improvements in thermostability or catalytic efficiency of phytase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Germ cell regeneration-mediated, enhanced mutagenesis in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis reveals flexible germ cell formation from different somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keita; Hozumi, Akiko; Treen, Nicholas; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Shirae-Kurabayashi, Maki; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2017-03-15

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis has a high regeneration capacity that enables the regeneration of artificially removed primordial germ cells (PGCs) from somatic cells. We utilized PGC regeneration to establish efficient methods of germ line mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). When PGCs were artificially removed from animals in which a TALEN pair was expressed, somatic cells harboring mutations in the target gene were converted into germ cells, this germ cell population exhibited higher mutation rates than animals not subjected to PGC removal. PGC regeneration enables us to use TALEN expression vectors of specific somatic tissues for germ cell mutagenesis. Unexpectedly, cis elements for epidermis, neural tissue and muscle could be used for germ cell mutagenesis, indicating there are multiple sources of regenerated PGCs, suggesting a flexibility of differentiated Ciona somatic cells to regain totipotency. Sperm and eggs of a single hermaphroditic, PGC regenerated animal typically have different mutations, suggesting they arise from different cells. PGCs can be generated from somatic cells even though the maternal PGCs are not removed, suggesting that the PGC regeneration is not solely an artificial event but could have an endogenous function in Ciona. This study provides a technical innovation in the genome-editing methods, including easy establishment of mutant lines. Moreover, this study suggests cellular mechanisms and the potential evolutionary significance of PGC regeneration in Ciona. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After passing through a cotton wool, the serially diluted spore suspension was spread on GYM- agar containing caffeine. The plates were irradiated with UV light, wrapped in aluminum foil and incubated. The colonies were sub-cultured again to express the mutations. An aliquot of the spore suspension prepared from the resulted culture was poured in GYM agar plates and incubated. The plates were overlaid with nutrient-agar containing penicillin G and Klebsiela pneumoniae, and incubated. The inhibition zone diameter was measured and compared with the wild type colony. Repeating this procedure, the overproducer mutants were selected. Concentration of clavulanic acid was determined by HPLC analysis. It was concluded that secondary metabolites, mainly antibiotics containing clavulanic acid, were produced about 6-7 days after the growth, and concentration of clavulanic acid was increased up to two-folds after UV mutagenesis.

  1. In vitro mutagenesis for the improvement of Josapine pineapple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli Ibrahim; Amir Hamzah

    2006-01-01

    Pineapple is the most important fruit in terms of revenue earner in Malaysia. There are about 10,000 ha cultivated with this fruit and half of this is owned by estates and planted for the canning industry. The export of canned pineapple is about 2 million standard cases annually valued at RM 60 million, while the export of fresh pineapple is about 40,000 tonnes worth about RM 10 million. The industry for canning is however, an ailing industry with production on the decline since the 70s. Somaclonal variations and induced mutation using irradiation in breeding are least invasive in changes to genetic make-up of an established variety and will be useful for improving the pineapple varieties. The use of tissue culture to generate somaclones with minute genetic changes that do not damage the overall varietal identity would be the most suitable tool to improve the variety. Protocols for the production of tissue culture plantlets of pineapple using bioreactor technology has been developed and proved to be much more efficient and productive compared to conventional method. In vitro mutagenesis using adventitious buds had produced new plants with smooth leaves, vigorous growth and ornamental-like characters. A total of 30,000 plants derived from tissue culture will be planted and screened in the field for the improvement of Josapine pineapple against bacterial heart rot disease and multiple crown. (Author)

  2. Diverse responses to UV light exposure in Acinetobacter include the capacity for DNA damage-induced mutagenesis in the opportunistic pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter ursingii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, James A.; Lin, Ching-li; Elam, Tyler J.

    2012-01-01

    Error-prone and error-free DNA damage repair responses that are induced in most bacteria after exposure to various chemicals, antibiotics or radiation sources were surveyed across the genus Acinetobacter. The error-prone SOS mutagenesis response occurs when DNA damage induces a cell’s umuDC- or dinP-encoded error-prone polymerases. The model strain Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 possesses an unusual, regulatory umuD allele (umuDAb) with an extended 5′ region and only incomplete fragments of umuC. Diverse Acinetobacter species were investigated for the presence of umuDC and their ability to conduct UV-induced mutagenesis. Unlike ADP1, most Acinetobacter strains possessed multiple umuDC loci containing either umuDAb or a umuD allele resembling that of Escherichia coli. The nearly omnipresent umuDAb allele was the ancestral umuD in Acinetobacter, with horizontal gene transfer accounting for over half of the umuDC operons. Despite multiple umuD(Ab)C operons in many strains, only three species conducted UV-induced mutagenesis: Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter ursingii and Acinetobacter beijerinckii. The type of umuDC locus or mutagenesis phenotype a strain possessed was not correlated with its error-free response of survival after UV exposure, but similar diversity was apparent. The survival of 30 Acinetobacter strains after UV treatment ranged over five orders of magnitude, with the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–A. baumannii (Acb) complex and haemolytic strains having lower survival than non-Acb or non-haemolytic strains. These observations demonstrate that a genus can possess a range of DNA damage response mechanisms, and suggest that DNA damage-induced mutation could be an important part of the evolution of the emerging pathogens A. baumannii and A. ursingii. PMID:22117008

  3. The induced mutagenesis and the genetic progress in the work with sour cherry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, O.S.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: We used radiation breeding for improving sour cherry varieties since 1958. X- and gamma-rays and also other physical factors have been applied to cuttings, seeds, flower parts and whole plants as well as in-vitro cultures. Doses of 30-60 Gy appeared to be most effective for inducing mutation when cuttings were irradiated. The main number of mutations occurred in M 1 and M 2 . Mutations were divided into 5 main classes concerning morphological characters, tree growth, dates of fruit bearing, biochemical composition, system of propagation. As a result of x-irradiation of a sour cherry/bird cherry hybrid 'Padocerus', immune to Coccomyces hiemalis, a highly fertile mutant 'Padocerus M' has been obtained. A dominant gene has been identified, controlling resistance to Coccomyces hiemalis. By obtaining 'Padocerus M' the possibilities of increasing the genetic resources have been expanded. 'Almaz' is the monogenic donor of resistance to C. hiemalis. In literature there are indications of the possibility of obtaining apomictic forms by mutagenesis. As a result of irradiating 'Padocerus' plants in the gamma field during three years a mutant has been found in which the basic mass of seeds is formed as a result of apomixis-autonomous diplosporic parthenogenesis. Apomixis seems to be controlled by a small number of major and minor genes. The mutant is called 'Padocerus A' and is used in hybridisation with other sour cherry varieties; segregation for the apomictic type of propagation has been found. A population of Prunus fructicosa has been studied in the region of the so-called Tatar bank in the Tambov district. Large-fruited forms have been selected which may be the result of accumulating spontaneous mutations. Mutations of a different type have been obtained when using chemical mutagens or a laser beam. (author)

  4. Genome-wide mutagenesis reveals that ORF7 is a novel VZV skin-tropic factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV is a ubiquitous human alpha-herpesvirus that is the causative agent of chicken pox and shingles. Although an attenuated VZV vaccine (v-Oka has been widely used in children in the United States, chicken pox outbreaks are still seen, and the shingles vaccine only reduces the risk of shingles by 50%. Therefore, VZV still remains an important public health concern. Knowledge of VZV replication and pathogenesis remains limited due to its highly cell-associated nature in cultured cells, the difficulty of generating recombinant viruses, and VZV's almost exclusive tropism for human cells and tissues. In order to circumvent these hurdles, we cloned the entire VZV (p-Oka genome into a bacterial artificial chromosome that included a dual-reporter system (GFP and luciferase reporter genes. We used PCR-based mutagenesis and the homologous recombination system in the E. coli to individually delete each of the genome's 70 unique ORFs. The collection of viral mutants obtained was systematically examined both in MeWo cells and in cultured human fetal skin organ samples. We use our genome-wide deletion library to provide novel functional annotations to 51% of the VZV proteome. We found 44 out of 70 VZV ORFs to be essential for viral replication. Among the 26 non-essential ORF deletion mutants, eight have discernable growth defects in MeWo. Interestingly, four ORFs were found to be required for viral replication in skin organ cultures, but not in MeWo cells, suggesting their potential roles as skin tropism factors. One of the genes (ORF7 has never been described as a skin tropic factor. The global profiling of the VZV genome gives further insights into the replication and pathogenesis of this virus, which can lead to improved prevention and therapy of chicken pox and shingles.

  5. Intensive mutagenesis of the nisin hinge leads to the rational design of enhanced derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Healy

    Full Text Available Nisin A is the most extensively studied lantibiotic and has been used as a preservative by the food industry since 1953. This 34 amino acid peptide contains three dehydrated amino acids and five thioether rings. These rings, resulting from one lanthionine and four methyllanthionine bridges, confer the peptide with its unique structure. Nisin A has two mechanisms of action, with the N-terminal domain of the peptide inhibiting cell wall synthesis through lipid II binding and the C-terminal domain responsible for pore-formation. The focus of this study is the three amino acid 'hinge' region (N 20, M 21 and K 22 which separates these two domains and allows for conformational flexibility. As all lantibiotics are gene encoded, novel variants can be generated through manipulation of the corresponding gene. A number of derivatives in which the hinge region was altered have previously been shown to possess enhanced antimicrobial activity. Here we take this approach further by employing simultaneous, indiscriminate site-saturation mutagenesis of all three hinge residues to create a novel bank of nisin derivative producers. Screening of this bank revealed that producers of peptides with hinge regions consisting of AAK, NAI and SLS displayed enhanced bioactivity against a variety of targets. These and other results suggested a preference for small, chiral amino acids within the hinge region, leading to the design and creation of producers of peptides with hinges consisting of AAA and SAA. These producers, and the corresponding peptides, exhibited enhanced bioactivity against Lactococcus lactis HP, Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 13813, Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155 and Staphylococcus aureus RF122 and thus represent the first example of nisin derivatives that possess enhanced activity as a consequence of rational design.

  6. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finola E Moore

    Full Text Available Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  7. ENU mutagenesis reveals a novel phenotype of reduced limb strength in mice lacking fibrillin 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaynor Miller

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins 1 (FBN1 and 2 (FBN2 are components of microfibrils, microfilaments that are present in many connective tissues, either alone or in association with elastin. Marfan's syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA result from dominant mutations in the genes FBN1 and FBN2 respectively. Patients with both conditions often present with specific muscle atrophy or weakness, yet this has not been reported in the mouse models. In the case of Fbn1, this is due to perinatal lethality of the homozygous null mice making measurements of strength difficult. In the case of Fbn2, four different mutant alleles have been described in the mouse and in all cases syndactyly was reported as the defining phenotypic feature of homozygotes.As part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Mariusz, which exhibited muscle weakness along with hindlimb syndactyly. We identified an amber nonsense mutation in Fbn2 in this mouse mutant. Examination of a previously characterised Fbn2-null mutant, Fbn2(fp, identified a similar muscle weakness phenotype. The two Fbn2 mutant alleles complement each other confirming that the weakness is the result of a lack of Fbn2 activity. Skeletal muscle from mutants proved to be abnormal with higher than average numbers of fibres with centrally placed nuclei, an indicator that there are some regenerating muscle fibres. Physiological tests indicated that the mutant muscle produces significantly less maximal force, possibly as a result of the muscles being relatively smaller in Mariusz mice.These findings indicate that Fbn2 is involved in integrity of structures required for strength in limb movement. As human patients with mutations in the fibrillin genes FBN1 and FBN2 often present with muscle weakness and atrophy as a symptom, Fbn2-null mice will be a useful model for examining this aspect of the disease process further.

  8. Effectiveness of gamma-ray chronic irradiation on in vitro mutagenesis in crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeki Nagatomi

    2002-01-01

    Effects of chronic or acute irradiations were compared using in vitro culture on inducing the mutation in model crops. In chrysanthemum, combined method with irradiation and in vitro culture can solve the problem of chimera formation in induced mutants, and provided 10 times greater mutation frequency than usual plant irradiation. The chronic culture method showed the widest color spectrum, whereas, the acute culture indicated a relatively low mutation rate and a very limited flower color spectrum in chrysanthemum. Flower color mutation of the regenerators could be induced more from petals and buds than from leaves. These facts are supposed that the gene loci fully expressed on floral organs may be unstable for mutation by mutagenesis or culture. It may be likely to control a direction of desired mutation on using explants with specific gene loci activated. In sugarcane, the chronic culture method extended quantitative characteristics of regenerated clonal lines toward not only the negative but positive direction. On the other hand, the acute culture method showed lower quantitative mutation as the irradiation dose rose. In chronic irradiation, regenerated mutant lines in sugarcane indicate generally little decrease in chromosome number and wider variations with relatively less damage. In acute irradiation, regenerated mutant lines show remarkable decrease of chromosome numbers in sugarcane mutant lines as the irradiation dose rose. There is close positive correlation between chromosome number and biomass of each mutant line. The chromosome number estimation is a proper indicator to monitor damage of adopted irradiation methods. Possible reason why the chronic culture methods indicate higher frequency and wider spectrum on mutation is demonstrated. . Problems solved and prospect of chronic irradiation and in vitro techniques are discussed. (Author)

  9. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  10. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  11. High-spin nuclear traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, P.; Dracoulis, G.

    1994-01-01

    The reaction pathways in stars, where all the heavy elements in the Universe were formed, are inextricably linked with isomers that live long enough to capture a neutron or proton before they decay. These isomers usually have excitation energies below 0.1 MeV. It is also possible to find highly excited isomers, with several MeV of excitation energy, that are trapped because of their large angular momentum (or spin). But attempts to understand the long-lived highly excited isomers, sometimes known as ''spin traps'', have been hampered by the difficulty of producing this exotic form of nuclear matter. Now, a new generation of radioactive ion beams promises a revolution in the study of high-spin nuclear traps. (author)

  12. Laser traps for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voytas, P.A.; Behr, J.A.; Ghosh, A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L.A.; Simsarian, J.E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Xu, F.

    1996-01-01

    The techniques of laser cooling and trapping now make it possible to observe large samples of stable atoms in a small volume at low temperature. This capability was recently extended to radioactive isotopes. This opens up new opportunities for the investigation of fundamental symmetries through measurements using radioactive atoms. In this paper we will discuss several fundamental measurements in atomic systems and how the ability to trap radioactive atoms will play an important role in improving the precision of such measurements. Measurements of the effects of the weak interaction are of particular note since they are becoming quite precise. In particular, we will describe in detail the system developed at Stony Brook to trap radioactive alkali atoms and measure weak interaction effects in francium isotopes. (orig.)

  13. Sound trapping and dredging barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Yu, Wuzhou; Jiang, Zaixiu; Mao, Dongxing

    2017-06-01

    When sound barriers are installed on both sides of a noise source, degradation in performance is observed. Barriers having negative-phase-gradient surfaces successfully eliminate this drawback by trapping sound energy in between the barriers. In contrast, barriers can also be designed to "dredge" the energy flux out. An extended model considering higher-order diffractions, which resulted from the interplay of the induced surface wave and barrier surface periodicity, is presented. It is found that the sound dredging barriers provide a remarkable enhancement over the trapping ones, and hence have the potential to be widely used in noise control engineering.

  14. A live-trap and trapping technique for fossorial mammals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    comer of the door and prevents reopening by sliding into the slit at the top of the door. A hole is drilled through the back of the door housing unit and the door to accommodate an L-shaped wire (bent bicycle spoke) measuring 185 mm along the top of the trap, and a 60 mm portion which extends down into the interior.

  15. Ion trap architectures and new directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverns, James D.; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2017-12-01

    Trapped ion technology has seen advances in performance, robustness and versatility over the last decade. With increasing numbers of trapped ion groups worldwide, a myriad of trap architectures are currently in use. Applications of trapped ions include: quantum simulation, computing and networking, time standards and fundamental studies in quantum dynamics. Design of such traps is driven by these various research aims, but some universally desirable properties have lead to the development of ion trap foundries. Additionally, the excellent control achievable with trapped ions and the ability to do photonic readout has allowed progress on quantum networking using entanglement between remotely situated ion-based nodes. Here, we present a selection of trap architectures currently in use by the community and present their most salient characteristics, identifying features particularly suited for quantum networking. We also discuss our own in-house research efforts aimed at long-distance trapped ion networking.

  16. Plasmon assisted optical trapping: fundamentals and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Tsigaridas, Georgios N.; Gousetis, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    The field of optical trapping has dramatically grown due to implementation in various arenas including physics, biology, medicine and nanotechnology. Certainly, optical tweezers are an invaluable tool to manipulate a variation of particles, such as small dielectric spheres, cells, bacteria, chromosomes and even genes, by highly focused laser beams through microscope. As the main disadvantage of the conventional optical trapping systems is the diffraction limit of the incident light, plasmon assisted nanotrapping is reported as a suitable technique for trapping sub-wavelength metallic or dielectric particles. In this work, firstly, we report briefly on the basic theory of plasmon excitation, focusing on the interaction of nanoscale metallic structures with laser light. Secondly, experimental and numerical simulation results are also presented, demonstrating enhancement of the trapping efficiency of glass or SiO2 substrates, coated with Au and Ag nanostructures, with or without nanoparticles. The optical forces were calculated by measuring the particle's escape velocity calibration method. Finally, representative applications of plasmon assisted optical trapping are reviewed, from cancer therapeutics to fundamental biology and cell nanosurgery.

