WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene transfer stability

  1. Evaluation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer of the stability of nonviral gene delivery vectors under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaka, Keiji; Harada, Atsushi; Nakamura, Kozo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2002-01-01

    The stability in physiological medium of polyplex- and lipoplex-type nonviral gene vectors was evaluated by detecting the conformational change of complexed plasmid DNA (pDNA) labeled simultaneously with fluorescein (energy donor) and X-rhodamine (energy acceptor) through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Upon mixing with cationic components, such as LipofectAMINE, poly(L-lysine), and poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lysine) block copolymer (PEG-PLys), the fluorescence spectrum of doubly labeled pDNA underwent a drastic change due to the occurrence of FRET between the donor-acceptor pair on pDNA taking a globular conformation (condensed state) through complexation. The measurement was carried out also in the presence of 20% serum, under which conditions FRET from condensed pDNA was clearly monitored without interference from coexisting components in the medium, allowing evaluation of the condensed state of pDNA in nonviral gene vectors under physiological conditions. Serum addition immediately induced a sharp decrease in FRET for the LipofectAMINE/pDNA (lipoplex) system, which was consistent with the sharp decrease in the transfection efficiency of the lipoplex system in serum-containing medium. In contrast, the PEG-PLys/pDNA polyplex (polyion complex micelle) system maintained appreciable transfection efficiency even in serum-containing medium, and FRET efficiency remained constant for up to 12 h, indicating the high stability of the polyion complex micelle under physiological conditions.

  2. Inferring horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Ravenhall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric" methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic" approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.; Morin, K. W.; Knaus, E. E.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering and molecular biology have opened the door to disease treatment by transferring genes to cells that are responsible for the pathological condition being addressed. These genes can serve to supplement or introduce the function of indigenous genes that are either inadequately expressed or that are congenitally absent in the patient. They can introduce new functions such as drug sensitization to provide a unique therapeutic target. Gene transfer is readily monitored in vitro using a range of histochemical and biochemical tests that are ''built in'' to the therapeutic gene cassette. In vivo, in situ monitoring of the gene transfer and gene expression processes can be achieved with these tests only if biopsy is possible. Scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the extent and location of gene expression, provided that an appropriate reporter gene is included in the therapeutic cassette. This overview includes a brief orientation to gene transfer therapy and is followed by a review of current approaches to gene therapy imaging. The concluding section deals with imaging based on radiolabelled nucleoside substrates for herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase, with emphasis on IVFRU, a stable potent and selective HSV-1 TK substrate developed in their laboratories

  4. Stability of the LHC transfer lines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V; Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is filled from the SPS through two 3 km transfer lines. The injected beam parameters need to be well under control for luminosity performance, machine protection and operational efficiency. Small fractions of beam loss on the transfer line collimation system create showers which can trigger the sensitive LHC beam loss monitor system nearby and cause a beam abort during filling. The stability of the transfer line trajectory through the collimators is particularly critical in this respect. This paper will report on the transfer line trajectory stability during the proton run in 2011, correlations with injection losses, correction frequency and the most likely sources for the observed oscillations.

  5. Rifkin strikes against gene transfer experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, T

    Jeremy Rifkin's lobbying organization, the Foundation on Economic Trends, has brought suit in U.S. District Court, together with the Humane Society of the U.S., to halt gene transfer experiments being carried out in livestock by the Department of Agriculture. The plaintiffs allege that the experiments--which entail injecting fusion genes that include the DNA structural sequence of the human growth hormone into the fertilized eggs of sheep and pigs--are morally objectionable, a potential threat to the biological stability of animal species, and likely to have undesirable economic and environmental consequences.

  6. Problems associated with gene transfer and opportunities for microgravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessen, Daniel J.

    1997-01-01

    The method of crop improvement by gene transfer is becoming increasingly routine with transgenic foods and ornamental crops now being marketed to consumers. However, biological processes of plants, and the physical barriers of current protocols continue to limit the application of gene transfer in many commercial crops. The goal of this paper is to outline the current limitations of gene transfer and to hypothesize possible opportunities for use of microgravity to overcome such limitations. The limitations detailed in this paper include host-range specificity of Agrobacterium mediated transformation, probability of gene insertion, position effects of the inserted genes, gene copy number, stability of foreign gene expression in host plants, and regeneration of recalcitrant plant species. Microgravity offers an opportunity for gene transfer where cell growth kinetics, DNA synthesis, and genetic recombination rates can be altered. Such biological conditions may enhance the ability for recombination of reporter genes and other genes of interest to agriculture. Proposed studies would be useful for understanding instability of foreign gene expression and may lead to stable transformed plants. Other aspects of gene transfer in microgravity are discussed.

  7. Transferring alien genes to wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    In broad terms an alien gene can be considered to be any gene transferred to wheat from a related species. As described above by Maan (section 7D) the genus Triticum contains a broad range of species, some of which cross readily with the cultivated tetraploid (T. Turgidum L.) or hexaploid (T. aestivum L.) wheats, and others only with great difficulty. In addition, wheat will also cross with species in a number of other genera including Agropyron, Elymus, Elytrigia (=Agropyron), Haynaldia, Hordeum, and Secale (Riley and Kimber, 1966; Knobloch, 1968; Feldman and Sears, 1981). In discussing the Triticum and Aegilops spp., the classification by Kimber and Sears, section SA-I, above, will be followed. For the Agropyron and related species the classification described by Dewey (1983) will be used. To avoid confusion, in referring to the literature the designations used by the authors will be given, followed by the new designation. The wild relatives of wheat are adapted to a broad range of environments and carry a large reservoir of useful genes (Zohary et al., 1969; Kerber and Dyck, 1973; Brezhnev, 1977; Feldman and Sears, 1981; Limin and Fowler, 1981; Sharma et aI., 1981; McGuire and Dvorak, 1981). Initially they were considered to be primarily sources of disease resistance, but more recently they have been recognized as potential sources of genes for high protein, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, drought tolerance, lodging resistance, early maturity, and even yield. Extensive screening of the wild relatives of wheat needs to be done before their useful genes can be fully utilized

  8. Gene transfer: anything goes in plant mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parasitic plants and their hosts have proven remarkably adept at exchanging fragments of mitochondrial DNA. Two recent studies provide important mechanistic insights into the pattern, process and consequences of horizontal gene transfer, demonstrating that genes can be transferred in large chunks and that gene conversion between foreign and native genes leads to intragenic mosaicism. A model involving duplicative horizontal gene transfer and differential gene conversion is proposed as a hitherto unrecognized source of genetic diversity. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/150

  9. Gene transfer: anything goes in plant mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic plants and their hosts have proven remarkably adept at exchanging fragments of mitochondrial DNA. Two recent studies provide important mechanistic insights into the pattern, process and consequences of horizontal gene transfer, demonstrating that genes can be transferred in large chunks and that gene conversion between foreign and native genes leads to intragenic mosaicism. A model involving duplicative horizontal gene transfer and differential gene conversion is proposed as a hitherto unrecognized source of genetic diversity. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/150 PMID:21176244

  10. Horizontal gene transfer in the phytosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsas, van J.D.; Turner, S.; Bailey, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Here, the ecological aspects of gene transfer processes between bacteria in the phytosphere are examined in the context of emerging evidence for the dominant role that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played in the evolutionary shaping of bacterial communities. Moreover, the impact of the putative

  11. Translating Gene Transfer: A Stalled Effort

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Alexandra J.; McCormick, Jennifer; Tapia, Carmen J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    The journey of gene transfer from laboratory to clinic has been slow and fraught with many challenges and barriers. Despite the development of the initial technology in the early 1970s, a standard clinical treatment involving “gene therapy” remains to be seen. Furthermore, much was written about the technology in the early 1990s, but since then, not much has been written about the journey of gene transfer. The translational path of gene transfer thus far, both pitfalls and successes, can serv...

  12. Translating gene transfer: a stalled effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; McCormick, Jennifer; Tapia, Carmen J; Windebank, Anthony J

    2011-08-01

    The journey of gene transfer from laboratory to clinic has been slow and fraught with many challenges and barriers. Despite the development of the initial technology in the early 1970s, a standard clinical treatment involving "gene therapy" remains to be seen. Furthermore, much was written about the technology in the early 1990s, but since then, not much has been written about the journey of gene transfer. The translational path of gene transfer thus far, both pitfalls and successes, can serve as a study not only in navigating ethical and safety concerns, but also in the importance of scientist-public interactions. Here, we examine the translational progress of gene transfer and what can be gleaned from its history. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  14. The interconnection between biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars H.

    2012-01-01

    of their believed importance in the understanding of the adaptation and subsequent evolution of social traits in bacteria. Here, we discuss current evidence for such interconnectedness centred on plasmids. Horizontal transfer rates are typically higher in biofilm communities compared with those in planktonic states....... Biofilms, furthermore, promote plasmid stability and may enhance the host range of mobile genetic elements that are transferred horizontally. Plasmids, on the other hand, are very well suited to promote the evolution of social traits such as biofilm formation. This, essentially, transpires because plasmids...... stable social interactions. It also indicates that horizontal gene transfer ultimately enhances the relatedness of bacteria carrying the mobile genetic elements of the same origin. The perspective of this review extends to an overall interconnectedness between horizontal gene transfer, mobile genetic...

  15. Optical stabilization for time transfer infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtech, Josef; Altmann, Michal; Skoda, Pavel; Horvath, Tomas; Slapak, Martin; Smotlacha, Vladimir; Havlis, Ondrej; Munster, Petr; Radil, Jan; Kundrat, Jan; Altmannova, Lada; Velc, Radek; Hula, Miloslav; Vohnout, Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we propose and present verification of all-optical methods for stabilization of the end-to-end delay of an optical fiber link. These methods are verified for deployment within infrastructure for accurate time and stable frequency distribution, based on sharing of fibers with research and educational network carrying live data traffic. Methods range from path length control, through temperature conditioning method to transmit wavelength control. Attention is given to achieve continuous control for relatively broad range of delays. We summarize design rules for delay stabilization based on the character and the total delay jitter.

  16. Plant gene transfer and expression protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Heddwyn

    1995-01-01

    ... proteins in plants can often lead to a better understanding of biochemical and physiological processes. Fourth, gene transfer technology has allowed the improvement of plant agricultural productivity. For example, plants have been engineered with improved viral resistance or the ability to withstand herbicide attack, therefore allowing a more eff...

  17. Horizontal gene transfer in silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, is the model insect for the order Lepidoptera, has economically important values, and has gained some representative behavioral characteristics compared to its wild ancestor. The genome of B. mori has been fully sequenced while function analysis of BmChi-h and BmSuc1 genes revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT maybe bestow a clear selective advantage to B. mori. However, the role of HGT in the evolutionary history of B. mori is largely unexplored. In this study, we compare the whole genome of B. mori with those of 382 prokaryotic and eukaryotic species to investigate the potential HGTs. Results Ten candidate HGT events were defined in B. mori by comprehensive sequence analysis using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian method combining with EST checking. Phylogenetic analysis of the candidate HGT genes suggested that one HGT was plant-to- B. mori transfer while nine were bacteria-to- B. mori transfer. Furthermore, functional analysis based on expression, coexpression and related literature searching revealed that several HGT candidate genes have added important characters, such as resistance to pathogen, to B. mori. Conclusions Results from this study clearly demonstrated that HGTs play an important role in the evolution of B. mori although the number of HGT events in B. mori is in general smaller than those of microbes and other insects. In particular, interdomain HGTs in B. mori may give rise to functional, persistent, and possibly evolutionarily significant new genes.

  18. Widespread of horizontal gene transfer in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wenze; Tsai, Lillian; Li, Yulong; Hua, Nan; Sun, Chen; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-01-01

    Background A fundamental concept in biology is that heritable material is passed from parents to offspring, a process called vertical gene transfer. An alternative mechanism of gene acquisition is through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which involves movement of genetic materials between different species. Horizontal gene transfer has been found prevalent in prokaryotes but very rare in eukaryote. In this paper, we investigate horizontal gene transfer in the human genome. Results From the pa...

  19. The use of alien gene transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    The present status of the gene transfers from alien species belonging to the sub-tribe Triticanae into wheat is reviewed, and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods available for such transfers are examined. In general, the alien genes provide a high degree of resistance against a notably wide range of physiological races of wheat rusts, powdery mildew and other diseases. The alien resistance, like other sources of resistance, is known to break down for certain new races. This may happen more often when alien genes of resistance are widely incorporated in commercial cultivars and grown over large areas. So far, few of the available induced translocation stocks have contributed to the development of agronomically superior commercial cultivars, mainly due to the associated undesirable effects of the translocations on agronomic characters of the recipient variety. The deleterious effects appear in some genetic backgrounds and not in others. Extensive hybridization of translocation stocks with different genotypes has been emphasized by most investigators. Such programmes have led to the release of three commercial cultivars - 2 in Australia and 1 in the USA. On the other hand, spontaneous wheat-rye translocations carrying gene(s) for disease resistance have been unconsciously incorporated into several wheat cultivars, some of them are widely cultivated and were top in ranking based on grain yield. (author)

  20. Characterization of an ancient lepidopteran lateral gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wheeler

    Full Text Available Bacteria to eukaryote lateral gene transfers (LGT are an important potential source of material for the evolution of novel genetic traits. The explosion in the number of newly sequenced genomes provides opportunities to identify and characterize examples of these lateral gene transfer events, and to assess their role in the evolution of new genes. In this paper, we describe an ancient lepidopteran LGT of a glycosyl hydrolase family 31 gene (GH31 from an Enterococcus bacteria. PCR amplification between the LGT and a flanking insect gene confirmed that the GH31 was integrated into the Bombyx mori genome and was not a result of an assembly error. Database searches in combination with degenerate PCR on a panel of 7 lepidopteran families confirmed that the GH31 LGT event occurred deep within the Order approximately 65-145 million years ago. The most basal species in which the LGT was found is Plutella xylostella (superfamily: Yponomeutoidea. Array data from Bombyx mori shows that GH31 is expressed, and low dN/dS ratios indicates the LGT coding sequence is under strong stabilizing selection. These findings provide further support for the proposition that bacterial LGTs are relatively common in insects and likely to be an underappreciated source of adaptive genetic material.

  1. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  2. Transcriptional delay stabilizes bistable gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R

    2013-08-02

    Transcriptional delay can significantly impact the dynamics of gene networks. Here we examine how such delay affects bistable systems. We investigate several stochastic models of bistable gene networks and find that increasing delay dramatically increases the mean residence times near stable states. To explain this, we introduce a non-Markovian, analytically tractable reduced model. The model shows that stabilization is the consequence of an increased number of failed transitions between stable states. Each of the bistable systems that we simulate behaves in this manner.

  3. Methods for gene transfer to synovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, R; Robbins, P D; Evans, C H

    1997-01-01

    Development of methods for gene transfer to synoviocytes was borne from the idea that gene therapy could be used to more effectively treat rheumatoid arthritis (EU) and other joint disorders (1). Current pharmaceutical modalities in use against RA have limited effectiveness because of problems related to inefficient targeting of drugs to the joint, as well as inefficacies of the drugs themselves. Drug delivery to the joint by traditional oral, iv, and intramuscular routes, depends on passive diffusion of the drug from the synovial vasculature into the joint space (2). Thus, high systemic concentrations of the drug are necessary to achieve therapeutic intra-articular drug levels; in chronic RA, perfusion of the synovium may be compromised (3), driving required systemic drug levels even higher. This is of major concern, as the pharmaceuticals used to treat this disease are associated with serious side effects. Further compounding these problems is the chronic nature of RA, which requires lifelong treatment with high dosages of these drugs.

  4. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  5. Progress in gene transfer by germ cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yidong; Liang, Shulong

    2008-12-01

    Use of germ cells as vectors for transgenesis in mammals has been well developed and offers exciting prospects for experimental and applied biology, agricultural and medical sciences. Such approach is referred to as either male germ cell mediated gene transfer (MGCMGT) or female germ cell mediated gene transfer (FGCMGT) technique. Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT), including its alternative method, testis-mediated gene transfer (TMGT), becomes an established and reliable method for transgenesis. They have been extensively used for producing transgenic animals. The newly developed approach of FGCMGT, ovary-mediated gene transfer (OMGT) is also a novel and useful tool for efficient transgenesis. This review highlights an overview of the recent progress in germ cell mediated gene transfer techniques, methods developed and mechanisms of nucleic acid uptake by germ cells.

  6. Lentiviral Vector Gene Transfer to Porcine Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L Sinn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated lentiviral vector development and transduction efficiencies in well-differentiated primary cultures of pig airway epithelia (PAE and wild-type pigs in vivo. We noted gene transfer efficiencies similar to that observed for human airway epithelia (HAE. Interestingly, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-based vectors transduced immortalized pig cells as well as pig primary cells more efficiently than HIV-1–based vectors. PAE express TRIM5α, a well-characterized species-specific lentiviral restriction factor. We contrasted the restrictive properties of porcine TRIM5α against FIV- and HIV-based vectors using gain and loss of function approaches. We observed no effect on HIV-1 or FIV conferred transgene expression in response to porcine TRIM5α overexpression or knockdown. To evaluate the ability of GP64-FIV to transduce porcine airways in vivo, we delivered vector expressing mCherry to the tracheal lobe of the lung and the ethmoid sinus of 4-week-old pigs. One week later, epithelial cells expressing mCherry were readily detected. Our findings indicate that pseudotyped FIV vectors confer similar tropisms in porcine epithelia as observed in human HAE and provide further support for the selection of GP64 as an appropriate envelope pseudotype for future preclinical gene therapy studies in the porcine model of cystic fibrosis (CF.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of 'biologicals', in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L. I. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  9. Patterns of prokaryotic lateral gene transfers affecting parasitic microbial eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmark, Cecilia; Foster, Peter G; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of lateral gene transfer on gene origins and biology in eukaryotes is poorly understood compared with those of prokaryotes. A number of independent investigations focusing on specific genes, individual genomes, or specific functional categories from various eukaryotes have...... indicated that lateral gene transfer does indeed affect eukaryotic genomes. However, the lack of common methodology and criteria in these studies makes it difficult to assess the general importance and influence of lateral gene transfer on eukaryotic genome evolution. RESULTS: We used a phylogenomic...... are conserved among lineages, the genes making up those pathways can have very different origins in different eukaryotes. Thus, from the perspective of the effects of lateral gene transfer on individual gene ancestries in different lineages, eukaryotic metabolism appears to be chimeric....

  10. Widespread of horizontal gene transfer in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenze; Tsai, Lillian; Li, Yulong; Hua, Nan; Sun, Chen; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-04-04

    A fundamental concept in biology is that heritable material is passed from parents to offspring, a process called vertical gene transfer. An alternative mechanism of gene acquisition is through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which involves movement of genetic materials between different species. Horizontal gene transfer has been found prevalent in prokaryotes but very rare in eukaryote. In this paper, we investigate horizontal gene transfer in the human genome. From the pair-wise alignments between human genome and 53 vertebrate genomes, 1,467 human genome regions (2.6 M bases) from all chromosomes were found to be more conserved with non-mammals than with most mammals. These human genome regions involve 642 known genes, which are enriched with ion binding. Compared to known horizontal gene transfer regions in the human genome, there were few overlapping regions, which indicated horizontal gene transfer is more common than we expected in the human genome. Horizontal gene transfer impacts hundreds of human genes and this study provided insight into potential mechanisms of HGT in the human genome.

  11. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  12. Ethical perception of cross-species gene transfer in plant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... the ethical acceptance of cross-species gene transfers in developing country. Key words: Ethical perception, genetically modified (GM) rice, cross-species gene transfer, Malaysia. INTRODUCTION. Rice is a staple food in much of Asia countries including. Malaysia, and by 2025 about 60% more rice must ...

  13. Gene transfer technology and genetic radioisotope targeting therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaqiong; Wang Zizheng

    2004-01-01

    With deeper cognition about mechanisms of disease at the cellular and molecular level, gene therapy has become one of the most important research fields in medical molecular biology at present. Gene transfer technology plays an important role during the course of gene therapy, and further improvement should be made about vectors carrying target gene sequences. Also, gene survey is needed during gene therapy, and gene imaging is the most effective method. The combination of gene therapy and targeted radiotherapy, that is, 'Genetic Radioisotope Targeting Therapy', will be a novel approach to tumor gene therapy

  14. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    OpenAIRE

    Orit Adato; Noga Ninyo; Uri Gophna; Sagi Snir

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally ...

  15. Pollen irradiation and possible gene transfer in Nicotiana species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1985-01-01

    Progeny from crosses of Nicotiana langsdorffii with gamma irradiated pollen of Nicotiana alata ‘Crimson Bedder’ showed skewed segregation in the F2 favoring the maternal parent. This is probably not gene transfer in a strict sense, rather just an extreme case of reduced transmission of irradiated...... chromosomes, leading to massive overrepresentation of maternal genes. Gene transfer or mutational loss may explain some anomalous F1 plants. Segregation in the F2 progeny showed the presence of several genes from the irradiated pollen. Crosses of Nicotiana sylvestris, N. plumbaginifolia N. paniculata......, and Petunia parodii with irradiated pollen from N. alata and Petunia hybrida showed no evidence of gene transfer, nor did experiments with irradiated mentor pollen. This indicates that gene transfer with irradiated pollen between non-crossing species or between species giving sterile hybrids is probably...

  16. AAV5-Factor VIII Gene Transfer in Severe Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Savita; Walsh, Liron; Lester, Will; Perry, David; Madan, Bella; Laffan, Michael; Yu, Hua; Vettermann, Christian; Pierce, Glenn F; Wong, Wing Y; Pasi, K John

    2017-12-28

    Patients with hemophilia A rely on exogenous factor VIII to prevent bleeding in joints, soft tissue, and the central nervous system. Although successful gene transfer has been reported in patients with hemophilia B, the large size of the factor VIII coding region has precluded improved outcomes with gene therapy in patients with hemophilia A. We infused a single intravenous dose of a codon-optimized adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector encoding a B-domain-deleted human factor VIII (AAV5-hFVIII-SQ) in nine men with severe hemophilia A. Participants were enrolled sequentially into one of three dose cohorts (low dose [one participant], intermediate dose [one participant], and high dose [seven participants]) and were followed through 52 weeks. Factor VIII activity levels remained at 3 IU or less per deciliter in the recipients of the low or intermediate dose. In the high-dose cohort, the factor VIII activity level was more than 5 IU per deciliter between weeks 2 and 9 after gene transfer in all seven participants, and the level in six participants increased to a normal value (>50 IU per deciliter) that was maintained at 1 year after receipt of the dose. In the high-dose cohort, the median annualized bleeding rate among participants who had previously received prophylactic therapy decreased from 16 events before the study to 1 event after gene transfer, and factor VIII use for participant-reported bleeding ceased in all the participants in this cohort by week 22. The primary adverse event was an elevation in the serum alanine aminotransferase level to 1.5 times the upper limit of the normal range or less. Progression of preexisting chronic arthropathy in one participant was the only serious adverse event. No neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII were detected. The infusion of AAV5-hFVIII-SQ was associated with the sustained normalization of factor VIII activity level over a period of 1 year in six of seven participants who received a high dose, with

  17. LATERAL GENE TRANSFER AND THE HISTORY OF BACTERIAL GENOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Ochman

    2006-02-22

    The aims of this research were to elucidate the role and extent of lateral transfer in the differentiation of bacterial strains and species, and to assess the impact of gene transfer on the evolution of bacterial genomes. The ultimate goal of the project is to examine the dynamics of a core set of protein-coding genes (i.e., those that are distributed universally among Bacteria) by developing conserved primers that would allow their amplification and sequencing in any bacterial taxa. In addition, we adopted a bioinformatic approach to elucidate the extent of lateral gene transfer in sequenced genome.

  18. Trends and barriers to lateral gene transfer in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Ovidiu; Dagan, Tal

    2011-10-01

    Gene acquisition by lateral gene transfer (LGT) is an important mechanism for natural variation among prokaryotes. Laboratory experiments show that protein-coding genes can be laterally transferred extremely fast among microbial cells, inherited to most of their descendants, and adapt to a new regulatory regime within a short time. Recent advance in the phylogenetic analysis of microbial genomes using networks approach reveals a substantial impact of LGT during microbial genome evolution. Phylogenomic networks of LGT among prokaryotes reconstructed from completely sequenced genomes uncover barriers to LGT in multiple levels. Here we discuss the kinds of barriers to gene acquisition in nature including physical barriers for gene transfer between cells, genomic barriers for the integration of acquired DNA, and functional barriers for the acquisition of new genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mammary-Specific Gene Transfer for Modeling Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yi

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop a mouse model system that allows for rapid assessment of genetic lesions involved in breast tumor development, we are adapting a somatic gene transfer system based on avian leukosis virus A (ALV...

  20. Evolution of glutamate dehydrogenase genes: evidence for lateral gene transfer within and between prokaryotes and eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Andrew J

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral gene transfer can introduce genes with novel functions into genomes or replace genes with functionally similar orthologs or paralogs. Here we present a study of the occurrence of the latter gene replacement phenomenon in the four gene families encoding different classes of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, to evaluate and compare the patterns and rates of lateral gene transfer (LGT in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Results We extend the taxon sampling of gdh genes with nine new eukaryotic sequences and examine the phylogenetic distribution pattern of the various GDH classes in combination with maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses. The distribution pattern analyses indicate that LGT has played a significant role in the evolution of the four gdh gene families. Indeed, a number of gene transfer events are identified by phylogenetic analyses, including numerous prokaryotic intra-domain transfers, some prokaryotic inter-domain transfers and several inter-domain transfers between prokaryotes and microbial eukaryotes (protists. Conclusion LGT has apparently affected eukaryotes and prokaryotes to a similar extent within the gdh gene families. In the absence of indications that the evolution of the gdh gene families is radically different from other families, these results suggest that gene transfer might be an important evolutionary mechanism in microbial eukaryote genome evolution.

  1. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    reservoir; under Antarctic ice or in near-boiling water; in acid springs or in alkaline pools – microbial life exists .... The close similarity of the rrnE region of Salmo- nella subspecies I to that of E. coli suggests lateral ..... transfer and the nature of bacterial innovation; Nature (Lon- don) 405 299–304. Pan A, Dutta C and Das J ...

  2. Addressing the issue of horizontal gene transfer from a diet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of these hazards, which have great controversy reports, is the possible horizontal gene transfer from GM-food or feed to human or animal tissues. Many researches were conducted to investigate the presence of some transgenic sequences in animal tissues fed on GM- crops. Many of the inserted genes in the GM-crops ...

  3. Design of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Staehler, P.; Kley, J.; Spiegel, M.; Gross, C.; Graepler, F.T.C.; Gregor, M.; Lauer, U.; Oberdorfer, F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy with emission tomography is expected to lead to improved management of cancer by the year 2010. There are now only a few examples and approaches to the design of radiopharmaceuticals for gene transfer therapy. This paper introduces a novel concept for the monitoring of gene therapy. We present the optimisation of the labelling of recombinant human β-NGF ligands for in vitro studies prior to using 123 I for SPET and 124 I for PET studies. (author)

  4. Horizontal gene transfer between Wolbachia and the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT from Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria to their eukaryotic hosts is a topic of considerable interest and debate. Recent transfers of genome fragments from Wolbachia into insect chromosomes have been reported, but it has been argued that these fragments may be on an evolutionary trajectory to degradation and loss. Results We have discovered a case of HGT, involving two adjacent genes, between the genomes of Wolbachia and the currently Wolbachia-uninfected mosquito Aedes aegypti, an important human disease vector. The lower level of sequence identity between Wolbachia and insect, the transcription of all the genes involved, and the fact that we have identified homologs of the two genes in another Aedes species (Ae. mascarensis, suggest that these genes are being expressed after an extended evolutionary period since horizontal transfer, and therefore that the transfer has functional significance. The association of these genes with Wolbachia prophage regions also provides a mechanism for the transfer. Conclusion The data support the argument that HGT between Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria and their hosts has produced evolutionary innovation.

  5. Interspecies gene transfer provides soybean resistance to a fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Caspar; Schultheiss, Holger; Rosendahl, Martin; Tresch, Nadine; Conrath, Uwe; Goellner, Katharina

    2016-02-01

    Fungal pathogens pose a major challenge to global crop production. Crop varieties that resist disease present the best defence and offer an alternative to chemical fungicides. Exploiting durable nonhost resistance (NHR) for crop protection often requires identification and transfer of NHR-linked genes to the target crop. Here, we identify genes associated with NHR of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the devastating fungal disease called Asian soybean rust. We transfer selected Arabidopsis NHR-linked genes to the soybean host and discover enhanced resistance to rust disease in some transgenic soybean lines in the greenhouse. Interspecies NHR gene transfer thus presents a promising strategy for genetically engineered control of crop diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Improving Power System Stability Using Transfer Function: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shahgholian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a small-signal dynamic model of a single-machine infinite-bus (SMIB power system that includes IEEE type-ST1 excitation system and PSS based on transfer fu¬n¬c¬¬tion structure is presented. The changes in the operating co¬n¬dition of a power system on dynamic performance have been exa¬m¬ined. The dynamic performance of the closed-loop system is ana¬lyzed base on its eigenvalues. The effectiveness of the par¬a¬m¬e¬t¬ers changes on dynamic stability is verified by simulation res¬u¬l¬ts. Three types of PSS have been considered for analysis: (a the derivative PSS, (b the lead-lag PSS or conventional PSS, and (c the proportional-integral-derivative PSS. The objective fu¬nc¬t¬i¬o¬n is formulated to increase the dam¬¬ping ratio of the electromechanical mode eigenvalues. Simu¬la¬tion results show that the PID-PSS performs better for less ov¬e¬r¬shoot and less settling time comp¬ared with the CPSS and DPSS un¬der different load ope¬ration and the significant system pa¬r¬am¬eter variation conditions.

  7. Heat transfer modelling and stability analysis of selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusarov, A.V.; Yadroitsev, I.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2007-01-01

    The process of direct manufacturing by selective laser melting basically consists of laser beam scanning over a thin powder layer deposited on a dense substrate. Complete remelting of the powder in the scanned zone and its good adhesion to the substrate ensure obtaining functional parts with improved mechanical properties. Experiments with single-line scanning indicate, that an interval of scanning velocities exists where the remelted tracks are uniform. The tracks become broken if the scanning velocity is outside this interval. This is extremely undesirable and referred to as the 'balling' effect. A numerical model of coupled radiation and heat transfer is proposed to analyse the observed instability. The 'balling' effect at high scanning velocities (above ∼20 cm/s for the present conditions) can be explained by the Plateau-Rayleigh capillary instability of the melt pool. Two factors stabilize the process with decreasing the scanning velocity: reducing the length-to-width ratio of the melt pool and increasing the width of its contact with the substrate

  8. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adato, Orit; Ninyo, Noga; Gophna, Uri; Snir, Sagi

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM). Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain.

  9. Stability and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Condensing Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Pedersen, P. C.; Allen, J. S.; Shear, M. A.; Chen, Z. Q.; Alexandrou, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to investigate the fundamental physics of film condensation in reduced gravity. The condensation of vapor on a cool surface is important in many engineering problems,including spacecraft thermal control and also the behavior of condensate films that may form on the interior surfaces of spacecraft. To examine the effects of body force on condensing films, two different geometries have been tested in the laboratory: (1) a stabilizing gravitational body force (+1g, or condensing surface facing 'upwards') and (2) de-stabilizing gravitational body force (-1g, or 'downwards'). For each geometry, different fluid configurations are employed to help isolate the fluid mechanical and thermal mechanisms operative in condensing films. The fluid configurations are (a) a condensing film, and (b) a non-condensing film with film growth by mass addition by through the plate surface. Condensation experiments are conducted in a test cell containing a cooled copper or brass plate with an exposed diameter of 12.7 cm. The metal surface is polished to allow for double-pass shadowgraph imaging, and the test surface is instrumented with imbedded heat transfer gauges and thermocouples. Representative shadowgraph images of a condensing, unstable (-1g) n-pentane film are shown. The interfacial disturbances associated with the de-stabilizing body force leading to droplet formation and break-off can be clearly seen. The heat transfer coefficient associated with the condensing film is shown. The heat transfer coefficient is seen to initially decrease, consistent with the increased thermal resistance due to layer growth. For sufficiently long time, a steady value of heat transfer is observed, accompanied by continuous droplet formation and break-off. The non-condensing cell consists of a stack of thin stainless steel disks 10 cm in diameter mounted in a brass enclosure. The disks are perforated with a regular pattern of 361 holes each 0.25 mm in diameter

  10. Evaluation of resistance gene transfer from heat-treated Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Jouy, Eric; Kempf, Isabelle

    2018-04-02

    Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli may be present in various foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of heat treatment, simulating food preparation, on the possibility of antimicrobial resistance genes being transferred from E. coli cells. The study was performed on antimicrobial-resistant E. coli cells in suspension in a sterile saline solution. The stability of resistance genes and the possibility of their transfer by transformation or conjugation were analyzed. Results showed that antimicrobial-resistant E. coli cells managing to survive after a few minutes at 60 °C retained their antimicrobial resistance. No plasmid could be transferred by conjugation from antimicrobial-resistant E. coli cells heated to 60 °C for ten or more minutes. Twelve electroporation experiments were performed using a bacterial suspension heated to 70 °C for 30 min. Genes coding for resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, tetracycline or sulfonamides were transferred to an E. coli DH5α recipient on two occasions. In conclusion we showed that heat-treated E. coli may occasionally transfer resistance genes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gene transfer strategies for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, B.E.; Buchsbaum, D.J.; Zinn, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Utilization of molecular biology techniques offers attractive options in nuclear medicine for improving cancer imaging and therapy with radiolabeled peptides. Two of these options include utilization of phage-panning to identify novel tumor specific peptides or single chain antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the number of antigen/receptor sites expressed on malignant cells. The group has focused on the latter approach for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy. The most widely used gene transfer vectors in clinical gene therapy trials include retrovirus, cationic lipids and adenovirus. It has been utilized adenovirus vectors for gene transfer because of their ability to accomplish efficient in vivo gene transfer. Adenovirus vectors encoding the genes for a variety of antigens/receptors (carcinoembryonic antigen, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2) have all shown that their expression is increased on cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo following adenovirus infection. Of particular interest has been the adenovirus encoding for SSTr2 (AdCMVSSTr2). Various radioisotopes have been attached to somatostatin analogues for imaging and therapy of SSTr2-positive tumors both clinically and in animal models. The use of these analogues in combination with AdCMVSSTr2 is a promising approach for improving the detection sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of these radiolabeled peptides against solid tumors. In addition, it has been proposed the use of SSTr2 as a marker for imaging the expression of another cancer therapeutic transgene (e.g. cytosine deaminase, thymidine kinase) encoded within the same vector. This would allow for non-invasive monitoring of gene delivery to tumor sites

  12. A gene in the process of endosymbiotic transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Jiroutová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endosymbiotic birth of organelles is accompanied by massive transfer of endosymbiont genes to the eukaryotic host nucleus. In the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana the Psb28 protein is encoded in the plastid genome while a second version is nuclear-encoded and possesses a bipartite N-terminal presequence necessary to target the protein into the diatom complex plastid. Thus it can represent a gene captured during endosymbiotic gene transfer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To specify the origin of nuclear- and plastid-encoded Psb28 in T. pseudonana we have performed extensive phylogenetic analyses of both mentioned genes. We have also experimentally tested the intracellular location of the nuclear-encoded Psb28 protein (nuPsb28 through transformation of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum with the gene in question fused to EYFP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show here that both versions of the psb28 gene in T. pseudonana are transcribed. We also provide experimental evidence for successful targeting of the nuPsb28 fused with EYFP to the diatom complex plastid. Extensive phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that nucleotide composition of the analyzed genes deeply influences the tree topology and that appropriate methods designed to deal with a compositional bias of the sequences and the long branch attraction artefact (LBA need to be used to overcome this obstacle. We propose that nuclear psb28 in T. pseudonana is a duplicate of a plastid localized version, and that it has been transferred from its endosymbiont.

  13. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  14. Staphylococci on ICE: Overlooked agents of horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansevere, Emily A; Robinson, D Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer plays a significant role in spreading antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes throughout the genus Staphylococcus , which includes species of clinical relevance to humans and animals. While phages and plasmids are the most well-studied agents of horizontal gene transfer in staphylococci, the contribution of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) has been mostly overlooked. Experimental work demonstrating the activity of ICEs in staphylococci remained frozen for years after initial work in the 1980s that showed Tn 916 was capable of transfer from Enterococcus to Staphylococcus . However, recent work has begun to thaw this field. To date, 2 families of ICEs have been identified among staphylococci - Tn 916 that includes the Tn 5801 subfamily, and ICE 6013 that includes at least 7 subfamilies. Both Tn 5801 and ICE 6013 commonly occur in clinical strains of S. aureus . Tn 5801 is the most studied of the Tn 916 family elements in staphylococci and encodes tetracycline resistance and a protein that, when expressed in Escherichia coli , inhibits restriction barriers to incoming DNA. ICE 6013 is among the shortest known ICEs, but it still includes many uncharacterized open reading frames. This element uses an IS 30 -like transposase as its recombinase, providing some versatility in integration sites. ICE 6013 also conjugatively transfers among receptive S. aureus strains at relatively higher frequency than Tn 5801 . Continued study of these mobile genetic elements may reveal the full extent to which ICEs impact horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of staphylococci.

  15. Systematic inference of highways of horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Mukul S; Banay, Guy; Harlow, Timothy J; Gogarten, J Peter; Shamir, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a crucial role in the evolution of prokaryotic species. Typically, no more than a few genes are horizontally transferred between any two species. However, several studies identified pairs of species (or linages) between which many different genes were horizontally transferred. Such a pair is said to be linked by a highway of gene sharing. Inferring such highways is crucial to understanding the evolution of prokaryotes and for inferring past symbiotic and ecological associations among different species. We present a new improved method for systematically detecting highways of gene sharing. As we demonstrate using a variety of simulated datasets, our method is highly accurate and efficient, and robust to noise and high rates of HGT. We further validate our method by applying it to a published dataset of >22 000 gene trees from 144 prokaryotic species. Our method makes it practical, for the first time, to perform accurate highway analysis quickly and easily even on large datasets with high rates of HGT. An implementation of the method can be freely downloaded from: http://acgt.cs.tau.ac.il/hide.

  16. Quasispecies theory for horizontal gene transfer and recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a generalization of the parallel, or Crow-Kimura, and Eigen models of molecular evolution to represent the exchange of genetic information between individuals in a population. We study the effect of different schemes of genetic recombination on the steady-state mean fitness and distribution of individuals in the population, through an analytic field theoretic mapping. We investigate both horizontal gene transfer from a population and recombination between pairs of individuals. Somewhat surprisingly, these nonlinear generalizations of quasispecies theory to modern biology are analytically solvable. For two-parent recombination, we find two selected phases, one of which is spectrally rigid. We present exact analytical formulas for the equilibrium mean fitness of the population, in terms of a maximum principle, which are generally applicable to any permutation invariant replication rate function. For smooth fitness landscapes, we show that when positive epistatic interactions are present, recombination or horizontal gene transfer introduces a mild load against selection. Conversely, if the fitness landscape exhibits negative epistasis, horizontal gene transfer or recombination introduces an advantage by enhancing selection towards the fittest genotypes. These results prove that the mutational deterministic hypothesis holds for quasispecies models. For the discontinuous single sharp peak fitness landscape, we show that horizontal gene transfer has no effect on the fitness, while recombination decreases the fitness, for both the parallel and the Eigen models. We present numerical and analytical results as well as phase diagrams for the different cases.

  17. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Adato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM. Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain.

  18. Evaluation of Hose in Hose Transfer Line Service Life for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TORRES, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    RPP-6153, Engineering Task Plan for Hose-in-Hose Transfer System for the Interim Stabilization Program, defines the programmatic goals, functional requirements, and technical criteria for the development and subsequent installation of transfer line equipment to support Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program. RPP-6028, Specification for Hose in Hose Transfer Lines for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program, has been issued to define the specific requirements for the design, manufacture, and verification of transfer line assemblies for specific waste transfer applications. Included in RPP-6028 are tables defining the chemical constituents of concern to which transfer lines will be exposed. Current Interim Stabilization Program planning forecasts that the at-grade transfer lines will be required to convey pumpable waste for as much as three years after commissioning. Prudent engineering dictates that the equipment placed in service have a working life in excess of this forecasted time period, with some margin to allow for future adjustments to the planned schedule. This document evaluates the effective service life of the Hose-in-Hose Transfer Lines, based on information submitted by the manufacturer and published literature. The effective service life of transfer line assemblies is a function of several factors. Foremost among these are process fluid characteristics, ambient environmental conditions, and the manufacturer's stated shelf life. This evaluation examines the manufacturer's certification of shelf life, the manufacturer's certifications of chemical compatibility with waste, and published literature on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on the mechanical properties of elastomeric materials to evaluate transfer line service life

  19. Detection of Horizontal Gene Transfers from Phylogenetic Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylro, Victor Satler; Vespoli, Luciano de Souza; Duarte, Gabriela Frois; Yotoko, Karla Suemy Clemente

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial phylogenies have become one of the most important challenges for microbial ecology. This field started in the mid-1970s with the aim of using the sequence of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S) tool to infer bacterial phylogenies. Phylogenetic hypotheses based on other sequences usually give conflicting topologies that reveal different evolutionary histories, which in some cases may be the result of horizontal gene transfer events. Currently, one of the major goals of molecular biology is to understand the role that horizontal gene transfer plays in species adaptation and evolution. In this work, we compared the phylogenetic tree based on 16S with the tree based on dszC, a gene involved in the cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds. Bacteria of several genera perform this survival task when living in environments lacking free mineral sulfur. The biochemical pathway of the desulphurization process was extensively studied due to its economic importance, since this step is expensive and indispensable in fuel production. Our results clearly show that horizontal gene transfer events could be detected using common phylogenetic methods with gene sequences obtained from public sequence databases. PMID:22675653

  20. Myeloprotection by Cytidine Deaminase Gene Transfer in Antileukemic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Lachmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer of drug resistance (CTX-R genes can be used to protect the hematopoietic system from the toxicity of anticancer chemotherapy and this concept recently has been proven by overexpression of a mutant O6-methylguaninemethyltransferase in the hematopoietic system of glioblastoma patients treated with temozolomide. Given its protection capacity against such relevant drugs as cytosine arabinoside (ara-C, gemcitabine, decitabine, or azacytidine and the highly hematopoiesis-specific toxicity profile of several of these agents, cytidine deaminase (CDD represents another interesting candidate CTX-R gene and our group recently has established the myeloprotective capacity of CDD gene transfer in a number of murine transplant studies. Clinically, CDD overexpression appears particularly suited to optimize treatment strategies for acute leukemias and myelodysplasias given the efficacy of ara-C (and to a lesser degree decitabine and azacytidine in these disease entities. This article will review the current state of the art with regard to CDD gene transfer and point out potential scenarios for a clinical application of this strategy. In addition, risks and potential side effects associated with this approach as well as strategies to overcome these problems will be highlighted.

  1. Horizontal gene transfer confers adaptive advantages to phytopathogenic fungi: a case study of catalase-peroxidase in Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the exchange and stable integration of genetic material between different evolutionary lineages, is widely observed in fungi. We hypothesize that successful stabilization of HGT elements provides adaptive advantages (e.g., virulence). Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are ...

  2. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2015-08-18

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners--the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)--and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic--and plant and algal--lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller's ratchet--the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex--might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation.

  3. In Silico Prediction of Horizontal Gene Transfer Events in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus Reveals Protocooperation in Yogurt Manufacturing▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjin; Siezen, Roland J.; Nauta, Arjen

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, used in yogurt starter cultures, are well known for their stability and protocooperation during their coexistence in milk. In this study, we show that a close interaction between the two species also takes place at the genetic level. We performed an in silico analysis, combining gene composition and gene transfer mechanism-associated features, and predicted horizontally transferred genes in both L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. Putative horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events that have occurred between the two bacterial species include the transfer of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis genes, transferred from S. thermophilus to L. bulgaricus, and the gene cluster cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE for the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, transferred from L. bulgaricus or Lactobacillus helveticus to S. thermophilus. The HGT event for the cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE gene cluster was analyzed in detail, with respect to both evolutionary and functional aspects. It can be concluded that during the coexistence of both yogurt starter species in a milk environment, agonistic coevolution at the genetic level has probably been involved in the optimization of their combined growth and interactions. PMID:19395564

  4. In silico prediction of horizontal gene transfer events in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus reveals protocooperation in yogurt manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjin; Siezen, Roland J; Nauta, Arjen

    2009-06-01

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, used in yogurt starter cultures, are well known for their stability and protocooperation during their coexistence in milk. In this study, we show that a close interaction between the two species also takes place at the genetic level. We performed an in silico analysis, combining gene composition and gene transfer mechanism-associated features, and predicted horizontally transferred genes in both L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. Putative horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events that have occurred between the two bacterial species include the transfer of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis genes, transferred from S. thermophilus to L. bulgaricus, and the gene cluster cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE for the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, transferred from L. bulgaricus or Lactobacillus helveticus to S. thermophilus. The HGT event for the cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE gene cluster was analyzed in detail, with respect to both evolutionary and functional aspects. It can be concluded that during the coexistence of both yogurt starter species in a milk environment, agonistic coevolution at the genetic level has probably been involved in the optimization of their combined growth and interactions.

  5. Immunotherapy of Malignancy by in vivo Gene Transfer into Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Gregory E.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bei-Yue; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Leaf; Nabel, Gary J.

    1993-05-01

    The immune system confers protection against a variety of pathogens and contributes to the surveillance and destruction of neoplastic cells. Several cell types participate in the recognition and lysis of tumors, and appropriate immune stimulation provides therapeutic effects in malignancy. Foreign major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins also serve as a potent stimulus to the immune system. In this report, a foreign MHC gene was introduced directly into malignant tumors in vivo in an effort to stimulate tumor rejection. In contrast to previous attempts to induce tumor immunity by cell-mediated gene transfer, the recombinant gene was introduced directly into tumors in vivo. Expression of the murine class I H-2K^s gene within the CT26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma (H-2K^d) or the MCA 106 fibrosarcoma (H-2K^b) induced a cytotoxic T-cell response to H-2K^s and, more importantly, to other antigens present on unmodified tumor cells. This immune response attenuated tumor growth and caused complete tumor regression in many cases. Direct gene transfer in vivo can therefore induce cell-mediated immunity against specific gene products, which provides an immunotherapeutic effect for malignancy, and potentially can be applied to the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases in man.

  6. Important aspects of placental-specific gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Melissa R; Albers, Renee E; Keoni, Chanel; Kulkarni-Datar, Kashmira; Natale, David R; Brown, Thomas L

    2014-10-15

    The placenta is a unique and highly complex organ that develops only during pregnancy and is essential for growth and survival of the developing fetus. The placenta provides the vital exchange of gases and wastes, the necessary nutrients for fetal development, acts as immune barrier that protects against maternal rejection, and produces numerous hormones and growth factors that promote fetal maturity to regulate pregnancy until parturition. Abnormal placental development is a major underlying cause of pregnancy-associated disorders that often result in preterm birth. Defects in placental stem cell propagation, growth, and differentiation are the major factors that affect embryonic and fetal well-being and dramatically increase the risk of pregnancy complications. Understanding the processes that regulate placentation is important in determining the underlying factors behind abnormal placental development. The ability to manipulate genes in a placenta-specific manner provides a unique tool to analyze development and eliminates potentially confounding results that can occur with traditional gene knockouts. Trophoblast stem cells and mouse embryos are not overly amenable to traditional gene transfer techniques. Most viral vectors, however, have a low infection rate and often lead to mosaic transgenesis. Although the traditional method of embryo transfer is intrauterine surgical implantation, the methodology reported here, combining lentiviral blastocyst infection and nonsurgical embryo transfer, leads to highly efficient and placental-specific gene transfer. Numerous advantages of our optimized procedures include increased investigator safety, a reduction in animal stress, rapid and noninvasive embryo transfer, and higher a rate of pregnancy and live birth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving Adenovirus Based Gene Transfer: Strategies to Accomplish Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amalfitano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (Ad based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1 Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2 covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3 the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4 the use of genome modified Ads; and (5 the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  8. Improving adenovirus based gene transfer: strategies to accomplish immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1) Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2) covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3) the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4) the use of genome modified Ads; and (5) the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  9. Source-sink plasmid transfer dynamics maintain gene mobility in soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James P J; Wood, A Jamie; Harrison, Ellie; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2016-07-19

    Horizontal gene transfer is a fundamental process in bacterial evolution that can accelerate adaptation via the sharing of genes between lineages. Conjugative plasmids are the principal genetic elements mediating the horizontal transfer of genes, both within and between bacterial species. In some species, plasmids are unstable and likely to be lost through purifying selection, but when alternative hosts are available, interspecific plasmid transfer could counteract this and maintain access to plasmid-borne genes. To investigate the evolutionary importance of alternative hosts to plasmid population dynamics in an ecologically relevant environment, we established simple soil microcosm communities comprising two species of common soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and a mercury resistance (Hg(R)) plasmid, pQBR57, both with and without positive selection [i.e., addition of Hg(II)]. In single-species populations, plasmid stability varied between species: although pQBR57 survived both with and without positive selection in P. fluorescens, it was lost or replaced by nontransferable Hg(R) captured to the chromosome in P. putida A simple mathematical model suggests these differences were likely due to pQBR57's lower intraspecific conjugation rate in P. putida By contrast, in two-species communities, both models and experiments show that interspecific conjugation from P. fluorescens allowed pQBR57 to persist in P. putida via source-sink transfer dynamics. Moreover, the replacement of pQBR57 by nontransferable chromosomal Hg(R) in P. putida was slowed in coculture. Interspecific transfer allows plasmid survival in host species unable to sustain the plasmid in monoculture, promoting community-wide access to the plasmid-borne accessory gene pool and thus potentiating future evolvability.

  10. Can Viruses be Modified to Achieve Sustained Gene Transfer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildegund CJ Ertl

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It is very easy to replace a faulty gene in an immunocompromised mouse. First, one takes a well-characterized virus, such as an adenovirus or an adeno-associated virus, and incorporates the correct version of the faulty gene together with some regulatory sequences into the genome. Then, one transduces the recombinant genome into helper cells, which will add the viral capsid. At last, one injects the resulting viral vector into the sick mouse, and the mouse is cured. It is not that easy in an immunocompetent mouse, let alone in a human, as over the eons the immune system evolved to eliminate viruses regardless if they penetrate as dangerous pathogens or are injected by a well-meaning gene therapist. Here we offer our perspective on the potential of how viral vectors achieve sustained gene transfer in the face of a hostile immune system.

  11. [Research progress in sperm mediated gene transfer technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoxiong; Zhu, Zheng; Cao, Mianfu; Li, Chengren; Lin, Yunlai

    2013-04-01

    With the rapid development of biotechnology, we can change the trait of organism using transgenetic technology. In recent years, there are growing interests in the establishment of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) technology as an effective and convenient method to produce transgenic animals. SMGT technology is a transgenetic method, which is easy in operation and does little harm to the cell compared with the other transgenetic methods. In this review, we expound the background, development, mechanism, operation and application of SMGT.

  12. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Spear, John R; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2011-07-08

    The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei) and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria). We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles.

  13. Selective Gene Transfer to the Retina Using Intravitreal Ultrasound Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Sonoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal ultrasound (US irradiation for green fluorescent protein (GFP plasmid transfer into the rabbit retina using a miniature US transducer. Intravitreal US irradiation was performed by a slight modification of the transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy system utilizing a small probe. After vitrectomy, the US probe was inserted through a scleral incision. A mixture of GFP plasmid (50 μL and bubble liposomes (BLs; 50 μL was injected into the vitreous cavity, and US was generated to the retina using a SonoPore 4000. The control group was not exposed to US. After 72 h, the gene-transfer efficiency was quantified by counting the number of GFP-positive cells. The retinas that received plasmid, BL, and US showed a significant increase in the number (average ± SEM of GFP-positive cells (32±4.9; n=7; P<0.01 . No GFP-positive cells were observed in the control eyes (n=7. Intravitreal retinal US irradiation can transfer the GFP plasmid into the retina without causing any apparent damage. This procedure could be used to transfer genes and drugs directly to the retina and therefore has potential therapeutic value.

  14. Dynamic Transfer Schemes and Stability of International Climate Coalitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagashima, M.N.; Dellink, R.B.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the formation and stability of coalitions in international climate agreements with a combined game-theoretic and integrated assessment model. The empirical model comprises twelve regions and investigates partial coalition formation in a one-shot cartel game. We argue that a

  15. Dynamic monitoring of horizontal gene transfer in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. Y.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.; Bennett, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microbial gene expression underlies microbial behaviors (phenotypes) central to many aspects of C, N, and H2O cycling. However, continuous monitoring of microbial gene expression in soils is challenging because genetically-encoded reporter proteins widely used in the lab are difficult to deploy in soil matrices: for example, green fluorescent protein cannot be easily visualized in soils, even in the lab. To address this problem we have developed a reporter protein that releases small volatile gases. Here, we applied this gas reporter in a proof-of-concept soil experiment, monitoring horizontal gene transfer, a microbial activity that alters microbial genotypes and phenotypes. Horizontal gene transfer is central to bacterial evolution and adaptation and is relevant to problems such as the spread of antibiotic resistance, increasing metal tolerance in superfund sites, and bioremediation capability of bacterial consortia. This process is likely to be impacted by a number of matrix properties not well-represented in the petri dish, such as microscale variations in water, nutrients, and O2, making petri-dish experiments a poor proxy for environmental processes. We built a conjugation system using synthetic biology to demonstrate the use of gas-reporting biosensors in safe, lab-based biogeochemistry experiments, and here we report the use of these sensors to monitor horizontal gene transfer in soils. Our system is based on the F-plasmid conjugation in Escherichia coli. We have found that the gas signal reports on the number of cells that acquire F-plasmids (transconjugants) in a loamy Alfisol collected from Kellogg Biological Station. We will report how a gas signal generated by transconjugants varies with the number of F-plasmid donor and acceptor cells seeded in a soil, soil moisture, and soil O2 levels.