  17. Identification and characterization of genes underlying chitinolysis in Collimonas fungivorans Ter331

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsche, K.; De Boer, W.; Gerards, S.; Van den Berg, M.; Van Veen, J.A.; Leveau, J.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Through a combinatorial approach of plasposon mutagenesis, genome mining, and heterologous expression, we identified genes contributing to the chitinolytic phenotype of bacterium Collimonas fungivorans Ter331. One of five mutants with abolished ability to hydrolyze colloidal chitin carried its

  18. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prendergast, N.J.; Delcamp, T.J.; Smith, P.L.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-05-17

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 ..-->.. Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme.

  19. Mutagenesis and haploid culture for disease resistance in Brassica napus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, M.V.; Ahmad, I.; Ingram, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Most winter oilseed rape cultivars share parentage and therefore show little genetic diversity. There is no known resistance to Alternaria spp. in oilseed rape or in any related Brassica species. Experiments with tissue culture yielded only transient, non-genetic resistance. Therefore, mutagenesis may be used to generate heritable resistance to Alternaria spp. Gamma irradiation was applied to seeds of 'Bienvenue', secondary embryoids of cvs 'Primor' and 'Rapora', and buds of cvs 'Primor' and 'Ariana'. Isolated microspores from cv 'Ariana' and rapid cycling B. napus were also treated. The doses used ranged from 0-100 Gy for isolated microspores and buds, up to 600 Gy for seeds and 960 Gy for secondary embryoids. EMS was used to treat seeds of line WRG-42 (supplied by Nickersons RPB) and microspores of cv 'Bienvenue' and rapid cycling B. napus. Seeds were treated with up to 2.0% EMS for 0.2 h. before plating them on the culture medium. Seed irradiation up to 600 Gy did not reduce germination. M 1 and M 2 progenies were tested both in the laboratory and in field trials, and none of these were found to be resistant to Alternaria. However, considerable variation for other characters was observed. Haploid cultures from these plants were extremely difficult to regenerate, and for this reason no regenerant plants have been tested for resistance. For irradiated secondary embryoids the regeneration capacity decreased with increasing dose. Regenerated plants have been tested for resistance to Alternaria, but stable resistance was not observed. Haploid cultures were obtained from irradiated buds, using both anther and microspore culture. Low irradiation treatment was beneficial to developing embryoids. Some regenerants have been obtained from EMS treated microspores and seeds. Four plants have repeatedly given increased levels of resistance to A. brassicicola, and progenies are being tested to determine the genetic nature of the resistance. (author)

  20. Development of a high-frequency in vivo transposon mutagenesis system for Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Kazuyuki; Mimuro, Mamoru; Tsuchiya, Tohru

    2014-11-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) is the first sequenced photosynthetic organism and has two advantages: natural transformation and light-activated heterotrophic growth. Such characteristics have mainly promoted reverse genetic analysis in this organism, however, to date approximately 50% of genes are still annotated as 'unknown protein' or 'hypothetical protein'. Therefore, forward genetic analysis is required for the identification of significant genes responsible for photosynthesis and other physiological phenomena among the genes of unknown function. The in vivo transposon mutagenesis system is one of the major methods for random mutagenesis. However, present in vivo transposon mutagenesis systems for cyanobacteria face problems such as relatively low frequency of transposition and repeated transposition in the host cells. In this study, we constructed vectors based on a mini-Tn5-derived vector that was designed to prevent repeated transposition. Our vectors carry a hyperactive transposase and optimized recognition sequence of transposase, which were reported to enhance frequency of transposition. Using the vector, we succeeded in highly frequent transposition (9×10(-3) per recipient cell) in Synechocystis. Transposon insertion sites of 10 randomly selected mutants indicated that the insertion sites spread throughout the genome with low sequence dependency. Furthermore, one of the 10 mutants exhibited the slow-growing phenotype, and the mutant was functionally complemented by using our expression vector. Our system also worked with another model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, with high frequency. These results indicate that the developed system can be applied to the forward genetic analysis of a broad range of cyanobacteria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  2. Indeterminacy, sunspots, and development traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodyan, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, 1-2 (2005), s. 159-185 ISSN 0165-1889 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : indeterminacy * development trap * stochastic stability Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.691, year: 2005 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jedc.2003.04.011

  3. Efficiency of antlion trap construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertin, Arnold; Casas, Jérôme

    2006-09-01

    Assessing the architectural optimality of animal constructions is in most cases extremely difficult, but is feasible for antlion larvae, which dig simple pits in sand to catch ants. Slope angle, conicity and the distance between the head and the trap bottom, known as off-centring, were measured using a precise scanning device. Complete attack sequences in the same pits were then quantified, with predation cost related to the number of behavioural items before capture. Off-centring leads to a loss of architectural efficiency that is compensated by complex attack behaviour. Off-centring happened in half of the cases and corresponded to post-construction movements. In the absence of off-centring, the trap is perfectly conical and the angle is significantly smaller than the crater angle, a physical constant of sand that defines the steepest possible slope. Antlions produce efficient traps, with slopes steep enough to guide preys to their mouths without any attack, and shallow enough to avoid the likelihood of avalanches typical of crater angles. The reasons for the paucity of simplest and most efficient traps such as theses in the animal kingdom are discussed.

  4. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.F.; Blatt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers hold the promise of solving certain computational tasks much more efficiently than classical computers. We review recent experimental advances towards a quantum computer with trapped ions. In particular, various implementations of qubits, quantum gates and some key experiments are discussed. Furthermore, we review some implementations of quantum algorithms such as a deterministic teleportation of quantum information and an error correction scheme

  5. Efficiency of subaquatic light traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ditrich, Tomáš; Čihák, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2017), s. 171-184 ISSN 0165-0424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29857S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Heteroptera * Diptera * light trap Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 0.524, year: 2016

  6. Quantum Games in ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buluta, Iulia Maria; Fujiwara, Shingo; Hasegawa, Shuichi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided

  7. The rise of trapped populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April T Humble

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As border security increases and borders become less permeable, cross-border migration is becoming increasingly difficult, selective and dangerous. Growing numbers of people are becoming trapped in their own countries or in transit countries, or being forced to roam border areas, unable to access legal protection or basic social necessities.

  8. Quantum Games in ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia Maria [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: noa@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Fujiwara, Shingo [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujiwara@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Shuichi [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: hasegawa@q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-10-09

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided.

  9. Essential roles for imuA′- and imuB-encoded accessory factors in DnaE2-dependent mutagenesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Digby F.; Ndwandwe, Duduzile E.; Abrahams, Garth L.; Kana, Bavesh D.; Machowski, Edith E.; Venclovas, Česlovas; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), damage-induced mutagenesis is dependent on the C-family DNA polymerase, DnaE2. Included with dnaE2 in the Mtb SOS regulon is a putative operon comprising Rv3395c, which encodes a protein of unknown function restricted primarily to actinomycetes, and Rv3394c, which is predicted to encode a Y-family DNA polymerase. These genes were previously identified as components of an imuA-imuB-dnaE2–type mutagenic cassette widespread among bacterial genomes. Here, we c...

  10. Dietary flavonoids bind to mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 in nuclei, and inhibit chemical induced mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Fusao; Harada, Takasuke; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Aiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlight: • Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 is involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis. • Dietary flavonoids bind to and inhibit purified mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 helicase. • Dietary flavonoids show anti-mutagenic action. • Annexin A1 may serve as a putative target of cancer chemoprevention by flavonoids. - Abstract: In order to investigate the mechanisms of anti-mutagenic action by dietary flavonoids, we investigated if they inhibit mutation of the thymidine kinase (tk) gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein suppressed mutation of the tk gene induced in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and As 3+ . Flavone and flavonol were less effective. To establish that mutation of the tk gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by MMS and As 3+ is mediated through mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1, L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells were treated with annexin A1 anti-sense oligonucleotide. The treatment reduced mRNA as well as protein levels of annexin A1, and suppressed mutation of the tk gene. Nuclear extracts from L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells catalyzed translesion DNA synthesis with an oligonucleotide template containing 8-oxo-guanosine in an annexin A1 dependent manner. This translesion DNA synthesis was inhibited by the anti-mutagenic flavonoids, silibinin, quercetin and genistein, in a concentration dependent manner, but only slightly by flavone and flavonol. Because these observations implicate involvement of annexin A1 in mutagenesis, we examined if flavonoids suppress nuclear annexin A1 helicase activity. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein inhibited ssDNA binding, DNA chain annealing and DNA unwinding activities of purified nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1. Flavone and flavonol were ineffective. The apparent direct binding of anti-mutagenic flavonoids to the annexin A1 molecule was supported by fluorescence quenching. Taken together, these findings illustrate that nuclear annexin A1 may be a novel

  11. Dietary flavonoids bind to mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 in nuclei, and inhibit chemical induced mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Fusao, E-mail: fhirata@wayne.edu; Harada, Takasuke; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Aiko

    2014-01-15

    Highlight: • Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 is involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis. • Dietary flavonoids bind to and inhibit purified mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 helicase. • Dietary flavonoids show anti-mutagenic action. • Annexin A1 may serve as a putative target of cancer chemoprevention by flavonoids. - Abstract: In order to investigate the mechanisms of anti-mutagenic action by dietary flavonoids, we investigated if they inhibit mutation of the thymidine kinase (tk) gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein suppressed mutation of the tk gene induced in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and As{sup 3+}. Flavone and flavonol were less effective. To establish that mutation of the tk gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by MMS and As{sup 3+} is mediated through mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1, L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells were treated with annexin A1 anti-sense oligonucleotide. The treatment reduced mRNA as well as protein levels of annexin A1, and suppressed mutation of the tk gene. Nuclear extracts from L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells catalyzed translesion DNA synthesis with an oligonucleotide template containing 8-oxo-guanosine in an annexin A1 dependent manner. This translesion DNA synthesis was inhibited by the anti-mutagenic flavonoids, silibinin, quercetin and genistein, in a concentration dependent manner, but only slightly by flavone and flavonol. Because these observations implicate involvement of annexin A1 in mutagenesis, we examined if flavonoids suppress nuclear annexin A1 helicase activity. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein inhibited ssDNA binding, DNA chain annealing and DNA unwinding activities of purified nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1. Flavone and flavonol were ineffective. The apparent direct binding of anti-mutagenic flavonoids to the annexin A1 molecule was supported by fluorescence quenching. Taken together, these findings illustrate that nuclear annexin A1 may be

  12. ENU Mutagenesis Screen to Establish Motor Phenotypes in Wild-Type Mice and Modifiers of a Pre-Existing Motor Phenotype in Tau Mutant Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifier screening is a powerful genetic tool. While not widely used in the vertebrate system, we applied these tools to transgenic mouse strains that recapitulate key aspects of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, such as tau-expressing mice. These are characterized by a robust pathology including both motor and memory impairment. The phenotype can be modulated by ENU mutagenesis, which results in novel mutant mouse strains and allows identifying the underlying gene/mutation. Here we discuss this strategy in detail. We firstly obtained pedigrees that modify the tau-related motor phenotype, with mapping ongoing. We further obtained transgene-independent motor pedigrees: (i hyperactive, circling ENU 37 mice with a causal mutation in the Tbx1 gene—the complete knock-out of Tbx1 models DiGeorge Syndrome; (ii ENU12/301 mice that show sudden jerky movements and tremor constantly; they have a causal mutation in the Kcnq1 gene, modelling aspects of the Romano-Ward and Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndromes; and (iii ENU16/069 mice with tremor and hypermetric gait that have a causal mutation in the Mpz (Myelin Protein Zero gene, modelling Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1B. Together, we provide evidence for a real potential of an ENU mutagenesis to dissect motor functions in wild-type and tau mutant mice.

  13. Mice with alopecia, osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis due to mutation in Zdhhc13, a gene coding for palmitoyl acyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir N Saleem

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein palmitoylation has emerged as an important mechanism for regulating protein trafficking, stability, and protein-protein interactions; however, its relevance to disease processes is not clear. Using a genome-wide, phenotype driven N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-mediated mutagenesis screen, we identified mice with failure to thrive, shortened life span, skin and hair abnormalities including alopecia, severe osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis (both AA and AL amyloids depositions. Whole-genome homozygosity mapping with 295 SNP markers and fine mapping with an additional 50 SNPs localized the disease gene to chromosome 7 between 53.9 and 56.3 Mb. A nonsense mutation (c.1273A>T was located in exon 12 of the Zdhhc13 gene (Zinc finger, DHHC domain containing 13, a gene coding for palmitoyl transferase. The mutation predicted a truncated protein (R425X, and real-time PCR showed markedly reduced Zdhhc13 mRNA. A second gene trap allele of Zdhhc13 has the same phenotypes, suggesting that this is a loss of function allele. This is the first report that palmitoyl transferase deficiency causes a severe phenotype, and it establishes a direct link between protein palmitoylation and regulation of diverse physiologic functions where its absence can result in profound disease pathology. This mouse model can be used to investigate mechanisms where improper palmitoylation leads to disease processes and to understand molecular mechanisms underlying human alopecia, osteoporosis, and amyloidosis and many other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding and amyloidosis.

  14. Genomic and proteomic analyses of the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora provide insights into nematode-trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkui Yang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nematode-trapping fungi are "carnivorous" and attack their hosts using specialized trapping devices. The morphological development of these traps is the key indicator of their switch from saprophytic to predacious lifestyles. Here, the genome of the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora Fres. (ATCC24927 was reported. The genome contains 40.07 Mb assembled sequence with 11,479 predicted genes. Comparative analysis showed that A. oligospora shared many more genes with pathogenic fungi than with non-pathogenic fungi. Specifically, compared to several sequenced ascomycete fungi, the A. oligospora genome has a larger number of pathogenicity-related genes in the subtilisin, cellulase, cellobiohydrolase, and pectinesterase gene families. Searching against the pathogen-host interaction gene database identified 398 homologous genes involved in pathogenicity in other fungi. The analysis of repetitive sequences provided evidence for repeat-induced point mutations in A. oligospora. Proteomic and quantitative PCR (qPCR analyses revealed that 90 genes were significantly up-regulated at the early stage of trap-formation by nematode extracts and most of these genes were involved in translation, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall and membrane biogenesis. Based on the combined genomic, proteomic and qPCR data, a model for the formation of nematode trapping device in this fungus was proposed. In this model, multiple fungal signal transduction pathways are activated by its nematode prey to further regulate downstream genes associated with diverse cellular processes such as energy metabolism, biosynthesis of the cell wall and adhesive proteins, cell division, glycerol accumulation and peroxisome biogenesis. This study will facilitate the identification of pathogenicity-related genes and provide a broad foundation for understanding the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying fungi-nematodes interactions.

  15. Identification of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment Genes in Gene Therapy Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapy using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors is a promising approach to provide life-long correction for genetic defects. HSC gene therapy clinical studies have resulted in functional cures for several diseases, but in some studies clonal expansion or leukemia has occurred. This is due to the dyregulation of endogenous host gene expression from vector provirus insertional mutagenesis. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replicating retroviruses have been used extensively to identify genes that influence oncogenesis. However, retroviral mutagenesis screens can also be used to determine the role of genes in biological processes such as stem cell engraftment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential for vector insertion site data from gene therapy studies to provide novel insights into mechanisms of HSC engraftment. In HSC gene therapy studies dysregulation of host genes by replication-incompetent vector proviruses may lead to enrichment of repopulating clones with vector integrants near genes that influence engraftment. Thus, data from HSC gene therapy studies can be used to identify novel candidate engraftment genes. As HSC gene therapy use continues to expand, the vector insertion site data collected will be of great interest to help identify novel engraftment genes and may ultimately lead to new therapies to improve engraftment.

  16. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...

  17. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    mitochondrial genome mutagenesis, and antioxidants significantly rescue these events.

  18. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-01-01

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequen...

  19. Stokes Trap: Multiplexed particle trapping and manipulation using fluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Anish; Schroeder, Charles

    We report the development of the Stokes Trap, which is a multiplexed microfluidic trap for control over an arbitrary number of small particles in a microfluidic device. Our work involves the design and implementation of ``smart'' flow-based devices by coupling feedback control with microfluidics, thereby enabling new routes for the fluidic-directed assembly of particles. Here, we discuss the development of a new method to achieve multiplexed microfluidic trapping of an arbitrary number of particles using the sole action of fluid flow. In particular, we use a Hele-Shaw microfluidic cell to generate hydrodynamic forces on particles in a viscous-dominated flow defined by the microdevice geometry and imposed peripheral flow rates. This platform allows for a high degree of flow control over individual particles and can be used for manufacturing novel particles for fundamental studies, using fluidic-directed assembly. From a broader perspective, our work provides a solid framework for guiding the design of next-generation, automated on-chip assays.

  20. Advances in knowledge of mutagenesis at the molecular level in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilan, R.A.; Owais, W.M.; Rosichan, J.L.; Kleinhofs, A.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the densely and sparsely ionizing types of radiation in plant cells has been investigated. The indirect actions of physical mutagens in plant cells through the modifying influences of oxygen, water content, and temperature are well known. In terms of the nature of the mutations induced by physical mutagens in plants, a vast array of mutational events can be induced by neutrons, X-ray, gamma-ray, etc. It was determined that Na azides have been highly efficient mutagen in barley, peas, soybean, maize, Chlamydomonas, rice, yeast, Chinese hamster cells and certain strains of S. typhimurium and E. coli. Na azides were used as respiration inhibitor to investigate how chromosomes break and mutations are induced and/or repaired in the cells of irradiated barley seeds. Azides alone in the presence of O 2 induced about 6% mutation of chlorophyll-deficient seedlings which could be increased to 20% when the seeds had been treated in azide solutions at the pH values below the pKa of azides. When the seeds were presoaked for 15 hours at 1 deg C and 12 - 16 hrs at 20 deg C in aerated solution prior to azide treatment, 75% mutation was obtained. This mutation frequency is compared to 17% and 40 - 45% induced in barley by X-ray and ethyl methanesulfonate, respectively. It was shown that both L-cysteine and L-cysteine inhibited azide mutagenesis, and the inhibition seemed to be specific to azides. The waxy locus of barley controlling the starch composition is used to measure forward and reverse mutations and mutant recombination frequency on the grain per million pollen basis, and provides high genetic resolution and a detailed map of the genes. (Yamashita, S.)

  1. Principle and application of plant mutagenesis in crop improvement: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuff Oladosu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first step in plant breeding is to identify suitable genotypes containing the desired genes among existing varieties, or to create one if it is not found in nature. In nature, variation occurs mainly as a result of mutations and without it, plant breeding would be impossible. In this context, the major aim in mutation-based breeding is to develop and improve well-adapted plant varieties by modifying one or two major traits to increase their productivity or quality. Both physical and chemical mutagenesis is used in inducing mutations in seeds and other planting materials. Then, selection for agronomic traits is done in the first generation, whereby most mutant lines may be discarded. The agronomic traits are confirmed in the second and third generations through evident phenotypic stability, while other evaluations are carried out in the subsequent generations. Finally, only the mutant lines with desirable traits are selected as a new variety or as a parent line for cross breeding. New varieties derived by induced mutatgenesis are used worldwide: rice in Vietnam, Thailand, China and the United States; durum wheat in Italy and Bulgaria; barley in Peru and European nations; soybean in Vietnam and China; wheat in China; as well as leguminous food crops in Pakistan and India. This paper integrates available data about the impact of mutation breeding-derived crop varieties around the world and highlights the potential of mutation breeding as a flexible and practicable approach applicable to any crop provided that appropriate objectives and selection methods are used.

  2. The Use of Camera Traps in Wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    Yasin Uçarlı; Bülent Sağlam

    2013-01-01

    Camera traps are increasingly used in the abundance and density estimates of wildlife species. Camera traps are very good alternative for direct observation in case, particularly, steep terrain, dense vegetation covered areas or nocturnal species. The main reason for the use of camera traps is eliminated that the economic, personnel and time loss in a continuous manner at the same time in different points. Camera traps, motion and heat sensitive, can take a photo or video according to the mod...

  3. Sympathetic Cooling of Trapped Cd+ Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Blinov, B. B.; Deslauriers, L.; Lee, P.; Madsen, M. J.; Miller, R.; Monroe, C.

    2001-01-01

    We sympathetically cool a trapped 112Cd+ ion by directly Doppler-cooling a 114Cd+ ion in the same trap. This is the first demonstration of optically addressing a single trapped ion being sympathetically cooled by a different species ion. Notably, the experiment uses a single laser source, and does not require strong focusing. This paves the way toward reducing decoherence in an ion trap quantum computer based on Cd+ isotopes.

  4. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Mutagenesis - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demple, Bruce [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). School of Medicine

    2012-08-24

    The delicate balance among cellular pathways that control mutagenic changes in DNA will be the focus of the 2012 Mutagenesis Gordon Research Conference. Mutagenesis is essential for evolution, while genetic stability maintains cellular functions in all organisms from microbes to metazoans. Different systems handle DNA lesions at various times of the cell cycle and in different places within the nucleus, and inappropriate actions can lead to mutations. While mutation in humans is closely linked to disease, notably cancers, mutational systems can also be beneficial. The conference will highlight topics of beneficial mutagenesis, including full establishment of the immune system, cell survival mechanisms, and evolution and adaptation in microbial systems. Equal prominence will be given to detrimental mutation processes, especially those involved in driving cancer, neurological diseases, premature aging, and other threats to human health. Provisional session titles include Branching Pathways in Mutagenesis; Oxidative Stress and Endogenous DNA Damage; DNA Maintenance Pathways; Recombination, Good and Bad; Problematic DNA Structures; Localized Mutagenesis; Hypermutation in the Microbial World; and Mutation and Disease.

  5. Expanding the Lotus japonicus reverse genetics toolbox – Development of LORE1 retrotransposon mutagenesis and artificial miRNA-mediated silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

    2011-01-01

    . Prior to this project, the only reverse genetics resource available in Lotus was the TILLING resource. In an attempt to advance Lotus genetic studies, present study is focused on the development of two additional resources. The first is based on insertional mutagenesis and the second on harnessing post-transcriptional......Currently, the most common approach to studying Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genes is forward genetics in which a gene responsible for the studied phenotype is identified through map-based cloning. In reverse genetics, the activity of a gene of interest is modified to discover its mutant phenotype....... The protocols developed in the current project are now the cornerstone of a new LORE1 reverse genetics resource characterized by efficient mutant line generation and accurate mutation annotation. In parallel, artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) were designed based on both Arabidopsis and Lotus backbones...

  6. Dynamic array of dark optical traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, V.R.; Rodrigo, P.J.; Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic array of dark optical traps is generated for simultaneous trapping and arbitrary manipulation of multiple low-index microstructures. The dynamic intensity patterns forming the dark optical trap arrays are generated using a nearly loss-less phase-to-intensity conversion of a phase-encode...

  7. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trapping program. 31.16 Section 31.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge...

  8. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  9. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...

  10. Biased trapping issue on weighted hierarchical networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using a method based on generating functions, we determine explicitly the mean first-passage time (MFPT) for the trapping issue. Let parameter (0 < < 1) be the weight factor. We show that the efficiency of the trapping process depends on the parameter a; the smaller the value of a, the more efficient is the trapping ...

  11. Revealing trap depth distributions in persistent phosphors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Eeckhout, K.; Bos, A.J.J.; Poelman, D.; Smet, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent luminescence or afterglow is caused by a gradual release of charge carriers from trapping centers. The energy needed to release these charge carriers is determined by the trap depths. Knowledge of these trap depths is therefore crucial in the understanding of the persistent luminescence

  12. Identification and Characterization of Non-Cellulose-Producing Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Generated by Tn5 Transposon Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Xiao, Chaowen; Tien, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The acs operon of Gluconacetobacter is thought to encode AcsA, AcsB, AcsC, and AcsD proteins that constitute the cellulose synthase complex, required for the synthesis and secretion of crystalline cellulose microfibrils. A few other genes have been shown to be involved in this process, but their precise role is unclear. We report here the use of Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis to identify and characterize six non-cellulose-producing (Cel−) mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769. The genes disrupted were acsA, acsC, ccpAx (encoding cellulose-complementing protein [the subscript “Ax” indicates genes from organisms formerly classified as Acetobacter xylinum]), dgc1 (encoding guanylate dicyclase), and crp-fnr (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate nitrate reductase transcriptional regulator). Protein blot analysis revealed that (i) AcsB and AcsC were absent in the acsA mutant, (ii) the levels of AcsB and AcsC were significantly reduced in the ccpAx mutant, and (iii) the level of AcsD was not affected in any of the Cel− mutants. Promoter analysis showed that the acs operon does not include acsD, unlike the organization of the acs operon of several strains of closely related Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Complementation experiments confirmed that the gene disrupted in each Cel− mutant was responsible for the phenotype. Quantitative real-time PCR and protein blotting results suggest that the transcription of bglAx (encoding β-glucosidase and located immediately downstream from acsD) was strongly dependent on Crp/Fnr. A bglAx knockout mutant, generated via homologous recombination, produced only ∼16% of the wild-type cellulose level. Since the crp-fnr mutant did not produce any cellulose, Crp/Fnr may regulate the expression of other gene(s) involved in cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:24013627

  13. Yeast cytochrome c peroxidase: mutagenesis and expression in Escherichia coli show tryptophan-51 is not the radical site in compound I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishel, L.A.; Villafranca, J.E.; Mauro, J.M.; Kraut, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis, they have constructed a system for the mutation and expression of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP, EC 1.11.1.5) in Escherichia coli and applied it to test the hypothesis that Trp-51 is the locus of the free radical observed in compound I of CCP. The system was created by substituting a CCP gene modified by site-directed mutagenesis, CCP(MI), for the fol gene in a vector previously used for mutagenesis and overexpression of dihydrofolate reductase. E. coli transformed with the resulting plasmid produced the CCP(MI) enzyme in large quantities, more than 15 mg/L of cell culture, of which 10% is holo- and 90% is apo-CCP(MI). The apoenzyme was easily converted to holoenzyme by the addition of bovine hemin. Purified CCP(MI) has the same catalytic activity and spectra as bakers' yeast CCP. A mutation has been made in CCP(MI), Trp-51 to Phe. The Phe-51 mutant protein CCP(MI,F51) is fully active, and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum, at 89 K, of its oxidized intermediate, compound I, displays a strong sharp resonance at g = 2.004, which is very similar to the signal observed for compound I of both bakers' yeast CCP and CCP(MI). However, UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy revealed that the half-life of CCP(MI,F51) compound I at 23 0 C is only 1.4% of that observed for the compound I forms of CCP(MI) or bakers' yeast CCP. Thus, Trp-51 is not necessary for the formation of the free radical observed in compound I but appears to exert a significant influence on its stability

  14. Mutagenesis of tGCN5 core region reveals two critical surface residues F90 and R140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kinjal Rajesh; Chan, Yan M.; Lee, Man X.; Yang, Ching Yao; Voloshchuk, Natalya [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Montclare, Jin Kim, E-mail: jmontcla@poly.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutagenesis of the tGCN5 core region reveals two residues important for function. {yields} Developed a fluorescent lysate-based activity assay to assess mutants. {yields} Surface-exposed residues F90 and R140 of tGCN5 are critical for H3 acetylation. -- Abstract: Tetrahymena General Control Non-Derepressor 5 (tGCN5) is a critical regulator of gene transcription via acetylation of histones. Since the acetylation ability has been attributed to the 'core region', we perform mutagenesis of residues within the tGCN5 'core region' in order to identify those critical for function and stability. Residues that do not participate in catalysis are identified, mutated and characterized for activity, structure and thermodynamic stability. Variants I107V, Q114L, A121T and A130S maintain the acetylation function relative to wild-type tGCN5, while variants F90Y, F112R and R140H completely abolish function. Of the three non-functional variants, since F112 is mutated into a non-homologous charged residue, a loss in function is expected. However, the remaining two variants are mutated into homologous residues, suggesting that F90 and R140 are critical for the activity of tGCN5. While mutation to homologous residue maintains acetylation of histone H3 for the majority of the variants, the two surface-exposed residues, F90 and R140, appear to be essential for tGCN5 function, structure or stability.

  15. Systematic dissection and trajectory-scanning mutagenesis of the molecular interface that ensures specificity of two-component signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Capra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems enable bacteria to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental stimuli. Sensor histidine kinases transmit signals to their cognate response regulators via phosphorylation. The faithful transmission of information through two-component pathways and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk require exquisite specificity of histidine kinase-response regulator interactions to ensure that cells mount the appropriate response to external signals. To identify putative specificity-determining residues, we have analyzed amino acid coevolution in two-component proteins and identified a set of residues that can be used to rationally rewire a model signaling pathway, EnvZ-OmpR. To explore how a relatively small set of residues can dictate partner selectivity, we combined alanine-scanning mutagenesis with an approach we call trajectory-scanning mutagenesis, in which all mutational intermediates between the specificity residues of EnvZ and another kinase, RstB, were systematically examined for phosphotransfer specificity. The same approach was used for the response regulators OmpR and RstA. Collectively, the results begin to reveal the molecular mechanism by which a small set of amino acids enables an individual kinase to discriminate amongst a large set of highly-related response regulators and vice versa. Our results also suggest that the mutational trajectories taken by two-component signaling proteins following gene or pathway duplication may be constrained and subject to differential selective pressures. Only some trajectories allow both the maintenance of phosphotransfer and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk.

  16. Casting epPCR (cepPCR): A simple random mutagenesis method to generate high quality mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Ruff, Anna J; Arlt, Marcus; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    During the last decade, directed evolution has become a standard protein engineering strategy to reengineer proteins for industrial applications under high stress conditions (e.g., high temperature, extreme pH, ionic liquids, or organic solvents). The most commonly employed method for diversity generation to improve biocatalysts for these properties is random mutagenesis by error-prone polymerase chain reaction (epPCR). However, recent reports show that epPCR often fails to produce >70% of beneficial positions/amino acid exchanges which improve enzyme properties such as organic solvent or ionic liquid resistance. In this report, bsla (543 bp, small lipase gene from Bacillus subtilis) was divided into three fragments (147, 192, 204 bp). Each fragment was subjected to an epPCR with a high mutation load (22, 31, and 33 mutations per kb) in order to increase the number of identified beneficial positions while maintaining a fraction of active population which can efficiently be screened in agar plate or microtiter plate format. The use of this "casting epPCR" process termed as (cepPCR), doubles the number of identified beneficial positions (from 14% to 29%), when compared to standard epPCR for the BSLA enzyme model. A further increase to 39% of beneficial positions is obtainable through combination of cepPCR with the transversion biased sequence saturation mutagenesis (SeSaM) method. Furthermore, sequencing of up to 600 mutations per fragment provided valuable insights into the correlation of total throughput and number of identified beneficial positions as well as how an efficient balance of screening efforts to obtainable results can be achieved in directed evolution campaigns. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1921-1927. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  18. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. C.; Hamilton, P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a protocol for rotation measurement via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry using trapped ions. The ion trap based interferometer encloses a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without contrast loss. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb-Dicke regime, Doppler laser cooling should be sufficient to reach a sensitivity of { S }=1.4× {10}-6 {{rad}} {{{s}}}-1 {{{H}}{{z}}}-1/2. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Wes Campbell was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  19. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  20. Poverty Traps and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Tol, Richard S. J.

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED We use a demo-economic model to examine the question of whether climate change could widen or deepen poverty traps. The model includes two crucial mechanisms. Parents are risk averse when deciding how many children to have; fertility is high when infant survival is low. High fertility spreads scarce household resources thin, resulting in children being poorly educated. At the macro level, technological progress is slow because of decreasing returns to scale in agriculture. With h...

  1. Targeted mutagenesis in a human-parasitic nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer S Gang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes infect over 1 billion people worldwide and cause some of the most common neglected tropical diseases. Despite their prevalence, our understanding of the biology of parasitic nematodes has been limited by the lack of tools for genetic intervention. In particular, it has not yet been possible to generate targeted gene disruptions and mutant phenotypes in any parasitic nematode. Here, we report the development of a method for introducing CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene disruptions in the human-parasitic threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis. We disrupted the S. stercoralis twitchin gene unc-22, resulting in nematodes with severe motility defects. Ss-unc-22 mutations were resolved by homology-directed repair when a repair template was provided. Omission of a repair template resulted in deletions at the target locus. Ss-unc-22 mutations were heritable; we passed Ss-unc-22 mutants through a host and successfully recovered mutant progeny. Using a similar approach, we also disrupted the unc-22 gene of the rat-parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti. Our results demonstrate the applicability of CRISPR-Cas9 to parasitic nematodes, and thereby enable future studies of gene function in these medically relevant but previously genetically intractable parasites.

  2. Positron trapping at dislocations in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergersen, B.; McMullen, T.

    1977-01-01

    The trapping rate of positrons at dislocations in metals, and its temperature dependence, are calculated. Two different trapping processes, with the excess energy absorbed in either electron-hole pair formation or by phonon creation, are considered and the former is found to be the most important. An extension of the theory to include depletion of the positron density around the dislocations in a diffusion approximation is included. The trapping is found to be transition limited if the temperature is low or the trap potential shallow. At room temperature diffusion is important for deep traps. (author)

  3. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-01-01

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  4. Environmental Stress Induces Trinucleotide Repeat Mutagenesis in Human Cells by Alt-Nonhomologous End Joining Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2016-07-31

    Multiple pathways modulate the dynamic mutability of trinucleotide repeats (TNRs), which are implicated in neurodegenerative disease and evolution. Recently, we reported that environmental stresses induce TNR mutagenesis via stress responses and rereplication, with more than 50% of mutants carrying deletions or insertions-molecular signatures of DNA double-strand break repair. We now show that knockdown of alt-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) components-XRCC1, LIG3, and PARP1-suppresses stress-induced TNR mutagenesis, in contrast to the components of homologous recombination and NHEJ, which have no effect. Thus, alt-NHEJ, which contributes to genetic mutability in cancer cells, also plays a novel role in environmental stress-induced TNR mutagenesis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Intrinsic electron trapping in amorphous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Jack; Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas’ev, Valeri V.; Lisoni, Judit G.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate that electron trapping at intrinsic precursor sites is endemic in non-glass-forming amorphous oxide films. The energy distributions of trapped electron states in ultra-pure prototype amorphous (a)-HfO2 insulator obtained from exhaustive photo-depopulation experiments demonstrate electron states in the energy range of 2–3 eV below the oxide conduction band. These energy distributions are compared to the results of density functional calculations of a-HfO2 models of realistic density. The experimental results can be explained by the presence of intrinsic charge trapping sites formed by under-coordinated Hf cations and elongated Hf–O bonds in a-HfO2. These charge trapping states can capture up to two electrons, forming polarons and bi-polarons. The corresponding trapping sites are different from the dangling-bond type defects responsible for trapping in glass-forming oxides, such as SiO2, in that the traps are formed without bonds being broken. Furthermore, introduction of hydrogen causes formation of somewhat energetically deeper electron traps when a proton is immobilized next to the trapped electron bi-polaron. The proposed novel mechanism of intrinsic charge trapping in a-HfO2 represents a new paradigm for charge trapping in a broad class of non-glass-forming amorphous insulators.