  16. Radiation improves gene transfer into human ovarian carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaday, Daniel; Zeng Ming; Cerniglia, George; Stevens, Craig W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Poor gene transfer is the major stumbling block to successful gene therapy today. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation might activate cellular recombination, and so improve stable gene transfer. During studies to quantitate radiation activated recombination, we also found that both plasmid and adenoviral vector transduction could be increased by irradiation. The studies presented here describe the effects of irradiation on gene transduction efficiency (both transient and stable transduction) in several human ovarian carcinoma lines, as a prelude to in vivo animal studies. Materials and Methods: The effect of irradiation on stable gene transfer efficiency was determined in human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (SKOV3, CAOV3 and PA1). Either irradiated or unirradiated cells were transfected with pRSVZ plasmid (containing a LacZ expression cassette) in either the supercoiled and linearized (XmnI) forms and β-galactosidase expression followed with time. Transfection efficiency was measured by flow cytometry following FDG staining at 0, 48, and 96 hours after irradiation. FDG is converted to a fluorescent metabolite by LacZ, and thus reflects the transfection efficiency of the LacZ containing vector. Vector quantitation was also performed by southern hybridization. Stable transduction efficiency was measured 14 -35 days after irradiation. Optimization of the time of irradiation with respect to transfection was performed. Since cells demonstrated increased stable recombination for as long as 96 hours after irradiation, continuous low dose rate and multiple radiation fractions were also tested. These experiments were repeated using the Ad5CMVlacZ. Dividing cells were exposed to Ad5CMVlacZ at an MOI of 0.1,1,5,10 and 100 to determine optimum transfection concentration. Transduction efficiency was again measured at various intervals to determine the radiation dose and interval post transfection which provides the maximum increase in transfection

  17. Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributes to the Evolution of Arthropod Herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybouw, Nicky; Pauchet, Yannick; Heckel, David G; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2016-06-27

    Within animals, evolutionary transition toward herbivory is severely limited by the hostile characteristics of plants. Arthropods have nonetheless counteracted many nutritional and defensive barriers imposed by plants and are currently considered as the most successful animal herbivores in terrestrial ecosystems. We gather a body of evidence showing that genomes of various plant feeding insects and mites possess genes whose presence can only be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). HGT is the asexual transmission of genetic information between reproductively isolated species. Although HGT is known to have great adaptive significance in prokaryotes, its impact on eukaryotic evolution remains obscure. Here, we show that laterally transferred genes into arthropods underpin many adaptations to phytophagy, including efficient assimilation and detoxification of plant produced metabolites. Horizontally acquired genes and the traits they encode often functionally diversify within arthropod recipients, enabling the colonization of more host plant species and organs. We demonstrate that HGT can drive metazoan evolution by uncovering its prominent role in the adaptations of arthropods to exploit plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  19. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    House Christopher H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. Results We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria. We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Conclusions Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles.

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer in plants and biosafety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goyal, Vinod

    2012-12-01

    Agrobacterium, the natures' genetic engineer, has been used as a vector to create transgenic plants. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer in plants is a highly efficient transformation process which is governed by various factors including genotype of the host plant, explant, vector, plasmid, bacterial strain, composition of culture medium, tissue damage, and temperature of co-cultivation. Agrobacterium has been successfully used to transform various economically and horticulturally important monocot and dicot species by standard tissue culture and in planta transformation techniques like floral or seedling infilteration, apical meristem transformation, and the pistil drip methods. Monocots have been comparatively difficult to transform by Agrobacterium. However, successful transformations have been reported in the last few years based on the adjustment of the parameters that govern the responses of monocots to Agrobacterium. A novel Agrobacterium transferred DNA-derived nanocomplex method has been developed which will be highly valuable for plant biology and biotechnology. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation is known to be the preferred method of creating transgenic plants from a commercial and biosafety perspective. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer predominantly results in the integration of foreign genes at a single locus in the host plant, without associated vector backbone and is also known to produce marker free plants, which are the prerequisites for commercialization of transgenic crops. Research in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation can provide new and novel insights into the understanding of the regulatory process controlling molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and developmental processes occurring during Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and also into a wide range of aspects on biological safety of transgenic crops to improve crop production to meet the demands of ever-growing world's population.

  1. Radio galaxies radiation transfer, dynamics, stability and evolution of a synchrotron plasmon

    CERN Document Server

    Pacholczyk, A G

    1977-01-01

    Radio Galaxies: Radiation Transfer, Dynamics, Stability and Evolution of a Synchrotron Plasmon deals with the physics of a region in space containing magnetic field and thermal and relativistic particles (a plasmon). The synchrotron emission and absorption of this region are discussed, along with the properties of its spectrum; its linear and circular polarization; transfer of radiation through such a region; its dynamics and expansion; and interaction with external medium.Comprised of eight chapters, this volume explores the stability, turbulence, and acceleration of particles in a synchrotro

  2. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  3. Effects of stabilizers on the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafai, K.; Ettefagh, J.

    1986-07-01

    This report summarizes the feasibility and the effectiveness of using stabilizers (internal metal structural components) to augment the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear waste canister. The problem was modeled as a transient two-dimensional heat transfer in two physical domains - the stabilizer and the wedge (a 30-degree-angle canister segment), which includes the heat-producing spent-fuel rods. This problem is solved by a simultaneous and interrelated numerical investigation of the two domains in cartesian and polar coordinate systems. The numerical investigations were performed for three cases. In the first case, conduction was assumed to be the dominant mechanism for heat transfer. The second case assumed that radiation was the dominant mechanism, and in the third case both radiation and conduction were considered as mechanisms of heat transfer. The results show that for typical conditions in a waste package design, the stabilizers are quite effective in reducing the overall temperature in a waste canister. Furthermore, the results show that increasing the stabilizer thickness over the thickness specified in the present design has a negligible effect on the temperature distribution in the canister. Finally, the presence of the stabilizers was found to shift the location of the peak temperature areas in the waste canister

  4. Mechanistic Basis for Biological Polymer Stability, Electron Transfer and Molecular Sensing in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    optimum for enolase catalysis was 80C, close to the measured thermal stability of the protein which was 15. SUBJECT TERMS thermally stable proteins...analysis of two thermophilic enzymes, electron transfer reactions in cyanobacteria, and the first description of a thermophilic microbial fuel cell...temperature optimum for enolase catalysis was 80°C, close to the measured thermal stability of the protein which was determined to be 75°C, while the pH

  5. Laterally Transferred Gene Recruited as a Venom in Parasitoid Wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Ellen O; Martinson, Vincent G; Edwards, Rachel; Mrinalini; Werren, John H

    2016-04-01

    Parasitoid wasps use venom to manipulate the immunity and metabolism of their host insects in a variety of ways to provide resources for their offspring. Yet, how genes are recruited and evolve to perform venom functions remain open questions. A recently recognized source of eukaryotic genome innovation is lateral gene transfer (LGT). Glycoside hydrolase family 19 (GH19) chitinases are widespread in bacteria, microsporidia, and plants where they are used in nutrient acquisition or defense, but have previously not been known in metazoans. In this study, a GH19 chitinase LGT is described from the unicellular microsporidia/Rozella clade into parasitoid wasps of the superfamily Chalcidoidea, where it has become recruited as a venom protein. The GH19 chitinase is present in 15 species of chalcidoid wasps representing four families, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it was laterally transferred near or before the origin of Chalcidoidea (∼95 Ma). The GH19 chitinase gene is highly expressed in the venom gland of at least seven species, indicating a role in the complex host manipulations performed by parasitoid wasp venom. RNAi knockdown in the model parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis reveals that-following envenomation-the GH19 chitinase induces fly hosts to upregulate genes involved in an immune response to fungi. A second, independent LGT of GH19 chitinase from microsporidia into mosquitoes was also found, also supported by phylogenetic reconstructions. Besides these two LGT events, GH19 chitinase is not found in any other sequenced animal genome, or in any fungi outside the microsporidia/Rozella clade. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Gene Transfer Enhancement by Alkylcarboxylation of Poly(propylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hashemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among synthetic carriers, dendrimers with the more flexible structure have attracted a great deal of researchers’ attention in the field of gene delivery. Followed by the promising results upon hydrophobic modification on polymeric structures in our laboratory, alkylcarboxylated poly (propylenimine-based carriers were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of amines with alkyl moieties and were further characterized for their physicochemical and biological characteristics for plasmid DNA delivery. Although not noticeably effective gene transfer activity for hexanoate- and hexadecanoate-modified series was observed, but alkylation by decanoic acid significantly improved the transfection efficiency of the final constructs up to 60 fold in comparison with unmodified poly(propylenimine (PPI. PPI modified by 10-bromodecanoic acid at 50% grafting, showed significantly higher gene expression at c/p ratio of 2 compared to Superfect as positive control.  Overall, modification of PPI with 50% primary amines grafting with 10-bromodecanoic acid could increase the transfection efficiency which is occurred at lower c/p ratio when compared to Superfect, i.e. less amount of modified vector is required to exhibit the same efficiency as Superfect. Therefore, the obtained constructs seem to be safer carriers for long-term gene therapy applications.

  7. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  8. Resistance gene transfer during treatments for experimental avian colibacillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Mourand, Gwenaëlle; Bouder, Axelle; Jouy, Eric; Kempf, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in animal facilities to compare the impacts of four avian colibacillosis treatments-oxytetracycline (OTC), trimethoprim-sulfadimethoxine (SXT), amoxicillin (AMX), or enrofloxacin (ENR)-on the susceptibility of Escherichia coli in broiler intestinal tracts. Birds were first orally inoculated with rifampin-resistant E. coli strains bearing plasmid genes conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones (qnr), cephalosporins (bla(CTX-M) or bla(FOX)), trimethoprim-sulfonamides, aminoglycosides, or tetracyclines. Feces samples were collected before, during, and after antimicrobial treatments. The susceptibilities of E. coli strains were studied, and resistance gene transfer was analyzed. An increase in the tetracycline-resistant E. coli population was observed only in OTC-treated birds, whereas multiresistant E. coli was detected in the dominant E. coli populations of SXT-, AMX-, or ENR-treated birds. Most multiresistant E. coli strains were susceptible to rifampin and exhibited various pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting the transfer of one of the multiresistance plasmids from the inoculated strains to other E. coli strains in the intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study clearly illustrates how, in E. coli, "old" antimicrobials may coselect antimicrobial resistance to recent and critical molecules.

  9. GENE TRANSFER IN TOBACCO MITOCHONDRIA IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

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    Katyshev A.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, we had showed that isolated mitochondria from different organisms can import DNA. Exploiting this mechanism, we assessed the possibility of genes transfer in tobacco mitochondria in vitro and in vivo. Whereas homologous recombination is a rare occasion in higher plant nuclei, recombination between the large direct repeats in plant mitochondrial genome generates its multipartite structure. Following transfection of isolated organelles with constructs composed of a partial gfp gene flanked by mitochondrial DNA fragments, we showed the homologous recombination of imported DNA with the resident DNA and the integration of the reporter gene. The recombination yielded an insertion of a continuous exogenous DNA fragment including the gfp sequence and at least the 0.5 kb of the flanking sequence on each side. Using of transfection constructs carrying multiple sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA could be suitable for insertion of a target gene into any region of the mitochondrial genome, which turns this approach to be of a general and methodical importance. Usually mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS level is under strict control of the antioxidant system including the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD. MnSOD is presented in multiple forms encoded by several genes in plants. Possibly, this enzyme, beside its catalytic function, fulfills as well some unknown biochemical functions. Thus, one of maize SOD enzymes (SOD3.4 could bind with mitochondrial DNA. Another SOD form (SOD3.1 is located in close proximity to mitochondrial respiratory complexes, where ROS are generated. To study possible physiological functions of this enzyme, we cloned the maize SOD3.1 gene. Compared to the SOD3.4, this enzyme didn't demonstrate DNA-binding activity. At the same time, SOD3.1 didn't show non-specific DNA-hydrolyzing activity as Cu/ZnSOD does. It means that this enzyme might have some DNA protective function. We made NtPcob-sod3.1-IGR

  10. Updated clusters of orthologous genes for Archaea: a complex ancestor of the Archaea and the byways of horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collections of Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COGs provide indispensable tools for comparative genomic analysis, evolutionary reconstruction and functional annotation of new genomes. Initially, COGs were made for all complete genomes of cellular life forms that were available at the time. However, with the accumulation of thousands of complete genomes, construction of a comprehensive COG set has become extremely computationally demanding and prone to error propagation, necessitating the switch to taxon-specific COG collections. Previously, we reported the collection of COGs for 41 genomes of Archaea (arCOGs. Here we present a major update of the arCOGs and describe evolutionary reconstructions to reveal general trends in the evolution of Archaea. Results The updated version of the arCOG database incorporates 91% of the pangenome of 120 archaea (251,032 protein-coding genes altogether into 10,335 arCOGs. Using this new set of arCOGs, we performed maximum likelihood reconstruction of the genome content of archaeal ancestral forms and gene gain and loss events in archaeal evolution. This reconstruction shows that the last Common Ancestor of the extant Archaea was an organism of greater complexity than most of the extant archaea, probably with over 2,500 protein-coding genes. The subsequent evolution of almost all archaeal lineages was apparently dominated by gene loss resulting in genome streamlining. Overall, in the evolution of Archaea as well as a representative set of bacteria that was similarly analyzed for comparison, gene losses are estimated to outnumber gene gains at least 4 to 1. Analysis of specific patterns of gene gain in Archaea shows that, although some groups, in particular Halobacteria, acquire substantially more genes than others, on the whole, gene exchange between major groups of Archaea appears to be largely random, with no major ‘highways’ of horizontal gene transfer. Conclusions The updated collection

  11. Engineering Task Plan for Hose-In-Hose Transfer Lines for the Interim Stabilization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TORRES, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    The document is the Engineering Task Plan for the engineering, design services, planning, project integration and management support for the design, modification, installation and testing of an over ground transfer (OGT) system to support the interim stabilization of S/SX and U Tank Farms

  12. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  13. Evaluation of Hose in Hose Transfer Line Service Life for Hanfords Interim Stabilization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TORRES, T.D.

    2001-01-01

    RPP-6153, Engineering Task Plan for Hose-in-Hose Transfer System for the Interim Stabilization Program (Torres, 2000a), defines the programmatic goals, functional requirements, and technical criteria for the development and subsequent installation of waste transfer line equipment to support Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program. RPP-6028, Specification for Hose in Hose Transfer Lines for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program (Torres, 2000b), has been issued to define the specific requirements for the design, manufacture, and verification of transfer line assemblies for specific waste transfer applications associated with Interim Stabilization. Included in RPP-6028 are tables defining the chemical constituents of concern to which transfer lines will be exposed. Current Interim Stabilization Program planning forecasts that the at-grade transfer lines will be required to convey pumpable waste for as much as three years after commissioning, RPP-6028 Section 3.2.7. Performance Incentive Number ORP-05 requires that all the Single Shell Tanks be Interim Stabilized by September 30, 2003. The Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestone M-41-00, enforced by a federal consent decree, requires all the Single Shell Tanks to be Interim stabilized by September 30, 2004. By meeting the Performance Incentive the TPA milestone is met. Prudent engineering dictates that the equipment used to transfer waste have a life in excess of the forecasted operational time period, with some margin to allow for future adjustments to the planned schedule. This document evaluates the effective service life of the Hose-in-Hose Transfer Lines, based on information submitted by the manufacturer, published literature and calculations. The effective service life of transfer line assemblies is a function of several factors. Foremost among these are the hose material's resistance to the harmful effects of process fluid characteristics, ambient environmental conditions, exposure to ionizing radiation and the

  14. Novel "Superspreader" Bacteriophages Promote Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Eric C; Bliskovsky, Valery V; Malagon, Francisco; Baker, James D; Prince, Jeffrey S; Klaus, James S; Adhya, Sankar L

    2017-01-17

    Bacteriophages infect an estimated 10 23 to 10 25 bacterial cells each second, many of which carry physiologically relevant plasmids (e.g., those encoding antibiotic resistance). However, even though phage-plasmid interactions occur on a massive scale and have potentially significant evolutionary, ecological, and biomedical implications, plasmid fate upon phage infection and lysis has not been investigated to date. Here we show that a subset of the natural lytic phage population, which we dub "superspreaders," releases substantial amounts of intact, transformable plasmid DNA upon lysis, thereby promoting horizontal gene transfer by transformation. Two novel Escherichia coli phage superspreaders, SUSP1 and SUSP2, liberated four evolutionarily distinct plasmids with equal efficiency, including two close relatives of prominent antibiotic resistance vectors in natural environments. SUSP2 also mediated the extensive lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance in unbiased communities of soil bacteria from Maryland and Wyoming. Furthermore, the addition of SUSP2 to cocultures of kanamycin-resistant E. coli and kanamycin-sensitive Bacillus sp. bacteria resulted in roughly 1,000-fold more kanamycin-resistant Bacillus sp. bacteria than arose in phage-free controls. Unlike many other lytic phages, neither SUSP1 nor SUSP2 encodes homologs to known hydrolytic endonucleases, suggesting a simple potential mechanism underlying the superspreading phenotype. Consistent with this model, the deletion of endonuclease IV and the nucleoid-disrupting protein ndd from coliphage T4, a phage known to extensively degrade chromosomal DNA, significantly increased its ability to promote plasmid transformation. Taken together, our results suggest that phage superspreaders may play key roles in microbial evolution and ecology but should be avoided in phage therapy and other medical applications. Bacteriophages (phages), viruses that infect bacteria, are the planet's most numerous biological

  15. Evolutionary Origins of the Eukaryotic Shikimate Pathway: Gene Fusions, Horizontal Gene Transfer, and Endosymbiotic Replacements†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A.; Dacks, Joel B.; Campbell, Samantha A.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.; Foster, Peter G.; McLeod, Rima; Roberts, Craig W.

    2006-01-01

    Currently the shikimate pathway is reported as a metabolic feature of prokaryotes, ascomycete fungi, apicomplexans, and plants. The plant shikimate pathway enzymes have similarities to prokaryote homologues and are largely active in chloroplasts, suggesting ancestry from the plastid progenitor genome. Toxoplasma gondii, which also possesses an alga-derived plastid organelle, encodes a shikimate pathway with similarities to ascomycete genes, including a five-enzyme pentafunctional arom. These data suggests that the shikimate pathway and the pentafunctional arom either had an ancient origin in the eukaryotes or was conveyed by eukaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer (HGT). We expand sampling and analyses of the shikimate pathway genes to include the oomycetes, ciliates, diatoms, basidiomycetes, zygomycetes, and the green and red algae. Sequencing of cDNA from Tetrahymena thermophila confirmed the presence of a pentafused arom, as in fungi and T. gondii. Phylogenies and taxon distribution suggest that the arom gene fusion event may be an ancient eukaryotic innovation. Conversely, the Plantae lineage (represented here by both Viridaeplantae and the red algae) acquired different prokaryotic genes for all seven steps of the shikimate pathway. Two of the phylogenies suggest a derivation of the Plantae genes from the cyanobacterial plastid progenitor genome, but if the full Plantae pathway was originally of cyanobacterial origin, then the five other shikimate pathway genes were obtained from a minimum of two other eubacterial genomes. Thus, the phylogenies demonstrate both separate HGTs and shared derived HGTs within the Plantae clade either by primary HGT transfer or secondarily via the plastid progenitor genome. The shared derived characters support the holophyly of the Plantae lineage and a single ancestral primary plastid endosymbiosis. Our analyses also pinpoints a minimum of 50 gene/domain loss events, demonstrating that loss and replacement events have been

  16. The Impact of Gene Silencing on Horizontal Gene Transfer and Bacterial Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre, W W

    2016-01-01

    The H-NS family of DNA-binding proteins is the subject of intense study due to its important roles in the regulation of horizontally acquired genes critical for virulence, antibiotic resistance, and metabolism. Xenogeneic silencing proteins, typified by the H-NS protein of Escherichia coli, specifically target and downregulate expression from AT-rich genes by selectively recognizing specific structural features unique to the AT-rich minor groove. In doing so, these proteins facilitate bacterial evolution; enabling these cells to engage in horizontal gene transfer while buffering potential any detrimental fitness consequences that may result from it. Xenogeneic silencing and counter-silencing explain how bacterial cells can evolve effective gene regulatory strategies in the face of rampant gene gain and loss and it has extended our understanding of bacterial gene regulation beyond the classic operon model. Here we review the structures and mechanisms of xenogeneic silencers as well as their impact on bacterial evolution. Several H-NS-like proteins appear to play a role in facilitating gene transfer by other mechanisms including by regulating transposition, conjugation, and participating in the activation of virulence loci like the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island of pathogenic strains of E. coli. Evidence suggests that the critical determinants that dictate whether an H-NS-like protein will be a silencer or will perform a different function do not lie in the DNA-binding domain but, rather, in the domains that control oligomerization. This suggests that H-NS-like proteins are transcription factors that both recognize and alter the shape of DNA to exert specific effects that include but are not limited to gene silencing. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  17. Horizontal gene transfer: building the web of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Shannon M; Huang, Jinling; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the sharing of genetic material between organisms that are not in a parent-offspring relationship. HGT is a widely recognized mechanism for adaptation in bacteria and archaea. Microbial antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity are often associated with HGT, but the scope of HGT extends far beyond disease-causing organisms. In this Review, we describe how HGT has shaped the web of life using examples of HGT among prokaryotes, between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and even between multicellular eukaryotes. We discuss replacement and additive HGT, the proposed mechanisms of HGT, selective forces that influence HGT, and the evolutionary impact of HGT on ancestral populations and existing populations such as the human microbiome.

  18. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Magne Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  19. Euglena gracilis chloroplast transfer RNA transcription units. I. Physical map of the transfer RNA gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, E M; Hallick, R B

    1982-03-25

    The locations of transfer RNA genes with respect to the restriction endonuclease cleavage map of Euglena gracilis Klebs, strain Z Pringsheim chloroplast DNA have been determined. Purified chloroplast tRNAs were treated with snake venom phosphodiesterase to remove the 3'-CCA terminus, and radioactively labeled by the action of Escherichia coli tRNA nucleotidyltransferase in the presence of [alpha-32P]CTP. Chloroplast DNA was treated individually and with combinations of the enzymes Bal I, Bam HI, Eco RI, Pst I, Pvu II, Sal I, and Xho I. The location of tRNA genes with respect to the cleavage sites for these enzymes was determined by hybridization of the 32P-labeled tRNAs to membrane filter blots of the chloroplast DNA restriction nuclease fragments following gel electrophoresis. The 145-kilobase pair genome was resolved into nine areas of strong tRNA hybridization, separated by areas of weak or no tRNA hybridization. The loci of tRNA genes are within the Eco RI fragments Eco A, B, G, H, I, J', P, Q, and V.

  20. Widespread impact of horizontal gene transfer on plant colonization of land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Sun, Hang; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    In complex multicellular eukaryotes such as animals and plants, horizontal gene transfer is commonly considered rare with very limited evolutionary significance. Here we show that horizontal gene transfer is a dynamic process occurring frequently in the early evolution of land plants. Our genome analyses of the moss Physcomitrella patens identified 57 families of nuclear genes that were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses. Many of these gene families were transferred to the ancestors of green or land plants. Available experimental evidence shows that these anciently acquired genes are involved in some essential or plant-specific activities such as xylem formation, plant defence, nitrogen recycling as well as the biosynthesis of starch, polyamines, hormones and glutathione. These findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer had a critical role in the transition of plants from aquatic to terrestrial environments. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of horizontal gene transfer mechanism in nonvascular and seedless vascular plants.

  1. Stabilizing Parametric Region of Multiloop PID Controllers for Multivariable Systems Based on Equivalent Transfer Function

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    Xiaoli Luan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the stabilizing PID parametric region for multivariable systems. Firstly, a general equivalent transfer function parameterization method is proposed to construct the multiloop equivalent process for multivariable systems. Then, based on the equivalent single loops, a model-based method is presented to derive the stabilizing PID parametric region by using the generalized Hermite-Biehler theorem. By sweeping over the entire ranges of feasible proportional gains and determining the stabilizing regions in the space of integral and derivative gains, the complete set of stabilizing PID controllers can be determined. The robustness of the design procedure against the approximation in getting the SISO plants is analyzed. Finally, simulation of a practical model is carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  2. What tangled web: barriers to rampant horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Charles G

    2005-07-01

    Dawkins in his The Selfish Gene(1) quite aptly applies the term "selfish" to parasitic repetitive DNA sequences endemic to eukaryotic genomes, especially vertebrates. Doolittle and Sapienza(2) as well as Orgel and Crick(3) enlivened this notion of selfish DNA with the identification of such repetitive sequences as remnants of mobile elements such as transposons. In addition, Orgel and Crick(3) associated parasitic DNA with a potential to outgrow their host genomes by propagating both vertically via conventional genome replication as well as infectiously by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to other genomes. Still later, Doolittle(4) speculated that unchecked HGT between unrelated genomes so complicates phylogeny that the conventional representation of a tree of life would have to be replaced by a thicket or a web of life.(4) In contrast, considerable data now show that reconstructions based on whole genome sequences are consistent with the conventional "tree of life".(5-10) Here, we identify natural barriers that protect modern genome populations from the inroads of rampant HGT. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of the environment on horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsman, Clara A; Collins, Roy Eric; Rocap, Gabrielle; Brazelton, William J

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer, the transfer and incorporation of genetic material between different species of organisms, has an important but poorly quantified role in the adaptation of microbes to their environment. Previous work has shown that genome size and the number of horizontally transferred genes are strongly correlated. Here we consider how genome size confuses the quantification of horizontal gene transfer because the number of genes an organism accumulates over time depends on its evolutionary history and ecological context (e.g., the nutrient regime for which it is adapted). We investigated horizontal gene transfer between archaea and bacteria by first counting reciprocal BLAST hits among 448 bacterial and 57 archaeal genomes to find shared genes. Then we used the DarkHorse algorithm, a probability-based, lineage-weighted method (Podell & Gaasterland, 2007), to identify potential horizontally transferred genes among these shared genes. By removing the effect of genome size in the bacteria, we have identified bacteria with unusually large numbers of shared genes with archaea for their genome size. Interestingly, archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share unusually large numbers of genes. However, high salt was not found to significantly affect the numbers of shared genes. Numbers of shared (genome size-corrected, reciprocal BLAST hits) and transferred genes (identified by DarkHorse) were strongly correlated. Thus archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share horizontally transferred genes. These horizontally transferred genes are over-represented by genes involved in energy conversion as well as the transport and metabolism of inorganic ions and amino acids. Anaerobic and thermophilic bacteria share unusually large numbers of genes with archaea. This is mainly due to horizontal gene transfer of genes from the archaea to the bacteria. In

  4. Effect of the environment on horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara A. Fuchsman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Horizontal gene transfer, the transfer and incorporation of genetic material between different species of organisms, has an important but poorly quantified role in the adaptation of microbes to their environment. Previous work has shown that genome size and the number of horizontally transferred genes are strongly correlated. Here we consider how genome size confuses the quantification of horizontal gene transfer because the number of genes an organism accumulates over time depends on its evolutionary history and ecological context (e.g., the nutrient regime for which it is adapted. Results We investigated horizontal gene transfer between archaea and bacteria by first counting reciprocal BLAST hits among 448 bacterial and 57 archaeal genomes to find shared genes. Then we used the DarkHorse algorithm, a probability-based, lineage-weighted method (Podell & Gaasterland, 2007, to identify potential horizontally transferred genes among these shared genes. By removing the effect of genome size in the bacteria, we have identified bacteria with unusually large numbers of shared genes with archaea for their genome size. Interestingly, archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share unusually large numbers of genes. However, high salt was not found to significantly affect the numbers of shared genes. Numbers of shared (genome size-corrected, reciprocal BLAST hits and transferred genes (identified by DarkHorse were strongly correlated. Thus archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share horizontally transferred genes. These horizontally transferred genes are over-represented by genes involved in energy conversion as well as the transport and metabolism of inorganic ions and amino acids. Conclusions Anaerobic and thermophilic bacteria share unusually large numbers of genes with archaea. This is mainly due to horizontal gene transfer of

  5. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results

  6. The Fusarium graminearum genome reveals more secondary metabolite gene clusters and hints of horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M K Sieber

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes are of major interest due to the pharmacological properties of their products (like mycotoxins and antibiotics. The genome of the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum codes for a large number of candidate enzymes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. However, the chemical nature of most enzymatic products of proteins encoded by putative secondary metabolism biosynthetic genes is largely unknown. Based on our analysis we present 67 gene clusters with significant enrichment of predicted secondary metabolism related enzymatic functions. 20 gene clusters with unknown metabolites exhibit strong gene expression correlation in planta and presumably play a role in virulence. Furthermore, the identification of conserved and over-represented putative transcription factor binding sites serves as additional evidence for cluster co-regulation. Orthologous cluster search provided insight into the evolution of secondary metabolism clusters. Some clusters are characteristic for the Fusarium phylum while others show evidence of horizontal gene transfer as orthologs can be found in representatives of the Botrytis or Cochliobolus lineage. The presented candidate clusters provide valuable targets for experimental examination.

  7. High-efficiency gene transfer into skeletal muscle mediated by electric pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mir, L M; Bureau, M F; Gehl, J

    1999-01-01

    report very efficient plasmid DNA transfer in muscle fibers by using square-wave electric pulses of low field strength (less than 300 V/cm) and of long duration (more than 1 ms). Contrary to the electropermeabilization-induced uptake of small molecules into muscle fibers, plasmid DNA has to be present...... in the tissue during the electric pulses, suggesting a direct effect of the electric field on DNA during electrotransfer. This i.m. electrotransfer method increases reporter and therapeutic gene expression by several orders of magnitude in various muscles in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey. Moreover, i.......m. electrotransfer strongly decreases variability. Stability of expression was observed for at least 9 months. With a pCMV-FGF1 plasmid coding for fibroblast growth factor 1, this protein was immunodetected in the majority of muscle fibers subjected to the electric pulses. DNA electrotransfer in muscle may have...

  8. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  9. Horizontal Gene Transfer of Functional Type VI Killing Genes by Natural Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT can have profound effects on bacterial evolution by allowing individuals to rapidly acquire adaptive traits that shape their strategies for competition. One strategy for intermicrobial antagonism often used by Proteobacteria is the genetically encoded contact-dependent type VI secretion system (T6SS, a weapon used to kill heteroclonal neighbors by direct injection of toxic effectors. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that Vibrio cholerae can acquire new T6SS effector genes via horizontal transfer and utilize them to kill neighboring cells. Replacement of one or more parental alleles with novel effectors allows the recombinant strain to dramatically outcompete its parent. Using spatially explicit modeling, we examine how this process could affect the ecology and evolution of surface-attached microbial populations. HGT of T6SS effector-immunity pairs is risky: transformation brings a cell into conflict with its former clone mates but can be adaptive when superior T6SS alleles are acquired. More generally, we find that these costs and benefits are not symmetric and that high rates of HGT can act as a hedge against competitors with unpredictable T6SS efficacy. We conclude that antagonism and horizontal transfer drive successive rounds of weapon optimization and selective sweeps, dynamically shaping the composition of microbial communities.

  10. Insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and therapeutic strategies using gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, M O; Turunen, M P; Laitinen, M; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy for the treatment of atherosclerosis and related diseases has shown its potential in animal models and in the first human trials. Gene transfer to the vascular system can be performed both via intravascular and extravascular periadventitial routes. Intravascular gene transfer can be done with several types of catheters under fluoroscopic control. Extravascular gene transfer, on the other hand, provides a well-targeted gene delivery route available during vascular surgery. It can be done with direct injection or by using perivascular cuffs or surgical collagen sheets. Ex vivo gene delivery via transfected smooth muscle cells or endothelial cells might be useful for the production of secreted therapeutic compounds. Gene transfer to the liver has been used for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. The first clinical trials for the induction of therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic myocardium or peripheral muscles with VEGF or FGF gene transfer are under way and preliminary results are promising. VEGF has also been used for the prevention of postangioplasty restenosis because of its capability to induce endothelial repair and production of NO and prostacyclin. However, further basic research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in conditions related to atherosclerosis. Also, further development of gene transfer vectors and gene delivery techniques will improve the efficacy and safety of human gene therapy.

  11. Somatostatin receptor gene transfer inhibits established pancreatic cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celinski, Scott A; Fisher, William E; Amaya, Felipe; Wu, Yuan Qing; Yao, Q; Youker, Keith A; Li, Min

    2003-11-01

    Most human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells do not express somatostatin receptors, and somatostatin does not inhibit the growth of these cancers. We have demonstrated previously that somatostatin inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancers expressing somatostatin receptor subtype-2 (SSTR2), but not receptor-negative cancers. SSTR2 expression may be an important tumor-suppressor pathway that is lost in human pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that SSTR2 gene transfer would restore the growth-inhibitory response of human pancreatic cancer to somatostatin. Palpable human pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors were established on the backs of nude mice by subcutaneous injection of cultured cells (Panc-1). The animals were divided into 5 groups (n = 10/group). Group I served as an untreated control. Group II received an intramuscular injection of the long-acting somatostatin analogue Sandostatin LAR. Group III received Lac-Z expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection. Group IV received SSTR2 expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection. Group V received SSTR2 expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection and an intramuscular injection of Sandostatin LAR. The rate of tumor growth was assessed with calipers. After 28 days, the animals were anesthetized and exsanguanated, and the tumors were excised and weighed. Plasma somatostatin and octreotide levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Expression of cell-surface somatostatin-receptor protein and known tumor-suppressor proteins was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Systemic delivery of SSTR2-expressing adenovirus by intraperitoneal injection resulted in expression of SSTR2 protein in the subcutaneous human pancreatic cancers. Final tumor weight was significantly decreased in the groups expressing SSTR2 receptors compared to the other 3 groups. Treatment with Sandostatin LAR increased plasma octreotide levels as determined by radioimmunoassay

  12. Minimal alteration in muscle lipid genes following stabilized weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Robert H; Robinette, Leizleigh; Kern, Philip A

    2017-12-01

    Variations in skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), carntine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), perilipin protein 2 (PLIN2), and adipose tissue triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) have been described as playing important roles in the metabolic regulation of lipid oxidation, and may influence intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and muscle lipid droplet size (LDS). While acute changes in caloric balance and/or aerobic capacity may affect lipid metabolism, the influence of sustained weight loss derived from caloric restriction with weight loss (CWL) compared with exercise training with weight loss (EWL) on the abovementioned parameters has not been fully elucidated. Using a combination of metabolic feeding and/or supervised exercise training, we evaluated the influence of stabilized weight loss elicited by CWL compared with EWL without the confounding influence of acute alterations in caloric balance on molecular markers of mitochondrial metabolism and lipid droplet size in middle-aged overweight individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. There were no significant changes in PGC-1α, CPT-1, PLIN2, ATGL and, CGI-58 messenger RNA (mRNA) in CWL and EWL. While there were no changes in ATGL mRNA in CWL, there was a strong trend (P = 0.05) for the ΔATGL mRNA in EWL with stabilized weight loss. There were no significant changes in IMCL or LDS within skeletal muscle in CWL or EWL, respectively. In conclusion, under the conditions of chronic caloric balance following dietary or exercise-based interventions, mediators of mitochondrial function, IMCL and LDS, were largely unaffected. Future studies should focus on intervention-based changes in protein expression and/or phosphorylation and the relationship to physiological endpoints.

  13. Investigations of the influence of liposome composition on vesicle stability and drug transfer in human plasma: a transfer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzschuh, Stephan; Kaeß, Kathrin; Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Decker, Christiane; Fahr, Alfred; May, Sylvio

    2018-03-01

    Liposomal delivery constitutes a promising approach for i.v. administration of temoporfin (mTHPC) because lipid membranes can host these drug molecules. This study investigates the transfer and release of mTHPC to plasma proteins and stability of various liposomal formulations. To this end, we employed traces of radioactive markers and studied the effects of fatty acid chain length and the degree of saturation in the lipophilic tail, addition of cholesterol and PEGylation of the membrane surface and different drug-to-lipid ratios (DLRs). Liposomes were incubated in human plasma for various incubation times. Drawn samples were separated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Drug was recovered in four fractions identified as albumin, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and liposomes. Our results suggest that mTHPC fits best into fluid, unmodified bilayers when the drug-to-lipid ratio is low. Membrane rigidification as well as the presence of cholesterol and PEGyated lipids reduced the ability of the membrane to accommodate the drug but simultaneously improved the vesicle stability in plasma. Both mechanisms jointly affect the total degree of mTHPC release. We analyzed our data using a kinetic model that suggests the drug to be associated with the host membrane in two distinct states of which only one interacts directly with the plasma compartment.

  14. TGFβ Triggers miR-143/145 Transfer From Smooth Muscle Cells to Endothelial Cells, Thereby Modulating Vessel Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, Montserrat; Quintavalle, Manuela; Miragoli, Michele; Chen, Ju; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Elia, Leonardo

    2015-05-22

    The miR-143/145 cluster is highly expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), where it regulates phenotypic switch and vascular homeostasis. Whether it plays a role in neighboring endothelial cells (ECs) is still unknown. To determine whether SMCs control EC functions through passage of miR-143 and miR-145. We used cocultures of SMCs and ECs under different conditions, as well as intact vessels to assess the transfer of miR-143 and miR-145 from one cell type to another. Imaging of cocultured cells transduced with fluorescent miRNAs suggested that miRNA transfer involves membrane protrusions known as tunneling nanotubes. Furthermore, we show that miRNA passage is modulated by the transforming growth factor (TGF) β pathway because both a specific transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) inhibitor (SB431542) and an shRNA against TGFβRII suppressed the passage of miR-143/145 from SMCs to ECs. Moreover, miR-143 and miR-145 modulated angiogenesis by reducing the proliferation index of ECs and their capacity to form vessel-like structures when cultured on matrigel. We also identified hexokinase II (HKII) and integrin β 8 (ITGβ8)-2 genes essential for the angiogenic potential of ECs-as targets of miR-143 and miR-145, respectively. The inhibition of these genes modulated EC phenotype, similarly to miR-143 and miR-145 overexpression in ECs. These findings were confirmed by ex vivo and in vivo approaches, in which it was shown that TGFβ and vessel stress, respectively, triggered miR-143/145 transfer from SMCs to ECs. Our results demonstrate that miR-143 and miR-145 act as communication molecules between SMCs and ECs to modulate the angiogenic and vessel stabilization properties of ECs. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The training schedule affects the stability, not the magnitude, of the interlimb transfer of learned dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Wilsaan M; Brayanov, Jordan B; Smith, Maurice A

    2013-08-01

    The way that a motor adaptation is trained, for example, the manner in which it is introduced or the duration of the training period, can influence its internal representation. However, recent studies examining the gradual versus abrupt introduction of a novel environment have produced conflicting results. Here we examined how these effects determine the effector specificity of motor adaptation during visually guided reaching. After adaptation to velocity-dependent dynamics in the right arm, we estimated the amount of adaptation transferred to the left arm, using error-clamp measurement trials to directly measure changes in learned dynamics. We found that a small but significant amount of generalization to the untrained arm occurs under three different training schedules: a short-duration (15 trials) abrupt presentation, a long-duration (160 trials) abrupt presentation, and a long-duration gradual presentation of the novel dynamic environment. Remarkably, we found essentially no difference between the amount of interlimb generalization when comparing these schedules, with 9-12% transfer of the trained adaptation for all three. However, the duration of training had a pronounced effect on the stability of the interlimb transfer: The transfer elicited from short-duration training decayed rapidly, whereas the transfer from both long-duration training schedules was considerably more persistent (90% retention over the first 20 trials). These results indicate that the amount of interlimb transfer is similar for gradual versus abrupt training and that interlimb transfer of learned dynamics can occur after even a brief training period but longer training is required for an enduring effect.

  16. From retroviral vector production to gene transfer: spontaneous inactivation is caused by loss of reverse transcription capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, M; Panet, A; Carrondo, M J T; Alves, P M; Cruz, P E

    2008-04-01

    The loss of gene transfer capacity in retroviral vectors constitutes a major disadvantage in the development of retroviral vectors for gene therapy applications. In the present work the loss of a vector's capacity to perform reverse transcription was studied as a possible explanation for the low stability of retroviral vectors from the production stage to the target cell gene transfer event. Inactivation studies were performed with murine leukemia virus vectors at 37 degrees C and several residual activities were tested, including viral infectivity, reverse transcription capacity, reverse transcriptase (RT) activities and viral RNA stability. The results indicate a high correlation between loss of infectivity and the capacity of the virus to perform the initial steps of reverse transcription. To further understand the thermosensitivity of the reverse transcription process, the two enzyme activities of RT were investigated. The results indicate that, although the inactivation rate of the DNA polymerase is faster than that of RNase H, the decline of these two enzyme activities is significantly slower than that of reverse transcription. Also, viral RNA stability is not implicated in the loss of the virus capacity to perform reverse transcription as the rate of viral RNA degradation was very slow. Furthermore, it was observed that the amount of viral RNA that entered the cells decreased slowly due to viral inactivation at 37 degrees C. The reverse transcription process is thermolabile and this sensitivity determines the rate of retroviral inactivation. Strategies targeting stabilization of the reverse transcription complex should be pursued to improve the applicability of retroviral vectors in gene therapy studies. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Gene transfer from wild Helianthus to sunflower: topicalities and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breton Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sunflower (2n=17 belongs to the Helianthus genus (Asteraceae. Wild Helianthus species display morphological variation for branching and stem number, for architecture and seed size, and for resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses due to which they thrive in different environments in North America. The genus is divided into botanical sections, two for annual as sunflower, and two for perennial species as Jerusalem artichoke that produces rhizomes (tubers. We explain the difficulties and successes obtained by crossing sunflower with these species to improve the agronomic traits of the sunflower crop. It is easier to cross the annual species than the perennials’ with sunflower. Several traits such as Cytoplasmic male sterility and restorer Rf-PET1 genes, Downy mildew resistance, Phomopsis resistance, Sclerotinia resistance, Rust resistance, and Orobanche resistance have already been introduced from annual species into sunflower crop, but the complex genomic organization of these species compared to sunflower limits their important potential. Perennial species are much more diverse, and their genomes display 2n, 4n, or 6n chromosomes for n 17. The realities of inter-specific hybridization are relatively disappointing due to the introgression lines that have low oil and low seed yield. We report here several attempts to introgress agronomic traits from these species to sunflower, and we present as a case study, an introgressed progenies from H. mollis, a diploid species with sessile small leaves. We constructed a preliminary genetic map with AFLP markers in 21 BC1 plants, and we then showed that some progenies display 6 to 44% of introgression from H. mollis. Although this study is promising due to the novel compact architecture of the progenies, we cannot estimate the transferability from H. mollis to other perennial Helianthus to improve sunflower.

  18. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D McDaniel

    Full Text Available Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT. However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA

  19. A first glimpse into the pattern and scale of gene transfer in the Apicomplexa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, J.L.; Mullapudi, N.; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    with a phylogenomic approach to detect potential gene transfers in four apicomplexan genomes. We have detected genes of algal nuclear, chloroplast (cyanobacterial) and proteobacterial origin. Plant-like genes were detected in species not currently harbouring a plastid (e.g. Cryptosporidium parvum) and putatively...

  20. Horizontal gene and chromosome transfer in plantpathogenic fungi affecting host range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Bahkali, A.H.; Abd-Elsalam, K.A.; M'Barek, Ben S.; Mirzadi Gohari, A.; Karimi Jashini, M.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Kema, G.H.J.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi adapt quickly to changing environments including overcoming plant disease resistance genes. This is usually achieved by mutations in single effector genes of the pathogens, enabling them to avoid recognition by the host plant. In addition, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and

  1. The Roles of Mitochondrion in Intergenomic Gene Transfer in Plants: A Source and a Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Wang, Yumei; Hua, Jinping

    2018-02-11

    Intergenomic gene transfer (IGT) is continuous in the evolutionary history of plants. In this field, most studies concentrate on a few related species. Here, we look at IGT from a broader evolutionary perspective, using 24 plants. We discover many IGT events by assessing the data from nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. Thus, we summarize the two roles of the mitochondrion: a source and a pool. That is, the mitochondrion gives massive sequences and integrates nuclear transposons and chloroplast tRNA genes. Though the directions are opposite, lots of likenesses emerge. First, mitochondrial gene transfer is pervasive in all 24 plants. Second, gene transfer is a single event of certain shared ancestors during evolutionary divergence. Third, sequence features of homologies vary for different purposes in the donor and recipient genomes. Finally, small repeats (or micro-homologies) contribute to gene transfer by mediating recombination in the recipient genome.

  2. The Roles of Mitochondrion in Intergenomic Gene Transfer in Plants: A Source and a Pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intergenomic gene transfer (IGT is continuous in the evolutionary history of plants. In this field, most studies concentrate on a few related species. Here, we look at IGT from a broader evolutionary perspective, using 24 plants. We discover many IGT events by assessing the data from nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. Thus, we summarize the two roles of the mitochondrion: a source and a pool. That is, the mitochondrion gives massive sequences and integrates nuclear transposons and chloroplast tRNA genes. Though the directions are opposite, lots of likenesses emerge. First, mitochondrial gene transfer is pervasive in all 24 plants. Second, gene transfer is a single event of certain shared ancestors during evolutionary divergence. Third, sequence features of homologies vary for different purposes in the donor and recipient genomes. Finally, small repeats (or micro-homologies contribute to gene transfer by mediating recombination in the recipient genome.

  3. Horizontal Gene Transfer of Pectinases from Bacteria Preceded the Diversification of Stick and Leaf Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelomi, Matan; Danchin, Etienne G J; Heckel, David; Wipfler, Benjamin; Bradler, Sven; Zhou, Xin; Pauchet, Yannick

    2016-05-23

    Genes acquired by horizontal transfer are increasingly being found in animal genomes. Understanding their origin and evolution requires knowledge about the phylogenetic relationships from both source and recipient organisms. We used RNASeq data and respective assembled transcript libraries to trace the evolutionary history of polygalacturonase (pectinase) genes in stick insects (Phasmatodea). By mapping the distribution of pectinase genes on a Polyneoptera phylogeny, we identified the transfer of pectinase genes from known phasmatodean gut microbes into the genome of an early euphasmatodean ancestor that took place between 60 and 100 million years ago. This transfer preceded the rapid diversification of the suborder, enabling symbiont-free pectinase production that would increase the insects' digestive efficiency and reduce dependence on microbes. Bacteria-to-insect gene transfer was thought to be uncommon, however the increasing availability of large-scale genomic data may change this prevailing notion.

  4. Exact Algorithms for Duplication-Transfer-Loss Reconciliation with Non-Binary Gene Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Misagh; Bansal, Mukul S

    2017-06-01

    Duplication-Transfer-Loss (DTL) reconciliation is a powerful method for studying gene family evolution in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. DTL reconciliation seeks to reconcile gene trees with species trees by postulating speciation, duplication, transfer, and loss events. Efficient algorithms exist for finding optimal DTL reconciliations when the gene tree is binary. In practice, however, gene trees are often non-binary due to uncertainty in the gene tree topologies, and DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees is known to be NP-hard. In this paper, we present the first exact algorithms for DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees. Specifically, we (i) show that the DTL reconciliation problem for non-binary gene trees is fixed-parameter tractable in the maximum degree of the gene tree, (ii) present an exponential-time, but in-practice efficient, algorithm to track and enumerate all optimal binary resolutions of a non-binary input gene tree, and (iii) apply our algorithms to a large empirical data set of over 4700 gene trees from 100 species to study the impact of gene tree uncertainty on DTL-reconciliation and to demonstrate the applicability and utility of our algorithms. The new techniques and algorithms introduced in this paper will help biologists avoid incorrect evolutionary inferences caused by gene tree uncertainty.

  5. Horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of transcriptionalregulation in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Morgan N.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2007-12-20

    Background: Most bacterial genes were acquired by horizontalgene transfer from other bacteria instead of being inherited bycontinuous vertical descent from an ancient ancestor}. To understand howthe regulation of these {acquired} genes evolved, we examined theevolutionary histories of transcription factors and of regulatoryinteractions from the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12. Results:Although most transcription factors have paralogs, these usually arose byhorizontal gene transfer rather than by duplication within the E. colilineage, as previously believed. In general, most neighbor regulators --regulators that are adjacent to genes that they regulate -- were acquiredby horizontal gene transfer, while most global regulators evolvedvertically within the gamma-Proteobacteria. Neighbor regulators wereoften acquired together with the adjacent operon that they regulate, sothe proximity might be maintained by repeated transfers (like "selfishoperons"). Many of the as-yet-uncharacterized (putative) regulators havealso been acquired together with adjacent genes, so we predict that theseare neighbor regulators as well. When we analyzed the histories ofregulatory interactions, we found that the evolution of regulation byduplication was rare, and surprisingly, many of the regulatoryinteractions that are shared between paralogs result from convergentevolution. Another surprise was that horizontally transferred genes aremore likely than other genes to be regulated by multiple regulators, andmost of this complex regulation probably evolved after the transfer.Conclusions: Our results highlight the rapid evolution of niche-specificgene regulation in bacteria.

  6. Evaluation of Available Transfer Capability Using Transient Stability Constrained Line Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoechi, Lazarus Okechukwu; Mahajan, Satish M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to evaluate transient stability constrained available transfer capability (ATC). A linear and fast line flow-based (LFB) method was adopted to optimize the ATC values. This enabled the direct determination of the system source-sink locations. This paper formulated different market transactions considering bilateral and multilateral impacts in the stability constrained ATC. The proposed method was demonstrated on the WECC 9-bus and IEEE 39-bus systems. The critical energy performance index (CEPI) enabled the direct identification of candidates for contingency screening based on ranking. This index helped to reduce the list of credible contingencies for ATC evaluation and, therefore, the computation time. The results of the proposed ATC method are consistent with the literature and can be deployed for fast assessment of the impact of transactions in an electric power system.

  7. Impact of Load Behavior on Transient Stability and Power Transfer Limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents utility based load modeling practices and explores the interaction between loads and the power system and the effect of the interaction on transient stability and power transfer limitations. The effect of load composition is investigated at major load centers together...... power systems are presented. A series of examples illustrate the results for which stable and unstable system responses are obtained....... with the impact on rotor angle excursions of large scale generators during the transient and post-transient period. Responses of multi-induction motor stalling are also considered for different fault clearances in the system. Findings of the investigations carried out on the Eastern Australian interconnected...

  8. The Explicit Green's Approach with stability enhancement for solving the bioheat transfer equation

    OpenAIRE

    Loureiro, FS; Mansur, WJ; Wrobel, LC; Silva, JEA

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a strategy for performing a stability enhancement into the Explicit Green’s Approach (ExGA) method applied to the bioheat transfer equation. The ExGA method is a time-stepping technique that uses numerical Green’s functions in the time domain; these functions are here computed by the FEM. Basically, a new two nonequal time substeps procedure is proposed to compute Green’s functions at the first time step. This is accomplished by adopting the standard explic...

  9. Gene transfer to chicks using lentiviral vectors administered via the embryonic chorioallantoic membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Hen

    Full Text Available The lack of affordable techniques for gene transfer in birds has inhibited the advancement of molecular studies in avian species. Here we demonstrate a new approach for introducing genes into chicken somatic tissues by administration of a lentiviral vector, derived from the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, into the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM of chick embryos on embryonic day 11. The FIV-derived vectors carried yellow fluorescent protein (YFP or recombinant alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH genes, driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. Transgene expression, detected in chicks 2 days after hatch by quantitative real-time PCR, was mostly observed in the liver and spleen. Lower expression levels were also detected in the brain, kidney, heart and breast muscle. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analyses confirmed transgene expression in chick tissues at the protein level, demonstrating a transduction efficiency of ∼0.46% of liver cells. Integration of the viral vector into the chicken genome was demonstrated using genomic repetitive (CR1-PCR amplification. Viability and stability of the transduced cells was confirmed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay, immunostaining with anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (anti-PCNA, and detection of transgene expression 51 days post transduction. Our approach led to only 9% drop in hatching efficiency compared to non-injected embryos, and all of the hatched chicks expressed the transgenes. We suggest that the transduction efficiency of FIV vectors combined with the accessibility of the CAM vasculature as a delivery route comprise a new powerful and practical approach for gene delivery into somatic tissues of chickens. Most relevant is the efficient transduction of the liver, which specializes in the production and secretion of proteins, thereby providing an optimal target for prolonged study of secreted hormones and peptides.