  6. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  7. Trapping Dust to Form Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Growing a planet from a dust grain is hard work! A new study explores how vortices in protoplanetary disks can assist this process.When Dust Growth FailsTop: ALMA image of the protoplanetary disk of V1247 Orionis, with different emission components labeled. Bottom: Synthetic image constructed from the best-fit model. [Kraus et al. 2017]Gradual accretion onto a seed particle seems like a reasonable way to grow a planet from a grain of dust; after all, planetary embryos orbit within dusty protoplanetary disks, which provides them with plenty of fuel to accrete so they can grow. Theres a challenge to this picture, though: the radial drift problem.The radial drift problem acknowledges that, as growing dust grains orbit within the disk, the drag force on them continues to grow as well. For large enough dust grains perhaps around 1 millimeter the drag force will cause the grains orbits to decay, and the particles drift into the star before they are able to grow into planetesimals and planets.A Close-Up Look with ALMASo how do we overcome the radial drift problem in order to form planets? A commonly proposed mechanism is dust trapping, in which long-lived vortices in the disk trap the dust particles, preventing them from falling inwards. This allows the particles to persist for millions of years long enough to grow beyond the radial drift barrier.Observationally, these dust-trapping vortices should have signatures: we would expect to see, at millimeter wavelengths, specific bright, asymmetric structures where the trapping occurs in protoplanetary disks. Such disk structures have been difficult to spot with past instrumentation, but the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has made some new observations of the disk V1247 Orionis that might be just what were looking for.Schematic of the authors model for the disk of V1247 Orionis. [Kraus et al. 2017]Trapped in a Vortex?ALMAs observations of V1247 Orionis are reported by a team of scientists led by Stefan

  8. Direct Mutagenesis of Thousands of Genomic Targets using Microarray-derived Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Kosuri, Sriram; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering (MAGE) allows simultaneous mutagenesis of multiple target sites in bacterial genomes using short oligonucleotides. However, large-scale mutagenesis requires hundreds to thousands of unique oligos, which are costly to synthesize and impossible to scale...... operons in E. coli using this method, which we call Microarray-Oligonucleotide (MO)-MAGE. The resulting mutant library was characterized by high-throughput sequencing to show that all attempted insertions were estimated to have occurred at an average frequency of 0.02 % per loci with 0.4 average...

  9. The influence of glycerol on γ-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.G.; Krasavin, E.A.; Kozubek, S.; Amirtaev, K.G.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the modifying effect of glycerol on the survival rate and γ-radiation-induced mutagenesis of Salmonella typhimurium cells TA98, TA100 and TA102. The DMF value, with respect to the survival rate, was 2.05-0.20. The dependence of the yield of γ-radiation-induced mutants on radiation dose was described by the curve with a maximum; the mutation frequency M(D) was well described by a gradual function M(D)=kD x . DMF values of the induced mutagenesis amounted to 2 for strains TA100 and TA102, and 1.5 for strain TA98

  10. E. coli mismatch repair enhances AT-to-GC mutagenesis caused by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kota; Yamada, Yoko; Takahashi, Eizo; Arimoto, Sakae; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Negishi, Kazuo; Negishi, Tomoe

    2017-03-01

    Alkylating agents are known to induce the formation of O 6 -alkylguanine (O 6 -alkG) and O 4 -alkylthymine (O 4 -alkT) in DNA. These lesions have been widely investigated as major sources of mutations. We previously showed that mismatch repair (MMR) facilitates the suppression of GC-to-AT mutations caused by O 6 -methylguanine more efficiently than the suppression of GC-to-AT mutations caused by O 6 -ethylguanine. However, the manner by which O 4 -alkyT lesions are repaired remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the repair pathway involved in the repair of O 4 -alkT. The E. coli CC106 strain, which harbors Δprolac in its genomic DNA and carries the F'CC106 episome, can be used to detect AT-to-GC reverse-mutation of the gene encoding β-galactosidase. Such AT-to-GC mutations should be induced through the formation of O 4 -alkT at AT base pairs. As expected, an O 6 -alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) -deficient CC106 strain, which is defective in both ada and agt genes, exhibited elevated mutant frequencies in the presence of methylating agents and ethylating agents. However, in the UvrA-deficient strain, the methylating agents were less mutagenic than in wild-type, while ethylating agents were more mutagenic than in wild-type, as observed with agents that induce O 6 -alkylguanine modifications. Unexpectedly, the mutant frequencies decreased in a MutS-deficient strain, and a similar tendency was observed in MutL- or MutH-deficient strains. Thus, MMR appears to promote mutation at AT base pairs. Similar results were obtained in experiments employing double-mutant strains harboring defects in both MMR and AGT, or MMR and NER. E. coli MMR enhances AT-to-GC mutagenesis, such as that caused by O 4 -alkylthymine. We hypothesize that the MutS protein recognizes the O 4 -alkT:A base pair more efficiently than O 4 -alkT:G. Such a distinction would result in misincorporation of G at the O 4 -alkT site, followed by higher mutation frequencies in wild

  11. Stationary-state mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: a model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conjugational recombination, where the RecBCD enzyme is generally believed to be loaded on to DNA from a double- stranded end and uses its nuclease and helicase activities to generate an invasive 3H single-strand end. However, the effect of mutations in the strand transfer genes (ruvA, ruvB,. ruvC and recG) on SSM ...

  12. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Gould, M.; Cuppen, E.; Smits, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach

  13. Deletion Mutagenesis and Identification of Causative Mutations in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shangang; Li, Aixia; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David

    2018-01-01

    We describe a method for gamma-irradiation of mature maize seeds to generate mutants with opaque endosperm and reduced kernel fill phenotypes. We also describe methods for mapping mutants and identifying causal gene mutations. Using this method, a population of 1788M2 families and 47 Mo17 × F2s showing stable, segregating, and viable kernel phenotypes was developed. For molecular characterization of the mutants, we utilized a novel functional genomics platform that combines separate Bulked Segregant RNA and exome sequencing data sets (BSREx-seq) to map causative mutations and identify candidate genes within mapping intervals. We also describe the use of exome capture sequencing of F2 mutant and normal pools to perform mapping and candidate gene identification without the need for separate RNA-seq (BSEx-seq). To exemplify the utility of the deletion mutants for functional genomics and provide proof-of-concept for the bioinformatics platform, we summarize the identification of the causative deletion in two mutants. Mutant 937, which was characterized by BSREx-seq, harbors a 6203-bp in-frame deletion covering six exons within the Opaque-1 gene on chromosome 4. Preliminary investigation of opaque mutant 1486 with BSEx-seq shows a tight mapping interval and associated deletion on chromosome 10.

  14. Cyclic peptide inhibitors of lysine-specific demethylase 1 with improved potency identified by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasinghe, Isuru R; Woster, Patrick M

    2018-03-25

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is a chromatin-remodeling enzyme that plays an important role in cancer. Over-expression of LSD1 decreases methylation at histone 3 lysine 4, and aberrantly silences tumor suppressor genes. Inhibitors of LSD1 have been designed as chemical probes and potential antitumor agents. We recently reported the cyclic peptide 9, which potently and reversibly inhibits LSD1 (IC 50 2.1 μM; K i 385 nM). Systematic alanine mutagenesis of 9 revealed residues that are critical for LSD1 inhibition, and these mutated peptides were evaluated as LSD1 inhibitors. Alanine substitution at positions 2, 3, 4, 6 and 11-17 preserved inhibition, while substitution of alanine at positions 8 and 9 resulted in complete loss of activity. Cyclic mutant peptides 11 and 16 produced the greatest LSD1 inhibition, and 11, 16, 27 and 28 increased global H3K4me2 in K562 cells. In addition, 16, 27 and 28 promoted significant increases in H3K4me2 levels at the promoter sites of the genes IGFBP2 and FEZ1. Data from these LSD1 inhibitors will aid in the design of peptidomimetics with improved stability and pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient and heritable targeted mutagenesis in tomato plants in the first and later generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Changtian; Ye, Lei; Qin, Li; Liu, Xue; He, Yanjun; Wang, Jie; Chen, Lifei; Lu, Gang

    2016-04-21

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has successfully been used in various organisms for precise targeted gene editing. Although it has been demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 system can induce mutation in tomato plants, the stability of heredity in later generations and mutant specificity induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system in tomato plants have not yet been elucidated in detail. In this study, two genes, SlPDS and SlPIF4, were used for testing targeted mutagenesis in tomato plants through an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. A high mutation frequency was observed in all tested targets in the T0 transgenic tomato plants, with an average frequency of 83.56%. Clear albino phenotypes were observed for the psd mutants. High frequencies of homozygous and biallelic mutants were detected even in T0 plants. The majority of the detected mutations were 1- to 3-nucleotide deletions, followed by 1-bp insertions. The target mutations in the T0 lines were stably transmitted to the T1 and T2 generations, without new modifications or revision. Off-target activities associated with SlPDS and SlPIF4 were also evaluated by sequencing the putative off-target sites, and no clear off-target events were detected. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient tool for generating stable and heritable modifications in tomato plants.

  16. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  17. Portable Pbars, traps that travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.; Hynes, M.V.; Picklesimer, A.

    1987-10-01

    The advent of antiproton research utilizing relatively small scale storage devices for very large numbers of these particles opens the possibility of transporting these devices to a research site removed from the accelerator center that produced the antiprotons. Such a portable source of antiprotons could open many new areas of research and make antiprotons available to a new research community. At present antiprotons are available at energies down to 1 MeV. From a portable source these particles can be made available at energies ranging from several tens of kilovolts down to a few millielectron volts. These low energies are in the domain of interest to the atomic and condensed matter physicist. In addition such a source can be used as an injector for an accelerator which could increase the energy domain even further. Moreover, the availability of such a source at a university will open research with antiprotons to a broader range of students than possible at a centralized research facility. This report focuses on the use of ion traps, in particular cylindrical traps, for the antiproton storage device. These devices store the charged antiprotons in a combination of electric and magnet fields. At high enough density and low enough temperature the charged cloud will be susceptible to plasma instabilities. Present day ion trap work is just starting to explore this domain. Our assessment of feasibility is based on what could be done with present day technology and what future technology could achieve. We conclude our report with a radiation safety study that shows that about 10 11 antiprotons can be transported safely, however the federal guidelines for this transport must be reviewed in detail. More antiprotons than this will require special transportation arrangements. 28 refs., 8 figs

  18. The composite insect trap: an innovative combination trap for biologically diverse sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Russo

    Full Text Available Documentation of insect diversity is an important component of the study of biodiversity, community dynamics, and global change. Accurate identification of insects usually requires catching individuals for close inspection. However, because insects are so diverse, most trapping methods are specifically tailored to a particular taxonomic group. For scientists interested in the broadest possible spectrum of insect taxa, whether for long term monitoring of an ecosystem or for a species inventory, the use of several different trapping methods is usually necessary. We describe a novel composite method for capturing a diverse spectrum of insect taxa. The Composite Insect Trap incorporates elements from four different existing trapping methods: the cone trap, malaise trap, pan trap, and flight intercept trap. It is affordable, resistant, easy to assemble and disassemble, and collects a wide variety of insect taxa. Here we describe the design, construction, and effectiveness of the Composite Insect Trap tested during a study of insect diversity. The trap catches a broad array of insects and can eliminate the need to use multiple trap types in biodiversity studies. We propose that the Composite Insect Trap is a useful addition to the trapping methods currently available to ecologists and will be extremely effective for monitoring community level dynamics, biodiversity assessment, and conservation and restoration work. In addition, the Composite Insect Trap will be of use to other insect specialists, such as taxonomists, that are interested in describing the insect taxa in a given area.

  19. Solar Trap for Banana Drying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Food drying methods nowadays are mostly in high use of electricity and fuel which lead to high operational cost. This has resulted in a waste of energy and money due to the use of modern tools requires significant costs for implementation. Meanwhile, the traditional food drying process only uses sun rays in their process, where the process is far more efficient than the modern drying method. In this study, the test was conducted to determine the trapped solar heat energy requirements for the process of drying foods such as agricultural products, particularly bananas. The solar trap test by using solar trap container was carried out include determining the thermal energy requirement for drying, preparing equipment (solar trap container to trap solar energy, handling and drying tests on samples of bananas. The percentage amount of water removal and energy required for the drying process was found to be 48% and 134 J. The results of this study can determine that solar trap drying method is easier, quicker and more effective than the usual method of drying because it use natural solar energy. Several proposals have been suggested for improvement for future study, such as controlling the solar trap air in the container, replacing the trap solar wall with a darker color, examining the floors slope so that more solar traps collected and installing a small hose on the base of the container so that the water evaporated in the solar trap may exit through the route.

  20. Trapping leidenfrost drops with crenelations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupeux, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2011-09-09

    Drops placed on very hot solids levitate on a cushion of their own vapor, as discovered by Leidenfrost. This confers to these drops a remarkable mobility, which makes problematic their control and manipulation. Here we show how crenelated surfaces can be used to increase the friction of Leidenfrost drops by a factor on the order of 100, making them decelerate and be trapped on centimetric distances instead of the usual metric ones. We measure and characterize the friction force as a function of the design of the crenelations.

  1. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  2. Mutagenesis and mitotic recombination in Aspergillus niger, an expedition from gene to genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vondervoort, Peter Jozef Ida van de

    2007-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is a cosmopolitan fungus and its spores can be found in air and soil worldwide. This saprophyte is used in food biotechnology for the production of proteins, mainly enzymes and for the production of organic acids. In the production of proteins, several problems are encountered such

  3. Site-saturation mutagenesis of Glomerella cingulata cutinase gene for enhanced enzyme thermostability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanapi, Wan Nurhidayah Wan; Iuan-Sheau, Chin; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu

    2015-09-01

    Cutinase is an important biocatalyst for various industrial applications. This enzyme which has dual functionality comparable to esterases and lipases, is efficient in the hydrolysis of soluble esters and emulsified triacylglycerols. Naturally-occurring enzymes usually have disadvantages when applied in non-natural catalysis due to Glomerella cingulata cutinase enzyme thermostability. It is postulated that by increasing the rigidity at certain amino acid positions showing high mobility based on the three-dimensional structure of G. cingulata cutinase, the improvement in thermostability will be achieved. The amino acid N82 of G. cingulata cutinase was selected based on its high B-factor value determined via the B-FITTER program. Megaprimer PCR was employed to introduce mutations at the chosen site by randomization using NNK degenerate primers. About 300 transformants were selected for screening of positive cutinase variants. The N82_V14 cutinase variant was observed to be more thermostable at an almost 2-fold increase when exposed at 50°C for 1 hr as compared to the wild-type enzyme. This study may provide valuable information regarding thermal stability of cutinases denaturation at high temperatures.

  4. An ENU mutagenesis screen identifies novel and known genes involved in epigenetic processes in the mouse

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daxinger, L.; Harten, S.K.; Oey, H.; Epp, Trevor; Isbel, L.; Huang, E.; Whitelaw, N.; Apedaile, A.; Sorolla, A.; Yong, J.; Bharti, V.; Sutton, J.; Ashe, A.; Pang, Z.Y.; Wallace, N.; Gerhardt, D.J.; Blewitt, M.E.; Jeddeloh, J.A.; Whitelaw, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 9 (2013) ISSN 1465-6906 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : epigenetics * variegation * forward genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.465, year: 2013

  5. Targated mutagenesis and functional analysis of adipokinetic hormone-encoding gene in Drosophila

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sajwan, Suresh; Sidorov, Roman; Stašková, Tereza; Žaloudíková, Anna; Takasu, Y.; Kodrík, Dalibor; Žurovec, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 61, JUN 01 (2015), s. 79-86 ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S; GA ČR GA14-27816S; GA ČR GAP305/10/2406 EU Projects: European Commission(CZ) FP7/2007-2013 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : neuropeptide * carbohydrate metabolism * drome-Akh Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965174815000181

  6. Discovery of Novel Mammary Developmental and Cancer Genes Using ENU Mutagenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ormandy, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    .... In their second attempt, they are screening for reduced latency to palpable mammary tumors in response to expression of a doxycycline-inducible myc oncogene that is produced by the loss of a second...

  7. In vivo expression technology and signature-tagged mutagenesis screens for identifying mechanisms of survival of zoonotic foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Edward G

    2008-08-01

    High-throughput genetic screens provide great insights into the biochemistry and molecular biology of how bacteria sense, respond to, and propagate within their environments. Genomics era techniques such as microarrays and proteomics have great potential to increase our understanding of how foodborne pathogens grow and survive within animal and human hosts, in the environment and foods, and during thermal and nonthermal inactivation protocols. While these techniques are incredibly useful for studying gene expression in simplified in vitro conditions, it is much more challenging to pursue similar studies within more complex experimental models such as in vivo, within the food matrix, or within heterogeneous microbial populations. Techniques such as in vivo expression technology (IVET) and signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) provide alternatives for studying bacterial gene expression and growth requirements within these settings. These techniques are used extensively by the medical, veterinary, and plant research communities for identifying genes promoting the colonization and disease process, factors mediating commensalism between bacteria and their host, and genes that promote survival of environmental bacteria within natural settings. Research into the transmission and survival of foodborne pathogens from farm-to-fork would likely benefit from these techniques, however there are few reports describing their use for such purposes. This review will briefly cover the methods of IVET and STM, discuss how these techniques improved our understanding of the interactions between zoonotic foodborne pathogens and their animal hosts, and ask whether these techniques could be further exploited to better understand the survival of foodborne pathogens within the environment, within food matrices, and during inactivation protocols.

  8. Creation of Novel Protein Variants with CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Mutagenesis: Turning a Screening By-Product into a Discovery Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine F Donovan

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 screening has proven to be a versatile tool for genomics research. Based on unexpected results from a genome-wide screen, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated approach to mutagenesis, exploiting the allelic diversity generated by error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ to identify novel gain-of-function and drug resistant alleles of the MAPK signaling pathway genes MEK1 and BRAF. We define the parameters of a scalable technique to easily generate cell populations containing thousands of endogenous allelic variants to map gene functions. Further, these results highlight an unexpected but important phenomenon, that Cas9-induced gain-of-function alleles are an inherent by-product of normal Cas9 loss-of-function screens and should be investigated during analysis of data from large-scale positive selection screens.

  9. Identification of α-amylase by random and specific mutagenesis of Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis 13CCT strain isolated from extreme alkaline-saline soil of the former Lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-López, Juan Manuel; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Gómez-Acata, Selene; Hernández-Montañez, Zahuiti; Dendooven, Luc

    2014-05-01

    The alkaline α-amylase produced by Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis 13CC(T) strain was identified by random mutagenesis and confirmed by directed mutagenesis. A transposon mutagenesis approach was taken to identify the gene responsible for the degradation of starch in T. texcoconensis 13CC(T) strain. The deduced amino acids of the amy gene had a 99% similarity with those of Bacillus selenitireducens MLS10 and 97% with those of Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus YK9. The enzyme showed a maximum activity of 131.1 U/mL at 37 °C and pH 9.5 to 10.5. In situ activity of the enzyme determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed only one band with amylolytic activity. This is the first report of a bacterium isolated from the extreme alkaline-saline soil of the former Lake Texcoco (Mexico) with amylolytic activity in alkaline conditions while its potential as a source of amylases for the industry is discussed.

  10. Efficient method for site-directed mutagenesis in large plasmids without subcloning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louay K Hallak

    Full Text Available Commonly used methods for site-directed DNA mutagenesis require copying the entire target plasmid. These methods allow relatively easy modification of DNA sequences in small plasmids but become less efficient and faithful for large plasmids, necessitating full sequence verification. Introduction of mutations in larger plasmids requires subcloning, a slow and labor-intensive process, especially for multiple mutations. We have developed an efficient DNA mutagenesis technique, UnRestricted Mutagenesis and Cloning (URMAC that replaces subcloning steps with quick biochemical reactions. URMAC does not suffer from plasmid size constraints and allows simultaneous introduction of multiple mutations. URMAC involves manipulation of only the mutagenesis target site(s, not the entire plasmid being mutagenized, therefore only partial sequence verification is required. Basic URMAC requires two PCR reactions, each followed by a ligation reaction to circularize the product, with an optional third enrichment PCR step followed by a traditional cloning step that requires two restriction sites. Here, we demonstrate URMAC's speed, accuracy, and efficiency through several examples, creating insertions, deletions or substitutions in plasmids ranging from 2.6 kb to 17 kb without subcloning.

  11. Efficient method for site-directed mutagenesis in large plasmids without subcloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallak, Louay K; Berger, Kelly; Kaspar, Rita; Kwilas, Anna R; Montanaro, Federica; Peeples, Mark E

    2017-01-01

    Commonly used methods for site-directed DNA mutagenesis require copying the entire target plasmid. These methods allow relatively easy modification of DNA sequences in small plasmids but become less efficient and faithful for large plasmids, necessitating full sequence verification. Introduction of mutations in larger plasmids requires subcloning, a slow and labor-intensive process, especially for multiple mutations. We have developed an efficient DNA mutagenesis technique, UnRestricted Mutagenesis and Cloning (URMAC) that replaces subcloning steps with quick biochemical reactions. URMAC does not suffer from plasmid size constraints and allows simultaneous introduction of multiple mutations. URMAC involves manipulation of only the mutagenesis target site(s), not the entire plasmid being mutagenized, therefore only partial sequence verification is required. Basic URMAC requires two PCR reactions, each followed by a ligation reaction to circularize the product, with an optional third enrichment PCR step followed by a traditional cloning step that requires two restriction sites. Here, we demonstrate URMAC's speed, accuracy, and efficiency through several examples, creating insertions, deletions or substitutions in plasmids ranging from 2.6 kb to 17 kb without subcloning.

  12. Random mutagenesis of human serine racemase reveals residues important for the enzymatic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoffman, Hillary Elizabeth; Jirásková, Jana; Zvelebil, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2010), s. 59-79 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : D-serine * serine racemase * random mutagenesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  13. Virtual potentials for feedback traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonggun; Bechhoefer, John

    2012-12-01

    The recently developed feedback trap can be used to create arbitrary virtual potentials, to explore the dynamics of small particles or large molecules in complex situations. Experimentally, feedback traps introduce several finite time scales: There is a delay between the measurement of a particle's position and the feedback response, the feedback response is applied for a finite update time, and a finite camera exposure integrates motion. We show how to incorporate such timing effects into the description of particle motion. For the test case of a virtual quadratic potential, we give the first accurate description of particle dynamics, calculating the power spectrum and variance of fluctuations as a function of feedback gain, testing against simulations. We show that for small feedback gains, the motion approximates that of a particle in an ordinary harmonic potential. Moreover, if the potential is varied in time, for example by varying its stiffness, the work that is calculated approximates that done in an ordinary changing potential. The quality of the approximation is set by the ratio of the update time of the feedback loop to the relaxation time of motion in the virtual potential.

  14. Production and trapping of francium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atutov, S.N.; Biancalana, V.; Burchianti, A.; Calabrese, R.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Guidi, V.; Khanbekyan, A.; Mai, B.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Moi, L.; Sanguinetti, S.; Stancari, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Veronesi, S.

    2004-01-01

    A new facility has been constructed at the INFN Legnaro National Laboratory (LNL) for the production of francium isotopes via a fusion-evaporation nuclear reaction and a laser laboratory has been set up for francium trapping. Francium is produced inside a gold target and after diffusion desorbs from its surface as an ion. A secondary beam line delivers the francium ions to the trapping cell where they are neutralized and trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Details on the production, delivery and neutralization methods are presented. Preliminary results on trapped francium are also shown. Production rate of ≅ 10 6 ions/s and a trap population of about 100 atoms have been achieved

  15. Genetic labeling of neuronal subsets through enhancer trapping in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Kelsch

    Full Text Available The ability to label, visualize, and manipulate subsets of neurons is critical for elucidating the structure and function of individual cell types in the brain. Enhancer trapping has proved extremely useful for the genetic manipulation of selective cell types in Drosophila. We have developed an enhancer trap strategy in mammals by generating transgenic mice with lentiviral vectors carrying single-copy enhancer-detector probes encoding either the marker gene lacZ or Cre recombinase. This transgenic strategy allowed us to genetically identify a wide variety of neuronal subpopulations in distinct brain regions. Enhancer detection by lentiviral transgenesis could thus provide a complementary method for generating transgenic mouse libraries for the genetic labeling and manipulation of neuronal subsets.

  16. Identification of a Proton-Chloride Antiporter (EriC) by Himar1 Transposon Mutagenesis in Lactobacillus reuteri and Its Role in Histamine Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemarajata, P; Spinler, JK; Balderas, MA; Versalovic, J

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiome may modulate intestinal immunity by luminal conversion of dietary amino acids to biologically active signals. The model probiotic organism Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 is indigenous to the human microbiome, and converts the amino acid L-histidine to the biogenic amine, histamine. Histamine suppresses TNF production by human myeloid cells and is a product of L-histidine decarboxylation, which is a proton-facilitated reaction. A transposon mutagenesis strategy was developed based on a single-plasmid nisin-inducible Himar1 transposase/transposon delivery system for L. reuteri. A highly conserved proton-chloride antiporter gene (eriC), a gene widely present in the gut microbiome was discovered by Himar1 transposon (Tn)-mutagenesis presented in this study. Genetic inactivation of eriC by transposon insertion and genetic recombineering resulted in reduced ability of L. reuteri to inhibit TNF production by activated human myeloid cells, diminished histamine production by the bacteria and downregulated expression of histidine decarboxylase (hdc) cluster genes compared to those of WT 6475. EriC belongs to a large family of ion transporters that includes chloride channels and proton-chloride antiporters and may facilitate the availability of protons for the decarboxylation reaction, resulting in histamine production by L. reuteri. This report leverages the tools of bacterial genetics for probiotic gene discovery. The findings highlight the widely conserved nature of ion transporters in bacteria and how ion transporters are coupled with amino acid decarboxylation and contributed to microbiome-mediated immunomodulation. PMID:24488273

  17. Case Study: Trap Crop with Pheromone Traps for Suppressing Euschistus servus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say, can disperse from source habitats, including corn, Zea mays L., and peanut, Arachis hypogaea L., into cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. Therefore, a 2-year on-farm experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench spp. bicolor trap crop, with or without Euschistus spp. pheromone traps, to suppress dispersal of this pest to cotton. In 2004, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops (with or without pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Similarly, in 2006, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops and pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Thus, the combination of the sorghum trap crop and pheromone traps effectively suppressed dispersal of E. servus into cotton. Inclusion of pheromone traps with trap crops potentially offers additional benefits, including: (1 reducing the density of E. servus adults in a trap crop, especially females, to possibly decrease the local population over time and reduce the overwintering population, (2 reducing dispersal of E. servus adults from the trap crop into cotton, and (3 potentially attracting more dispersing E. servus adults into a trap crop during a period of time when preferred food is not prevalent in the landscape.

  18. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  19. How to detect trap cluster systems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandowski, Arkadiusz

    2008-01-01

    Spatially correlated traps and recombination centres (trap-recombination centre pairs and larger clusters) are responsible for many anomalous phenomena that are difficult to explain in the framework of both classical models, i.e. model of localized transitions (LT) and the simple trap model (STM), even with a number of discrete energy levels. However, these 'anomalous' effects may provide a good platform for identifying trap cluster systems. This paper considers selected cluster-type effects, mainly relating to an anomalous dependence of TL on absorbed dose in the system of isolated clusters (ICs). Some consequences for interacting cluster (IAC) systems, involving both localized and delocalized transitions occurring simultaneously, are also discussed

  20. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.

    1995-01-01

    The basic ideas of laser cooling and atom trapping will be discussed. These techniques have applications in spectroscopy, metrology, nuclear physics, biophysics, geophysics, and polymer science. (author)

  1. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  2. High Optical Access Trap 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-26

    The High Optical Access (HOA) trap was designed in collaboration with the Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer (MUSIQC) team, funded along with Sandia National Laboratories through IARPA's Multi Qubit Coherent Operations (MQCO) program. The design of version 1 of the HOA trap was completed in September 2012 and initial devices were completed and packaged in February 2013. The second version of the High Optical Access Trap (HOA-2) was completed in September 2014 and is available at IARPA's disposal.

  3. Laser-cooling and electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.; Migdall, A.L.; Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently it has been impossible to confine and trap neutral atoms using electromagnetic fields. While many proposals for such traps exist, the small potential energy depth of the traps and the high kinetic energy of available atoms prevented trapping. We review various schemes for atom trapping, the advances in laser cooling of atomic beams which have now made trapping possible, and the successful magnetic trapping of cold sodium atoms

  4. The expanding universe of transposon technologies for gene and cell engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivics Zoltán

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposable elements can be viewed as natural DNA transfer vehicles that, similar to integrating viruses, are capable of efficient genomic insertion. The mobility of class II transposable elements (DNA transposons can be controlled by conditionally providing the transposase component of the transposition reaction. Thus, a DNA of interest (be it a fluorescent marker, a small hairpin (shRNA expression cassette, a mutagenic gene trap or a therapeutic gene construct cloned between the inverted repeat sequences of a transposon-based vector can be used for stable genomic insertion in a regulated and highly efficient manner. This methodological paradigm opened up a number of avenues for genome manipulations in vertebrates, including transgenesis for the generation of transgenic cells in tissue culture, the production of germline transgenic animals for basic and applied research, forward genetic screens for functional gene annotation in model species, and therapy of genetic disorders in humans. Sleeping Beauty (SB was the first transposon shown to be capable of gene transfer in vertebrate cells, and recent results confirm that SB supports a full spectrum of genetic engineering including transgenesis, insertional mutagenesis, and therapeutic somatic gene transfer both ex vivo and in vivo. The first clinical application of the SB system will help to validate both the safety and efficacy of this approach. In this review, we describe the major transposon systems currently available (with special emphasis on SB, discuss the various parameters and considerations pertinent to their experimental use, and highlight the state of the art in transposon technology in diverse genetic applications.

  5. Optimizing Trap Design and Trapping Protocols for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, Justin M; Buitenhuis, Rosemarije; Hallett, Rebecca H

    2014-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is a recent invasive pest of fruit crops in North America and Europe. Carpophagous larvae render fruit unmarketable and may promote secondary rot-causing organisms. To monitor spread and develop programs to time application of controls, further work is needed to optimize trap design and trapping protocols for adult D. suzukii. We compared commercial traps and developed a new, easy-to-use plastic jar trap that performed well compared with other designs. For some trap types, increasing the entry area led to increased D. suzukii captures and improved selectivity for D. suzukii when populations were low. However, progressive entry area enlargement had diminishing returns, particularly for commercial traps. Unlike previous studies, we found putting holes in trap lids under a close-fitting cover improved captures compared with holes on sides of traps. Also, red and black traps outperformed yellow and clear traps when traps of all colors were positioned 10-15 cm apart above crop foliage. In smaller traps, attractant surface area and entry area, but not other trap features (e.g., headspace volume), appeared to affect D. suzukii captures. In the new, plastic jar trap, tripling attractant volume (360 vs 120 ml) and weekly attractant replacement resulted in the highest D. suzukii captures, but in the larger commercial trap these measures only increased by-catch of large-bodied Diptera. Overall, the plastic jar trap with large entry area is affordable, durable, and can hold high attractant volumes to maximize D. suzukii capture and selectivity. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of Neisseria meningitidis in human whole blood and mutagenesis studies identify virulence factors involved in blood survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Echenique-Rivera

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During infection Neisseria meningitidis (Nm encounters multiple environments within the host, which makes rapid adaptation a crucial factor for meningococcal survival. Despite the importance of invasion into the bloodstream in the meningococcal disease process, little is known about how Nm adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. To address this, we performed a time-course transcriptome analysis using an ex vivo model of human whole blood infection. We observed that Nm alters the expression of ≈30% of ORFs of the genome and major dynamic changes were observed in the expression of transcriptional regulators, transport and binding proteins, energy metabolism, and surface-exposed virulence factors. In particular, we found that the gene encoding the regulator Fur, as well as all genes encoding iron uptake systems, were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of regulated genes encoding for surface-exposed proteins involved in Nm pathogenesis allowed us to better understand mechanisms used to circumvent host defenses. During blood infection, Nm activates genes encoding for the factor H binding proteins, fHbp and NspA, genes encoding for detoxifying enzymes such as SodC, Kat and AniA, as well as several less characterized surface-exposed proteins that might have a role in blood survival. Through mutagenesis studies of a subset of up-regulated genes we were able to identify new proteins important for survival in human blood and also to identify additional roles of previously known virulence factors in aiding survival in blood. Nm mutant strains lacking the genes encoding the hypothetical protein NMB1483 and the surface-exposed proteins NalP, Mip and NspA, the Fur regulator, the transferrin binding protein TbpB, and the L-lactate permease LctP were sensitive to killing by human blood. This increased knowledge of how Nm responds to adaptation in blood could also be helpful to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to control the devastating

  7. In Vitro Study of Mutagenesis Induced by Crocidolite-Exposed Alveolar Macrophages NR8383 in Cocultured Big Blue Rat2 Embryonic Fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, Y.; Gate, L.; Darne, C.; Bottin, M.C.; Langlais, C.

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos-induced mutagenicity in the lung may involve reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) released by alveolar macrophages. With the aim of proposing an alternative in vitro mutagenesis test, a co culture system of rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) and transgenic Big Blue Rat 2 embryonic fibroblasts was developed and tested with a crocidolite sample. Crocidolite exposure induced no detectable increase in ROS production from NR8383, contrasting with the oxidative burst that occurred following a brief exposure (1 hour) to zymosan, a known macrophage activator. In separated co cultures, crocidolite and zymosan induced different changes in the gene expressions involved in cellular inflammation in NR8383 and Big Blue. In particular, both particles induced up-regulation of iNOS expression in Big Blue, suggesting the formation of potentially genotoxic nitrogen species. However, crocidolite exposure in separated or mixed co cultures induced no mutagenic effects whereas an increase in Big Blue mutants was detected after exposure to zymosan in mixed co cultures. NR8383 activation by crocidolite is probably insufficient to induce in vitro mutagenic events. The mutagenesis assay based on the co culture of NR8383 and Big Blue cannot be used as an alternative in vitro method to assess the mutagenic properties of asbestos fibres.

  8. One-Tube-Only Standardized Site-Directed Mutagenesis: An Alternative Approach to Generate Amino Acid Substitution Collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janire Mingo

    Full Text Available Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM is a powerful tool to create defined collections of protein variants for experimental and clinical purposes, but effectiveness is compromised when a large number of mutations is required. We present here a one-tube-only standardized SDM approach that generates comprehensive collections of amino acid substitution variants, including scanning- and single site-multiple mutations. The approach combines unified mutagenic primer design with the mixing of multiple distinct primer pairs and/or plasmid templates to increase the yield of a single inverse-PCR mutagenesis reaction. Also, a user-friendly program for automatic design of standardized primers for Ala-scanning mutagenesis is made available. Experimental results were compared with a modeling approach together with stochastic simulation data. For single site-multiple mutagenesis purposes and for simultaneous mutagenesis in different plasmid backgrounds, combination of primer sets and/or plasmid templates in a single reaction tube yielded the distinct mutations in a stochastic fashion. For scanning mutagenesis, we found that a combination of overlapping primer sets in a single PCR reaction allowed the yield of different individual mutations, although this yield did not necessarily follow a stochastic trend. Double mutants were generated when the overlap of primer pairs was below 60%. Our results illustrate that one-tube-only SDM effectively reduces the number of reactions required in large-scale mutagenesis strategies, facilitating the generation of comprehensive collections of protein variants suitable for functional analysis.