  10. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  11. Ultrasound -Assisted Gene Transfer to Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem/Progenitor Cells (ASCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ueno, Hitomi; Hokari, Rei; Yuan, Wenji; Kuno, Shuichi; Kakimoto, Takashi; Enosawa, Shin; Negishi, Yoichi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Chiba, Toshio; Hayashi, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, multilineage adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) have become increasingly attractive as a promising source for cell transplantation and regenerative medicine. Particular interest has been expressed in the potential to make tissue stem cells, such as ASCs and marrow stromal cells (MSCs), differentiate by gene transfection. Gene transfection using highly efficient viral vectors such as adeno- and sendai viruses have been developed for this purpose. Sonoporation, or ultrasound (US)-assisted gene transfer, is an alternative gene manipulation technique which employs the creation of a jet stream by ultrasonic microbubble cavitation. Sonoporation using non-viral vectors is expected to be a much safer, although less efficient, tool for prospective clinical gene therapy. In this report, we assessed the efficacy of the sonoporation technique for gene transfer to ASCs. We isolated and cultured adipocyets from mouse adipose tissue. ASCs that have the potential to differentiate with transformation into adipocytes or osteoblasts were obtained. Using the US-assisted system, plasmid DNA containing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were transferred to the ASCs. For this purpose, a Sonopore 4000 (NEPAGENE Co.) and a Sonazoid (Daiichi Sankyo Co.) instrument were used in combination. ASCs were subjected to US (3.1 MHz, 50% duty cycle, burst rate 2.0 Hz, intensity 1.2 W/cm2, exposure time 30 sec). We observed that the gene was more efficiently transferred with increased concentrations of plasmid DNA (5-150 μg/mL). However, further optimization of the US parameters is required, as the gene transfer efficiency was still relatively low. In conclusion, we herein demonstrate that a gene can be transferred to ASCs using our US-assisted system. In regenerative medicine, this system might resolve the current issues surrounding the use of viral vectors for gene transfer.

  12. In utero recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer in mice, rats, and primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrero Luis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer into the amniotic fluid using recombinant adenovirus vectors was shown previously to result in high efficiency transfer of transgenes into the lungs and intestines. Adenovirus mediated in utero gene therapy, however, resulted in expression of the transgene for less than 30 days. Recombinant adenovirus associated viruses (rAAV have the advantage of maintaining the viral genome in daughter cells thus providing for long-term expression of transgenes. Methods Recombinant AAV2 carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP was introduced into the amniotic sac of fetal rodents and nonhuman primates. Transgene maintenance and expression was monitor. Results Gene transfer resulted in rapid uptake and long-term gene expression in mice, rats, and non-human primates. Expression and secretion of the reporter gene, GFP, was readily demonstrated within 72 hours post-therapy. In long-term studies in rats and nonhuman primates, maintenance of GFP DNA, protein expression, and reporter gene secretion was documented for over one year. Conclusions Because only multipotential stem cells are present at the time of therapy, these data demonstrated that in utero gene transfer with AAV2 into stem cells resulted in long-term systemic expression of active transgene roducts. Thus, in utero gene transfer via the amniotic fluid may be useful in treatment of gene disorders.

  13. Cross-species gene transfer; implications for a new theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvanen, M

    1985-01-21

    It has been established that genes can be transferred and expressed among procaryotes of different species. I am hypothesizing--and there is mounting evidence for this conclusion--that genes are transferred and expressed among all species, and that such exchange is facilitated by, and can help account for, the existence of the biological unities, from the uniform genetic code to the cross-species similarity of the stages of embryological development. If this idea is correct, the uniformity of the genetic code would allow organisms to decipher and use genes transposed from chromosomes of foreign species, and the shared sequence of embryological development within each phylum would allow the organism to integrate these genes, particularly when the genes affect complex morphological traits. The cross-species gene transfer model could help explain many observations which have puzzled evolutionists, such as rapid bursts in evolution and the widespread occurrence of parallelism in the fossil record.

  14. A new computational method for the detection of horizontal gene transfer events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the increase in the amounts of available genomic data has made it easier to appreciate the extent by which organisms increase their genetic diversity through horizontally transferred genetic material. Such transfers have the potential to give rise to extremely dynamic genomes where a significant proportion of their coding DNA has been contributed by external sources. Because of the impact of these horizontal transfers on the ecological and pathogenic character of the recipient organisms, methods are continuously sought that are able to computationally determine which of the genes of a given genome are products of transfer events. In this paper, we introduce and discuss a novel computational method for identifying horizontal transfers that relies on a gene's nucleotide composition and obviates the need for knowledge of codon boundaries. In addition to being applicable to individual genes, the method can be easily extended to the case of clusters of horizontally transferred genes. With the help of an extensive and carefully designed set of experiments on 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, we demonstrate that the new method exhibits significant improvement in sensitivity when compared to previously published approaches. In fact, it achieves an average relative improvement across genomes of between 11 and 41% compared to the Codon Adaptation Index method in distinguishing native from foreign genes. Our method's horizontal gene transfer predictions for 123 microbial genomes are available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT/.

  15. Investigation of yeast genes possibly involved in mtDNA stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening of Caenorhabditis elegans genes possibly involved in the mitochondrial genome maintenance was performed using our previous validated method of RNAi combined with ethidium bromide. This was to knock down C. elegans genes homologous to yeast genes known to be involved in mtDNA stability but of ...

  16. Intrapleural 'outside-in' gene therapy: therapeutics for organs of the chest via gene transfer to the pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heguy, Adriana; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-10-01

    The pleural space is an attractive site for using viral vectors to deliver gene products to the lung parenchyma, other thoracic structures and the systemic circulation. The advantages of intrapleural gene transfer using viral vectors include: (i) easy accessibility; (ii) large surface area; (iii) ability to provide high concentrations of secreted gene products to chest structures; (iv) low risk of detrimental effects of possible vector-induced inflammation compared with intravascular delivery; and (v) because it is local, lower vector doses can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to thoracic structures than less efficient systemic routes. Examples of pleural gene transfer include the use of adenovirus vectors to treat mesothelioma by transiently expressing genes that encode toxic proteins, immunomodulatory molecules or anti-angiogenesis factors. Intrapleural delivery of adeno-associated viral vectors represents an efficient strategy to treat alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, achieving high lung and systemic therapeutic levels of alpha1AT. Intrapleural delivery of gene transfer vectors holds promise for the treatment of diseases requiring transient, localized gene expression, as well as sustained expression of genes to correct hereditary disorders requiring localized or systemic expression of the therapeutic protein.

  17. Alterations in radioresistance of eucaryotic cells after the transfer of genomic wildtype DNA and metallothionein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrer, H.

    1987-01-01

    The presented paper describes experiments concerning the alteration of radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after gene transfer. Ionizing radiation (γ- or X-ray) induces DNA single- or double strand breaks, which are religated by an unknown repair system. Repair deficient cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. In the experiments described, cells from a patient with the heritable disease Ataxia telangiectasia were used as well as two X-ray sensitive CHO mutant cell lines. After gene transfer of an intact human DNA repair gene or a metallothionein gene the cells should regain radioresistance. (orig.) [de

  18. Modifier Genes for Mouse Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Protein alpha (vibrator) That Bypass Juvenile Lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Concepcion, Dorothy; Johannes, Frank; Lo, Yuan Hung; Yao, Jay; Fong, Jerry; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) mediate lipid signaling and membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Loss-of-function mutations of the gene encoding PITP alpha in mice result in a range of dosage-sensitive phenotypes, including neurological dysfunction, neurodegeneration, and

  19. Incorporation of a horizontally transferred gene into an operon during cnidarian evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Dana

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing has revealed examples of horizontally transferred genes, but we still know little about how such genes are incorporated into their host genomes. We have previously reported the identification of a gene (flp that appears to have entered the Hydra genome through horizontal transfer. Here we provide additional evidence in support of our original hypothesis that the transfer was from a unicellular organism, and we show that the transfer occurred in an ancestor of two medusozoan cnidarian species. In addition we show that the gene is part of a bicistronic operon in the Hydra genome. These findings identify a new animal phylum in which trans-spliced leader addition has led to the formation of operons, and define the requirements for evolution of an operon in Hydra. The identification of operons in Hydra also provides a tool that can be exploited in the construction of transgenic Hydra strains.

  20. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. - Highlights: • Recycled fin explants outgrow cells bearing stable mesenchymal traits. • Cell production and quality is enhanced in the recycled explant culture system. • Fresh fin primary culture is highly variable and loose epithelial traits over time

  1. Role of chromosome stability and telomere length in the production of viable cell lines for somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betts Dean H

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT provides an appealing alternative for the preservation of genetic material in non-domestic and endangered species. An important prerequisite for successful SCNT is the availability of good quality donor cells, as normal embryo development is dependent upon proper reprogramming of the donor genome so that embryonic genes can be appropriately expressed. The characteristics of donor cell lines and their ability to produce embryos by SCNT were evaluated by testing the effects of tissue sample collection (DART biopsy, PUNCH biopsy, post-mortem EAR sample and culture initiation (explant, collagenase digestion techniques. Results Differences in initial sample size based on sample collection technique had an effect on the amount of time necessary for achieving primary confluence and the number of population doublings (PDL produced. Thus, DART and PUNCH biopsies resulted in cultures with decreased lifespans (50 PDL and chromosomally stable (>70% normal cells at 20 PDL cultures produced by post-mortem EAR samples. Chromosome stability was influenced by sample collection technique and was dependent upon the culture's initial telomere length and its rate of shortening over cell passages. Following SCNT, short-lived cultures resulted in significantly lower blastocyst development (≤ 0.9% compared to highly proliferative cultures (11.8%. Chromosome stability and sample collection technique were significant factors in determining blastocyst development outcome. Conclusion These data demonstrate the influence of culture establishment techniques on cell culture characteristics, including the viability, longevity and normality of cells. The identification of a quantifiable marker associated with SCNT embryo developmental potential, chromosome stability, provides a means by which cell culture conditions can be monitored and improved.

  2. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Keejong; Qian, Jin; Jiang, MeiSheng; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Ming-Che; Chen, Chi-Dar; Lai, Chao-Kuen; Lo, Hsin-Lung; Hsiao, Chin-Ton; Brown, Lucy; Bolen, James; Huang, Hsiao-I; Ho, Pei-Yu; Shih, Ping Yao; Yao, Chen-Wen

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT) that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal ...

  3. In Vivo Targeted Gene Transfer by Direct Irradiation with Nanosecond Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Makoto; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrated in vivo targeted gene transfer to rat skin by direct irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses without major side effects. Expressions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were observed only in the area irradiated with laser pulses; in the skin, epidermal cells were selectively transfected. Unlike other physical methods, this method enables noncontact gene transfer. Moreover, the laser intensity required in this method is as low as 20 MW/cm2, and thus fiber-based beam delivery is possible.

  4. Optimization of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer: structure-function, physico-chemical, and cellular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Marie; Tranchant, Isabelle; Niore, Pierre-Antoine; Byk, Gerardo; Mignet, Nathalie; Escriou, Virginie; Scherman, Daniel; Herscovici, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The rationale design aimed at the enhancement of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer is discussed. These improvements are based on the straight evaluation of the structure-activity relationship and on the introduction of new structures. Much attention have been given to the supramolecular structures of the lipid/DNA complexes, to the effect of serum on gene transfer and to the intracellular trafficking of the lipoplexes. Finally new avenue using reducible cationic lipids has been discussed.

  5. MUC1 and other sialoglycoconjugates inhibit adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcasoy, S M; Latoche, J; Gondor, M; Watkins, S C; Henderson, R A; Hughey, R; Finn, O J; Pilewski, J M

    1997-10-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses are currently being evaluated as gene transfer vectors for the treatment of airway diseases. Recent evidence indicates that gene transfer to differentiated airway epithelial cells is inefficient. We hypothesized that apical membrane glycoconjugates, such as the transmembrane mucin MUC1, reduce the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. To address this, studies were performed in primary bronchial epithelial and Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells transduced to express human MUC1. Colocalization of MUC1 and an adenoviral lacZ transgene in the bronchial epithelial cells revealed that at several multiplicities of infection, the percentage of cells expressing lacZ was five-fold less in MUC1-expressing cells. Moreover, lacZ expression was three- to eight-fold lower in MUC1-expressing than in control MDCK cells, demonstrating that MUC1 interferes with gene transfer and is not merely a phenotypic marker of a cell that is refractory to adenovirus infection. Neuraminidase pretreatment of cells to remove sialic acid residues prior to viral adsorption increased the efficiency of gene transfer two- to five-fold in human airway and MDCK cells, and in a xenograft model of human airway. This effect was also observed in cultured cells that do not express MUC1, suggesting that other sialylated glycoconjugates impact on the efficiency of gene transfer. An inhibitory effect of negatively charged glycoconjugates on adenovirus binding was further supported by the finding that adsorption of adenovirus with a polycation significantly increased gene transfer efficiency. These data demonstrate for the first time that sialoglycoconjugates on epithelial cells reduce the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

  6. Evaluation of Hose in Hose Transfer Line Service Life for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TORRES, T.D.

    2000-08-24

    RPP-6153, Engineering Task Plan for Hose-in-Hose Transfer System for the Interim Stabilization Program, defines the programmatic goals, functional requirements, and technical criteria for the development and subsequent installation of transfer line equipment to support Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program. RPP-6028, Specification for Hose in Hose Transfer Lines for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program, has been issued to define the specific requirements for the design, manufacture, and verification of transfer line assemblies for specific waste transfer applications. Included in RPP-6028 are tables defining the chemical constituents of concern to which transfer lines will be exposed. Current Interim Stabilization Program planning forecasts that the at-grade transfer lines will be required to convey pumpable waste for as much as three years after commissioning. Prudent engineering dictates that the equipment placed in service have a working life in excess of this forecasted time period, with some margin to allow for future adjustments to the planned schedule. This document evaluates the effective service life of the Hose-in-Hose Transfer Lines, based on information submitted by the manufacturer and published literature. The effective service life of transfer line assemblies is a function of several factors. Foremost among these are process fluid characteristics, ambient environmental conditions, and the manufacturer's stated shelf life. This evaluation examines the manufacturer's certification of shelf life, the manufacturer's certifications of chemical compatibility with waste, and published literature on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on the mechanical properties of elastomeric materials to evaluate transfer line service life.

  7. Mood-stabilizers differentially affect housekeeping gene expression in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Timothy R; Powell-Smith, Georgia; Haddley, Kate; Mcguffin, Peter; Quinn, John; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Farmer, Anne E; D'Souza, Ursula M

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that antidepressants affect the expression of constitutively expressed "housekeeping genes" commonly used as normalizing reference genes in quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments. There has yet to be an investigation however on the effects of mood-stabilizers on housekeeping gene stability. The current study utilized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from patients with mood disorders to investigate the effects of a range of doses of lithium (0, 1, 2 and 5 mM) and sodium valproate (0, 0.06, 0.03 and 0.6 mM) on the stability of 12 housekeeping genes. RNA was extracted from LCLs and qPCR was used to generate cycle threshold (Ct ) values which were input into RefFinder analyses. The study revealed drug-specific effects on housekeeping gene stability. The most stable housekeeping genes in LCLs treated: acutely with sodium valproate were ACTB and RPL13A; acutely with lithium were GAPDH and ATP5B; chronically with lithium were ATP5B and CYC1. The stability of GAPDH and B2M were particularly affected by duration of lithium treatment. The study adds to a growing literature that the selection of appropriate housekeeping genes is important for the accurate normalization of target gene expression in experiments investigating the molecular effects of mood disorder pharmacotherapies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Influence of putative exopolysaccharide genes on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilm stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Fazli, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    We report a study of the role of putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters in the formation and stability of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilm. Two novel putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters, pea and peb, were identified, and evidence is provided that they encode products that stabilize P....... putida KT2440 biofilm. The gene clusters alg and bcs, which code for proteins mediating alginate and cellulose biosynthesis, were found to play minor roles in P. putida KT2440 biofilm formation and stability under the conditions tested. A P. putida KT2440 derivative devoid of any identifiable...... exopolysaccharide genes was found to form biofilm with a structure similar to wild-type biofilm, but with a stability lower than that of wild-type biofilm. Based on our data, we suggest that the formation of structured P. putida KT2440 biofilm can occur in the absence of exopolysaccharides; however...

  9. An acyltransferase gene that putatively functions in anthocyanin modification was horizontally transferred from Fabaceae into the genus Cuscuta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT refers to the flow of genetic materials to non-offspring, and occasionally HGT in plants can improve the adaptation of organisms in new niches due to expanded metabolic capability. Anthocyanins are an important group of water-soluble red, purple, or blue secondary metabolites, whose diversity results from modification after the main skeleton biosynthesis. Cuscuta is a stem holoparasitic genus, whose members form direct connection with hosts to withdraw water, nutrients, and macromolecules. Such intimate association is thought to increase the frequency of HGT. By transcriptome screening for foreign genes in Cuscuta australis, we discovered that one gene encoding a putative anthocyanin acyltransferase gene of the BAHD family, which is likely to be involved in anthocyanin modification, was acquired by C. australis from Fabaceae through HGT. The anthocyanin acyltransferase-like (AT-like gene was confirmed to be present in the genome assembly of C. australis and the transcriptomes of Cuscuta pentagona. The higher transcriptional level in old stems is consistent with its putative function in secondary metabolism by stabilizing anthocyanin at neutral pH and thus HGT of this AT-like gene may have improved biotic and abiotic resistance of Cuscuta.

  10. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolet, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the work described is to assess the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to deliver a specific antibody cytokine fusion protein called CC49-1L2 to a tumor expressing antigen reactive with the antibody...

  11. Ethical perception of cross-species gene transfer in plant | Amin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of genetically modified (GM) rice to enrich its nutritional value, such as Vitamin C might involve gene transfer across different species. The purpose of this paper is to examine how the public in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia, perceive the development of GM rice which contain mice gene to increase its ...

  12. Transcriptional regulation of pWW0 transfer genes in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, L.M.; Molin, Søren; Kroer, N.

    2004-01-01

    The conjugative IncP-9 plasmid pWW0 (TOL) carries transfer genes, many of whose functions can be predicted from sequence similarities to the well-studied IncW and IncP-1 plasmids, and that are clustered with the replication and maintenance genes of the plasmid core. In this study we show that the...

  13. Stability and flexibility of epigenetic gene regulation in mammalian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reik, Wolf

    2007-05-24

    During development, cells start in a pluripotent state, from which they can differentiate into many cell types, and progressively develop a narrower potential. Their gene-expression programmes become more defined, restricted and, potentially, 'locked in'. Pluripotent stem cells express genes that encode a set of core transcription factors, while genes that are required later in development are repressed by histone marks, which confer short-term, and therefore flexible, epigenetic silencing. By contrast, the methylation of DNA confers long-term epigenetic silencing of particular sequences--transposons, imprinted genes and pluripotency-associated genes--in somatic cells. Long-term silencing can be reprogrammed by demethylation of DNA, and this process might involve DNA repair. It is not known whether any of the epigenetic marks has a primary role in determining cell and lineage commitment during development.

  14. Gene loss and horizontal gene transfer contributed to the genome evolution of the extreme acidophile Ferrovum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Roxana Ullrich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD, associated with active and abandoned mining sites, is a habitat for acidophilic microorganisms that gain energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and ferrous iron and that thrive at pH below 4. Members of the recently proposed genus Ferrovum are the first acidophilic iron oxidizers to be described within the Betaproteobacteria. Although they have been detected as typical community members in AMD habitats worldwide, knowledge of their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is scarce. Genomics approaches appear to be most promising in addressing this lacuna since isolation and cultivation of Ferrovum has proven to be extremely difficult and has so far only been successful for the designated type strain Ferrovum myxofaciens P3G. In this study, the genomes of two novel strains of Ferrovum (PN-J185 and Z-31 derived from water samples of a mine water treatment plant were sequenced. These genomes were compared with those of Ferrovum sp. JA12 that also originated from the mine water treatment plant, and of the type strain (P3G. Phylogenomic scrutiny suggests that the four strains represent three Ferrovum species that cluster in two groups (1 and 2. Comprehensive analysis of their predicted metabolic pathways revealed that these groups harbor characteristic metabolic profiles, notably with respect to motility, chemotaxis, nitrogen metabolism, biofilm formation and their potential strategies to cope with the acidic environment. For example, while the F. myxofaciens strains (group 1 appear to be motile and diazotrophic, the non-motile group 2 strains have the predicted potential to use a greater variety of fixed nitrogen sources. Furthermore, analysis of their genome synteny provides first insights into their genome evolution, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer and genome reduction in the group 2 strains by loss of genes encoding complete metabolic pathways or physiological features contributed to the observed

  15. Horizontal gene transfer in the innovation and adaptation of land plants

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Huang, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been well documented in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, but its role in plants and animals remains elusive. In a recent study, we showed that at least 57 families of nuclear genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses and that HGT played a critical role in plant colonization of land. In this paper, we categorize all acquired genes based on their putative functions and biological processes, and further addr...

  16. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  17. Cellular automata-based artificial life system of horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-xin Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutation and natural selection is the core of Darwin's idea about evolution. Many algorithms and models are based on this idea. However, in the evolution of prokaryotes, more and more researches have indicated that horizontal gene transfer (HGT would be much more important and universal than the authors had imagined. Owing to this mechanism, the prokaryotes not only become adaptable in nearly any environment on Earth, but also form a global genetic bank and a super communication network with all the genes of the prokaryotic world. Under this background, they present a novel cellular automata model general gene transfer to simulate and study the vertical gene transfer and HGT in the prokaryotes. At the same time, they use Schrodinger's life theory to formulate some evaluation indices and to discuss the intelligence and cognition of prokaryotes which is derived from HGT.

  18. Fundamental study on gene transfer utilizing magnetic force and jet injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Nakagami, H.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishjima, S. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Recently, DNA vaccination is attracting attentions as a new therapeutic method for lifestyle diseases and autoimmune diseases. However, its clinical applications are limited because a safe and efficient gene transfer method has not been established yet. In this study, a new method of gene transfer was proposed which utilizes the jet injection and the magnetic transfection. The jet injection is a method to inject medical liquid by momentary high pressure without needle. The injected liquid diffuses in the bio tissue and the endocytosis is considered to be improved by the diffusion. The magnetic transfection is a method to deliver the conjugates of plasmid DNA and magnetic particles to the desired site by external magnetic field. It is expected that jet injection of the conjugates causes slight membrane disruptions and the traction of the conjugates by magnetic field induces the efficient gene transfer. In conclusion, the possibility of improvement of the gene expression by the combination of jet injection and magnetic transfection was confirmed.

  19. Investigation of yeast genes possibly involved in mtDNA stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phelim Isichei

    large number of possible candidate genes, these approaches most often remains laborious (De Lonlay et ... RNA interference of genes involved in mtDNA replication such as polg-1, encoding the mitochondrial DNA .... adult worms were independently picked up and transferred to fresh. RNAi plates with or without different ...

  20. Widespread horizontal gene transfer from double-stranded RNA viruses to eukaryotic nuclear genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiquan; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Li, Guoqing; Xie, Jiatao; Cheng, Jiasen; Peng, Youliang; Ghabrial, Said A; Yi, Xianhong

    2010-11-01

    Horizontal gene transfer commonly occurs from cells to viruses but rarely occurs from viruses to their host cells, with the exception of retroviruses and some DNA viruses. However, extensive sequence similarity searches in public genome databases for various organisms showed that the capsid protein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes from totiviruses and partitiviruses have widespread homologs in the nuclear genomes of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, arthropods, fungi, nematodes, and protozoa. PCR amplification and sequencing as well as comparative evidence of junction coverage between virus and host sequences support the conclusion that these viral homologs are real and occur in eukaryotic genomes. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggest that these genes were likely transferred horizontally from viruses to eukaryotic genomes. Furthermore, we present evidence showing that some of the transferred genes are conserved and expressed in eukaryotic organisms and suggesting that these viral genes are also functional in the recipient genomes. Our findings imply that horizontal transfer of double-stranded RNA viral genes is widespread among eukaryotes and may give rise to functionally important new genes, thus entailing that RNA viruses may play significant roles in the evolution of eukaryotes.

  1. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  2. GENETIC STABILITY ANALYSIS OF RB GENE IN GENETICALLY MODIFIED POTATO LINES TOLERANT TO Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Listanto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of potato cultivars with high levels of broad spectrum resistance is a key long-term management strategy against late blight disease caused by Phytophthora infestans. Six progeny lines of hybridization between transgenic potato Katahdin SP951 with non-transgenic Granola and Atlantic were selected based on agronomical characteristics and resistance to late blight disease. The study aimed to analyze the number of insertions and stability of inserted RB gene in the transgenic potato lines. The research was carried out through plant DNA extraction, southern blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Southern blot analysis was used to detect the number of inserts integrated into potato genome, while PCR analysis was used to detect stability of RB gene from generation to generation. The results showed that the progenies obtained from hybridization between Atlantic and transgenic Katahdin SP951 (lines No. 20 and 27 and between Granola and transgenic Katahdin SP951 (line No. 69 contained one copy number of RB gene, according to the probing of nptII. The result is similar to that of inserted RB gene found in the parental transgenic Katahdin SP951. The presence of RB gene in four different generations (G0, G1, G2 and G3 showed stable integration of the gene into the plant genome. The single copy number of RB gene will repress the occurrence of silencing gene expression. The stability analysis of RB gene can determine that the gene is still present in plant genome after several generations.

  3. Transfer of tetracycline resistance gene (tetr) between replicons in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing among the isolates showed resistance to amoxicillin (92%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (84.4%), tetracycline (71.4%), gentamycin (43.5%), nalidixic acid (38.3%) and nitrofurantoin (7.9%). E. coli showed the highest resistance to most of the antibiotics. Tetracycline resistance gene was ...

  4. Could bacteriophages transfer antibiotic resistance genes from environmental bacteria to human-body associated bacterial populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Environments without any contact with anthropogenic antibiotics show a great abundance of antibiotic resistance genes that use to be chromosomal and are part of the core genes of the species that harbor them. Some of these genes are shared with human pathogens where they appear in mobile genetic elements. Diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in non-contaminated environments is much greater than in human and animal pathogens, and in environments contaminated with antibiotic from anthropogenic activities. This suggests the existence of some bottleneck effect for the mobilization of antibiotic resistance genes among different biomes. Bacteriophages have characteristics that make them suitable vectors between different biomes, and as well for transferring genes from biome to biome. Recent metagenomic studies and detection of bacterial genes by genomic techniques in the bacteriophage fraction of different microbiota provide indirect evidences that the mobilization of genes mediated by phages, including antibiotic resistance genes, is far more relevant than previously thought. Our hypothesis is that bacteriophages might be of critical importance for evading one of the bottlenecks, the lack of ecological connectivity that modulates the pass of antibiotic resistance genes from natural environments such as waters and soils, to animal and human microbiomes. This commentary concentrates on the potential importance of bacteriophages in transferring resistance genes from the environment to human and animal body microbiomes, but there is no doubt that transduction occurs also in body microbiomes.

  5. A reconstruction problem for a class of phylogenetic networks with lateral gene transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Gabriel; Pons, Joan Carles; Rosselló, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Lateral, or Horizontal, Gene Transfers are a type of asymmetric evolutionary events where genetic material is transferred from one species to another. In this paper we consider LGT networks, a general model of phylogenetic networks with lateral gene transfers which consist, roughly, of a principal rooted tree with its leaves labelled on a set of taxa, and a set of extra secondary arcs between nodes in this tree representing lateral gene transfers. An LGT network gives rise in a natural way to a principal phylogenetic subtree and a set of secondary phylogenetic subtrees, which, roughly, represent, respectively, the main line of evolution of most genes and the secondary lines of evolution through lateral gene transfers. We introduce a set of simple conditions on an LGT network that guarantee that its principal and secondary phylogenetic subtrees are pairwise different and that these subtrees determine, up to isomorphism, the LGT network. We then give an algorithm that, given a set of pairwise different phylogenetic trees [Formula: see text] on the same set of taxa, outputs, when it exists, the LGT network that satisfies these conditions and such that its principal phylogenetic tree is [Formula: see text] and its secondary phylogenetic trees are [Formula: see text].

  6. Plant expansins in bacteria and fungi: evolution by horizontal gene transfer and independent domain fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Doran, Nicole; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been described as a common mechanism of transferring genetic material between prokaryotes, whereas genetic transfers from eukaryotes to prokaryotes have been rarely documented. Here we report a rare case of HGT in which plant expansin genes that code for plant cell-wall loosening proteins were transferred from plants to bacteria, fungi, and amoebozoa. In several cases, the species in which the expansin gene was found is either in intimate association with plants or is a known plant pathogen. Our analyses suggest that at least two independent genetic transfers occurred from plants to bacteria and fungi. These events were followed by multiple HGT events within bacteria and fungi. We have also observed that in bacteria expansin genes have been independently fused to DNA fragments that code for an endoglucanase domain or for a carbohydrate binding module, pointing to functional convergence at the molecular level. Furthermore, the functional similarities between microbial expansins and their plant xenologs suggest that these proteins mediate microbial-plant interactions by altering the plant cell wall and therefore may provide adaptive advantages to these species. The evolution of these nonplant expansins represents a unique case in which bacteria and fungi have found innovative and adaptive ways to interact with and infect plants by acquiring genes from their host. This evolutionary paradigm suggests that despite their low frequency such HGT events may have significantly contributed to the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species.

  7. Follistatin allows efficient retroviral-mediated gene transfer into rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgnon, Josephine; Djamouri, Fatima; Lorand, Isabelle; Rico, Virginie Di; Loux, Nathalie; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Franco, Dominique; Capron, Frederique; Weber, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Retroviral vectors are widely used tools for gene therapy. However, in vivo gene transfer is only effective in dividing cells, which, in liver, requires a regenerative stimulus. Follistatin is effective in promoting liver regeneration after 90% and 70% hepatectomy in rats. We studied its efficacy on liver regeneration and retroviral-mediated gene delivery in 50% hepatectomized rats. When human recombinant follistatin was infused into the portal vein immediately after 50% hepatectomy, hepatocyte proliferation was significantly higher than in control 50% hepatectomized rats. A single injection of virus particles administered 23 h after follistatin infusion resulted in more than 20% gene transduction efficiency in hepatocytes compared to 3% in control rats. It is concluded that a single injection of follistatin induces onset of proliferation in 50% hepatectomized rats and allows efficient retroviral-mediated gene transfer to the liver

  8. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  9. What tangled web: barriers to rampant horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Kurland, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Dawkins in his The Selfish Gene(1) quite aptly applies the term "selfish" to parasitic repetitive DNA sequences endemic to eukaryotic genomes, especially vertebrates. Doolittle and Sapienza (2) as well as Orgel and Crick (3) enlivened this notion of selfish DNA with the identification of such repetitive sequences as remnants of mobile elements such as transposons. In addition, Orgel and Crick (3) associated parasitic DNA with a potential to outgrow their host genomes by propagating ...

  10. Ancient horizontal gene transfer from bacteria enhances biosynthetic capabilities of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Schmitt

    Full Text Available Polyketides are natural products with a wide range of biological functions and pharmaceutical applications. Discovery and utilization of polyketides can be facilitated by understanding the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the biosynthetic machinery and the natural product potential of extant organisms. Gene duplication and subfunctionalization, as well as horizontal gene transfer are proposed mechanisms in the evolution of biosynthetic gene clusters. To explain the amount of homology in some polyketide synthases in unrelated organisms such as bacteria and fungi, interkingdom horizontal gene transfer has been evoked as the most likely evolutionary scenario. However, the origin of the genes and the direction of the transfer remained elusive.We used comparative phylogenetics to infer the ancestor of a group of polyketide synthase genes involved in antibiotic and mycotoxin production. We aligned keto synthase domain sequences of all available fungal 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA-type PKSs and their closest bacterial relatives. To assess the role of symbiotic fungi in the evolution of this gene we generated 24 6-MSA synthase sequence tags from lichen-forming fungi. Our results support an ancient horizontal gene transfer event from an actinobacterial source into ascomycete fungi, followed by gene duplication.Given that actinobacteria are unrivaled producers of biologically active compounds, such as antibiotics, it appears particularly promising to study biosynthetic genes of actinobacterial origin in fungi. The large number of 6-MSA-type PKS sequences found in lichen-forming fungi leads us hypothesize that the evolution of typical lichen compounds, such as orsellinic acid derivatives, was facilitated by the gain of this bacterial polyketide synthase.

  11. The transfer and transformation of collective network information in gene-matched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsukawa, Takashi; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-10-09

    Networks, such as the human society network, social and professional networks, and biological system networks, contain vast amounts of information. Information signals in networks are distributed over nodes and transmitted through intricately wired links, making the transfer and transformation of such information difficult to follow. Here we introduce a novel method for describing network information and its transfer using a model network, the Gene-matched network (GMN), in which nodes (neurons) possess attributes (genes). In the GMN, nodes are connected according to their expression of common genes. Because neurons have multiple genes, the GMN is cluster-rich. We show that, in the GMN, information transfer and transformation were controlled systematically, according to the activity level of the network. Furthermore, information transfer and transformation could be traced numerically with a vector using genes expressed in the activated neurons, the active-gene array, which was used to assess the relative activity among overlapping neuronal groups. Interestingly, this coding style closely resembles the cell-assembly neural coding theory. The method introduced here could be applied to many real-world networks, since many systems, including human society and various biological systems, can be represented as a network of this type.

  12. Highly efficient retrograde gene transfer into motor neurons by a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with fusion glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyabi Hirano

    Full Text Available The development of gene therapy techniques to introduce transgenes that promote neuronal survival and protection provides effective therapeutic approaches for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Intramuscular injection of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors, as well as lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G, permits gene delivery into motor neurons in animal models for motor neuron diseases. Recently, we developed a vector with highly efficient retrograde gene transfer (HiRet by pseudotyping a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1-based vector with fusion glycoprotein B type (FuG-B or a variant of FuG-B (FuG-B2, in which the cytoplasmic domain of RV-G was replaced by the corresponding part of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G. We have also developed another vector showing neuron-specific retrograde gene transfer (NeuRet with fusion glycoprotein C type, in which the short C-terminal segment of the extracellular domain and transmembrane/cytoplasmic domains of RV-G was substituted with the corresponding regions of VSV-G. These two vectors afford the high efficiency of retrograde gene transfer into different neuronal populations in the brain. Here we investigated the efficiency of the HiRet (with FuG-B2 and NeuRet vectors for retrograde gene transfer into motor neurons in the spinal cord and hindbrain in mice after intramuscular injection and compared it with the efficiency of the RV-G pseudotype of the HIV-1-based vector. The main highlight of our results is that the HiRet vector shows the most efficient retrograde gene transfer into both spinal cord and hindbrain motor neurons, offering its promising use as a gene therapeutic approach for the treatment of motor neuron diseases.

  13. Ex-Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentiviral Mediated Gene Transfer Into Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanieh Jalali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Introduction of therapeutic genes into the injured site of nervous system can be achieved using transplantation of cellular vehicles containing desired gene. To transfer exogenous genes into the cellular vehicles, lentiviral vectors are one of interested vectors because of advantages such high transduction efficiency of dividing and non-dividing cells. Unrestricted somatic stem cells are subclasses of umbilical cord blood derived stem cells which are appreciate candidates to use as cellular vehicles for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system. Objectives In current study we investigated the effect of lentiviral vector transduction on the neuronal related features of unrestricted somatic stem cells to indicate the probable and unwanted changes related to transduction procedure. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lentiviral vector containing green fluorescent protein (GFP were transduced into unrestricted somatic stem cells and its effect was investigated with using MTT assay, qPCR and immunohistochemistry techniques. For statistical comparison of real time PCR results, REST software (2009, Qiagen was used. Results Obtained results showed lentiviral vector transduction did not have cytotoxic effects on unrestricted somatic stem cells and did not change neuronal differentiation capacity of them as well the expression of some neuronal related genes and preserved them in multilineage situation. Conclusions In conclusion, we suggested that lentiviral vectors could be proper vectors to transfer therapeutic gene into unrestricted somatic stem cells to provide a cellular vehicle for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system disorders.

  14. Potential transfer of extended spectrum β-lactamase encoding gene, blashv18 gene, between Klebsiella pneumoniae in raw foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yangjin; Matthews, Karl R

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the transfer frequency of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding gene (blaSHV18) among Klebsiella pneumoniae in tryptic soy broth (TSB), pasteurized milk, unpasteurized milk, alfalfa sprouts and chopped lettuce at defined temperatures. All transconjugants were characterized phenotypically and genotypically. KP04(ΔKM) and KP08(ΔKM) isolated from seed sprouts and KP342 were used as recipients in mating experiments with K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 serving as the donor. In mating experiments, no transconjugants were detected at 4 °C in liquid media or chopped lettuce, but detected in all media tested at 15 °C, 24 °C, and 37 °C. At 24 °C, the transfer of blaSHV18 gene occurred more frequently in alfalfa sprouts (5.15E-04 transconjugants per recipient) and chopped lettuce (3.85E-05) than liquid media (1.08E-05). On chopped lettuce, transconjugants were not detected at day 1 post-mating at 15 °C, but observed on day 2 (1.43E-05). Transconjugants carried the blaSHV18 gene transferred from the donor and the virulence gene harbored by recipient. More importantly, a class 1 integrase gene and resistance to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were co-transferred during mating. These quantitative results suggest that fresh produce exposed to temperature abuse may serve as a competent vehicle for the spread of gene encoding for antibiotic resistance, having a potential negative impact on human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributes to Plant Evolution: The Case of Agrobacterium T-DNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe-Huamanquispe, Dora G.; Gheysen, Godelieve; Kreuze, Jan F.

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) can be defined as the acquisition of genetic material from another organism without being its offspring. HGT is common in the microbial world including archaea and bacteria, where HGT mechanisms are widely understood and recognized as an important force in evolution. In eukaryotes, HGT now appears to occur more frequently than originally thought. Many studies are currently detecting novel HGT events among distinct lineages using next-generation sequencing. Most examples to date include gene transfers from bacterial donors to recipient organisms including fungi, plants, and animals. In plants, one well-studied example of HGT is the transfer of the tumor-inducing genes (T-DNAs) from some Agrobacterium species into their host plant genomes. Evidence of T-DNAs from Agrobacterium spp. into plant genomes, and their subsequent maintenance in the germline, has been reported in Nicotiana, Linaria and, more recently, in Ipomoea species. The transferred genes do not produce the usual disease phenotype, and appear to have a role in evolution of these plants. In this paper, we review previous reported cases of HGT from Agrobacterium, including the transfer of T-DNA regions from Agrobacterium spp. to the sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] genome which is, to date, the sole documented example of a naturally-occurring incidence of HGT from Agrobacterium to a domesticated crop plant. We also discuss the possible evolutionary impact of T-DNA acquisition on plants. PMID:29225610

  16. Desmin-regulated lentiviral vectors for skeletal muscle gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Gillian E; Waddington, Simon N; Bales, Olivia; Tchen, Rose C; Antoniou, Michael N

    2010-03-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are highly attractive as a gene therapy agent as they are able to stably integrate their genomes in both dividing and nondividing cells and, in principle, provide long-term therapeutic benefit. However, their performance in skeletal muscle in adult animals has, to date, been disappointing. In order to gain clearer insight into their utility in this tissue type, we have conducted an extensive quantitative comparison of constitutive and muscle-specific promoter activities in skeletal muscle and nonmuscle systems following LV delivery in cell lines and neonatal mice. Our data show that LV delivery to hind leg skeletal muscle of neonatal mouse results in long-term transgene expression in adulthood. We find that the human desmin (DES) promoter/enhancer is the first muscle-specific control region to match the activity of the highly active constitutive human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoter/enhancer in skeletal muscle within a LV context both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the DES promoter/enhancer provides six- to eightfold greater expression per viral copy than the muscle-specific human muscle creatine kinase (CKM) promoter/enhancer. DES also confers a more reproducible and tissue-specific transgene expression profile compared to CKM and is therefore a highly attractive regulatory element for use in muscle gene therapy vectors.

  17. Imaging living central neurones using viral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschemacher, A G; Paton, J F R; Kasparov, S

    2005-01-02

    Studies of central neurones and other cellular components of the brain, such as glial and vascular cells, can be greatly advanced by the use of the modern optical techniques such as confocal live cell imaging. Fluorescent proteins have allowed imaging of particular cell types or intracellular elements to be visualised and distinguished from irrelevant background structures. To introduce the genetic information encoding for fluorescent proteins into relevant cellular targets, molecular tools are required. Viral vectors are one of the best ways of gene delivery into differentiated postnatal brain neurones and glia. Current progress in this field allows targeting of various cell types and therefore makes it possible to express a variety of fluorescent constructs in selected subpopulations of neurones, for example. In this review, we will discuss and compare the properties of the most popular viral gene delivery systems and the advantages of different brain cell preparations to illustrate how they can be used for high-resolution live cell confocal imaging in order to study new aspects of central nervous system (CNS) structure and function.

  18. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...

  19. Origin of the plant Tm-1-like gene via two independent horizontal transfer events and one gene fusion event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zefeng; Liu, Li; Fang, Huimin; Li, Pengcheng; Xu, Shuhui; Cao, Wei; Xu, Chenwu; Huang, Jinling; Zhou, Yong

    2016-09-20

    The Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) resistance gene Tm-1 encodes a direct inhibitor of ToMV RNA replication to protect tomato from infection. The plant Tm-1-like (Tm-1L) protein is predicted to contain an uncharacterized N-terminal UPF0261 domain and a C-terminal TIM-barrel signal transduction (TBST) domain. Homologous searches revealed that proteins containing both of these two domains are mainly present in charophyte green algae and land plants but absent from glaucophytes, red algae and chlorophyte green algae. Although Tm-1 homologs are widely present in bacteria, archaea and fungi, UPF0261- and TBST-domain-containing proteins are generally encoded by different genes in these linages. A co-evolution analysis also suggested a putative interaction between UPF0261- and TBST-domain-containing proteins. Phylogenetic analyses based on homologs of these two domains revealed that plants have acquired UPF0261- and TBST-domain-encoding genes through two independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events before the origin of land plants from charophytes. Subsequently, gene fusion occurred between these two horizontally acquired genes and resulted in the origin of the Tm-1L gene in streptophytes. Our results demonstrate a novel evolutionary mechanism through which the recipient organism may acquire genes with functional interaction through two different HGT events and further fuse them into one functional gene.

  20. In vivo tyrosinase mini-gene transfer enhances killing effect of BNCT on amelanotic melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, H.; Mishima, Y. [Mishima Institute for Dermatological Research, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Hiratsuka, J. [Kawasaki Medical School, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Iwakura, M. [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Using accentuated melanogenesis principally occurring within melanoma cells, we have successfully treated human malignant melanoma (Mm) with {sup 10}B-BPA BNCT. Despite this success, there are still remaining issues for poorly melanogenic Mm and further non-pigment cell tumors. We found the selective accumulation of {sup 10}B-BPA to Mm is primarily due to the complex formation of BPA and melanin-monomers activity synthesized within Mm cells. Then, we succeeded in transferring the tyrosinase gene into amelanotic to substantially produce melanin monomers. These cells has demonstrated increased boron accumulation and enhanced killing effect of BNCT. Further, transfection of TRP-2 (DOPAchrome tautomerase) gene into poorly eumelanotic and slightly phenomelanotic Mm cells in culture cell systems also led to increased BPA accumulation. Thereafter, we studied in vivo gene transfer. We transferred the tyrosinase mini-gene by intra-tumor injection into poorly melanotic Mm proliferating subcutaneously in hamster skin, and performed BNCT. Compared to control tumors, gene-transferred tumors showed increased BPA accumulation leading to enhanced killing effect. (author)

  1. Analysis of bone marrow stromal cell transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene by PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakawa, Toshiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Blood Transfusion and Hematology; Hibino, Hitoshi; Tani, Kenzaburo; Asano, Shigetaka; Futatugawa, Shouji; Sera, Kouichiro

    1997-12-31

    PIXE, Particle Induced X-ray Emission, is a powerful, multi-elemental analysis method which has many distinguishing features and has been used in varies research fields. Recently the method of applying baby cyclotrons for nuclear medicine to PIXE has been developed. This enables us to study biomedical phenomena from the physical point of view. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells were transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene (LacZ gene) by murine retroviral vectors. Analysis of the bone marrow stromal cells with the LacZ gene by PIXE revealed remarkable changes of intracellular trace elements compared with the normal control cells. These results indicate that gene transfer by retroviral vectors may bring about a dynamic change of intracellular circumstances of the target cell. (author)

  2. Extensive horizontal transfer of core genome genes between two Lactobacillus species found in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguin Emmanuelle

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While genes that are conserved between related bacterial species are usually thought to have evolved along with the species, phylogenetic trees reconstructed for individual genes may contradict this picture and indicate horizontal gene transfer. Individual trees are often not resolved with high confidence, however, and in that case alternative trees are generally not considered as contradicting the species tree, although not confirming it either. Here we conduct an in-depth analysis of 401 protein phylogenetic trees inferred with varying levels of confidence for three lactobacilli from the acidophilus complex. At present the relationship between these bacteria, isolated from environments as diverse as the gastrointestinal tract (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus johnsonii and yogurt (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, is ambiguous due to contradictory phenotypical and 16S rRNA based classifications. Results Among the 401 phylogenetic trees, those that could be reconstructed with high confidence support the 16S-rRNA tree or one alternative topology in an astonishing 3:2 ratio, while the third possible topology is practically absent. Lowering the confidence threshold for trees to be taken into consideration does not significantly affect this ratio, and therefore suggests that gene transfer may have affected as much as 40% of the core genome genes. Gene function bias suggests that the 16S rRNA phylogeny of the acidophilus complex, which indicates that L. acidophilus and L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus are the closest related of these three species, is correct. A novel approach of comparison of interspecies protein divergence data employed in this study allowed to determine that gene transfer most likely took place between the lineages of the two species found in the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion This case-study reports an unprecedented level of phylogenetic incongruence, presumably resulting from extensive

  3. Identification of abnormal gene expression in bovine transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jongki; Kang, Sungkeun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the expression of three genes related to early embryonic development in bovine transgenic cloned embryos. To accomplish this, development of bovine transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos was compared with non-transgenic embryos. Next, mRNA transcription of three specific genes (DNMT1, Hsp 70.1, and Mash2) related to early embryo development in transgenic SCNT embryos was compared between transgenic and non-transgenic SCNTs, parthenogene...

  4. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer gives rise to genome mosaicism in euglenids

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    Weber Andreas PM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euglenophytes are a group of photosynthetic flagellates possessing a plastid derived from a green algal endosymbiont, which was incorporated into an ancestral host cell via secondary endosymbiosis. However, the impact of endosymbiosis on the euglenophyte nuclear genome is not fully understood due to its complex nature as a 'hybrid' of a non-photosynthetic host cell and a secondary endosymbiont. Results We analyzed an EST dataset of the model euglenophyte Euglena gracilis using a gene mining program designed to detect laterally transferred genes. We found E. gracilis genes showing affinity not only with green algae, from which the secondary plastid in euglenophytes evolved, but also red algae and/or secondary algae containing red algal-derived plastids. Phylogenetic analyses of these 'red lineage' genes suggest that E. gracilis acquired at least 14 genes via eukaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfer from algal sources other than the green algal endosymbiont that gave rise to its current plastid. We constructed an EST library of the aplastidic euglenid Peranema trichophorum, which is a eukaryovorous relative of euglenophytes, and also identified 'red lineage' genes in its genome. Conclusions Our data show genome mosaicism in E. gracilis and P. trichophorum. One possible explanation for the presence of these genes in these organisms is that some or all of them were independently acquired by lateral gene transfer and contributed to the successful integration and functioning of the green algal endosymbiont as a secondary plastid. Alternative hypotheses include the presence of a phagocytosed alga as the single source of those genes, or a cryptic tertiary endosymbiont harboring secondary plastid of red algal origin, which the eukaryovorous ancestor of euglenophytes had acquired prior to the secondary endosymbiosis of a green alga.

  5. Horizontal transfer of a nitrate assimilation gene cluster and ecological transitions in fungi: a phylogenetic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Slot

    Full Text Available High affinity nitrate assimilation genes in fungi occur in a cluster (fHANT-AC that can be coordinately regulated. The clustered genes include nrt2, which codes for a high affinity nitrate transporter; euknr, which codes for nitrate reductase; and NAD(PH-nir, which codes for nitrite reductase. Homologs of genes in the fHANT-AC occur in other eukaryotes and prokaryotes, but they have only been found clustered in the oomycete Phytophthora (heterokonts. We performed independent and concatenated phylogenetic analyses of homologs of all three genes in the fHANT-AC. Phylogenetic analyses limited to fungal sequences suggest that the fHANT-AC has been transferred horizontally from a basidiomycete (mushrooms and smuts to an ancestor of the ascomycetous mold Trichoderma reesei. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences from diverse eukaryotes and eubacteria, and cluster structure, are consistent with a hypothesis that the fHANT-AC was assembled in a lineage leading to the oomycetes and was subsequently transferred to the Dikarya (Ascomycota+Basidiomycota, which is a derived fungal clade that includes the vast majority of terrestrial fungi. We propose that the acquisition of high affinity nitrate assimilation contributed to the success of Dikarya on land by allowing exploitation of nitrate in aerobic soils, and the subsequent transfer of a complete assimilation cluster improved the fitness of T. reesei in a new niche. Horizontal transmission of this cluster of functionally integrated genes supports the "selfish operon" hypothesis for maintenance of gene clusters.

  6. Detection of horizontal transfer of individual genes by anomalous oligomer frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhai Jeff

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the history of life requires that we understand the transfer of genetic material across phylogenetic boundaries. Detecting genes that were acquired by means other than vertical descent is a basic step in that process. Detection by discordant phylogenies is computationally expensive and not always definitive. Many have used easily computed compositional features as an alternative procedure. However, different compositional methods produce different predictions, and the effectiveness of any method is not well established. Results The ability of octamer frequency comparisons to detect genes artificially seeded in cyanobacterial genomes was markedly increased by using as a training set those genes that are highly conserved over all bacteria. Using a subset of octamer frequencies in such tests also increased effectiveness, but this depended on the specific target genome and the source of the contaminating genes. The presence of high frequency octamers and the GC content of the contaminating genes were important considerations. A method comprising best practices from these tests was devised, the Core Gene Similarity (CGS method, and it performed better than simple octamer frequency analysis, codon bias, or GC contrasts in detecting seeded genes or naturally occurring transposons. From a comparison of predictions with phylogenetic trees, it appears that the effectiveness of the method is confined to horizontal transfer events that have occurred recently in evolutionary time. Conclusions The CGS method may be an improvement over existing surrogate methods to detect genes of foreign origin.

  7. Fluoroquinolone induction of phage-mediated gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity, which can cause DNA damage and result in bacterial cell death. In response to DNA damage, bacteria induce an SOS response to stimulate DNA repair. However, the SOS response may also induce prophage with production of infectious virions. Salmonella strains typically contain multiple prophages, and certain strains including phage types DT120 and DT104 contain prophage that upon induction are capable of generalised transduction. In this study, strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 were exposed to fluoroquinolones important for use in human and veterinary disease therapy to determine whether prophage(s) are induced that could facilitate phage-mediated gene transfer. Cultures of MDR S. Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 containing a kanamycin resistance plasmid were lysed after exposure to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin). Bacterial cell lysates were able to transfer the plasmid to a recipient kanamycin-susceptible Salmonella strain by generalised transduction. In addition, exposure of DT120 to ciprofloxacin induced the recA gene of the bacterial SOS response and genes encoded in a P22-like generalised transducing prophage. This research indicates that fluoroquinolone exposure of MDR Salmonella can facilitate horizontal gene transfer, suggesting that fluoroquinolone usage in human and veterinary medicine may have unintended consequences, including the induction of phage-mediated gene transfer from MDR Salmonella. Stimulation of gene transfer following bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones should be considered an adverse effect, and clinical decisions regarding antibiotic selection for infectious disease therapy should include this potential risk. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer and nucleotide compositional anomaly in large DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Hiroyuki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA viruses have a wide range of genome sizes (5 kb up to 1.2 Mb, compared to 0.16 Mb to 1.5 Mb for obligate parasitic bacteria that do not correlate with their virulence or the taxonomic distribution of their hosts. The reasons for such large variation are unclear. According to the traditional view of viruses as gifted "gene pickpockets", large viral genome sizes could originate from numerous gene acquisitions from their hosts. We investigated this hypothesis by studying 67 large DNA viruses with genome sizes larger than 150 kb, including the recently characterized giant mimivirus. Given that horizontally transferred DNA often have anomalous nucleotide compositions differing from the rest of the genome, we conducted a detailed analysis of the inter- and intra-genome compositional properties of these viruses. We then interpreted their compositional heterogeneity in terms of possible causes, including strand asymmetry, gene function/expression, and horizontal transfer. Results We first show that the global nucleotide composition and nucleotide word usage of viral genomes are species-specific and distinct from those of their hosts. Next, we identified compositionally anomalous (cA genes in viral genomes, using a method based on Bayesian inference. The proportion of cA genes is highly variable across viruses and does not exhibit a significant correlation with genome size. The vast majority of the cA genes were of unknown function, lacking homologs in the databases. For genes with known homologs, we found a substantial enrichment of cA genes in specific functional classes for some of the viruses. No significant association was found between cA genes and compositional strand asymmetry. A possible exogenous origin for a small fraction of the cA genes could be confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction. Conclusion At odds with the traditional dogma, our results argue against frequent genetic transfers to large DNA viruses from their

  9. Operon Formation is Driven by Co-Regulation and Not by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Katherine H.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2005-04-12

    Although operons are often subject to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), non-HGT genes are particularly likely to be in operons. To resolve this apparent discrepancy and to determine whether HGT is involved in operon formation, we examined the evolutionary history of the genes and operons in Escherichia coli K12. We show that genes that have homologs in distantly related bacteria but not in close relatives of E. coli (indicating HGTi) form new operons at about the same rates as native genes. Furthermore, genes in new operons are no more likely than other genes to have phylogenetic trees that are inconsistent with the species tree. In contrast, essential genes and ubiquitous genes without paralogs (genes believed to undergo HGT rarely) often form new operons. We conclude that HGT is not associated with operon formation, but instead promotes the prevalence of pre-existing operons. To explain operon formation, we propose that new operons reduce the amount of regulatory information required to specify optimal expression patterns. Consistent with this hypothesis, operons have greater amounts of conserved regulatory sequences than do individually transcribed genes.