  9. Targeted mutagenesis of the Clostridium acetobutylicum acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksley, Clare M; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hengzheng; Redl, Stephanie; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P

    2012-11-01

    The production of the chemical solvents acetone and butanol by the bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum was one of the first large-scale industrial processes to be developed, and in the first part of the last century ranked second in importance only to ethanol production. After a steep decline in its industrial use, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process, with a particular emphasis on butanol production. In order to generate strains suitable for efficient use on an industrial scale, metabolic engineering is required to alter the AB ratio in favour of butanol, and eradicate the production of unwanted products of fermentation. Using ClosTron technology, a large-scale targeted mutagenesis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was carried out, generating a set of 10 mutants, defective in alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (adhE1, adhE2), butanol dehydrogenases A and B (bdhA, bdhB), phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb), acetate kinase (ack), acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), CoA transferase (ctfA/ctfB), and a previously uncharacterised putative alcohol dehydrogenase (CAP0059). However, inactivation of the main hydrogenase (hydA) and thiolase (thl) could not be achieved. Constructing such a series of mutants is paramount for the acquisition of information on the mechanism of solvent production in this organism, and the subsequent development of industrial solvent producing strains. Unexpectedly, bdhA and bdhB mutants did not affect solvent production, whereas inactivation of the previously uncharacterised gene CAP0059 resulted in increased acetone, butanol, and ethanol formation. Other mutants showed predicted phenotypes, including a lack of acetone formation (adc, ctfA, and ctfB mutants), an inability to take up acids (ctfA and ctfB mutants), and a much reduced acetate formation (ack mutant). The adhE1 mutant in particular produced very little solvents, demonstrating that this gene was indeed the main contributor to

  10. Endoglucanase enzyme protein engineering by site-directed mutagenesis to improve the enzymatic properties and its expression in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Nikzad Jamnani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fossil fuel is an expensive and finite energy source. Therefore, the use of renewable energy and biofuels production has been taken into consideration. One of the most suitable raw materials for biofuels is cellulosic compounds. Only microorganisms that contain cellulose enzymes can decompose cellulose and fungus of Trichodermareesei is the most important producer of this enzyme. Methods: In this study the nucleotide sequence of endoglucanase II, which is the starter of attack to cellulose chains, synthesized from amino acid sequence of this enzyme in fungus T.reesei and based on codon usage in the host; yeast Pichiapastoris. To produce optimized enzyme and to decrease the production time and enzyme price, protein engineering will be used. There are some methods to improve the enzymatic properties like site-directed mutagenesis in which amino-acid replacement occur. In this study two mutations were induced in endoglucanase enzyme gene by PCR in which free syctein positions 169 and 393 were switched to valine and histidine respectively. Then this gene was inserted into the pPinka expression vector and cloned in Escherichia coli. The recombinant plasmids were transferred into P.pastoris competent cells with electroporation, recombinant yeasts were cultured in BMMY medium and induced with methanol. Results: The sequencing of gene proved the induction of the two mutations and the presence of recombinant enzyme was confirmed by dinitrosalicilic acid method and SDS-PAGE. Conclusion: Examination of biochemical properties revealed that the two mutations simultaneously decreased catalytic power, thermal stability and increased the affinity of enzyme and substrate.

  11. Collective excitations of harmonically trapped ideal gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Lazarides, A.

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the collective excitations of an ideal gas confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. We give an exact solution to the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation; as expected for a single-component system, the associated mode frequencies are integer multiples of the trapping frequency. We show

  12. Modes of oscillation in radiofrequency Paul traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landa, H.; Reznik, B.; Drewsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the time-dependent dynamics of ion crystals in radiofrequency traps. The problem of stable trapping of general threedimensional crystals is considered and the validity of the pseudopotential approximation is discussed. We analytically derive the micromotion amplitude of the ions...

  13. An Experimental Analysis of Social Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechner, Kevin C.

    1977-01-01

    Social traps, such as the overgrazing of pasturelands, overpopulation, and the extinction of species, are situations where individuals in a group respond for their own advantage in a manner damaging to the group. Alaboratory analog was devised to simulate conditions that produce social traps. The intent was to cause an immediate positive…

  14. Tunneling of trapped-atom Bose condensates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tunneling of trapped-atom Bose condensates. SUBODH R SHENOY. Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 586, Trieste 34100, Italy. Abstract. We obtain the dynamics in number and phase difference, for Bose condensates that tun- nel between two wells of a double-well atomic trap, using the ...

  15. Biased trapping issue on weighted hierarchical networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hierarchical network. Here, we focus on a particular case with the trap located at the node with the highest degree. We derive rigorous solution to the MFPT that characterizes the trapping process. Moreover ..... The weighted networks can mimic some real-world natural and social systems to some extent [20–22]. We focus ...

  16. Lobster trap detection at the Saba Bank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    According to previous studies and anecdotal evidence there are a lot of lost lobster traps at the Saba Bank. One study estimated the loss to be between 210 and 795 lobster traps per year. The Saba Bank is an approximately 2,200 km2 submerged area and spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) is one of the

  17. Astroturf seed traps for studying hydrochory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, M; Geertsema, J; Chang, ER; Veeneklaas, RM; Carey, PD; Bakker, JP

    1. Astroturf mats can effectively trap diaspores dispersed by tidal water. 2. Within four tidal inundations, up to 745 propagules per m(2) and between three and eight different species per astroturf mat were trapped. Overall, 15 different species were collected on the astroturf mats, 10 of which

  18. Measuring oxide trapping parameters in MOS structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, J.

    1978-01-01

    System for controlled injection of electrons or holes into oxide layer of MOS capacitor can be used to measure oxide trapping parameters. Since trapping mechanisms can cause degradation and ultimate failure of MOS elements exposed to ionizing radiation, system can be helpful in predicting device tolerance.

  19. Insects in IBL-4 pine weevil traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Skrzecz

    2003-01-01

    Pipe traps (IBL-4) are used in Polish coniferous plantations to monitor and control the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.). This study was conducted in a one-year old pine plantation established on a reforested clear-cut area in order to evaluate the impact of these traps on non-target insects. Evaluation of the catches indicated that species of

  20. Spectral intensity distribution of trapped fermions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature being very low, trapped cold atomic gases are in the quantum degener- acy regime. In this regime bosons ... that this ideal Fermi system, in the presence of an isotropic harmonic trapping potential, is very interesting and we consider ... function of the system as an example. The dynamical response function, ...

  1. Inelastic collision rates of trapped metastable hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landhuis, D; Matos, L; Moss, SC; Steinberger, JK; Vant, K; Willmann, L; Greytak, TJ; Kleppner, D

    We report the first detailed decay studies of trapped metastable (2S) hydrogen. By two-photon excitation of ultracold H samples, we have produced clouds of at least 5x10(7) magnetically trapped 2S atoms at densities greater than 4x10(10) cm(-3) and temperatures below 100 muK. At these densities and

  2. Optical trapping at low numerical aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallinga, S.

    2011-01-01

    A theory of optical trapping at low Numerical Aperture (NA) is presented. The theory offers an analytical description of the competition between the stabilizing gradient and destabilizing scattering force. The trade-off can be characterized by a single dimensionless trapping parameter, which

  3. Influence of trap construction on mosquito capture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebesta, Oldřich; Peško, Juraj; Gelbič, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2012), s. 209-215 ISSN 1934-7391 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : CDC miniature light traps * baited lard-can traps * mosquitoes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  4. Depolarization of UCN stored in material traps

    CERN Document Server

    Serebrov, A; Lasakov, M; Rudnev, Y; Krasnoschekova, I A; Geltenbort, P; Butterworth, J; Bowles, T; Morris, C; Seestrom, S; Smith, D; Young, A R

    2000-01-01

    Depolarization of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in material traps was first observed. The probability of UCN spin flip per reflection depends on the trap material and varies from 7x10 sup - sup 6 (beryllium) to 10 sup - sup 4 (glass).

  5. Depolarization of UCN stored in material traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Lasakov, M.; Rudnev, Yu.; Krasnoshekova, I.; Geltenbort, P.; Butterworth, J.; Bowles, T.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Smith, D.; Young, A.R

    2000-02-11

    Depolarization of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in material traps was first observed. The probability of UCN spin flip per reflection depends on the trap material and varies from 7x10{sup -6} (beryllium) to 10{sup -4} (glass)

  6. Cold and trapped metastable noble gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassen, W.; Cohen-Tannoudji, C.; Leduc, M.; Boiron, D.; Westbrook, C.I.; Truscott, A.; Baldwin, K.; Birkl, G.; Cancio, P.; Trippenbach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental work on cold, trapped metastable noble gases is reviewed. The aspects which distinguish work with these atoms from the large body of work on cold, trapped atoms in general is emphasized. These aspects include detection techniques and collision processes unique to metastable atoms.

  7. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  8. Enhanced trapping of stable flies via olfactory and visual cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult stable flies are highly attracted to the so-called Alsynite cylinder trap; however this trap is expensive. Here we report the development of a cheaper and better white panel trap with options of adding visual and olfactory stimuli for enhanced stable fly trapping. The white panel trap attracte...

  9. Improving ethanol fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high-gravity fermentation through chemical mutagenesis and meiotic recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Ding, Wen-Tao; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Wang, Jing-Yu [Tianjin Univ. (China). Dept. of Biochemical Engineering

    2011-08-15

    Genome shuffling is an efficient way to improve complex phenotypes under the control of multiple genes. For the improvement of strain's performance in very high-gravity (VHG) fermentation, we developed a new method of genome shuffling. A diploid ste2/ste2 strain was subjected to EMS (ethyl methanesulfonate) mutagenesis followed by meiotic recombination-mediated genome shuffling. The resulting haploid progenies were intrapopulation sterile and therefore haploid recombinant cells with improved phenotypes were directly selected under selection condition. In VHG fermentation, strain WS1D and WS5D obtained by this approach exhibited remarkably enhanced tolerance to ethanol and osmolarity, increased metabolic rate, and 15.12% and 15.59% increased ethanol yield compared to the starting strain W303D, respectively. These results verified the feasibility of the strain improvement strategy and suggested that it is a powerful and high throughput method for development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with desired phenotypes that is complex and cannot be addressed with rational approaches. (orig.)

  10. High-throughput sequencing and mutagenesis to accelerate the domestication of Microlaena stipoides as a new food crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapter, Frances M; Cross, Michael; Ablett, Gary; Malory, Sylvia; Chivers, Ian H; King, Graham J; Henry, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Global food demand, climatic variability and reduced land availability are driving the need for domestication of new crop species. The accelerated domestication of a rice-like Australian dryland polyploid grass, Microlaena stipoides (Poaceae), was targeted using chemical mutagenesis in conjunction with high throughput sequencing of genes for key domestication traits. While M. stipoides has previously been identified as having potential as a new grain crop for human consumption, only a limited understanding of its genetic diversity and breeding system was available to aid the domestication process. Next generation sequencing of deeply-pooled target amplicons estimated allelic diversity of a selected base population at 14.3 SNP/Mb and identified novel, putatively mutation-induced polymorphisms at about 2.4 mutations/Mb. A 97% lethal dose (LD₉₇) of ethyl methanesulfonate treatment was applied without inducing sterility in this polyploid species. Forward and reverse genetic screens identified beneficial alleles for the domestication trait, seed-shattering. Unique phenotypes observed in the M2 population suggest the potential for rapid accumulation of beneficial traits without recourse to a traditional cross-breeding strategy. This approach may be applicable to other wild species, unlocking their potential as new food, fibre and fuel crops.

  11. High-throughput sequencing and mutagenesis to accelerate the domestication of Microlaena stipoides as a new food crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances M Shapter

    Full Text Available Global food demand, climatic variability and reduced land availability are driving the need for domestication of new crop species. The accelerated domestication of a rice-like Australian dryland polyploid grass, Microlaena stipoides (Poaceae, was targeted using chemical mutagenesis in conjunction with high throughput sequencing of genes for key domestication traits. While M. stipoides has previously been identified as having potential as a new grain crop for human consumption, only a limited understanding of its genetic diversity and breeding system was available to aid the domestication process. Next generation sequencing of deeply-pooled target amplicons estimated allelic diversity of a selected base population at 14.3 SNP/Mb and identified novel, putatively mutation-induced polymorphisms at about 2.4 mutations/Mb. A 97% lethal dose (LD₉₇ of ethyl methanesulfonate treatment was applied without inducing sterility in this polyploid species. Forward and reverse genetic screens identified beneficial alleles for the domestication trait, seed-shattering. Unique phenotypes observed in the M2 population suggest the potential for rapid accumulation of beneficial traits without recourse to a traditional cross-breeding strategy. This approach may be applicable to other wild species, unlocking their potential as new food, fibre and fuel crops.

  12. GAMMASPHERE: Correction technique for detector charge trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    GAMMASPHERE uses 110 very large germanium detectors. Such detectors exhibit charge trapping effects on energy resolution initially due to a native electron trap that is present in virtually all germanium. Furthermore, radiation damage is a serious problem in GAMMASPHERE experiments, producing hole traps that degrade resolution and eventually require annealing to restore the original performance. The technique discussed here uses the current pulse shape from a detector to develop a parameter related to the radius of the largest interaction in the ``track`` of a gamma ray in the detector. Since the charge trapping loss in a signal can be related to the distance carriers travel, the ``radius`` parameter can be used by software to apply a trap correction to the signal.

  13. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  14. Sodium azide mutagenesis in wheat: Mutants with golden glumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, K.A.; Jafri, K.A.; Arain, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    In bread wheat, Triticum aestivum L. (2n=6x=42, AABBDD), detection of induced mutations is hampered by the presence of duplicate and triplicate genes. Induced changes in spike characteristics are known, but mutants with changed glume colour do not seem to have been reported. Physical mutagens such as gamma rays, thermal neutrons and fast neutrons, and chemical mutagens like EMS, El, dES and NEH have been extensively used for induction of mutations in bread wheat but it seems as if these mutagens did not induce mutants with changed glume colour. We used sodium azide for inducing mutations in the widely adapted cultivar 'Sonalika', which is characterized by brown glume colour. Presoaked seeds were treated with 0.2M sodium azide for 3 hours. Three spikes were harvested from each M 1 plant. M 2 generation was space-planted as spike progeny. We were successful in identifying 3 mutants with golden glumes. The mutants resemble 'Sonalika' in other spike characteristics. The mutants glume colour was confirmed in M 3 . The mutants were also evaluated for agronomically important characteristics. Some characters were significantly different from the parent. Glume colours may be useful as genetic markers since such characters are less influenced by the environment. Our investigation confirms that also agronomically useful genetic variation may be readily induced in bread wheat through sodium azide

  15. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Melloni N. [University of Memphis; Dunning, Jonathan P [University of Memphis; Wiley, Ronald G [Vanderbilt University and Veterans Administration, Nashville, TN; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  16. Library construction and evaluation for site saturation mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Bradford; Walton, Adam Z; Stewart, Jon D

    2013-06-10

    We developed a method for creating and evaluating site-saturation libraries that consistently yields an average of 27.4±3.0 codons of the 32 possible within a pool of 95 transformants. This was verified by sequencing 95 members from 11 independent libraries within the gene encoding alkene reductase OYE 2.6 from Pichia stipitis. Correct PCR primer design as well as a variety of factors that increase transformation efficiency were critical contributors to the method's overall success. We also developed a quantitative analysis of library quality (Q-values) that defines library degeneracy. Q-values can be calculated from standard fluorescence sequencing data (capillary electropherograms) and the degeneracy predicted from an early stage of library construction (pooled plasmids from the initial transformation) closely matched that observed after ca. 1000 library members were sequenced. Based on this experience, we suggest that this analysis can be a useful guide when applying our optimized protocol to new systems, allowing one to focus only on good-quality libraries and reject substandard libraries at an early stage. This advantage is particularly important when lower-throughput screening techniques such as chiral-phase GC must be employed to identify protein variants with desirable properties, e.g., altered stereoselectivities or when multiple codons are targeted for simultaneous randomization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation induced mutagenesis in soybean (Glycine Max L. Merrill)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakode, M.M.; Nandanwar, R.S.; Patil, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of gamma rays (10, 20 and 30 kR) on some biological parameter in M1 generation and frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and morphological mutations in five cultivars of soybean viz. JS-8021, JS-335, JS- 7105, Monetta and PKV -1 have been studied. A dose dependant decrease was noticed in most of the characters like root length, shoot length, germination, plant height, plant survival and pollen sterility. While seedling height, number of seeds per pod and number of branches per plant were not affected significantly. The highest frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and morphological mutations was noticed in variety JS-8021 in which 20 different gene loci for various characters were mutated. However variety JS- 7105 showed less radio sensitive response for different traits in which only 12 different loci were mutated. While JS-335, monetta and PKV-I showed moderate response to frequency and spectrum of various mutations. These varieties showed differential response to radio sensitivity, some useful mutations included, high yielding mutant in 20 kR, non shattering mutant in 30 kR and vine type mutant in 10 kR in variety monetta. Extra early type, erect and high branched type mutant were recorded with high frequency in 10 and 20 kR respectively in variety JS-8021. In general, 20 kR dose was found more effective in all the varieties studied. (author)

  18. Mutagenesis and breeding for disease resistance in capsicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccardo, F.; Sree Ramulu, K.

    1977-01-01

    The principal diseases, for which no sources have so far been found within the cultivars of Capsicum annuum in Italy, are caused by Verticillium dahliae, Phytophthora capsici and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The wild species C. pendulum, C. frutescens, C. chinense, C. chacoense, C. pubescens and C. eximium were analysed to find out if the sources for resistance to the three diseases are available. It was observed that particularly the species C. frutescens and C. chinense had good sources of resistance to V. dahliae and Ph. capsici. However, the occurrence of reproductive barriers between the wild and cultivated species appears to be a problem for the transfer of disease-resistant genes. For CMV, none of the wild species showed good resistance; so in this case a screening technique was set up using mutagenic agents to isolate resistant types in the prominent agronomic cultivars of C. annuum. Also, for V. dahliae and Ph. capsici, mutation screening techniques were set up to induce disease resistance character directly in the cultivars of C. annuum, without causing any changes in the most important agronomic characters of the cultivars. (author)

  19. Whole-genome profiling of mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L; Chaudhry, Iasha; Taylor, Jon; Neil, Sarah E; Rogula, Aleksandra; Zapf, Rick; Hirst, Martin; Butterfield, Yaron; Jones, Steven J; Marra, Marco A; Barstead, Robert J; Moerman, Donald G

    2010-06-01

    Deep sequencing offers an unprecedented view of an organism's genome. We describe the spectrum of mutations induced by three commonly used mutagens: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), and ultraviolet trimethylpsoralen (UV/TMP) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our analysis confirms the strong GC to AT transition bias of EMS. We found that ENU mainly produces A to T and T to A transversions, but also all possible transitions. We found no bias for any specific transition or transversion in the spectrum of UV/TMP-induced mutations. In 10 mutagenized strains we identified 2723 variants, of which 508 are expected to alter or disrupt gene function, including 21 nonsense mutations and 10 mutations predicted to affect mRNA splicing. This translates to an average of 50 informative mutations per strain. We also present evidence of genetic drift among laboratory wild-type strains derived from the Bristol N2 strain. We make several suggestions for best practice using massively parallel short read sequencing to ensure mutation detection.

  20. Whole-Genome Profiling of Mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L.; Chaudhry, Iasha; Taylor, Jon; Neil, Sarah E.; Rogula, Aleksandra; Zapf, Rick; Hirst, Martin; Butterfield, Yaron; Jones, Steven J.; Marra, Marco A.; Barstead, Robert J.; Moerman, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    Deep sequencing offers an unprecedented view of an organism's genome. We describe the spectrum of mutations induced by three commonly used mutagens: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), and ultraviolet trimethylpsoralen (UV/TMP) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our analysis confirms the strong GC to AT transition bias of EMS. We found that ENU mainly produces A to T and T to A transversions, but also all possible transitions. We found no bias for any specific transition or transversion in the spectrum of UV/TMP-induced mutations. In 10 mutagenized strains we identified 2723 variants, of which 508 are expected to alter or disrupt gene function, including 21 nonsense mutations and 10 mutations predicted to affect mRNA splicing. This translates to an average of 50 informative mutations per strain. We also present evidence of genetic drift among laboratory wild-type strains derived from the Bristol N2 strain. We make several suggestions for best practice using massively parallel short read sequencing to ensure mutation detection. PMID:20439774

  1. Mass trapping with MosquiTRAPs does not reduce Aedes aegypti abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Marlen Degener

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Aedes aegypti mass trapping using the sticky trap MosquiTRAP (MQT by performing a cluster randomised controlled trial in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil. After an initial questionnaire and baseline monitoring of adult Ae. aegypti abundance with BG-Sentinel (BGS traps in six clusters, three clusters were randomly assigned to the intervention arm where each participating household received three MQTs for mass trapping during 17 months. The remaining three clusters (control arm did not receive traps. The effect of mass trapping on adult Ae. aegypti abundance was monitored fortnightly with BGS traps. During the last two months of the study, a serological survey was conducted. After the study, a second questionnaire was applied in the intervention arm. Entomological monitoring indicated that MQT mass trapping did not reduce adult Ae. aegypti abundance. The serological survey indicated that recent dengue infections were equally frequent in the intervention and the control arm. Most participants responded positively to questions concerning user satisfaction. According to the results, there is no evidence that mass trapping with MQTs can be used as a part of dengue control programs. The use of this sticky trap is only recommendable for dengue vector monitoring.

  2. TRAP230/ARC240 and TRAP240/ARC250 Mediator subunits are functionally conserved through evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Camilla O; Baraznenok, Vera; Khorosjutina, Olga

    2003-01-01

    for Srb8 and Srb9. Here, we identify a TRAP240/ARC250 homologue in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and demonstrate that this protein, spTrap240, is stably associated with a larger form of Mediator, which also contains conserved homologues of Srb8, Srb10, and Srb11. We find that spTrap240 and Sch. pombe Srb8 (sp...... with the polymerase. Our findings provide experimental evidence for recent suggestions that TRAP230/ARC240 and TRAP240/ARC250 may indeed be the Srb8 and Srb9 homologues of mammalian Mediator. Apparently Srb8/TRAP230/ARC240, Srb9/TRAP240/ARC250, Srb10, and Srb11 constitute a conserved Mediator submodule, which...

  3. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  4. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Beacham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed.

  5. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, T A; Macia, V Mora; Rooks, P; White, D A; Ali, S T

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed.

  6. The mutagenesis and breeding of high productive strains of streptomyces jingyangensis '5406'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Hongyan; Yin Xinyun

    1988-03-01

    The purpose of these experiments is to explore the mutagenesis rhythm and breed high productive strains of actinomycete '5406'. The single colony agar pieces of strain F 358 were treated with fast neutron and 60 Co-γ ray irradiation Two mutants have been selected from 20025 treated single colonies. The output of cytokinins from them is higher than from strain F 358 . The original strain 'Mu-Tan-al' rejuvenated by freezing was treated with several physical and chemical mutagens. The mutagenesis rhythm has been summed up tentatively. Eight mutants obtained from 93014 treated single colonies produced more '5406' antibiotics than that of strain 'Mu-Tan-al,. The effect of mutant 'N2-10-Ra3' was the best

  7. Mutagenesis of the bacterial RNA polymerase alpha subunit for improvement of complex phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Marcuschamer, Daniel; Santos, Christine Nicole S; Yu, Huimin; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    Combinatorial or random methods for strain engineering have been extensively used for the improvement of multigenic phenotypes and other traits for which the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Although the preferred method has traditionally been mutagenesis and selection, our laboratory has successfully used mutant transcription factors, which direct the RNA polymerase (RNAP) during transcription, to engineer complex phenotypes in microbial cells. Here, we show that it is also possible to impart new phenotypes by altering the RNAP core enzyme itself, in particular through mutagenesis of the alpha subunit of the bacterial polymerase. We present the use of this tool for improving tolerance of Escherichia coli to butanol and other solvents and for increasing the titers of two commercially relevant products, L-tyrosine and hyaluronic acid. In addition, we explore the underlying physiological changes that give rise to the solvent-tolerant mutant.

  8. Mutagenesis of the somaclones in vitro of cut roses by 60Co γ-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Suping; Su Yan; Wang Lihua; Tang Kaixue; Wang Jihua; Zhang Hao

    2009-01-01

    Mutagenesis of cut rose in vitro irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays was studied. The callus of leaves and regenerations adventitious bud was used as the explants for mutagenesis. Effect of 60 Co γ-rays irradiation on the callus's regeneration rate, adventitious bud's multiplication rate and vegetal status were studied. The results showed that the regeneration frequency of callus was decreased by 60 Co γ-rays irradiation. The regenerations adventitious bud was the better experimental materials compared with the callus of leaves. The lethal dose was 122 Gy and the semi-lethal dose was 76 Gy according to the regression equation. The appropriate dose on adventitious bud by irradiation rays was 50-60 Gy. (authors)

  9. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at ....

  10. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  11. Mutagenesis of Jatropha curcas - Exploring new traits in the breeding of a biofuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Sobri Hussein; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2010-01-01

    Mutagenesis in plant species is considered effective in recovering and producing useful mutants as it leads to a high degree of chimerism and produces high degree of somaclonal variations for further selection in breeding programmes. Jatropha curcas is a species with many attributes and considerable potential, especially as bio diesel. Narrow genetic background of Jatropha spp. gives less selection to growers for better quality plant materials. In this study, a new method through nuclear technology was used to increase the genetic variability of Jatropha towards novel superior potential mutant lines. The objective of the study is to generate new mutant varieties of Jatropha curcas through the mutagenesis approach in getting new sustainable mutants for high oil yield and improved plant characteristics. Seeds of a Jatropha cultivar were from selected materials from Lembaga Kenaf and Tembakau Negara, Kelantan. Radiosensitivity test was done by irradiating a total of each 60 seeds at multiple doses (0 Gy, 20 Gy, 40 Gy, 60 Gy, 80 Gy, 100 Gy, 200 Gy, 300 Gy, 400 Gy, 600 Gy and 700 Gy). After getting the LD 50 , three doses i.e. 250 Gy, 300 Gy and 350 Gy were selected for mutagenesis, where a total of 1000 seeds were exposed to gamma radiation. The seeds were hardened and field planted at close distance of 1 m x 1 m. Pruning was conducted three times at two months interval prior to screening for early flowering, short stature and high branching mutant lines. Radiosensitivity of seeds to acute gamma irradiation revealed that the LD 50 was at 320 Gy. At nursery stage, somatic mutations related to chlorophyll changes were observed on leaves with certain shapes. Screening of Jatropha via seed mutagenesis bore 6 early flowering mutants, 7 dwarf mutants and, 17 high branching plants. In narrowing the mutant lines, cuttings from each selected trait were collected and re-planted for further evaluation. (author)

  12. Repair and mutagenesis of herpes simplex virus in UV-irradiated monkey cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Goddard, J.G.; Lin, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Mutagenic repair in mammalian cells was investigated by determining the mutagenesis of UV-irradiated or unirradiated herpes simplex virus in UV-irradiated CV-1 monkey kidney cells. These results were compared with the results for UV-enhanced virus reactivation (UVER) in the same experimental situation. High and low multiplicities of infection were used to determine the effects of multiplicity reactivation (MR). UVER and MR were readily demonstrable and were approximately equal in amount in an infectious center assay. For this study, a forward-mutation assay was developed to detect virus mutants resistant to iododeoxycytidine (ICdR), probably an indication of the mutant virus being defective at its thymidine kinase locus. ICdR-resistant mutants did not have a growth advantage over wild-type virus in irradiated or unirradiated cells. Thus, higher fractions of mutant virus indicated greater mutagenesis during virus repair and/or replication. The data showed that: (1) unirradiated virus was mutated in unirradiated cells, providing a background level of mutagenesis; (2) unirradiated virus was mutated about 40% more in irradiated cells, indicating that virus replication (DNA synthesis) became more mutagenic as a result of cell irradiation; (3) irradiated virus was mutated much more (about 6-fold) than unirradiated virus, even in unirradiated cells; (4) cell irradiation did not change the mutagenesis of irradiated virus except at high multiplicity of infection. High multiplicity of infection did not demonstrate UVER or MR alone to be either error-free or error-prone. When the two processes were present simultaneously, they were mutagenic. (orig.)

  13. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  14. Neutrophil extracellular traps go viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Schönrich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as a first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils to produce extracellular traps (NETs in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently was it recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  15. Induction of Pectinase Hyper Production by Multistep Mutagenesis Using a Fungal Isolate--Aspergillus flavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Sabika; Prasuna, R Gyana; Khanam, Rasheeda

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus flavipes, a slow growing pectinase producing ascomycete, was isolated from soil identified and characterised in the previously done preliminary studies. Optimisation studies revealed that Citrus peel--groundnut oil cake [CG] production media is the best media for production of high levels of pectinase up to 39 U/ml using wild strain of A. flavipes. Strain improvement of this isolated strain for enhancement of pectinase production using multistep mutagenesis procedure is the endeavour of this project. For this, the wild strain of A. flavipes was treated with both physical (UV irradiation) and chemical [Colchicine, Ethidium bromide, H2O2] mutagens to obtain Ist generation mutants. The obtained mutants were assayed and differentiated basing on pectinase productivity. The better pectinase producing strains were further subjected to multistep mutagenesis to attain stability in mutants. The goal of this project was achieved by obtaining the best pectinase secreting mutant, UV80 of 45 U/ml compared to wild strain and sister mutants. This fact was confirmed by quantitatively analysing 3rd generation mutants obtained after multistep mutagenesis.

  16. Spontaneous mutability and light-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium: effects of an R-plasmid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia, L.

    1979-01-01

    The UV-protecting plasmid R46 was transferred by conjugation to a genetically marked mouse-virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain, not derived from LT2; in this host the plasmid conferred UV protection and enhanced UV mutagenesis just as it does in LT2 lines. Tra - derivatives of R46 encountered during transduction retained UV-protecting and mutagenesis-enhancing ability. Stored strains carrying the R46-derived plasmids with strong mutator effect but not UV-protecting had lost most of their original streptomycin resistance but were slightly resistant to spectinomycin; attempts to transfer such plasmids failed. R46 enhanced the weak mutagenic effect of visible light on several his and trp mutants of strain LT2, including some whose frequency of spontaneous reversion was not increased by the plasmid. A mutagenic effect was produced by visible-light irradiation of hisG46(R46), either growing cells or nonmultiplying (histidine-deprived cells at 10 0 C). Presence of catalase or cyanide during irradiation did not prevent mutagenesis, which excludes some hypothetical mechanisms. Visible-light irradiation of hisG46 or hisG46(R46) under strict anaerobiosis had little or no mutagenic effect (controls showed that revertants if produced would have been detected). This is as expected if visible-light irradiation in air causes photodynamic damage to DNA and mutations are produced during error-prone, plasmid-enhanced repair

  17. UV-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli SOS response: a quantitative model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Krishna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli bacteria respond to DNA damage by a highly orchestrated series of events known as the SOS response, regulated by transcription factors, protein-protein binding, and active protein degradation. We present a dynamical model of the UV-induced SOS response, incorporating mutagenesis by the error-prone polymerase, Pol V. In our model, mutagenesis depends on a combination of two key processes: damage counting by the replication forks and a long-term memory associated with the accumulation of UmuD'. Together, these provide a tight regulation of mutagenesis, resulting, we show, in a "digital" turn-on and turn-off of Pol V. Our model provides a compact view of the topology and design of the SOS network, pinpointing the specific functional role of each of the regulatory processes. In particular, we suggest that the recently observed second peak in the activity of promoters in the SOS regulon (Friedman et al., 2005, PLoS Biology 3(7: e238 is the result of positive feedback from Pol V to RecA filaments.

  18. Combined mutagenesis of Rhodosporidium toruloides for improved production of carotenoids and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaolei; Shen, Hongwei; Zhang, Xibin; Yu, Xue; Wang, Han; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Jihui; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2016-10-01

    To improve production of lipids and carotenoids by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides by screening mutant strains. Upon physical mutagenesis of the haploid strain R. toruloides np11 with an atmospheric and room temperature plasma method followed by chemical mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine, a mutant strain, R. toruloides XR-2, formed dark-red colonies on a screening plate. When cultivated in nitrogen-limited media, XR-2 cells grew slower but accumulated 0.23 g lipids/g cell dry wt and 0.75 mg carotenoids/g CDW. To improve its production capacity, different amino acids and vitamins were supplemented. p-Aminobenzoic acid and tryptophan had beneficial effects on cell growth. When cultivated in nitrogen-limited media in the presence of selected vitamins, XR-2 accumulated 0.41 g lipids/g CDW and 0.69 mg carotenoids/g CDW. A mutant R. toruloides strain with improved production profiles for lipids and carotenoids was obtained, indicating its potential to use combined mutagenesis for a more productive phenotype.

  19. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavis Forrester

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an open data standard for storing and sharing camera trap data, developed by experts from a variety of organizations. The standard captures information necessary to share data between projects and offers a foundation for collecting the more detailed data needed for advanced analysis. The data standard captures information about study design, the type of camera used, and the location and species names for all detections in a standardized way. This information is critical for accurately assessing results from individual camera trapping projects and for combining data from multiple studies for meta-analysis. This data standard is an important step in aligning camera trapping surveys with best practices in data-intensive science. Ecology is moving rapidly into the realm of big data, and central data repositories are becoming a critical tool and are emerging for camera trap data. This data standard will help researchers standardize data terms, align past data to new repositories, and provide a framework for utilizing data across repositories and research projects to advance animal ecology and conservation.

  20. Spin trapping in γ-irradiated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    Spin trapping techniques, allowing one to visualize transient free radical populations by reacting short-lived radicals with a spin trap to produce persistent spin adduct radicals, require that the rate constant for parent radical addition to the spin trap be sufficiently large. The study on the rate of spin trapping reactions, dependent upon steric and electronic (polar) interactions in the complex, has been extended to nitrone spin trapping using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap. We concentrated on the trapping of carboxyalkyl radicals which feature strong hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl group of the spin addend carboxyl function and the aminosyl oxygen, and a strongly electron withdrawing effect of the spin addend on the DMPO ring. These two features in these radicals, enhancing the polarization of the N 1 -C 2 bond to produce spin adduct fragmentation, were found to be significantly more pronounced than in the case of hydroxylalkyl radical adducts to DMPO. (J.P.N.)

  1. Fluorescent prey traps in carnivorous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, R; Johnson, A J; Sankar, S; Hussain, A A; Sathish Kumar, C; Sabulal, B

    2013-05-01

    Carnivorous plants acquire most of their nutrients by capturing ants, insects and other arthropods through their leaf-evolved biological traps. So far, the best-known attractants in carnivorous prey traps are nectar, colour and olfactory cues. Here, fresh prey traps of 14 Nepenthes, five Sarracenia, five Drosera, two Pinguicula species/hybrids, Dionaea muscipula and Utricularia stellaris were scanned at UV 366 nm. Fluorescence emissions of major isolates of fresh Nepenthes khasiana pitcher peristomes were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 366 nm. N. khasiana field pitcher peristomes were masked by its slippery zone extract, and prey capture rates were compared with control pitchers. We found the existence of distinct blue fluorescence emissions at the capture spots of Nepenthes, Sarracenia and Dionaea prey traps at UV 366 nm. These alluring blue emissions gradually developed with the growth of the prey traps and diminished towards their death. On excitation at 366 nm, N. khasiana peristome 3:1 CHCl3–MeOH extract and its two major blue bands showed strong fluorescence emissions at 430–480 nm. Masking of blue emissions on peristomes drastically reduced prey capture in N. khasiana pitchers. We propose these molecular emissions as a critical factor attracting arthropods and other visitors to these carnivorous traps. Drosera, Pinguicula and Utricularia prey traps showed only red chlorophyll emissions at 366 nm.