  10. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Nehrke, Keith; Blaser, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between bacteria occurs in the intestinal tract of their animal hosts and facilitates both virulence and antibiotic resistance. A model in which both the pathogen and the host are genetically tractable facilitates developing insight into mechanistic processes enabling or restricting the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Here we develop an in vivo experimental system to study HGT in bacteria using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Using a thermosensitive conjugative system, we provide evidence that conjugation between two Escherichia coli strains can take place in the intestinal lumen of N2 wild-type worms at a rate of 10−3 and 10−2 per donor. We also show that C. elegans age and genotype are important determinants of the frequency of conjugation. Whereas ∼1 transconjugant for every 100 donor cells could be recovered from the intestine of N2 C. elegans, for the age-1 and tol-1 mutants, the detected rate of transconjugation (10−3 and 10−4 per donor cell, respectively) was significantly lower. This work demonstrates that increased recombination among lumenal microbial populations is a phenotype associated with host aging, and the model provides a framework to study the dynamics of bacterial horizontal gene transfer within the intestinal environment.—Portal-Celhay, C., Nehrke, K., Blaser, M. J. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria. PMID:23085995

  11. Role of Vibrio cholerae exochitinase ChiA2 in horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Moumita; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae exochitinase ChiA2 plays a key role in acquisition of nutrients by chitin hydrolysis in the natural environment as well as in pathogenesis in the intestinal milieu. In this study we demonstrate the importance of ChiA2 in horizontal gene transfer in the natural environment. We found that the expression of ChiA2 and TfoX, the central regulator of V. cholerae horizontal gene transfer, varied with changes in environmental conditions. The activity of ChiA2 was also dependent on these conditions. In 3 different environmental conditions tested here, we observed that the supporting environmental condition for maximum expression and activity of ChiA2 was 20 °C, pH 5.5, and 100 mmol/L salinity in the presence of chitin. The same condition also induced TfoX expression and was favorable for horizontal gene transfer in V. cholerae. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that ChiA2 released a significant amount of (GlcNAc)2 from chitin hydrolysis under the favorable condition. We hypothesized that under the favorable environmental condition, ChiA2 was upregulated and maximally active to produce a significant amount of (GlcNAc)2 from chitin. The same environmental condition also induced tfoX expression, followed by its translational activation by the (GlcNAc)2 produced, leading to efficient horizontal gene transfer.

  12. An efficient marker-free vector for clean gene transfer into plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A marker-free vector, pBINMF, for clean gene transfer was constructed based on the binary vector pBINPLUS. Vector pBINMF, carrying only a multiple cloning site (MCS) between the left and the right T-DNA border, was suitable to directly generate marker-free transgenic plants (MFTPs) without any vector sequences ...

  13. Generation of regulatory gut-homing human T lymphocytes using ex vivo interleukin 10 gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfrans, Catherine; Hooijberg, Erik; Rodriguez Pena, Maria Sol; de Jong, Esther C.; Spits, Hergen; te Velde, Anje A.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Background & Aims: Systemic treatment of Crohn's disease patients using recombinant interleukin (rIL)-10 has not resulted in significant therapeutic benefit presumably because of limited bioavailability and unexpected proinflammatory effects of high-dose rIL-10. Ex vivo gene transfer of the

  14. The evolution of land plants: a perspective from horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qia Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that horizontal gene transfer (HGT played a significant role in the evolution of eukaryotic lineages. We here review the mechanisms of HGT in plants and the importance of HGT in land plant evolution. In particular, we discuss the role of HGT in plant colonization of land, phototropic response, C4 photosynthesis, and mitochondrial genome evolution.

  15. The evolution of land plants: a perspective from horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Qia Wang; Hang Sun; Jinling Huang

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) played a significant role in the evolution of eukaryotic lineages. We here review the mechanisms of HGT in plants and the importance of HGT in land plant evolution. In particular, we discuss the role of HGT in plant colonization of land, phototropic response, C4 photosynthesis, and mitochondrial genome evolution.

  16. Bacteriophage-like Particles Associated with the Gene Transfer Agent of Methanococcus Voltale PS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.; Eiserling, F.; Pushkin, A.; Gingery, M.

    1999-01-01

    The methanogenic archaebacterium Methanococus voltae (strain PS) is known to produce a filterable, DNase resistant agent (called VTA, for voltae transfer agent), which carries very small fragments (4,400 base pairs) of bacterial DNA and is able to transduce bacterial genes between derivatives of the strain.

  17. CRISPR-cas-mediated phage resistance enhances horizontal gene transfer by transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, Bridget N.J.; Staals, Raymond H.J.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2018-01-01

    A powerful contributor to prokaryotic evolution is horizontal gene transfer (HGT) through transformation, conjugation, and transduction, which can be advantageous, neutral, or detrimental to fitness. Bacteria and archaea control HGT and phage infection through CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly

  18. Localized gene transfer into organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and acute hippocampal slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Shen, H

    1993-01-01

    Viral vectors derived from herpes simplex virus, type-1 (HSV), can transfer and express genes into fully differentiated, post-mitotic neurons. These vectors also transduce cells effectively in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Nanoliter quantities of a virus stock of HSVlac, an HSV vector...

  19. Lipopolycationic Telomers for Gene Transfer: Synthesis and Evaluation of Their in Vitro Transfection Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verderone, G.; van Craynest, N.; Boussif, O.; Santaella, C.; Bischoff, Rainer; Kolbe, H.V.; Vierling, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of a series of lipopolyamine telomers I-14,n, I-18,n, and II-18,n and on their in vitro gene-transfer capability. Their structure consists of a polyamine polar moiety, including n primary amine functions (from 1 to 70), connected to a hydrophobic moiety, including two

  20. Direct gene transfer in the Gottingen minipig CNS using stereotaxic lentiviral microinjections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GLUD, AN; Hedegaard, Claus; nielsen, MS

    2010-01-01

    We aim to induce direct viral mediated gene transfer in the substantia nigra (SN) of the Gottingen minipig using MRI guided stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Nine female Gottingen minipigs were injected unilaterally into the SN with 6...

  1. Horizontal gene transfer of a plastid gene in the non-photosynthetic flowering plants Orobanche and Phelipanche (Orobanchaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Mi; Manen, Jean-François; Schneeweiss, Gerald M

    2007-06-01

    Plastid sequences are among the most widely used in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies in flowering plants, where they are usually assumed to evolve like non-recombining, uniparentally transmitted, single-copy genes. Among others, this assumption can be violated by intracellular gene transfer (IGT) within cells or by the exchange of genes across mating barriers (horizontal gene transfer, HGT). We report on HGT of a plastid region including rps2, trnL-F, and rbcL in a group of non-photosynthetic flowering plants. Species of the parasitic broomrape genus Phelipanche harbor two copies of rps2, a plastid ribosomal gene, one corresponding to the phylogenetic position of the respective species, the other being horizontally acquired from the related broomrape genus Orobanche. While the vertically transmitted copies probably reside within the plastid genome, the localization of the horizontally acquired copies is not known. With both donor and recipient being parasitic plants, a possible pathway for the exchange of genetic material is via a commonly attacked host.

  2. Prophage-like gene transfer agents-novel mechanisms of gene exchange for Methanococcus, Desulfovibrio, Brachyspira, and Rhodobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Thad B

    2007-04-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) are novel mechanisms for bacterial gene transfer. They resemble small, tailed bacteriophages in ultrastructure and act like generalized transducing prophages. In contrast to functional prophages, GTAs package random fragments of bacterial genomes and incomplete copies of their own genomes. The packaged DNA content is characteristic of the GTA and ranges in size from 4.4 to 13.6kb. GTAs have been reported in species of Brachyspira, Methanococcus, Desulfovibrio, and Rhodobacter. The best studied GTAs are VSH-1 of the anaerobic, pathogenic spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and RcGTA of the nonsulfur, purple, photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. VSH-1 and RcGTA have likely contributed to the ecology and evolution of these bacteria. The existence of GTAs in phylogenetically diverse bacteria suggests GTAs may be more common in nature than is now appreciated.

  3. Horizontal gene transfer in the innovation and adaptation of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Huang, Jinling

    2013-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been well documented in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, but its role in plants and animals remains elusive. In a recent study, we showed that at least 57 families of nuclear genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses and that HGT played a critical role in plant colonization of land. In this paper, we categorize all acquired genes based on their putative functions and biological processes, and further address the importance of HGT in plant innovation and evolution.

  4. Developmental and Functional Expression of miRNA-Stability Related Genes in the Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, ?rica; Walter, Lais Takata; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Casado, Ot?vio Augusto Nocera; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    In the nervous system, control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) has been investigated in fundamental processes, such as development and adaptation to ambient demands. The action of these short nucleotide sequences on specific genes depends on intracellular concentration, which in turn reflects the balance of biosynthesis and degradation. Whereas mechanisms underlying miRNA biogenesis has been investigated in recent studies, little is known about miRNA-stability related proteins. We fi...

  5. Phylogenetic evidence for lateral gene transfer in the intestine of marine iguanas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Nelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lateral gene transfer (LGT appears to promote genotypic and phenotypic variation in microbial communities in a range of environments, including the mammalian intestine. However, the extent and mechanisms of LGT in intestinal microbial communities of non-mammalian hosts remains poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two fosmid inserts obtained from a genomic DNA library derived from an agar-degrading enrichment culture of marine iguana fecal material. The inserts harbored 16S rRNA genes that place the organism from which they originated within Clostridium cluster IV, a well documented group that habitats the mammalian intestinal tract. However, sequence analysis indicates that 52% of the protein-coding genes on the fosmids have top BLASTX hits to bacterial species that are not members of Clostridium cluster IV, and phylogenetic analysis suggests that at least 10 of 44 coding genes on the fosmids may have been transferred from Clostridium cluster XIVa to cluster IV. The fosmids encoded four transposase-encoding genes and an integrase-encoding gene, suggesting their involvement in LGT. In addition, several coding genes likely involved in sugar transport were probably acquired through LGT. CONCLUSION: Our phylogenetic evidence suggests that LGT may be common among phylogenetically distinct members of the phylum Firmicutes inhabiting the intestinal tract of marine iguanas.

  6. Phylogenetic evidence for lateral gene transfer in the intestine of marine iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David M; Cann, Isaac K O; Altermann, Eric; Mackie, Roderick I

    2010-05-24

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) appears to promote genotypic and phenotypic variation in microbial communities in a range of environments, including the mammalian intestine. However, the extent and mechanisms of LGT in intestinal microbial communities of non-mammalian hosts remains poorly understood. We sequenced two fosmid inserts obtained from a genomic DNA library derived from an agar-degrading enrichment culture of marine iguana fecal material. The inserts harbored 16S rRNA genes that place the organism from which they originated within Clostridium cluster IV, a well documented group that habitats the mammalian intestinal tract. However, sequence analysis indicates that 52% of the protein-coding genes on the fosmids have top BLASTX hits to bacterial species that are not members of Clostridium cluster IV, and phylogenetic analysis suggests that at least 10 of 44 coding genes on the fosmids may have been transferred from Clostridium cluster XIVa to cluster IV. The fosmids encoded four transposase-encoding genes and an integrase-encoding gene, suggesting their involvement in LGT. In addition, several coding genes likely involved in sugar transport were probably acquired through LGT. Our phylogenetic evidence suggests that LGT may be common among phylogenetically distinct members of the phylum Firmicutes inhabiting the intestinal tract of marine iguanas.

  7. Phylogenetic Evidence for Lateral Gene Transfer in the Intestine of Marine Iguanas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David M.; Cann, Isaac K. O.; Altermann, Eric; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lateral gene transfer (LGT) appears to promote genotypic and phenotypic variation in microbial communities in a range of environments, including the mammalian intestine. However, the extent and mechanisms of LGT in intestinal microbial communities of non-mammalian hosts remains poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced two fosmid inserts obtained from a genomic DNA library derived from an agar-degrading enrichment culture of marine iguana fecal material. The inserts harbored 16S rRNA genes that place the organism from which they originated within Clostridium cluster IV, a well documented group that habitats the mammalian intestinal tract. However, sequence analysis indicates that 52% of the protein-coding genes on the fosmids have top BLASTX hits to bacterial species that are not members of Clostridium cluster IV, and phylogenetic analysis suggests that at least 10 of 44 coding genes on the fosmids may have been transferred from Clostridium cluster XIVa to cluster IV. The fosmids encoded four transposase-encoding genes and an integrase-encoding gene, suggesting their involvement in LGT. In addition, several coding genes likely involved in sugar transport were probably acquired through LGT. Conclusion Our phylogenetic evidence suggests that LGT may be common among phylogenetically distinct members of the phylum Firmicutes inhabiting the intestinal tract of marine iguanas. PMID:20520734

  8. A stringently controlled expression system for analysing lateral gene transfer between bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenecke, S; de Lorenzo, V; Timmis, K N; Díaz, E

    1996-07-01

    The lateral transfer of genetic information among microorganisms is a major force driving the outstanding adaptability of microbial communities to environmental changes. Until now little information has been obtained on gene transfer in natural ecosystems. We present here a genetic circuit for detecting and quantifying horizontal gene transfer from a defined donor microorganism to recipient organisms in the absence of selection for a recipient-specific phenotype. The system consists of an engineered lacZ (encoding beta-galactosidase) reporter gene whose expression is controlled by a synthetic regulatory element based on a fusion between the Pr promoter-operator from lambda bacteriophage and the 5' non-coding leader region of the inp gene encoding the IS 10 transposase function. Expression of this reporter cassette in the recombinant microorganism is completely shut down by two chromosomally encoded trans-acting repressors working at the level of transcription (the Cl-EK117 protein from the lambda phage), and at the level of translation (the antisense RNA-OUT of the IS 10 element). When the reporter element is transferred to a different host by any mechanism, it escapes repression and becomes expressed. The system was validated with Pseudo-monas putida, and conjugational transfer frequencies of the reporter element as low as 10(-6) were detected. The modular design and broad host range of the genetic circuit, in combination with biomarkers which permit real-time in situ detection, will facilitate the monitor-ing of gene flow in a non-disruptive manner within the environment.

  9. Modulation of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression for gene transfer to normal and dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larochelle, Nancy; Teng, Qingshan; Gilbert, Rénald; Deol, Jatinderpal R; Karpati, George; Holland, Paul C; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2010-03-01

    Efficient adenovirus (AdV)-mediated gene transfer is possible only in immature muscle or regenerating muscle, suggesting that a developmentally regulated event plays a major role in limiting AdV uptake in mature skeletal muscle. Previously, we showed that the expression of the primary coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is severely down-regulated during muscle maturation and that, in muscle-specific CAR transgenic mice, there is significant enhancement of AdV-mediated gene transfer to mature skeletal muscle. To evaluate whether increasing CAR expression can also augment gene transfer to dystrophic muscle that has many regenerating fibers, we crossed CAR transgenics with dystrophin-deficient mice (mdx/CAR). We also tested a two-step protocol in which CAR levels were increased in the target muscle, prior to administration of AdV, through the use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV2) expressing CAR. Lastly, we assessed the effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors on CAR and AdV transduction efficiency in myoblasts and mdx muscle. Although somewhat higher rates of transduction can be achieved in adult mdx mice than in normal mice as a result of ongoing muscle regeneration in these animals, CAR expression in the mdx background (mdx/CAR transgenics) still markedly improved the susceptibility of mature muscle to AdV-mediated gene transfer of dystrophin. Prior administration of AAV2-CAR to normal muscle led to significantly increased transduction by subsequent injection of AdV. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproate increased CAR transcript and protein levels in myoblasts and mdx muscle, and also increased AdV-mediated gene transfer. We have developed a method of increasing CAR levels in both normal and regenerating muscle.

  10. Evidence for the intense exchange of MazG in marine cyanophages by horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Bryan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S-PM2 is a phage capable of infecting strains of unicellular cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Synechococcus. S-PM2, like other myoviruses infecting marine cyanobacteria, encodes a number of bacterial-like genes. Amongst these genes is one encoding a MazG homologue that is hypothesized to be involved in the adaption of the infected host for production of progeny phage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study focuses on establishing the occurrence of mazG homologues in other cyanophages isolated from different oceanic locations. Degenerate PCR primers were designed using the mazG gene of S-PM2. The mazG gene was found to be widely distributed and highly conserved among Synechococcus myoviruses and podoviruses from diverse oceanic provinces. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence of a globally connected cyanophage gene pool, the cyanophage mazG gene having a small effective population size indicative of rapid lateral gene transfer despite being present in a substantial fraction of cyanophage. The Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus phage mazG genes do not cluster with the host mazG gene, suggesting that their primary hosts are not the source of the mazG gene.

  11. Transfer of Chinese hamster DNA repair gene(s) into repair-deficient human cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of repair genes by DNA transfection into repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells has thus far been unsuccessful, presenting an obstacle to cloning XP genes. The authors chose an indirect route to transfer repair genes in chromosome fragments. DNA repair-competent (UV resistant) hybrid cell lines were established by PEG-mediated fusions of DNA repair-deficient (UV sensitive) human fibroblasts (XP12RO) with wild type Chinese hamster (CHO) cells (AA8). CHO cells were exposed to 5 Krad X-rays prior to fusions, predisposing hybrid cells to lose CHO chromosome fragments preferentially. Repair-competent hybrids were selected by periodic exposures to UV light. Secondary and tertiary hybrid cell lines were developed by fusion of X-irradiated hybrids to XP12RO. The hybrid cell lines exhibit resistance to UV that is comparable to that of CHO cells and they are proficient at repair replication after UV exposure. Whole cell DNA-DNA hybridizations indicate that the hybrids have greater homology to CHO DNA than is evident between XP12RO and CHO. These observations indicate that CHO DNA sequences which can function in repair of UV-damaged DNA in human cells have been transferred into the genome of the repair-deficient XP12RO cells

  12. Transcriptional expression of type I interferon response genes and stability of housekeeping genes in the human endometrium and endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna L; Knudsen, Ulla B; Munk, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful chronic female disease defined by the presence of endometrial tissue implants in ectopic locations. The pathogenesis is much debated, and type I interferons could be involved. The expression of genes of the type I interferon response were profiled by a specific PCR Array...... of RNA obtained from ectopic and eutopic endometrium collected from 9 endometriosis patients and 9 healthy control women. Transcriptional expression levels of selected interferon-regulated and housekeeping genes were investigated by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Stably...... expressed housekeeping genes for valid normalization of transcriptional studies of endometrium and endometriosis have not yet been published. Here, seven housekeeping genes were evaluated for stability using the GeNorm and NormFinder software. A normalization factor based on HMBS, TBP, and YWHAZ expression...

  13. Parallel Evolution and Horizontal Gene Transfer of the pst Operon in Firmicutes from Oligotrophic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Moreno-Letelier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The high affinity phosphate transport system (pst is crucial for phosphate uptake in oligotrophic environments. Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB has extremely low P levels and its endemic Bacillus are closely related to oligotrophic marine Firmicutes. Thus, we expected the pst operon of CCB to share the same evolutionary history and protein similarity to marine Firmicutes. Orthologs of the pst operon were searched in 55 genomes of Firmicutes and 13 outgroups. Phylogenetic reconstructions were performed for the pst operon and 14 concatenated housekeeping genes using maximum likelihood methods. Conserved domains and 3D structures of the phosphate-binding protein (PstS were also analyzed. The pst operon of Firmicutes shows two highly divergent clades with no correlation to the type of habitat nor a phylogenetic congruence, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Despite sequence divergence, the PstS protein had a similar 3D structure, which could be due to parallel evolution after horizontal gene transfer events.

  14. Stability maps, unstable periodic orbits and transfers in the Jovian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villac, Benjamin; Lara, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Low cost transfers of a spacecraft in a multi-gravitational orbital environment, which are based on connections between unstable periodic orbits, present several trade-offs, such time-of-flight v.s transfer fuel cost.

  15. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Liu

    Full Text Available Retrovirus (RV is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  16. Gene transfer agent (GTA) genes reveal diverse and dynamic Roseobacter and Rhodobacter populations in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Wang, Kui; Budinoff, Charles; Buchan, Alison; Lang, Andrew; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2009-03-01

    Within the bacterial class Alphaproteobacteria, the order Rhodobacterales contains the Roseobacter and Rhodobacter clades. Roseobacters are abundant and play important biogeochemical roles in marine environments. Roseobacter and Rhodobacter genomes contain a conserved gene transfer agent (GTA) gene cluster, and GTA-mediated gene transfer has been observed in these groups of bacteria. In this study, we investigated the genetic diversity of these two groups in Chesapeake Bay surface waters using a specific PCR primer set targeting the conserved Rhodobacterales GTA major capsid protein gene (g5). The g5 gene was successfully amplified from 26 Rhodobacterales isolates and the bay microbial communities using this primer set. Four g5 clone libraries were constructed from microbial assemblages representing different regions and seasons of the bay and yielded diverse sequences. In total, 12 distinct g5 clusters could be identified among 158 Chesapeake Bay clones, 11 fall within the Roseobacter clade, and one falls in the Rhodobacter clade. The vast majority of the clusters (10 out of 12) lack cultivated representatives. The composition of g5 sequences varied dramatically along the bay during the wintertime, and a distinct Roseobacter population composition between winter and summer was observed. The congruence between g5 and 16S rRNA gene phylogenies indicates that g5 may serve as a useful genetic marker to investigate diversity and abundance of Roseobacter and Rhodobacter in natural environments. The presence of the g5 gene in the natural populations of Roseobacter and Rhodobacter implies that genetic exchange through GTA transduction could be an important mechanism for maintaining the metabolic flexibility of these groups of bacteria.

  17. Comparison of reprogramming genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and nuclear transfer cloned embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Zhendong; Shen, Jingling; Shan, Zhiyan; Shen, Xinghui; Wu, Yanshuang; Sun, Ruizhen; Li, Tong; Yuan, Rui; Zhao, Qiaoshi; Bai, Guangyu; Gu, Yanli; Jin, Lianhong; Lei, Lei

    2014-08-01

    The most effective reprogramming methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are widely used in biological research and regenerative medicine, yet the mechanism that reprograms somatic cells to totipotency remains unclear and thus reprogramming efficiency is still low. Microarray technology has been employed in analyzing the transcriptomes changes during iPS reprogramming. Unfortunately, it is difficult to obtain enough DNA from SCNT reconstructed embryos to take advantage of this technology. In this study, we aimed to identify critical genes from the transcriptional profile for iPS reprogramming and compared expression levels of these genes in SCNT reprogramming. By integrating gene expression information from microarray databases and published studies comparing somatic cells with either miPSCs or mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we obtained two lists of co-upregulated genes. The gene ontology (GO) enriched analysis of these two lists demonstrated that the reprogramming process is associated with numerous biological processes. Specifically, we selected 32 genes related to heterochromatin, embryonic development, and cell cycle from our co-upregulated gene datasets and examined the gene expression level in iPSCs and SCNT embryos by qPCR. The results revealed that some reprogramming related genes in iPSCs were also expressed in SCNT reprogramming. We established the network of gene interactions that occur with genes differentially expressed in iPS and SCNT reprogramming and then performed GO analysis on the genes in the network. The network genes function in chromatin organization, heterochromatin, transcriptional regulation, and cell cycle. Further researches to improve reprogramming efficiency, especially in SCNT, will focus on functional studies of these selected genes.

  18. Low cytotoxicity effect of dendrosome as an efficient carrier for rotavirus VP2 gene transferring into a human lung cell line : dendrosome, as a novel intranasally gene porter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Ahmadian, Shahin; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi; Massumi, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of dendrosome (a gene porter) was assessed in transferring recombinant human rotavirus VP2 cDNA into A549, a human lung cell line. After gene transferring, transmission electron microscopy showed core-like particles (CLPs) formation in the transfected cells both with dendrosome and lipofectamine porters. In addition, western blotting analysis showed that the expression of VP2 gene was almost equal in the dendrosome and lipofectamine-transfected cells. Also, the cytotoxicity studies revealed that dendrosome had a lower cytotoxicity than lipofectamine. Therefore, our study may introduce dendrosome as a possible carrier for gene transferring into the human lung cell line, especially, for intranasally administration of DNA vaccines.

  19. Homologous recombination mediates functional recovery of dysferlin deficiency following AAV5 gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Grose

    Full Text Available The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9. Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes.

  20. Efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into Chinese hamster cell mutants: interspecific transfer of the human genes encoding leucyl- and asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirullo, R.E.; Dana, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell recipients has been developed that does not rely on using calcium phosphate-precipitated high-molecular-weight DNA. Interspecific cell hybrids between human leukocytes and temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutants with either a thermolabile leucyl-tRNA synthetase or a thermolabile asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase were used as the starting material in these experiments. These hybrids contain only one or a few human chromosomes and require expression of the appropriate human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene to grow at 39 degrees C. Hybrids were exposed to very high doses of gamma-irradiation to extensively fragment the chromosomes and re-fused immediately to the original temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster mutant, and secondary hybrids were isolated at 39 degrees C. Secondary hybrids, which had retained small fragments of the human genome containing the selected gene, were subjected to another round of irradiation, refusion, and selection at 39 degrees C to reduce the amount of human DNA even further. Using this procedure, Chinese hamster cell lines have been constructed that express the human genes encoding either asparaginyl- or leucyl-tRNA synthetase, yet less than 0.1% of their DNA is derived from the human genome, as quantitated by a sensitive dot-blot nucleic acid hybridization procedure

  1. Lateral Transfer of the Denitrification Pathway Genes among Thermus thermophilus Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Laura; Bricio, Carlos; José Gómez, Manuel; Berenguer, José

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate respiration is a common and strain-specific property in Thermus thermophilus encoded by the nitrate respiration conjugative element (NCE) that can be laterally transferred by conjugation. In contrast, nitrite respiration and further denitrification steps are restricted to a few isolates of this species. These later steps of the denitrification pathway are under the regulatory control of an NCE-encoded transcription factor, but nothing is known about their coding sequences or its putative genetic linkage to the NCE. In this study we examine the genetic linkage between nitrate and nitrite respiration through lateral gene transfer (LGT) assays and describe a cluster of genes encoding the nitrite-nitric oxide respiration in T. thermophilus PRQ25. We show that the whole denitrification pathway can be transferred from the denitrificant strain PRQ25 to an aerobic strain, HB27, and that the genes coding for nitrite and nitric oxide respiration are encoded near the NCE. Sequence data from the draft genome of PRQ25 confirmed these results and allowed us to describe the most compact nor-nir cluster known thus far and to demonstrate the expression and activities of the encoded enzymes in the HB27 denitrificant derivatives obtained by LGT. We conclude that this NCE nor-nir supercluster constitutes a whole denitrification island that can be spread by lateral transfer among Thermus thermophilus strains. PMID:21169443

  2. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  3. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting.As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells.These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  4. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  5. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT + colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references

  6. Phylogenetic inference in Rafflesiales: the influence of rate heterogeneity and horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal-Russell Romina

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylogenetic relationships among the holoparasites of Rafflesiales have remained enigmatic for over a century. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies using the mitochondrial matR gene placed Rafflesia, Rhizanthes and Sapria (Rafflesiaceae s. str. in the angiosperm order Malpighiales and Mitrastema (Mitrastemonaceae in Ericales. These phylogenetic studies did not, however, sample two additional groups traditionally classified within Rafflesiales (Apodantheaceae and Cytinaceae. Here we provide molecular phylogenetic evidence using DNA sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear genes for representatives of all genera in Rafflesiales. Results Our analyses indicate that the phylogenetic affinities of the large-flowered clade and Mitrastema, ascertained using mitochondrial matR, are congruent with results from nuclear SSU rDNA when these data are analyzed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. The relationship of Cytinaceae to Malvales was recovered in all analyses. Relationships between Apodanthaceae and photosynthetic angiosperms varied depending upon the data partition: Malvales (3-gene, Cucurbitales (matR or Fabales (atp1. The latter incongruencies suggest that horizontal gene transfer (HGT may be affecting the mitochondrial gene topologies. The lack of association between Mitrastema and Ericales using atp1 is suggestive of HGT, but greater sampling within eudicots is needed to test this hypothesis further. Conclusions Rafflesiales are not monophyletic but composed of three or four independent lineages (families: Rafflesiaceae, Mitrastemonaceae, Apodanthaceae and Cytinaceae. Long-branch attraction appears to be misleading parsimony analyses of nuclear small-subunit rDNA data, but model-based methods (maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses recover a topology that is congruent with the mitochondrial matR gene tree, thus providing compelling evidence for organismal relationships. Horizontal gene transfer appears to

  7. Plant–Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Satoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can reduce ethylene levels in plants through 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, which cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia, resulting in reduced ethylene production. The whole genome sequence data showed that A. tumefaciens does not possess an ACC deaminase gene in its genome. Therefore, providing ACC deaminase activity to the bacteria would improve gene transfer. As expected, A. tumefaciens with ACC deaminase activity, designated as super-Agrobacterium, could suppress ethylene evolution and increase the gene transfer efficiency in several plant species. In this review, we summarize plant–Agrobacterium interactions and their applications for improving Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering techniques via super-Agrobacterium. PMID:25520733

  8. Characterization and transfer studies of macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L; Hammerum, Anette M; Lambertsen, Lotte M

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, erythromycin resistance has been increasing in frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae in Denmark. In the present study, 49 non-related erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from invasive sites and 20 isolates from non-invasive sites were collected; antimicrobial...... influence on the protein. Transformation was detectable in 5 out of 13 isolates and transfer of erm(B), mef(I) and mef(E) was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first time mef(I) has been proved transformable. Gene transfer by conjugation was not detectable. Erythromycin resistance in pneumococcal...

  9. Transferencia de gene(s de androesterilidad a una línea avanzada de arroz de riego A male sterlity gene transfered to an advanced rice line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkarung Surapong

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available La investigación tuvo como objetivo incorporar un gen mutante de androesterilidad en un material de arroz de riego con el fin de obtener isolíneas para un proyecto de selección recurrente y mejoramiento poblacional. Se dispuso de tres recursos genéticos: TOX 1011-4-1 (Mutante fuente de androesterilidad, COL 1/M312A polinizador ocasional y CT6047-13-5-3-4-M (padre recurrente. Se evaluaron dos ciclos de retrocruzamiento con sus generaciones F1 y F2 respectivamente. La selección de plantas y familias se fundamentó en la integración de criterios asociados con la expresión fenotípica de la androesterilidad en las panículas, espiguillas y granos de polen teñidos con IKI (Yodo Yoduro de Potasio, Acetocarmin y Fluorceina. También se evaluaron la altura de la planta, días a floración, longitud de panículas, porcentaje de grano lleno y porcentaje de espiguillas vanas. Se obtuvieron cinco familias y 16 líneas seleccionadas en la F2 del BC2 que exhibieron estabilidad fenotípica para el gene mutante. Hubo ganancia genética para caracteres del parental recurrente en los ciclos de retrocruzamiento. Se presentaron diferencias significativas entre líneas androestériles y el parental recurrente para las seis características evaluadas.A male sterile mutant gene was transfered to a rice line in order to get male sterile isolines usable in population improvement recurrent selection programs. Three germoplasms were used: TOX 1011-4-1 (m.s. Col l/M312A (ocasional pollinator and CT 6047-I3-5-34M (recurrent parent. Two backcrosses F1 and F2 generations were evaluated. Individual and family selection were based on phenotypic expression of m.s. on panicles, spikelets and pollen grains after tinctions iodin, acetocarmin and fluorcein. Plant height days to flowering, panicle length, % filled seeds and empty florets were evaluated. Five families and 16 lines were selected exhibiting m.s. stability positive genetic gain was for characters for the

  10. Evidence of recent interkingdom horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and Candida parapsilosis

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    Butler Geraldine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date very few incidences of interdomain gene transfer into fungi have been identified. Here, we used the emerging genome sequences of Candida albicans WO-1, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Pichia guilliermondii, and Lodderomyces elongisporus to identify recent interdomain HGT events. We refer to these as CTG species because they translate the CTG codon as serine rather than leucine, and share a recent common ancestor. Results Phylogenetic and syntenic information infer that two C. parapsilosis genes originate from bacterial sources. One encodes a putative proline racemase (PR. Phylogenetic analysis also infers that there were independent transfers of bacterial PR enzymes into members of the Pezizomycotina, and protists. The second HGT gene in C. parapsilosis belongs to the phenazine F (PhzF superfamily. Most CTG species also contain a fungal PhzF homolog. Our phylogeny suggests that the CTG homolog originated from an ancient HGT event, from a member of the proteobacteria. An analysis of synteny suggests that C. parapsilosis has lost the endogenous fungal form of PhzF, and subsequently reacquired it from a proteobacterial source. There is evidence that Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Basidiomycotina also obtained a PhzF homolog through HGT. Conclusion Our search revealed two instances of well-supported HGT from bacteria into the CTG clade, both specific to C. parapsilosis. Therefore, while recent interkingdom gene transfer has taken place in the CTG lineage, its occurrence is rare. However, our analysis will not detect ancient gene transfers, and we may have underestimated the global extent of HGT into CTG species.

  11. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  12. Molecular hydrogel-stabilized enzyme with facilitated electron transfer for determination of H2O2 released from live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Liao, Chuanan; Zhang, Limin; Wang, Qigang; Tian, Yang

    2014-05-06

    In this work, small molecular hydrogel was first employed as a surrounding matrix to stabilize an enzyme model, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), and more importantly to facilitate electron transfer between redox enzyme and electrode. Direct electron transfer of Cyt c was successfully achieved in the molecular hydrogel with redox formal potential (E(0')) of 100.7 ± 3.2 mV versus Ag|AgCl and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ks) up to 18.6 ± 2.3 s(-1). Experimental data demonstrated that Cyt c was stably immobilized into the molecular hydrogel and retained its inherent bioactive activity toward H2O2. The direct redox reaction of Cyt c, followed by the biochemical reaction between Cyt c and H2O2, established a reliable approach to determine H2O2 at an optimized potential with high selectivity over other reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxygen, metal ions, ascobic acid (AA), and so on. In addition, the present biosensor for H2O2 also exhibited wide linear range and low detection limit, which fulfills the requirements for detection of H2O2 in a biological system. The remarkable analytical performance of the present biosensor, as well as the long-term stability and good reproducibility ascribed to the molecular hydrogel-stabilized enzyme, provided a durable platform for real-time determination of H2O2 from live cells.

  13. Effects of packaging and heat transfer kinetics on drug-product stability during storage under uncontrolled temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toru; Yamaji, Takayuki; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-05-01

    To predict the stability of pharmaceutical preparations under uncontrolled temperature conditions accurately, a method to compute the average reaction rate constant taking into account the heat transfer from the atmosphere to the product was developed. The average reaction rate constants computed with taken into consideration heat transfer (κ(re) ) were then compared with those computed without taking heat transfer into consideration (κ(in) ). The apparent thermal diffusivity (κ(a) ) exerted some influence on the average reaction rate constant ratio (R, R = κ(re) /κ(in) ). In the regions where the κ(a) was large (above 1 h(-1) ) or very small, the value of R was close to 1. On the contrary, in the middle region (0.001-1 h(-1) ), the value of R was less than 1.The κ(a) of the central part of a large-size container and that of the central part of a paper case of 10 bottles of liquid medicine (100 mL) fell within this middle region. On the basis of the above-mentioned considerations, heat transfer may need to be taken into consideration to enable a more accurate prediction of the stability of actual pharmaceutical preparations under nonisothermal atmospheres. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Talima; Giffard, Philip; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Auerbach, Raymond; Hornstra, Heidie; Tuanyok, Apichai; Price, Erin P; Glass, Mindy B; Leadem, Benjamin; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James S; Allan, Gerard J; Foster, Jeffrey T; Wagner, David M; Okinaka, Richard T; Sim, Siew Hoon; Pearson, Ofori; Wu, Zaining; Chang, Jean; Kaul, Rajinder; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Brettin, Thomas S; Robison, Richard A; Mayo, Mark; Gee, Jay E; Tan, Patrick; Currie, Bart J; Keim, Paul

    2009-11-18

    Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia. We describe an Australian origin for B

  15. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, T.; Giffard, P.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S.; Auerbach, R.; Hornstra, H.; Tuanyok, A.; Price, E.P.; Glass, M.B.; Leadem, B.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, J. S.; Allan, G.J.; Foster, J.T.; Wagner, D.M.; Okinaka, R.T.; Sim, S.H.; Pearson, O.; Wu, Z.; Chang, J.; Kaul, R.; Hoffmaster, A.R.; Brettin, T.S.; Robison, R.A.; Mayo, M.; Gee, J.E.; Tan, P.; Currie, B.J.; Keim, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results: Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia. Conclusion: We describe an

  16. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaul Rajinder

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia

  17. A Preliminary List of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Prokaryotes Determined by Tree Reconstruction and Reconciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeonsoo Jeong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide global detection of genes involved in horizontal gene transfer (HGT remains an active area of research in medical microbiology and evolutionary genomics. Utilizing the explicit evolutionary method of comparing topologies of a total of 154,805 orthologous gene trees against corresponding 16S rRNA “reference” trees, we previously detected a total of 660,894 candidate HGT events in 2,472 completely-sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Here, we report an HGT-index for each individual gene-reference tree pair reconciliation, representing the total number of detected HGT events on the gene tree divided by the total number of genomes (taxa member of that tree. HGT-index is thus a simple measure indicating the sensitivity of prokaryotic genes to participate (or not participate in HGT. Our preliminary list provides HGT-indices for a total of 69,365 genes (detected in >10 and <50% available prokaryotic genomes that are involved in a wide range of biological processes such as metabolism, information, and bacterial response to environment. Identification of horizontally-derived genes is important to combat antibiotic resistance and is a step forward toward reconstructions of improved phylogenies describing the history of life. Our effort is thus expected to benefit ongoing research in the fields of clinical microbiology and evolutionary biology.

  18. Improvement of Hydrodynamics-Based Gene Transfer of Nonviral DNA Targeted to Murine Hepatocytes

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    Shingo Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an important organ for supporting the life of an individual. Gene transfer toward this organ has been attempted in many laboratories to date; however, there have been few reports on improved liver-targeted gene delivery by using a nonviral vector. In this study, we examined the effect of various types of gene delivery carriers on enhancing the uptake and gene expression of exogenous DNA in murine hepatocytes when a hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HGD is performed via tail-vein injection. Mice were singly injected with a large amount of phosphate-buffered saline containing reporter plasmid DNA and/or with a gene delivery carrier. One day after the gene delivery, the animals' livers were dissected and subjected to biochemical, histochemical, and molecular biological analyses. The strongest signal from the reporter plasmid DNA was observed when the DNA was mixed with a polyethylenimine- (PEI- based reagent. Coinjection with pCRTEIL (a loxP-floxed reporter construct and pTR/NCre (a liver-specific Cre expression vector resulted in the liver-specific recombination of pCRTEIL. The combination of PEI with HGD would thus be a valuable tool for liver-specific manipulation to examine the function of a gene of interest in the liver and for creating liver disease models.

  19. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huping Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study, ovine mastitis (ED133, pig (ST398, chicken (ED98, and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9 were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may

  20. Cross-kingdom gene transfer facilitates the evolution of virulence in fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Donald M; Kazan, Kemal; Manners, John M

    2013-09-01

    The constant interaction between plants and their pathogens has resulted in the evolution of a diverse array of microbial infection strategies. It is increasingly evident that horizontal acquisition of new virulence functions in fungi is one of the evolutionary processes that maintain pathogens' competitive edge over host plants. Genome analyses of fungi are pointing towards this phenomenon being particularly prevalent in the subphylum Pezizomycota. While the extent of cross-kingdom gene transfer can be determined with existing genomic tools and databases, so far very few horizontally transmitted genes have been functionally characterised, and an understanding of their physiological roles in virulence has been determined for even fewer genes. Understanding the evolutionary selection pressures that drive the retention of acquired genes in particular fungal lineages is important, as it will undoubtedly reveal new insights into both fungal virulence mechanisms and corresponding plant defence processes in the future. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relations between transfer matrices and numerical stability analysis to avoid the $\\Omega d$ problem

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Álvarez, R.; Pernas-Salomón, R.; Velasco, V. R.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer matrix method is usually employed to study problems described by $N$ equations of matrix Sturm-Liouville (MSL) kind. In some cases a numerical degradation (the so called $\\Omega d$ problem) appears thus impairing the performance of the method. We present here a procedure that can overcome this problem in the case of multilayer systems having piecewise constant coefficients. This is performed by studying the relations between the associated transfer matrix and other transfer matri...

  2. Horizontal Gene Transfer and Population of Phyllosphere Bacteria on Transgenic and Nontransgenic Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHANI CINTA BADIA GINTING

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of horizontal gene transfer of plant genomic DNA and bacteria in the soil, particularly as this relates to the possible transfer of genes encoding antibiotic resistance, has been seen as hazard associated with genetically engineered plants. It is hypothesized that introduction of bacterial genes into the plant genome leads to a higher probability of gene transfer from plants to bacteria due to the presence of homologous sequences. Bollgard (BG cotton was constructed through the introduction of cry1A(c gene, encodes for insecticidal activity againts Lepidopteran pests, together with genes for spectinomycin/streptomycin resistant (aad and kanamycin resistant (nptII, into the genome of a conventional cotton variety, Delta Pine (DP. The aim of this study were to evaluate the ability of naturally competent Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain ADP1 to take up and integrate transgenic plant DNA based on homologous recombination under optimized laboratory condition, and to compare phyllosphere microbial population resistant to antibiotic on leaves of transgenic and nontransgenic plant. The results showed that transformation of ADP1 cells with Bollgard DNA was not detected on nitrocellulose membrane nor in sterile soil. Total phyllosphere bacterial population on leaves collected from one month after planting were 1.3 x 108 and 1.6 x 108 cfu/g leave fresh weight for BG and DP, respectively. Samples collected after three month contained 5.9 x 107 and 7.1 x 107 cfu/g leave fresh weight for BG and DP, respectively. This study also showed that there was no significant difference of phyllosphere bacterial population resistant to streptomycin and kanamycin on leaves of BG or DP samples collected from one or three month after planting.

  3. Correction of Fanconi Anemia Group C Hematopoietic Stem Cells Following Intrafemoral Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouassila Habi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of morbidity and mortality in Fanconi anemia patients is the development of bone marrow (BM failure; thus correction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs through gene transfer approaches would benefit FA patients. However, gene therapy trials for FA patients using ex vivo transduction protocols have failed to provide long-term correction. In addition, ex vivo cultures have been found to be hazardous for FA cells. To circumvent negative effects of ex vivo culture in FA stem cells, we tested the corrective ability of direct injection of recombinant lentiviral particles encoding FancC-EGFP into femurs of FancC−/− mice. Using this approach, we show that FancC−/− HSCs were efficiently corrected. Intrafemoral gene transfer of the FancC gene prevented the mitomycin C-induced BM failure. Moreover, we show that intrafemoral gene delivery into aplastic marrow restored the bone marrow cellularity and corrected the remaining HSCs. These results provide evidence that targeting FA-deficient HSCs directly in their environment enables efficient and long-term correction of BM defects in FA.

  4. Gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells as treatment for primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candotti, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Gene transfer into the hematopoietic stem cell has shown curative potential for a variety of hematological disorders. Primary immunodeficiency diseases have led to the way in this field of gene therapy as an example and a model. Clinical results from the past 15 years have shown that significant improvement and even cure can be achieved for diseases such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Unfortunately, with the initial clear clinical benefits, the first serious complications of gene therapy have also occurred. In a significant number of patients treated using vectors based on murine gamma-retroviruses and carrying powerful viral enhancer elements, insertional oncogenesis events have resulted in acute leukemias that, in some cases, have had fatal outcomes. These serious adverse events have sparked a revision of the assessment of risks and benefits of integrating gene transfer for hematological diseases and prompted the development and application of new generations of viral vectors with recognized superior safety characteristics. This review summarizes the clinical experience of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies and discusses the likely avenues of progress in the future development of this expanding field of clinical investigations.

  5. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  6. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human α 1 -antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the α 1 antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes

  7. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene transfer between raw sludge bacteria and the digester microbial community. PMID:27014196

  8. Eliminating HIV-1 Packaging Sequences from Lentiviral Vector Proviruses Enhances Safety and Expedites Gene Transfer for Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Conrad A; Counsell, John R; Perocheau, Dany P; Karda, Rajvinder; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Brugman, Martijn H; Galla, Melanie; Schambach, Axel; McKay, Tristan R; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J

    2017-08-02

    Lentiviral vector genomic RNA requires sequences that partially overlap wild-type HIV-1 gag and env genes for packaging into vector particles. These HIV-1 packaging sequences constitute 19.6% of the wild-type HIV-1 genome and contain functional cis elements that potentially compromise clinical safety. Here, we describe the development of a novel lentiviral vector (LTR1) with a unique genomic structure designed to prevent transfer of HIV-1 packaging sequences to patient cells, thus reducing the total HIV-1 content to just 4.8% of the wild-type genome. This has been achieved by reconfiguring the vector to mediate reverse-transcription with a single strand transfer, instead of the usual two, and in which HIV-1 packaging sequences are not copied. We show that LTR1 vectors offer improved safety in their resistance to remobilization in HIV-1 particles and reduced frequency of splicing into human genes. Following intravenous luciferase vector administration to neonatal mice, LTR1 sustained a higher level of liver transgene expression than an equivalent dose of a standard lentivirus. LTR1 vectors produce reverse-transcription products earlier and start to express transgenes significantly quicker than standard lentiviruses after transduction. Finally, we show that LTR1 is an effective lentiviral gene therapy vector as demonstrated by correction of a mouse hemophilia B model. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Garbian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control.

  10. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbian, Yael; Maori, Eyal; Kalev, Haim; Shafir, Sharoni; Sela, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control.

  11. Transfer of alien genes by means of induced translocation in oats and other crop species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, H.; Taing Aung

    1977-01-01

    Some of the best sources of resistance to mildew, which is the most important disease of the oat crop in the United Kingdom, occur in related weed species. The mildew resistance found in a genotype of the tetraploid species Avena barbata has been transferred into the germ plasm of the cultivated hexaploid species A. sativa by means of an induced translocation. The procedures adopted to isolate the desirable translocation and to determine its breeding behaviour are described. A number of alien genes have been transferred into wheat by means of induced translocations and genetic induction, but their successful introduction into commercial varieties has been limited. In this paper, the use and limitations of alien transfers as breeding material are discussed. (author)

  12. Et tu, Brute? Not Even Intracellular Mutualistic Symbionts Escape Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio López-Madrigal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many insect species maintain mutualistic relationships with endosymbiotic bacteria. In contrast to their free-living relatives, horizontal gene transfer (HGT has traditionally been considered rare in long-term endosymbionts. Nevertheless, meta-omics exploration of certain symbiotic models has unveiled an increasing number of bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host genetic transfers. The abundance and function of transferred loci suggest that HGT might play a major role in the evolution of the corresponding consortia, enhancing their adaptive value or buffering detrimental effects derived from the reductive evolution of endosymbionts’ genomes. Here, we comprehensively review the HGT cases recorded to date in insect-bacteria mutualistic consortia, and discuss their impact on the evolutionary success of these associations.

  13. Plant–Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, Satoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-pro...

  14. Transcriptional reprogramming of gene expression in bovine somatic cell chromatin transfer embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Grier P

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful reprogramming of a somatic genome to produce a healthy clone by somatic cells nuclear transfer (SCNT is a rare event and the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly defined. When serial or successive rounds of cloning are performed, blastocyst and full term development rates decline even further with the increasing rounds of cloning. Identifying the "cumulative errors" could reveal the epigenetic reprogramming blocks in animal cloning. Results Bovine clones from up to four generations of successive cloning were produced by chromatin transfer (CT. Using Affymetrix bovine microarrays we determined that the transcriptomes of blastocysts derived from the first and the fourth rounds of cloning (CT1 and CT4 respectively have undergone an extensive reprogramming and were more similar to blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF than to the donor cells used for the first and the fourth rounds of chromatin transfer (DC1 and DC4 respectively. However a set of transcripts in the cloned embryos showed a misregulated pattern when compared to IVF embryos. Among the genes consistently upregulated in both CT groups compared to the IVF embryos were genes involved in regulation of cytoskeleton and cell shape. Among the genes consistently upregulated in IVF embryos compared to both CT groups were genes involved in chromatin remodelling and stress coping. Conclusion The present study provides a data set that could contribute in our understanding of epigenetic errors in somatic cell chromatin transfer. Identifying "cumulative errors" after serial cloning could reveal some of the epigenetic reprogramming blocks shedding light on the reprogramming process, important for both basic and applied research.

  15. Phylogenetic Evidence for Lateral Gene Transfer in the Intestine of Marine Iguanas

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, David M.; Cann, Isaac K. O.; Altermann, Eric; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lateral gene transfer (LGT) appears to promote genotypic and phenotypic variation in microbial communities in a range of environments, including the mammalian intestine. However, the extent and mechanisms of LGT in intestinal microbial communities of non-mammalian hosts remains poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two fosmid inserts obtained from a genomic DNA library derived from an agar-degrading enrichment culture of marine iguana fecal material. The ...

  16. Hypothalamic Gene Transfer of BDNF Inhibits Breast Cancer Progression and Metastasis in Middle Age Obese Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xianglan; McMurphy, Travis; Xiao, Run; Slater, Andrew; Huang, Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the hypothalamus-adipocyte axis is associated with an antiobesity and anticancer phenotype in animal models of melanoma and colon cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key mediator in the hypothalamus leading to preferential sympathoneural activation of adipose tissue and the ensuing resistance to obesity and cancer. Here, we generated middle age obese mice by high fat diet feeding for a year and investigated the effects of hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF on a...

  17. Novel recA-Independent Horizontal Gene Transfer in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W Kingston

    Full Text Available In bacteria, mechanisms that incorporate DNA into a genome without strand-transfer proteins such as RecA play a major role in generating novelty by horizontal gene transfer. We describe a new illegitimate recombination event in Escherichia coli K-12: RecA-independent homologous replacements, with very large (megabase-length donor patches replacing recipient DNA. A previously uncharacterized gene (yjiP increases the frequency of RecA-independent replacement recombination. To show this, we used conjugal DNA transfer, combining a classical conjugation donor, HfrH, with modern genome engineering methods and whole genome sequencing analysis to enable interrogation of genetic dependence of integration mechanisms and characterization of recombination products. As in classical experiments, genomic DNA transfer begins at a unique position in the donor, entering the recipient via conjugation; antibiotic resistance markers are then used to select recombinant progeny. Different configurations of this system were used to compare known mechanisms for stable DNA incorporation, including homologous recombination, F'-plasmid formation, and genome duplication. A genome island of interest known as the immigration control region was specifically replaced in a minority of recombinants, at a frequency of 3 X 10(-12 CFU/recipient per hour.

  18. Green fluorescent protein as a selectable marker of fibronectin-facilitated retroviral gene transfer in primary human T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dardalhon, V.; Noraz, N.; Pollok, K.; Rebouissou, C.; Boyer, M.; Bakker, A. Q.; Spits, H.; Taylor, N.

    1999-01-01

    The success of gene therapy strategies for congenital and acquired blood disorders requires high levels of gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. Retroviral vectors have been extensively used to deliver foreign genes to mammalian cells and improvement of transduction protocols remains dependent on

  19. Transferability of microsatellite markers located in candidate genes for wood properties between Eucalyptus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia V. Acuña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study:  To analyze the feasibility of extrapolating conclusions on wood quality genetic control between different Eucalyptus species, particularly from species with better genomic information, to those less characterized. For this purpose, the first step is to analyze the conservation and cross-transferability of microsatellites markers (SSRs located in candidate genes.Area of study: Eucalyptus species implanted in Argentina coming from different Australian origins.Materials and methods: Twelve validated and polymorphic SSRs in candidate genes (SSR-CGs for wood quality in E. globulus were selected for cross species amplification in six species: E. grandis, E. saligna, E. dunnii, E. viminalis, E. camaldulensis and E. tereticornis.Main results: High cross-species transferability (92% to 100% was found for the 12 polymorphic SSRs detected in E. globulus. These markers revealed allelic diversity in nine important candidate genes: cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR, cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3, the transcription factor LIM1, homocysteine S-methyltransferase (HMT, shikimate kinase (SK, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase 2 (XTH2, glutathione S-transferase (GST, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD and peroxidase (PER.Research highlights: The markers described are potentially suitable for comparative QTL mapping, molecular marker assisted breeding (MAB and for population genetic studies across different species within the subgenus Symphyomyrtus.Keywords: validation; cross-transferability; SSR; functional markers; eucalypts; Symphyomyrtus.

  20. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (Padventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  1. THE RISK OF GENE TRANSFERRING IN THE INSURANCE PROTECTION OF AGRICULTERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper justified essence of genetic engineering as the object of insurance services. Defines the concept of risk gene transferring. The character features of this specific risk. The influence and consequences for agricultural producers. The description of the possible creation of the concept of insurance services that cover risk of gene transferring. The study reveals of the use of GMOs in agriculture, due to issues of economic security of a particular region or country as a whole. To determined the impact of risks and control for developing and developed countries that are important aspects of farming. Changes in weather, climate, productivity, price values, public policy, the situation on global markets can cause large fluctuations in agricultural production, and consequently affecting the income of agricultural producers. Risk management includes a range of strategies that reduce the social and financial implications of possible changes affecting the production and income of farmers. There is a need for an in-depth study of the theoretical and practical aspects of the impact of the risk of gene transferring in the context of insurance protection.

  2. Improving the Safety of Cell Therapy Products by Suicide Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eDi Stasi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T-cell therapy can involve donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the administration of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TILs expanded ex-vivo, or more recently the use of T cell receptor (TCR or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR redirected T cells. However cellular therapies can pose significant risks, including graft-versus-host-disease and other on and off-target effects, and therefore strategies need to be implemented to permanently reverse any sign of toxicity. A suicide gene is a genetically encoded molecule that allows selective destruction of adoptively transferred cells. Suicide gene addition to cellular therapeutic products can lead to selective ablation of gene-modified cells, preventing collateral damage to contiguous cells and/or tissues. The ‘ideal’ suicide gene would ensure the safety of gene modified cellular applications by granting irreversible elimination of ‘all’ and ‘only’ the cells responsible for the unwanted toxicity. This review presents the suicide gene safety systems reported to date, with a focus on the state-of-the-art and potential applications regarding two of the most extensively validated suicide genes, including the clinical setting: herpes-simplex-thymidine-kinase (HSV-TK and inducible-caspase-9 (iCasp9.

  3. Basic peptides as functional components of non-viral gene transfer vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Mahito; Eguchi, Akiko; Akuta, Teruo; Nagoshi, Emi; Fujita, Shigeo; Okabe, Jun; Senda, Takao; Hasegawa, Mamoru

    2003-04-01

    Improving the performance of non-viral gene-delivery vehicles that consist of synthetic compounds and nucleic acids is a key to successful gene therapy. Supplementing synthetic vehicles with various biological functions by using natural or artificial peptides is a promising approach with which to achieve this goal. One of the obstacles hindering this effort is that some of the potentially useful peptides, especially those with many basic amino acid residues, interfere with the formation of the complex owing to strong electrostatic interactions with the nucleic acid. In this review, we describe our recent work in examining the potential of these peptides in gene delivery, using a recombinant lambda phage particle as the model for the gene-delivery complex. Lambda phage encapsulates large duplex DNA in a rigid polyplex-like shell with a diameter of 55 nm, and can display various peptides on this capsid, independently of particle formation. By examining the expression of marker genes encapsulated in the phage capsid, we have demonstrated that the protein transduction domain of HIV Tat protein and the nuclear localization signal derived from SV40 T antigen can remarkably facilitate the delivery of these marker genes across the two major barriers, the cell membrane and the nuclear membrane, respectively. Our results indicate that these basic peptides can constitute effective components of synthetic gene-transfer complexes, as long as sufficient copies are displayed on the outer surface of the complex.

  4. Improving the safety of cell therapy products by suicide gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin S; Lamb, Lawrence S; Goldman, Frederick; Di Stasi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy can involve donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the administration of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte expanded ex-vivo, or more recently the use of T cell receptor or chimeric antigen receptor redirected T cells. However, cellular therapies can pose significant risks, including graft-vs.-host-disease and other on and off-target effects, and therefore strategies need to be implemented to permanently reverse any sign of toxicity. A suicide gene is a genetically encoded molecule that allows selective destruction of adoptively transferred cells. Suicide gene addition to cellular therapeutic products can lead to selective ablation of gene-modified cells, preventing collateral damage to contiguous cells and/or tissues. The "ideal" suicide gene would ensure the safety of gene modified cellular applications by granting irreversible elimination of "all" and "only" the cells responsible for the unwanted toxicity. This review presents the suicide gene safety systems reported to date, with a focus on the state-of-the-art and potential applications regarding two of the most extensively validated suicide genes, including the clinical setting: herpes-simplex-thymidine-kinase and inducible-caspase-9.

  5. Surprisingly high stability of barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, towards denaturant, heat and proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Winther, J R

    2001-01-01

    have been suggested as transporters of monomers for cutin synthesis. We have analysed the stability of LTP1 towards denaturant, heat and proteases and found it to be a highly stable protein, which apparently does not denature at temperatures up to 100 degrees C. This high stability may be important...

  6. Effects of lorentz force on flow fields of free burning arc and wall stabilized non-transferred arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yi; Huang Heji; Pan Wenxia

    2013-01-01

    The flow fields of two typical DC plasma arcs, namely the transferred free burning arc and the non-transferred arc were simulated by solving hydrodynamic equations and electromagnetic equations. The effects of the Lorentz force on the characteristics of the flow fields of these two typical DC plasma arcs were estimated. Results show that in the case of the free burning arc, the Lorentz force due to the current self-induced magnetic field has significant impact on the flow fields, as the self-induced magnetic compression is the main arc constraint mechanism. However, in the case of the non-transferred arc generated in a torch with long and narrow inter-electrode inserts and an abruptly expanded anode, the Lorentz force has limited impact on the flow fields of the plasma especially at the downstream of the inter-electrode inserts, compared with the strong wall constraints and relatively high aerodynamic force. This is because the ratio of the electromagnetic force to the aerodynamic force is only about 0.01 in this region. When the main consideration is outlet parameters of the wall stabilized non-transferred DC arc plasma generator, in order to improve the efficiency of the numerical simulation program, the Lorentz force could be neglected in the non-transferred arc in some cases. (authors)

  7. Involvement of plastid, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Sanchez-Puerta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer (HGT involving the three DNA-containing cellular compartments. It highlights the great incidence of HGT in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA of angiosperms, the increasing number of examples in plant nuclear genomes, and the lack of any convincing evidence for HGT in the well-studied plastid genome of land plants. Most of the foreign mitochondrial genes are non-functional, generally found as pseudogenes in the recipient plant mtDNA that maintains its functional native genes. The few exceptions involve chimeric HGT, in which foreign and native copies recombine leading to a functional and single copy of the gene. Maintenance of foreign genes in plant mitochondria is probably the result of genetic drift, but a possible evolutionary advantage may be conferred through the generation of genetic diversity by gene conversion between native and foreign copies. Conversely, a few cases of nuclear HGT in plants involve functional transfers of novel genes that resulted in adaptive evolution. Direct cell-to-cell contact between plants (e.g. host-parasite relationships or natural grafting facilitate the exchange of genetic material, in which HGT has been reported for both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and in the form of genomic DNA, instead of RNA. A thorough review of the literature indicates that HGT in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of angiosperms is much more frequent than previously expected and that the evolutionary impact and mechanisms underlying plant-to-plant HGT remain to be uncovered.

  8. Horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions in all categories of the living matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the history of widespread exchanges of genetic segments initiated over 3 billion years ago, to be part of their life style, by sphero-protoplastic cells, the ancestors of archaea, prokaryota, and eukaryota. These primordial cells shared a hostile anaerobic and overheated environment and competed for survival. "Coexist with, or subdue and conquer, expropriate its most useful possessions, or symbiose with it, your competitor" remain cellular life's basic rules. This author emphasizes the role of viruses, both in mediating cell fusions, such as the formation of the first eukaryotic cell(s) from a united crenarchaeon and prokaryota, and the transfer of host cell genes integrated into viral (phages) genomes. After rising above the Darwinian threshold, rigid rules of speciation and vertical inheritance in the three domains of life were established, but horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions were never abolished. The author proves with extensive, yet highly selective documentation, that not only unicellular microorganisms, but the most complex multicellular entities of the highest ranks resort to, and practice, cell fusions, and donate and accept horizontally (laterally) transferred genes. Cell fusions and horizontally exchanged genetic materials remain the fundamental attributes and inherent characteristics of the living matter, whether occurring accidentally or sought after intentionally. These events occur to cells stagnating for some 3 milliard years at a lower yet amazingly sophisticated level of evolution, and to cells achieving the highest degree of differentiation, and thus functioning in dependence on the support of a most advanced multicellular host, like those of the human brain. No living cell is completely exempt from gene drains or gene insertions.

  9. Developmental and functional expression of miRNA-stability related genes in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Érica; Walter, Lais Takata; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Casado, Otávio Augusto Nocera; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    In the nervous system, control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) has been investigated in fundamental processes, such as development and adaptation to ambient demands. The action of these short nucleotide sequences on specific genes depends on intracellular concentration, which in turn reflects the balance of biosynthesis and degradation. Whereas mechanisms underlying miRNA biogenesis has been investigated in recent studies, little is known about miRNA-stability related proteins. We first detected two genes in the retina that have been associated to miRNA stability, XRN2 and PAPD4. These genes are highly expressed during retinal development, however with distinct subcellular localization. We investigated whether these proteins are regulated during specific phases of the cell cycle. Combined analyses of nuclei position in neuroblastic layer and labeling using anti-cyclin D1 revealed that both proteins do not accumulate in S or M phases of the cell cycle, being poorly expressed in progenitor cells. Indeed, XRN2 and PAPD4 were observed mainly after neuronal differentiation, since low expression was also observed in astrocytes, endothelial and microglial cells. XRN2 and PAPD4 are expressed in a wide variety of neurons, including horizontal, amacrine and ganglion cells. To evaluate the functional role of both genes, we carried out experiments addressed to the retinal adaptation in response to different ambient light conditions. PAPD4 is upregulated after 3 and 24 hours of dark- adaptation, revealing that accumulation of this protein is governed by ambient light levels. Indeed, the fast and functional regulation of PAPD4 was not related to changes in gene expression, disclosing that control of protein levels occurs by post-transcriptional mechanisms. Furthermore, we were able to quantify changes in PAPD4 in specific amacrine cells after dark -adaptation, suggesting for circuitry-related roles in visual perception. In summary, in this study we first described the

  10. Fluorescence reporter gene platform applicable for the detection and quantification of horizontal gene transfer in anoxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinilla Redondo, Rafael

    Background: The study of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in microbial communities has been revolutionized by advances in cultivation-independent methods based on fluorescence reporter-gene technologies. However, the use of fluorescent markers like green fluorescent protein (GFP) and m......Cherry is limited by environmental constraints that affect the correct maturation of their fluorophores, such as oxygen availability and pH levels. Few studies have focused on elucidating their impact, and the sheer amount of distinct protein variants requires each system to be examined in an individual fashion....... The wealth of ecologically and clinically relevant oxygen-deprived micro-habitats in which bacteria thrive, calls for the urgent development of suitable tools that permit their study. Objectives: Development of an aerobic fluorescence recovery method for mCherry and GFPmut3, as well as characterisation...

  11. Stability of gene contributions and identification of outliers in multivariate analysis of microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schumacher Martin M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate ordination methods are powerful tools for the exploration of complex data structures present in microarray data. These methods have several advantages compared to common gene-by-gene approaches. However, due to their exploratory nature, multivariate ordination methods do not allow direct statistical testing of the stability of genes. Results In this study, we developed a computationally efficient algorithm for: i the assessment of the significance of gene contributions and ii the identification of sample outliers in multivariate analysis of microarray data. The approach is based on the use of resampling methods including bootstrapping and jackknifing. A statistical package of R functions was developed. This package includes tools for both inferring the statistical significance of gene contributions and identifying outliers among samples. Conclusion The methodology was successfully applied to three published data sets with varying levels of signal intensities. Its relevance was compared with alternative methods. Overall, it proved to be particularly effective for the evaluation of the stability of microarray data.

  12. CysQ of , a Protozoa, May Have Been Acquired from Bacteria by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is the movement of genetic material between kingdoms and is considered to play a positive role in adaptation. Cryptosporidium parvum is a parasitic protozoan that causes an infectious disease. Its genome sequencing reported 14 bacteria-like proteins in the nuclear genome. Among them, cgd2_1810, which has been annotated as CysQ, a sulfite synthesis pathway protein, is listed as one of the candidates of genes horizontally transferred from bacterial origin. In this report, we examined this issue using phylogenetic analysis. Our BLAST search showed that C. parvum CysQ protein had the highest similarity with that of proteobacteria. Analysis with NCBI's Conserved Domain Tree showed phylogenetic incongruence, in that C. parvum CysQ protein was located within a branch of proteobacteria in the cd01638 domain, a bacterial member of the inositol monophosphatase family. According to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway, the sulfate assimilation pathway, where CysQ plays an important role, is well conserved in most eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes. However, the Apicomplexa, including C. parvum, largely lack orthologous genes of the pathway, suggesting its loss in those protozoan lineages. Therefore, we conclude that C. parvum regained cysQ from proteobacteria by HGT, although its functional role is elusive.

  13. Insights on the Horizontal Gene Transfer of Carbapenemase Determinants in the Opportunistic Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Gabriela Jorge; Domingues, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a driving force to the evolution of bacteria. The fast emergence of antimicrobial resistance reflects the ability of genetic adaptation of pathogens. Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged in the last few decades as an important opportunistic nosocomial pathogen, in part due to its high capacity of acquiring resistance to diverse antibiotic families, including to the so-called last line drugs such as carbapenems. The rampant selective pressure and genetic exchange of resistance genes hinder the effective treatment of resistant infections. A. baumannii uses all the resistance mechanisms to survive against carbapenems but production of carbapenemases are the major mechanism, which may act in synergy with others. A. baumannii appears to use all the mechanisms of gene dissemination. Beyond conjugation, the mostly reported recent studies point to natural transformation, transduction and outer membrane vesicles-mediated transfer as mechanisms that may play a role in carbapenemase determinants spread. Understanding the genetic mobilization of carbapenemase genes is paramount in preventing their dissemination. Here we review the carbapenemases found in A. baumannii and present an overview of the current knowledge of contributions of the various HGT mechanisms to the molecular epidemiology of carbapenem resistance in this relevant opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27681923

  14. Preliminary studies on gene therapy with TGF β1 antisense gene/liposome complexes and adenovirus transfer vector in RPF rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunjie; Wang Dewen; Zhang Zhaoshan; Gao Yabing; Xiong Chengqi; Long Jianyin; Wang Huixin; Peng Ruiyun; Cui Xuemei

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observed the efficiency of gene therapy with TGF β1 antisense gene/liposome complexes and adenovirus transfer vector in RPF rats. Methods: TGFβ1 sense and antisense gene expression vectors and adenovirus transfer vector were introduced into rat bronchus by way of intratracheal instillation. Results: At day 1.5 after TGFβ1 sense and antisense gene transfer, PCR amplification using neo gene-specific primer from lung tissue DNA was all positive. After day 5.5, 67% (2/3) of lung tissue DNA was positive. RNA dot blot hybridization indicated that TGFβ1 mRNA content of lung tissue transfected with pMAMneo-antiTGFβ1 gene decreased. Detection of lung hydroxyproline (Hyp) content after day 35 of gene transfer showed that even in lung of rats received pMAMneo-AntiTGFβ1 lipid complexes it raised remarkably (P 9 pfu/ml were instilled into bronchus at 0.5 ml per rat. After day 2 day 6, the lung tissues of all six rats (three per each group )expressed the transfected luciferase gene by luminometer. Conclusion: Cationic lipid-mediated TGFβ1 antisense gene therapy was a simple and easy method. It can slow down the course of pathogenesis of lung fibrosis. Replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene therapy of lung diseases is a good and efficient method

  15. A stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible viscous flow with heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curi, Marcos Filardy

    2011-01-01

    In view of the problem of global warming and the search for clean energy sources, a worldwide expansion on the use of nuclear energy is foreseen. Thus, the development of science and technology regarding nuclear power plants is essential, in particular in the field of reactor engineering. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer play an important role in the development of nuclear reactors. Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD) is becoming ever more important in the optimization of cost and safety of the designs. This work presents a stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible flows with heat transfer. A second order time discretization precedes a spatial discretization using finite elements. The terms that stabilize the finite element method arise naturally from the discretization process, rather than being introduced a priori in the variational formulation. The method was implemented in the program 'ns n ew s olvec2d av 2 M PI' written in FORTRAN90, developed in the Parallel Computing Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (LCP/IEN). Numerical solutions of some representative examples, including free, mixed and forced convection, demonstrate that the proposed stabilized formulation attains very good agreement with experimental and computational results available in the literature. (author)

  16. Inferring Drosophila gap gene regulatory network: Pattern analysis of simulated gene expression profiles and stability analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fomekong-Nanfack, Y.; Postma, M.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) requires accurate data, a method to simulate the expression patterns and an efficient optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters. Using this approach it is possible to obtain alternative circuits without making any a priori

  17. Two-way time transfer via optical fiber providing subpicosecond precision and high temperature stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodet, J.; Pánek, Petr; Procházka, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2015), s. 18-26 ISSN 0026-1394 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : optical fiber * time transfer * TWOTT Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.500, year: 2015

  18. Design analysis report for the 244-AR vault Interim Stabilization interior transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARLSON, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation note is to verify that the 244-AR Vault Interior Transfer System piping installed in the vault meets ASME B31.3 code requirements. This calculation also evaluates the pipe support loads

  19. Two-way time transfer via optical fiber providing subpicosecond precision and high temperature stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodet, J.; Pánek, Petr; Procházka, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2016), s. 18-26 ISSN 0026-1394 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : TWOTT * Time transfer * Optical fiber Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  20. Tolerance induction to cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase by hepatic AAV gene transfer: implications for antigen presentation and immunotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley T Martino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic gene transfer, in particular using adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, has been shown to induce immune tolerance to several protein antigens. This approach has been exploited in animal models of inherited protein deficiency for systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. Adequate levels of transgene expression in hepatocytes induce a suppressive T cell response, thereby promoting immune tolerance. This study addresses the question of whether AAV gene transfer can induce tolerance to a cytoplasmic protein.AAV-2 vector-mediated hepatic gene transfer for expression of cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase (beta-gal was performed in immune competent mice, followed by a secondary beta-gal gene transfer with E1/E3-deleted adenoviral Ad-LacZ vector to provoke a severe immunotoxic response. Transgene expression from the AAV-2 vector in approximately 2% of hepatocytes almost completely protected from inflammatory T cell responses against beta-gal, eliminated antibody formation, and significantly reduced adenovirus-induced hepatotoxicity. Consequently, approximately 10% of hepatocytes continued to express beta-gal 45 days after secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer, a time point when control mice had lost all Ad-LacZ derived expression. Suppression of inflammatory T cell infiltration in the liver and liver damage was linked to specific transgene expression and was not seen for secondary gene transfer with Ad-GFP. A combination of adoptive transfer studies and flow cytometric analyses demonstrated induction of Treg that actively suppressed CD8(+ T cell responses to beta-gal and that was amplified in liver and spleen upon secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer.These data demonstrate that tolerance induction by hepatic AAV gene transfer does not require systemic delivery of the transgene product and that expression of a cytoplasmic neo-antigen in few hepatocytes can induce Treg and provide long-term suppression of inflammatory responses and immunotoxicity.

  1. The advantages and disadvantages of horizontal gene transfer and the emergence of the first species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgs Paul G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT is beneficial to a cell if the acquired gene confers a useful function, but is detrimental if the gene has no function, if it is incompatible with existing genes, or if it is a selfishly replicating mobile element. If the balance of these effects is beneficial on average, we would expect cells to evolve high rates of acceptance of horizontally transferred genes, whereas if it is detrimental, cells should reduce the rate of HGT as far as possible. It has been proposed that the rate of HGT was very high in the early stages of prokaryotic evolution, and hence there were no separate lineages of organisms. Only when the HGT rate began to fall, would lineages begin to emerge with their own distinct sets of genes. Evolution would then become more tree-like. This phenomenon has been called the Darwinian Threshold. Results We study a model for genome evolution that incorporates both beneficial and detrimental effects of HGT. We show that if rate of gene loss during genome replication is high, as was probably the case in the earliest genomes before the time of the last universal common ancestor, then a high rate of HGT is favourable. HGT leads to the rapid spread of new genes and allows the build-up of larger, fitter genomes than could be achieved by purely vertical inheritance. In contrast, if the gene loss rate is lower, as in modern prokaryotes, then HGT is, on average, unfavourable. Conclusions Modern cells should therefore evolve to reduce HGT if they can, although the prevalence of independently replicating mobile elements and viruses may mean that cells cannot avoid HGT in practice. In the model, natural selection leads to gradual improvement of the replication accuracy and gradual decrease in the optimal rate of HGT. By clustering genomes based on gene content, we show that there are no separate lineages of organisms when the rate of HGT is high; however, as the rate of HGT decreases, a tree

  2. Lateral Gene Transfer Dynamics in the Ancient Bacterial GenusStreptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bradon R; Currie, Cameron R

    2017-06-06

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) profoundly shapes the evolution of bacterial lineages. LGT across disparate phylogenetic groups and genome content diversity between related organisms suggest a model of bacterial evolution that views LGT as rampant and promiscuous. It has even driven the argument that species concepts and tree-based phylogenetics cannot be applied to bacteria. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are surprisingly rare in the ubiquitous and biomedically important bacterial genus Streptomyces Using a molecular clock, we estimate that the Streptomyces bacteria are ~380 million years old, indicating that this bacterial genus is as ancient as land vertebrates. Calibrating LGT rate to this geologic time span, we find that on average only 10 genes per million years were acquired and subsequently maintained. Over that same time span, Streptomyces accumulated thousands of point mutations. By explicitly incorporating evolutionary timescale into our analyses, we provide a dramatically different view on the dynamics of LGT and its impact on bacterial evolution. IMPORTANCE Tree-based phylogenetics and the use of species as units of diversity lie at the foundation of modern biology. In bacteria, these pillars of evolutionary theory have been called into question due to the observation of thousands of lateral gene transfer (LGT) events within and between lineages. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are exceedingly rare in the bacterial genus Streptomyces , with merely one gene acquired in Streptomyces lineages every 100,000 years. These findings stand in contrast to the current assumption of rampant genetic exchange, which has become the dominant hypothesis used to explain bacterial diversity. Our results support a more nuanced understanding of genetic exchange, with LGT impacting evolution over short timescales but playing a significant role over long timescales. Deeper understanding of LGT provides new

  3. Biofuel co-product uses for pavement geo-materials stabilization : tech transfer summary, April 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Objectives : Evaluate the ability of biofuel co-product (BCP) to function as an effective soil stabilizing agent. : Investigate the effect of BCP on the engineering properties of soil-BCP mixtures for Iowa conditions.

  4. Isolation of identical nitrilase genes from multiple bacterial strains and real-time PCR detection of the genes from soils provides evidence of horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lee; Clarke, Adrienne; Duggan, Patrick; Tambling, Karen; Horgan, Serenia; Dowling, David; O'Reilly, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial enzymes capable of nitrile hydrolysis have significant industrial potential. Microbacterium sp. AJ115, Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 and AJ300 were isolated from the same location in England and harbour identical nitrile hydratase/amidase gene clusters. Strain AJ270 has been well studied due to its nitrile hydratase and amidase activity. R. erythropolis ITCBP was isolated from Denmark and carries a very similar nitrile hydratase/amidase gene cluster. In this study, an identical nitrilase gene (nit1) was isolated from the four strains, and the nitrilase from strain AJ270 cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the recombinant nitrilase has shown it to be functional with activity demonstrated towards phenylacetonitrile. A real-time PCR TaqMan assay was developed that allowed nit1 detection directly from soil enrichment cultures without DNA extraction, with nit1 detected in all samples tested. Real-time PCR screening of isolates from these soils resulted in the isolation of nit1 and also very similar nitrilase gene nit2 from a number of Burkholderia sp. The genes nit1 and nit2 have also been detected in many bacteria of different genera but are unstable in these isolates. It is likely that the genes were acquired by horizontal gene transfer and may be wide-spread in the environment.

  5. Gene expression system in green sulfur bacteria by conjugative plasmid transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Azai

    Full Text Available Gene transfer and expression systems in green sulfur bacteria were established by bacterial conjugation with Escherichia coli. Conjugative plasmid transfer from E. coli S17-1 to a thermophilic green sulfur bacterium, Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum WT2321, was executed with RSF1010-derivative broad-host-range plasmids, named pDSK5191 and pDSK5192, that confer erythromycin and streptomycin/spectinomycin resistance, respectively. The transconjugants harboring these plasmids were reproducibly obtained at a frequency of approximately 10(-5 by selection with erythromycin and a combination of streptomycin and spectinomycin, respectively. These plasmids were stably maintained in C. tepidum cells in the presence of these antibiotics. The plasmid transfer to another mesophilic green sulfur bacterium, C. limnaeum (formerly Chlorobium phaeobacteroides RK-j-1, was also achieved with pDSK5192. The expression plasmid based on pDSK5191 was constructed by incorporating the upstream and downstream regions of the pscAB gene cluster on the C. tepidum genome, since these regions were considered to include a constitutive promoter and a ρ-independent terminator, respectively. Growth defections of the ∆cycA and ∆soxB mutants were completely rescued after introduction of pDSK5191-cycA and -soxB that were designed to express their complementary genes. On the other hand, pDSK5191-6xhis-pscAB, which incorporated the gene cluster of 6xhis-pscA and pscB, produced approximately four times more of the photosynthetic reaction center complex with His-tagged PscA as compared with that expressed in the genome by the conventional natural transformation method. This expression system, based on conjugative plasmid, would be applicable to general molecular biological studies of green sulfur bacteria.

  6. Spatially and temporally controlled gene transfer by electroporation into adherent cells on plasmid DNA-loaded electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kato, Koichi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2004-01-01

    Functional characterization of human genes is one of the most challenging tasks in current genomics. Owing to a large number of newly discovered genes, high-throughput methodologies are greatly needed to express in parallel each gene in living cells. To develop a method that allows efficient transfection of plasmids into adherent cells in spatial- and temporal-specific manners, we studied electric pulse-triggered gene transfer using a plasmid-loaded electrode. A plasmid was loaded on a gold e...

  7. Changing the Direction and Orientation of Electric Field During Electric Pulses Application Improves Plasmid Gene Transfer in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlin, Mojca; Haberl, Saša; Reberšek, Matej; Miklavčič, Damijan; Kandušer, Maša

    2011-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is a physical method used to deliver genes into the cells by application of short and intense electric pulses, which cause destabilization of cell membrane, making it permeable to small molecules and allows transfer of large molecules such as DNA. It represents an alternative to viral vectors, due to its safety, efficacy and ease of application. For gene electrotransfer different electric pulse protocols are used in order to achieve maximum gene transfection, one of them ...

  8. Contribution of Multiple Inter-kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers to Evolution and Adaptation of Amphibian-killing Chytrid, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baofa Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Amphibian populations are experiencing catastrophic declines driven by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. Although horizontal gene transfer (HGT facilitates the evolution and adaptation in many fungi by conferring novel function genes to the recipient fungi, inter-kingdom HGT in Bd remains largely unexplored. In this study, our investigation detects 19 bacterial genes transferred to Bd, including metallo-beta-lactamase and arsenate reductase that play important roles in the resistance to antibiotics and arsenates. Moreover, three probable HGT gene families in Bd are from plants and one gene family coding the ankyrin repeat-containing protein appears to come from oomycetes. The observed multi-copy gene families associated with HGT are probably due to the independent transfer events or gene duplications. Five HGT genes with extracellular locations may relate to infection, and some other genes may participate in a variety of metabolic pathways, and in doing so add important metabolic traits to the recipient. The evolutionary analysis indicates that all the transferred genes evolved under purifying selection, suggesting that their functions in Bd are similar to those of the donors. Collectively, our results indicate that HGT from diverse donors may be an important evolutionary driver of Bd, and improve its adaptations for infecting and colonizing host amphibians.

  9. Bacterial Transport and Fate and Its Effect on Horizontal Gene Transfer in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, N.; Massoudieh, A.; Nguyen, T. H.; Kamai, T.; Zilles, J. L.; Ginn, T. R.; Liang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycling in ecosystems relies heavily on soil bacterial communities. Bacterial communities adapt to natural or anthropogenic disruptions through mutation and horizontal gene transfer. Horizontal gene transfer alters bacterial communities rapidly by transferring DNA across species. A systematic understanding of bacterial transport and fate and its effects on horizontal gene transfer is critical for predicting and harnessing bacterial adaption and evolution in soil. In this work, a multi-scale approach was applied to study the effects of both flagella and motility on transport and fate of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii in porous media. Both micromodel and column experiments showed decreasing deposition over time, suggesting that both flagellated and non-flagellated cells were blocked from deposition by previously deposited cells. In later stages, ripening effects were also observed, and they appeared earlier for the non-flagellated strain. Based on the overall clean collector removal efficiencies determined from micromodel and column experiments, the non-motile and non-flagellated strain DJNM deposited the most, while the motile, wild-type strain DJ showed the least deposition. The overall clean collector removal efficiencies was due to decreased deposition of motile cells on the front sides of the collectors (relative to the flow direction). The horizontal gene transfer of extracellular DNA, known as natural transformation, was evaluated with both dissolved and adsorbed extracellular DNA and with motile and non-motile but flagellated strains (DJ and DJ77, respectively). The distinct transport mechanisms of these strains resulted in different natural transformation rates and relationships to the concentration of cells and dissolved extracellular DNA. A modified mass action type relationship with power relationships was established to model the differences in natural transformation between DJ and DJ77. A cell-DNA pairing hypothesis was

  10. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Ping Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal antibody (mAb C, is reactive to a surface antigen on sperm of all tested species including pig, mouse, chicken, cow, goat, sheep, and human. mAb C is a basic protein that binds to DNA through ionic interaction allowing exogenous DNA to be linked specifically to sperm. After fertilization of the egg, the DNA is shown to be successfully integrated into the genome of viable pig and mouse offspring with germ-line transfer to the F1 generation at a highly efficient rate: 37.5% of pigs and 33% of mice. The integration is demonstrated again by FISH analysis and F2 transmission in pigs. Furthermore, expression of the transgene is demonstrated in 61% (35/57 of transgenic pigs (F0 generation. Conclusions Our data suggests that LB-SMGT could be used to generate transgenic animals efficiently in many different species.

  11. Enhanced surface transfer doping of diamond by V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with improved thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Kevin G., E-mail: k.crawford.2@research.gla.ac.uk; Moran, David A. J. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Cao, Liang [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Qi, Dongchen, E-mail: d.qi@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and Physics, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Tallaire, Alexandre [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Villetaneuse 93430 (France); Limiti, E.; Verona, C. [Department of Industrial Engineering, “Tor Vergata” University, Rome 00173 (Italy); Wee, Andrew T. S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2016-01-25

    Surface transfer doping of hydrogen-terminated diamond has been achieved utilising V{sub 2}O{sub 5} as a surface electron accepting material. Contact between the oxide and diamond surface promotes the transfer of electrons from the diamond into the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} as revealed by the synchrotron-based high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. Electrical characterization by Hall measurement performed before and after V{sub 2}O{sub 5} deposition shows an increase in hole carrier concentration in the diamond from 3.0 × 10{sup 12} to 1.8 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} at room temperature. High temperature Hall measurements performed up to 300 °C in atmosphere reveal greatly enhanced thermal stability of the hole channel produced using V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in comparison with an air-induced surface conduction channel. Transfer doping of hydrogen-terminated diamond using high electron affinity oxides such as V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is a promising approach for achieving thermally stable, high performance diamond based devices in comparison with air-induced surface transfer doping.

  12. DNA methylation in an intron of the IBM1 histone demethylase gene stabilizes chromatin modification patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigal, Mélanie; Kevei, Zoltán; Pélissier, Thierry; Mathieu, Olivier

    2012-06-29

    The stability of epigenetic patterns is critical for genome integrity and gene expression. This highly coordinated process involves interrelated positive and negative regulators that impact distinct epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation and dimethylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2). In Arabidopsis, mutations in the DNA methyltransferase MET1, which maintains CG methylation, result in aberrant patterns of other epigenetic marks, including ectopic non-CG methylation and the relocation of H3K9me2 from heterochromatin into gene-rich chromosome regions. Here, we show that the expression of the H3K9 demethylase IBM1 (increase in BONSAI methylation 1) requires DNA methylation. Surprisingly, the regulatory methylated region is contained in an unusually large intron that is conserved in IBM1 orthologues. The re-establishment of IBM1 expression in met1 mutants restored the wild-type H3K9me2 nuclear patterns, non-CG DNA methylation and transcriptional patterns at selected loci, which included DNA demethylase genes. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for long-standing puzzling observations in met1 mutants and reveal yet another layer of control in the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modification, which stabilizes DNA methylation patterns at genes.

  13. Radiation-Resistant Photon-Counting Detector Package Providing Sub-ps Stability for Laser Time Transfer in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochzaka, Ivan; Kodat, Jan; Blazej, Josef; Sun, Xiaoli (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting on a design, construction and performance of photon-counting detector packages based on silicon avalanche photodiodes. These photon-counting devices have been optimized for extremely high stability of their detection delay. The detectors have been designed for future applications in fundamental metrology and optical time transfer in space. The detectors have been qualified for operation in space missions. The exceptional radiation tolerance of the detection chip itself and of all critical components of a detector package has been verified in a series of experiments.

  14. Generation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene-targeted pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqing; Xin, Jige; Fan, Nana; Zou, Qingjian; Huang, Jiao; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhao, Yu; Zhao, Bentian; Liu, Zhaoming; Lai, Sisi; Yi, Xiaoling; Guo, Lin; Esteban, Miguel A; Zeng, Yangzhi; Yang, Huaqiang; Lai, Liangxue

    2015-03-01

    The domestic pig has been widely used as an important large animal model. Precise and efficient genetic modification in pig provides a great promise in biomedical research. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been successfully used to produce many gene-targeted animals. However, these animals have been generated by co-injection of Cas9 mRNA and single-guide RNA (sgRNA) into one-cell stage embryos, which mostly resulted in mosaicism of the modification. One or two rounds of further breeding should be performed to obtain homozygotes with identical genotype and phenotype. To address this issue, gene-targeted somatic cells can be used as donor for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce gene-targeted animals with single and identical mutations. In this study, we applied Cas9/sgRNAs to effectively direct gene editing in porcine fetal fibroblasts and then mutant cell colonies were used as donor to generate homozygous gene-targeted pigs through single round of SCNT. As a result, we successfully obtained 15 tyrosinase (TYR) biallelic mutant pigs and 20 PARK2 and PINK1 double-gene knockout (KO) pigs. They were all homozygous and no off-target mutagenesis was detected by comprehensive analysis. TYR (-/-) pigs showed typical albinism and the expression of parkin and PINK1 were depleted in PARK2 (-/-)/PINK1 (-/-) pigs. The results demonstrated that single- or double-gene targeted pigs can be effectively achieved by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system combined with SCNT without mosaic mutation and detectable off-target effects. This gene-editing system provides an efficient, rapid, and less costly manner to generate genetically modified pigs or other large animals.

  15. Gene Transfer to the Developing Mouse Inner Ear by In Vivo Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Jiang, Han; Brigande, John V.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear has 6 distinct sensory epithelia: 3 cristae in the ampullae of the semicircular canals; maculae in the utricle and saccule; and the organ of Corti in the coiled cochlea. The cristae and maculae contain vestibular hair cells that transduce mechanical stimuli to subserve the special sense of balance, while auditory hair cells in the organ of Corti are the primary transducers for hearing 1. Cell fate specification in these sensory epithelia and morphogenesis of the semicircular canals and cochlea take place during the second week of gestation in the mouse and are largely completed before birth 2,3. Developmental studies of the mouse inner ear are routinely conducted by harvesting transgenic embryos at different embryonic or postnatal stages to gain insight into the molecular basis of cellular and/or morphological phenotypes 4,5. We hypothesize that gene transfer to the developing mouse inner ear in utero in the context of gain- and loss-of-function studies represents a complimentary approach to traditional mouse transgenesis for the interrogation of the genetic mechanisms underlying mammalian inner ear development6. The experimental paradigm to conduct gene misexpression studies in the developing mouse inner ear demonstrated here resolves into three general steps: 1) ventral laparotomy; 2) transuterine microinjection; and 3) in vivo electroporation. Ventral laparotomy is a mouse survival surgical technique that permits externalization of the uterus to gain experimental access to the implanted embryos7. Transuterine microinjection is the use of beveled, glass capillary micropipettes to introduce expression plasmid into the lumen of the otic vesicle or otocyst. In vivo electroporation is the application of square wave, direct current pulses to drive expression plasmid into progenitor cells8-10. We previously described this electroporation-based gene transfer technique and included detailed notes on each step of the protocol11. Mouse experimental

  16. DNA thermodynamic stability and supercoil dynamics determine the gene expression program during the bacterial growth cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobetzko, Patrick; Glinkowska, Monika; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2013-07-01

    The chromosomal DNA polymer constituting the cellular genetic material is primarily a device for coding information. Whilst the gene sequences comprise the digital (discontinuous) linear code, physiological alterations of the DNA superhelical density generate in addition analog (continuous) three-dimensional information essential for regulation of both chromosome compaction and gene expression. Insight into the relationship between the DNA analog information and the digital linear code is of fundamental importance for understanding genetic regulation. Our previous study in the model organism Escherichia coli suggested that the chromosomal gene order and a spatiotemporal gradient of DNA superhelicity associated with DNA replication determine the growth phase-dependent gene transcription. In this study we reveal a general gradient of DNA thermodynamic stability correlated with the polarity of chromosomal replication and manifest in the spatiotemporal pattern of gene transcription during the bacterial growth cycle. Furthermore, by integrating the physical and dynamic features of the transcribed sequences with their functional content we identify spatiotemporal domains of gene expression encompassing different functions. We thus provide both an insight into the organisational principle of the bacterial growth program and a novel holistic methodology for exploring chromosomal dynamics.

  17. Acinetobacter baumannii transfers the blaNDM-1 gene via outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Somdatta; Mondal, Ayan; Mitra, Shravani; Basu, Sulagna

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the transmission of the gene encoding New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 ( bla NDM-1 ) through outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from an Acinetobacter baumannii strain (A_115). Isolation and purification of OMVs by density gradient from a carbapenem-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii harbouring plasmid-mediated bla NDM-1 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes was performed. DNA was purified from the OMVs and used for PCR and dot-blot analysis. Vesicles treated with DNase I and proteinase K were used to transform A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and Escherichia coli JM109 strains. MIC values for the transformants were determined, followed by PCR and restriction digestion of plasmids. PFGE was done for A_115 and transformants of ATCC 19606 and JM109. The A. baumannii strain (ST 1462) released vesicles (25-100 nm) during in vitro growth at late log phase. PCR and dot-blot analysis confirmed the presence of bla NDM-1 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes in intravesicular DNA. bla NDM-1 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were transferred to both the A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and E. coli JM109 recipient cells. The transformation frequency of the purified OMVs was in the range of 10 -5 -10 -6 and gradually reduced with storage of OMVs. The sizes of the plasmids in the transformants and their restriction digestion patterns were identical to the plasmid in A_115. The transformants showed elevated MIC values of the β-lactam group of antibiotics, which confirmed the presence of a bla NDM-1 -harbouring plasmid. This is the first experimental evidence of intra- and inter-species transfer of a plasmid harbouring a bla NDM-1 gene in A. baumannii via OMVs with high transformation frequency. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  19. Survival of antibiotic resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer control antibiotic resistance gene content in anaerobic digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hafer Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp. and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp. anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate (tet(G remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O, tet(W, and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457 to 0.829, P<0.05 with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O or tet(W ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130 to 0.486, P = 0.075 to 0.612. However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O and tet(W ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  20. Transfer of genes for stem rust resistance from Agropyron elongatum and imperial rye to durum wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakara Rao, M.V.

    1977-01-01

    The Agropyron elongatum gene for stem rust resistance on chromosome 6A of Knott's Thatcher translocation line was transferred to a susceptible local durum wheat variety, Jaya, through a series of back-crosses. Plants heterozygous for the Agropyron translocation always show at least one open bivalent. Homozygotes have not been obtained, probably because of the absence of male transmission in durum background. Monotelosomic addition of the short arm of Imperial rye chromosome 3R (formerly ''G'' of Sears), which carries a gene(s) for resistance to wheat stem rust, was obtained in the local durum variety. Rust-resistant plants from parents having the added rye telocentric were irradiated with gamma rays just before meiosis, and the pollen obtained from the irradiated spikes was used to pollinate euploid plants. In addition, seeds harvested from 2n+1 resistant plants were irradiated with thermal neutrons and the resistant M 1 plants were selfed to raise M 2 families. Two durum-rye translocation lines were obtained following irradiation. DRT-1 was transmitted normally through the female gametes but showed no male transmission. As a result of this, homozygotes have not been obtained. Gametic transmission rates of DRT-2 are being tested. Alien translocations, which show normal gametic and zygotic transmissions in the hexaploid wheat, may behave differently in a tetraploid background. The results indicate that alien genetic transfers may be more difficult to obtain in durum wheat, probably owing to the reduced buffering effect of the tetraploid genome. (author)

  1. Evolution of Phototrophy in the Chloroflexi Phylum Driven by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis M. Ward

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary mechanisms behind the extant distribution of photosynthesis is a point of substantial contention. Hypotheses range from the presence of phototrophy in the last universal common ancestor and massive gene loss in most lineages, to a later origin in Cyanobacteria followed by extensive horizontal gene transfer into the extant phototrophic clades, with intermediate scenarios that incorporate aspects of both end-members. Here, we report draft genomes of 11 Chloroflexi: the phototrophic Chloroflexia isolate Kouleothrix aurantiaca as well as 10 genome bins recovered from metagenomic sequencing of microbial mats found in Japanese hot springs. Two of these metagenome bins encode photrophic reaction centers and several of these bins form a metabolically diverse, monophyletic clade sister to the Anaerolineae class that we term Candidatus Thermofonsia. Comparisons of organismal (based on conserved ribosomal and phototrophy (reaction center and bacteriochlorophyll synthesis protein phylogenies throughout the Chloroflexi demonstrate that two new lineages acquired phototrophy independently via horizontal gene transfer (HGT from different ancestral donors within the classically phototrophic Chloroflexia class. These results illustrate a complex history of phototrophy within this group, with metabolic innovation tied to HGT. These observations do not support simple hypotheses for the evolution of photosynthesis that require massive character loss from many clades; rather, HGT appears to be the defining mechanic for the distribution of phototrophy in many of the extant clades in which it appears.

  2. Investigation of transfection efficacy with transcatheter arterial transporting transferring to enhance p53 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qin; Niu Huanzhang; Zhu Guangyu; An Yanli; Qiu Dinghong; Teng Gaojun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the function of transferrin-DNA complex, transported by transferrin(Tf) and trans-arterial injection via interventional approach be the duel-target-orientated delivery and the transferring into malignant cells to get more effective therapy. Methods: p53-LipofectAMINE ligand with different concentrations of Tf (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 μg)transfected the 4 strains including LM6,Hep3B,YY and L02 in vitro to evaluate the gene transfection efficiency through western blot. Then, after setting up the VX2 hepatocarcinoma models, we delivered the Tf-p53-LipofectAMlNE complex into the hepatic arteries via interventional techniques to analyse the transfection efficiency in vivo. Results: Tf, within the range of l0 100 μg, could increase gene transfection efficiency mediated by liposome, and the efficiency increases with the raise of Tf concentration. Combination with interventional technique to inject Tf-DNA complex into tumor arteries, gene transfection efficiency was enhanced in rabbit models. Conclusion: Tf can enhance gene-liposome transfection efficiency, furthermore with combination of interventional catheter technique, there would be a potential duel-target-orientated gene therapy method. (authors)

  3. Interkingdom gene transfer of a hybrid NPS/PKS from bacteria to filamentous Ascomycota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Lawrence

    Full Text Available Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs and polyketides (PKs are ecologically important secondary metabolites produced by bacteria and fungi using multidomain enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs and polyketide synthases (PKSs, respectively. Previous phylogenetic analyses of fungal NRPSs and PKSs have suggested that a few of these genes were acquired by fungi via horizontal gene transfer (HGT from bacteria, including a hybrid NPS/PKS found in Cochliobolus heterostrophus (Dothideomycetes, Ascomycota. Here, we identify this hybrid gene in fungi representing two additional classes of Ascomycota (Aspergillus spp., Microsporum canis, Arthroderma spp., and Trichophyton spp., Eurotiomycetes; Chaetomium spp. and Metarhizium spp., Sordariomycetes and use phylogenetic analyses of the most highly conserved domains from NRPSs (adenylation (A domain and PKSs (ketoacyl synthase (KS domain to examine the hypothesis that the hybrid NPS7/PKS24 was acquired by fungi from bacteria via HGT relatively early in the evolution of the Pezizomycotina. Our results reveal a unique ancestry of the A domain and KS domain in the hybrid gene relative to known fungal NRPSs and PKSs, provide strong evidence for HGT of the hybrid gene from a putative bacterial donor in the Burkholderiales, and suggest the HGT event occurred early in the evolution of the filamentous Ascomycota.

  4. Site-specific gene transfer into the rat spinal cord by photomechanical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Toyooka, Terushige; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2011-10-01

    Nonviral, site-specific gene delivery to deep tissue is required for gene therapy of a spinal cord injury. However, an efficient method satisfying these requirements has not been established. This study demonstrates efficient and targeted gene transfer into the spinal cord by using photomechanical waves (PMWs), which were generated by irradiating a black laser absorbing rubber with 532-nm nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses. After a solution of plasmid DNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or luciferase was intraparenchymally injected into the spinal cord, PMWs were applied to the target site. In the PMW application group, we observed significant EGFP gene expression in the white matter and remarkably high luciferase activity only in the spinal cord segment exposed to the PMWs. We also assessed hind limb movements 24 h after the application of PMWs based on the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) score to evaluate the noninvasiveness of this method. Locomotor evaluation showed no significant decrease in BBB score under optimum laser irradiation conditions. These findings demonstrated that exogenous genes can be efficiently and site-selectively delivered into the spinal cord by applying PMWs without significant locomotive damage.

  5. Viridans group streptococci are donors in horizontal transfer of topoisomerase IV genes to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre, Luz; Ferrándiz, María José; Liñares, Josefina; Tubau, Fe; de la Campa, Adela G

    2003-07-01

    A total of 46 ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cip(r)) Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from 1991 to 2001 at the Hospital of Bellvitge. Five of these strains showed unexpectedly high rates of nucleotide variations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of their parC, parE, and gyrA genes. The nucleotide sequence of the full-length parC, parE, and gyrA genes of one of these isolates revealed a mosaic structure compatible with an interspecific recombination origin. Southern blot analysis and nucleotide sequence determinations showed the presence of an ant-like gene in the intergenic parE-parC regions of the S. pneumoniae Cip(r) isolates with high rates of variations in their parE and parC QRDRs. The ant-like gene was absent from typical S. pneumoniae strains, whereas it was present in the intergenic parE-parC regions of the viridans group streptococci (Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis). These results suggest that the viridans group streptococci are acting as donors in the horizontal transfer of fluoroquinolone resistance genes to S. pneumoniae.

  6. Gene Transfer into the Lung by Nanoparticle Dextran-Spermine/Plasmid DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cationic polymer, dextran-spermine (D-SPM, has been found to mediate gene expression in a wide variety of cell lines and in vivo through systemic delivery. Here, we extended the observations by determining the optimal conditions for gene expression of D-SPM/plasmid DNA (D-SPM/pDNA in cell lines and in the lungs of BALB/c mice via instillation delivery. In vitro studies showed that D-SPM could partially protect pDNA from degradation by nuclease and exhibited optimal gene transfer efficiency at D-SPM to pDNA weight-mixing ratio of 12. In the lungs of mice, the levels of gene expression generated by D-SPM/pDNA are highly dependent on the weight-mixing ratio of D-SPM to pDNA, amount of pDNA in the complex, and the assay time postdelivery. Readministration of the complex at day 1 following the first dosing showed no significant effect on the retention and duration of gene expression. The study also showed that there was a clear trend of increasing size of the complexes as the amount of pDNA was increased, where the sizes of the D-SPM/pDNA complexes were within the nanometer range.

  7. A Subset of Autism-Associated Genes Regulate the Structural Stability of Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Frei, Jeannine A.; Kilander, Michaela B. C.; Shen, Wenjuan; Blatt, Gene J.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals’ ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity. These mechanisms together regulate the structural stability of neurons and are vulnerable targets in ASD. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of those autism risk genes that affect the structural connectivity of neurons. We sub-categorize them into (1) cytoskeletal regulators, e.g., motors and small RhoGTPase regulators; (2) adhesion molecules, e.g., cadherins, NCAM, and neurexin superfamily; (3) cell surface receptors, e.g., glutamatergic receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases; (4) signaling molecules, e.g., protein kinases and phosphatases; and (5) synaptic proteins, e.g., vesicle and scaffolding proteins. Although the roles of some of these genes in maintaining neuronal structural stability are well studied, how mutations contribute to the autism phenotype is still largely unknown. Investigating whether and how the neuronal structure and function are affected when these genes are mutated will provide insights toward developing effective interventions aimed at improving the lives of people with autism and their families. PMID:27909399

  8. Petrol and diesel exhaust particles accelerate the horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Gu, April Z; Cen, Tianyu; Li, Xiangyang; Li, Dan; Chen, Jianmin

    2018-03-07

    Particles exhausted from petrol and diesel consumptions are major components of urban air pollution that can be exposed to human via direct inhalation or other routes due to atmospheric deposition into water and soil. Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious threats to modern health care. However, how the petrol and diesel exhaust particles affect the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in various environments remain largely unknown. This study investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of four representative petrol and diesel exhaust particles, namely 97 octane petrol, 93 octane petrol, light diesel oil, and marine heavy diesel oil, on the horizontal transfer of ARGs between two opportunistic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains, E. coli S17-1 (donor) and E. coli K12 (recipient). The results demonstrated that these four representative types of nano-scale particles induced concentration-dependent increases in conjugative transfer rates compared with the controls. The underlying mechanisms involved in the accelerated transfer of ARGs were also identified, including the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the consequent induction of oxidative stress, SOS response, changes in cell morphology, and the altered mRNA expression of membrane protein genes and those involved in the promotion of conjugative transfer. The findings provide new evidences and mechanistic insights into the antimicrobial resistance risks posed by petrol and diesel exhaust particles, and highlight the implications and need for stringent strategies on alternative fuels to mitigate air pollution and health risks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stabilized gene duplication enables long-term selection-free heterologous pathway expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyo, Keith E J; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-08-01

    Engineering robust microbes for the biotech industry typically requires high-level, genetically stable expression of heterologous genes and pathways. Although plasmids have been used for this task, fundamental issues concerning their genetic stability have not been adequately addressed. Here we describe chemically inducible chromosomal evolution (CIChE), a plasmid-free, high gene copy expression system for engineering Escherichia coli. CIChE uses E. coli recA homologous recombination to evolve a chromosome with approximately 40 consecutive copies of a recombinant pathway. Pathway copy number is stabilized by recA knockout, and the resulting engineered strain requires no selection markers and is unaffected by plasmid instabilities. Comparison of CIChE-engineered strains with equivalent plasmids revealed that CIChE improved genetic stability approximately tenfold and growth phase-specific productivity approximately fourfold for a strain producing the high metabolic burden-biopolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate. We also increased the yield of the nutraceutical lycopene by 60%. CIChE should be applicable in many organisms, as it only requires having targeted genomic integration methods and a recA homolog.

  10. HgtSIM: a simulator for horizontal gene transfer (HGT in microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhi Song

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and application of metagenomic approaches have provided an opportunity to study and define horizontal gene transfer (HGT on the level of microbial communities. However, no current metagenomic data simulation tools offers the option to introduce defined HGT within a microbial community. Here, we present HgtSIM, a pipeline to simulate HGT event among microbial community members with user-defined mutation levels. It was developed for testing and benchmarking pipelines for recovering HGTs from complex microbial datasets. HgtSIM is implemented in Python3 and is freely available at: https://github.com/songweizhi/HgtSIM.

  11. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dale; Qi, Jinfeng; Yue, Jipei; Huang, Jinling; Sun, Ting; Li, Suoping; Wen, Jian-Fan; Hettenhausen, Christian; Wu, Jinsong; Wang, Lei; Zhuang, Huifu; Wu, Jianqiang; Sun, Guiling

    2014-01-13

    Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts.

  12. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. Results A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Conclusions Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts

  13. A Two-Dimensional Numerical Study of Hydrodynamic, Heat and Mass Transfer and Stability in a Salt Gradient Solar Pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ben Moussa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the problem of hydrodynamic, heat and mass transfer and stability in a salt gradient solar pond has been numerically studied by means of computational fluid dynamics in transient regime. The body of the simulated pond is an enclosure of height H and length L wherein an artificial salinity gradient is created in order to suppress convective motions induced by solar radiation absorption and to stabilize the solar pond during the period of operation. Here we show the distribution of velocity, temperature and salt concentration fields during energy collection and storage in a solar pond filled with water and constituted by three different salinity zones. The bottom of the pond is blackened and the free-surface is subjected to heat losses by convection, evaporation and radiation while the vertical walls are adiabatic and impermeable. The governing equations of continuity, momentum, thermal energy and mass transfer are discretized by finite–volume method in transient regime. Velocity vector fields show the presence of thin convective cells in the upper convective zone (UCZ and large convective cells in the lower convective zone (LCZ. This study shows the importance of buoyancy ratio in the decrease of temperature in the UCZ and in the preservation of high temperature in the LCZ. It shows also the importance of the thickness of Non-Convective Zone (NCZ in the reduction of the upwards heat losses.

  14. NPY gene transfer in the hippocampus attenuates synaptic plasticity and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Carli, Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    . Future clinical progress, however, requires more detailed evaluation of possible side effects of this treatment. Until now it has been unknown whether rAAV vector-based NPY overexpression in the hippocampus alters normal synaptic transmission and plasticity, which could disturb learning and memory...... processing. Here we show, by electrophysiological recordings in CA1 of the hippocampal formation of rats, that hippocampal NPY gene transfer into the intact brain does not affect basal synaptic transmission, but slightly alters short-term synaptic plasticity, most likely via NPY Y2 receptor...... is partially impaired and animals have a slower rate of hippocampal-based spatial discrimination learning. These data provide the first evidence that rAAV-based gene therapy using NPY exerts relative limited effect on synaptic plasticity and learning in the hippocampus, and therefore this approach could...

  15. Untangling hybrid phylogenetic signals: horizontal gene transfer and artifacts of phylogenetic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiko, Robert G; Ragan, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenomic methods can be used to investigate the tangled evolutionary relationships among genomes. Building 'all the trees of all the genes' can potentially identify common pathways of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) among taxa at varying levels of phylogenetic depth. Phylogenetic affinities can be aggregated and merged with the information about genetic linkage and biochemical function to examine hypotheses of adaptive evolution via HGT. Additionally, the use of many genetic data sets increases the power of statistical tests for phylogenetic artifacts. However, large-scale phylogenetic analyses pose several challenges, including the necessary abandonment of manual validation techniques, the need to translate inferred phylogenetic discordance into inferred HGT events, and the challenges involved in aggregating results from search-based inference methods. In this chapter we describe a tree search procedure to recover the most parsimonious pathways of HGT, and examine some of the assumptions that are made by this method.

  16. Expression of Arabidopsis gdh2 gene depends on activity of alternative electron transfer pathway in mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinov Yu. M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We studied the expression level of gdh2 gene, encoding subunit of mitochondrial glutamate dehydrogenase, in Arabidopsis suspension culture cells with genetically modified level of alternative oxidase AOX1a. Methods. Polymerase chain reaction, Northern-blotting. Results. The treatment with main electron transfer pathway inhibitor antimycin A led to an increase in gdh2 transcript level in the wild-type cells and the cells with decreased level of alternative oxidase, but not in the cells with elevated level of alternative oxidase. Conclusions. It is known that an increase in alternative oxidase level in the plant cell results in more oxidized state of ubiquinone pool in respiratory chain. Therefore, the obtained results support the earlier proposed model according to which the expression level of gdh2 gene depends on the redox state of ubiquinone pool.

  17. Transfer and expression of the rabbit defensin NP-1 gene in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, D; Xiong, X; Tu, W F; Yao, W; Liang, H W; Chen, F J; He, Z Q

    2017-01-23

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae, with high food and medicinal value. However, the crop is susceptible to several viruses that are transmitted by aphids and is highly vulnerable to post-harvest diseases, as well as insect and mammal pests and fungal and bacterial diseases. Here, the rabbit defensin gene NP-1 was transferred into lettuce by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to obtain a broad-spectrum disease-resistant lettuce. Transgenic lettuce plants were selected and regenerated on selective media. The presence of the NP-1 gene in these plants was confirmed by western blot analyses. Resistance tests revealed native defensin NP-1 expression conferred partial resistance to Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which suggests new possibilities for lettuce disease resistance.

  18. Agrobacterium tumefaciens exoR controls acid response genes and impacts exopolysaccharide synthesis, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Brynn C; Tomlinson, Amelia D; Morton, Elise R; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative plant pathogen and the causative agent of crown gall disease. The initial stage of infection involves attachment to plant tissues, and subsequently, biofilms may form at these sites. This study focuses on the periplasmic ExoR regulator, which was identified based on the severe biofilm deficiency of A. tumefaciens exoR mutants. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed to elucidate the complete ExoR regulon. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan is a dramatic phenotype of exoR mutants. Comparative expression analyses revealed that the core ExoR regulon is unaffected by succinoglycan synthesis. Several findings are consistent with previous observations: genes involved in succinoglycan biosynthesis, motility, and type VI secretion are differentially expressed in the ΔexoR mutant. In addition, these studies revealed new functional categories regulated by ExoR, including genes related to virulence, conjugation of the pAtC58 megaplasmid, ABC transporters, and cell envelope architecture. To address how ExoR exerts a broad impact on gene expression from its periplasmic location, a genetic screen was performed to isolate suppressor mutants that mitigate the exoR motility phenotype and identify downstream components of the ExoR regulatory pathway. This suppression analysis identified the acid-sensing two-component system ChvG-ChvI, and the suppressor mutant phenotypes suggest that all or most of the characteristic exoR properties are mediated through ChvG-ChvI. Subsequent analysis indicates that exoR mutants are simulating a response to acidic conditions, even in neutral media. This work expands the model for ExoR regulation in A. tumefaciens and underscores the global role that this regulator plays on gene expression. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Mutational Pleiotropy and the Strength of Stabilizing Selection Within and Between Functional Modules of Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Julie M; McGuigan, Katrina; Allen, Scott L; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Blows, Mark W

    2018-02-01

    Variational modules, sets of pleiotropically covarying traits, affect phenotypic evolution, and therefore are predicted to reflect functional modules, such that traits within a variational module also share a common function. Such an alignment of function and pleiotropy is expected to facilitate adaptation by reducing the deleterious effects of mutations, and allowing coordinated evolution of functionally related sets of traits. Here, we adopt a high-dimensional quantitative genetic approach using a large number of gene expression traits in Drosophila serrata to test whether functional grouping, defined by GO terms, predicts variational modules. Mutational or standing genetic covariance was significantly greater than among randomly grouped sets of genes for 38% of our functional groups, indicating that GO terms can predict variational modularity to some extent. We estimated stabilizing selection acting on mutational covariance to test the prediction that functional pleiotropy would result in reduced deleterious effects of mutations within functional modules. Stabilizing selection within functional modules was weaker than that acting on randomly grouped sets of genes in only 23% of functional groups indicating that functional alignment can reduce deleterious effects of pleiotropic mutation, but typically does not. Our analyses also revealed the presence of variational modules that spanned multiple functions. Copyright © 2018, Genetics.

  20. Transfer of toxin genes to alternate bacterial hosts for mosquito control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orduz

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are vector of serious human and animal diseases, such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, among others. The use of biological control agents has provide an environmentally safe and highly specific alternative to the use of chemical insecticides in the control of vector borne diseases. Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus produce toxic proteins to mosquito larvae. Great progress has been made on the biochemical and molecular characterization of such proteins and the genes encoding them. Nevertheless, the low residuality of these biological insecticides is one of the major drawbacks. This article present some interesting aspects of the mosquito larvae feeding habits and review the attempts that have been made to genetically engineer microorganisms that while are used by mosquito larvae as a food source should express the Bacillus toxin genes in order to improve the residuality and stability in the mosquito breeding ponds.

  1. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

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    Shimon Bershtein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90% in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM, correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the

  2. Adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer and neurotransplantation : possibilities and limitations in grafting of the fetal rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esseveldt, K E; Liu, R.; Hermens, W.T.J.M.C.; Verhaagen, J; Boer, G J

    Several studies have reported on the use of primary neural cells transduced by adenoviral vectors as donor cells in neurotransplantation. In the present investigation, we examined whether adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer could be used to introduce and express a foreign gene in solid neural

  3. Controlled Gene Expression Systems for Lactic Acid Bacteria : Transferable Nisin-Inducible Expression Cassettes for Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Lactobacillus spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, Michiel; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vaughan, Elaine E.; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1997-01-01

    A transferable dual-plasmid inducible gene expression system for use in lactic acid bacteria that is based on the autoregulatory properties of the antimicrobial peptide nisin produced by Lactococcus lactis was developed. Introduction of the two plasmids allowed nisin-inducible gene expression in

  4. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded BART MicroRNA: A Paradigm for Viral Modulation of Host Immune Response Genes and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Dreyfus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, is associated through epidemiologic evidence with common autoimmune syndromes and cancers. However, specific genetic mechanisms of pathogenesis have been difficult to identify. In this review, the author summarizes evidence that recently discovered noncoding RNAs termed microRNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus BARF (BamHI A right frame termed BART (BamHI A right transcripts are modulators of human immune response genes and genome stability in infected and bystander cells. BART expression is apparently regulated by complex feedback loops with the host immune response regulatory NF-κB transcription factors. EBV-encoded BZLF-1 (ZEBRA protein could also regulate BART since ZEBRA contains a terminal region similar to ankyrin proteins such as IκBα that regulate host NF-κB. BALF-2 (BamHI A left frame transcript, a viral homologue of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene recombinase RAG-1 (recombination-activating gene-1, may also be coregulated with BART since BALF-2 regulatory sequences are located near the BART locus. Viral-encoded microRNA and viral mRNA transferred to bystander cells through vesicles, defective viral particles, or other mechanisms suggest a new paradigm in which bystander or hit-and-run mechanisms enable the virus to transiently or chronically alter human immune response genes as well as the stability of the human genome.

  5. Developmental and functional expression of miRNA-stability related genes in the nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica de Sousa

    Full Text Available In the nervous system, control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs has been investigated in fundamental processes, such as development and adaptation to ambient demands. The action of these short nucleotide sequences on specific genes depends on intracellular concentration, which in turn reflects the balance of biosynthesis and degradation. Whereas mechanisms underlying miRNA biogenesis has been investigated in recent studies, little is known about miRNA-stability related proteins. We first detected two genes in the retina that have been associated to miRNA stability, XRN2 and PAPD4. These genes are highly expressed during retinal development, however with distinct subcellular localization. We investigated whether these proteins are regulated during specific phases of the cell cycle. Combined analyses of nuclei position in neuroblastic layer and labeling using anti-cyclin D1 revealed that both proteins do not accumulate in S or M phases of the cell cycle, being poorly expressed in progenitor cells. Indeed, XRN2 and PAPD4 were observed mainly after neuronal differentiation, since low expression was also observed in astrocytes, endothelial and microglial cells. XRN2 and PAPD4 are expressed in a wide variety of neurons, including horizontal, amacrine and ganglion cells. To evaluate the functional role of both genes, we carried out experiments addressed to the retinal adaptation in response to different ambient light conditions. PAPD4 is upregulated after 3 and 24 hours of dark- adaptation, revealing that accumulation of this protein is governed by ambient light levels. Indeed, the fast and functional regulation of PAPD4 was not related to changes in gene expression, disclosing that control of protein levels occurs by post-transcriptional mechanisms. Furthermore, we were able to quantify changes in PAPD4 in specific amacrine cells after dark -adaptation, suggesting for circuitry-related roles in visual perception. In summary, in this study we

  6. Design and analysis of power supply and information transfer to three-axis gyroscope stabilizer platform

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    Belyanin Lev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on problems of the engineering implementation of 3-axis gyrostabilizer of the camera for orthophotography performed from light and ultralight aircrafts. The functional diagram of gyrostabilizer is characterized by a lighter ball-bearing having a large inner diameter used for the platform suspension on its internal (vertical axis. The problem is to transfer the supply voltage to the platform and the electric signals to and from the platform. Design solutions concerning the power supply and information transfer are supported by the experimental techniques suggested in this paper, namely: the use of the rolling contact; three-phase gyro motor power supply replaced by that from the single-phase network; signal transmission from the precession angle sensor using the air transformer; current and voltage frequency division; DC mode selection for the torquer. The results obtained prove the efficiency of the suggested design solutions.

  7. Coupling of heterogeneous and homogeneous electron transfer: Transition from stability to chaotic behavior

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hromadová, Magdaléna; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Fanelli, N.; Gál, Miroslav; Kolivoška, Viliam; Valášek, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, - (2012), s. 72 ISSN 0872-1904. [Iberic Meeting of Electrochemistry /14./ and Meeting of the Portuguese Electrochemical Society /17./. 11.04.2012-14.04.2012, Madeira Island] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0705; GA AV ČR IAA400400802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electron transfer * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  8. A novel roseobacter phage possesses features of podoviruses, siphoviruses, prophages and gene transfer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuanchao; Huang, Sijun; Voget, Sonja; Simon, Meinhard; Chen, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria in the Roseobacter lineage have been studied extensively due to their significant biogeochemical roles in the marine ecosystem. However, our knowledge on bacteriophage which infects the Roseobacter clade is still very limited. Here, we report a new bacteriophage, phage DSS3Φ8, which infects marine roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DSS3Φ8 is a lytic siphovirus. Genomic analysis showed that DSS3Φ8 is most closely related to a group of siphoviruses, CbK-like phages, which infect freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. DSS3Φ8 contains a smaller capsid and has a reduced genome size (146 kb) compared to the CbK-like phages (205-279 kb). DSS3Φ8 contains the DNA polymerase gene which is closely related to T7-like podoviruses. DSS3Φ8 also contains the integrase and repressor genes, indicating its potential to involve in lysogenic cycle. In addition, four GTA (gene transfer agent) genes were identified in the DSS3Φ8 genome. Genomic analysis suggests that DSS3Φ8 is a highly mosaic phage that inherits the genetic features from siphoviruses, podoviruses, prophages and GTAs. This is the first report of CbK-like phages infecting marine bacteria. We believe phage isolation is still a powerful tool that can lead to discovery of new phages and help interpret the overwhelming unknown sequences in the viral metagenomics.

  9. Design and bioinformatics analysis of novel biomimetic peptides as nanocarriers for gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asia Majidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The introduction of nucleic acids into cells for therapeutic objectives is significantly hindered by the size and charge of these molecules and therefore requires efficient vectors that assist cellular uptake. For several years great efforts have been devoted to the study of development of recombinant vectors based on biological domains with potential applications in gene therapy. Such vectors have been synthesized in genetically engineered approach, resulting in biomacromolecules with new properties that are not present in nature. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have designed new peptides using homology modeling with the purpose of overcoming the cell barriers for successful gene delivery through Bioinformatics tools. Three different carriers were designed and one of those with better score through Bioinformatics tools was cloned, expressed and its affinity for pDNA was monitored. Results: The resultszz demonstrated that the vector can effectively condense pDNAinto nanoparticles with the average sizes about 100 nm. Conclusion: We hope these peptides can overcome the biological barriers associated with gene transfer, and mediate efficient gene delivery.

  10. Hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF inhibits breast cancer progression and metastasis in middle age obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglan; McMurphy, Travis; Xiao, Run; Slater, Andrew; Huang, Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Activation of the hypothalamus-adipocyte axis is associated with an antiobesity and anticancer phenotype in animal models of melanoma and colon cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key mediator in the hypothalamus leading to preferential sympathoneural activation of adipose tissue and the ensuing resistance to obesity and cancer. Here, we generated middle age obese mice by high fat diet feeding for a year and investigated the effects of hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF on a hormone receptor-positive mammary tumor model. The recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-mediated overexpression of BDNF led to marked weight loss and decrease of adiposity without change of food intake. BDNF gene therapy improved glucose tolerance, alleviated steatosis, reduced leptin level, inhibited mouse breast cancer EO771 growth, and prevented the metastasis. The reduced tumor growth in BDNF-treated mice was associated with reduced angiogenesis, decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and reduced adipocyte recruitment and lipid accumulation. Moreover, BDNF gene therapy reduced inflammation markers in the hypothalamus, the mammary gland, the subcutaneous fat, and the mammary tumor. Our results suggest that manipulating a single gene in the brain may influence multiple mechanisms implicated in obesity-cancer association and provide a target for the prevention and treatment of both obesity and cancer.

  11. Genetic diversity of bacterial communities and gene transfer agents in northern South China Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA amplicons was performed to investigate the unique distribution of bacterial communities in northern South China Sea (nSCS and evaluate community structure and spatial differences of bacterial diversity. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes constitute the majority of bacteria. The taxonomic description of bacterial communities revealed that more Chroococcales, SAR11 clade, Acidimicrobiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales are present in the nSCS waters than other bacterial groups. Rhodobacterales were less abundant in tropical water (nSCS than in temperate and cold waters. Furthermore, the diversity of Rhodobacterales based on the gene transfer agent (GTA major capsid gene (g5 was investigated. Four g5 gene clone libraries were constructed from samples representing different regions and yielded diverse sequences. Fourteen g5 clusters could be identified among 197 nSCS clones. These clusters were also related to known g5 sequences derived from genome-sequenced Rhodobacterales. The composition of g5 sequences in surface water varied with the g5 sequences in the sampling sites; this result indicated that the Rhodobacterales population could be highly diverse in nSCS. Phylogenetic tree analysis result indicated distinguishable diversity patterns among tropical (nSCS, temperate, and cold waters, thereby supporting the niche adaptation of specific Rhodobacterales members in unique environments.

  12. Computer Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Hybrid-Stabilized Argon–Water Electric Arc

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeništa, Jiří; Takana, H.; Nishiyama, H.; Křenek, Petr; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 11 (2011), s. 2892-2893 ISSN 0093-3813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Divergence of radiation flux * hybrid-stabilized electric arc * mass flow rate * partial characteristics * radiation flux Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.174, year: 2011 http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=27

  13. Identification of two key genes controlling chill haze stability of beer in barley (Hordeum vulgare L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lingzhen; Huang, Yuqing; Dai, Fei; Ning, Huajiang; Li, Chengdao; Zhou, Meixue; Zhang, Guoping

    2015-06-11

    In bright beer, haze formation is a serious quality problem, degrading beer quality and reducing its shelf life. The quality of barley (Hordeum vulgare L) malt, as the main raw material for beer brewing, largely affects the colloidal stability of beer. In this study, the genetic mechanism of the factors affecting beer haze stability in barley was studied. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of alcohol chill haze (ACH) in beer was carried out using a Franklin/Yerong double haploid (DH) population. One QTL, named as qACH, was detected for ACH, and it was located on the position of about 108 cM in chromosome 4H and can explain about 20 % of the phenotypic variation. Two key haze active proteins, BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd were identified by proteomics analysis. Bioinformatics analysis showed that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd had the same position as qACH in the chromosome. It may be deduced that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd are candidate genes for qACH, controlling colloidal stability of beer. Polymorphism comparison between Yerong and Franklin in the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd detected the corresponding gene specific markers, which could be used in marker-assisted selection for malt barley breeding. We identified a novel QTL, qACH controlling chill haze of beer, and two key haze active proteins, BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd. And further analysis showed that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd might be the candidate genes associated with beer chill haze.

  14. DNA stabilization by the upregulation of estrogen signaling in BRCA gene mutation carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suba Z

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Zsuzsanna Suba Surgical and Molecular Tumor Pathology Centre, National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: Currently available scientific evidence erroneously suggests that mutagenic weakness or loss of the BRCA1/2 genes may liberate the proliferative effects of estrogen signaling, which provokes DNA damage and genomic instability. Conversely, BRCA mutation seems to be an imbalanced defect, crudely inhibiting the upregulation of estrogen receptor expression and liganded transcriptional activity, whereas estrogen receptor-repressor functions become predominant. In BRCA-proficient cases, estrogen signaling orchestrates the activity of cell proliferation and differentiation with high safety, while upregulating the expression and DNA-stabilizing impact of BRCA genes. In turn, BRCA proteins promote estrogen signaling by proper estrogen synthesis via CYP19 gene regulation and by induction of the appropriate expression and transcriptional activity of estrogen receptors. In this exquisitely organized regulatory system, the dysfunction of each player may jeopardize genome stability and lead to severe chronic diseases, such as cancer development. Female organs, such as breast, endometrium, and ovary, exhibiting regular cyclic proliferative activity are particularly vulnerable in case of disturbances in either estrogen signaling or BRCA-mediated DNA repair. BRCA mutation carrier women may apparently be healthy or exhibit clinical signs of deficient estrogen signaling in spite of hyperestrogenism. Even women who enjoy sufficient compensatory DNA-defending activities are at risk of tumor development because many endogenous and environmental factors may jeopardize the mechanisms of extreme compensatory processes. Natural estrogens have numerous benefits in tumor prevention and therapy even in BRCA mutation carriers. There are no toxic effects even in sky-high doses and all physiologic cellular functions are strongly upregulated, while malignant

  15. Neuroprotective effect of adenoviral catalase gene transfer in cortical neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáspár, Tamás; Domoki, Ferenc; Lenti, Laura; Institoris, Adám; Snipes, James A; Bari, Ferenc; Busija, David W

    2009-05-13

    Reduced availability of reactive oxygen species is a key component of neuroprotection against various toxic stimuli. Recently we showed that the hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase plays a central role in delayed preconditioning induced by the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener BMS-191095. The purpose of the experiments discussed here was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of catalase in vitro using a recombinant adenoviral catalase gene transfer protocol. To induce catalase overexpression, cultured rat cortical neurons were infected with the adenoviral vector Ad5CMVcatalase and control cells were incubated with Ad5CMVntLacZ for 24 h. Gene transfer effectively increased catalase protein levels and activity, but did not influence other antioxidants tested. Ad5CMVcatalase, with up to 10 plaque forming units (pfu) per neuron, did not affect cell viability under control conditions and did not protect against glutamate excitotoxicity or oxygen-glucose deprivation. In contrast, catalase overexpression conferred a dose-dependent protection against exposure to hydrogen peroxide (viability: control, 33.02+/-1.09%; LacZ 10 pfu/cell, 32.85+/-1.51%; catalase 1 pfu/cell, 62.09+/-4.17%*; catalase 2 pfu/cell, 98.71+/-3.35%*; catalase 10 pfu/cell, 99.68+/-1.99%*; *pcatalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole. Our results support the view that enhancing cellular antioxidant capacity may play a crucial role in neuroprotective strategies.

  16. Microbial co-habitation and lateral gene transfer: what transposases can tell us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Sean D.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-03-01

    Determining the habitat range for various microbes is not a simple, straightforward matter, as habitats interlace, microbes move between habitats, and microbial communities change over time. In this study, we explore an approach using the history of lateral gene transfer recorded in microbial genomes to begin to answer two key questions: where have you been and who have you been with? All currently sequenced microbial genomes were surveyed to identify pairs of taxa that share a transposase that is likely to have been acquired through lateral gene transfer. A microbial interaction network including almost 800 organisms was then derived from these connections. Although the majority of the connections are between closely related organisms with the same or overlapping habitat assignments, numerous examples were found of cross-habitat and cross-phylum connections. We present a large-scale study of the distributions of transposases across phylogeny and habitat, and find a significant correlation between habitat and transposase connections. We observed cases where phylogenetic boundaries are traversed, especially when organisms share habitats; this suggests that the potential exists for genetic material to move laterally between diverse groups via bridging connections. The results presented here also suggest that the complex dynamics of microbial ecology may be traceable in the microbial genomes.

  17. Butyrylcholinesterase gene transfer in obese mice prevents postdieting body weight rebound by suppressing ghrelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vicky Ping; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2017-10-10

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate but treatment options remain limited. Despite initial success, weight loss by calorie restriction (CR) often fails because of rebound weight gain. Postdieting hyperphagia along with altered hypothalamic neuro-architecture appears to be one direct cause of this undesirable outcome. In response to calorie deficiency the circulating levels of the appetite-promoting hormone, acyl-ghrelin, rise sharply. We hypothesize that proper modulation of acyl-ghrelin and its receptor's sensitivity will favorably impact energy intake and reprogram the body weight set point. Here we applied viral gene transfer of the acyl-ghrelin hydrolyzing enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Our results confirmed that BChE overexpression decreased circulating acyl-ghrelin levels, suppressed CR-provoked ghrelin signaling, and restored central ghrelin sensitivity. In addition to maintaining healthy body weights, BChE treated mice had modest postdieting food intake and showed normal glucose homeostasis. Spontaneous activity and energy expenditure did not differ significantly between treated and untreated mice after body weight rebound, suggesting that BChE gene transfer did not alter energy expenditure in the long term. These findings indicate that combining BChE treatment with CR could be an effective approach in treating human obesity and aiding lifelong weight management.

  18. Long-term effects for acute phase myocardial infarct VEGF165 gene transfer cardiac extracellular matrix remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataveli, Fabio D'Aguiar; Han, Sang Won; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Mendes, Aline; Kanishiro, Rose; Tucci, Paulo; Lopes, Antonio Carlos; Baptista-Silva, Jose Carlos Costa; Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto; de Carvalho, Leonardo Pinto; Denapoli, Priscila Martins Andrade; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2009-02-01

    Cardiac remodeling is ultimately regulated by components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated the important role that growth factors play in the regulation of ECM remodeling that occurs as a consequence of myocardium damage. Rats were submitted to the ligation of the left anterior coronary artery and pcDNA3-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)(165) was immediately injected intramyocardially in the treated group. The animals were divided into large size myocardium infarction (LMI) and small size myocardium infarction, with or without gene transfer. The plasmid-containing DNA encoding VEGF(165) was injected into the cardiac muscle and its effect was observed on the ECM components. Glycosaminoglycans were identified and quantified by agarose gel based electrophoresis and ELISA as well as immunocytochemistry to examine specific cathepsin B, heparanase, and syndecan-4 changes. The amounts of hyaluronic acid (HA; p < 0.005), DS, chondroitin sulfate, and heparan sulfate (p < 0.001) were significantly increased in the LMI treated group in comparison to the other groups, which correlates with the decrease in the expression of heparanase. A decrease in the molecular mass of HA was found in the scar tissue of treated group. The data obtained strongly support the idea that changes in the ECM and its components are important determinants of cardiac remodeling after myocardium infarct and may be essential for inflammatory response and attempt to stabilize the damage and provide a compensatory mechanisms to maintain cardiac output since the ECM components analyzed are involved with angiogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation.

  19. Lateral gene transfer of streptococcal ICE element RD2 (region of difference 2 encoding secreted proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mereghetti Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of serotype M28 group A Streptococcus (GAS strain MGAS6180 contains a novel genetic element named Region of Difference 2 (RD2 that encodes seven putative secreted extracellular proteins. RD2 is present in all serotype M28 strains and strains of several other GAS serotypes associated with female urogenital infections. We show here that the GAS RD2 element is present in strain MGAS6180 both as an integrative chromosomal form and a circular extrachromosomal element. RD2-like regions were identified in publicly available genome sequences of strains representing three of the five major group B streptococcal serotypes causing human disease. Ten RD2-encoded proteins have significant similarity to proteins involved in conjugative transfer of Streptococcus thermophilus integrative chromosomal elements (ICEs. Results We transferred RD2 from GAS strain MGAS6180 (serotype M28 to serotype M1 and M4 GAS strains by filter mating. The copy number of the RD2 element was rapidly and significantly increased following treatment of strain MGAS6180 with mitomycin C, a DNA damaging agent. Using a PCR-based method, we also identified RD2-like regions in multiple group C and G strains of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp.equisimilis cultured from invasive human infections. Conclusions Taken together, the data indicate that the RD2 element has disseminated by lateral gene transfer to genetically diverse strains of human-pathogenic streptococci.

  20. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Sara; Harms, Klaus; Fricke, W Florian; Johnsen, Pål J; da Silva, Gabriela J; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like). Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE), Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation provides a much

  1. Heat-transfer-based detection of SNPs in the PAH gene of PKU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanden Bon N

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natalie Vanden Bon,1 Bart van Grinsven,2 Mohammed Sharif Murib,2 Weng Siang Yeap,2 Ken Haenen,2,3 Ward De Ceuninck,2,3 Patrick Wagner,2,3 Marcel Ameloot,1 Veronique Vermeeren,1 Luc Michiels11Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 2Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 3IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, BelgiumAbstract: Conventional neonatal diagnosis of phenylketonuria is based on the presence of abnormal levels of phenylalanine in the blood. However, for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis, direct detection of disease-correlated mutations is needed. To speed up and simplify mutation screening in genes, new technologies are developed. In this study, a heat-transfer method is evaluated as a mutation-detection technology in entire exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene. This method is based on the change in heat-transfer resistance (Rth upon thermal denaturation of dsDNA (double-stranded DNA on nanocrystalline diamond. First, ssDNA (single-stranded DNA fragments that span the size range of the PAH exons were successfully immobilized on nanocrystalline diamond. Next, it was studied whether an Rth change could be observed during the thermal denaturation of these DNA fragments after hybridization to their complementary counterpart. A clear Rth shift during the denaturation of exon 5, exon 9, and exon 12 dsDNA was observed, corresponding to lengths of up to 123 bp. Finally, Rth was shown to detect prevalent single-nucleotide polymorphisms, c.473G>A (R158Q, c.932T>C (p.L311P, and c.1222C>T (R408W, correlated with phenylketonuria, displaying an effect related to the different melting temperatures of homoduplexes and heteroduplexes.Keywords: mutation detection, heat-transfer resistance, melting temperature, nanocrystalline diamond, persistence length

  2. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Etienne G J; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Rancurel, Corinne; Thorpe, Peter; Da Rocha, Martine; Bajew, Simon; Neilson, Roy; Guzeeva, Elena Sokolova; Da Silva, Corinne; Guy, Julie; Labadie, Karine; Esmenjaud, Daniel; Helder, Johannes; Jones, John T; den Akker, Sebastian Eves-van

    2017-10-23

    Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been implicated in the evolution of plant parasitism. We have used ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNAseq) to generate reference transcriptomes for two economically important nematode species, Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus , representative of two genera within the early-branching Clade 2 of the phylum Nematoda. We used a transcriptome-wide analysis to identify putative horizontal gene transfer events. This represents the first in-depth transcriptome analysis from any plant-parasitic nematode of this clade. For each species, we assembled ~30 million Illumina reads into a reference transcriptome. We identified 62 and 104 transcripts, from X. index and L. elongatus , respectively, that were putatively acquired via horizontal gene transfer. By cross-referencing horizontal gene transfer prediction with a phylum-wide analysis of Pfam domains, we identified Clade 2-specific events. Of these, a GH12 cellulase from X. index was analysed phylogenetically and biochemically, revealing a likely bacterial origin and canonical enzymatic function. Horizontal gene transfer was previously shown to be a phenomenon that has contributed to the evolution of plant parasitism among nematodes. Our findings underline the importance and the extensiveness of this phenomenon in the evolution of plant-parasitic life styles in this speciose and widespread animal phylum.

  3. Dual effects of adenovirus-mediated thrombopoietin gene transfer on hepatic oval cell proliferation and platelet counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiba, Miho; Shimomura, Takashi; Murai, Rie; Hashiguchi, Koichi; Saeki, Toshiya; Yoshida, Yoko; Kanbe, Takamasa; Tanabe, Naotada; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Miura, Norimasa; Tajima, Fumihito; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Shiota, Goshi

    2005-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the growth factor for megakaryocytes and platelets, however, it also acts as a potent regulator of stem cell proliferation. To examine the significance of TPO expression in proliferation of hepatic oval cells, the effect of adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer into livers of the Solt-Farber model, which mimics the condition where liver regeneration is impaired, was examined. Hepatic TPO mRNA peaked its expression at 2 days after gene transduction and then gradually decreased. The peripheral platelet number began to increase at 4 days (P < 0.05) and reached its plateau at 9 days (P < 0.01). Oval cells expressed c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO as well as immature hematopoietic and hepatocytic surface markers such as CD34 and AFP. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive oval cells in rats into which adenovirus-TPO gene was transferred at 7 and 9 days were significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each), and the total numbers of oval cells in the adenovirus-TPO gene transferred at 9 and 13 days were also significantly greater than those in adenovirus-LacZ gene transferred (P < 0.05, each). Expression of SCF protein was increased at 4, 7, and 9 days by TPO gene administration and that of c-Kit was increased at 4 and 7 days. These data suggest that adenovirus-mediated TPO gene transfer stimulated oval cell proliferation in liver as well as increasing peripheral platelet counts, emphasizing the significance of the TPO/c-Mpl system in proliferation of hepatic oval cells

  4. Control of gene expression during T cell activation: alternate regulation of mRNA transcription and mRNA stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorospe Myriam

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. The effective correlation of observed changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements remains difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Results In order to investigate the relative contribution of gene transcription and changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression, we used two distinct microarray methods which individually measure nuclear gene transcription and changes in polyA mRNA gene expression. Gene expression profiles were obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin. Comparative analysis revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in polyA mRNA in this system, as inferred by the absence of any corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for these groups of genes. Genes which displayed dramatic elevations in both mRNA and nuclear run-on RNA were shown to be inhibited by Actinomycin D (ActD pre-treatment of cells while large numbers of genes regulated only through altered mRNA turnover (both up and down were ActD-resistant. Consistent patterns across the time course were observed for both transcribed and stability-regulated genes. Conclusion We propose that regulation of mRNA stability contributes significantly to the observed changes in gene expression in response to external stimuli, as measured by high throughput systems.

  5. Arsenate stabilized Cu₂O nanoparticle catalyst for one-electron transfer reversible reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ramkrishna; Dutta, Soumen; Pradhan, Mukul; Ray, Chaiti; Roy, Anindita; Pal, Tarasankar; Pal, Anjali

    2014-05-14

    The befitting capping capabilities of AsO4(3-) provide a stable Cu2O nanocatalyst from a galvanic reaction between a Cu(II) precursor salt and As(0) nanoparticles. This stable Cu2O hydrosol appears to be a suitable catalyst for the one-electron transfer reversible redox reaction between Eosin Y and NaBH4. The progress of the reaction relates to three different kinetic stages. In the presence of the new catalyst the reversible redox reaction of Eosin Y in air shows a periodic color change providing a new crowd-pleasing demonstration, i.e. a "clock reaction".

  6. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  7. Stabilization

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    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  8. Efficiency of RAFT-synthesized PDMAEMA in gene transfer to the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitoque, Diogo B; Simão, Sónia; Oliveira, Ana V; Machado, Susana; Duran, Margarita R; Lopes, Eduardo; da Costa, Ana M Rosa; Silva, Gabriela A

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy has long been heralded as the new hope to evolve from symptomatic care of genetic pathologies to a full cure. Recent successes in using gene therapy for treating several ocular and haematopoietic pathologies have shown the great potential of this approach that, in the early days, relied on the use of viral vectors, which were considered by many to be undesirable for human treatment. Therefore, there is considerable interest and effort in developing non-viral vectors, with efficiency close to that of viral vectors. The aim of this study was to develop suitable non-viral carriers for gene therapy to treat pathologies affecting the retina. In this study poly(2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate), PDMAEMA was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) and the in vitro cytocompatibility and transfection efficiency of a range of polymer:DNA ratios evaluated using a retinal cell line; in vivo biocompatibility was evaluated by ocular injection in C57BL/6 mice. The results showed that through RAFT, it is possible to produce a defined-size polymer that is compatible with cell viability in vitro and capable of efficiently directing gene expression in a polymer-DNA ratio-dependent manner. When injected into the eyes of mice, these vectors induced a transient, mild inflammation, characteristic of the implantation of medical devices. These results form the basis of future studies where RAFT-synthesized PDMAEMA will be used to deliver gene expression systems to the retina of mouse models of retinal pathologies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Putative cross-kingdom horizontal gene transfer in sponge (Porifera mitochondria

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    Ilan Micha

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial genome of Metazoa is usually a compact molecule without introns. Exceptions to this rule have been reported only in corals and sea anemones (Cnidaria, in which group I introns have been discovered in the cox1 and nad5 genes. Here we show several lines of evidence demonstrating that introns can also be found in the mitochondria of sponges (Porifera. Results A 2,349 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cox1 gene was sequenced from the sponge Tetilla sp. (Spirophorida. This fragment suggests the presence of a 1143 bp intron. Similar to all the cnidarian mitochondrial introns, the putative intron has group I intron characteristics. The intron is present in the cox1 gene and encodes a putative homing endonuclease. In order to establish the distribution of this intron in sponges, the cox1 gene was sequenced from several representatives of the demosponge diversity. The intron was found only in the sponge order Spirophorida. A phylogenetic analysis of the COI protein sequence and of the intron open reading frame suggests that the intron may have been transmitted horizontally from a fungus donor. Conclusion Little is known about sponge-associated fungi, although in the last few years the latter have been frequently isolated from sponges. We suggest that the horizontal gene transfer of a mitochondrial intron was facilitated by a symbiotic relationship between fungus and sponge. Ecological relationships are known to have implications at the genomic level. Here, an ecological relationship between sponge and fungus is suggested based on the genomic analysis.

  10. Multiple interkingdom horizontal gene transfers in Pyrenophora and closely related species and their contributions to phytopathogenic lifestyles.

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    Bao-Fa Sun

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported horizontal gene transfer (HGT events from eukaryotes, especially fungi. However, only a few investigations summarized multiple interkingdom HGTs involving important phytopathogenic species of Pyrenophora and few have investigated the genetic contributions of HGTs to fungi. We investigated HGT events in P. teres and P. tritici-repentis and discovered that both species harbored 14 HGT genes derived from bacteria and plants, including 12 HGT genes that occurred in both species. One gene coding a leucine-rich repeat protein was present in both species of Pyrenophora and it may have been transferred from a host plant. The transfer of genes from a host plant to pathogenic fungi has been reported rarely and we discovered the first evidence for this transfer in phytopathogenic Pyrenophora. Two HGTs in Pyrenophora underwent subsequent duplications. Some HGT genes had homologs in a few other fungi, indicating relatively ancient transfer events. Functional analyses indicated that half of the HGT genes encoded extracellular proteins and these may have facilitated the infection of plants by Pyrenophora via interference with plant defense-response and the degradation of plant cell walls. Some other HGT genes appeared to participate in carbohydrate metabolism. Together, these functions implied that HGTs may have led to highly efficient mechanisms of infection as well as the utilization of host carbohydrates. Evolutionary analyses indicated that HGT genes experienced amelioration, purifying selection, and accelerated evolution. These appeared to constitute adaptations to the background genome of the recipient. The discovery of multiple interkingdom HGTs in Pyrenophora, their significance to infection, and their adaptive evolution, provided valuable insights into the evolutionary significance of interkingdom HGTs from multiple donors.

  11. Expression of VEGF protein of lung and liver in GM-CSF gene transferred mice after neutron acute injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bin; Yang Zhanshan; Wang Tianchang; Li Na; Hu Lijun; Yang Binjun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study lung and liver vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression changes in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor(GM-CSF) transgene mice after neutron exposure. Methods: Male BALB/C mice were irradiated with neutron, in dose of 0.6Gy, the mice were divided into the non-transfer group and the gene transfer group. In the gene transfer group, hGM-CSF gene was transfered by electroporation in vivo 24 h prior to exposure. Animals in the two groups were sacrificed at the 1st, 14th, 28th day, using pathologic test, immunohistochemica test and Western blot to study VEGF protein expression in lung and liver. Results: From 14 d to 28 d after exposure, the levels of VEGF protein expression in the mice in the genetransfer group was significantly higher than that in the non-transfer group. Conclusion: GM-CSF in vivo gene transfer in mice significantly promote angiogenesis and restoration in the climax and recovery phase acute injury caused by neutron. (authors)

  12. RP-2 Thermal Stability and Heat Transfer Investigation for Hydrocarbon Boost Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNoord, J. L.; Stiegemeier, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    A series of electrically heated tube tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Heated Tube Facility to investigate the use of RP-2 as a fuel for next generation regeneratively cooled hydrocarbon boost engines. The effect that test duration, operating condition and test piece material have on the overall thermal stability and materials compatibility characteristics of RP-2 were evaluated using copper and 304 stainless steel test sections. The copper tests were run at 1000 psia, heat flux up to 6.0 Btu/in.2-sec, and wall temperatures up to 1180 F. Preliminary results, using measured wall temperature as an indirect indicator of the carbon deposition process, show that in copper test pieces above approximately 850 F, RP-2 begins to undergo thermal decomposition resulting in local carbon deposits. Wall temperature traces show significant local temperature increases followed by near instantaneous drops which have been attributed to the carbon deposition/shedding process in previous investigations. Data reduction is currently underway for the stainless steel test sections and carbon deposition measurements will be performed in the future for all test sections used in this investigation. In conjunction with the existing thermal stability database, these findings give insight into the feasibility of cooling a long life, high performance, high-pressure liquid rocket combustor and nozzle with RP-2.

  13. Retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human β-globin genes in cultured murine and human erythroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber-Benarous, A.; Cone, R.D.; London, I.M.; Mulligan, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors cloned human β-globin DNA sequences from a genomic library prepared from DNA isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562 and have used the retroviral vector pZip-NeoSV(X)1 to introduce a 3.0-kilobase segment encompassing the globin gene into mouse erythroleukemia cells. Whereas the endogenous K562 β-globin gene is repressed in K562 cells, when introduced into mouse erythroleukemia cells by retroviral-mediated gene transfer, the β-globin gene from K562 cells was transcribed and induced 5-20-fold after treatment of the cells with dimethyl sulfoxide. The transcripts were correctly initiated, and expression and regulation of the K562 gene were identical to the expression of a normal human β-globin gene transferred into mouse erythroleukemia cells in the same way. They have also introduced the normal human β-globin gene into K562 cells using the same retrovirus vector. SP6 analysis of the RNA isolated from the transduced cells showed that the normal β-globin gene was transcribed at a moderately high level, before or after treatment with hemin. Based on these data, they suggest that the lack of expression of the endogenous β-globin gene in K562 cells does not result from an alteration in the gene itself and may not result from a lack of factor(s) necessary for β-lobin gene transcription. Retroviral-mediated transfer of the human β-globin gene may, however, uniquely influence expression of the gene K562 cells

  14. Dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in microbial ecosystems through horizontal gene transfer

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    Christian Johannes Hendrik Von Wintersdorff

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria has been a rising problem for public health in recent decades. It is becoming increasingly recognized that not only antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs encountered in clinical pathogens are of relevance, but rather, all pathogenic, commensal as well as environmental bacteria – and also mobile genetic elements and bacteriophages – form a reservoir of ARGs (the resistome from which pathogenic bacteria can acquire resistance via horizontal gene transfer (HGT. HGT has caused antibiotic resistance to spread from commensal and environmental species to pathogenic ones, as has been shown for some clinically important ARGs. Of the three canonical mechanisms of HGT, conjugation is thought to have the greatest influence on the dissemination of ARGs. While transformation and transduction are deemed less important, recent discoveries suggest their role may be larger than previously thought. Understanding the extent of the resistome and how its mobilization to pathogenic bacteria takes place is essential for efforts to control the dissemination of these genes. Here, we will discuss the concept of the resistome, provide examples of HGT of clinically relevant ARGs and present an overview of the current knowledge of the contributions the various HGT mechanisms make to the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  15. Parkinson-related parkin reduces α-Synuclein phosphorylation in a gene transfer model

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    Rebeck GW

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α-Synuclein aggregates in Lewy bodies and plays a central role in the pathogenesis of a group of neurodegenerative disorders, known as "Synucleinopathies", including Parkinson's disease. Parkin mutations result in loss of parkin E3-ubiquitin ligase activity and cause autosomal recessive early onset parkinsonism. Results We tested how these two genes interact by examining the effects of parkin on post-translational modification of α-Synuclein in gene transfer animal models, using a lentiviral gene delivery system into the striatum of 2-month old male Sprague Dawley rats. Viral expression of wild type α-Synuclein caused accumulation of α-Synuclein and was associated with increased cell death and inflammation. α-Synuclein increased PLK2 levels and GSK-3β activity and increased the levels of phosphorylated α-Synuclein and Tau. Parkin co-expression reduced the levels of phosphorylated α-Synuclein and attenuated cell death and inflammation. Parkin reduced PLK2 levels and increased PP2A activation. Conclusions These data suggest that parkin reduces α-Synuclein levels and alters the balance between phosphatase and kinase activities that affect the levels of phosphorylated α-Synuclein. These results indicate novel mechanisms for parkin protection against α-Synuclein-induced toxicity in PD.

  16. Polygalacturonase from Sitophilus oryzae: Possible horizontal transfer of a pectinase gene from fungi to weevils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicheng Shen

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Endo-polygalacturonase, one of the group of enzymes known collectively as pectinases, is widely distributed in bacteria, plants and fungi. The enzyme has also been found in several weevil species and a few other insects, such as aphids, but not in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, or Caenorhabditis elegans or, as far as is known, in any more primitive animal species. What, then, is the genetic origin of the polygalacturonases in weevils? Since some weevil species harbor symbiotic microorganisms, it has been suggested, reasonably, that the symbionts' genomes of both aphids and weevils, rather than the insects' genomes, could encode polygalacturonase. We report here the cloning of a cDNA that encodes endo-polygalacturonase in the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L., and investigations based on the cloned cDNA. Our results, which include analysis of genes in antibiotic-treated rice weevils, indicate that the enzyme is, in fact, encoded by the insect genome. Given the apparent absence of the gene in much of the rest of the animal kingdom, it is therefore likely that the rice weevil polygalacturonase gene was incorporated into the weevil's genome by horizontal transfer, possibly from a fungus.

  17. Generation of biallelic knock-out sheep via gene-editing and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honghui; Wang, Gui; Hao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Guozhong; Qing, Yubo; Liu, Shuanghui; Qing, Lili; Pan, Weirong; Chen, Lei; Liu, Guichun; Zhao, Ruoping; Jia, Baoyu; Zeng, Luyao; Guo, Jianxiong; Zhao, Lixiao; Zhao, Heng; Lv, Chaoxiang; Xu, Kaixiang; Cheng, Wenmin; Li, Hushan; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Wang, Wen; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-09-22

    Transgenic sheep can be used to achieve genetic improvements in breeds and as an important large-animal model for biomedical research. In this study, we generated a TALEN plasmid specific for ovine MSTN and transfected it into fetal fibroblast cells of STH sheep. MSTN biallelic-KO somatic cells were selected as nuclear donor cells for SCNT. In total, cloned embryos were transferred into 37 recipient gilts, 28 (75.7%) becoming pregnant and 15 delivering, resulting in 23 lambs, 12 of which were alive. Mutations in the lambs were verified via sequencing and T7EI assay, and the gene mutation site was consistent with that in the donor cells. Off-target analysis was performed, and no off-target mutations were detected. MSTN KO affected the mRNA expression of MSTN relative genes. The growth curve for the resulting sheep suggested that MSTN KO caused a remarkable increase in body weight compared with those of wild-type sheep. Histological analyses revealed that MSTN KO resulted in muscle fiber hypertrophy. These findings demonstrate the successful generation of MSTN biallelic-KO STH sheep via gene editing in somatic cells using TALEN technology and SCNT. These MSTN mutant sheep developed and grew normally, and exhibited increased body weight and muscle growth.

  18. Generation of biallelic knock-out sheep via gene-editing and somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honghui; Wang, Gui; Hao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Guozhong; Qing, Yubo; Liu, Shuanghui; Qing, Lili; Pan, Weirong; Chen, Lei; Liu, Guichun; Zhao, Ruoping; Jia, Baoyu; Zeng, Luyao; Guo, Jianxiong; Zhao, Lixiao; Zhao, Heng; Lv, Chaoxiang; Xu, Kaixiang; Cheng, Wenmin; Li, Hushan; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Wang, Wen; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic sheep can be used to achieve genetic improvements in breeds and as an important large-animal model for biomedical research. In this study, we generated a TALEN plasmid specific for ovine MSTN and transfected it into fetal fibroblast cells of STH sheep. MSTN biallelic-KO somatic cells were selected as nuclear donor cells for SCNT. In total, cloned embryos were transferred into 37 recipient gilts, 28 (75.7%) becoming pregnant and 15 delivering, resulting in 23 lambs, 12 of which were alive. Mutations in the lambs were verified via sequencing and T7EI assay, and the gene mutation site was consistent with that in the donor cells. Off-target analysis was performed, and no off-target mutations were detected. MSTN KO affected the mRNA expression of MSTN relative genes. The growth curve for the resulting sheep suggested that MSTN KO caused a remarkable increase in body weight compared with those of wild-type sheep. Histological analyses revealed that MSTN KO resulted in muscle fiber hypertrophy. These findings demonstrate the successful generation of MSTN biallelic-KO STH sheep via gene editing in somatic cells using TALEN technology and SCNT. These MSTN mutant sheep developed and grew normally, and exhibited increased body weight and muscle growth. PMID:27654750

  19. The Or gene enhances carotenoid accumulation and stability during post-harvest storage of potato tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yang, Yong; Xu, Qiang; Owsiany, Katherine; Welsch, Ralf; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Lu, Shan; Van Eck, Joyce; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Failla, Mark; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2012-03-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality. To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability, we investigated transgenic potato tubers that expressed the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene. We found that the Or transgene not only promoted retention of β-carotene level, but also continuously stimulated its accumulation during 5 months of cold storage. In contrast, no increased levels of carotenoids were observed in the tubers of vector-only controls or a yellow-flesh variety during the same period of storage. The increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be associated with the formation of lipoprotein-carotenoid sequestering structures, as well as with the enhanced abundance of phytoene synthase, a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the provitamin A carotenoids stored were shown to be stable during simulated digestion and accessible for uptake by human intestinal absorptive cells. Proteomic analysis identified three major functional groups of proteins (i.e. heat shock proteins, glutathione-S-transferases, and carbohydrate metabolic proteins) that are potentially important in the Or-regulated carotenoid accumulation. Our results show that regulation of carotenoid sequestration capacity is an important mechanism by which carotenoid stability is regulated. Our findings suggest that induction of a proper sink structure formation in staple crops may provide the crops with a unique ability to promote and/or stabilize provitamin A accumulation during plant growth and post-harvest storage.

  20. Orexin gene transfer into the amygdala suppresses both spontaneous and emotion-induced cataplexy in orexin-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Konadhode, Roda Rani; Luan, Liju; Shiromani, Priyattam J

    2016-03-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder linked to the loss of orexin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Cataplexy, a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking, is an important distinguishing symptom of narcolepsy and it is often triggered by strong emotions. The neural circuit underlying cataplexy attacks is not known, but is likely to involve the amygdala, a region implicated in regulating emotions. In mice models of narcolepsy, transfer of the orexin gene into surrogate neurons has been successful in ameliorating narcoleptic symptoms. However, it is not known whether this method also blocks cataplexy triggered by strong emotions. To examine this possibility, the gene encoding mouse prepro-orexin was transferred into amygdala neurons of orexin-knockout (KO) mice (rAAV-orexin; n = 8). Orexin-KO mice that did not receive gene transfer (no-rAAV; n = 7) or received only the reporter gene (rAAV-GFP; n = 7) served as controls. Three weeks later, the animal's sleep and behaviour were recorded at night (no-odour control night), followed by another recording at night in the presence of predator odour (odour night). Orexin-KO mice given the orexin gene transfer into surrogate amygdala neurons had significantly less spontaneous bouts of cataplexy, and predator odour did not induce cataplexy compared with control mice. Moreover, the mice with orexin gene transfer were awake more during the odour night. These results demonstrate that orexin gene transfer into amygdala neurons can suppress both spontaneous and emotion-induced cataplexy attacks in narcoleptic mice. It suggests that manipulating amygdala pathways is a potential strategy for treating cataplexy in narcolepsy. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Area-Specific Cell Stimulation via Surface-Mediated Gene Transfer Using Apatite-Based Composite Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushin Yazaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface-mediated gene transfer systems using biocompatible calcium phosphate (CaP-based composite layers have attracted attention as a tool for controlling cell behaviors. In the present study we aimed to demonstrate the potential of CaP-based composite layers to mediate area-specific dual gene transfer and to stimulate cells on an area-by-area basis in the same well. For this purpose we prepared two pairs of DNA–fibronectin–apatite composite (DF-Ap layers using a pair of reporter genes and pair of differentiation factor genes. The results of the area-specific dual gene transfer successfully demonstrated that the cells cultured on a pair of DF-Ap layers that were adjacently placed in the same well showed specific gene expression patterns depending on the gene that was immobilized in theunderlying layer. Moreover, preliminary real-time PCR results indicated that multipotential C3H10T1/2 cells may have a potential to change into different types of cells depending on the differentiation factor gene that was immobilized in the underlying layer, even in the same well. Because DF-Ap layers have a potential to mediate area-specific cell stimulation on their surfaces, they could be useful in tissue engineering applications.

  2. Genomic stability of lyophilized sheep somatic cells before and after nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuso, Domenico; Czernik, Marta; Di Egidio, Fiorella; Sampino, Silvestre; Zacchini, Federica; Bochenek, Michal; Smorag, Zdzislaw; Modlinski, Jacek A; Ptak, Grazyna; Loi, Pasqualino

    2013-01-01

    The unprecedented decline of biodiversity worldwide is urging scientists to collect and store biological material from seriously threatened animals, including large mammals. Lyophilization is being explored as a low-cost system for storage in bio-banks of cells that might be used to expand or restore endangered or extinct species through the procedure of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT). Here we report that the genome is intact in about 60% of lyophylized sheep lymphocytes, whereas DNA damage occurs randomly in the remaining 40%. Remarkably, lyophilized nuclei injected into enucleated oocytes are repaired by a robust DNA repairing activity of the oocytes, and show normal developmental competence. Cloned embryos derived from lyophylized cells exhibited chromosome and cellular composition comparable to those of embryos derived from fresh donor cells. These findings support the feasibility of lyophylization as a storage procedure of mammalian cells to be used for SCNT.

  3. Facile phase transfer of gold nanorods and nanospheres stabilized with block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikov, Yaroslav I; Shandryuk, Georgiy A; Talroze, Raisa V; Ezhov, Alexander A; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2018-01-01

    A fast route to transfer Au nanoparticles from aqueous to organic media is proposed based on the use of a high molecular mass diblock copolymer of styrene and 2-vinylpyridine for ligand exchange at the nanoparticle surface. The method enables the preparation of stable sols of Au nanorods with sizes of up to tens of nanometers or Au nanospheres in various organic solvents. By comparing the optical absorbance spectra of Au hydro- and organosols with the data of numerical simulations of the surface plasmon resonance, we find that nanoparticles do not aggregate and confirm the transmission electron microscopy data regarding their shape and size. The proposed approach can be effective in preparing hybrid composites without the use of strong thiol and amine surfactants.

  4. Live embryo imaging to follow cell cycle and chromosomes stability after nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbach, Sebastian T; Boiani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) into mouse oocytes yields a transcriptionally and functionally heterogeneous population of cloned embryos. Most studies of NT embryos consider only embryos at predefined key stages (e.g., morula or blastocyst), that is, after the bulk of reprogramming has taken place. These retrospective approaches are of limited use to elucidate mechanisms of reprogramming and to predict developmental success. Observing cloned embryo development using live embryo cinematography has the potential to reveal otherwise undetectable embryo features. However, light exposure necessary for live cell cinematography is highly toxic to cloned embryos. Here we describe a protocol for combined bright-field and fluorescence live-cell imaging of histone H2b-GFP expressing mouse embryos, to record cell divisions up to the blastocyst stage. This protocol, which can be adapted to observe other reporters such as Oct4-GFP or Nanog-GFP, allowed us to quantitatively analyze cleavage kinetics of cloned embryos.

  5. Genomic stability of lyophilized sheep somatic cells before and after nuclear transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Iuso

    Full Text Available The unprecedented decline of biodiversity worldwide is urging scientists to collect and store biological material from seriously threatened animals, including large mammals. Lyophilization is being explored as a low-cost system for storage in bio-banks of cells that might be used to expand or restore endangered or extinct species through the procedure of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT. Here we report that the genome is intact in about 60% of lyophylized sheep lymphocytes, whereas DNA damage occurs randomly in the remaining 40%. Remarkably, lyophilized nuclei injected into enucleated oocytes are repaired by a robust DNA repairing activity of the oocytes, and show normal developmental competence. Cloned embryos derived from lyophylized cells exhibited chromosome and cellular composition comparable to those of embryos derived from fresh donor cells. These findings support the feasibility of lyophylization as a storage procedure of mammalian cells to be used for SCNT.

  6. Modeling horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the gut of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durvasula Ravi V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paratransgenesis is an approach to reducing arthropod vector competence using genetically modified symbionts. When applied to control of Chagas disease, the symbiont bacterium Rhodococcus rhodnii, resident in the gut lumen of the triatomine vector Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae, is transformed to export cecropin A, an insect immune peptide. Cecropin A is active against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. While proof of concept has been achieved in laboratory studies, a rigorous and comprehensive risk assessment is required prior to consideration of field release. An important part of this assessment involves estimating probability of transgene horizontal transfer to environmental organisms (HGT. This article presents a two-part risk assessment methodology: a theoretical model predicting HGT in the gut of R. prolixus from the genetically transformed symbiont R. rhodnii to a closely related non-target bacterium, Gordona rubropertinctus, in the absence of selection pressure, and a series of laboratory trials designed to test the model. Results The model predicted an HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations at the 99% certainty level. The model was iterated twenty times, with the mean of the ten highest outputs evaluated at the 99% certainty level. Laboratory trials indicated no horizontal gene transfer, supporting the conclusions of the model. Conclusions The model treats HGT as a composite event, the probability of which is determined by the joint probability of three independent events: gene transfer through the modalities of transformation, transduction, and conjugation. Genes are represented in matrices and Monte Carlo method and Markov chain analysis are used to simulate and evaluate environmental conditions. The model is intended as a risk assessment instrument and predicts HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations. With laboratory studies that

  7. Age-related Differences in Dystrophin: Impact on Force Transfer Proteins, Membrane Integrity, and Neuromuscular Junction Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David C; Marcotte, George R; Marshall, Andrea G; West, Daniel W D; Baehr, Leslie M; Wallace, Marita A; Saleh, Perrie M; Bodine, Sue C; Baar, Keith

    2017-05-01

    The loss of muscle strength with age has been studied from the perspective of a decline in muscle mass and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) stability. A third potential factor is force transmission. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes in the force transfer apparatus within aging muscle and the impact on membrane integrity and NMJ stability. We measured an age-related loss of dystrophin protein that was greatest in the flexor muscles. The loss of dystrophin protein occurred despite a twofold increase in dystrophin mRNA. Importantly, this disparity could be explained by the four- to fivefold upregulation of the dystromir miR-31. To compensate for the loss of dystrophin protein, aged muscle contained increased α-sarcoglycan, syntrophin, sarcospan, laminin, β1-integrin, desmuslin, and the Z-line proteins α-actinin and desmin. In spite of the adaptive increase in other force transfer proteins, over the 48 hours following lengthening contractions, the old muscles showed more signs of impaired membrane integrity (fourfold increase in immunoglobulin G-positive fibers and 70% greater dysferlin mRNA) and NMJ instability (14- to 96-fold increases in Runx1, AchRδ, and myogenin mRNA). Overall, these data suggest that age-dependent alterations in dystrophin leave the muscle membrane and NMJ more susceptible to contraction-induced damage even before changes in muscle mass are obvious. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Polycations increase the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcasoy, S M; Latoche, J D; Gondor, M; Pitt, B R; Pilewski, J M

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses are being developed for gene therapy for cystic fibrosis and other lung diseases, and for prevention and treatment of vascular thrombosis. A major limitation to the clinical utility of adenoviruses is the low efficiency of gene transfer achieved in vivo. In addition, little is known about the initial interactions between adenoviruses and the target cell. To address the hypothesis that the negative charge presented by membrane glycoproteins reduces the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, primary cultures of human airway, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, an immortalized cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell line, and primary cultures of sheep pulmonary artery endothelium were infected with recombinant adenovirus containing the E. coli lacZ reporter gene (Ad2 beta gal2) in the presence of various polyions. For each cell type, adsorption of Ad2 beta gal2 in the presence of the polycations polybrene, protamine, DEAE-dextran, and poly-L-lysine significantly increased the percentage of cells that express lacZ. The polyanion heparin did not significantly alter gene transfer efficiency, but completely abrogated the effects of polycations. These data provide evidence that negatively charged moieties on the cell surface reduce the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, and that alteration of the charge interaction between adenoviruses and the cell surface may improve the potential clinical application of these vectors.

  9. The Dynamics of Lateral Gene Transfer in Genus Leishmania - A Route for Adaptation and Species Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikeved, Elisabet; Backlund, Anders; Alsmark, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Leishmania major harbours a comparably high proportion of genes of prokaryote origin, acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Some of these are present in closely related trypanosomatids, while some are detected in Leishmania only. We have evaluated the impact and destiny of LGT in genus Leishmania. To study the dynamics and fate of LGTs we have performed phylogenetic, as well as nucleotide and amino acid composition analyses within orthologous groups of LGTs detected in Leishmania. A set of universal trypanosomatid LGTs was added as a reference group. Both groups of LGTs have, to some extent, ameliorated to resemble the recipient genomes. However, while virtually all of the universal trypanosomatid LGTs are distributed and conserved in the entire genus Leishmania, the LGTs uniquely present in genus Leishmania are more prone to gene loss and display faster rates of evolution. Furthermore, a PCR based approach has been employed to ascertain the presence of a set of twenty LGTs uniquely present in genus Leishmania, and three universal trypanosomatid LGTs, in ten additional strains of Leishmania. Evolutionary rates and predicted expression levels of these LGTs have also been estimated. Ten of the twenty LGTs are distributed and conserved in all species investigated, while the remainder have been subjected to modifications, or undergone pseudogenization, degradation or loss in one or more species. LGTs unique to the genus Leishmania have been acquired after the divergence of Leishmania from the other trypanosomatids, and are evolving faster than their recipient genomes. This implies that LGT in genus Leishmania is a continuous and dynamic process contributing to species differentiation and speciation. This study also highlights the importance of carefully evaluating these dynamic genes, e.g. as LGTs have been suggested as potential drug targets.

  10. Horizontal gene transfer confers fermentative metabolism in the respiratory-deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienne, Susan; Pappas, Georgios; Benabdellah, Karim; González, Antonio; Zingales, Bianca

    2012-04-01

    Among trypanosomatids, the genus Phytomonas is the only one specifically adapted to infect plants. These hosts provide a particular habitat with a plentiful supply of carbohydrates. Phytomonas sp. lacks a cytochrome-mediated respiratory chain and Krebs cycle, and ATP production relies predominantly on glycolysis. We have characterised the complete gene encoding a putative pyruvate/indolepyruvate decarboxylase (PDC/IPDC) (548 amino acids) of P. serpens, that displays high amino acid sequence similarity with phytobacteria and Leishmania enzymes. No orthologous PDC/IPDC genes were found in Trypanosoma cruzi or T. brucei. Conservation of the PDC/IPDC gene sequence was verified in 14 Phytomonas isolates. A phylogenetic analysis shows that Phytomonas protein is robustly monophyletic with Leishmania spp. and C. fasciculata enzymes. In the trees this clade appears as a sister group of indolepyruvate decarboxylases of γ-proteobacteria. This supports the proposition that a horizontal gene transfer event from a donor phytobacteria to a recipient ancestral trypanosome has occurred prior to the separation between Phytomonas, Leishmania and Crithidia. We have measured the PDC activity in P. serpens cell extracts. The enzyme has a Km value for pyruvate of 1.4mM. The acquisition of a PDC, a key enzyme in alcoholic fermentation, explains earlier observations that ethanol is one of the major end-products of glucose catabolism under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This represents an alternative and necessary route to reoxidise part of the NADH produced in the highly demanding glycolytic pathway and highlights the importance of this type of event in metabolic adaptation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lateral transfer of a lectin-like antifreeze protein gene in fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A Graham

    Full Text Available Fishes living in icy seawater are usually protected from freezing by endogenous antifreeze proteins (AFPs that bind to ice crystals and stop them from growing. The scattered distribution of five highly diverse AFP types across phylogenetically disparate fish species is puzzling. The appearance of radically different AFPs in closely related species has been attributed to the rapid, independent evolution of these proteins in response to natural selection caused by sea level glaciations within the last 20 million years. In at least one instance the same type of simple repetitive AFP has independently originated in two distant species by convergent evolution. But, the isolated occurrence of three very similar type II AFPs in three distantly related species (herring, smelt and sea raven cannot be explained by this mechanism. These globular, lectin-like AFPs have a unique disulfide-bonding pattern, and share up to 85% identity in their amino acid sequences, with regions of even higher identity in their genes. A thorough search of current databases failed to find a homolog in any other species with greater than 40% amino acid sequence identity. Consistent with this result, genomic Southern blots showed the lectin-like AFP gene was absent from all other fish species tested. The remarkable conservation of both intron and exon sequences, the lack of correlation between evolutionary distance and mutation rate, and the pattern of silent vs non-silent codon changes make it unlikely that the gene for this AFP pre-existed but was lost from most branches of the teleost radiation. We propose instead that lateral gene transfer has resulted in the occurrence of the type II AFPs in herring, smelt and sea raven and allowed these species to survive in an otherwise lethal niche.

  12. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    CERN Document Server

    Awazu, K; Tamiya, E

    2002-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm sup 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 mu m, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 mu m. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  13. In vitro assembly of a prohead-like structure of the Rhodobacter capsulatus gene transfer agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spano, Anthony J.; Chen, Frank S.; Goodman, Benjamin E.; Sabat, Agnes E.; Simon, Martha N.; Wall, Joseph S.; Correia, John J.; McIvor, Wilson; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Schnur, Joel M.; Lebedev, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    The gene transfer agent (GTA) is a phage-like particle capable of exchanging double-stranded DNA fragments between cells of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Here we show that the major capsid protein of GTA, expressed in E. coli, can be assembled into prohead-like structures in the presence of calcium ions in vitro. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of uranyl acetate staining material and thin sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed material demonstrates that these associates have spherical structures with diameters in the range of 27-35 nm. The analysis of scanning TEM images revealed particles of mass ∼ 4.3 MDa, representing 101 ± 11 copies of the monomeric subunit. The establishment of this simple and rapid method to form prohead-like particles permits the GTA system to be used for genome manipulation within the photosynthetic bacterium, for specific targeted drug delivery, and for the construction of biologically based distributed autonomous sensors for environmental monitoring

  14. New Markov Model Approaches to Deciphering Microbial Genome Function and Evolution: Comparative Genomics of Laterally Transferred Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodovsky, M.

    2013-04-11

    Algorithmic methods for gene prediction have been developed and successfully applied to many different prokaryotic genome sequences. As the set of genes in a particular genome is not homogeneous with respect to DNA sequence composition features, the GeneMark.hmm program utilizes two Markov models representing distinct classes of protein coding genes denoted "typical" and "atypical". Atypical genes are those whose DNA features deviate significantly from those classified as typical and they represent approximately 10% of any given genome. In addition to the inherent interest of more accurately predicting genes, the atypical status of these genes may also reflect their separate evolutionary ancestry from other genes in that genome. We hypothesize that atypical genes are largely comprised of those genes that have been relatively recently acquired through lateral gene transfer (LGT). If so, what fraction of atypical genes are such bona fide LGTs? We have made atypical gene predictions for all fully completed prokaryotic genomes; we have been able to compare these results to other "surrogate" methods of LGT prediction.

  15. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  16. Microbubble-enhanced ultrasound exposure improves gene transfer in vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Fang; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Tang, Qing; Lu, Ming-De

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of ultrasound exposure combined with microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) on the permeability of the cellular membrane and on the expression of plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) transfer into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). METHODS: HUVECs with fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD500) and HUVECs with pEGFP were exposed to continuous wave (1.9 MHz, 80.0 mW/cm2) for 5 min, with or without a SonoVue. The percentage of FD500 taken by the HUVECs and the transient expression rate of pEGFP in the HUVECs were examined by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. RESULTS: The percentage of FD500-positive HUVECs in the group of ultrasound exposure combined with SonoVue was significantly higher than that of the group of ultrasound exposure alone (24.0% ± 5.5% vs 66.6% ± 4.1%, P SonoVue (16.1% ± 1.9% vs 1.5% ± 0.2%, P SonoVue (94.1% ± 2.3% vs 91.1% ± 4.1%). CONCLUSION: The cell membrane permeability of HUVECs and the transfection efficiency of pEGFP into HUVECs exposed to ultrasound are significantly increased after addition of an ultrasound contrast agent without obvious damage to the survival of HUVECs. This non-invasive gene transfer method may be a useful tool for clinical gene therapy of hepatic tumors. PMID:17167842

  17. Lightning-triggered electroporation and electrofusion as possible contributors to natural horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik, Tadej

    2013-09-01

    Phylogenetic studies show that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a significant contributor to genetic variability of prokaryotes, and was perhaps even more abundant during the early evolution. Hitherto, research of natural HGT has mainly focused on three mechanisms of DNA transfer: conjugation, natural competence, and viral transduction. This paper discusses the feasibility of a fourth such mechanism--cell electroporation and/or electrofusion triggered by atmospheric electrostatic discharges (lightnings). A description of electroporation as a phenomenon is followed by a review of experimental evidence that electroporation of prokaryotes in aqueous environments can result in release of non-denatured DNA, as well as uptake of DNA from the surroundings and transformation. Similarly, a description of electrofusion is followed by a review of experiments showing that prokaryotes devoid of cell wall can electrofuse into hybrids expressing the genes of their both precursors. Under sufficiently fine-tuned conditions, electroporation and electrofusion are efficient tools for artificial transformation and hybridization, respectively, but the quantitative analysis developed here shows that conditions for electroporation-based DNA release, DNA uptake and transformation, as well as for electrofusion are also present in many natural aqueous environments exposed to lightnings. Electroporation is thus a plausible contributor to natural HGT among prokaryotes, and could have been particularly important during the early evolution, when the other mechanisms might have been scarcer or nonexistent. In modern prokaryotes, natural absence of the cell wall is rare, but it is reasonable to assume that the wall has formed during a certain stage of evolution, and at least prior to this, electrofusion could also have contributed to natural HGT. The concluding section outlines several guidelines for assessment of the feasibility of lightning-triggered HGT. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  18. Genomic stability in response to high versus low linear energy transfer radiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eHuefner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Low linear energy transfer (LET gamma rays and high LET HZE (high atomic weight, high energy particles act as powerful mutagens in both plants and animals. DNA damage generated by HZE particles is more densely clustered than that generated by gamma rays. To understand the genetic requirements for resistance to high vs. low LET radiation, a series of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants were exposed to either 1GeV Fe nuclei or gamma radiation. A comparison of effects on the germination and subsequent growth of seedlings led us to conclude that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE of the two types of radiation (HZE vs. gamma are roughly 3:1. Similarly, in wild-type lines, loss of somatic heterozygosity was induced at an RBE of about a 2:1 (HZE vs. gamma. Checkpoint and repair defects, as expected, enhanced sensitivity to both agents. The replication fork checkpoint, governed by ATR, played a slightly more important role in resistance to HZE-induced mutagenesis than in resistance to gamma induced mutagenesis.

  19. International Pig-a gene mutation assay trial: evaluation of transferability across 14 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertinger, Stephen D; Phonethepswath, Souk; Weller, Pamela; Nicolette, John; Murray, Joel; Sonders, Paul; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Shi, Jing; Krsmanovic, Ljubica; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura; Henwood, Andrew; Sweder, Kevin; Stankowski, Leon F; Roberts, Daniel J; Giddings, Amanda; Kenny, Julia; Lynch, Anthony M; Defrain, Céline; Nesslany, Fabrice; van der Leede, Bas-jan M; Van Doninck, Terry; Schuermans, Ann; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hiwata, Yoshie; Tajima, Osamu; Wilde, Eleanor; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Gunther, William C; Thiffeault, Catherine J; Shutsky, Thomas J; Fiedler, Ronald D; Kimoto, Takafumi; Bhalli, Javed A; Heflich, Robert H; MacGregor, James T

    2011-12-01

    A collaborative international trial was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility and transferability of an in vivo mutation assay based on the enumeration of CD59-negative rat erythrocytes, a phenotype that is indicative of Pig-a gene mutation. Fourteen laboratories participated in this study, where anti-CD59-PE, SYTO 13 dye, and flow cytometry were used to determine the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes (RBC(CD59-)) and CD59-negative reticulocytes (RET(CD59-)). To provide samples with a range of mutant phenotype cell frequencies, male rats were exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) via oral gavage for three consecutive days (Days 1-3). Each laboratory studied 0, 20, and 40 mg ENU/kg/day (n = 5 per group). Three sites also evaluated 4 mg/kg/day. At a minimum, blood samples were collected three times: predosing and on Days 15 and 30. Blood samples were processed according to a standardized sample processing and data acquisition protocol, and three endpoints were measured: %reticulocytes, frequency of RET(CD59-) , and frequency of RBC(CD59-) . The methodology was found to be reproducible, as the analysis of technical replicates resulted in experimental coefficients of variation that approached theoretical values. Good transferability was evident from the similar kinetics and magnitude of the dose-related responses that were observed among different laboratories. Concordance correlation coefficients showed a high level of agreement between the reference site and the test sites (range: 0.87-0.99). Collectively, these data demonstrate that with adequate training of personnel, flow cytometric analysis is capable of reliably enumerating mutant phenotype erythrocytes, thereby providing a robust in vivo mutation assay that is readily transferable across laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Background Adjusted Alignment-Free Dissimilarity Measures Improve the Detection of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kujin Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays an important role in the evolution of microbial organisms including bacteria. Alignment-free methods based on single genome compositional information have been used to detect HGT. Currently, Manhattan and Euclidean distances based on tetranucleotide frequencies are the most commonly used alignment-free dissimilarity measures to detect HGT. By testing on simulated bacterial sequences and real data sets with known horizontal transferred genomic regions, we found that more advanced alignment-free dissimilarity measures such as CVTree and d2* that take into account the background Markov sequences can solve HGT detection problems with significantly improved performance. We also studied the influence of different factors such as evolutionary distance between host and donor sequences, size of sliding window, and host genome composition on the performances of alignment-free methods to detect HGT. Our study showed that alignment-free methods can predict HGT accurately when host and donor genomes are in different order levels. Among all methods, CVTree with word length of 3, d2* with word length 3, Markov order 1 and d2* with word length 4, Markov order 1 outperform others in terms of their highest F1-score and their robustness under the influence of different factors.

  1. Phylogenomic study indicates widespread lateral gene transfer in Entamoeba and suggests a past intimate relationship with parabasalids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jessica R; Katz, Laura A

    2014-09-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has impacted the evolutionary history of eukaryotes, though to a lesser extent than in bacteria and archaea. Detecting LGT and distinguishing it from single gene tree artifacts is difficult, particularly when considering very ancient events (i.e., over hundreds of millions of years). Here, we use two independent lines of evidence--a taxon-rich phylogenetic approach and an assessment of the patterns of gene presence/absence--to evaluate the extent of LGT in the parasitic amoebozoan genus Entamoeba. Previous work has suggested that a number of genes in the genome of Entamoeba spp. were acquired by LGT. Our approach, using an automated phylogenomic pipeline to build taxon-rich gene trees, suggests that LGT is more extensive than previously thought. Our analyses reveal that genes have frequently entered the Entamoeba genome via nonvertical events, including at least 116 genes acquired directly from bacteria or archaea, plus an additional 22 genes in which Entamoeba plus one other eukaryote are nested among bacteria and/or archaea. These genes may make good candidates for novel therapeutics, as drugs targeting these genes are less likely to impact the human host. Although we recognize the challenges of inferring intradomain transfers given systematic errors in gene trees, we find 109 genes supporting LGT from a eukaryote to Entamoeba spp., and 178 genes unique to Entamoeba spp. and one other eukaryotic taxon (i.e., presence/absence data). Inspection of these intradomain LGTs provide evidence of a common sister relationship between genes of Entamoeba (Amoebozoa) and parabasalids (Excavata). We speculate that this indicates a past close relationship (e.g., symbiosis) between ancestors of these extant lineages. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Two hAT transposon genes were transferred from Brassicaceae to broomrapes and are actively expressed in some recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ting; Renner, Susanne S.; Xu, Yuxing; Qin, Yan; Wu, Jianqiang; Sun, Guiling

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence is pointing to an important role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the evolution of higher plants. However, reports of HGTs of transposable elements (TEs) in plants are still scarce, and only one case is known of a class II transposon horizontally transferred between grasses. To investigate possible TE transfers in dicots, we performed transcriptome screening in the obligate root parasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Orobanchaceae), data-mining in the draft genome assemblies of four other Orobanchaceae, gene cloning, gene annotation in species with genomic information, and a molecular phylogenetic analysis. We discovered that the broomrape genera Phelipanche and Orobanche acquired two related nuclear genes (christened BO transposase genes), a new group of the hAT superfamily of class II transposons, from Asian Sisymbrieae or a closely related tribe of Brassicaceae, by HGT. The collinearity of the flanking genes, lack of a classic border structure, and low expression levels suggest that BO transposase genes cannot transpose in Brassicaceae, whereas they are highly expressed in P. aegyptiaca. PMID:27452947

  3. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Dharmin; Jong, Marion de; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Cox, Peter; Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo; Driesse, Maarten; Avezaat, Cees; Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard; Smitt, Peter Sillevis

    2002-01-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of 123 I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with 123 I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). 123 I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with 123 I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after 123 I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with the transgene in the former E1

  4. [Development of Patient Transfer Techniques based on Postural-stability Principles for the Care Helpers in Nursing Homes and Evaluation of Effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ryewon; Jung, Dukyoo

    2016-02-01

    This study was done to develop a postural-stability patient transfer technique for care helpers in nursing homes and to evaluate its effectiveness. Four types of patient transfer techniques (Lifting towards the head board of the bed, turning to the lateral position, sitting upright on the bed, transferring from wheel chair to bed) were practiced in accordance with the following three methods; Care helpers habitually used transfer methods (Method 1), patient transfer methods according to care helper standard textbooks (Method 2), and a method developed by the author ensuring postural-stability (Method 3). The care helpers' muscle activity and four joint angles were measured. The collected data were analyzed using the program SPSS Statistic 21.0. To differentiate the muscle activity and joint angle, the Friedman test was executed and the post-hoc analysis was conducted using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Muscle activity was significantly lower during Method 3 compared to Methods 1 and 2. In addition, the joint angle was significantly lower for the knee and shoulder joint angle while performing Method 3 compared to Methods 1 and 2. Findings indicate that using postural-stability patient transfer techniques can contribute to the prevention of musculoskeletal disease which care helpers suffer from due to physically demanding patient care in nursing homes.

  5. Pharmacological modulation of humoral immunity in a nonhuman primate model of AAV gene transfer for hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingozzi, Federico; Chen, Yifeng; Murphy, Samuel L; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Tai, Alex; Price, Sandra D; Metzger, Mark E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E; High, Katherine A

    2012-07-01

    Liver gene transfer for hemophilia B has shown very promising results in recent clinical studies. A potential complication of gene-based treatments for hemophilia and other inherited disorders, however, is the development of neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against the therapeutic transgene. The risk of developing NAb to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated hepatic gene transfer for hemophilia is small but not absent, as formation of inhibitory antibodies to F.IX is observed in experimental animals following liver gene transfer. Thus, strategies to modulate antitransgene NAb responses are needed. Here, we used the anti-B cell monoclonal antibody rituximab (rtx) in combination with cyclosporine A (CsA) to eradicate anti-human F.IX NAb in rhesus macaques previously injected intravenously with AAV8 vectors expressing human F.IX. A short course of immunosuppression (IS) resulted in eradication of anti-F.IX NAb with restoration of plasma F.IX transgene product detection. In one animal, following IS anti-AAV6 antibodies also dropped below detection, allowing for successful AAV vector readministration and resulting in high levels (60% or normal) of F.IX transgene product in plasma. Though the number of animals is small, this study supports for the safety and efficacy of B cell-targeting therapies to eradicate NAb developed following AAV-mediated gene transfer.

  6. High throughput sequencing identifies an imprinted gene, Grb10, associated with the pluripotency state in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Gao, Shuai; Huang, Hua; Liu, Wenqiang; Huang, Huanwei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Yawei; Le, Rongrong; Kou, Xiaochen; Zhao, Yanhong; Kou, Zhaohui; Li, Jia; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hailin; Cai, Tao; Sun, Qingyuan; Gao, Shaorong; Han, Zhiming

    2017-07-18

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer and transcription factor mediated reprogramming are two widely used techniques for somatic cell reprogramming. Both fully reprogrammed nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, and evaluation of the stem cell pluripotency state is crucial for these applications. Previous reports have shown that the Dlk1-Dio3 region is associated with pluripotency in induced pluripotent stem cells and the incomplete somatic cell reprogramming causes abnormally elevated levels of genomic 5-methylcytosine in induced pluripotent stem cells compared to nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and embryonic stem cells. In this study, we compared pluripotency associated genes Rian and Gtl2 in the Dlk1-Dio3 region in exactly syngeneic nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells with same genomic insertion. We also assessed 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels and performed high-throughput sequencing in these cells. Our results showed that Rian and Gtl2 in the Dlk1-Dio3 region related to pluripotency in induced pluripotent stem cells did not correlate with the genes in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells, and no significant difference in 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels were observed between fully and partially reprogrammed nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Through syngeneic comparison, our study identifies for the first time that Grb10 is associated with the pluripotency state in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

  7. Transfer of human proinsulin gene into Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. via agrobacterium method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abookazemi Kameh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, approximately 5.8% in adult population around the world are suffering by diabetes. It can be caused by an increase in risk factors such as being overweight. Also it has been estimated that the number of patients will be doubled in near future and the demands for insulin hormone will be growing up by 3 to 4 % annually. Therefore, it’s necessary to develop new methods for hormone production with high rate of capacity in future. By advanced technology of transgenic DNA, the transgenic plants are introduced as an attractive system for expression and production of many kinds of pharmaceutical proteins. In this study, we investigated transfer of Human Proinsulin Gene into the Cucumber (Cucumissativus L.. Transgenic cucumber could be a great prospect for future source of eatable insulin pharmaceutical drugs to be taken by patients.Agrobacterium tumefaciensstrain LBA4404 carrying proinsulin genes with CaMV 35S promoter was used for the transformation purpose. The transgenic plants were analyzed by PCR, RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE, Dot blot and Electrochemiluminescence techniques. Production of proinsulin in cucumber could be a great prospect in molecular farming of human proinsulin.

  8. Think laterally: horizontal gene transfer from symbiotic microbes may extend the phenotype of marine sessile hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandie M Degnan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the origin of the animal kingdom, marine animals have lived in association with viruses, prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, often as symbionts. This long and continuous interaction has provided ample opportunity not only for the evolution of intimate interactions such as sharing of metabolic pathways, but also for horizontal gene transfer (HGT of non-metazoan genes into metazoan genomes. The number of demonstrated cases of inter-kingdom HGT is currently small, such that it is not yet widely appreciated as a significant player in animal evolution. Sessile marine invertebrates that vertically inherit bacterial symbionts, that have no dedicated germ line, or that bud or excise pluripotent somatic cells during their life history may be particularly receptive to HGT from their symbionts. Closer scrutiny of the growing number of genomes being accrued for these animals may thus reveal HGT as a regular source of novel variation that can function to extend the host phenotype metabolically, morphologically or even behaviourally. Taxonomic identification of symbionts will help to address the intriguing question of whether past HGT events may constrain contemporary symbioses.

  9. No evidence of inhibition of horizontal gene transfer by CRISPR-Cas on evolutionary timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gophna, Uri; Kristensen, David M; Wolf, Yuri I; Popa, Ovidiu; Drevet, Christine; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-09-01

    The CRISPR (clustered, regularly, interspaced, short, palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated genes) systems of archaea and bacteria provide adaptive immunity against viruses and other selfish elements and are believed to curtail horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Limiting acquisition of new genetic material could be one of the sources of the fitness cost of CRISPR-Cas maintenance and one of the causes of the patchy distribution of CRISPR-Cas among bacteria, and across environments. We sought to test the hypothesis that the activity of CRISPR-Cas in microbes is negatively correlated with the extent of recent HGT. Using three independent measures of HGT, we found no significant dependence between the length of CRISPR arrays, which reflects the activity of the immune system, and the estimated number of recent HGT events. In contrast, we observed a significant negative dependence between the estimated extent of HGT and growth temperature of microbes, which could be explained by the lower genetic diversity in hotter environments. We hypothesize that the relevant events in the evolution of resistance to mobile elements and proclivity for HGT, to which CRISPR-Cas systems seem to substantially contribute, occur on the population scale rather than on the timescale of species evolution.

  10. Visual evidence of horizontal gene transfer between plants and bacteria in the phytosphere of transplastomic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiroli, Alessandra; Rizzi, Aurora; Simonet, Pascal; Daffonchio, Daniele; Vogel, Timothy M; Monier, Jean-Michel

    2009-05-01

    Plant surfaces, colonized by numerous and diverse bacterial species, are often considered hot spots for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between plants and bacteria. Plant DNA released during the degradation of plant tissues can persist and remain biologically active for significant periods of time, suggesting that soil or plant-associated bacteria could be in direct contact with plant DNA. In addition, nutrients released during the decaying process may provide a copiotrophic environment conducive for opportunistic microbial growth. Using Acinetobacter baylyi strain BD413 and transplastomic tobacco plants harboring the aadA gene as models, the objective of this study was to determine whether specific niches could be shown to foster bacterial growth on intact or decaying plant tissues, to develop a competence state, and to possibly acquire exogenous plant DNA by natural transformation. Visualization of HGT in situ was performed using A. baylyi strain BD413(rbcL-DeltaPaadA::gfp) carrying a promoterless aadA::gfp fusion. Both antibiotic resistance and green fluorescence phenotypes were restored in recombinant bacterial cells after homologous recombination with transgenic plant DNA. Opportunistic growth occurred on decaying plant tissues, and a significant proportion of the bacteria developed a competence state. Quantification of transformants clearly supported the idea that the phytosphere constitutes a hot spot for HGT between plants and bacteria. The nondisruptive approach used to visualize transformants in situ provides new insights into environmental factors influencing HGT for plant tissues.

  11. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eLabonté

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a three km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32 % of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment.

  12. Challenges to develop nitrogen-fixing cereals by direct nif-gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatti, Leonardo; Rubio, Luis M

    2014-08-01

    Some regions of the developing world suffer low cereal production yields due to low fertilizer inputs, among other factors. Biological N2 fixation, catalyzed by the prokaryotic enzyme nitrogenase, is an alternative to the use of synthetic N fertilizers. The molybdenum nitrogenase is an O2-labile metalloenzyme composed of the NifDK and NifH proteins, which biosyntheses require a number of nif gene products. A challenging strategy to increase cereal crop productivity in a scenario of low N fertilization is the direct transfer of nif genes into cereals. The sensitivity of nitrogenase to O2 and the apparent complexity of nitrogenase biosynthesis are the main barriers identified so far. Expression of active NifH requires the products of nifM, nifH, and possibly nifU and nifS, whereas active NifDK requires the products of nifH, nifD, nifK, nifB, nifE, nifN, and possibly nifU, nifS, nifQ, nifV, nafY, nifW and nifZ. Plastids and mitochondria are potential subcellular locations for nitrogenase. Both could provide the ATP and electrons required for nitrogenase to function but they differ in their internal O2 levels and their ability to incorporate ammonium into amino acids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  14. Inter-genomic displacement via lateral gene transfer of bacterial trp operons in an overall context of vertical genealogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyhani Nemat O

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing conviction that lateral gene transfer plays a significant role in prokaryote genealogy opens up a need for comprehensive evaluations of gene-enzyme systems on a case-by-case basis. Genes of tryptophan biosynthesis are frequently organized as whole-pathway operons, an attribute that is expected to facilitate multi-gene transfer in a single step. We have asked whether events of lateral gene transfer are sufficient to have obscured our ability to track the vertical genealogy that underpins tryptophan biosynthesis. Results In 47 complete-genome Bacteria, the genes encoding the seven catalytic domains that participate in primary tryptophan biosynthesis were distinguished from any paralogs or xenologs engaged in other specialized functions. A reliable list of orthologs with carefully ascertained functional roles has thus been assembled and should be valuable as an annotation resource. The protein domains associated with primary tryptophan biosynthesis were then concatenated, yielding single amino-acid sequence strings that represent the entire tryptophan pathway. Lateral gene transfer of several whole-pathway trp operons was demonstrated by use of phylogenetic analysis. Lateral gene transfer of partial-pathway trp operons was also shown, with newly recruited genes functioning either in primary biosynthesis (rarely or specialized metabolism (more frequently. Conclusions (i Concatenated tryptophan protein trees are congruent with 16S rRNA subtrees provided that the genomes represented are of sufficiently close phylogenetic spacing. There are currently seven tryptophan congruency groups in the Bacteria. Recognition of a succession of others can be expected in the near future, but ultimately these should coalesce to a single grouping that parallels the 16S rRNA tree (except for cases of lateral gene transfer. (ii The vertical trace of evolution for tryptophan biosynthesis can be deduced. The daunting complexities engendered

  15. Replicative Stress and the FHIT Gene: Roles in Tumor Suppression, Genome Stability and Prevention of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karras, Jenna R.; Paisie, Carolyn A.; Huebner, Kay, E-mail: kay.huebner@osumc.edu [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-06-04

    The fragile FHIT gene, encompassing the chromosomal fragile site FRA3B, is an early target of DNA damage in precancerous cells. While vulnerable to DNA damage itself, FHIT protein expression is essential to protect from DNA damage-induced cancer initiation and progression by modulating genome stability, oxidative stress and levels of accumulating DNA damage. Thus, FHIT, whose expression is lost or reduced in many human cancers, is a tumor suppressor and genome caretaker whose loss initiates genome instability in preneoplastic lesions. Ongoing studies are seeking more detailed understanding of the role of FHIT in the cellular response to oxidative damage. This review discusses the relationship between FHIT, reactive oxygen species production, and DNA damage in the context of cancer initiation and progression.

  16. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danchin, Etienne G.J.; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Rancurel, Corinne; Thorpe, Peter; Rocha, Da Martine; Bajew, Simon; Neilson, Roy; Sokolova, Elena; Silva, Da Corinne; Guy, Julie; Labadie, Karine; Esmenjaud, Daniel; Helder, Hans; Jones, John T.; Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been

  17. Identification of the rctA Gene, Which Is Required for Repression of Conjugative Transfer of Rhizobial Symbiotic Megaplasmids†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Edgardo; Pando, Victoria; Muñoz, Socorro; Nogales, Joaquina; Olivares, José; Soto, Maria J.; Herrera-Cervera, José A.; Romero, David; Brom, Susana; Sanjuán, Juan

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the conjugative transfer of pRetCFN42d, the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli, has revealed a novel gene, rctA, as an essential element of a regulatory system for silencing the conjugative transfer of R. etli pSym by repressing the transcription of conjugal transfer genes in standard laboratory media. The rctA gene product lacks sequence conservation with other proteins of known function but may belong to the winged-helix DNA-binding subfamily of transcriptional regulators. Similar to that of many transcriptional repressors, rctA transcription seems to be positively autoregulated. rctA expression is greatly reduced upon overexpression of another gene, rctB, previously identified as a putative activator of R. etli pSym conjugal transfer. Thus, rctB seems to counteract the repressive action of rctA. rctA homologs are present in at least three other bacterial genomes within the order Rhizobiales, where they are invariably located adjacent to and divergently transcribed from putative virB-like operons. We show that similar to that of R. etli pSym, conjugative transfer of the 1.35-Mb symbiotic megaplasmid A of Sinorhizobium meliloti is also subjected to the inhibitory action of rctA. Our data provide strong evidence that the R. etli and S. meliloti pSym plasmids are indeed self-conjugative plasmids and that this property would only be expressed under optimal, as yet unknown conditions that entail inactivation of the rctA function. The rctA gene seems to represent novel but probably widespread regulatory systems controlling the transfer of conjugative elements within the order Rhizobiales. PMID:16237017

  18. Using complementary approaches to identify trans-domain nuclear gene transfers in the extremophile Galdieria sulphuraria (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi S; Saxena, Garima; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Qiu, Huan; Azad, Rajeev K

    2017-02-01

    Identification of horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) has primarily relied on phylogenetic tree based methods, which require a rich sampling of sequenced genomes to ensure a reliable inference. Because the success of phylogenetic approaches depends on the breadth and depth of the database, researchers usually apply stringent filters to detect only the most likely gene transfers in the genomes of interest. One such study focused on a highly conservative estimate of trans-domain gene transfers in the extremophile eukaryote, Galdieria sulphuraria (Galdieri) Merola (Rhodophyta), by applying multiple filters in their phylogenetic pipeline. This led to the identification of 75 inter-domain acquisitions from Bacteria or Archaea. Because of the evolutionary, ecological, and potential biotechnological significance of foreign genes in algae, alternative approaches and pipelines complementing phylogenetics are needed for a more comprehensive assessment of HGT. We present here a novel pipeline that uncovered 17 novel foreign genes of prokaryotic origin in G. sulphuraria, results that are supported by multiple lines of evidence including composition-based, comparative data, and phylogenetics. These genes encode a variety of potentially adaptive functions, from metabolite transport to DNA repair. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Phylogenomic Analysis Demonstrates a Pattern of Rare and Ancient Horizontal Gene Transfer between Plants and Fungi[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A.; Soanes, Darren M.; Foster, Peter G.; Leonard, Guy; Thornton, Christopher R.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) describes the transmission of genetic material across species boundaries and is an important evolutionary phenomenon in the ancestry of many microbes. The role of HGT in plant evolutionary history is, however, largely unexplored. Here, we compare the genomes of six plant species with those of 159 prokaryotic and eukaryotic species and identify 1689 genes that show the highest similarity to corresponding genes from fungi. We constructed a phylogeny for all 1689 genes identified and all homolog groups available from the rice (Oryza sativa) genome (3177 gene families) and used these to define 14 candidate plant-fungi HGT events. Comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of these 14 data sets, using methods that account for site rate heterogeneity, demonstrated support for nine HGT events, demonstrating an infrequent pattern of HGT between plants and fungi. Five HGTs were fungi-to-plant transfers and four were plant-to-fungi HGTs. None of the fungal-to-plant HGTs involved angiosperm recipients. These results alter the current view of organismal barriers to HGT, suggesting that phagotrophy, the consumption of a whole cell by another, is not necessarily a prerequisite for HGT between eukaryotes. Putative functional annotation of the HGT candidate genes suggests that two fungi-to-plant transfers have added phenotypes important for life in a soil environment. Our study suggests that genetic exchange between plants and fungi is exceedingly rare, particularly among the angiosperms, but has occurred during their evolutionary history and added important metabolic traits to plant lineages. PMID:19584142

  20. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne G.J. Danchin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been implicated in the evolution of plant parasitism. We have used ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNAseq to generate reference transcriptomes for two economically important nematode species, Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus, representative of two genera within the early-branching Clade 2 of the phylum Nematoda. We used a transcriptome-wide analysis to identify putative horizontal gene transfer events. This represents the first in-depth transcriptome analysis from any plant-parasitic nematode of this clade. For each species, we assembled ~30 million Illumina reads into a reference transcriptome. We identified 62 and 104 transcripts, from X. index and L. elongatus, respectively, that were putatively acquired via horizontal gene transfer. By cross-referencing horizontal gene transfer prediction with a phylum-wide analysis of Pfam domains, we identified Clade 2-specific events. Of these, a GH12 cellulase from X. index was analysed phylogenetically and biochemically, revealing a likely bacterial origin and canonical enzymatic function. Horizontal gene transfer was previously shown to be a phenomenon that has contributed to the evolution of plant parasitism among nematodes. Our findings underline the importance and the extensiveness of this phenomenon in the evolution of plant-parasitic life styles in this speciose and widespread animal phylum.

  1. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Alves de Meneses

    Full Text Available Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed regarding the emission of toxic and asphyxiating gases, particularly as it pertains to parameterization of the process. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the effect of manufacturing aspects of welding processes (short-circuit metal transfer stability and shielding gas composition on the gas emission levels during MIG/MAG welding (occupational health and environmental aspects. Using mixtures of Argon with CO2 and O2 and maintaining the same average current and the same weld bead volume, short-circuit welding was performed with carbon steel welding wire in open (welder’s breathing zone and confined environments. The welding voltage was adjusted to gradually vary the transfer stability. It was found that the richer the composition of the shielding gas is in CO2, the more CO and CO2 are generated by the arc. However, unlike fume emission, voltage and transfer stability had no effect on the generation of these gases. It was also found that despite the large quantity of CO and CO2 emitted by the arc, especially when using pure CO2 shielding gas, there was no high level residual concentration of CO and CO2 in or near the worker’s breathing zone, even in confined work cells.

  2. AS3MT-mediated tolerance to arsenic evolved by multiple independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria to eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Engström, Karin; Hallström, Björn M

    2017-01-01

    the evolutionary origin of AS3MT and assessed the ability of different genotypes to produce methylated arsenic metabolites. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that multiple, independent horizontal gene transfers between different bacteria, and from bacteria to eukaryotes, increased tolerance to environmental arsenic...

  3. Evidence of recent interspecies horizontal gene transfer regarding nucleopolyhedrovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Gloria Patricia; Belaich, Mariano Nicolás; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Villamizar, Laura Fernanda; Ghiringhelli, Pablo Daniel

    2015-11-25

    Baculoviruses are insect-associated viruses carrying large, circular double-stranded-DNA genomes with significant biotechnological applications such as biological pest control, recombinant protein production, gene delivery in mammals and as a model of DNA genome evolution. These pathogens infect insects from the orders Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera and Diptera, and have high species diversity which is expressed in their diverse biological properties including morphology, virulence or pathogenicity. Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), the fall armyworm, represents a significant pest for agriculture in America; it is a host for baculoviruses such as the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) (Colombia strain, genotype A) having been classified as a Group II alphabaculovirus making it a very attractive target for bioinsecticidal use. Genome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed that SfMNPV ColA has 145 ORFs, 2 of which were not present in the other sequenced genotypes of the virus (SfMNPV-NicB, SfMNPV-NicG, SfMNPV-19 and SfMNPV-3AP2). An in-depth bioinformatics study showed that ORF023 and ORF024 were acquired by a recent homologous recombination process between Spodoptera frugiperda and Spodoptera litura (the Oriental leafworm moth) nucleopolyhedroviruses. Auxiliary genes are numerous in the affected locus which has a homologous region (hr3), a repetitive sequence associated with genome replication which became lost in SfColA along with 1 ORF. Besides, the mRNAs associated with two acquired genes appeared in the virus' life-cycle during the larval stage. Predictive studies concerning the theoretical proteins identified that ORF023 protein would be a phosphatase involved in DNA repair and that the ORF024 protein would be a membrane polypeptide associated with cell transport. The SfColA genome was thus revealed to be a natural recombinant virus showing evidence of recent horizontal gene transfer between different baculovirus species occurring

  4. Gene Transfer and Modulation for the Production of Food with Enhanced Quali-Quantitative Values: Potentials, Promises and Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Karbarz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the research and achievements of applications of molecular tools based on gene transfer and gene modulation (gene knock-down and knock-out, aimed at enhancing food production, improving food properties and producing various valuable compounds for human nutrition. Selected cases of genetically manipulated plants (biofortification and allergene silencing and animals (fish and livestock are examined. Promises and accomplishments are considered when giving topic examples of the potentials offered by some applications of molecular biology for obtaining goods, among them milk, with enhanced value, and of their impact on society at large.

  5. Lateral gene transfer of an ABC transporter complex between major constituents of the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Conor J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several links have been established between the human gut microbiome and conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel syndrome. This highlights the importance of understanding what properties of the gut microbiome can affect the health of the human host. Studies have been undertaken to determine the species composition of this microbiome and infer functional profiles associated with such host properties. However, lateral gene transfer (LGT between community members may result in misleading taxonomic attributions for the recipient organisms, thus making species-function links difficult to establish. Results We identified a peptides/nickel transport complex whose components differed in abundance based upon levels of host obesity, and assigned the encoded proteins to members of the microbial community. Each protein was assigned to several distinct taxonomic groups, with moderate levels of agreement observed among different proteins in the complex. Phylogenetic trees of these proteins produced clusters that differed greatly from taxonomic attributions and indicated that habitat-directed LGT of this complex is likely to have occurred, though not always between the same partners. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that certain membrane transport systems may be an important factor within an obese-associated gut microbiome and that such complexes may be acquired several times by different strains of the same species. Additionally, an example of individual proteins from different organisms being transferred into one operon was observed, potentially demonstrating a functional complex despite the donors of the subunits being taxonomically disparate. Our results also highlight the potential impact of habitat-directed LGT on the resident microbiota.

  6. Novel “Superspreader” Bacteriophages Promote Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Keen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages infect an estimated 1023 to 1025 bacterial cells each second, many of which carry physiologically relevant plasmids (e.g., those encoding antibiotic resistance. However, even though phage-plasmid interactions occur on a massive scale and have potentially significant evolutionary, ecological, and biomedical implications, plasmid fate upon phage infection and lysis has not been investigated to date. Here we show that a subset of the natural lytic phage population, which we dub “superspreaders,” releases substantial amounts of intact, transformable plasmid DNA upon lysis, thereby promoting horizontal gene transfer by transformation. Two novel Escherichia coli phage superspreaders, SUSP1 and SUSP2, liberated four evolutionarily distinct plasmids with equal efficiency, including two close relatives of prominent antibiotic resistance vectors in natural environments. SUSP2 also mediated the extensive lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance in unbiased communities of soil bacteria from Maryland and Wyoming. Furthermore, the addition of SUSP2 to cocultures of kanamycin-resistant E. coli and kanamycin-sensitive Bacillus sp. bacteria resulted in roughly 1,000-fold more kanamycin-resistant Bacillus sp. bacteria than arose in phage-free controls. Unlike many other lytic phages, neither SUSP1 nor SUSP2 encodes homologs to known hydrolytic endonucleases, suggesting a simple potential mechanism underlying the superspreading phenotype. Consistent with this model, the deletion of endonuclease IV and the nucleoid-disrupting protein ndd from coliphage T4, a phage known to extensively degrade chromosomal DNA, significantly increased its ability to promote plasmid transformation. Taken together, our results suggest that phage superspreaders may play key roles in microbial evolution and ecology but should be avoided in phage therapy and other medical applications.

  7. Novel “Superspreader” Bacteriophages Promote Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliskovsky, Valery V.; Malagon, Francisco; Baker, James D.; Prince, Jeffrey S.; Klaus, James S.; Adhya, Sankar L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages infect an estimated 1023 to 1025 bacterial cells each second, many of which carry physiologically relevant plasmids (e.g., those encoding antibiotic resistance). However, even though phage-plasmid interactions occur on a massive scale and have potentially significant evolutionary, ecological, and biomedical implications, plasmid fate upon phage infection and lysis has not been investigated to date. Here we show that a subset of the natural lytic phage population, which we dub “superspreaders,” releases substantial amounts of intact, transformable plasmid DNA upon lysis, thereby promoting horizontal gene transfer by transformation. Two novel Escherichia coli phage superspreaders, SUSP1 and SUSP2, liberated four evolutionarily distinct plasmids with equal efficiency, including two close relatives of prominent antibiotic resistance vectors in natural environments. SUSP2 also mediated the extensive lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance in unbiased communities of soil bacteria from Maryland and Wyoming. Furthermore, the addition of SUSP2 to cocultures of kanamycin-resistant E. coli and kanamycin-sensitive Bacillus sp. bacteria resulted in roughly 1,000-fold more kanamycin-resistant Bacillus sp. bacteria than arose in phage-free controls. Unlike many other lytic phages, neither SUSP1 nor SUSP2 encodes homologs to known hydrolytic endonucleases, suggesting a simple potential mechanism underlying the superspreading phenotype. Consistent with this model, the deletion of endonuclease IV and the nucleoid-disrupting protein ndd from coliphage T4, a phage known to extensively degrade chromosomal DNA, significantly increased its ability to promote plasmid transformation. Taken together, our results suggest that phage superspreaders may play key roles in microbial evolution and ecology but should be avoided in phage therapy and other medical applications. PMID:28096488

  8. OPTIMAL ELECTROPORATION CONDITION FOR SPERM MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER IN STRIPPED CATFISH (Pangasionodon hypophthalmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raden Roro Sri Pudji Sinarni Dewi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of transgenic fish production has been achieved through eggs fertilization using electroporated sperms carrying exogenous DNA. This study was conducted in order to obtain the optimal electroporation condition for stripped catfish sperm. A plasmid containing green fluorescent protein (GFP gene driven by carp β-actin promoter was transferred into sperm using electrophoresis method towards transgenic stripped catfish (Pangasionodon hypophthalmus production. Electroporation was carried out using square wave shock with pulse length of 30 ms and pulse interval of 0.1 sec. Treatments are combination between voltage (50 V, 75 V, and 100 V and pulse number (1 and 3. Exogenous DNA concentration used was 10 μg/mL of Tris-EDTA. Results showed that increasing the voltage from 50 to 100 decreased sperm motility, while pulse number did not affect sperm motility. Voltage of 50 gave the best motility of sperm, although sperm viability relatively similar between treatments and control except at 100 V with 3 pulses number. Further, electroporation-treated sperms were able to fertilize eggs. Higher hatching rate of eggs was obtained in electroporation treatment at 50 V with pulse number of 1 and 3. The persistence of transferred GFP was detected in electroporated and incubated sperms (control. However, GFP was only detected in larvae from eggs that were fertilized by electroporated sperm. Thus, electroporation could be applied to produce transgenic stripped catfish.

  9. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition.To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter-based imaging.These results support the

  10. Transfer-Printed PEDOT:PSS Electrodes Using Mild Acids for High Conductivity and Improved Stability with Application to Flexible Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xi; Xu, Bingang; Liu, Shenghua; Cui, Chaohua; Wang, Jinzhao; Yan, Feng

    2016-06-08

    Highly conductive, flexible, and transparent electrodes (FTEs) of PSS films on plastic substrates have been achieved using strong acid treatments. However, it is rare to realize a performance attenuation of PSS FTEs on plastic substrates and flexible optoelectronic devices because of strong acid residues in the PSS matrix. Herein, we develop a feasible transfer-printing technique using mild acids. Because of a mild and weak property of these acids and less acid residues in PSS matrix, the transferred PSS FTEs exhibited a significant enhancement in stability, conductivity (3500 S cm(-1)), transparency, and mechanical flexibility on plastic substrates. Flexible organic solar cells with the FTEs also showed a remarkable enhancement in power conversion efficiency and stability in the ambient atmosphere. It is expected that the novel transfer-printing technique for making PSS FTEs is also useful in many other types of flexible optoelectronic devices.

  11. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer technology. Final report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1996-02-01

    Genetic manipulation of plants often involves the introduction of homologous or partly homologous genes. Ectropic introduction of homologous sequences into plant genomes may trigger epigenetic changes, making expression of the genes unpredictable. The main project objective was to examine the feasibility of using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer for homologous gene targeting in plants.

  12. Stable genetic transformation of Jatropha curcas via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer using leaf explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2010-07-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel crop. A simple and reproducible protocol was developed for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of J. curcas using leaf explains. Agrobacterium strain LBA 4404 harbouring the binary vector pCAMBIA 1304 having sense-dehydration responsive element binding (S-DREB2A), beta-glucuronidase (gus), and hygromycin-phosphotransferase (hpt) genes were used for gene transfer. A number of parameters such as preculture of explains, wounding of leaf explants, Agrobacterium growth phase (OD), infection duration, co-cultivation period, co-cultivation medium pH, and acetosyringone, were studied to optimized transformation efficiency. The highest transformation efficiency was achieved using 4-day precultured, non-wounded leaf explants infected with Agrobacterium culture corresponding to OD(600)=0.6 for 20 min, followed by co-cultivation for 4 days in a co-cultivation medium containing 100 mu M acetosyringone, pH 5.7. Co-cultivated leaf explants were initially cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.27 mu M thidiazuron (TDZ) for regeneration of shoot buds, followed by selection on same medium with 5 mu g ml(-1) hygromycin. Selected shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 mu M kinetin (Kn), 4.5 mu M 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA), and 5.5 mu M alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for proliferation. The proliferated shoots were elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 mu M BA and 8.5 mu M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The elongated shoots were rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 15 mu M indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 5.7 mu M IAA, 5.5 mu M NAA, and 0.25 mg l(-1) activated charcoal. GUS histochemical analysis of the transgenic tissues further confirmed the transformation event. PCR and DNA gel blot hybridization were performed to confirm the presence of transgene. A transformation efficiency of 29% was

  13. Horizontal gene transfer: essentiality and evolvability in prokaryotes, and roles in evolutionary transitions [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene V. Koonin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The wide spread of gene exchange and loss in the prokaryotic world has prompted the concept of ‘lateral genomics’ to the point of an outright denial of the relevance of phylogenetic trees for evolution. However, the pronounced coherence congruence of the topologies of numerous gene trees, particularly those for (nearly universal genes, translates into the notion of a statistical tree of life (STOL, which reflects a central trend of vertical evolution. The STOL can be employed as a framework for reconstruction of the evolutionary processes in the prokaryotic world. Quantitatively, however, horizontal gene transfer (HGT dominates microbial evolution, with the rate of gene gain and loss being comparable to the rate of point mutations and much greater than the duplication rate. Theoretical models of evolution suggest that HGT is essential for the survival of microbial populations that otherwise deteriorate due to the Muller’s ratchet effect. Apparently, at least some bacteria and archaea evolved dedicated vehicles for gene transfer that evolved from selfish elements such as plasmids and viruses. Recent phylogenomic analyses suggest that episodes of massive HGT were pivotal for the emergence of major groups of organisms such as multiple archaeal phyla as well as eukaryotes. Similar analyses appear to indicate that, in addition to donating hundreds of genes to the emerging eukaryotic lineage, mitochondrial endosymbiosis severely curtailed HGT. These results shed new light on the routes of evolutionary transitions, but caution is due given the inherent uncertainty of deep phylogenies.

  14. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells.

  15. Evidence for frequent OspC gene transfer between Borrelia valaisiana sp. nov. and other Lyme disease spirochetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; van Dam, A P; Dankert, J

    1999-08-15

    Molecular polymorphism of the ospC gene has been reported in Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii and Borrelia afzelii, the spirochetes causing human Lyme borreliosis. To assess the genetic relationship between ospC genes from the recently described Borrelia valaisiana sp. nov. and other B. burgdorferi sensu lato species, the ospC genes from eight B. valaisiana isolates were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. The ospC genes of three B. valaisiana isolates were identical, but clearly distinct from ospC genes from other Borrelia species. Four B. valaisiana isolates possessed ospC genes more related to those of B. garinii, and fell into a cluster representing B. garinii species in the phylogenetic tree. One isolate had an ospC gene encoding a protein identical to that of B. afzelii strain. Since five of the eight (62.5%) B. valaisiana isolates contained a gene highly homologous or even identical to ospC genes found among B. garinii and B. afzelii strains, our findings indicate that ospC gene transfer occurs between B. valaisiana and other Lyme disease spirochetes.

  16. Transferability of a tetracycline resistance gene from probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri to bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egervärn, Maria; Lindmark, Hans; Olsson, Johan; Roos, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The potential of Lactobacillus reuteri as a donor of antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut was investigated by studying the transferability of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(W) to faecal enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. In a double-blind clinical study, seven subjects consumed L. reuteri ATCC 55730 harbouring a plasmid-encoded tet(W) gene (tet(W)-reuteri) and an equal number of subjects consumed L. reuteri DSM 17938 derived from the ATCC 55730 strain by the removal of two plasmids, one of which contained the tet(W) gene. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after ingestion of 5 x 10(8) CFU of L. reuteri per day for 14 days. Both L. reuteri strains were detectable at similar levels in faeces after 14 days of intake but neither was detected after a two-week wash-out period. After enrichment and isolation of tetracycline resistant enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli from each faecal sample, DNA was extracted and analysed for presence of tet(W)-reuteri using a real-time PCR allelic discrimination method developed in this study. No tet(W)-reuteri signal was produced from any of the DNA samples and thus gene transfer to enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli during intestinal passage of the probiotic strain was non-detectable under the conditions tested, although transfer at low frequencies or to the remaining faecal bacterial population cannot be excluded.

  17. Functional analysis of promoter variants in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Diana; Schneider-Muntau, Alexandra; Klapper, Maja; Nitz, Inke; Helwig, Ulf; Fölsch, Ulrich R; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Döring, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) is required for the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins from the intestine and liver. According to this function, polymorphic sites in the MTTP gene showed associations to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and related traits of the metabolic syndrome. Here we studied the functional impact of common MTTP promoter polymorphisms rs1800804:T>C (-164T>C), rs1800803:A>T (-400A>T), and rs1800591:G>T (-493G>T) using gene-reporter assays in intestinal Caco-2 and liver Huh-7 cells. Significant results were obtained in Huh-7 cells. The common MTTP promoter haplotype -164T/-400A/-493G showed about two-fold lower activity than the rare haplotype -164C/-400T/-493T. MTTP promoter mutant constructs -164T/-400A/-493T and -164T/-400T/-493T exhibited similar activity than the common haplotype. Activities of mutants -164C/-400A/-493G and -164C/-400A/-493T resembled the rare MTTP promoter haplotype. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed higher binding capacity of the transcriptional factor Sterol regulatory element binding protein1a (SREBP1a) to the -164T probe in comparison to the -164C probe. In conclusion, our study indicates that the polymorphism -164T>C mediates different activities of common MTTP promoter haplotypes via SREBP1a. This suggested that the already described SREBP-dependent modulation of MTTP expression by diet is more effective in -164T than in -164C carriers. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Phylogeny Reconstruction with Alignment-Free Method That Corrects for Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Bromberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Advances in sequencing have generated a large number of complete genomes. Traditionally, phylogenetic analysis relies on alignments of orthologs, but defining orthologs and separating them from paralogs is a complex task that may not always be suited to the large datasets of the future. An alternative to traditional, alignment-based approaches are whole-genome, alignment-free methods. These methods are scalable and require minimal manual intervention. We developed SlopeTree, a new alignment-free method that estimates evolutionary distances by measuring the decay of exact substring matches as a function of match length. SlopeTree corrects for horizontal gene transfer, for composition variation and low complexity sequences, and for branch-length nonlinearity caused by multiple mutations at the same site. We tested SlopeTree on 495 bacteria, 73 archaea, and 72 strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella. We compared our trees to the NCBI taxonomy, to trees based on concatenated alignments, and to trees produced by other alignment-free methods. The results were consistent with current knowledge about prokaryotic evolution. We assessed differences in tree topology over different methods and settings and found that the majority of bacteria and archaea have a core set of proteins that evolves by descent. In trees built from complete genomes rather than sets of core genes, we observed some grouping by phenotype rather than phylogeny, for instance with a cluster of sulfur-reducing thermophilic bacteria coming together irrespective of their phyla. The source-code for SlopeTree is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/download/pub/slopetree_v1/slopetree.tar.gz.

  19. Phylogeny Reconstruction with Alignment-Free Method That Corrects for Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Nick V.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek

    2016-01-01

    Advances in sequencing have generated a large number of complete genomes. Traditionally, phylogenetic analysis relies on alignments of orthologs, but defining orthologs and separating them from paralogs is a complex task that may not always be suited to the large datasets of the future. An alternative to traditional, alignment-based approaches are whole-genome, alignment-free methods. These methods are scalable and require minimal manual intervention. We developed SlopeTree, a new alignment-free method that estimates evolutionary distances by measuring the decay of exact substring matches as a function of match length. SlopeTree corrects for horizontal gene transfer, for composition variation and low complexity sequences, and for branch-length nonlinearity caused by multiple mutations at the same site. We tested SlopeTree on 495 bacteria, 73 archaea, and 72 strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella. We compared our trees to the NCBI taxonomy, to trees based on concatenated alignments, and to trees produced by other alignment-free methods. The results were consistent with current knowledge about prokaryotic evolution. We assessed differences in tree topology over different methods and settings and found that the majority of bacteria and archaea have a core set of proteins that evolves by descent. In trees built from complete genomes rather than sets of core genes, we observed some grouping by phenotype rather than phylogeny, for instance with a cluster of sulfur-reducing thermophilic bacteria coming together irrespective of their phyla. The source-code for SlopeTree is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/download/pub/slopetree_v1/slopetree.tar.gz. PMID:27336403

  20. Lentiviral gene transfer into the dorsal root ganglion of adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Frank

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentivector-mediated gene delivery into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG is a promising method for exploring pain pathophysiology and for genetic treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, a series of modified lentivector particles with different cellular promoters, envelope glycoproteins, and viral accessory proteins were generated to evaluate the requirements for efficient transduction into neuronal cells in vitro and adult rat DRG in vivo. Results In vitro, lentivectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α promoter and pseudotyped with the conventional vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G envelope exhibited the best performance in the transfer of EGFP into an immortalized DRG sensory neuron cell line at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs, and into primary cultured DRG neurons at higher MOIs. In vivo, injection of either first or second-generation EF1α-EGFP lentivectors directly into adult rat DRGs led to transduction rates of 19 ± 9% and 20 ± 8% EGFP-positive DRG neurons, respectively, detected at 4 weeks post injection. Transduced cells included a full range of neuronal phenotypes, including myelinated neurons as well as both non-peptidergic and peptidergic nociceptive unmyelinated neurons. Conclusion VSV-G pseudotyped lentivectors containing the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α-EGFP expression cassette demonstrated relatively efficient transduction to sensory neurons following direct injection into the DRG. These results clearly show the potential of lentivectors as a viable system for delivering target genes into DRGs to explore basic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, with the potential for future clinical use in treating chronic pain.

  1. Perpendicular spin transfer torque magnetic random access memories with high spin torque efficiency and thermal stability for embedded applications (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Luc, E-mail: luc.thomas@headway.com; Jan, Guenole; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Huanlong; Lee, Yuan-Jen; Le, Son; Tong, Ru-Ying; Pi, Keyu; Wang, Yu-Jen; Shen, Dongna; He, Renren; Haq, Jesmin; Teng, Jeffrey; Lam, Vinh; Huang, Kenlin; Zhong, Tom; Torng, Terry; Wang, Po-Kang [TDK-Headway Technologies, Inc., Milpitas, California 95035 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic random access memories based on the spin transfer torque phenomenon (STT-MRAMs) have become one of the leading candidates for next generation memory applications. Among the many attractive features of this technology are its potential for high speed and endurance, read signal margin, low power consumption, scalability, and non-volatility. In this paper, we discuss our recent results on perpendicular STT-MRAM stack designs that show STT efficiency higher than 5 k{sub B}T/μA, energy barriers higher than 100 k{sub B}T at room temperature for sub-40 nm diameter devices, and tunnel magnetoresistance higher than 150%. We use both single device data and results from 8 Mb array to demonstrate data retention sufficient for automotive applications. Moreover, we also demonstrate for the first time thermal stability up to 400 °C exceeding the requirement of Si CMOS back-end processing, thus opening the realm of non-volatile embedded memory to STT-MRAM technology.

  2. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Gene Transfer Rescues a Neonatal Lethal Murine Model of Propionic Acidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Randy J.; Chandrasekaran, Suma; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Senac, Julien S.; Hofherr, Sean E.; Barry, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Propionic acidemia (PA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism caused by a deficiency of propionyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (PCC). Despite optimal dietary and cofactor therapy, PA patients still suffer from lethal metabolic instability and experience multisystemic complications. A murine model of PA (Pcca–/–) of animals that uniformly die within the first 48 hr of life was used to determine the efficacy of adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer as a potential therapy for PA. An AAV serotype 8 (AAV8) vector was engineered to express the human PCCA cDNA and delivered to newborn mice via an intrahepatic injection. Greater than 64% of the Pcca–/– mice were rescued after AAV8-mediated gene transfer and survived until day of life 16 or beyond. Western analysis of liver extracts showed that PCC was completely absent from Pcca–/– mice but was restored to greater than wild-type levels after AAV gene therapy. The treated Pcca–/– mice also exhibited markedly reduced plasma levels of 2-methylcitrate compared with the untreated Pcca–/– mice, which indicates significant PCC enzymatic activity was provided by gene transfer. At the time of this report, the oldest treated Pcca–/– mice are over 6 months of age. In summary, AAV gene delivery of PCCA effectively rescues Pcca–/– mice from neonatal lethality and substantially ameliorates metabolic markers of the disease. These experiments demonstrate a gene transfer approach using AAV8 that might be used as a treatment for PA, a devastating and often lethal disorder desperately in need of new therapeutic options. PMID:20950151

  3. Observation on bio-effect of EJ cell line with smac gene transferred and 12C6+ ions-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Baofeng; Tian Mei; Ruan Jianlei; Su Xu; Li Wenjian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe whether smac gene can increase the bio-effect of EJ cells induced by 12 C 6+ ions irradiation. Methods: The cells were divided into three groups: blank control group, vector transferred group and smac gene transferred group. Immuno-histochemistry and flow cytometry were used to identify the expression of smac gene. Following 12 C 6+ ions treatment at 0, 2, 4 Gy, three groups' survival ratio was detected by colony-formation assay. 24 h after 12 C 6+ ions treatment, flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. Results: Immuno-histochemistry results indicated that the expression of smac gene in smac gene transferred group was notably enhanced compared with vector pcDNA3.1 transfer red group. Fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS) results also indicated that the expression of smac gene in smac gene transferred group was significantly enhanced compared with that of vector pcDNA3.1 transferred group (3080 vs 2256, P 12 C 6+ ions treatment, FACS results indicated that smac gene transferred group showed apparent cell apoptosis ratio, which was higher than that of vector pcDNA3.1 transferred group (P 12 C 6+ ions irradiation. (authors)

  4. Vectors based on Semliki Forest virus for rapid and efficient gene transfer into non-endothelial cardiovascular cells: comparison to adenovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roks, A. J.; Pinto, Y. M.; Paul, M.; Pries, F.; Stula, M.; Eschenhagen, T.; Orzechowski, H. D.; Gschwendt, S.; Wilschut, J.; van Gilst, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Replication-deficient, recombinant adenovirus is used as a carrier for gene transfer, but it is unspecific and the onset of transgene expression is relatively late. Here, we evaluated the efficiency and selectivity of gene transfer mediated by recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV).

  5. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  6. Coupling sperm mediated gene transfer and sperm sorting techniques: a new perspective for swine transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cecco, Marco; Spinaci, Marcella; Zannoni, Augusta; Bernardini, Chiara; Seren, Eraldo; Forni, Monica; Bacci, Maria Laura

    2010-09-15

    Flow cytometric separation of X and Y chromosome-bearing spermatozoa has been demonstrated to be effective in pigs, allowing the use of boar sexed semen in in vitro trials. Sperm Mediated Gene Transfer (SMGT) is a widely used and efficient technique for the creation of transgenic animals. The present research intended to prove that it is possible to associate sperm sexing with the SMGT technique in order to speed up the assessment of homozygous lines of transgenic pigs. In the first experiment, the sorting protocol was modified in order to obtain the highest DNA uptake by sorted spermatozoa. In the second experiment, spermatozoa that had undergone only sperm sorting, only SMGT, or both procedures (Sorted-SMGT) were used for in in vitro fertilization of in vitro matured oocytes. In the third experiment, transformed blastocysts of the desired gender (male) were obtained with Sorted-SMGT in an in vitro fertilization trial. The method we developed here allowed us to produce transgenic swine blastocysts of pre-determined gender, giving a positive answer at the aim to couple SMGT and sperm sorting in swine, obtaining fertile spermatozoa able to produce transgenic embryos of pre-determined gender. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct Gene Transfer into Plant Mature Seeds via Electroporation After Vacuum Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagio, Takashi

    A number of direct gene transfer methods have been used successfully in plant genetic engineering, providing powerful tools to investigate fundamental and applied problems in plant biology (Chowrira et al., 1996; D'halluin et al., 1992; Morandini and Salamini, 2003; Rakoczy-Trojanowska, 2002; Songstad et al., 1995). In cereals, several methods have been found to be suitable for obtaining transgenic plant; these include bombardment of scutellum (Hagio et al., 1995) and inflorescence cultures (He et al., 2001), and silicon carbide fiber-mediated DNA delivery (Asano et al., 1991) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation (Potrykus, 1990). Electroporation of cereal protoplasts also has proved successful but it involves prolonged cell treatments and generally is limited by the difficulties of regeneration from cereal protoplast cultures (Fromm et al., 1987). Many laboratories worldwide are now using Agrobacterium as a vehicle for routine production of transgenic crop plants. The primary application of the particle system (Klein et al., 1987) has been for transformation of species recalcitrant to conventional Agrobacterium (Binns, 1990) or protoplast methods. But these conventional methods can be applied to the species and varieties that are amenable to tissue culture (Machii et al., 1998). Mature seeds are readily available and free from the seasonal limits that immature embryo, inflorescence, and anther have. This method enables us to produce transgenic plants without time-consuming tissue culture process.

  8. The genus Amycolatopsis: Indigenous plasmids, cloning vectors and gene transfer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, S; Lal, R

    2007-03-01

    The genus Amycolatopsis is a member of the phylogenetic group nocardioform actinomycetes. Most of the members of the genus Amycolatopsis are known to produce antibiotics. Additionally, members of this genus have been reported to metabolize aromatic compounds as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Development of genetic manipulation in Amycolatopsis has progressed slowly due to paucity of genetic tools and methods. The occurrence of indigenous plasmids in different species of Amycolatopsis is not very common. Till date, only three indigenous plasmids viz., pMEA100, pMEA300 and pA387 have been reported in Amycolatopsis species. Various vectors based on the indigenous plasmids, pMEA100, pMEA300 and pA387, have been constructed. These vectors have proved useful for molecular genetics studies of actinomycetes. Molecular genetic work with Amycolatopsis strains is not easy, since transformation methods have to be developed, or at least optimized, for each particular strain. Nonetheless, methods for efficient transformation (polyethyleneglycol (PEG) induced protoplast transformation, transformation by electroporation and direct transformation) have been developed and used successfully for the introduction of DNA into several Amycolatopsis species. The construction of plasmid cloning vectors and the development of gene transfer systems has opened up possibilities for studying the molecular genetics of these bacteria.

  9. Risks of gene transfer from GMOs to livestock, and consequences for health and nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, R.H.; Beever, D.E.; Einspanier, R.

    2005-01-01

    There has been rapid uptake of GM crops, with widespread use in livestock production systems. The concept of substantial equivalence as the starting point for the safety assessment of GM crops is discussed, together with the role of compositional and nutritional equivalence. Concerns have been expressed as to the fate of transgenic DNA and the expressed protein, and the safety of milk, meat and eggs derived from animals receiving diets containing GM feeds, and the effects of feed processing, conservation and nutrient digestion on the fate of transgenic DNA and proteins, are presented. Their presence in milk, meat and eggs has never been established in any study to date. There is no evidence to suggest that livestock products from animals receiving GM feed ingredients are anything other than as safe as those produced from conventional feeds. Furthermore, although hypothetically possible, horizontal gene transfer between transgenic DNA and microorganisms either in the digestive tract of livestock or in the soil has not been established under natural conditions. (author)

  10. Constraints on lateral gene transfer in promoting fimbrial usher protein diversity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Christopher J; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor; Heinz, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Fimbriae are long, adhesive structures widespread throughout members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are multimeric extrusions, which are moved out of the bacterial cell through an integral outer membrane protein called usher. The complex folding mechanics of the usher protein were recently revealed to be catalysed by the membrane-embedded translocation and assembly module (TAM). Here, we examine the diversity of usher proteins across a wide range of extraintestinal (ExPEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli , and further focus on a so far undescribed chaperone-usher system, with this usher referred to as UshC. The fimbrial system containing UshC is distributed across a discrete set of EPEC types, including model strains like E2348/67, as well as ExPEC ST131, currently the most prominent multi-drug-resistant uropathogenic E. coli strain worldwide. Deletion of the TAM from a naive strain of E. coli results in a drastic time delay in folding of UshC, which can be observed for a protein from EPEC as well as for two introduced proteins from related organisms, Yersinia and Enterobacter We suggest that this models why the TAM machinery is essential for efficient folding of proteins acquired via lateral gene transfer. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Gene transfer corrects acute GM2 gangliosidosis--potential therapeutic contribution of perivascular enzyme flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachón-González, M Begoña; Wang, Susan Z; McNair, Rosamund; Bradley, Josephine; Lunn, David; Ziegler, Robin; Cheng, Seng H; Cox, Timothy M

    2012-08-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are fatal lysosomal storage diseases principally affecting the brain. Absence of β-hexosaminidase A and B activities in the Sandhoff mouse causes neurological dysfunction and recapitulates the acute Tay-Sachs (TSD) and Sandhoff diseases (SD) in infants. Intracranial coinjection of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV), serotype 2/1, expressing human β-hexosaminidase α (HEXA) and β (HEXB) subunits into 1-month-old Sandhoff mice gave unprecedented survival to 2 years and prevented disease throughout the brain and spinal cord. Classical manifestations of disease, including spasticity-as opposed to tremor-ataxia-were resolved by localized gene transfer to the striatum or cerebellum, respectively. Abundant biosynthesis of β-hexosaminidase isozymes and their global distribution via axonal, perivascular, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, as well as diffusion, account for the sustained phenotypic rescue-long-term protein expression by transduced brain parenchyma, choroid plexus epithelium, and dorsal root ganglia neurons supplies the corrective enzyme. Prolonged survival permitted expression of cryptic disease in organs not accessed by intracranial vector delivery. We contend that infusion of rAAV into CSF space and intraparenchymal administration by convection-enhanced delivery at a few strategic sites will optimally treat neurodegeneration in many diseases affecting the nervous system.

  12. Population-Dynamic Modeling of Bacterial Horizontal Gene Transfer by Natural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junwen; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-05

    Natural transformation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and plays an essential role in bacterial adaptation, evolution, and speciation. Although its molecular underpinnings have been increasingly revealed, natural transformation is not well characterized in terms of its quantitative ecological roles. Here, by using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as an example, we developed a population-dynamic model for natural transformation and analyzed its dynamic characteristics with nonlinear tools and simulations. Our study showed that bacteria capable of natural transformation can display distinct population behaviors ranging from extinction to coexistence and to bistability, depending on their HGT rate and selection coefficient. With the model, we also illustrated the roles of environmental DNA sources-active secretion and passive release-in impacting population dynamics. Additionally, by constructing and utilizing a stochastic version of the model, we examined how noise shapes the steady and dynamic behaviors of the system. Notably, we found that distinct waiting time statistics for HGT events, namely a power-law distribution, an exponential distribution, and a mix of the both, are associated with the dynamics in the regimes of extinction, coexistence, and bistability accordingly. This work offers a quantitative illustration of natural transformation by revealing its complex population dynamics and associated characteristics, therefore advancing our ecological understanding of natural transformation as well as HGT in general. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treating Cocaine Addiction, Obesity, and Emotional Disorders by Viral Gene Transfer of Butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Brimijoin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, a plasma enzyme that hydrolyses the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine relatively well, with far lower efficiency than acetylcholinesterase (AChE but with the capability to degrade a broad range of bioactive esters. AChE is universally understood as essential to cholinergic neurotransmission, voluntary muscle performance, and cognition, among other roles, and its catalytic impact is essential for life. A total absence of BChE activity, whether by enzyme inhibition or simple lack of enzyme protein is not only compatible with life, but does not lead to obvious physiologic disturbance. However, very recent studies at Mayo Clinic have amassed support for the concept that BChE does have a true physiological role as a “ghrelin hydrolase” and, pharmacologically, as a cocaine hydrolase. Human subjects and animal mutations that lack functional BChE show higher than normal levels of ghrelin, an acylated peptide that drives hunger and feeding, along with certain emotional behaviors. Mice treated by viral gene transfer of BChE show higher plasma levels of enzyme and lower levels of ghrelin. Ghrelin is acknowledged as a driver of food-seeking and stress. This brief review examines some key phenomena and considers means of modulating BChE as treatments for cocaine addiction, anxiety, aggression, and obesity.

  14. Molecular evidence for ongoing complementarity and horizontal gene transfer in endosymbiotic systems of mealybugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eLópez-Madrigal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial supply of essential amino acids is common among sap-feeding insects, thus complementing the scarcity of nitrogenous compounds in plant phloem. This is also the role of the two mealybug endosymbiotic systems whose genomes have been sequenced. In the nested endosymbiotic system from Planococcus citri (Pseudococcinae, Candidatus Tremblaya princeps and Candidatus Moranella endobia cooperate to synthesize essential amino acids, while in Phenacoccus avenae (Phenacoccinae this function is performed by its single endosymbiont Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola. However, little is known regarding the evolution of essential amino acid supplementation strategies in other mealybug systems. To address this knowledge gap, we screened for the presence of six selected loci involved in essential amino acid biosynthesis in five additional mealybug species. We found evidence of ongoing complementarity among endosymbionts from insects of subfamily Pseudococcinae, as well as horizontal gene transfer affecting endosymbionts from insects of family Phenacoccinae, providing a more comprehensive picture of the evolutionary history of these endosymbiotic systems. Additionally, we report two diagnostic motifs to help identify invasive mealybug species.

  15. Breeding bread wheat cultivars for high protein content by transfer of protein genes from Triticum dicoccoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, A.; Gerechter-Amitai, Z.K.; Blum, A.; Rubenthaler, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Triticum dicoccoides sel. G-25, a selection of wild emmer with a protein content of 20.5% and a kernel weight of 31.5 mg, was used as the donor of protein genes. Since this selection is highly resistant to stripe rust, the object of the crossing programme was to transfer this resistance, together with the high protein potential, to durum and bread wheat cultivars susceptible to the disease. In the tetraploid lines obtained from the T. dicoccoides/T. durum cross, the protein values ranged from 17 to 22%. These lines had resistance to stripe rust from the wild emmer and to stem rust from the durum. After two further crosses between these tetraploid lines and T. aestivum cultivars, several lines were selected which combined good yield, high protein level and resistance to rust diseases. These lines attained protein levels of 14 to 19% in the whole grain and 14 to 17% in the flour, combined with yields of 4.5 to 6.0 t/ha. They had also inherited resistance to stem rust, and in some instances also to leaf rust, from the cultivated wheat parental lines. (author)

  16. A PiggyBac-mediated approach for muscle gene transfer or cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Ley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An emerging therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the transplantation of autologous myogenic progenitor cells genetically modified to express dystrophin. The use of this approach is challenged by the difficulty in maintaining these cells ex vivo while keeping their myogenic potential, and ensuring sufficient transgene expression following their transplantation and myogenic differentiation in vivo. We investigated the use of the piggyBac transposon system to achieve stable gene expression when transferred to cultured mesoangioblasts and into murine muscles. Without selection, up to 8% of the mesoangioblasts expressed the transgene from 1 to 2 genomic copies of the piggyBac vector. Integration occurred mostly in intergenic genomic DNA and transgene expression was stable in vitro. Intramuscular transplantation of mouse Tibialis anterior muscles with mesoangioblasts containing the transposon led to sustained myofiber GFP expression in vivo. In contrast, the direct electroporation of the transposon-donor plasmids in the mouse Tibialis muscles in vivo did not lead to sustained transgene expression despite molecular evidence of piggyBac transposition in vivo. Together these findings provide a proof-of-principle that piggyBac transposon may be considered for mesoangioblast cell-based therapies of muscular dystrophies.

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of Pasteurellaceae and horizontal gene transfer of leukotoxin in wild and domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Scott T; Cassirer, E Frances; Weiser, Glen C; Safaee, Shirin

    2007-01-01

    Wild and domestic animal populations are known to be sources and reservoirs of emerging diseases. There is also a growing recognition that horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) plays an important role in bacterial pathogenesis. We used molecular phylogenetic methods to assess diversity and cross-transmission rates of Pasteurellaceae bacteria in populations of bighorn sheep, Dall's sheep, domestic sheep and domestic goats. Members of the Pasteurellaceae cause an array of deadly illnesses including bacterial pneumonia known as "pasteurellosis", a particularly devastating disease for bighorn sheep. A phylogenetic analysis of a combined dataset of two RNA genes (16S ribosomal RNA and RNAse P RNA) revealed remarkable evolutionary diversity among Pasteurella trehalosi and Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica bacteria isolated from sheep and goats. Several phylotypes appeared to associate with particular host species, though we found numerous instances of apparent cross-transmission among species and populations. Statistical analyses revealed that host species, geographic locale and biovariant classification, but not virulence, correlated strongly with Pasteurellaceae phylogeny. Sheep host species correlated with P. trehalosi isolates phylogeny (PTP test; P=0.002), but not with the phylogeny of M. haemolytica isolates, suggesting that P. trehalosi bacteria may be more host specific. With regards to populations within species, we also discovered a strong correlation between geographic locale and isolate phylogeny in the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (PTP test; P=0.001). We also investigated the potential for HGT of the leukotoxin A (lktA) gene, which produces a toxin that plays an integral role in causing disease. Comparative analysis of the combined RNA gene phylogeny and the lktA phylogenies revealed considerable incongruence between the phylogenies, suggestive of HGT. Furthermore, we found identical lktA alleles in unrelated bacterial species, some of which had been isolated

  18. Production and characterization of novel recombinant adeno-associated virus replicative-form genomes: a eukaryotic source of DNA for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Li

    Full Text Available Conventional non-viral gene transfer uses bacterial plasmid DNA containing antibiotic resistance genes, cis-acting bacterial sequence elements, and prokaryotic methylation patterns that may adversely affect transgene expression and vector stability in vivo. Here, we describe novel replicative forms of a eukaryotic vector DNA that consist solely of an expression cassette flanked by adeno-associated virus (AAV inverted terminal repeats. Extensive structural analyses revealed that this AAV-derived vector DNA consists of linear, duplex molecules with covalently closed ends (termed closed-ended, linear duplex, or "CELiD", DNA. CELiD vectors, produced in Sf9 insect cells, require AAV rep gene expression for amplification. Amounts of CELiD DNA produced from insect cell lines stably transfected with an ITR-flanked transgene exceeded 60 mg per 5 × 10(9 Sf9 cells, and 1-15 mg from a comparable number of parental Sf9 cells in which the transgene was introduced via recombinant baculovirus infection. In mice, systemically delivered CELiD DNA resulted in long-term, stable transgene expression in the liver. CELiD vectors represent a novel eukaryotic alternative to bacterial plasmid DNA.

  19. Shewanella species as the origin of blaOXA-48 genes: insights into gene diversity, associated phenotypes and possible transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacão, Marta; Araújo, Susana; Vendas, Maria; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    Chromosome-encoded beta-lactamases of Shewanella spp. have been indicated as probable progenitors of bla OXA-48 -like genes. However, these have been detected in few Shewanella spp. and dissemination mechanisms are unclear. Thus, our main objective was to confirm the role of Shewanella species as progenitors of bla OXA-48 -like genes. In silico analysis of Shewanella genomes was performed to detect bla OXA-48 -like genes and context, and 43 environmental Shewanella spp. were characterised. Clonal relatedness was determined by BOX-PCR. Phylogenetic affiliation was assessed by 16S rDNA and gyrB sequencing. Antibiotic susceptibility phenotypes were determined. The bla OXA-48 -like genes and genetic context were inspected by PCR, hybridisation and sequence analysis. Gene variants were cloned in Escherichia coli and MICs were determined. Shewanella isolates were screened for integrons, plasmids and insertion sequences. Analysis of Shewanella spp. genomes showed that putative bla OXA-48 -like is present in the majority and in an identical context. Isolates presenting unique BOX profiles affiliated with 11 Shewanella spp. bla OXA-48 -like genes were detected in 22 isolates from 6 species. Genes encoded enzymes identical to OXA-48, OXA-204, OXA-181, and 7 new variants differing from OXA-48 from 2 to 82 amino acids. IS1999 was detected in 24 isolates, although not in the vicinity of bla OXA-48 genes. Recombinant E. coli strains presented altered MICs. The presence/absence of bla OXA-48 -like genes was species-related. Gene variants encoded enzymes with hydrolytic spectra similar to OXA-48-like from non-shewanellae. From the mobile elements previously described in association with bla OXA-48 -like genes, only the IS1999 was found in Shewanella, which indicates its relevance in bla OXA-48 -like genes transfer to other hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatially and temporally controlled gene transfer by electroporation into adherent cells on plasmid DNA-loaded electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kato, Koichi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2004-12-21

    Functional characterization of human genes is one of the most challenging tasks in current genomics. Owing to a large number of newly discovered genes, high-throughput methodologies are greatly needed to express in parallel each gene in living cells. To develop a method that allows efficient transfection of plasmids into adherent cells in spatial- and temporal-specific manners, we studied electric pulse-triggered gene transfer using a plasmid-loaded electrode. A plasmid was loaded on a gold electrode surface having an adsorbed layer of poly(ethyleneimine), and cells were then plated directly onto this modified surface. The plasmid was detached from the electrode by applying a short electric pulse and introduced into the cells cultured on the electrode, resulting in efficient gene expression, even in primary cultured cells. The location of transfected cells could be restricted within a small area on a micropatterned electrode, showing the versatility of the method for spatially controlled transfection. Plasmid transfection could also be performed in a temporally controlled manner without a marked loss of the efficiency when an electric pulse was applied within 3 days after cell plating. The method described here will provide an efficient means to transfer multiple genes, in parallel, into cultured mammalian cells for high-throughput reverse genetics research.

  1. Widespread horizontal transfer of the cerato-ulmin gene between Ophiostoma novo-ulmi and Geosmithia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Priscilla P; Frascella, Arcangela; Kolařík, Miroslav; Comparini, Cecilia; Pepori, Alessia L; Santini, Alberto; Scala, Felice; Scala, Aniello

    2014-08-01

    Previous work had shown that a sequence homologous to the gene encoding class II hydrophobin cerato-ulmin from the fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, the causal agent of Dutch Elm Disease (DED), was present in a strain of the unrelated species Geosmithia species 5 (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) isolated from Ulmus minor affected by DED. As both fungi occupy the same habitat, even if different ecological niches, the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer was proposed. In the present work we have analysed for the presence of the cerato-ulmin gene 70 Geosmithia strains representing 29 species, isolated from different host plants and geographic locations. The gene was found in 52.1 % of the strains derived from elm trees, while none of those isolated from nonelms possessed it. The expression of the gene in Geosmithia was also assessed by real time PCR in different growth conditions (liquid culture, solid culture, elm sawdust, dual culture with O. novo-ulmi), and was found to be extremely low in all conditions tested. On the basis of these results we propose that the cerato-ulmin gene is not functional in Geosmithia, but can be considered instead a marker of more extensive transfers of genetic material as shown in other fungi. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Horizontal gene transfer from macrophages to ischemic muscles upon delivery of naked DNA with Pluronic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vivek; Gaymalov, Zagit; Alakhova, Daria; Gupta, Richa; Zucker, Irving H; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of plasmid DNA (pDNA) with non-ionic Pluronic block copolymers increases gene expression in injected muscles and lymphoid organs. We studied the role of immune cells in muscle transfection upon inflammation. Local inflammation in murine hind limb ischemia model (MHLIM) drastically increased DNA, RNA and expressed protein levels in ischemic muscles injected with pDNA/Pluronic. The systemic inflammation (MHLIM or peritonitis) also increased expression of pDNA/Pluronic in the muscles. When pDNA/Pluronic was injected in ischemic muscles the reporter gene, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) co-localized with desmin(+) muscle fibers and CD11b(+) macrophages (MØs), suggesting transfection of MØs along with the muscle cells. P85 enhanced (∼ 4 orders) transfection of MØs with pDNA in vitro. Moreover, adoptively transferred MØs were shown to pass the transgene to inflamed muscle cells in MHLIM. Using a co-culture of myotubes (MTs) and transfected MØs expressing a reporter gene under constitutive (cmv-luciferase) or muscle specific (desmin-luciferase) promoter we demonstrated that P85 enhances horizontal gene transfer from MØ to MTs. Therefore, MØs can play an important role in muscle transfection with pDNA/Pluronic during inflammation, with both inflammation and Pluronic contributing to the increased gene expression. pDNA/Pluronic has potential for therapeutic gene delivery in muscle pathologies that involve inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Brochier-Armanet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 °C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  4. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Forterre, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT) to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 degrees C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  5. Widespread gene transfer in the central nervous system of cynomolgus macaques following delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hinderer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9 vectors have recently been shown to transduce cells throughout the central nervous system of nonhuman primates when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, a finding which could lead to a minimally invasive approach to treat genetic and acquired diseases affecting the entire CNS. We characterized the transduction efficiency of two routes of vector administration into the CSF of cynomolgus macaques—lumbar puncture, which is typically used in clinical practice, and suboccipital puncture, which is more commonly used in veterinary medicine. We found that delivery of vector into the cisterna magna via suboccipital puncture is up to 100-fold more efficient for achieving gene transfer to the brain. In addition, we evaluated the inflammatory response to AAV9-mediated GFP expression in the nonhuman primate CNS. We found that while CSF lymphocyte counts increased following gene transfer, there were no clinical or histological signs of immune toxicity. Together these data indicate that delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna is an effective method for achieving gene transfer in the CNS, and suggest that adapting this uncommon injection method for human trials could vastly increase the efficiency of gene delivery.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer of epigenetic machinery and evolution of parasitism in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and other apicomplexans.

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    Kishore, Sandeep P; Stiller, John W; Deitsch, Kirk W

    2013-02-11

    The acquisition of complex transcriptional regulatory abilities and epigenetic machinery facilitated the transition of the ancestor of apicomplexans from a free-living organism to an obligate parasite. The ability to control sophisticated gene expression patterns enabled these ancient organisms to evolve several differentiated forms, invade multiple hosts and evade host immunity. How these abilities were acquired remains an outstanding question in protistan biology. In this work, we study SET domain bearing genes that are implicated in mediating immune evasion, invasion and cytoadhesion pathways of modern apicomplexans, including malaria parasites. We provide the first conclusive evidence of a horizontal gene transfer of a Histone H4 Lysine 20 (H4K20) modifier, Set8, from an animal host to the ancestor of apicomplexans. Set8 is known to contribute to the coordinated expression of genes involved in immune evasion in modern apicomplexans. We also show the likely transfer of a H3K36 methyltransferase (Ashr3 from plants), possibly derived from algal endosymbionts. These transfers appear to date to the transition from free-living organisms to parasitism and coincide with the proposed horizontal acquisition of cytoadhesion domains, the O-glycosyltransferase that modifies these domains, and the primary family of transcription factors found in apicomplexan parasites. Notably, phylogenetic support for these conclusions is robust and the genes clearly are dissimilar to SET sequences found in the closely related parasite Perkinsus marinus, and in ciliates, the nearest free-living organisms with complete genome sequences available. Animal and plant sources of epigenetic machinery provide new insights into the evolution of parasitism in apicomplexans. Along with the horizontal transfer of cytoadhesive domains, O-linked glycosylation and key transcription factors, the acquisition of SET domain methyltransferases marks a key transitional event in the evolution to parasitism in

  7. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

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    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human colorectal explant tissues from normal individuals. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed to assess any tissue damage or inflammation. Transduction efficiency and systemic biodistribution were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. LV-fLuc expression was evaluated by ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. LV-β-Gal expression and identity of transduced cell types were examined by histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Results Imaging studies showed positive fLuc signals in murine distal colon; β-Gal-positive cells were found in both murine and human intestinal tissue. In the murine model, β-Gal-positive epithelial and lamina propria cells were found to express cytokeratin, CD45, and CD4. LV-transduced β-Gal-positive cells were also seen in human colorectal explants, consisting mainly of CD45, CD4, and CD11c-positive cells confined to the LP. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of LV-mediated gene transfer into colonic mucosa. We also identified differential patterns of mucosal gene transfer dependent on whether murine or human tissue was used. Within the limitations of the study, the LV did not appear to induce mucosal damage and were not distributed beyond the distal colon.

  8. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

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    Chen Libo, E-mail: libochen888@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Guo Guoying [Xinyuan Institute of Medicine and Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe [Division of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zhu Ruisen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated {sup 125}I{sup -} up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T{sub 1/2eff} of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or {sup 131}I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%{+-}2.5%, 43.4%{+-}2.8% and 8.6%{+-}1.2% after exposure to {sup 131}I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  9. Structural Stability of the Coiled-Coil Domain of Tumor Susceptibility Gene (TSG)-101.

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    White, Jordan T; Toptygin, Dmitri; Cohen, Randy; Murphy, Natalie; Hilser, Vincent J

    2017-09-05

    The tumor susceptibility gene-101 coiled coil domain (TSG101cc) is an integral component of the endosomal maturation machinery and cytokinesis, and also interacts with several transcription factors. The TSG101cc has been crystallized as a homotetramer but is known to interact with two of its binding partners as a heterotrimer. To investigate this apparent discrepancy, we examined the solution thermodynamics of the TSG101cc. Here, we use circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence, and structural thermodynamic analysis to investigate the structural stability and the unfolding of the TSG101cc. We demonstrate that TSG101cc exists in solution primarily as a tetramer, which unfolds in a two-state manner. Surprisingly, no homodimeric or homotrimeric species were detected. Structural thermodynamic analysis of the homotetrameric structure and comparison with known oligomeric coiled-coils suggests that the TSG101cc homotetramer is comparatively unstable on a per residue basis. Furthermore, the homotrimeric coiled-coil is predicted to be much less stable than the functional heterotrimeric coiled-coil in the endosomal sorting complex required for transport 1 (ESCRT1). These results support a model whereby the tetramer-monomer equilibrium of TSG101 serves as the cellular reservoir of TSG101, which is effectively outcompeted when its binding partners are present and the heteroternary complex can form.

  10. Homologues of Genetic Transformation DNA Import Genes Are Required for Rhodobacter capsulatus Gene Transfer Agent Recipient Capability Regulated by the Response Regulator CtrA.

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    Brimacombe, Cedric A; Ding, Hao; Johnson, Jeanette A; Beatty, J Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) morphologically resemble small, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages; however, their only known role is to package and transfer random pieces of the producing cell genome to recipient cells. The best understood GTA is that of Rhodobacter capsulatus, termed RcGTA. We discovered that homologues of three genes involved in natural transformation in other bacteria, comEC, comF, and comM, are essential for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition. This paper gives genetic and biochemical evidence that RcGTA-borne DNA entry into cells requires the ComEC and ComF putative DNA transport proteins and genetic evidence that putative cytoplasmic ComM protein of unknown function is required for recipient capability. Furthermore, the master regulator of RcGTA production in bacterial horizontal gene transfer mechanisms, where donor DNA is packaged in transducing phage-like particles and recipient cells take up DNA using natural transformation-related machinery. Both of these differentiated subsets of a culture population, donors and recipients, are dependent on the same response regulator, CtrA. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major driver of bacterial evolution and adaptation to environmental stresses. Traits such as antibiotic resistance or metabolic properties can be transferred between bacteria via HGT; thus, HGT can have a tremendous effect on the fitness of a bacterial population. The three classically described HGT mechanisms are conjugation, transformation, and phage-mediated transduction. More recently, the HGT factor GTA was described, where random pieces of producing cell genome are packaged into phage-like particles that deliver DNA to recipient cells. In this report, we show that transport of DNA borne by the R. capsulatus RcGTA into recipient cells requires key genes previously thought to be specific to natural transformation pathways. These findings indicate that RcGTA combines central aspects of phage-mediated transduction and natural

  11. Carotenoids gene markers for sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam): applications in genetic mapping, diversity evaluation and cross-species transference.

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    Arizio, C M; Costa Tártara, S M; Manifesto, M M

    2014-04-01

    Carotenoids play essential biological roles in plants, and genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway are evolutionarily conserved. Orange sweetpotato is an important source of β-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A. In spite of this, only a few research studies have focussed on the molecular aspects of carotenoid genes regarding their specific sequence and structure. In this study, we used published carotenoid gene sequences from Ipomoea and other species for "exon-primed intron-crossing" approaches. Fifteen pairs of primers representing six carotenoid genes were designed for different introns, eleven of which amplified scorable and reproducible alleles. The sequence of PCR products showed high homology to the original ones. Moreover, the structure and sequence of the introns and exons from five carotenoid structural genes were partially defined. Intron length polymorphism and intron single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in amplified sequences. Marker dosages and allelic segregations were analysed in a mapping population. The developed markers were evaluated in a set of Ipomoeas batatas accessions so as to analyse genetic diversity and conservation applicability. Using CG strategy combined with EPIC-PCR technique, we developed carotenoid gene markers in sweetpotato. We reported the first set of polymorphic Candidate Gene markers for I. batatas, and demonstrated transferability in seven wild Ipomoea species. We described the sequence and structure of carotenoid genes and introduced new information about genomic constitution and allele dosage.

  12. Contribution of horizontal gene transfer to the emergence of VIM-4 carbapenemase producer Enterobacteriaceae in Kuwait

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    Sonnevend Á

    2017-12-01

    . Monitoring of such events is of high importance as the interference with the spread of mobile genetic elements may represent a formidable challenge to infection control. Keywords: Enterobacteriaceae, VIM carbapenemase, horizontal gene transfer, multidrug resistance, Middle East

  13. Next generation macrocyclic and acyclic cationic lipids for gene transfer: Synthesis and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeli, Emile; Maginty, Amanda B; Abdul Khalique, Nada; Raju, Liji; Abdulhai, Mohamad; Nicholson, David G; Larsen, Helge; Pungente, Michael D; Goldring, William P D

    2015-10-01

    formulated with DOPE. A number of the lipid formulations with cholesterol as co-lipid performed as well as, or better than Lipofectamine 2000™ and EPC, the two positive controls employed in these studies. These results suggest that our novel cyclic and acyclic cationic lipid vectors are effective nonviral gene transfer agents that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A nonspecific Setaria italica lipid transfer protein gene plays a critical role under abiotic stress

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    Yanlin Pan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are a class of cysteine-rich soluble proteins having small molecular weights. LTPs participate in flower and seed development, cuticular wax deposition, also play important roles in pathogen and abiotic stress responses. A nonspecific LTP gene (SiLTP was isolated from a foxtail millet (Setaria italica suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH library enriched for differentially expressed genes after abiotic stress treatments. A semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that SiLTP was expressed in all foxtail millet tissues. Additionally, the SiLTP promoter drove GUS expression in root tips, stems, leaves, flowers and siliques of transgenic Arabidopsis. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the SiLTP expression was induced by NaCl, polyethylene glycol and abscisic acid. SiLTP was localized in the cytoplasm of tobacco leaf epidermal cells and maize protoplasts. The ectopic expression of SiLTP in tobacco resulted in higher levels of salt and drought tolerance than in the wild type (WT. To further assess the function of SiLTP, SiLTP overexpression (OE and RNA interference (RNAi-based transgenic foxtail millet were obtained. SiLTP-OE lines performed better under salt and drought stresses compared with WT plants. In contrast, the RNAi lines were much more sensitive to salt and drought compared than WT. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and yeast one-hybrids indicated that the transcription factor (TF ABA-responsive DRE-binding protein (SiARDP could bind to the dehydration-responsive element of SiLTP promoter in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Moreover, the SiLTP expression levels were higher in SiARDP-OE plants compared than the WT. These results confirmed that SiLTP plays important roles in improving salt and drought stress tolerance of foxtail millet, and may partly be up-regulated by SiARDP. SiLTP may provide an effective genetic resource for molecular breeding in crops to enhance salt and

  15. Influence of cloning by chromatin transfer on placental gene expression at Day 45 of pregnancy in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Fernando S; Machado, Sergio A; Drnevich, Jenny; Borowicz, Pawel; Wang, Zhongde; Nowak, Romana A

    2013-01-30

    Poor success rates in somatic cell cloning are often attributed to abnormal early embryonic development as well as late abnormal fetal growth and placental development. Although promising results have been reported following chromatin transfer (CT), a novel cloning method that includes the remodeling of the donor nuclei in vitro prior to their transfer into enucleated oocytes, animals cloned by CT show placental abnormalities similar to those observed following conventional nuclear transfer. We hypothesized that the placental gene expression pattern from cloned fetuses was ontologically related to the frequently observed placental phenotype. The aim of the present study was to compare global gene expression by microarray analysis of Day 44-47 cattle placentas derived from CT cloned fetuses with those derived from in vitro fertilization (i.e. control), and confirm the altered mRNA and protein expression of selected molecules by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The differentially expressed genes identified in the present study are known to be involved in a range of activities associated with cell adhesion, cell cycle control, intracellular transport and proteolysis. Specifically, an imprinted gene, involved with cell proliferation and placentomegaly in humans (CDKN1C) and a peptidase that serves as a marker for non-invasive trophoblast cells in human placentas (DPP4), had mRNA and protein altered in CT placentas. It was concluded that the altered pattern of gene expression observed in CT samples may contribute to the abnormal placental development phenotypes commonly identified in cloned offspring, and that expression of imprinted as well as trophoblast invasiveness-related genes is altered in cattle cloned by CT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intratumoral Immunization by p19Arf and Interferon-β Gene Transfer in a Heterotopic Mouse Model of Lung Carcinoma

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    João Paulo Portela Catani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic strategies that act by eliciting and enhancing antitumor immunity have been clinically validated as an effective treatment modality but may benefit from the induction of both cell death and immune activation as primary stimuli. Using our AdRGD-PG adenovector platform, we show here for the first time that in situ gene transfer of p19Arf and interferon-β (IFNβ in the LLC1 mouse model of lung carcinoma acts as an immunotherapy. Although p19Arf is sufficient to induce cell death, only its pairing with IFNβ significantly induced markers of immunogenic cell death. In situ gene therapy with IFNβ, either alone or in combination with p19Arf, could retard tumor progression, but only the combined treatment was associated with a protective immune response. Specifically in the case of combined intratumoral gene transfer, we identified 167 differentially expressed genes when using microarray to evaluate tumors that were treated in vivo and confirmed the activation of CCL3, CXCL3, IL1α, IL1β, CD274, and OSM, involved in immune response and chemotaxis. Histologic evaluation revealed significant tumor infiltration by neutrophils, whereas functional depletion of granulocytes ablated the antitumor effect of our approach. The association of in situ gene therapy with cisplatin resulted in synergistic elimination of tumor progression. In all, in situ gene transfer with p19Arf and IFNβ acts as an immunotherapy involving recruitment of neutrophils, a desirable but previously untested outcome, and this approach may be allied with chemotherapy, thus providing significant antitumor activity and warranting further development for the treatment of lung carcinoma.

  17. Assessment of Estrogenic Endocrine-Disrupting Chemical Actions in the Brain Using in Vivo Somatic Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Vance L.; Turque, Nathalie; Le Mével, Sébastien; Alliot, Caroline; Gallant, Natacha; Coen, Laurent; Pakdel, Farzad; Demeneix, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals abnormally stimulate vitellogenin gene expression and production in the liver of many male aquatic vertebrates. However, very few studies demonstrate the effects of estrogenic pollutants on brain function. We have used polyethylenimine-mediated in vivo somatic gene transfer to introduce an estrogen response element–thymidine kinase–luciferase (ERE-TK-LUC) construct into the brain. To determine if waterborne estrogenic chemicals modulate gene transcription in the brain, we injected the estrogen-sensitive construct into the brains of Nieuwkoop-Faber stage 54 Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Both ethinylestradiol (EE2; p 0.05). The mixed antagonist/agonist tamoxifen was estrogenic in vivo and increased (p < 0.003) luciferase activity in the tadpole brain by 2.3-fold. There have been no previous reports of somatic gene transfer to the fish brain; therefore, it was necessary to optimize injection and transfection conditions for the adult goldfish (Carassius auratus). Following third brain ventricle injection of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-green fluorescent protein or CMV-LUC gene constructs, we established that cells in the telencephalon and optic tectum are transfected. Optimal transfections were achieved with 1 μg DNA complexed with 18 nmol 22 kDa polyethylenimine 4 days after brain injections. Exposure to EE2 increased brain luciferase activity by 2-fold in males (p < 0.05) but not in females. Activation of an ERE-dependent luciferase reporter gene in both tadpole and fish indicates that waterborne estrogens can directly modulate transcription of estrogen-responsive genes in the brain. We provide a method adaptable to aquatic organisms to study the direct regulation of estrogen-responsive genes in vivo. PMID:15743723

  18. Combined cocaine hydrolase gene transfer and anti-cocaine vaccine synergistically block cocaine-induced locomotion.

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    Marilyn E Carroll

    Full Text Available Mice and rats were tested for reduced sensitivity to cocaine-induced hyper-locomotion after pretreatment with anti-cocaine antibody or cocaine hydrolase (CocH derived from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE. In Balb/c mice, direct i.p. injection of CocH protein (1 mg/kg had no effect on spontaneous locomotion, but it suppressed responses to i.p. cocaine up to 80 mg/kg. When CocH was injected i.p. along with a murine cocaine antiserum that also did not affect spontaneous locomotion, there was no response to any cocaine dose. This suppression of locomotor activity required active enzyme, as it was lost after pretreatment with iso-OMPA, a selective BChE inhibitor. Comparable results were obtained in rats that developed high levels of CocH by gene transfer with helper-dependent adenoviral vector, and/or high levels of anti-cocaine antibody by vaccination with norcocaine hapten conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH. After these treatments, rats were subjected to a locomotor sensitization paradigm involving a "training phase" with an initial i.p. saline injection on day 1 followed by 8 days of repeated cocaine injections (10 mg/kg, i.p.. A 15-day rest period then ensued, followed by a final "challenge" cocaine injection. As in mice, the individual treatment interventions reduced cocaine-stimulated hyperactivity to a modest extent, while combined treatment produced a greater reduction during all phases of testing compared to control rats (with only saline pretreatment. Overall, the present results strongly support the view that anti-cocaine vaccine and cocaine hydrolase vector treatments together provide enhanced protection against the stimulatory actions of cocaine in rodents. A similar combination therapy in human cocaine users might provide a robust therapy to help maintain abstinence.

  19. Combined Cocaine Hydrolase Gene Transfer and Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Synergistically Block Cocaine-Induced Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Marilyn E.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Anker, Justin J.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.; Shen, Xiaoyun; Kinsey, Berma; Parks, Robin J.; Gao, Yang; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Mice and rats were tested for reduced sensitivity to cocaine-induced hyper-locomotion after pretreatment with anti-cocaine antibody or cocaine hydrolase (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). In Balb/c mice, direct i.p. injection of CocH protein (1 mg/kg) had no effect on spontaneous locomotion, but it suppressed responses to i.p. cocaine up to 80 mg/k