  2. Gene-mutation assays in lambda-lacZ transgenic mice : comparison of lacZ with endogenous genes in splenocytes and small intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Bergmans, A.; Dam, F.J. van; Tates, A.D.; Howard, L.; Winton, D.J.; Baan, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of results derived from transgenic animal gene-mutation assays with those from mutation analyses in endogenous genes is an important step in the validation of the former. We have used λlacZ transgenic mice to study alkylation-induced mutagenesis in vivo in (a) lacZ and hprt in spleen

  3. The identification of a novel gene, MAPO2, that is involved in the induction of apoptosis triggered by O⁶-methylguanine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Fujikane

    Full Text Available O⁶-Methylguanine, one of alkylated DNA bases, is especially mutagenic. Cells containing this lesion are eliminated by induction of apoptosis, associated with the function of mismatch repair (MMR proteins. A retrovirus-mediated gene-trap mutagenesis was used to isolate new genes related to the induction of apoptosis, triggered by the treatment with an alkylating agent, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU. This report describes the identification of a novel gene, MAPO2 (O⁶-methylguanine-induced apoptosis 2, which is originally annotated as C1orf201. The MAPO2 gene is conserved among a wide variety of multicellular organisms and encodes a protein containing characteristic PxPxxY repeats. To elucidate the function of the gene product in the apoptosis pathway, a human cell line derived from HeLa MR cells, in which the MAPO2 gene was stably knocked down by expressing specific miRNA, was constructed. The knockdown cells grew at the same rate as HeLa MR, thus indicating that MAPO2 played no role in the cellular growth. After exposure to MNU, HeLa MR cells and the knockdown cells underwent cell cycle arrest at G₂/M phase, however, the production of the sub-G₁ population in the knockdown cells was significantly suppressed in comparison to that in HeLa MR cells. Moreover, the activation of BAK and caspase-3, and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, hallmarks for the induction of apoptosis, were also suppressed in the knockdown cells. These results suggest that the MAPO2 gene product might positively contribute to the induction of apoptosis triggered by O⁶-methylguanine.

  4. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  5. Construction and expression of hepatitis B surface antigen escape variants within the "a" determinant by site directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz Shirazi, Forough; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Mohammadi, Hamed; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Roohi, Azam; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-09-01

    The antibody response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) controls hepatitis B virus infection. The "a" determinant of HBsAg is the most important target for protective antibody response, diagnosis and immunoprophylaxis. Mutations in this area may induce immune escape mutants and affect the performance of HBsAg assays. To construct clinically relevant recombinant mutant forms of HBsAg and assessment of their reactivity with anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Wild type (wt) and mutant (mt) HBsAg genes were constructed by site directed mutagenesis and SEOing PCR. The amplified genes were inserted into pCMV6-neo plasmid and transfected in CHO cell line. The expression of wt- and mtHBsAg was assessed by commercial ELISA assays and stable cells were established and cloned by limiting dilution. The recombinant mutants were further characterized using a panel of anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and the pattern of their reactivity was assessed by ELISA. Ten HBsAg mutants having single mutation within the "a" determinant including P120E, T123N, Q129H, M133L, K141E, P142S, D144A, G145R, N146S and C147S together with a wt form were successfully constructed and expressed in CHO cells. Reactivity of anti-HBs MAbs with mtHBsAgs displayed different patterns. The effect of mutations on antibody binding differed depending on the amino acid involved and its location within the ''a'' determinant. Mutation at amino acids 123 and 145 resulted in either complete loss or significant reduction of binding to all anti-HBs MAbs. Our panel of mtHBsAgs is a valuable tool for assessment of the antibody response to HBV escape mutants and may have substantial implications in HBV immunological diagnostics.

  6. Investigation of lethal and mutagenetic effects of UV-light on Salmonella currying wild and mutant alleles of lex A gene of Escherichia coli in the Salmonella genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, I.V.; Tiganova, I.G.; Skavronskaya, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Inheritance of LexA-gene of Escherichia coli- by Salmonella takes place during intergeneric trunsduction cross of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The presence of LexA-E. coli gene-did not eliminate earlier revealed peculiarity consisting in the absence of UV-induced mutagenesis in most of studied salmonollosis strains. So it is shown that the absence of UV mutagenesis in Salmonella does not result from mutation in LexA-gene. Inheritance of pKM101 by LexA-hybrid provides pronounced UV mutability and protective effect. Inheritance of this plasmid by LexA-hybrid did not result in the appearance of capability for UV-induced mutagenesis and improving UV resistance of bacteria. Thus the plasmids effect on repair and mutagenesis in Salmonella, the same as in E. coli, reveals in LexA-phenotype [ru

  7. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 markedly increases the rate of base substitution mutagenesis and has distinct effects on genomic deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamborszky, J.; Szikriszt, B.; Gervai, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of cancer. Owing to their function in homologous recombination repair, much research has focused on the unstable genomic phenotype of BRCA1/2 mutant cells manifest mainly as large-scale rearrangements. We used whole......-genome sequencing of multiple isogenic chicken DT40 cell clones to precisely determine the consequences of BRCA1/2 loss on all types of genomic mutagenesis. Spontaneous base substitution mutation rates increased sevenfold upon the disruption of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, and the arising mutation spectra showed strong....... Spontaneously arising and MMS-induced insertion/deletion mutations and large rearrangements were also more common in BRCA1/2 mutant cells compared with the wild-type control. A difference in the short deletion phenotypes of BRCA1 and BRCA2 suggested distinct roles for the two proteins in the processing of DNA...

  8. Passive Baited Sequential Filth Fly Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Robert L; Britch, Seth C; Snelling, Melissa; Gutierez, Arturo; White, Gregory; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2015-09-01

    Filth fly control measures may be optimized with a better understanding of fly population dynamics measured throughout the day. We describe the modification of a commercial motorized sequential mosquito trap to accept liquid odorous bait and leverage a classic inverted-cone design to passively confine flies in 8 modified collection bottles corresponding to 8 intervals. Efficacy trials in a hot-arid desert environment indicate no significant difference (P  =  0.896) between the modified sequential trap and a Rid-Max® fly trap.

  9. Work on open traps in the USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryutov, D. D.

    1981-10-01

    A general review of the historical development and future plans for open plasma devices is given. The major characteristics of the AMBAL device (which is close to an ambipolar fusion reactor in terms of many dimensionless parameters that characterize the state of the plasma), of the GOL-3 multimirror trap, the OGRA-4 mirror trap, and the PSP-4 rotating plasma traps are presented. Transverse plasma losses due to the asymmetry of the magnet system and losses produced by plasma instabilities are discussed. Plasma control and plasma heating are considered.

  10. Impurity beam-trapping instability in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.; Howe, H.C.

    1976-12-01

    The sensitivity of neutron energy production to the trapping by impurities by injected neutral beams is considered. The beam-trapping process is affected by inherent low-Z contamination of the tritium plasma, by the species composition of the neutral beam, and by the entrance angle of the beam. The sensitivities of the process are compared to these variables and to the variation with wall material. One finds that use of a low-Z, low sputtering material could retard a possible beam trapping instability

  11. Robust Digital Holography For Ultracold Atom Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Alexander; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2013-05-01

    We have formulated and experimentally demonstrated an improved algorithm for design of arbitrary two-dimensional holographic traps for ultracold atoms. Our method builds on the best previously available algorithm, MRAF, and improves on it in two ways. First, it allows for creation of holographic atom traps with a well defined background potential. Second, we experimentally show that for creating trapping potentials free of fringing artifacts it is important to go beyond the Fourier approximation in modelling light propagation. To this end, we incorporate full Helmholtz propagation into our calculations.

  12. Trapped Antihydrogen in Its Ground State

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W.S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.W.; George, M.C.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Weel, M.; Müllers, A.; Walz, J.

    2012-03-16

    Antihydrogen atoms are confined in an Ioffe trap for 15 to 1000 seconds -- long enough to ensure that they reach their ground state. Though reproducibility challenges remain in making large numbers of cold antiprotons and positrons interact, 5 +/- 1 simultaneously-confined ground state atoms are produced and observed on average, substantially more than previously reported. Increases in the number of simultaneously trapped antithydrogen atoms H are critical if laser-cooling of trapped antihydrogen is to be demonstrated, and spectroscopic studies at interesting levels of precision are to be carried out.

  13. Two Rab GTPases play different roles in conidiation, trap formation, stress resistance, and virulence in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuewei; Ma, Ni; Yang, Le; Zheng, Yaqing; Zhen, Zhengyi; Li, Qing; Xie, Meihua; Li, Juan; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2018-04-03

    Rab GTPases are the largest group of the small GTPases family, which play a pivotal role in the secretion of proteins. Arthrobotrys oligospora is a representative nematode-trapping fungus that can produce adhesive networks to capture nematodes. In this study, the roles of two Rab GTPases AoRab-7A and AoRab-2 were characterized by gene knockout in the fungus A. oligospora. The disruption of AoRab-7A hindered the mycelial growth in different media, the conidiation of ΔAoRab-7A transformants was almost abolished, and the transcription of four sporulation-related genes (AbaA, FluG, Hyp1, and VosA) was downregulated compared to the wild-type strain (WT). Furthermore, the tolerance of the ΔAoRab-7A mutants to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and H 2 O 2 was also significantly reduced compared to the WT, and the transcription of several genes related to environmental resistance, such as genes for catalase and trehalose synthase, was downregulated. Similarly, the extracellular proteolytic activity was decreased. Importantly, the ΔAoRab-7A mutants were unable to produce traps and capture nematodes. However, the disruption of gene AoRab-2 only affected the conidiation slightly but non-significantly, while other phenotypic traits were unaffected. Moreover, the gene AoRab-7A was also involved in the autophagy induced by nitrogen deprivation in A. oligospora. Our results revealed for the first time that the Rab GTPases are involved in the regulation of mycelial growth, conidiation, trap formation, stress resistance, and pathogenicity in the nematode-trapping fungus A. oligospora.

  14. Medfly female attractant trapping studies in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo, F.; Rendon, P.; Villatoro, C.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted from 1994 - 1998 to test the attractiveness of combinations of food-based chemicals for C. capitata (medfly) in Guatemala. Most studies were done in coffee. The 1995 studies, using the FA-2 attractants (ammonium acetate and putrescine) showed that this combination was attractive for females and had potential for use in conjunction with a SIT program. The 1996 studies at three elevations demonstrated that, in general, these attractants, when used in either the Open Bottom Dry Trap (OBDT), Closed Bottom Dry Trap (CBDT), or International Pheromone's McPhail Trap (IPMT) performed better than the Jumbo McPhail trap (JMT) baited with NuLure and borax (NU+B) for capture of feral females. At the high elevation (1400 m), the IPMT with FA-2 and OBDT with FA-2 were best; at the middle elevation (1100 m), the ORDT, IPMT, and CBDT with FA-2 were best; and at low elevations (659 m), the IPMT with FA-2, JMT with NU+B and ORDT with FA-2 were equal in performance. At the middle elevation, using sterile flies, the OBDT with FA-2 worked best. When experiments were carried out in pear, the traps using the FA-2 attractants captured more female flies than the JMT, NU+B, but not significantly more. During the 1997 trials, a third component, trimethylamine was added to the two component lure (FA-3). This attractant was tested in a number of locally produced traps using 2 I soft drink bottles with different color bottoms. The dry versions of the traps contained a yellow sticky insert. All study sites were at low elevation 600 - 650 m, in coffee, testing both sterile and feral flies. With the feral flies during the first phase of the study at finca San Carlos, there were no significant differences between treatments, at finca San Luis, the clear local trap with sticky insert and the green local trap with sticky insert were best, and at finca Valapraiso, the green local trap with yellow sticky insert and yellow local trap with sticky insert captured more flies

  15. Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study Revealed Three Important Residues in Hc-DAF-22, a Key Enzyme Regulating Diapause of Haemonchus contortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus (H. contortus is one of the most important parasites of small ruminants, especially goats and sheep. The complex life cycle of this nematode is a main obstacle for the control and prevention of haemonchosis. So far, a special form of arrested development called diapause different from the dauer stage in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans has been found in many parasitic nematodes. In our previous study, we have characterized a novel gene Hc-daf-22 from H. contortus sharing high homology with Ce-daf-22 and functional analysis showed this gene has similar biological function with Ce-daf-22. In this study, Hc-daf-22 mutants were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis, and carried out rescue experiments, RNA interference (RNAi experiments and in vitro enzyme activity analysis with the mutants to further explore the precise function site of Hc-DAF-22. The results showed that Hc-daf-22 mutants could be expressed in the rescued ok693 worms and the expression positions were mainly in the intestine which was identical with that of Hc-daf-22 rescued worms. Through lipid staining we found that Hc-daf-22 could rescue daf-22 mutant (ok693 from the fatty acid metabolism deficiency while Hc-daf-22 mutants failed. Brood size and body length analyses in rescue experiment along with body length and life span analyses in RNAi experiment elucidated that Hc-daf-22 resembled Ce-daf-22 in effecting the development and capacity of C. elegans and mutants impaired the function of Hc-daf-22. Together with the protease activity assay, this research revealed three important active resides 84C/299H/349H in Hc-DAF-22 by site-directed mutagenesis.

  16. Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study Revealed Three Important Residues in Hc-DAF-22, a Key Enzyme Regulating Diapause of Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Zheng, Xiuping; Zhang, Hongli; Ding, Haojie; Guo, Xiaolu; Yang, Yi; Chen, Xueqiu; Zhou, Qianjin; Du, Aifang

    2017-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus ( H. contortus ) is one of the most important parasites of small ruminants, especially goats and sheep. The complex life cycle of this nematode is a main obstacle for the control and prevention of haemonchosis. So far, a special form of arrested development called diapause different from the dauer stage in Caenorhabditis elegans ( C. elegans ) has been found in many parasitic nematodes. In our previous study, we have characterized a novel gene Hc-daf-22 from H. contortus sharing high homology with Ce-daf-22 and functional analysis showed this gene has similar biological function with Ce-daf-22 . In this study, Hc-daf-22 mutants were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis, and carried out rescue experiments, RNA interference (RNAi) experiments and in vitro enzyme activity analysis with the mutants to further explore the precise function site of Hc-DAF-22. The results showed that Hc-daf-22 mutants could be expressed in the rescued ok693 worms and the expression positions were mainly in the intestine which was identical with that of Hc-daf-22 rescued worms. Through lipid staining we found that Hc-daf-22 could rescue daf-22 mutant ( ok693 ) from the fatty acid metabolism deficiency while Hc-daf-22 mutants failed. Brood size and body length analyses in rescue experiment along with body length and life span analyses in RNAi experiment elucidated that Hc-daf-22 resembled Ce-daf-22 in effecting the development and capacity of C. elegans and mutants impaired the function of Hc-daf-22 . Together with the protease activity assay, this research revealed three important active resides 84C/299H/349H in Hc-DAF-22 by site-directed mutagenesis.

  17. PINK1 protects against oxidative stress by phosphorylating mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia W Pridgeon

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the PTEN induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 gene cause an autosomal recessive form of Parkinson disease (PD. So far, no substrates of PINK1 have been reported, and the mechanism by which PINK1 mutations lead to neurodegeneration is unknown. Here we report the identification of TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1, a mitochondrial molecular chaperone also known as heat shock protein 75 (Hsp75, as a cellular substrate for PINK1 kinase. PINK1 binds and colocalizes with TRAP1 in the mitochondria and phosphorylates TRAP1 both in vitro and in vivo. We show that PINK1 protects against oxidative-stress-induced cell death by suppressing cytochrome c release from mitochondria, and this protective action of PINK1 depends on its kinase activity to phosphorylate TRAP1. Moreover, we find that the ability of PINK1 to promote TRAP1 phosphorylation and cell survival is impaired by PD-linked PINK1 G309D, L347P, and W437X mutations. Our findings suggest a novel pathway by which PINK1 phosphorylates downstream effector TRAP1 to prevent oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis and implicate the dysregulation of this mitochondrial pathway in PD pathogenesis.

  18. 2014 MARFIN trap-video-diver comparison

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of the study was to perform paired diver, trap and video-based surveys to assess species-specific reef fish abundance, and to compare gear-specific...

  19. Methods in mooring deep sea sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Fernando, V.; Rajaraman, V.S.; Janakiraman, G.

    The experience gained during the process of deployment and retrieval of nearly 39 sets of deep sea sediment trap moorings on various ships like FS Sonne, ORV Sagarkanya and DSV Nand Rachit are outlined. The various problems encountered...

  20. Development of an antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Matthew James

    This thesis details the development and commissioning of the ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus. It discusses the history of antimatter physics that led to and enabled the design of the apparatus. It discusses the importance of antihydrogen trapping in testing one of the basic assumptions of the Standard Model of particle physics (that of CPT invariance). It goes on to discuss the design and construction of the apparatus. Finally, it presents results that demonstrate antihydrogen formation in the new magnetic field configurations that together constitute a magnetic minimum trap for neutral antihydrogen. This is an important preliminary result for any antihydrogen trapping apparatus, and confirms that the ALPHA apparatus does present a potential route towards laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen.