WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene encoding protein

  1. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  2. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...

  3. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, A J; Hettema, E H; van den Berg, M; Koerkamp, M G; van Ijlst, L; Distel, B; Tabak, H F

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the genes encoding these matrix proteins takes place in oleate-containing medium and is mediated via an oleate response element (ORE) present in the region preceding these genes. The authors have searched the yeast genome for OREs preceding open reading frames (ORFs), and for ORFs that contain either a PTS1 or PTS2. Of the ORFs containing an ORE, as well as either a PTS1 or a PTS2, many were known to encode bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins. In addition, candidate genes were identified as encoding putative new peroxisomal proteins. For one case, subcellular location studies validated the in silicio prediction. This gene encodes a new peroxisomal thioesterase.

  4. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...... is provided by a competitively coamplified DNA standard constructed by point mutation PCR. A single base difference was introduced to achieve a suitable migration difference in TGGE between the original target DNA and the modified standard without altering the PCR amplification efficiency. This competitive...... PCR strategy is a highly specific and sensitive way to monitor recombinant DNA in environments like the efflux of a biotechnological plant....

  5. The presence of two S-layer-protein-encoding genes is conserved among species related to Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Kolen, C.P.A.M.; Pot, B.; Kersters, K.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the type strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus possesses two S-protein-encoding genes, one of which is silent, on a chromosomal segment of 6 kb. The S-protein-encoding gene in the expression site can be exchanged for the silent S-protein-encoding gene by inversion of this

  6. Effect of salt stress on genes encoding translation-associated proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidbakhshfard, Mohammad Amin; Omranian, Nooshin; Ahmadi, Farajollah Shahriari; Nikoloski, Zoran; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    Salinity negatively affects plant growth and disturbs chloroplast integrity. Here, we aimed at identifying salt-responsive translation-related genes in Arabidopsis thaliana with an emphasis on those encoding plastid-located proteins. We used quantitative real-time PCR to test the expression of 170 genes after short-term salt stress (up to 24 h) and identified several genes affected by the stress including: PRPL11, encoding plastid ribosomal protein L11, ATAB2, encoding a chloroplast-located RNA-binding protein presumably functioning as an activator of translation, and PDF1B, encoding a peptide deformylase involved in N-formyl group removal from nascent proteins synthesized in chloroplasts. These genes were previously shown to have important functions in chloroplast biology and may therefore represent new targets for biotechnological optimization of salinity tolerance.

  7. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  8. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  9. Identification of a conserved cluster of skin-specific genes encoding secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Pierre; Salois, Patrick; St-Amant, Natalie; Gaumond, Marie-Hélène; Lanctôt, Christian

    2004-06-09

    Terminal differentiation of keratinocytes results in the formation of a cornified layer composed of cross-linked intracellular and extracellular material. Using a signal trap expression screening strategy, we have identified four cDNAs encoding secreted proteins potentially involved in this process. One of the cDNAs is identical to the short isoform of suprabasin, a recently described epidermis-specific protein, which is shown here to contain a functional secretory signal. The second cDNA, sk89, encodes a protein of 493 amino acids, rich in glycine and serine residues. The third cDNA encodes a C-terminal fragment of SK89 (amino acids 410-493). It comprises exons 13 to 18 of the sk89 locus but transcription starts at an isoform-specific exon encoding a distinct secretory signal. The fourth cDNA encodes keratinocyte differentiation-associated protein (KDAP), a precursor protein of 102 amino acids. Subcellular localization by immunofluorescence and detection of the tagged proteins by Western blotting confirmed that the four proteins are secreted. Northern analysis and in situ hybridization revealed that expression of the corresponding genes was restricted to the suprabasal keratinocytes of the epidermis. These genes encoding epidermis-specific secreted products are found in a conserved cluster on human chromosome 19q13.12 and on mouse chromosome 7A3.

  10. The first gene in the Escherichia coli secA operon, gene X, encodes a nonessential secretory protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapandi, T; Dolan, K M; Oliver, D B

    1991-01-01

    TnphoA insertions in the first gene of the Escherichia coli secA operon, gene X, were isolated and analyzed. Studies of the Gene X-PhoA fusion proteins showed that gene X encodes a secretory protein, since the fusion proteins possessed normal alkaline phosphatase activity and a substantial portion of this activity was found in the periplasm. In addition, the Gene X-PhoA fusion proteins were initially synthesized with a cleavable signal peptide. A gene X::TnphoA insertion was used to construct...

  11. Identification of toxin genes encoding Cyt proteins from standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods for identification of cyt subclasses from Bacillus thuringiensis were established. Eight of 68 standard and ten of 107 Argentine B. thuringiensis strains harbor at least one cyt gene. The combination of cyt1Aa/cyt2Ba genes was identified in four ...

  12. Sieve element occlusion (SEO) genes encode structural phloem proteins involved in wound sealing of the phloem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Antonia M; Jekat, Stephan B; Zielonka, Sascia; Müller, Boje; Neumann, Ulla; Rüping, Boris; Twyman, Richard M; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2012-07-10

    The sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family originally was delimited to genes encoding structural components of forisomes, which are specialized crystalloid phloem proteins found solely in the Fabaceae. More recently, SEO genes discovered in various non-Fabaceae plants were proposed to encode the common phloem proteins (P-proteins) that plug sieve plates after wounding. We carried out a comprehensive characterization of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SEO genes (NtSEO). Reporter genes controlled by the NtSEO promoters were expressed specifically in immature sieve elements, and GFP-SEO fusion proteins formed parietal agglomerates in intact sieve elements as well as sieve plate plugs after wounding. NtSEO proteins with and without fluorescent protein tags formed agglomerates similar in structure to native P-protein bodies when transiently coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, and the analysis of these protein complexes by electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural features resembling those of native P-proteins. NtSEO-RNA interference lines were essentially devoid of P-protein structures and lost photoassimilates more rapidly after injury than control plants, thus confirming the role of P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore provide direct evidence that SEO genes in tobacco encode P-protein subunits that affect translocation. We also found that peptides recently identified in fascicular phloem P-protein plugs from squash (Cucurbita maxima) represent cucurbit members of the SEO family. Our results therefore suggest a common evolutionary origin for P-proteins found in the sieve elements of all dicotyledonous plants and demonstrate the exceptional status of extrafascicular P-proteins in cucurbits.

  13. Molecular cloning and chromosome mapping of the human gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Shimer, S.; Johnson, K.A.; Bruskin, A.; Green, N.R.; Hill, D.E.; Lawrence, J.B.; Johnson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of growth suppressor genes appears to play a major role in the malignant process. To assess whether protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatases function as growth suppressors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone encoding human protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B for structural and functional characterization. The translation product deduced from the 1,305-nucleotide open reading frame predicts a protein containing 435 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 49,966 Da. The amino-terminal 321 amino acids deduced from the cDNA sequence are identical to the empirically determined sequence of protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B. A genomic clone has been isolated and used in an in situ hybridization to banded metaphase chromosomes to determine that the gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B maps as a single-copy gene to the long arm of chromosome 20 in the region q13.1-q13.2

  14. Variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins in atopic dermatitis patients from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Jörg T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. A main feature of AD as well as other allergic disorders is serum and tissue eosinophilia. Human eosinophils contain high amounts of cationic granule proteins, including eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO and major basic protein (MBP. Recently, variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We therefore genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ECP, EDN, EPO and MBP genes in a cohort of 361 German AD patients and 325 healthy controls. Results Genotype and allele frequencies did not differ between patients and controls for all polymorphisms investigated in this study. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any additional information. Conclusion We did not find evidence to support an influence of variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins for AD pathogenesis in this German cohort.

  15. LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hincha Dirk K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins have first been described about 25 years ago as accumulating late in plant seed development. They were later found in vegetative plant tissues following environmental stress and also in desiccation tolerant bacteria and invertebrates. Although they are widely assumed to play crucial roles in cellular dehydration tolerance, their physiological and biochemical functions are largely unknown. Results We present a genome-wide analysis of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 51 LEA protein encoding genes in the Arabidopsis genome that could be classified into nine distinct groups. Expression studies were performed on all genes at different developmental stages, in different plant organs and under different stress and hormone treatments using quantitative RT-PCR. We found evidence of expression for all 51 genes. There was only little overlap between genes expressed in vegetative tissues and in seeds and expression levels were generally higher in seeds. Most genes encoding LEA proteins had abscisic acid response (ABRE and/or low temperature response (LTRE elements in their promoters and many genes containing the respective promoter elements were induced by abscisic acid, cold or drought. We also found that 33% of all Arabidopsis LEA protein encoding genes are arranged in tandem repeats and that 43% are part of homeologous pairs. The majority of LEA proteins were predicted to be highly hydrophilic and natively unstructured, but some were predicted to be folded. Conclusion The analyses indicate a wide range of sequence diversity, intracellular localizations, and expression patterns. The high fraction of retained duplicate genes and the inferred functional diversification indicate that they confer an evolutionary advantage for an organism under varying stressful environmental conditions. This comprehensive analysis will be an important starting point for

  16. Motif analysis unveils the possible co-regulation of chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Jun; Daniell, Henry; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2012-09-01

    Chloroplasts play critical roles in land plant cells. Despite their importance and the availability of at least 200 sequenced chloroplast genomes, the number of known DNA regulatory sequences in chloroplast genomes are limited. In this paper, we designed computational methods to systematically study putative DNA regulatory sequences in intergenic regions near chloroplast genes in seven plant species and in promoter sequences of nuclear genes in Arabidopsis and rice. We found that -35/-10 elements alone cannot explain the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes. We also concluded that there are unlikely motifs shared by intergenic sequences of most of chloroplast genes, indicating that these genes are regulated differently. Finally and surprisingly, we found five conserved motifs, each of which occurs in no more than six chloroplast intergenic sequences, are significantly shared by promoters of nuclear-genes encoding chloroplast proteins. By integrating information from gene function annotation, protein subcellular localization analyses, protein-protein interaction data, and gene expression data, we further showed support of the functionality of these conserved motifs. Our study implies the existence of unknown nuclear-encoded transcription factors that regulate both chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast protein, which sheds light on the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes.

  17. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  18. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  19. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  20. Sca1, a previously undescribed paralog from autotransporter protein-encoding genes in Rickettsia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoult Didier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the 17 genes encoding autotransporter proteins of the "surface cell antigen" (sca family in the currently sequenced Rickettsia genomes, ompA, sca5 (ompB and sca4 (gene D, have been extensively used for identification and phylogenetic purposes for Rickettsia species. However, none of these genes is present in all 20 currently validated Rickettsia species. Of the remaining 14 sca genes, sca1 is the only gene to be present in all nine sequenced Rickettsia genomes. To estimate whether the sca1 gene is present in all Rickettsia species and its usefulness as an identification and phylogenetic tool, we searched for sca1genes in the four published Rickettsia genomes and amplified and sequenced this gene in the remaining 16 validated Rickettsia species. Results Sca1 is the only one of the 17 rickettsial sca genes present in all 20 Rickettsia species. R. prowazekii and R. canadensis exhibit a split sca1 gene whereas the remaining species have a complete gene. Within the sca1 gene, we identified a 488-bp variable sequence fragment that can be amplified using a pair of conserved primers. Sequences of this fragment are specific for each Rickettsia species. The phylogenetic organization of Rickettsia species inferred from the comparison of sca1 sequences strengthens the classification based on the housekeeping gene gltA and is similar to those obtained from the analyses of ompA, sca5 and sca4, thus suggesting similar evolutionary constraints. We also observed that Sca1 protein sequences have evolved under a dual selection pressure: with the exception of typhus group rickettsiae, the amino-terminal part of the protein that encompasses the predicted passenger domain, has evolved under positive selection in rickettsiae. This suggests that the Sca1 protein interacts with the host. In contrast, the C-terminal portion containing the autotransporter domain has evolved under purifying selection. In addition, sca1 is transcribed in R. conorii

  1. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human β-amyloid protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human β-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development

  2. A family of related proteins is encoded by the major Drosophila heat shock gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    At least four proteins of 70,000 to 75,000 molecular weight (70-75K) were synthesized from mRNA which hybridized with a cloned heat shock gene previously shown to be localized to the 87A and 87C heat shock puff sites. These in vitro-synthesized proteins were indistinguishable from in vivo-synthesized heat shock-induced proteins when analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A comparison of the pattern of this group of proteins synthesized in vivo during a 5-min pulse or during continuous labeling indicates that the 72-75K proteins are probably not kinetic precursors to the major 70K heat shock protein. Partial digestion products generated with V8 protease indicated that the 70-75K heat shock proteins are closely related, but that there are clear differences between them. The partial digestion patterns obtained from heat shock proteins from the Kc cell line and from the Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster are very similar. Genetic analysis of the patterns of 70-75K heat shock protein synthesis indicated that the genes encoding at least two of the three 72-75K heat shock proteins are located outside of the major 87A and 87C puff sites

  3. Genes encoding novel secreted and transmembrane proteins are temporally and spatially regulated during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Mauricio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Morphogenetic events that shape the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are tightly controlled by a genetic program in which specific sets of genes are up-regulated. We used a suppressive subtractive hybridization procedure to identify a group of developmentally regulated genes during early stages of D. melanogaster embryogenesis. We studied the spatiotemporal activity of these genes in five different intervals covering 12 stages of embryogenesis. Results Microarrays were constructed to confirm induction of expression and to determine the temporal profile of isolated subtracted cDNAs during embryo development. We identified a set of 118 genes whose expression levels increased significantly in at least one developmental interval compared with a reference interval. Of these genes, 53% had a phenotype and/or molecular function reported in the literature, whereas 47% were essentially uncharacterized. Clustering analysis revealed demarcated transcript groups with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental intervals. In situ hybridization assays were carried out on 23 uncharacterized genes, 15 of which proved to have spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns. Among these 15 uncharacterized genes, 13 were found to encode putative secreted and transmembrane proteins. For three of them we validated our protein sequence predictions by expressing their cDNAs in Drosophila S2R+ cells and analyzed the subcellular distribution of recombinant proteins. We then focused on the functional characterization of the gene CG6234. Inhibition of CG6234 by RNA interference resulted in morphological defects in embryos, suggesting the involvement of this gene in germ band retraction. Conclusion Our data have yielded a list of developmentally regulated D. melanogaster genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis and provide new information on the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several uncharacterized genes. In particular, we

  4. Genes encoding novel secreted and transmembrane proteins are temporally and spatially regulated during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Alejandro; Hödar, Christian; Hanna, Patricia; Ibáñez, Freddy; Moreno, Pablo; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Pastenes, Luis; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica

    2009-09-22

    Morphogenetic events that shape the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are tightly controlled by a genetic program in which specific sets of genes are up-regulated. We used a suppressive subtractive hybridization procedure to identify a group of developmentally regulated genes during early stages of D. melanogaster embryogenesis. We studied the spatiotemporal activity of these genes in five different intervals covering 12 stages of embryogenesis. Microarrays were constructed to confirm induction of expression and to determine the temporal profile of isolated subtracted cDNAs during embryo development. We identified a set of 118 genes whose expression levels increased significantly in at least one developmental interval compared with a reference interval. Of these genes, 53% had a phenotype and/or molecular function reported in the literature, whereas 47% were essentially uncharacterized. Clustering analysis revealed demarcated transcript groups with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental intervals. In situ hybridization assays were carried out on 23 uncharacterized genes, 15 of which proved to have spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns. Among these 15 uncharacterized genes, 13 were found to encode putative secreted and transmembrane proteins. For three of them we validated our protein sequence predictions by expressing their cDNAs in Drosophila S2R+ cells and analyzed the subcellular distribution of recombinant proteins. We then focused on the functional characterization of the gene CG6234. Inhibition of CG6234 by RNA interference resulted in morphological defects in embryos, suggesting the involvement of this gene in germ band retraction. Our data have yielded a list of developmentally regulated D. melanogaster genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis and provide new information on the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several uncharacterized genes. In particular, we recovered a substantial number of unknown genes encoding

  5. The ROOT HAIRLESS 1 gene encodes a nuclear protein required for root hair initiation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Mathur, J; Boudonck, K; Wells, B; Dolan, L; Roberts, K

    1998-07-01

    The epidermis of Arabidopsis wild-type primary roots, in which some cells grow hairs and others remain hairless in a position-dependent manner, has become an established model system to study cell differentiation. Here we present a molecular analysis of the RHL1 (ROOT HAIRLESS 1) gene that, if mutated, prevents the formation of hairs on primary roots and causes a seedling lethal phenotype. We have cloned the RHL1 gene by use of a T-DNA-tagged mutant and found that it encodes a protein that appears to be plant specific. The predicted RHL1 gene product is a small hydrophilic protein (38.9 kD) containing putative nuclear localization signals and shows no significant homology to any known amino acid sequence. We demonstrate that a 78-amino-acid sequence at its amino terminus is capable of directing an RHL1-GFP fusion protein to the nucleus. The RHL1 transcript is present throughout the wild-type plant and in suspension culture cells, but in very low amounts, suggesting a regulatory function for the RHL1 protein. Structural evidence suggests a role for the RHL1 gene product in the nucleolus. We have examined the genetic relationship between RHL1 and GL2, an inhibitor of root hair initiation in non-hair cells. Our molecular and genetic data with double mutants, together with the expression analysis of a GL2 promoter-GUS reporter gene construct, indicate that the RHL1 gene acts independently of GL2.

  6. Surfactant Protein-D-Encoding Gene Variant Polymorphisms Are Linked to Respiratory Outcome in Premature Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Dahl, Marianne; Tan, Qihua

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Associations between the genetic variation within or downstream of the surfactant protein-D-encoding gene (SFTPD), which encodes the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) and may lead to respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, recently were reported. Our aim...... were used to associate genetic variation to SP-D, respiratory distress (RD), oxygen requirement, and respiratory support. RESULTS: The 5'-upstream SFTPD SNP rs1923534 and the 3 structural SNPs rs721917, rs2243639, and rs3088308 were associated with the SP-D level. The same SNPs were associated with RD......, a requirement for supplemental oxygen, and a requirement for respiratory support. Haplotype analyses identified 3 haplotypes that included the minor alleles of rs1923534, rs721917, and rs3088308 that exhibited highly significant associations with decreased SP-D levels and decreased ORs for RD, oxygen...

  7. Genetic variability in the sable (Martes zibellina L.) with respect to genes encoding blood proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashtanov, S.N. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kazakova, T.I. [Afanas`ev Scientific Research Institute for Breeding of Fur-Bearing Animals, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-02-01

    Electrophoresis of blood proteins was used to determine, for the first time, the level of genetic variability of certain loci in the sable (Martes zibellina L., Mustelidae). Variation of 23 blood proteins encoded by 25 genes was analyzed. Polymorphism was revealed in six genes. The level of heterozygosity was estimated at 0.069; the proportion of polymorphic loci was 24%. Data on the history of the sable population maintained at the farm, on geographical distribution of natural sable populations, and on the number of animals selected for reproduction in captivity is presented. The great number of animals studies and the extensive range of natural sable populations, on the basis of which the population maintained in captivity was obtained, suggest that the results of this work can be used for estimating the variability of the gene pool of sable as a species. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Regulation of dsr genes encoding proteins responsible for the oxidation of stored sulfur in Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Frauke; Dobler, Nadine; Dahl, Christiane

    2010-03-01

    Sulfur globules are formed as obligatory intermediates during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in many environmentally important photo- and chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It is well established that the so-called Dsr proteins are essential for the oxidation of zero-valent sulfur accumulated in the globules; however, hardly anything is known about the regulation of dsr gene expression. Here, we present a closer look at the regulation of the dsr genes in the phototrophic sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. The dsr genes are expressed in a reduced sulfur compound-dependent manner and neither sulfite, the product of the reverse-acting dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrAB, nor the alternative electron donor malate inhibit the gene expression. Moreover, we show the oxidation of sulfur to sulfite to be the rate-limiting step in the oxidation of sulfur to sulfate as sulfate production starts concomitantly with the upregulation of the expression of the dsr genes. Real-time RT-PCR experiments suggest that the genes dsrC and dsrS are additionally expressed from secondary internal promoters, pointing to a special function of the encoded proteins. Earlier structural analyses indicated the presence of a helix-turn-helix (HTH)-like motif in DsrC. We therefore assessed the DNA-binding capability of the protein and provide evidence for a possible regulatory function of DsrC.

  9. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  10. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Muñoz-Martínez

    Full Text Available Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF. CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was

  11. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  12. Phytochrome-regulated expression of the genes encoding the small GTP-binding proteins in peas.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, K; Nagano, Y; Murai, N; Sasaki, Y

    1993-01-01

    We examined the effect of light on the mRNA levels of 11 genes (pra1-pra9A, pra9B, and pra9C) encoding the small GTP-binding proteins that belong to the ras superfamily in Pisum sativum. When the dark-grown seedlings were exposed to continuous white light for 24 hr, the levels of several pra mRNAs in the pea buds decreased: pra2 and pra3 mRNAs decreased markedly; pra4, pra6, and pra9A mRNAs decreased slightly; the other 6 pra mRNAs did not decrease. We studied the kinetics of mRNA accumulatio...

  13. The Neurospora crassa colonial temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) gene encodes protein elongation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propheta, O; Vierula, J; Toporowski, P; Gorovits, R; Yarden, O

    2001-02-01

    At elevated temperatures, the Neurospora crassa mutant colonial, temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) forms compact, highly branched colonies. Growth of the cot-3 strain under these conditions also results in the loss of the lower molecular weight (LMW) isoform of the Ser/Thr protein kinase encoded by the unlinked cot-1 gene, whose function is also involved in hyphal elongation. The unique cot-3 gene has been cloned by complementation and shown to encode translation elongation factor 2 (EF-2). As expected for a gene with a general role in protein synthesis, cot-3 mRNA is abundantly expressed throughout all asexual phases of the N. crassa life cycle. The molecular basis of the cot-3 mutation was determined to be an ATT to AAT transversion, which causes an Ile to Asn substitution at residue 278. Treatment with fusidic acid (a specific inhibitor of EF-2) inhibits hyphal elongation and induces hyperbranching in a manner which mimics the cot-3 phenotype, and also leads to a decrease in the abundance of the LMW isoform of COT1. This supports our conclusion that the mutation in cot-3 which results in abnormal hyphal elongation/branching impairs EF-2 function and confirms that the abundance of a LMW isoform of COT1 kinase is dependent on the function of this general translation factor.

  14. Regulatory elements in the promoter region of the rat gene encoding the acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Bjerking, G; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is an ubiquitously expressed 10-kDa protein which is present in high amounts in cells involved in solute transport or secretion. Rat ACBP is encoded by a gene containing the typical hallmarks of a housekeeping gene. Analysis of the promoter region of the rat ACBP g...

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ISW2 encodes a microtubule-interacting protein required for premeiotic DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtulcová, P; Janatová, I; Kohlwein, S D; Hasek, J

    2000-01-15

    A molecular genetic characterization of the ORF YOR304W (ISW2), identified in a screen of a yeast lambdagt11 library using a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a 210 kDa mammalian microtubule-interacting protein, is presented in this paper. The protein encoded by the ORF YOR304W is 50% identical to the Drosophila nucleosome remodelling factor ISWI and is therefore a new member of the SNF2 protein family and has been recently entered into SDG as ISW2. Although not essential for vegetative growth, we found that the ISW2 gene is required for early stages in sporulation. The isw2 homozygous deletant diploid strain was blocked in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, unable to execute the premeiotic DNA replication and progress through the nuclear meiotic division cycle. ISW2 expression from a multicopy plasmid had the same effect as deletion, but ISW2 expression from a centromeric plasmid rescued the deletion phenotype. In vegetatively growing diploid cells, the Isw2 protein was preferentially found in the cytoplasm, co-localizing with microtubules. An accumulation of the Isw2 protein within the nucleus was observed in cells entering sporulation. Together with data published very recently by Tsukiyama et al. (1999), we propose a role for the Isw2 protein in facilitating chromatin accessibility for transcriptional factor(s) that positively regulate meiosis/sporulation-specific genes. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Human coronavirus 229E encodes a single ORF4 protein between the spike and the envelope genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Wilbrink, Berry; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Minor, Philip D.; Franklin, Sally; Berkhout, Ben; Thiel, Volker; van der Hoek, Lia

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The genome of coronaviruses contains structural and non-structural genes, including several so-called accessory genes. All group 1b coronaviruses encode a single accessory protein between the spike and envelope genes, except for human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E. The prototype virus has a

  17. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Jennifer D.; Hall, Edward K.; Lennon, Jay T.; Evans, Sarah E.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Cotner, James B.; Nemergut, Diana R.; Graham, Emily B.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes.

  18. Lateral gene transfer of streptococcal ICE element RD2 (region of difference 2 encoding secreted proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mereghetti Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of serotype M28 group A Streptococcus (GAS strain MGAS6180 contains a novel genetic element named Region of Difference 2 (RD2 that encodes seven putative secreted extracellular proteins. RD2 is present in all serotype M28 strains and strains of several other GAS serotypes associated with female urogenital infections. We show here that the GAS RD2 element is present in strain MGAS6180 both as an integrative chromosomal form and a circular extrachromosomal element. RD2-like regions were identified in publicly available genome sequences of strains representing three of the five major group B streptococcal serotypes causing human disease. Ten RD2-encoded proteins have significant similarity to proteins involved in conjugative transfer of Streptococcus thermophilus integrative chromosomal elements (ICEs. Results We transferred RD2 from GAS strain MGAS6180 (serotype M28 to serotype M1 and M4 GAS strains by filter mating. The copy number of the RD2 element was rapidly and significantly increased following treatment of strain MGAS6180 with mitomycin C, a DNA damaging agent. Using a PCR-based method, we also identified RD2-like regions in multiple group C and G strains of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp.equisimilis cultured from invasive human infections. Conclusions Taken together, the data indicate that the RD2 element has disseminated by lateral gene transfer to genetically diverse strains of human-pathogenic streptococci.

  19. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia.

  20. Molecular characterization of a phloem-specific gene encoding the filament protein, phloem protein 1 (PP1), from Cucurbita maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A M; Jacobsen, K R; Bostwick, D E; Dannenhoffer, J M; Skaggs, M I; Thompson, G A

    1997-07-01

    Sieve elements in the phloem of most angiosperms contain proteinaceous filaments and aggregates called P-protein. In the genus Cucurbita, these filaments are composed of two major proteins: PP1, the phloem filament protein, and PP2, the phloem lactin. The gene encoding the phloem filament protein in pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch.) has been isolated and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the reconstructed gene gPP1 revealed a continuous 2430 bp protein coding sequence, with no introns, encoding an 809 amino acid polypeptide. The deduced polypeptide had characteristics of PP1 and contained a 15 amino acid sequence determined by N-terminal peptide sequence analysis of PP1. The sequence of PP1 was highly repetitive with four 200 amino acid sequence domains containing structural motifs in common with cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Expression of the PP1 gene was detected in roots, hypocotyls, cotyledons, stems, and leaves of pumpkin plants. PP1 and its mRNA accumulated in pumpkin hypocotyls during the period of rapid hypocotyl elongation after which mRNA levels declined, while protein levels remained elevated. PP1 was immunolocalized in slime plugs and P-protein bodies in sieve elements of the phloem. Occasionally, PP1 was detected in companion cells. PP1 mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization in companion cells at early stages of vascular differentiation. The developmental accumulation and localization of PP1 and its mRNA paralleled the phloem lactin, further suggesting an interaction between these phloem-specific proteins.

  1. Cloning and Characterization of a Gene (mspA) Encoding the Major Sheath Protein of Treponema maltophilum ATCC 51939T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuner, Klaus; Choi, Bong-Kyu; Schade, Rüdiger; Moter, Annette; Otto, Albrecht; Göbel, Ulf B.

    1999-01-01

    The major sheath protein-encoding gene (mspA) of the oral spirochete Treponema maltophilum ATCC 51939T was cloned by screening a genomic library with an anti-outer membrane fraction antibody. The mspA gene encodes a precursor protein of 575 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 62.3 kDa, including a signal peptide of 19 amino acids. The native MspA formed a heat-modifiable, detergent- and trypsin-stable complex which is associated with the outer membrane. Hybridization with an mspA-specific probe showed no cross-reactivity with the msp gene from Treponema denticola. PMID:9922270

  2. Enhanced expression in tobacco of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein by modification of its codon usage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwendal, G.J.A.; Mendes, O.; Wolbert, E.J.H.; Boer, de A.D.

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria was resynthesized to adapt its codon usage for expression in plants by increasing the frequency of codons with a C or a G in the third position from 32 to 60%. The strategy for constructing the synthetic gfp gene was based on

  3. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Linda J; Imre, Kathleen M; Hall, David A; Last, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/) identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/). Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles were identified.

  4. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Savage

    Full Text Available The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/. Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles

  5. Genes of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis encoding proteins of the exosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Sarah J; Moir, Arthur J G; Johnson, Matt J; Moir, Anne

    2003-06-01

    The exosporium is the outermost layer of spores of Bacillus cereus and its close relatives Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis. For these pathogens, it represents the surface layer that makes initial contact with the host. To date, only the BclA glycoprotein has been described as a component of the exosporium; this paper defines 10 more tightly associated proteins from the exosporium of B. cereus ATCC 10876, identified by N-terminal sequencing of proteins from purified, washed exosporium. Likely coding sequences were identified from the incomplete genome sequence of B. anthracis or B. cereus ATCC 14579, and the precise corresponding sequence from B. cereus ATCC 10876 was defined by PCR and sequencing. Eight genes encode likely structural components (exsB, exsC, exsD, exsE, exsF, exsG, exsJ, and cotE). Several proteins of the exosporium are related to morphogenetic and outer spore coat proteins of B. subtilis, but most do not have homologues in B. subtilis. ExsE is processed from a larger precursor, and the CotE homologue appears to have been C-terminally truncated. ExsJ contains a domain of GXX collagen-like repeats, like the BclA exosporium protein of B. anthracis. Although most of the exosporium genes are scattered on the genome, bclA and exsF are clustered in a region flanking the rhamnose biosynthesis operon; rhamnose is part of the sugar moiety of spore glycoproteins. Two enzymes, alanine racemase and nucleoside hydrolase, are tightly adsorbed to the exosporium layer; they could metabolize small molecule germinants and may reduce the sensitivity of spores to these, limiting premature germination.

  6. The you gene encodes an EGF-CUB protein essential for Hedgehog signaling in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G Woods

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling is required for many aspects of development in vertebrates and invertebrates. Misregulation of the Hedgehog pathway causes developmental abnormalities and has been implicated in certain types of cancer. Large-scale genetic screens in zebrafish have identified a group of mutations, termed you-class mutations, that share common defects in somite shape and in most cases disrupt Hedgehog signaling. These mutant embryos exhibit U-shaped somites characteristic of defects in slow muscle development. In addition, Hedgehog pathway mutations disrupt spinal cord patterning. We report the positional cloning of you, one of the original you-class mutations, and show that it is required for Hedgehog signaling in the development of slow muscle and in the specification of ventral fates in the spinal cord. The you gene encodes a novel protein with conserved EGF and CUB domains and a secretory pathway signal sequence. Epistasis experiments support an extracellular role for You upstream of the Hedgehog response mechanism. Analysis of chimeras indicates that you mutant cells can appropriately respond to Hedgehog signaling in a wild-type environment. Additional chimera analysis indicates that wild-type you gene function is not required in axial Hedgehog-producing cells, suggesting that You is essential for transport or stability of Hedgehog signals in the extracellular environment. Our positional cloning and functional studies demonstrate that You is a novel extracellular component of the Hedgehog pathway in vertebrates.

  7. A novel protein encoded by the circular form of the SHPRH gene suppresses glioma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Maolei; Huang, Nunu; Yang, Xuesong; Luo, Jingyan; Yan, Sheng; Xiao, Feizhe; Chen, Wenping; Gao, Xinya; Zhao, Kun; Zhou, Huangkai; Li, Ziqiang; Ming, Liu; Xie, Bo; Zhang, Nu

    2018-01-18

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are recognized as functional non-coding transcripts in eukaryotic cells. Recent evidence has indicated that even though circRNAs are generally expressed at low levels, they may be involved in many physiological or pathological processes, such as gene regulation, tissue development and carcinogenesis. Although the 'microRNA sponge' function is well characterized, most circRNAs do not contain perfect trapping sites for microRNAs, which suggests the possibility that circRNAs have functions that have not yet been defined. In this study, we show that a circRNA containing an open reading frame (ORF) driven by the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) can translate a functional protein. The circular form of the SNF2 histone linker PHD RING helicase (SHPRH) gene encodes a novel protein that we termed SHPRH-146aa. Circular SHPRH (circ-SHPRH) uses overlapping genetic codes to generate a 'UGA' stop codon, which results in the translation of the 17 kDa SHPRH-146aa. Both circ-SHPRH and SHPRH-146aa are abundantly expressed in normal human brains and are down-regulated in glioblastoma. The overexpression of SHPRH-146aa in U251 and U373 glioblastoma cells reduces their malignant behavior and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, SHPRH-146aa protects full-length SHPRH from degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome. Stabilized SHPRH sequentially ubiquitinates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as an E3 ligase, leading to inhibited cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. Our findings provide a novel perspective regarding circRNA function in physiological and pathological processes. Specifically, SHPRH-146aa generated from overlapping genetic codes of circ-SHPRH is a tumor suppressor in human glioblastoma.

  8. Genes encoding heterotrimeric G-proteins are associated with gray matter volume variations in the medial frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría-Siles, Iván; Rijpkema, Mark; Lips, Esther; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Verhage, Matthijs; Franke, Barbara; Fernández, Guillén; Posthuma, Danielle

    2013-05-01

    G-protein-coupled signal transduction mediates most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters; this signaling system transduces a large variety of extracellular stimuli into neurons and is the most widely used mechanism for cell communication at the synaptic level. The heterotrimeric G-proteins have been well established as key regulators of neuronal growth, differentiation, and function. More recently, the heterotrimeric G-protein genes group was associated with general cognitive ability. Although heterotrimeric G-proteins are linked to both cognitive ability and neuron signaling, it is unknown whether heterotrimeric G-proteins are also important for brain structure. We tested for association between local cerebral gray matter volume and the heterotrimeric G-protein genes group in 294 subjects; a replication analysis was performed in an independent sample of 238 subjects. Voxel-based morphometry revealed a strong replicated association between 2 genes encoding heterotrimeric G-proteins with specific local increase in medial frontal cortex volume, an area known to be involved in cognitive control and negative affect. This finding suggests that heterotrimeric G-proteins might modulate medial frontal cortex gray matter volume. The differences in gray matter volume due to variations in genes encoding G-proteins may be explained by the role of G-proteins in prenatal and postnatal neocortex development.

  9. Expression of the Immediate-Early Gene-Encoded Protein Egr-1 ("zif268") during in Vitro Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokin, Maxim; Keifer, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been shown to be induced by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity or behavioral training and is thought to play an important role in long-term memory. In the present study, we examined the induction and expression of the IEG-encoded protein Egr-1 during an in vitro neural correlate of eyeblink…

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of five genes encoding pentatricopeptide repeat proteins from Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luming; Zhu, Huayu; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2010-02-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family is one of the largest and most complex families in plants. These proteins contain multiple 35-amino acid repeats that are proposed to form a super helix capable of binding RNA. PPR proteins have been implicated in many crucial functions broadly involving organelle biogenesis and plant development. In this study, we identified many genes encoding PPR protein in Upland cotton through an extensive survey of the database of Gossypium hirsutum. Furthermore, we isolated five full-length cDNA of PPR genes from G. hirsutum 0-613-2R which were named GhPPR1-GhPPR5. Domain analysis revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences of GhPPR1-5 contained from 5 to 10 PPR motifs and those PPR proteins were divided into two different PPR subfamilies. GhPPR1-2 belonged to the PLS subfamily and GhPPR3-5 belonged to the P subfamily. Phylogenetic analysis of the five GhPPR proteins and 18 other plant PPR proteins also revealed that the same subfamily clustered together. All five GhPPR genes were differentially but constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, pollens, and fibers based on the gene expression analysis by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. This study is the first report and analysis of genes encoding PPR proteins in cotton.

  11. The Drosophila homologue of vertebrate myogenic-determination genes encodes a transiently expressed nuclear protein marking primary myogenic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, B M; Walldorf, U; Eldridge, J; Dübendorfer, A; Frasch, M; Gehring, W J

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone, called Dmyd for Drosophila myogenic-determination gene, that encodes a protein with structural and functional characteristics similar to the members of the vertebrate MyoD family. Dmyd clone encodes a polypeptide of 332 amino acids with 82% identity to MyoD in the 41 amino acids of the putative helix-loop-helix region and 100% identity in the 13 amino acids of the basic domain proposed to contain the essential recognition code for muscle-specific gene activation...

  12. Cloning of gene-encoded stem bromelain on system coming from Pichia pastoris as therapeutic protein candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Y.; Hidayati, W.

    2018-01-01

    The process of identifying bacterial recombination using PCR, and restriction, and then sequencing process was done after identifying the bacteria. This research aimed to get a yeast cell of Pichia pastoris which has an encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme. The production of recombinant stem bromelain enzymes using yeast cells of P. pastoris can produce pure bromelain rod enzymes and have the same conformation with the enzyme’s conformation in pineapple plants. This recombinant stem bromelain enzyme can be used as a therapeutic protein in inflammatory, cancer and degenerative diseases. This study was an early stage of a step series to obtain bromelain rod protein derived from pineapple made with genetic engineering techniques. This research was started by isolating the RNA of pineapple stem which was continued with constructing cDNA using reserve transcriptase-PCR technique (RT-PCR), doing the amplification of bromelain enzyme encoder gene with PCR technique using a specific premiere couple which was designed. The process was continued by cloning into bacterium cells of Escherichia coli. A vector which brought the encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme was inserted into the yeast cell of P. pastoris and was continued by identifying the yeast cell of P. pastoris which brought the encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme. The research has not found enzyme gene of stem bromelain in yeast cell of P. pastoris yet. The next step is repeating the process by buying new reagent; RNase inhibitor, and buying liquid nitrogen.

  13. Cloning and characterization of SmZF1, a gene encoding a Schistosoma mansoni zinc finger protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Paulo R Eleutério de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The zinc finger motifs (Cys2His2 are found in several proteins playing a role in the regulation of transcripton. SmZF1, a Schistosoma mansoni gene encoding a zinc finger protein was initially isolated from an adult worm cDNA library, as a partial cDNA. The full sequence of the gene was obtained by subcloning and sequencing cDNA and genomic fragments. The collated gene sequence is 2181 nt and the complete cDNA sequence is 705 bp containing the full open reading frame of the gene. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed the presence of three introns interrupting the coding region. The open reading frame theoretically encodes a protein of 164 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 18,667Da. The predicted protein contains three zinc finger motifs, usually present in transcription regulatory proteins. PCR amplification with specific primers for the gene allowed for the detection of the target in egg, cercariae, schistosomulum and adult worm cDNA libraries indicating the expression of the mRNA in these life cycle stages of S. mansoni. This pattern of expression suggests the gene plays a role in vital functions of different life cycle stages of the parasite. Future research will be directed to elucidate the functional role of SmZF1.

  14. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothini Odman-Naresh

    Full Text Available Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM, an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps, which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran

  15. Alternative mRNA splicing creates transcripts encoding soluble proteins from most LILR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Des C; Roghanian, Ali; Brown, Damien P; Chang, Chiwen; Allen, Rachel L; Trowsdale, John; Young, Neil T

    2009-11-01

    Leucocyte Ig-like receptors (LILR) are a family of innate immune receptors expressed on myeloid and lymphoid cells that influence adaptive immune responses. We identified a common mechanism of alternative mRNA splicing, which generates transcripts that encode soluble protein isoforms of the majority of human LILR. These alternative splice variants lack transmembrane and cytoplasmic encoding regions, due to the transcription of a cryptic stop codon present in an intron 5' of the transmembrane encoding exon. The alternative LILR transcripts were detected in cell types that express their membrane-associated isoforms. Expression of the alternative LILRB1 transcript in transfected cells resulted in the release of a soluble approximately 65 Kd LILRB1 protein into culture supernatants. Soluble LILRB1 protein was also detected in the culture supernatants of monocyte-derived DC. In vitro assays suggested that soluble LILRB1 could block the interaction between membrane-associated LILRB1 and HLA-class I. Soluble LILRB1 may act as a dominant negative regulator of HLA-class I-mediated LILRB1 inhibition. Soluble isoforms of the other LILR may function in a comparable way.

  16. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Akita (Japan)); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Genome organisation and expression profiling of ABC protein-encoding genes in Heterobasidion annosum s.l. complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Bikash; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2016-03-01

    Members of Heterobasidion annosum species complex are widely regarded as the most destructive fungal pathogens of conifer trees in the boreal and temperate zones of Northern hemisphere. To invade and colonise their host trees, Heterobasidion fungi must overcome components of host chemical defence, including terpenoid oleoresin and phenolic compounds. ABC transporters may play an important role in this process participating in the export of toxic host metabolites and maintaining their intracellular concentration below the critical level. We have identified and phylogenetically classified Heterobasidion genes encoding ABC transporters and closely related ABC proteins. The number of ABC proteins in the Heterobasidion genome is one of the lowest among analysed species of Agaricomycotina. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have analysed transcriptional response of Heterobasidion ABC transporter-encoding genes to monoterpenes as well as their expression profile during growth on pine wood in comparison to the growth on defined media. Several ABC transporters were up-regulated during growth on pine wood. The ABC-transporter encoding gene ABCG1.1 was induced both during growth of H. annosum on pine wood and upon exposure to monoterpenes. Our experimental data demonstrate the differential responses of Heterobasidion ABC genes to growth conditions and chemical stressors. The presented results suggest a potential role of Heterobasidion ABC-G transporters in the resistance to the components of conifer chemical defence. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent...... hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types....

  20. Comparative genomics of the family Vibrionaceae reveals the wide distribution of genes encoding virulence-associated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the family Vibrionaceae are ubiquitous in marine environments. Several of these species are important pathogens of humans and marine species. Evidence indicates that genetic exchange plays an important role in the emergence of new pathogenic strains within this family. Data from the sequenced genomes of strains in this family could show how the genes encoded by all these strains, known as the pangenome, are distributed. Information about the core, accessory and panproteome of this family can show how, for example, genes encoding virulence-associated proteins are distributed and help us understand how virulence emerges. Results We deduced the complete set of orthologs for eleven strains from this family. The core proteome consists of 1,882 orthologous groups, which is 28% of the 6,629 orthologous groups in this family. There were 4,411 accessory orthologous groups (i.e., proteins that occurred in from 2 to 10 proteomes and 5,584 unique proteins (encoded once on only one of the eleven genomes. Proteins that have been associated with virulence in V. cholerae were widely distributed across the eleven genomes, but the majority was found only on the genomes of the two V. cholerae strains examined. Conclusions The proteomes are reflective of the differing evolutionary trajectories followed by different strains to similar phenotypes. The composition of the proteomes supports the notion that genetic exchange among species of the Vibrionaceae is widespread and that this exchange aids these species in adapting to their environments.

  1. Expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins regulated by the algal cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Suzuki, Kenji; Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro

    2012-10-01

    Chloroplasts have evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont and their continuity has been maintained by chloroplast division, which is performed by the constriction of a ring-like division complex at the division site. It is believed that the synchronization of the endosymbiotic and host cell division events was a critical step in establishing a permanent endosymbiotic relationship, such as is commonly seen in existing algae. In the majority of algal species, chloroplasts divide once per specific period of the host cell division cycle. In order to understand both the regulation of the timing of chloroplast division in algal cells and how the system evolved, we examined the expression of chloroplast division genes and proteins in the cell cycle of algae containing chloroplasts of cyanobacterial primary endosymbiotic origin (glaucophyte, red, green, and streptophyte algae). The results show that the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins of both cyanobacterial and eukaryotic host origin are expressed specifically during the S phase, except for FtsZ in one graucophyte alga. In this glaucophyte alga, FtsZ is persistently expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas the expression of the nucleus-encoded MinD and MinE as well as FtsZ ring formation are regulated by the phases of the cell cycle. In contrast to the nucleus-encoded division genes, it has been shown that the expression of chloroplast-encoded division genes is not regulated by the host cell cycle. The endosymbiotic gene transfer of minE and minD from the chloroplast to the nuclear genome occurred independently on multiple occasions in distinct lineages, whereas the expression of nucleus-encoded MIND and MINE is regulated by the cell cycle in all lineages examined in this study. These results suggest that the timing of chloroplast division in algal cell cycle is restricted by the cell cycle-regulated expression of some but not all of the chloroplast division genes. In addition, it is

  2. The stem rust resistance gene Rpg5 encodes a protein with nucleotide-binding-site, leucine-rich, and protein kinase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggeman, R; Druka, A; Nirmala, J; Cavileer, T; Drader, T; Rostoks, N; Mirlohi, A; Bennypaul, H; Gill, U; Kudrna, D; Whitelaw, C; Kilian, A; Han, F; Sun, Y; Gill, K; Steffenson, B; Kleinhofs, A

    2008-09-30

    We isolated the barley stem rust resistance genes Rpg5 and rpg4 by map-based cloning. These genes are colocalized on a 70-kb genomic region that was delimited by recombination. The Rpg5 gene consists of an unusual structure encoding three typical plant disease resistance protein domains: nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat, and serine threonine protein kinase. The predicted RPG5 protein has two putative transmembrane sites possibly involved in membrane binding. The gene is expressed at low but detectable levels. Posttranscriptional gene silencing using VIGS resulted in a compatible reaction with a normally incompatible stem rust pathogen. Allele sequencing also validated the candidate Rpg5 gene. Allele and recombinant sequencing suggested that the probable rpg4 gene encoded an actin depolymerizing factor-like protein. Involvement of actin depolymerizing factor genes in nonhost resistance has been documented, but discovery of their role in gene-for-gene interaction would be novel and needs to be further substantiated.

  3. Effect of hypoxia on the expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in U87 glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Minchenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the effect of hypoxia on the expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in U87 glioma cells under the inhibition of IRE1 (inositol requiring enzyme-1, which controls cell proliferation and tumor growth as a central mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress. It was shown that hypoxia down-regulated gene expression of malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2, malic enzyme 2 (ME2, mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (GOT2, and subunit B of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB in control (transfected by empty vector glioma cells in a gene specific manner. At the same time, the expression level of mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2 and subunit D of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHD genes in these cells does not significantly change in hypoxic conditions. It was also shown that the inhibition of ІRE1 signaling enzyme function in U87 glioma cells decreases the effect of hypoxia on the expression of ME2, GOT2, and SDHB genes and introduces the sensitivity of IDH2 gene to hypoxia. Furthermore, the expression of all studied genes depends on IRE1-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling in gene specific manner, because ІRE1 knockdown significantly decreases their expression in normoxic conditions, except for IDH2 gene, which expression level is strongly up-regulated. Therefore, changes in the expression level of nuclear genes encoding ME2, MDH2, IDH2, SDHB, SDHD, and GOT2 proteins possibly reflect metabolic reprogramming of mitochondria by hypoxia and IRE1-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling and correlate with suppression of glioma cell proliferation under inhibition of the IRE1 enzyme function.

  4. Cloning and characterization of shk2, a gene encoding a novel p21-activated protein kinase from fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P; Kansra, S; Pimental, R A; Gilbreth, M; Marcus, S

    1998-07-17

    We describe the characterization of a novel gene, shk2, encoding a second p21(cdc42/rac)-activated protein kinase (PAK) homolog in fission yeast. Like other known PAKs, Shk2 binds to Cdc42 in vivo and in vitro. While overexpression of either shk2 or cdc42 alone does not impair growth of wild type fission yeast cells, cooverexpression of the two genes is toxic and leads to highly aberrant cell morphology, providing evidence for functional interaction between Cdc42 and Shk2 proteins in vivo. Fission yeast shk2 null mutants are viable and exhibit no obvious phenotypic defects. Overexpression of shk2 restores viability and normal morphology but not full mating competence to fission yeast cells carrying a shk1 null mutation. Additional genetic data suggest that Shk2, like Cdc42 and Shk1, participates in Ras-dependent morphological control and mating response pathways in fission yeast. We also show that overexpression of byr2, a gene encoding a Ste11/MAPK kinase kinase homolog, suppresses the mating defect of cells partially defective for Shk1 function, providing evidence of a link between PAKs and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in fission yeast. Taken together, our results suggest that Shk2 is partially overlapping in function with Shk1, with Shk1 being the dominant protein in function.

  5. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hampel

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR, a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors.

  6. Cloning and expression of gene encoding P23 protein from Cryptosporidium parvum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Thi Bich Lan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We cloned the cp23 gene coding P23 (glycoprotein from Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Thua Thien Hue province, Vietnam. The coding region of cp23 gene from C. parvum is 99% similar with cp23 gene deposited in NCBI (accession number: U34390. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the cp23 gene in E. coli BL21 StarTM (DE3 produced polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 37, 40 and 49 kDa. These molecules may be non-glycosylated or glycosylated P23 fusion polypeptides. Recombinant P23 protein purified by GST (glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography can be used as an antigen for C. parvum antibody production as well as to develop diagnostic kit for C. parvum.

  7. Expression of the gene encoding the PR-like protein PRms in germinating maize embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacuberta, J M; Raventós, D; Puigdoménech, P; San Segundo, B

    1992-07-01

    The PRms protein is a pathogenesis-related (PR)-like protein whose mRNA accumulates during germination of maize seeds. Expression of the PRms gene is induced after infection of maize seeds with the fungus Fusarium moniliforme. To further our investigations on the expression of the PRms gene we examined the accumulation of PRms mRNA in different tissues of maize seedlings infected with F. moniliforme and studied the effect of fungal elicitors, the mycotoxin moniliformin, the hormone gibberellic acid, and specific chemical agents. Our results indicate that fungal infection, and treatment either with fungal elicitors or with moniliformin, a mycotoxin produced by F. moniliforme, increase the steady-state level of PRms mRNA. PRms mRNA accumulation is also stimulated by the application of the hormone gibberellic acid or by treatment with silver nitrate, whereas acetylsalicylic acid has no effect. In situ RNA hybridization in isolated germinating embryo sections demonstrates that the PRms gene is expressed in the scutellum, particularly in a group of inner cells, and in the epithelium lying at the interface of the scutellum and the endosperm. The pattern of expression of the PRms gene closely resembles that found for hydrolytic enzymes, being confined to the scutellum and the aleurone layer of the germinating maize seed. Our results suggest that the PRms protein has a function during the normal process of seed germination that has become adapted to serve among the defence mechanisms induced in response to pathogens during maize seed germination.

  8. SOA genes encode proteins controlling lipase expression in response to triacylglycerol utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfougères, Thomas; Haddouche, Ramdane; Fudalej, Franck; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2010-02-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica efficiently metabolizes hydrophobic substrates such as alkanes, fatty acids or triacylglycerol. This yeast has been identified in oil-polluted water and in lipid-rich food. The enzymes involved in lipid breakdown, for use as a carbon source, are known, but the molecular mechanisms controlling the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes are still poorly understood. The study of mRNAs obtained from cells grown on oleic acid identified a new group of genes called SOA genes (specific for oleic acid). SOA1 and SOA2 are two small genes coding for proteins with no known homologs. Single- and double-disrupted strains were constructed. Wild-type and mutant strains were grown on dextrose, oleic acid and triacylglycerols. The double mutant presents a clear phenotype consisting of a growth defect on tributyrin and triolein, but not on dextrose or oleic acid media. Lipase activity was 50-fold lower in this mutant than in the wild-type strain. The impact of SOA deletion on the expression of the main extracellular lipase gene (LIP2) was monitored using a LIP2-beta-galactosidase promoter fusion protein. These data suggest that Soa proteins are components of a molecular mechanism controlling lipase gene expression in response to extracellular triacylglycerol.

  9. Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Widyastuti Suharsono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine. M. affine can grow well in acid soil with high level of soluble aluminum. One of the important proteins in the detoxifying xenobiotic stress including acid and Al stresses is a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP encoded by mrp gene. The objective of this research is to isolate and clone the cDNA fragment of MaMrp encoding MRP from M. affine. By reverse transcription, total cDNA had been synthesized from the total RNA as template. The fragment of cDNA MaMrp had been successfully isolated by PCR by using total cDNA as template and mrp primer designed from A. thaliana, yeast, and human. This fragment was successfully inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into E. coli DH5α. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the lenght of MaMrp fragment is 633 bp encoding 208 amino acids. Local alignment analysis based on nucleotide of mRNA showed that MaMrp fragment is 69% identical to AtMrp1 and 63% to AtMrp from A. thaliana. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, MaMRP is 84% identical to part of AtMRP13, 77% to AtMRP12, and 73% to AtMRP1 from A. thaliana respectively. Alignment analysis with AtMRP1 showed that MaMRP fragment is located in TM1 and NBF1 domains and has a specific amino acid sequence QCKAQLQNMEEE.

  10. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-10-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter-β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Metalloregulatory DNA-Binding Protein Encoded by the merR Gene: Isolation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Thomas; Walsh, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    The MerR protein mediates the induction of the mercury resistance phenotype in bacteria; it has been isolated in order to study the effects of metal-ion induced changes in the metabolism of prokaryotic cells at the molecular level. After DNA sequences responsible for negative autoregulation were removed, the 16-kilodalton protein was overproduced and purified to more than 90 percent homogeneity by a salt extraction procedure that yields about 5 milligrams of protein per gram of cells. Complementation data, amino terminal analysis, gel filtration, and deoxyribonuclease I protection studies demonstrate that the purified merR gene product is a dimer under nondenaturing conditions and that it binds specifically to DNA, in the presence and absence of mercury, at a palindromic site which is directly between the -10 and -35 regions of the structural genes and adjacent to its own promoter. These initial results indicate that MerR is a DNA-binding metalloregulatory protein that plays a central role in this heavy metal responsive system and they delineate an operator site in the mer operon.

  12. [Cloning, expression and antigenic analysis of VP1-VP4 gene encoding the structural protein of Coxsackie virus A16].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanbin; He, Sijie; Yu, Nan; Chen, Xinxin; Wang, Bin; Che, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Qiyi

    2012-12-01

    To clone and express VP1-VP4 genes encoding the structural proteins of Coxsackie virus A16 and analyze the antigenicity of the expressed recombinant proteins. The VP1-VP4 cDNAs were amplified with RT-PCR from the extracted viral RNA and cloned into pMD19-T vectors. The VP1-VP4 genes were inserted to the multi-cloning sites of the plasmid pQE30a, and the protein expressions in E. coli M15 were induced by IPTG. After purification by washing with 8 mol/L urea under denaturing condition, the recombinant proteins were identified by Western blotting and ELISA for their immunogenicity against rabbit antisera of Coxsackie virus A16 and enterovirus 71, respectively. The recombinant VP1-VP4 proteins were highly expressed in E. coli M15. The purified proteins could be recognized by rabbit antiserum of Coxsackie virus A16 and showed cross reactivity with the rabbit antiserum of Enterovirus 71. The recombinant Coxsackie virus A16 VP1-VP4 proteins obtained possess good antigenicity.

  13. Peptide Signals Encode Protein Localization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jay H.; Keiler, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial proteins are localized to precise intracellular locations, but in most cases the mechanism for encoding localization information is not known. Screening libraries of peptides fused to green fluorescent protein identified sequences that directed the protein to helical structures or to midcell. These peptides indicate that protein localization can be encoded in 20-amino-acid peptides instead of complex protein-protein interactions and raise the possibility that the location of a ...

  14. ICGA-PSO-ELM approach for accurate multiclass cancer classification resulting in reduced gene sets in which genes encoding secreted proteins are highly represented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, Saras; Sundaram, Suresh; Sundararajan, Narasimhan; Zimmermann, Michael; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2011-01-01

    A combination of Integer-Coded Genetic Algorithm (ICGA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), coupled with the neural-network-based Extreme Learning Machine (ELM), is used for gene selection and cancer classification. ICGA is used with PSO-ELM to select an optimal set of genes, which is then used to build a classifier to develop an algorithm (ICGA_PSO_ELM) that can handle sparse data and sample imbalance. We evaluate the performance of ICGA-PSO-ELM and compare our results with existing methods in the literature. An investigation into the functions of the selected genes, using a systems biology approach, revealed that many of the identified genes are involved in cell signaling and proliferation. An analysis of these gene sets shows a larger representation of genes that encode secreted proteins than found in randomly selected gene sets. Secreted proteins constitute a major means by which cells interact with their surroundings. Mounting biological evidence has identified the tumor microenvironment as a critical factor that determines tumor survival and growth. Thus, the genes identified by this study that encode secreted proteins might provide important insights to the nature of the critical biological features in the microenvironment of each tumor type that allow these cells to thrive and proliferate.

  15. A transcription unit at the ken and barbie gene locus encodes a novel Drosophila zinc finger protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnlein, R P; Chen, C K; Schuh, R

    1998-12-01

    We describe a novel Drosophila transcription unit, located in chromosome region 60A. It encodes a zinc finger protein that is expressed in distinct spatial and temporal patterns during embryogenesis. Its initial expression occurs in a stripe at the anterior and the posterior trunk boundary, respectively. The two stripes are activated and spatially controlled by gap-gene activities. The P-element of the enhancer trap line l(2)02970 is inserted in the 5'-region of the transcript and causes a ken and barbie (ken) phenotype, associated with malformation of male genital structures.

  16. Chimeric vip3Aa16TC Gene Encoding the Toxic Core of the Vegetative Insecticidal Protein Enhanced Bacillus thuringiensis Entomopathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Sellami; Maroua Cherif; Samir Jaoua; Kaïs Jamoussi

    2015-01-01

    Vip3 insecticidal protein is produced by Bacillus thuringiensis during the vegetative stage. Its proteolysis by the midgut juice of susceptible larvae formed four major products of approximately 66, 45, 33 and 22 kDa. In this study, we cloned the vip3Aa16TC DNA encoding the “Vip3Aa16 toxic core (TC)” of 33 kDa corresponding to the Vip3Aa16 region from amino acid 200 to 456. The vip3Aa16TC chimeric gene carried by the pHT-vip3Aa16TC plasmid was under the control of the sporulation ...

  17. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea gene transiently expressed in planta, encodes a mitochondrial protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eBenito-Pescador

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of ROS, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor.

  18. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  19. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan; Ferguson, David J P; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Wehner, Maria; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Swan, Daniel; Houniet, Darren; Büchner, Aline; Weibel, Lisa; Wagner, Nicola; Grimalt, Ramon; Bygum, Anette; Serre, Guy; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Sprecher, Eli; Schoch, Susanne; Oji, Vinzenz; Hamm, Henning; Farrant, Paul; Simon, Michel; Betz, Regina C

    2016-12-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic causes of UHS and shed light on its pathophysiology and hair physiology in general. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SHY1, the yeast homolog of the mammalian SURF-1 gene, encodes a mitochondrial protein required for respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkevich, G; Repetto, B; Glerum, D M; Jin, C; Tzagoloff, A

    1997-05-30

    C173 and W125 are pet mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, partially deficient in cytochrome oxidase but with elevated concentrations of cytochrome c. Assays of electron transport chain enzymes indicate that the mutations exert different effects on the terminal respiratory pathway, including an inefficient transfer of electrons between the bc1 and the cytochrome oxidase complexes. A cloned gene capable of restoring respiration in C173/U1 and W125 is identical to reading frame YGR112w of yeast chromosome VII (GenBank Z72897Z72897). The encoded protein is homologous to the product of the mammalian SURF-1 gene. In view of the homology, the yeast gene has been designated SHY1 (Surf Homolog of Yeast). An antibody against the carboxyl-terminal half of Shy1p has been used to localize the protein in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Deletion of part of SHY1 produces a phenotype similar to that of G91 mutants. Disruption of SHY1 at a BamHI site, located approximately 2/3 of the way into the gene, has no obvious phenotypic consequence. This evidence, together with the ability of a carboxyl-terminal coding sequence starting from the BamHI site to complement a shy1 mutant, suggests that the Shy1p contains two domains that can be separately expressed to form a functional protein.

  1. A Blumeria graminis gene family encoding proteins with a C-terminal variable region with homologues in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grell, Morten N; Mouritzen, Peter; Giese, Henriette

    2003-06-05

    In a study aimed at characterising, at the molecular level, the obligate biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh), we have identified a novel group of genes, the Egh16H genes, and shown that two of these are up-regulated during primary infection of barley leaves. The genes have partial homology to a previously characterised Bgh gene family, Egh16. Egh16 and Egh16H are subfamilies of a larger multigene family with presently about 15 members identified in Bgh. Egh16H has about ten members, and we show that five of these are expressed as highly conserved mRNAs that are predicted to encode proteins with a C-terminal variable region. Egh16H has high homology to sequences in Magnaporthe grisea and other plant pathogenic fungi, as well as sequences of both the insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae and the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. No close homologues of Egh16H were found in the non-pathogenic fungi Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans. We predict that Egh16H plays a general role in the interaction between pathogenic fungi and their hosts. At present, the large number of gene family members with C-terminal variation appears to be unique for Bgh, and the Egh16/Egh16H gene family is to our knowledge the largest gene family so far characterised in this fungus.

  2. The divergently transcribed genes encoding yeast ribosomal proteins L46 and S24 are activated by shared RPG-boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraakman, L S; Mager, W H; Maurer, K T; Nieuwint, R T; Planta, R J

    1989-12-11

    Transcription of the majority of the ribosomal protein (rp) genes in yeast is activated through common cis-acting elements, designated RPG-boxes. These elements have been shown to act as specific binding sites for the protein factor TUF/RAP1/GRF1 in vitro. Two such elements occur in the intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes encoding L46 and S24. To investigate whether the two RPG-boxes mediate transcription activation of both the L46 and S24 gene, two experimental strategies were followed: cloning of the respective genes on multicopy vectors and construction of fusion genes. Cloning of the L46 + S24 gene including the intergenic region in a multicopy yeast vector indicated that both genes are transcriptionally active. Using constructs in which only the S24 or the L46 gene is present, with or without the intergenic region, we obtained evidence that the intergenic region is indispensable for transcription activation of either gene. To demarcate the element(s) responsible for this activation, fusions of the intergenic region in either orientation to the galK reporter gene were made. Northern analysis of the levels of hybrid mRNA demonstrated that the intergenic region can serve as an heterologous promoter when it is in the 'S24-orientation'. Surprisingly, however, when fused in the reverse orientation the intergenic region did hardly confer transcription activity on the fusion gene. Furthermore, a 274 bp FnuDII-FnuDII fragment from the intergenic region that contains the RPG-boxes, could replace the naturally occurring upstream activation site (UASrpg) of the L25 rp-gene only when inserted in the 'S24-orientation'. Removal of 15 bp from the FnuDII fragment appeared to be sufficient to obtain transcription activation in the 'L46 orientation' as well. Analysis of a construct in which the RPG-boxes were selectively deleted from the promoter region of the L46 gene indicated that the RPG-boxes are needed for efficient transcriptional activation of

  3. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béringue Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated.

  4. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    -human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ...... hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types.......Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...

  5. QRI, a retina-specific gene, encodes an extracellular matrix protein exclusively expressed during neural retina differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, F J; Pouponnot, C; Jeanny, J C; Lecoq, O; Calothy, G; Pierani, A

    1996-02-01

    Neural retina development results from growth arrest of neuroectodermal precursors and differentiation of postmitotic cells. The QRI gene is specifically expressed in Müller retinal glial cells. Its expression coincides with the stage of withdrawal from the cell cycle and establishment of differentiation and is repressed upon induction of retinal cell proliferation by the v-src gene product. In this report, we show that the QR1 gene encodes several glycosylated proteins that are secreted and can either associate with the extracellular matrix or remain diffusible in the medium. By using pulse-chase experiments, the 100-103 kDa forms seem to appear first and are specifically incorporated into the extracellular matrix, whereas the 108 and 60 kDa polypeptides appear later and are detected as soluble forms in the culture medium. We also report that expression of the QR1 gene is developmentally regulated in the chicken. Its mRNA is first detectable at embryonic day 10, reaches a maximal level at embryonic day 15 and is no longer detected at embryonic day 18. Immunolocalization of the QR1 protein in chicken retina sections during development shows that expression of the protein parallels the differentiation pattern of post-miotic cells (in particular Müller cells and rods), corresponding to the two differentiation gradients in the retina: from the ganglion cell layer to the inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer, and from the optic nerve to the iris. At embryonic day 10, expression of the QR1 protein(s) is restricted to the optic nerve region and the inner nuclear layer, colocalizing with Müller cell bodies. As development proceeds, QR1 protein localization spreads towards the iris and towards the outer nuclear layer, following Müller cell elongations towards the photoreceptors. Between embryonic days 16 and 18, the QR1 protein is no longer detectable in the optic nerve region and is concentrated around the basal segment of the photoreceptors in the peripheral

  6. The Sporothrix schenckii Gene Encoding for the Ribosomal Protein L6 Has Constitutive and Stable Expression and Works as an Endogenous Control in Gene Expression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Trujillo-Esquivel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sporothrix schenckii is one of the causative agents of sporotrichosis, a worldwide-distributed mycosis that affects humans and other mammals. The interest in basic and clinical features of this organism has significantly increased in the last years, yet little progress in molecular aspects has been reported. Gene expression analysis is a set of powerful tools that helps to assess the cell response to changes in the extracellular environment, the genetic networks controlling metabolic pathways, and the adaptation to different growth conditions. Most of the quantitative methodologies used nowadays require data normalization, and this is achieved measuring the expression of endogenous control genes. Reference genes, whose expression is assumed to suffer minimal changes regardless the cell morphology, the stage of the cell cycle or the presence of harsh extracellular conditions are commonly used as controls in Northern blotting assays, microarrays, and semi-quantitative or quantitative RT-PCR. Since the biology of the organisms is usually species specific, it is difficult to find a reliable group of universal genes that can be used as controls for data normalization in experiments addressing the gene expression, regardless the taxonomic classification of the organism under study. Here, we compared the transcriptional stability of the genes encoding for elongation factor 1A, Tfc1, a protein involved in transcription initiation on Pol III promoters, ribosomal protein L6, histone H2A, β-actin, β-tubulin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, UAF30, the upstream activating factor 30, and the transcription initiation factor TFIID subunit 10, during the fungal growth in different culture media and cell morphologies. Our results indicated that only the gene encoding for the ribosomal protein L6 showed a stable and constant expression. Furthermore, it displayed not transcriptional changes when S. schenckii infected larvae of Galleria mellonella or

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 famil...

  8. Analysis of the CYP51 gene and encoded protein in propiconazole-resistant isolates of Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas-Gutiérrez, Gloria P; Angarita-Velásquez, Mónica J; Restrepo-Flórez, Juan M; Rodríguez, Paola; Moreno, Claudia X; Arango, Rafael

    2009-08-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet causes black sigatoka, the most important disease in bananas and plantains. Disease control is mainly through the application of systemic fungicides, including sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). Their intensive use has favoured the appearance of resistant strains. However, no studies have been published on the possible resistance mechanisms. In this work, the CYP51 gene was isolated and sequenced in 11 M. fijiensis strains that had shown different degrees of in vitro sensitivity to propiconazole, one of the most widely used DMI fungicides. Six mutations that could be related to the loss in sensitivity to this fungicide were found: Y136F, A313G, Y461D, Y463D, Y463H and Y463N. The mutations were analysed using a homology model of the protein that was constructed from the crystallographic structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Zoff.) Lehmann & Neumann. Additionally, gene expression was determined in 13 M. fijiensis strains through quantitative analysis of products obtained by RT-PCR. Several changes in the sequence of the gene encoding sterol 14alpha-demethylase were found that have been described in other fungi as being correlated with resistance to azole fungicides. No correlation was found between gene expression and propiconazole resistance.

  9. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics.

  10. Silencing herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid protein encoding genes by siRNA: a promising antiviral therapeutic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Jin

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, a member of the herpesviridae, causes a variety of human viral diseases globally. Although a series of antiviral drugs are available for the treatment of infection and suppression of dissemination, HSV-1 remains highly prevalent worldwide. Therefore, the development of novel antiviral agents with different mechanisms of action is a matter of extreme urgency. During the proliferation of HSV-1, capsid assembly is essential for viral growth, and it is highly conserved in all HSV-1 strains. In this study, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against the HSV-1 capsid protein were screened to explore the influence of silencing capsid expression on the replication of HSV-1. We designed and chemically synthesized siRNAs for the capsid gene and assessed their inhibitory effects on the expression of target mRNA and the total intracellular viral genome loads by quantitative real-time PCR, as well as on the replication of HSV-1 via plaque reduction assays and electron microscopy. Our results showed that siRNA was an effective approach to inhibit the expression of capsid protein encoding genes including UL18, UL19, UL26, UL26.5, UL35 and UL38 in vitro. Interference of capsid proteins VP23 (UL18 and VP5 (UL19 individually or jointly greatly affected the replication of clinically isolated acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 as well as HSV-1/F and HSV-2/333. Plaque numbers and intracellular virions were significantly reduced by simultaneous knockdown of UL18 and UL19. The total intracellular viral genome loads were also significantly decreased in the UL18 and UL19 knockdown groups compared with the viral control. In conclusion, interfering with UL18 and UL19 gene expression could inhibit HSV-1 replication efficiently in vitro. Our research offers new targets for an RNA interference-based therapeutic strategy against HSV-1.

  11. Silencing herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid protein encoding genes by siRNA: a promising antiviral therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fujun; Li, Shen; Zheng, Kai; Zhuo, Cuiqin; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Wang, Qiaoli; Zhang, Peizhuo; Fan, Jianglin; Ren, Zhe; Wang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the herpesviridae, causes a variety of human viral diseases globally. Although a series of antiviral drugs are available for the treatment of infection and suppression of dissemination, HSV-1 remains highly prevalent worldwide. Therefore, the development of novel antiviral agents with different mechanisms of action is a matter of extreme urgency. During the proliferation of HSV-1, capsid assembly is essential for viral growth, and it is highly conserved in all HSV-1 strains. In this study, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the HSV-1 capsid protein were screened to explore the influence of silencing capsid expression on the replication of HSV-1. We designed and chemically synthesized siRNAs for the capsid gene and assessed their inhibitory effects on the expression of target mRNA and the total intracellular viral genome loads by quantitative real-time PCR, as well as on the replication of HSV-1 via plaque reduction assays and electron microscopy. Our results showed that siRNA was an effective approach to inhibit the expression of capsid protein encoding genes including UL18, UL19, UL26, UL26.5, UL35 and UL38 in vitro. Interference of capsid proteins VP23 (UL18) and VP5 (UL19) individually or jointly greatly affected the replication of clinically isolated acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 as well as HSV-1/F and HSV-2/333. Plaque numbers and intracellular virions were significantly reduced by simultaneous knockdown of UL18 and UL19. The total intracellular viral genome loads were also significantly decreased in the UL18 and UL19 knockdown groups compared with the viral control. In conclusion, interfering with UL18 and UL19 gene expression could inhibit HSV-1 replication efficiently in vitro. Our research offers new targets for an RNA interference-based therapeutic strategy against HSV-1.

  12. CYT-21 : A nuclear gene encoding a mytochondrial ribosomal protein of Neurospora crassa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Marius Tiemen Roelof

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of my work has been to set up a procedure to isolate specific nuclear genes that are involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis of Neurospora crassa; to study the function and expresslon of one such gene and to determine which nuclearmitochondrial interactlons are involved in the

  13. Protein-protein association and cellular localization of four essential gene products encoded by tellurite resistance-conferring cluster "ter" from pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkovicova, Lenka; Vavrova, Silvia Minarikova; Mravec, Jozef; Grones, Jozef; Turna, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Gene cluster "ter" conferring high tellurite resistance has been identified in various pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7. However, the precise mechanism as well as the molecular function of the respective gene products is unclear. Here we describe protein-protein association and localization analyses of four essential Ter proteins encoded by minimal resistance-conferring fragment (terBCDE) by means of recombinant expression. By using a two-plasmid complementation system we show that the overproduced single Ter proteins are not able to mediate tellurite resistance, but all Ter members play an irreplaceable role within the cluster. We identified several types of homotypic and heterotypic protein-protein associations among the Ter proteins by in vitro and in vivo pull-down assays and determined their cellular localization by cytosol/membrane fractionation. Our results strongly suggest that Ter proteins function involves their mutual association, which probably happens at the interface of the inner plasma membrane and the cytosol.

  14. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kal, A. J.; Hettema, E. H.; van den Berg, M.; Koerkamp, M. G.; van Ijlst, L.; Distel, B.; Tabak, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the

  15. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments...... and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic...

  16. Sieve element occlusion (SEO) genes encode structural phloem proteins involved in wound sealing of the phloem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ernst, A.; Jekat, S. B.; Zielonka, S.; Mueller, B.; Neumann, U.; Ruping, B.; Twyman, R. M.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Pruefer, D.; Noll, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 28 (2012), E1980-E1989 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : photoassimilate transport * wound response * exudation * phloem protein 1 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  17. Cloning, expression and characterization of a gene from earthworm Eisenia fetida encoding a blood-clot dissolving protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GangQiang Li

    Full Text Available A lumbrokinase gene encoding a blood-clot dissolving protein was cloned from earthworm (Eisenia fetida by RT-PCR amplification. The gene designated as CST1 (GenBank No. AY840996 was sequence analyzed. The cDNA consists of 888 bp with an open reading frame of 729 bp, which encodes 242 amino acid residues. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that CST1 shares similarities and conserved amino acids with other reported lumbrokinases. The amino acid sequence of CST1 exhibits structural features similar to those found in other serine proteases, including human tissue-type (tPA, urokinase (uPA, and vampire bat (DSPAα1 plasminogen activators. CST1 has a conserved catalytic triad, found in the active sites of protease enzymes, which are important residues involved in polypeptide catalysis. CST1 was expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3. The molecular mass of recombinant CST1 (rCST was 25 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE, and further confirmed by Western Blot analysis. His-tagged rCST1 was purified and renatured using nickel-chelating resin with a recovery rate of 50% and a purity of 95%. The purified, renatured rCST1 showed fibrinolytic activity evaluated by both a fibrin plate and a blood clot lysis assay. rCST1 degraded fibrin on the fibrin plate. A significant percentage (65.7% of blood clot lysis was observed when blood clot was treated with 80 mg/mL of rCST1 in vitro. The antithrombotic activity of rCST1 was 912 units/mg calculated by comparison with the activity of a lumbrokinase standard. These findings indicate that rCST1 has potential as a potent blood-clot treatment. Therefore, the expression and purification of a single lumbrokinase represents an important improvement in the use of lumbrokinases.

  18. Biochemical activities of T-antigen proteins encoded by simian virus 40 A gene deletion mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, R; Peden, K; Pipas, J M; Nathans, D; Tjian, R

    1983-01-01

    We have analyzed T antigens produced by a set of simian virus 40 (SV40) A gene deletion mutants for ATPase activity and for binding to the SV40 origin of DNA replication. Virus stocks of nonviable SV40 A gene deletion mutants were established in SV40-transformed monkey COS cells. Mutant T antigens were produced in mutant virus-infected CV1 cells. The structures of the mutant T antigens were characterized by immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies directed against distinct regions of th...

  19. Allelic Diversity and Geographical Distribution of the Gene Encoding Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-3 in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaswong, Vorthon; Simpalipan, Phumin; Siripoon, Napaporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn

    2015-04-01

    Merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) of malaria parasites play critical roles during the erythrocyte invasion and so are potential candidates for malaria vaccine development. However, because MSPs are often under strong immune selection, they can exhibit extensive genetic diversity. The gene encoding the merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) of Plasmodium falciparum displays 2 allelic types, K1 and 3D7. In Thailand, the allelic frequency of the P. falciparum msp-3 gene was evaluated in a single P. falciparum population in Tak at the Thailand and Myanmar border. However, no study has yet looked at the extent of genetic diversity of the msp-3 gene in P. falciparum populations in other localities. Here, we genotyped the msp-3 alleles of 63 P. falciparum samples collected from 5 geographical populations along the borders of Thailand with 3 neighboring countries (Myanmar, Laos, and Cambodia). Our study indicated that the K1 and 3D7 alleles coexisted, but at different proportions in different Thai P. falciparum populations. K1 was more prevalent in populations at the Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders, whilst 3D7 was more prevalent at the Thailand-Laos border. Global analysis of the msp-3 allele frequencies revealed that proportions of K1 and 3D7 alleles of msp-3 also varied in different continents, suggesting the divergence of malaria parasite populations. In conclusion, the variation in the msp-3 allelic patterns of P. falciparum in Thailand provides fundamental knowledge for inferring the P. falciparum population structure and for the best design of msp-3 based malaria vaccines.

  20. The Hansenula polymorpha PER8 gene encodes a novel peroxisomal integral membrane protein involved in proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, X.; Waterham, H. R.; Veenhuis, M.; Cregg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    We previously described the isolation of mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha that are defective in peroxisome biogenesis. Here, we describe the characterization of one of these mutants, per8, and the cloning of the PER8 gene. In either methanol or methylamine medium, conditions

  1. The Hansenula polymorpha PER8 Gene Encodes a Novel Peroxisomal Integral Membrane Protein Involved in Proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Xuqiu; Waterham, Hans R.; Veenhuis, Marten; Cregg, James M.

    We previously described the isolation of mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha that are defective in peroxisome biogenesis. Here, we describe the characterization of one of these mutants, per8, and the cloning of the PER8 gene. In either methanol or methylamine medium, conditions

  2. Structure of the gene encoding the murine protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    II restriction endonuclease, and several blocks of sequence in the 5' flanking region are conserved between mouse and human. Despite all of these common features, one of the most striking differences found concerns the human CK2 alpha subunit binding domain at position -170 to -239 of the human gene. This domain...

  3. Novel mutations in genes encoding subcortical maternal complex proteins may cause human embryonic developmental arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqian; Song, Di; Mykytenko, Dmytro; Kuang, Yanping; Lv, Qifeng; Li, Bin; Chen, Biaobang; Mao, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yao; Zukin, Valery; Mazur, Pavlo; Mu, Jian; Yan, Zheng; Zhou, Zhou; Li, Qiaoli; Liu, Suying; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Sang, Qing; Sun, Zhaogui; Dong, Xi; Wang, Lei

    2018-03-21

    Successful human reproduction initiates from normal gamete formation, fertilization and early embryonic development. Abnormalities in any of these steps will lead to infertility. Many infertile patients undergo several failures of IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles, and embryonic developmental arrest is a common phenotype in cases of recurrent failure of IVF/ICSI attempts. However, the genetic basis for this phenotype is poorly understood. The subcortical maternal complex (SCMC) genes play important roles during embryonic development, and using whole-exome sequencing novel biallelic mutations in the SCMC genes TLE6, PADI6 and KHDC3L were identified in four patients with embryonic developmental arrest. A mutation in TLE6 was found in a patient with cleaved embryos that arrested on day 3 and failed to form blastocysts. Two patients with embryos that arrested at the cleavage stage had mutations in PADI6, and a mutation in KHDC3L was found in a patient with embryos arrested at the morula stage. No mutations were identified in these genes in an additional 80 patients. These findings provide further evidence for the important roles of TLE6, PADI6 and KHDC3L in embryonic development. This work lays the foundation for the genetic diagnosis of patients with recurrent IVF/ICSI failure. Copyright © 2018 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and immune-related proteins in Apis mellifera.

    OpenAIRE

    Anete Pedro Lourenço

    2008-01-01

    Os insetos desenvolveram um sistema imune eficiente contra parasitas e patógenos, que compreende a resposta celular e a humoral. Os mecanismos celulares envolvem a fagocitose e a encapsulação pelos hemócitos, enquanto que as respostas humorais incluem a ativação da Profenoloxidase, e a síntese pelo corpo gorduroso dos peptídeos antimicrobianos, que são liberados na hemolinfa. Duas vias de sinalização intracelular, Toll e Imd, controlam a expressão dos genes codificadores dos peptídeos antimic...

  5. Identification of human microRNA-like sequences embedded within the protein-encoding genes of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved, short (18-22 nts, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs of mRNAs. While numerous cellular microRNAs have been associated with the progression of various diseases including cancer, miRNAs associated with retroviruses have not been well characterized. Herein we report identification of microRNA-like sequences in coding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. RESULTS: Based on our earlier proteomics and bioinformatics studies, we have identified 8 cellular miRNAs that are predicted to bind to the mRNAs of multiple proteins that are dysregulated during HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells in vitro. In silico analysis of the full length and mature sequences of these 8 miRNAs and comparisons with all the genomic and subgenomic sequences of HIV-1 strains in global databases revealed that the first 18/18 sequences of the mature hsa-miR-195 sequence (including the short seed sequence, matched perfectly (100%, or with one nucleotide mismatch, within the envelope (env genes of five HIV-1 genomes from Africa. In addition, we have identified 4 other miRNA-like sequences (hsa-miR-30d, hsa-miR-30e, hsa-miR-374a and hsa-miR-424 within the env and the gag-pol encoding regions of several HIV-1 strains, albeit with reduced homology. Mapping of the miRNA-homologues of env within HIV-1 genomes localized these sequence to the functionally significant variable regions of the env glycoprotein gp120 designated V1, V2, V4 and V5. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that microRNA-like sequences are embedded within the protein-encoding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Given that the V1 to V5 regions of HIV-1 envelopes contain specific, well-characterized domains that are critical for immune responses, virus neutralization and disease progression, we propose that the newly discovered miRNA-like sequences within the HIV-1 genomes may have evolved to self-regulate survival of the

  6. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djavadian, Reza; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Johannsen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit “true” late kinetics–their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these “βγ” genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt) was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes. PMID:27348612

  7. The effect of clozapine on mRNA expression for genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors and the protein components of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Sally I; Hu, Ying; Weymer, Jon F; Rizig, Mie; McQuillin, Andrew; Hunt, Stephen P; Gurling, Hugh M D

    2013-08-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is an intracellular trafficking mechanism for packaging cargo, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), into clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The antipsychotic chlorpromazine inhibits CCV assembly of adaptor protein AP2 whereas clozapine increases serotonin2A receptor internalization. We hypothesized that clozapine alters the expression of CME genes modulating vesicle turnover and GPCR internalization. SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were incubated with clozapine (1-20 µmol/l) for 24-72 h. GPCR and CME-related gene mRNA expression was measured using RT-PCR. We quantified changes in the same genes using expression data from a microarray study of mice brains after 12 weeks of treatment with 12 mg/kg/day clozapine. The expression of genes encoding adaptor and clathrin assembly proteins, AP2A2, AP2B1, AP180, CLINT1, HIP1, ITSN2, and PICALM, increased relative to the control in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with 5-10 µmol/l clozapine for 24-72 h. The microarray study showed significantly altered expression of the above CME-related genes, with a marked 641-fold and 17-fold increase in AP180 and the serotonin1A GPCR, respectively. The expression of three serotonergic receptor and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 (EDG4) GPCR genes was upregulated in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with 5 µmol/l clozapine for 24 h. EDG4 expression was also increased with 10-20 µmol/l clozapine treatment at 48-72 h. Clozapine significantly decreased the expression of β-arrestin, involved in GPCR desensitization, both in vitro and vivo. The changes we report in CME and GPCR mRNAs implicate CCV-mediated internalization of GPCRs and the serotonergic system in clozapine's mechanism of action, which may be useful in the design of more effective and less toxic antipsychotic therapies.

  8. Taperin (c9orf75, a mutated gene in nonsyndromic deafness, encodes a vertebrate specific, nuclear localized protein phosphatase one alpha (PP1α docking protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Ferrar

    2012-02-01

    The promiscuous activity of protein phosphatase one (PP1 is controlled in the cell by associated proteins termed regulatory or targeting subunits. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches we demonstrate that the autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss gene, taperin (C9orf75, encodes a protein that preferentially docks the alpha isoform of PP1. Taperin associates with PP1 through a classic ‘RVxF’ motif and suppresses the general phosphatase activity of the enzyme. The steady-state localization of taperin is predominantly nuclear, however we demonstrate here that the protein can shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and that it is found complexed to PP1 in both of these cellular compartments. Although originally identified as a hearing loss gene, Western blot analyses with taperin-specific antibodies revealed that the protein is widely expressed across mammalian tissues as multiple splice variants. Taperin is a recent proteome addition appearing during the vertebrate lineage with the PP1 binding site embedded within the most conserved region of the protein. Taperin also shares an ancestral relationship with the cytosolic actin binding protein phostensin, another PP1 interacting partner. Quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Culture (SILAC-based mass spectrometry was employed to uncover additional taperin binding partners, and revealed an interaction with the DNA damage response proteins Ku70, Ku80, PARP and topoisomerases I and IIα. Consistent with this, we demonstrate the active recruitment of taperin to sites of DNA damage. This makes taperin a new addition to the family of PP1 targeting subunits involved in the DNA damage repair pathway.

  9. Expression and human chromosomal localization to 17q25 of the growth-regulated gene encoding the mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPL12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, L.; Fort, P. [Institut de Genetique Moleculaire, Montpellier (France); Taviaux, S. [INSERM, Montpellier (France)

    1997-05-01

    Mitochondrial activity requires the expression of nuclear genes, whose products are part of multiproteic complexes leading to ATP production and delivery. We recently characterized a growth-activated mRNA encoding the human mitochondrial ribosomal MRPL12 protein, which is thought to act as a translational regulator of mitochondrial mRNAs. We show here that MRPL12 mRNA expression is enhanced in growth-stimulated cells as a result of transcriptional activation, a feature lost in transformed cell lines. MRPL12 mRNA is highly expressed in the colon, in which a reduction in mitochondrial activity was shown to be associated with tumor formation. The human MRPL12 protein is encoded by a unique gene located on chromosome 17 (q25-qter). As no predisposition to colon cancer linked to this chromosomal region was hitherto reported, the MRPL12 gene might be involved in the process of differentiation of colonic epithelial cells. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Lactobacillus plantarum gene clusters encoding putative cell-surface protein complexes for carbohydrate utilization are conserved in specific gram-positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscariello Lidia

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes of gram-positive bacteria encode many putative cell-surface proteins, of which the majority has no known function. From the rapidly increasing number of available genome sequences it has become apparent that many cell-surface proteins are conserved, and frequently encoded in gene clusters or operons, suggesting common functions, and interactions of multiple components. Results A novel gene cluster encoding exclusively cell-surface proteins was identified, which is conserved in a subgroup of gram-positive bacteria. Each gene cluster generally has one copy of four new gene families called cscA, cscB, cscC and cscD. Clusters encoding these cell-surface proteins were found only in complete genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria innocua, Listeria monocytogenes, Lactococcus lactis ssp lactis and Bacillus cereus and in incomplete genomes of L. lactis ssp cremoris, Lactobacillus casei, Enterococcus faecium, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillius brevis, Oenococcus oeni, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Bacillus thuringiensis. These genes are neither present in the genomes of streptococci, staphylococci and clostridia, nor in the Lactobacillus acidophilus group, suggesting a niche-specific distribution, possibly relating to association with plants. All encoded proteins have a signal peptide for secretion by the Sec-dependent pathway, while some have cell-surface anchors, novel WxL domains, and putative domains for sugar binding and degradation. Transcriptome analysis in L. plantarum shows that the cscA-D genes are co-expressed, supporting their operon organization. Many gene clusters are significantly up-regulated in a glucose-grown, ccpA-mutant derivative of L. plantarum, suggesting catabolite control. This is supported by the presence of predicted CRE-sites upstream or inside the up-regulated cscA-D gene clusters. Conclusion We propose that the CscA, CscB, CscC and Csc

  11. [Effect of melafen on expression of Elip1 and Elip2 genes encoding chloroplast light-induced stress proteins in barley].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipenkova, O V; Ermokhina, O V; Belkina, G G; Oleskina, Iu P; Fattakhov, S G; Iurina, N P

    2008-01-01

    The effect of melafen, a plant growth regulator of a new generation, on the growth, pigment composition, and expression of nuclear genes Elip1 and Elip2 encoding chloroplast light-stress proteins in barley (Hordeum vulgare L) seedlings was studied. It is shown that the height of seedlings treated with melafen at concentrations of 0.5 x 10(-10) and 0.5 x 10(-8) M increased by approximately 10 and 20%, respectively, as compared to the control. At high concentrations (10(-5) and 10(-3) M), melafen had no effect on the growth of seedlings. The content of chlorophylls and carotenoids in chloroplasts barely differed from the control at all melafen concentrations tested. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that melafen did not influence the expression of the nuclear gene encoding the low-molecular-weight plastid stress protein ELIP1. At the same time, the expression of the nuclear gene encoding the high-molecular-weight light-inducible stress protein ELIP2 in the plants treated with melafen at a concentration of 0.5 x 10(-8) M, increased by approximately 70 %. At higher concentrations, melafen suppressed the Elip2 gene expression. Thus, melafen affects the expression of the Elip2 gene, which is involved in the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis and chloroplast biogenesis, which, in turn, may lead to changes in the resistance of plants to light-induced stress.

  12. A tomato mutant that shows stunting, wilting, progressive necrosis and constitutive expression of defence genes contains a recombinant Hcr9 gene encoding an autoactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Claire L; Talbot, Stephen J; Jones, Jonathan D G; Jones, David A

    2006-05-01

    The tomato Cf-9 gene confers resistance to races of the leaf mould fungus Cladosporium fulvum that carry the Avr9 avirulence gene. Cf-9 resides at a locus containing five paralogous genes and was isolated by transposon tagging using a modified maize Dissociation (Ds) element. The tagging experiment generated an allelic series of Ds-induced mutations of Cf-9, most of which were wild type in appearance. However, one mutant, designated M205, showed stunted growth, wilting, progressive leaf chlorosis and necrosis and constitutive expression of defence genes. The phenotype of M205 was caused by a semidominant, Avr9-independent mutation that co-segregated with a Ds element insertion at the Cf-9 locus. Molecular genetic analysis indicated that the Cf-9 locus of M205 had undergone recombination, generating a chimeric gene, designated Hcr9-M205, that comprised an in-frame fusion between the 5' coding region of the Cf-9 paralogue, Hcr9-9A, and the 3' coding region of Cf-9. The presence of a possible excision footprint adjacent to the junction between Hcr9-9A and Cf-9, and a Ds insertion at the homologous position in the downstream paralogue Hcr9-9D, is consistent with recombination between Hcr9-9A and Cf-9 promoted by transposition of Ds from Cf-9 into Hcr9-9D. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of Hcr9-M205 in Nicotiana tabacum caused chlorosis and the accumulation of defence gene transcripts, indicating that the protein encoded by this novel Hcr9 gene is autoactive.

  13. IRE1 KNOCKDOWN MODIFIES THE GLUTAMINE AND GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION EFFECT ON THE EXPRESSION OF NUCLEAR GENES ENCODING MITOCHONDRIAL PROTEINS IN U87 GLIOMA CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the glucose and glutamine deprivation effect on the expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in U87 glioma cells in relation to inhibition of inositol requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1. It was shown that glutamine deprivation down-regulated the expression of mitochondrial (NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2, malic enzyme 2 (ME2, mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (GOT2, and subunit B of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB genes in control glioma cells in gene specific manner. At the same time, the expression level of malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2 and subunit D of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHD genes in these cells was not changed upon glutamine deprivation. It was also shown that inhibition of ІRE1 signaling enzyme function in U87 glioma cells modified the glutamine deprivation effect on the expression of all studied genes. Furthermore, the expression of the majority of studied genes was resistant to glucose deprivation, except IDH2 and SDHB genes, which expression levels were slightly down-regulated. Inhibition of IRE1 modified the effect of glucose deprivation on ME2, SDHB, SDHD, and GOT2 genes expression. Therefore, glucose and glutamine deprivation affected the expression level of the majority of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in relation to the functional activity of IRE1 enzyme, which is a central mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress and controls cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  14. Structure of the human gene encoding the associated microfibrillar protein (MFAP1) and localization to chromosome 15q15-q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.; Chow, M.; Abrams, W.R. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Microfibrils with a diameter of 10-12 nm, found either in assocation with elastin or independently, are an important component of the extracellular matrix of many tissues. To extend understanding of the proteins composing these microfibrils, the cDNA and gene encoding the human associated microfibril protein (MRAP1) have been cloned and characterized. The coding portion is contained in 9 exons, and the sequence is very homologous to the previously described chick cDNA, but does not appear to share homology or domain motifs with any other known protein. Interestingly, the gene has been localized to chromosome 15q15-q21 by somatic hybrid cell and chromosome in situ analyses. This is the same chromosomal region to which the fibrillin gene, FBN1, known to be defective in the Marfan syndrome, has been mapped. MFAP1 is a candidate gene for heritable diseases affecting microfibrils. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Mutations in the gene encoding the synaptic scaffolding protein SHANK3 are associated with autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Christelle M.; Betancur, Catalina; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Bockmann, Juergen; Chaste, Pauline; Fauchereau, Fabien; Nygren, Gudrun; Rastam, Maria; Gillberg, I Carina; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Sponheim, Eili; Goubran-Botros, Hany; Delorme, Richard; Chabane, Nadia; Mouren-Simeoni, Marie-Christine; de Mas, Philippe; Bieth, Eric; Rogé, Bernadette; Héron, Delphine; Burglen, Lydie; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    SHANK3 (also known as ProSAP2) regulates the structural organization of dendritic spines and is a binding partner of neuroligins; genes encoding neuroligins are mutated in autism and Asperger syndrome. Here, we report that a mutation of a single copy of SHANK3 on chromosome 22q13 can result in language and/or social communication disorders. These mutations concern only a small number of individuals, but they shed light on one gene dosage-sensitive synaptic pathway that is involved in autism spectrum disorders. PMID:17173049

  16. Cloning and sequence determination of a gene encoding an osmotin-like protein from strawberry (Fragaria X ananassa Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Khan, A A; Shih CY, T; Shih, D S

    2001-12-01

    Osmotin and osmotin-like proteins (OLPs) are pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, whose synthesis is normally stimulated upon infection of plants by pathogens. A strawberry genomic clone containing an osmotin-like protein (OLP) gene was isolated and sequenced. This clone contains an open reading frame of 681 nucleotides without any intron. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein shares high degrees of homology with a number of other OLPs and related proteins, of which several are known to have antifungal activities. Southern hybridization analysis of strawberry genomic DNA suggested that the OLP is coded by a multi-gene family. Results from reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that this OLP gene is expressed in uninfected strawberry plants.

  17. Control of Paternally Expressed Imprinted UPWARD CURLY LEAF1, a Gene Encoding an F-Box Protein That Regulates CURLY LEAF Polycomb Protein, in the Arabidopsis Endosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Woong Jeong

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting, an epigenetic process in mammals and flowering plants, refers to the differential expression of alleles of the same genes in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. In Arabidopsis, imprinting occurs primarily in the endosperm, which nourishes the developing embryo. Recent high-throughput sequencing analyses revealed that more than 200 loci are imprinted in Arabidopsis; however, only a few of these imprinted genes and their imprinting mechanisms have been examined in detail. Whereas most imprinted loci characterized to date are maternally expressed imprinted genes (MEGs, PHERES1 (PHE1 and ADMETOS (ADM are paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs. Here, we report that UPWARD CURLY LEAF1 (UCL1, a gene encoding an E3 ligase that degrades the CURLY LEAF (CLF polycomb protein, is a PEG. After fertilization, paternally inherited UCL1 is expressed in the endosperm, but not in the embryo. The expression pattern of a β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene driven by the UCL1 promoter suggests that the imprinting control region (ICR of UCL1 is adjacent to a transposable element in the UCL1 5'-upstream region. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 silences the maternal UCL1 allele in the central cell prior to fertilization and in the endosperm after fertilization. The UCL1 imprinting pattern was not affected in paternal PRC2 mutants. We found unexpectedly that the maternal UCL1 allele is reactivated in the endosperm of Arabidopsis lines with mutations in cytosine DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1 or the DNA glycosylase DEMETER (DME, which antagonistically regulate CpG methylation of DNA. By contrast, maternal UCL1 silencing was not altered in mutants with defects in non-CpG methylation. Thus, silencing of the maternal UCL1 allele is regulated by both MET1 and DME as well as by PRC2, suggesting that divergent mechanisms for the regulation of PEGs evolved in Arabidopsis.

  18. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei mip gene, encoding a 30-kilodalton analog of the Legionella pneumophila Mip protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P; Hindersson, P

    1991-01-01

    After the demonstration of analogs of the Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein in other Legionella species, the Legionella micdadei mip gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis of the L. micdadei mip gene contained in the plasmid p...

  19. Tetrahymena gene encodes a protein that is homologous with the liver-specific F-antigen and associated with membranes of the Golgi apparatus and transport vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummel, R; Nørgaard, P; Andreasen, P H

    1992-01-01

    The F-antigen is a prominent liver protein which has been extensively used in studies on natural and induced immunological tolerance. However, its intracellular localization and biological function have remained elusive. It has generally been assumed that the F-antigen is confined phylogenetically...... of the TF-ag protein, however, declined only moderately during prolonged periods of starvation demonstrating that extensive release of the TF-ag did not take place. In combination these results suggest that the TF-ag protein is a recycled constituent of the intracellular membrane network in T. thermophila...... to vertebrates. Now we have cloned and characterized a gene from the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila encoding a protein which clearly is homologous with the rat F-antigen. The coding region of the Tetrahymena F-antigen (TF-ag) gene specifies a 46,051 M(r) protein and is interrupted by three introns...

  20. The human HIP gene, overexpressed in primary liver cancer encodes for a C-type carbohydrate binding protein with lactose binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christa, L; Felin, M; Morali, O; Simon, M T; Lasserre, C; Brechot, C; Sève, A P

    1994-01-03

    HIP was originally identified as a gene expression in primary liver cancers, and in normal tissues such as pancreas and small intestine. Based on gene data base homologies, the HIP protein should consist of a signal peptide linked to a single carbohydrate recognition domain. To test this hypothesis HIP and the putative carbohydrate recognition domain encoded by the last 138 C-terminal amino acids, were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase proteins (GST-HIP and GST-HIP-142, respectively). Both recombinant proteins were purified by a single affinity purification step from bacterial lysates and their ability to bind saccharides coupled to trisacryl GF 2000M were tested. Our results show that HIP and HIP-142 proteins bind to lactose, moreover the binding requires divalent cations. Thus the HIP protein is a lactose-binding lectin with the characteristics of a C-type carbohydrate recognition domain of 138 amino acids in the C-terminal region.

  1. THE LRP GENE ENCODING A MAJOR VAULT PROTEIN ASSOCIATED WITH DRUG-RESISTANCE MAPS PROXIMAL TO MRP ON CHROMOSOME-16 - EVIDENCE THAT CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN MRP OR LRP GENE AMPLIFICATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLOVAK, ML; HO, JP; COLE, SPC; DEELEY, RG; GREENBERGER, L; DEVRIES, EGE; BROXTERMAN, HJ; SCHEFFER, GL; SCHEPER, RJ

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the novel drug resistance gene, LRP (originally termed lung resistance-related protein), was isolated from HT1080/DR4, a 220-fold doxorubicin-resistant human fibrosarcoma cell line which displays a multidrug resistance phenotype and overexpresses the multidrug resistance protein

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Genes Encoding Methionine-Rich Proteins in Arabidopsis and Soybean Suggesting Their Roles in the Adaptation of Plants to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Duc Chu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation and reduction of methionine (Met play important roles in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling in living organisms. To understand the impacts of Met oxidation and reduction in plants during stress, we surveyed the genomes of Arabidopsis and soybean (Glycine max L. for genes encoding Met-rich proteins (MRPs. We found 121 and 213 genes encoding MRPs in Arabidopsis and soybean, respectively. Gene annotation indicated that those with known function are involved in vital cellular processes such as transcriptional control, calcium signaling, protein modification, and metal transport. Next, we analyzed the transcript levels of MRP-coding genes under normal and stress conditions. We found that 57 AtMRPs were responsive either to drought or to high salinity stress in Arabidopsis; 35 GmMRPs were responsive to drought in the leaf of late vegetative or early reproductive stages of soybean. Among the MRP genes with a known function, the majority of the abiotic stress-responsive genes are involved in transcription control and calcium signaling. Finally, Arabidopsis plant which overexpressed an MRP-coding gene, whose transcripts were downregulated by abiotic stress, was more sensitive to paraquat than the control. Taken together, our report indicates that MRPs participate in various vital processes of plants under normal and stress conditions.

  3. Development of a set of multiplex PCRs for detection of genes encoding cell wall-associated proteins in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from dogs, humans and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumthanakorn, Nathita; Chanchaithong, Pattrarat; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius commonly colonizes the skin of dogs, whilst nasal carriage may occur in humans who are in contact with dogs or the environment of veterinary hospitals. Genes encoding cell wall-associated (CWA) proteins have been described in Staphylococcus aureus but knowledge of their occurrence in S. pseudintermedius is still limited. The aim of the study was to develop a method to detect S. pseudintermedius surface protein genes (sps) encoding CWA proteins, and to examine the distribution of the genes in isolates from different sources. Four multiplex PCR assays (mPCR) were developed for detection of 18 sps genes, with 4-5 genes detected per mPCR. These were applied to 135 S. pseudintermedius isolates from carriage sites (n=35) and infected sites (n=35) in dogs, from the nasal cavity of humans (n=25), and from the environment of a veterinary hospital (n=40). The mPCRs were shown to detect all 18 known sps genes, and no discrepancies were found between uniplex and mPCR results. The mPCRs could detect at least 1pg/μl of DNA template. A total of 23 sps gene profiles were found among the 135 isolates, with diverse gene combinations. Only spsD, spsF, spsI, spsO, spsP, and spsQ were not detected in all isolates. spsP and spsQ were more frequently detected in the canine isolates from infected sites than from carriage sites. This finding suggests that these two genes may play a role in pathogenicity, whereas the presence of the 12 sps genes may contribute to adherence function at all surfaces where carriage occurs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  5. Candida albicans Lacking the Gene Encoding the Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase A Displays a Defect in Hyphal Formation and an Altered Localization of the Catalytic Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, Alejandro; Parrot, Marc; Silberstein, Susana; Magee, Beatrice B.; Passeron, Susana; Giasson, Luc; Cantore, María L.

    2004-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans switches from a yeast-like to a filamentous mode of growth in response to a variety of environmental conditions. We examined the morphogenetic behavior of C. albicans yeast cells lacking the BCY1 gene, which encodes the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. We cloned the BCY1 gene and generated a bcy1 tpk2 double mutant strain because a homozygous bcy1 mutant in a wild-type genetic background could not be obtained. In the bcy1 tpk2 mutant, protein kinase A activity (due to the presence of the TPK1 gene) was cyclic AMP independent, indicating that the cells harbored an unregulated phosphotransferase activity. This mutant has constitutive protein kinase A activity and displayed a defective germinative phenotype in N-acetylglucosamine and in serum-containing medium. The subcellular localization of a Tpk1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was examined in wild-type, tpk2 null, and bcy1 tpk2 double mutant strains. The fusion protein was observed to be predominantly nuclear in wild-type and tpk2 strains. This was not the case in the bcy1 tpk2 double mutant, where it appeared dispersed throughout the cell. Coimmunoprecipitation of Bcy1p with the Tpk1-GFP fusion protein demonstrated the interaction of these proteins inside the cell. These results suggest that one of the roles of Bcy1p is to tether the protein kinase A catalytic subunit to the nucleus. PMID:14871949

  6. batman Interacts with polycomb and trithorax group genes and encodes a BTB/POZ protein that is included in a complex containing GAGA factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, M; Roignant, J-Y; Netter, S; Charollais, J; Antoniewski, C; Théodore, L

    2003-02-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group genes maintain the appropriate repressed or activated state of homeotic gene expression throughout Drosophila melanogaster development. We have previously identified the batman gene as a Polycomb group candidate since its function is necessary for the repression of Sex combs reduced. However, our present genetic analysis indicates functions of batman in both activation and repression of homeotic genes. The 127-amino-acid Batman protein is almost reduced to a BTB/POZ domain, an evolutionary conserved protein-protein interaction domain found in a large protein family. We show that this domain is involved in the interaction between Batman and the DNA binding GAGA factor encoded by the Trithorax-like gene. The GAGA factor and Batman codistribute on polytene chromosomes, coimmunoprecipitate from nuclear embryonic and larval extracts, and interact in the yeast two-hybrid assay. Batman, together with the GAGA factor, binds to MHS-70, a 70-bp fragment of the bithoraxoid Polycomb response element. This binding, like that of the GAGA factor, requires the presence of d(GA)n sequences. Together, our results suggest that batman belongs to a subset of the Polycomb/trithorax group of genes that includes Trithorax-like, whose products are involved in both activation and repression of homeotic genes.

  7. The Neurospora crassa gene responsible for the cut and ovc phenotypes encodes a protein of the haloacid dehalogenase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssar, Loubna; Schmidhauser, Thomas J; Avalos, Javier

    2005-02-01

    Light stimulation of carotenogenesis in Neurospora crassa, mediated by the White Collar proteins, is enhanced in some regulatory mutants, such as vivid and ovc. The gene responsible for the vivid mutation has been identified, but not the one responsible for the ovc phenotype. The ovc mutant is sensitive to high osmotic conditions and allelic with another mutant, cut, also osmosensitive but not affected in carotenogenesis. A phenotypic characterization of both strains is presented. Light induction of mRNA levels of the carotenoid genes al-1 and al-2, the regulatory gene wc-1 or the conidiation-specific gene con-10 is not significantly changed in the ovc mutant when compared with the wild type. We have identified the gene affected in the ovc mutant by complementation of osmosensitivity with a cosmid library. This gene, which we call cut-1, codes for an enzyme of the haloacid dehalogenase family, which includes different classes of phosphatases. cut-1 is able to restore the wild-type phenotype of the ovc and cut strains, confirming that they are affected in the same gene. DNA sequence analysis identified a point mutation in the cut mutant, leading to a truncated protein. The ovc mutant represents a deletion encompassing the entire gene and surrounding sequences. The cut-1 promoter contains putative regulatory elements involved in osmotic or thermal stress. We show that cut-1 transcription is low in illuminated or dark-grown cultures, and is induced by high osmotic conditions or by heat shock.

  8. A mutation in the Arabidopsis HYL1 gene encoding a dsRNA binding protein affects responses to abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Fedoroff, N.

    2000-01-01

    Both physiological and genetic evidence indicate interconnections among plant responses to different hormones. We describe a pleiotropic recessive Arabidopsis transposon insertion mutation, designated hyponastic leaves (hyl1), that alters the plant's responses to several hormones. The mutant is characterized by shorter stature, delayed flowering, leaf hyponasty, reduced fertility, decreased rate of root growth, and an altered root gravitropic response. It also exhibits less sensitivity to auxin and cytokinin and hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid normalizes the mutant phenotype somewhat, whereas another auxin transport inhibitor, N-(1-naph-thyl)phthalamic acid, exacerbates the phenotype. The gene, designated HYL1, encodes a 419-amino acid protein that contains two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding motifs, a nuclear localization motif, and a C-terminal repeat structure suggestive of a protein-protein interaction domain. We present evidence that the HYL1 gene is ABA-regulated and encodes a nuclear dsRNA binding protein. We hypothesize that the HYL1 protein is a regulatory protein functioning at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of novel Morus alba germin-like protein gene which encodes for a silkworm gut digestion-resistant antimicrobial protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhusan Patnaik

    Full Text Available Silkworm fecal matter is considered one of the richest sources of antimicrobial and antiviral protein (substances and such economically feasible and eco-friendly proteins acting as secondary metabolites from the insect system can be explored for their practical utility in conferring broad spectrum disease resistance against pathogenic microbial specimens.Silkworm fecal matter extracts prepared in 0.02 M phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4, at a temperature of 60°C was subjected to 40% saturated ammonium sulphate precipitation and purified by gel-filtration chromatography (GFC. SDS-PAGE under denaturing conditions showed a single band at about 21.5 kDa. The peak fraction, thus obtained by GFC wastested for homogeneityusing C18reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The activity of the purified protein was tested against selected Gram +/- bacteria and phytopathogenic Fusarium species with concentration-dependent inhibitionrelationship. The purified bioactive protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS and N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation towards its identification. The N-terminal first 18 amino acid sequence following the predicted signal peptide showed homology to plant germin-like proteins (Glp. In order to characterize the full-length gene sequence in detail, the partial cDNA was cloned and sequenced using degenerate primers, followed by 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR. The full-length cDNA sequence composed of 630 bp encoding 209 amino acids and corresponded to germin-like proteins (Glps involved in plant development and defense.The study reports, characterization of novel Glpbelonging to subfamily 3 from M. alba by the purification of mature active protein from silkworm fecal matter. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein was found similar to the deduced amino acid sequence (without the transit

  10. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Novel Morus alba Germin-Like Protein Gene Which Encodes for a Silkworm Gut Digestion-Resistant Antimicrobial Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Oh, Seung Han; Song, Yong-Su; Chanh, Nguyen Dang Minh; Kim, Jong Sun; Jung, Woo-jin; Saha, Atul Kumar; Bindroo, Bharat Bhushan; Han, Yeon Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background Silkworm fecal matter is considered one of the richest sources of antimicrobial and antiviral protein (substances) and such economically feasible and eco-friendly proteins acting as secondary metabolites from the insect system can be explored for their practical utility in conferring broad spectrum disease resistance against pathogenic microbial specimens. Methodology/Principal Findings Silkworm fecal matter extracts prepared in 0.02 M phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4), at a temperature of 60°C was subjected to 40% saturated ammonium sulphate precipitation and purified by gel-filtration chromatography (GFC). SDS-PAGE under denaturing conditions showed a single band at about 21.5 kDa. The peak fraction, thus obtained by GFC wastested for homogeneityusing C18reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activity of the purified protein was tested against selected Gram +/− bacteria and phytopathogenic Fusarium species with concentration-dependent inhibitionrelationship. The purified bioactive protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation towards its identification. The N-terminal first 18 amino acid sequence following the predicted signal peptide showed homology to plant germin-like proteins (Glp). In order to characterize the full-length gene sequence in detail, the partial cDNA was cloned and sequenced using degenerate primers, followed by 5′- and 3′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). The full-length cDNA sequence composed of 630 bp encoding 209 amino acids and corresponded to germin-like proteins (Glps) involved in plant development and defense. Conclusions/Significance The study reports, characterization of novel Glpbelonging to subfamily 3 from M. alba by the purification of mature active protein from silkworm fecal matter. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein was found

  11. Proximal Region of the Gene Encoding Cytadherence-Related Protein Permits Molecular Typing of Mycoplasma genitalium Clinical Strains by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musatovova, Oxana; Herrera, Caleb; Baseman, Joel B.

    2006-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified proximal region of the gene encoding cytadherence accessory protein P110 (MG192) revealed DNA sequence divergences among 54 Mycoplasma genitalium clinical strains isolated from the genitourinary tracts of women attending a sexually transmitted disease-related health clinic, plus one from the respiratory tract and one from synovial fluid. Seven of 56 (12.5%) strains exhibited RFLPs following digestion of the proximal region with restriction endonuclease MboI or RsaI, or both. No sequence variability was detected in the distal portion of the gene. PMID:16455921

  12. Mutational analysis of the coding regions of the genes encoding protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1, phosphatase targeting to glycogen, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, and glycogenin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Fjordvang, H; Rasmussen, S K

    1999-01-01

    for a genetic involvement in the disease. The mode of inheritance of the common forms of NIDDM is as yet unclear, but the prevailing hypothesis supports a polygenic model. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the putative inheritable defects of insulin-stimulated muscle glycogen synthesis might...... be caused by genetic variability in the genes encoding proteins shown by biochemical evidence to be involved in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle. In 70 insulin-resistant Danish NIDDM patients, mutational analysis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-single strand...... of silent variants were identified in some of the examined genes, we found no evidence for the hypothesis that the defective insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle in NIDDM is caused by structural changes in the genes encoding the known components of the insulin-sensitive glycogen...

  13. The cisA cistron of Bacillus subtilis sporulation gene spoIVC encodes a protein homologous to a site-specific recombinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Samori, Y; Kobayashi, Y

    1990-02-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the sporulation gene spoIVC cisA in Bacillus subtilis was determined and found to encode a protein of 500 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 57,481, which is in good agreement with the size of the gene product estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal region of this protein is homologous to the site-specific DNA recombinases. Hybridization of a 3.6-kilobase EcoRI fragment carrying the spoIVC cisA gene with the EcoRI-restricted chromosomal DNA prepared from cells of various stages showed that DNA rearrangement occurs only in the mother cell in the region adjacent to spoIVC cisA 3 h after the initiation of sporulation. This result coincides with that of Stragier et al. (P. Stragier, B. Kunkel, L. Kroos, and R. Losick, Science 243:507-512, 1989). The timing of the DNA rearrangement coincides very well with the timing of spoIVC cisA gene expression. The DNA rearrangement was not observed in spoIVC cisA mutants. These results strongly suggest that the spoIVC cisA gene encodes a site-specific DNA recombinase having a very important role in sporulation.

  14. [Phototrophic microorganisms in the symbiotic communities of Baikal sponges: Diversity of psbA gene (encoding D1 protein of photosystem II) sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzhnaya, O V; Itskovich, V B

    2017-01-01

    The psbA gene, which encodes a major photosystem II protein (protein II or D1), is a marker for the presence of phototrophic organisms in water communities. We have pioneered the use of this marker for studying the diversity of phototrophic microflora of freshwater invertebrates. The object of the study is the microbial associations accompanying the endemic Baikal sponge Baikalospongia intermedia and the surrounding aquatic microbial community. Analysis of the psbA gene sequences in the examined microbiomes demonstrates the presence of various phototrophic groups, such as Cyanobacteria, Chlorophyta, Heterokonta, Haptophyta, and Ochrophyta algae, as well as cyanophages. A total of 35 unique psbA gene sequences have been distinguished in the microbial communities of the endemic sponge B. intermedia and 32 unique sequences in the water community surrounding the sponge. These data demonstrate the involvement of sponge symbiotic communities in the accumulation of primary production and carbon cycle in the Lake Baikal ecosystem.

  15. Characterization of two genes encoding metal tolerance proteins from Beta vulgaris subspecies maritima that confers manganese tolerance in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbasol, Isil; Bozdag, Gonensin Ozan; Koc, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient in plants. However increased Mn levels are toxic to plant cells. Metal tolerance proteins (MTPs), member of cation diffusion facilitator protein (CDF) family, have important roles in metal homeostatis in different plant species and catalyse efflux...... in planta localization and function as the Arabidopsis Mn-CDF homolog AtMTP11 and this conservation shows the evolutionary importance of these vesicular proteins in heavy metal homeostatis among plant species....... of excess metal ions. In this study, we identified and characterized two MTP genes from Beta vulgaris spp. maritima (B. v. ssp. maritima). Overexpression of these two genes provided Mn tolerance in yeast cells. Sequence analyses displayed BmMTP10 and BmMTP11as members of the Mn-CDF family. Functional...

  16. RNA-Seq-based analysis of cold shock response in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, a bacterium harboring a single cold shock protein encoding gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cold shock responses and the roles of cold shock proteins in microorganisms containing multiple cold shock protein genes have been well characterized, related studies on bacteria possessing a single cold shock protein gene have not been reported. Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4, a thermophile harboring only one known cold shock protein gene (TtescpC, can survive from 50° to 80 °C, but has poor natural competence under cold shock at 50 °C. We therefore examined cold shock responses and their effect on natural competence in this bacterium. RESULTS: The transcriptomes of T. tengcongensis before and after cold shock were analyzed by RNA-seq and over 1200 differentially expressed genes were successfully identified. These genes were involved in a wide range of biological processes, including modulation of DNA replication, recombination, and repair; energy metabolism; production of cold shock protein; synthesis of branched amino acids and branched-chain fatty acids; and sporulation. RNA-seq analysis also suggested that T. tengcongensis initiates cell wall and membrane remodeling processes, flagellar assembly, and sporulation in response to low temperature. Expression profiles of TtecspC and failed attempts to produce a TtecspC knockout strain confirmed the essential role of TteCspC in the cold shock response, and also suggested a role of this protein in survival at optimum growth temperature. Repression of genes encoding ComEA and ComEC and low energy metabolism levels in cold-shocked cells are the likely basis of poor natural competence at low temperature. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated changes in global gene expression under cold shock and identified several candidate genes related to cold shock in T. tengcongensis. At the same time, the relationship between cold shock response and poor natural competence at low temperature was preliminarily elucidated. These findings provide a foundation for future studies on genetic

  17. Characterization of the mouse Dazap1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein that interacts with infertility factors DAZ and DAZL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salido Eduardo C

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DAZAP1 (DAZ Associated Protein 1 was originally identified by a yeast two-hybrid system through its interaction with a putative male infertility factor, DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia. In vitro, DAZAP1 interacts with both the Y chromosome-encoded DAZ and an autosome-encoded DAZ-like protein, DAZL. DAZAP1 contains two RNA-binding domains (RBDs and a proline-rich C-terminal portion, and is expressed most abundantly in the testis. To understand the biological function of DAZAP1 and the significance of its interaction with DAZ and DAZL, we isolated and characterized the mouse Dazap1 gene, and studied its expression and the subcellular localization of its protein product. Results The human and mouse genes have similar genomic structures and map to syntenic chromosomal regions. The mouse and human DAZAP1 proteins share 98% identity and their sequences are highly similar to the Xenopus orthologue Prrp, especially in the RBDs. Dazap1 is expressed throughout testis development. Western blot detects a single 45 kD DAZAP1 protein that is most abundant in the testis. Although a majority of DAZAP1 is present in the cytoplasmic fraction, they are not associated with polyribosomes. Conclusions DAZAP1 is evolutionarily highly conserved. Its predominant expression in testes suggests a role in spermatogenesis. Its subcellular localization indicates that it is not directly involved in mRNA translation.

  18. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  19. The Vacuolar ATPase from Entamoeba histolytica: Molecular cloning of the gene encoding for the B subunit and subcellular localization of the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna-Arias Juan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entamoeba histolytica is a professional phagocytic cell where the vacuolar ATPase plays a key role. This enzyme is a multisubunit complex that regulates pH in many subcellular compartments, even in those that are not measurably acidic. It participates in a wide variety of cellular processes such as endocytosis, intracellular transport and membrane fusion. The presence of a vacuolar type H+-ATPase in E. histolytica trophozoites has been inferred previously from inhibition assays of its activity, the isolation of the Ehvma1 and Ehvma3 genes, and by proteomic analysis of purified phagosomes. Results We report the isolation and characterization of the Ehvma2 gene, which encodes for the subunit B of the vacuolar ATPase. This polypeptide is a 55.3 kDa highly conserved protein with 34 to 80% identity to orthologous proteins from other species. Particularly, in silico studies showed that EhV-ATPase subunit B displays 78% identity and 90% similarity to its Dictyostelium ortholog. A 462 bp DNA fragment of the Ehvma2 gene was expressed in bacteria and recombinant polypeptide was used to raise mouse polyclonal antibodies. EhV-ATPase subunit B antibodies detected a 55 kDa band in whole cell extracts and in an enriched fraction of DNA-containing organelles named EhkOs. The V-ATPase subunit B was located by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy in many vesicles, in phagosomes, plasma membrane and in EhkOs. We also identified the genes encoding for the majority of the V-ATPase subunits in the E. histolytica genome, and proposed a putative model for this proton pump. Conclusion We have isolated the Ehvma2 gene which encodes for the V-ATPase subunit B from the E. histolytica clone A. This gene has a 154 bp intron and encodes for a highly conserved polypeptide. Specific antibodies localized EhV-ATPase subunit B in many vesicles, phagosomes, plasma membrane and in EhkOs. Most of the orthologous genes encoding for the EhV-ATPase subunits

  20. A Major Facilitator Superfamily protein encoded by TcMucK gene is not required for cuticle pigmentation, growth and development in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Seulgi; Noh, Mi Young; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kramer, Karl J; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-01

    Insect cuticle pigmentation and sclerotization (tanning) are vital physiological processes for insect growth, development and survival. We have previously identified several colorless precursor molecules as well as enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and processing to yield the mature intensely colored body cuticle pigments. A recent study indicated that the Bombyx mori (silkmoth) gene, BmMucK, which encodes a protein orthologous to a Culex pipiens quiquefasciatus (Southern house mosquito) cis,cis, muconate transporter, is a member of the "Major Facilitator Superfamily" (MFS) of transporter proteins and is associated with the appearance of pigmented body segments of naturally occurring body color mutants of B. mori. While RNA interference of the BmMucK gene failed to result in any observable phenotype, RNAi using a dsRNA for an orthologous gene from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, was reported to result in molting defects and darkening of the cuticle and some body parts, leading to the suggestion that orthologs of MucK genes may differ in their functions among insects. To verify the role and essentiality of the ortholog of this gene in development and body pigmentation function in T. castaneum we obtained cDNAs for the orthologous gene (TcMucK) from RNA isolated from the GA-1 wild-type strain of T. castaneum. The sequence of a 1524 nucleotides-long cDNA for TcMucK which encodes the putatively full-length protein, was assembled from two overlapping RT-PCR fragments and the expression profile of this gene during development was analyzed by real-time PCR. This cDNA encodes a 55.8 kDa protein consisting of 507 amino acid residues and includes 11 putative transmembrane segments. Transcripts of TcMucK were detected throughout all of the developmental stages analyzed. The function of this gene was explored by injection of two different double-stranded RNAs targeting different regions of the TcMucK gene (dsTcMucKs) into young larvae to down

  1. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. DNA-Encoded Antibody Libraries: A Unified Platform for Multiplexed Cell Sorting and Detection of Genes and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan C.; Kwong, Gabriel A.; Radu, Caius G.; Witte, Owen N.; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Whether for pathological examination or for fundamental biology studies, different classes of biomaterials and biomolecules are each measured from a different region of a typically heterogeneous tissue sample, thus introducing unavoidable sources of noise that are hard to quantitate. We describe the method of DNA-encoded antibody libraries (DEAL) for spatially multiplexed detection of ssDNAs and proteins as well as for cell sorting, all on the same diagnostic platform. DEAL is based upon the coupling of ssDNA oligomers onto antibodies which are then combined with the biological sample of interest. Spotted DNA arrays, which are found to inhibit biofouling, are utilized to spatially stratify the biomolecules or cells of interest. We demonstrate the DEAL technique for: (1) the rapid detection of multiple proteins within a single microfluidic channel, and, with the additional step of electroless amplification of gold-nanoparticle labeled secondary antibodies, we establish a detection limit of 10 femtoMolar for the protein IL-2, 150 times more sensitive than the analog ELISA; (2) the multiplexed, on-chip sorting of both immortalized cell lines and primary immune cells with an efficiency that exceeds surface confined panning approaches; and (3) the co-detection of ssDNAs, proteins and cell populations on the same platform. PMID:17260987

  3. Investigation of genes encoding calcineurin B-like protein family in legumes and their expression analyses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Meena

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is a ubiquitous second messenger that transmits various internal and external signals including stresses and, therefore, is important for plants' response process. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs are one of the plant calcium sensors, which sense and convey the changes in cytosolic Ca2+-concentration for response process. A search in four leguminous plant (soybean, Medicago truncatula, common bean and chickpea genomes identified 9 to 15 genes in each species that encode CBL proteins. Sequence analyses of CBL peptides and coding sequences (CDS suggested that there are nine original CBL genes in these legumes and some of them were multiplied during whole genome or local gene duplication. Coding sequences of chickpea CBL genes (CaCBL were cloned from their cDNAs and sequenced, and their annotations in the genome assemblies were corrected accordingly. Analyses of protein sequences and gene structures of CBL family in plant kingdom indicated its diverse origin but showed a remarkable conservation in overall protein structure with appearance of complex gene structure in the course of evolution. Expression of CaCBL genes in different tissues and in response to different stress and hormone treatment were studied. Most of the CaCBL genes exhibited high expression in flowers. Expression profile of CaCBL genes in response to different abiotic stresses and hormones related to development and stresses (ABA, auxin, cytokinin, SA and JA at different time intervals suggests their diverse roles in development and plant defence in addition to abiotic stress tolerance. These data not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex regulation of chickpea CBL gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in chickpea functional genomics.

  4. Investigation of genes encoding calcineurin B-like protein family in legumes and their expression analyses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Mukesh Kumar; Ghawana, Sanjay; Sardar, Atish; Dwivedi, Vikas; Khandal, Hitaishi; Roy, Riti; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger that transmits various internal and external signals including stresses and, therefore, is important for plants' response process. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs) are one of the plant calcium sensors, which sense and convey the changes in cytosolic Ca2+-concentration for response process. A search in four leguminous plant (soybean, Medicago truncatula, common bean and chickpea) genomes identified 9 to 15 genes in each species that encode CBL proteins. Sequence analyses of CBL peptides and coding sequences (CDS) suggested that there are nine original CBL genes in these legumes and some of them were multiplied during whole genome or local gene duplication. Coding sequences of chickpea CBL genes (CaCBL) were cloned from their cDNAs and sequenced, and their annotations in the genome assemblies were corrected accordingly. Analyses of protein sequences and gene structures of CBL family in plant kingdom indicated its diverse origin but showed a remarkable conservation in overall protein structure with appearance of complex gene structure in the course of evolution. Expression of CaCBL genes in different tissues and in response to different stress and hormone treatment were studied. Most of the CaCBL genes exhibited high expression in flowers. Expression profile of CaCBL genes in response to different abiotic stresses and hormones related to development and stresses (ABA, auxin, cytokinin, SA and JA) at different time intervals suggests their diverse roles in development and plant defence in addition to abiotic stress tolerance. These data not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex regulation of chickpea CBL gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in chickpea functional genomics.

  5. Modular evolution of glutathione peroxidase genes in association with different biochemical properties of their encoded proteins in invertebrate animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zo Young-Gun

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidases (PHGPx, the most abundant isoforms of GPx families, interfere directly with hydroperoxidation of lipids. Biochemical properties of these proteins vary along with their donor organisms, which has complicated the phylogenetic classification of diverse PHGPx-like proteins. Despite efforts for comprehensive analyses, the evolutionary aspects of GPx genes in invertebrates remain largely unknown. Results We isolated GPx homologs via in silico screening of genomic and/or expressed sequence tag databases of eukaryotic organisms including protostomian species. Genes showing strong similarity to the mammalian PHGPx genes were commonly found in all genomes examined. GPx3- and GPx7-like genes were additionally detected from nematodes and platyhelminths, respectively. The overall distribution of the PHGPx-like proteins with different biochemical properties was biased across taxa; selenium- and glutathione (GSH-dependent proteins were exclusively detected in platyhelminth and deuterostomian species, whereas selenium-independent and thioredoxin (Trx-dependent enzymes were isolated in the other taxa. In comparison of genomic organization, the GSH-dependent PHGPx genes showed a conserved architectural pattern, while their Trx-dependent counterparts displayed complex exon-intron structures. A codon for the resolving Cys engaged in reductant binding was found to be substituted in a series of genes. Selection pressure to maintain the selenocysteine codon in GSH-dependent genes also appeared to be relaxed during their evolution. With the dichotomized fashion in genomic organizations, a highly polytomic topology of their phylogenetic trees implied that the GPx genes have multiple evolutionary intermediate forms. Conclusion Comparative analysis of invertebrate GPx genes provides informative evidence to support the modular pathways of GPx evolution, which have been accompanied with sporadic

  6. The carriage of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among Staphylococcus aureus lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Huanle Liu; Jingnan Lv; Xiuqin Qi; Yu Ding; Dan Li; Longhua Hu; Liangxing Wang; Fangyou Yu

    2015-01-01

    The serine-aspartate repeat proteins (Sdr) are members of a family of surface proteins and contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Among 288 S. aureus isolates including 158 and 130 associated with skin and soft tissue infections and bloodstream infection, respectively; 275 (95.5%) were positive for at least one of three sdr genes tested. The positivity rates for sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE among S. aureus isolates were 87.8% (253/288), 63.9% (184/288), and 68.1% (196/288), respect...

  7. Structural analysis of the wheat genes encoding NADH-dependent glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferases and correlation with grain protein content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Nigro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen uptake and the efficient absorption and metabolism of nitrogen are essential elements in attempts to breed improved cereal cultivars for grain or silage production. One of the enzymes related to nitrogen metabolism is glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase (GOGAT. Together with glutamine synthetase (GS, GOGAT maintains the flow of nitrogen from NH4 (+ into glutamine and glutamate, which are then used for several aminotransferase reactions during amino acid synthesis. RESULTS: The aim of the present work was to identify and analyse the structure of wheat NADH-GOGAT genomic sequences, and study the expression in two durum wheat cultivars characterized by low and high kernel protein content. The genomic sequences of the three homoeologous A, B and D NADH-GOGAT genes were obtained for hexaploid Triticum aestivum and the tetraploid A and B genes of Triticum turgidum ssp. durum. Analysis of the gene sequences indicates that all wheat NADH-GOGAT genes are composed of 22 exons and 21 introns. The three hexaploid wheat homoeologous genes have high conservation of sequence except intron 13 which shows differences in both length and sequence. A comparative analysis of sequences among di- and mono-cotyledonous plants shows both regions of high conservation and of divergence. qRT-PCR performed with the two durum wheat cvs Svevo and Ciccio (characterized by high and low protein content, respectively indicates different expression levels of the two NADH-GOGAT-3A and NADH-GOGAT-3B genes. CONCLUSION: The three hexaploid wheat homoeologous NADH-GOGAT gene sequences are highly conserved - consistent with the key metabolic role of this gene. However, the dicot and monocot amino acid sequences show distinctive patterns, particularly in the transit peptide, the exon 16-17 junction, and the C-terminus. The lack of conservation in the transit peptide may indicate subcellular differences between the two plant divisions - while the sequence

  8. The milkweed pod1 gene encodes a KANADI protein that is required for abaxial/adaxial patterning in maize leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Héctor; Johnston, Robyn; Gerhold, Abigail; Foster, Toshi; Hake, Sarah

    2008-08-01

    Leaf primordia initiate from the shoot apical meristem with inherent polarity; the adaxial side faces the meristem, while the abaxial side faces away from the meristem. Adaxial/abaxial polarity is thought to be necessary for laminar growth of leaves, as mutants lacking either adaxial or abaxial cell types often develop radially symmetric lateral organs. The milkweed pod1 (mwp1) mutant of maize (Zea mays) has adaxialized sectors in the sheath, the proximal part of the leaf. Ectopic leaf flaps develop where adaxial and abaxial cell types juxtapose. Ectopic expression of the HD-ZIPIII gene rolled leaf1 (rld1) correlates with the adaxialized regions. Cloning of mwp1 showed that it encodes a KANADI transcription factor. Double mutants of mwp1-R with a microRNA-resistant allele of rld1, Rld1-N1990, show a synergistic phenotype with polarity defects in sheath and blade and a failure to differentiate vascular and photosynthetic cell types in the adaxialized sectors. The sectored phenotype and timing of the defect suggest that mwp1 is required late in leaf development to maintain abaxial cell fate. The phenotype of mwp1; Rld1 double mutants shows that both genes are also required early in leaf development to delineate leaf margins as well as to initiate vascular and photosynthetic tissues.

  9. Molecular Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Tc8.2 Gene Indicates Two Differential Locations for the Encoded Protein in Epimastigote and Trypomastigote Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kian, Danielle; Lancheros, César Armando Contreras; Damiani, Igor Alexandre Campos; Fernandes, Tamiris Zanforlin Olmos; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Santos, Márcia Regina Machado dos; Silveira, José Franco da; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Silva, João Santana da; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi

    2015-08-01

    This report describes the molecular characterization of the Tc8.2 gene of Trypanosoma cruzi. Both the Tc8.2 gene and its encoded protein were analyzed by bioinformatics, while Northern blot and RT-PCR were used for the transcripts. Besides, immunolocalization of recombinant protein was done by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Analysis indicated the presence of a single copy of Tc8.2 in the T. cruzi genome and 2-different sized transcripts in epimastigotes/amastigotes and trypomastigotes. Immunoblotting showed 70 and 80 kDa polypeptides in epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, respectively, and a differential pattern of immunolocalization. Overall, the results suggest that Tc8.2 is differentially expressed during the T. cruzi life cycle.

  10. Characterization of big bang, a novel gene encoding for PDZ domain-containing proteins that are dynamically expressed throughout Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sabrina Y; Renihan, Maia K; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2006-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain proteins often function as scaffolding proteins and have been shown to play important roles in diverse cellular processes such as the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity, and signal transduction. Here, we report the identification and cloning of a novel Drosophila melanogaster gene that is predicted to produce several different PDZ domain-containing proteins through alternative promoter usage and alternative splicing. This gene, that we have named big bang (bbg), was first identified as C96-GAL4, a GAL4 enhancer trap line that was generated in our lab. To further characterize bbg, its expression pattern was examined in ovaries, embryos, and late third instar larvae using UAS reporter gene constructs, in situ hybridization, or immunocytochemistry. In addition, the expression of alternatively spliced transcripts was examined in more detail using in situ hybridization. We find that during embryogenesis bbg is predominantly expressed in the developing gut, but it is also expressed in external sensory organs found in the epidermis. In the late third instar larva, bbg is expressed along the presumptive wing margin in the wing disc, broadly in the eye disc, and in other imaginal discs as well as in the brain. The expression patterns observed are dynamic and specific during development, suggesting that like other genes that encode for several different PDZ domain protein isoforms, bbg likely plays important roles in multiple developmental processes.

  11. Targeted disruption of the mouse Csrp2 gene encoding the cysteine- and glycine-rich LIM domain protein CRP2 result in subtle alteration of cardiac ultrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoll Doris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cysteine and glycine rich protein 2 (CRP2 encoded by the Csrp2 gene is a LIM domain protein expressed in the vascular system, particularly in smooth muscle cells. It exhibits a bimodal subcellular distribution, accumulating at actin-based filaments in the cytosol and in the nucleus. In order to analyze the function of CRP2 in vivo, we disrupted the Csrp2 gene in mice and analysed the resulting phenotype. Results A ~17.3 kbp fragment of the murine Csrp2 gene containing exon 3 through 6 was isolated. Using this construct we confirmed the recently determined chromosomal localization (Chromosome 10, best fit location between markers D10Mit203 proximal and D10Mit150 central. A gene disruption cassette was cloned into exon 4 and a mouse strain lacking functional Csrp2 was generated. Mice lacking CRP2 are viable and fertile and have no obvious deficits in reproduction and survival. However, detailed histological and electron microscopic studies reveal that CRP2-deficient mice have subtle alterations in their cardiac ultrastructure. In these mice, the cardiomyocytes display a slight increase in their thickness, indicating moderate hypertrophy at the cellular level. Although the expression of several intercalated disc-associated proteins such as β-catenin, N-RAP and connexin-43 were not affected in these mice, the distribution of respective proteins was changed within heart tissue. Conclusion We conclude that the lack of CRP2 is associated with alterations in cardiomyocyte thickness and hypertrophy.

  12. The carriage of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among Staphylococcus aureus lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanle; Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Hu, Longhua; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2015-01-01

    The serine-aspartate repeat proteins (Sdr) are members of a family of surface proteins and contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Among 288 S. aureus isolates including 158 and 130 associated with skin and soft tissue infections and bloodstream infection, respectively; 275 (95.5%) were positive for at least one of three sdr genes tested. The positivity rates for sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE among S. aureus isolates were 87.8% (253/288), 63.9% (184/288), and 68.1% (196/288), respectively. 224 (77.8%) of 288 isolates were concomitantly positive for two or three sdr genes. There was an association between carriage of sdrE and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, while the carriage rates of sdrC and sdrD in MRSA isolates were similar to those in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. The prevalence of co-existence of sdrC and sdrE among MRSA isolates was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (psdr genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression of Magnaporthe oryzae genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins secreted during nitrogen starvation and interaction with its host, Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Liang, M L; Yan, J L; Yang, Y Q; Liu, L; Liu, C; Yang, L J; L, C Y

    2015-12-16

    Previous studies have shown that the blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, may experience nitrogen starvation during infection of its plant host (rice,Oryza sativa). Here, we studied the expression of seven genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins with N-terminal signal peptides during nitrogen limitation and throughout the infection process. Some genes were upregulated to a greater extent in weak pathogenic strains than in strong pathogenic strains when they were cultured in complete media, and the expression of some genes was higher in both weak and strong pathogenic strains cultured in 1/10-N and nitrogen starvation media. Furthermore, the expression of these genes was upregulated to different extents in the early stages of M. oryzae infection. These data demonstrate that the genes of interest are highly expressed in weak and strong pathogenic strains cultured under nitrogen limitation and at the early stage of the infection process. This indicates that cysteine-rich secreted proteins in the blast fungus might be involved in establishing disease in the host and that they are sensitive to nitrogen levels. Thus, their role in sensing nitrogen availability within the host is implied, which provides a basis for further functional identification of these genes and their products during plant infection.

  14. Smoking and polymorphisms of genes encoding mannose-binding lectin and surfactant protein-D in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Malthe; Frisch, Morten; Madsen, Hans Ole

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in genes coding for mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and surfactant protein-D (SP-D) are associated directly or by interaction with smoking with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) positive RA, and erosive RA. MBL2 genotypes, SFTPD...... smokers. Odds ratios with 95% confidence interval (OR, 95% CI) were calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for shared epitope. The low-producing SFTPD genotype was not associated with risk of RA or ACPA positive RA, but with erosive disease in the RA patients (OR = 1.8; 95% CI...

  15. Over-expression of gene encoding heat shock protein 70 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its evaluation as vaccine adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Dhakal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heat shock proteins (Hsps are evolutionary ancient and highly conserved molecular chaperons found in prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes. Hsp70 is a predominant member of Hsp family. Microbial Hsp70s (mHsp70s have acquired special significance in immunity since they have been shown to be potent activators of the innate immune system and generate specific immune responses against tumours and infectious agents. Objectives: The present study was aimed to clone express and purify recombinant Hsp70 from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and characterise it immunologically. The study also aimed at determining the potential of recombinant M. tuberculosis heat shock protein (rMTB-Hsp70 as adjuvant or antigen carrier. Materials and Methods: Cloning of M. tuberculosis heat shock protein (MTB-Hsp70 amplicon was carried out using the pGEMT-Easy vector although for expression, pProExHTb prokaryotic expression vector was used. Purification of recombinant Hsp70 was carried out by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. For immunological characterization and determining the adjuvant effect of MTB-Hsp70, BALB/c mice were used. The data obtained was statistically analysed. Results: Hsp70 gene was cloned, sequenced and the sequence data were submitted to National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. Recombinant MTB-Hsp70 was successfully over-expressed using the prokaryotic expression system and purified to homogeneity. The protein was found to be immunodominant. Significant adjuvant effect was produced by the rMTB-Hsp70 when inoculated with recombinant outer membrane protein 31; however, effect was less than the conventionally used the Freund′s adjuvant. Conclusion: Protocol standardised can be followed for bulk production of rHsp70 in a cost-effective manner. Significant adjuvant effect was produced by rMTB-Hsp70; however, the effect was than Freund′s adjuvant. Further, studies need to be carried out to explore its

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Edwards, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 family. The two TaPr-1-rk genes are located on homoeologous chromosomes 3D and 3A, respectively, and each contains a large open reading frame (7385 or 6060 bp) that is interrupted by seven introns and subjected to alternative splicing (AS) with five or six isoforms of mRNA transcripts. The deduced full-length TaPR-1-RK1 and TaPR-1-RK2 proteins (95% identity) contain two repeat PR-1 domains, the second of which is fused via a transmembrane helix to a serine/threonine kinase catalytic (STKc) domain characteristic of receptor-like protein kinases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two PR-1 domains of the TaPR-1-RK proteins form sister clades with their homologues identified in other monocot plants and are well separated from stand-alone PR-1 proteins, whereas the STKc domains may have originated from cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs). Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the TaPr-1-rk genes are predominantly expressed in wheat leaves and their expression levels are elevated in response to pathogen attack, such as infection by barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), and also to stress conditions, most obviously, to soil salinity. This is the first report of PR-1-CRK hybrid proteins in wheat. The data may shed new insights into the function/evolutionary origin of the PR-1 family and the STKc-mediated defense/stress response pathways in plants.

  17. A Central Nervous System-Dependent Intron-Embedded Gene Encodes a Novel Murine Fyn Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khalaf, Noureddine; Taha, Safa; Bakhiet, Moiz; Fathallah, M Dahmani

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between the nervous and immune systems is gradually being unraveled. We previously reported in the mouse the novel soluble immune system factor ISRAA, whose activation in the spleen is central nervous system-dependent. We also showed that ISRAA plays a role in modulating anti-infection immunity. Herein, we report the genomic description of the israa locus, along with some insights into the structure-function relationship of the protein. Our findings revealed that israa is nested within intron 6 of the mouse zmiz1 gene. Protein sequence analysis revealed a typical SH2 binding motif (Y102TEV), with Fyn being the most likely binding partner. Docking simulation showed a favorable conformation for the ISRAA-Fyn complex, with a specific binding mode for the binding of the YTEV motif to the SH2 domain. Experimental studies showed that in vitro, recombinant ISRAA is phosphorylated by Fyn at tyrosine 102. Cell transfection and pull-down experiments revealed Fyn as a binding partner of ISRAA in the EL4 mouse T-cell line. Indeed, we demonstrated that ISRAA downregulates T-cell activation and the phosphorylation of an activation tyrosine (Y416) of Src-family kinases in mouse splenocytes. Our observations highlight ISRAA as a novel Fyn binding protein that is likely to be involved in a signaling pathway driven by the nervous system.

  18. Transgenic Mouse Studies to Understand the Regulation, Expression and Function of the Testis-Specific Protein Y-Encoded (TSPY Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Schubert

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The TSPY gene, which encodes the testis-specific protein, Y-encoded, was first discovered and characterized in humans, but orthologous genes were subsequently identified on the Y chromosome of many other placental mammals. TSPY is expressed in the testis and to a much lesser extent in the prostate gland, and it is assumed that TSPY serves function in spermatogonial proliferation and/or differentiation. It is further supposed that TSPY is involved in male infertility and exerts oncogenic effects in gonadal and prostate tumor formation. As a member of the TSPY/SET/NAP protein family, TSPY is able to bind cyclin B types, and stimulates the cyclin B1-CDK1 kinase activity, thereby accelerating the G2/M phase transition of the cell cycle of target cells. Because the laboratory mouse carries only a nonfunctional Y-chromosomal Tspy-ps pseudogene, a knockout mouse model for functional research analyses is not a feasible approach. In the last decade, three classical transgenic mouse models have been developed to contribute to our understanding of TSPY regulation, expression and function. The different transgenic mouse approaches and their relevance for studying TSPY regulation, expression and function are discussed in this review.

  19. Cloning of a Nitrilase Gene from the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803 and Heterologous Expression and Characterization of the Encoded Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Ute; Engels, Dirk; Bürger, Sibylle; Kiziak, Christoph; Mattes, Ralf; Stolz, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The gene encoding a putative nitrilase was identified in the genome sequence of the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. The gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into an expression vector. The encoded protein was heterologously expressed in the native form and as a His-tagged protein in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant strains were shown to convert benzonitrile to benzoate. The active enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown by gel filtration to consist probably of 10 subunits. The purified nitrilase converted various aromatic and aliphatic nitriles. The highest enzyme activity was observed with fumarodinitrile, but also some rather hydrophobic aromatic (e.g., naphthalenecarbonitrile), heterocyclic (e.g., indole-3-acetonitrile), or long-chain aliphatic (di-)nitriles (e.g., octanoic acid dinitrile) were converted with higher specific activities than benzonitrile. From aliphatic dinitriles with less than six carbon atoms only 1 mol of ammonia was released per mol of dinitrile, and thus presumably the corresponding cyanocarboxylic acids formed. The purified enzyme was active in the presence of a wide range of organic solvents and the turnover rates of dodecanoic acid nitrile and naphthalenecarbonitrile were increased in the presence of water-soluble and water-immiscible organic solvents. PMID:12902216

  20. [Expression of cry1Ac gene directed by PexsYpromoter of the exsY gene encoding component protein of exosporium basal layer in Bacillus thuringiensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qingyun; Wang, Guannan; Zhang, Zhe; Qu, Ning; Zhang, Qi; Peng, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Jiguo; Song, Fuping

    2014-10-04

    To discover new elements for cry gene expression, PexsY, which is the promoter of the exosporium basal layer structural gene exsY, was used to express cry1Ac gene in Bacillus thuringiensis. We used be ta- galactosidase assays by promoter-lacZ fusion to analyze the transcriptional activity of exsY promoter and truncated exsY promoter. The cry1Ac gene was directed by the non-cry gene promoter PexsY and was then expressed in Bacillus thuringiensis HD73. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to observe the formation of crystal inclusion. The CrylAc yieldswere evaluated by protein quantification and SDS-PAGE analysis. Bioassays against Ostriniafurnacalis were used for the functional verification. Beta-galactosidase assays showed that the exsY promoter had a strong transcriptional activity in the acrystalliferous mutant strain HD73- on the late sporulation phase. Cry1Ac expression products directed by the PexsY could form diamond crystals. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the cry1Ac gene directed by the cry8E promoter has the highest protein yield among the four promoters while the cry1Ac gene under the direction of PexsYorcry3A promoters showed similar protein yields. The bioassay results showed that the Cry1Ac protein directed by the PexsY promoter was toxic against Ostrinia furnacalis. The cry1Ac gene under the direction ofthe non-cry gene promoter PexsY was able to express the Cry proteins at the late sporulation phase and could form crystal inclusion in a B. thuringiensis strain. Our finding provides applicationpotential for the genetically modification of engineered Bt strains.

  1. Sequence, expression and tissue localization of a gene encoding a makorin RING zinc-finger protein in germinating rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Thangavelu U; Davies, Eric; Morita, Eugene Hayato; Abe, Shunnosuke

    2007-01-01

    The makorin (MKRN) RING finger protein gene family encodes proteins (makorins) with a characteristic array of zinc-finger motifs and which are present in a wide array of eukaryotes. In the present study, we analyzed the structure and expression of a putative makorin RING finger protein gene in rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare). From the analysis of the genomic (AP003543), mRNA (AK120250) and deduced protein (BAD61603) sequences of the putative MKRN gene of rice, obtained from GenBank, we found that it was indeed a bona fide member of the MKRN gene family. The rice MKRN cDNA encoded a protein with four C3H zinc-finger-motifs, one putative Cys-His zinc-finger motif, and one RING zinc-finger motif. The presence of this distinct motif organization and overall amino acid identity clearly indicate that this gene is indeed a true MKRN ortholog. We isolated RNA from embryonic axes of rice seeds at various stages of imbibition and germination and studied the temporal expression profile of MKRN by RT-PCR. This analysis revealed that MKRN transcripts were present at all the time points studied. It was at very low levels in dry seeds, increased slowly during imbibition and germination, and slightly declined in the seedling growth stage. After 6days of germination, an organ-dependent expression pattern of MKRN was observed: highest in roots and moderate in leaves. Similarly to MKRN transcripts, transcripts of cytoskeletal actin and tubulin were also detected in dry embryos, steadily increased during imbibition and germination and leveled off after 24h of germination. We studied the spatial expression profile of MKRN in rice tissues, by using a relatively fast, simple and effective non-radioactive mRNA in situ hybridization (NRISH) technique, which provided the first spatial experimental data that hints at the function of a plant makorin. This analysis revealed that MKRN transcripts were expressed in young plumules, lateral root primordia, leaf primordia

  2. Daily expression pattern of protein-encoding genes and small noncoding RNAs in synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian; Hertel, Stefanie; Rediger, Anne; Lehmann, Robert; Wiegard, Anika; Kölsch, Adrian; Heilmann, Beate; Georg, Jens; Hess, Wolfgang R; Axmann, Ilka M

    2014-09-01

    Many organisms harbor circadian clocks with periods close to 24 h. These cellular clocks allow organisms to anticipate the environmental cycles of day and night by synchronizing circadian rhythms with the rising and setting of the sun. These rhythms originate from the oscillator components of circadian clocks and control global gene expression and various cellular processes. The oscillator of photosynthetic cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, linked to a complex regulatory network. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 possesses the standard cyanobacterial kaiABC gene cluster plus multiple kaiB and kaiC gene copies and antisense RNAs for almost every kai transcript. However, there is no clear evidence of circadian rhythms in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under various experimental conditions. It is also still unknown if and to what extent the multiple kai gene copies and kai antisense RNAs affect circadian timing. Moreover, a large number of small noncoding RNAs whose accumulation dynamics over time have not yet been monitored are known for Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Here we performed a 48-h time series transcriptome analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, taking into account periodic light-dark phases, continuous light, and continuous darkness. We found that expression of functionally related genes occurred in different phases of day and night. Moreover, we found day-peaking and night-peaking transcripts among the small RNAs; in particular, the amounts of kai antisense RNAs correlated or anticorrelated with those of their respective kai target mRNAs, pointing toward the regulatory relevance of these antisense RNAs. Surprisingly, we observed that the amounts of 16S and 23S rRNAs in this cyanobacterium fluctuated in light-dark periods, showing maximum accumulation in the dark phase. Importantly, the amounts of all transcripts, including small noncoding RNAs, did not show any rhythm under continuous light or darkness, indicating the absence

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding the proline transporter protein in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibao Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As a typical compatible solute, proline is accumulated in plants under environmental stresses. Proline transporter (ProT plays an important role in proline distribution between plant organs. Using a candidate gene approach, we cloned a cDNA sequence for ProT from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and designated the gene PvProT. The deduced amino acid sequence of PvProT showed high similarity to Bet/ProT proteins from other leguminous plants, and the highest similarity was observed with mothbean (Vigna aconitifolia L. VuProT. Relative quantification of the mRNA level of PvProT using real-time PCR analysis showed that the PvProT transcript level was higher in leaves than in stems and roots of common bean plants subjected to drought and salt stress. Under 20% (w/w PEG-6000 treatment, drought-resistant plants expressed a higher level of PvProT transcripts than drought-sensitive plants. Although heterologous expression of PvProT in the Escherichia coli mutant mkh13 showed that PvProT exhibited uptake activities for proline and betaine, no betaine content was detected in the common bean. These findings suggest that PvProT plays an important role in the transportation of proline in common bean plants exposed to drought and salt stress.

  4. The highly conserved skb1 gene encodes a protein that interacts with Shk1, a fission yeast Ste20/PAK homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, M; Yang, P; Wang, D; Frost, J; Polverino, A; Cobb, M H; Marcus, S

    1996-11-26

    The Shk1 protein kinase, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste20 and mammalian p21Cdc42/Rac-activated kinases, is an essential component of a Ras- and Cdc42-dependent signaling cascade required for cell viability, normal morphology, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated sexual responses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To identify S. pombe proteins that modulate or mediate Shk1 functions, we conducted a two-hybrid screen for Shk1-interacting proteins. One of the genes identified as a result of this screen was skb1. We show that Skb1 interacts with a region of the N-terminal regulatory domain of Shk1 distinct from that to which Cdc42 binds, and that Shk1, Cdc42, and Skb1 are able to form a ternary complex in vivo. S.pombe cells carrying an skb1 null mutation are less elongate in morphology than wild-type cells and exhibit a moderate growth defect. The morphology defect of the skb1 deletion mutant is suppressed by overexpression of Shk1. Overexpression of Skb1 causes wild-type S. pombe cells to become hyperelongated. Additional genetic analyses described herein suggest that Skb1 is a component of the morphology control branch of the Ras signaling cascade in S. pombe and that it positively modulates Shk1 function. Homologs of Skb1 are encoded by open reading frames in the genomes of S. cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans and by an uncharacterized human cDNA sequence. Thus, skb1 may be the first well-characterized member of a highly conserved family of genes encoding potential p21Cdc42/Rac-activated kinase regulators.

  5. The highly conserved skb1 gene encodes a protein that interacts with Shk1, a fission yeast Ste20/PAK homolog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Mary; Yang, Peirong; Wang, Dan; Frost, Jeff; Polverino, Anthony; Cobb, Melanie H.; Marcus, Stevan

    1996-01-01

    The Shk1 protein kinase, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste20 and mammalian p21Cdc42/Rac-activated kinases, is an essential component of a Ras- and Cdc42-dependent signaling cascade required for cell viability, normal morphology, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated sexual responses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To identify S. pombe proteins that modulate or mediate Shk1 functions, we conducted a two-hybrid screen for Shk1-interacting proteins. One of the genes identified as a result of this screen was skb1. We show that Skb1 interacts with a region of the N-terminal regulatory domain of Shk1 distinct from that to which Cdc42 binds, and that Shk1, Cdc42, and Skb1 are able to form a ternary complex in vivo. S. pombe cells carrying an skb1 null mutation are less elongate in morphology than wild-type cells and exhibit a moderate growth defect. The morphology defect of the skb1 deletion mutant is suppressed by overexpression of Shk1. Overexpression of Skb1 causes wild-type S. pombe cells to become hyperelongated. Additional genetic analyses described herein suggest that Skb1 is a component of the morphology control branch of the Ras signaling cascade in S. pombe and that it positively modulates Shk1 function. Homologs of Skb1 are encoded by open reading frames in the genomes of S. cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans and by an uncharacterized human cDNA sequence. Thus, skb1 may be the first well-characterized member of a highly conserved family of genes encoding potential p21Cdc42/Rac-activated kinase regulators. PMID:8943016

  6. Inherited bone marrow failure associated with germline mutation of ACD, the gene encoding telomere protein TPP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiran; Kartawinata, Melissa; Li, Jiankang; Pickett, Hilda A; Teo, Juliana; Kilo, Tatjana; Barbaro, Pasquale M; Keating, Brendan; Chen, Yulan; Tian, Lifeng; Al-Odaib, Ahmad; Reddel, Roger R; Christodoulou, John; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bryan, Tracy M

    2014-10-30

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that is necessary for overcoming telomere shortening in human germ and stem cells. Mutations in telomerase or other telomere-maintenance proteins can lead to diseases characterized by depletion of hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow failure (BMF). Telomerase localization to telomeres requires an interaction with a region on the surface of the telomere-binding protein TPP1 known as the TEL patch. Here, we identify a family with aplastic anemia and other related hematopoietic disorders in which a 1-amino-acid deletion in the TEL patch of TPP1 (ΔK170) segregates with disease. All family members carrying this mutation, but not those with wild-type TPP1, have short telomeres. When introduced into 293T cells, TPP1 with the ΔK170 mutation is able to localize to telomeres but fails to recruit telomerase to telomeres, supporting a causal relationship between this TPP1 mutation and bone marrow disorders. ACD/TPP1 is thus a newly identified telomere-related gene in which mutations cause aplastic anemia and related BMF disorders. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Population genetics and natural selection in the gene encoding the Duffy binding protein II in Iranian Plasmodium vivax wild isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Vahideh; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2014-01-01

    Region II of Duffy binding protein (PvDBP-II) is one of the most promising blood-stage vaccine candidate antigens against Plasmodium vivax and having knowledge of the nature and genetic polymorphism of PvDBP-II among global P. vivax isolates is important for developing a DBP-based vaccine. By using PCR and sequencing, the present molecular population genetic approach was carried out to investigate sequence diversity and natural selection of dbp-II gene in 63 P. vivax isolates collected from unstable and low transmission malaria-endemic areas of Iran during 2008-2012. Also, phylogenetic analysis, the diversifying natural selection, and recombination across the pvdbp-II gene, including regions containing B-cell epitopes were analyzed using the DnaSP and MEGA4 programs. Twenty two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, including 20 non-synonymous and 2 synonymous) were identified in PvDBP-II, resulting in 16 different PvDBP-II haplotypes among the Iranian P. vivax isolates. High binding inhibitory B-cell epitope (H3) overlapping with intrinsically unstructured/disordered region (aa: 384-392) appeared to be highly polymorphic (D384G/E385K/ K386N/Q/R390H), and positive selective pressure acted on this region. Most of the polymorphic amino acids, which are located on the surface of the protein, are under selective pressure that implies increased recombination events and exposure to the human immune system. In summary, PvDBP-II gene displays genetic polymorphism among Iranian P. vivax isolates and it is under selective pressure. Mutations, recombination, and positive selection seem to play a role in the resulting genetic diversity, and phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences demonstrates that Iranian isolates represent a sample of the global population. These results are useful for understanding the nature of the P. vivax population in Iran and also for development of PvDBP-II-based malaria vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Networks of Genes Encoding Palmitoylated Proteins in Axonal and Synaptic Compartments Are Affected in PPT1 Overexpressing Neuronal-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pezzini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available CLN1 disease (OMIM #256730 is an early childhood ceroid-lipofuscinosis associated with mutated CLN1, whose product Palmitoyl-Protein Thioesterase 1 (PPT1 is a lysosomal enzyme involved in the removal of palmitate residues from S-acylated proteins. In neurons, PPT1 expression is also linked to synaptic compartments. The aim of this study was to unravel molecular signatures connected to CLN1. We utilized SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells overexpressing wild type CLN1 (SH-p.wtCLN1 and five selected CLN1 patients’ mutations. The cellular distribution of wtPPT1 was consistent with regular processing of endogenous protein, partially detected inside Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein 2 (LAMP2 positive vesicles, while the mutants displayed more diffuse cytoplasmic pattern. Transcriptomic profiling revealed 802 differentially expressed genes (DEGs in SH-p.wtCLN1 (as compared to empty-vector transfected cells, whereas the number of DEGs detected in the two mutants (p.L222P and p.M57Nfs*45 was significantly lower. Bioinformatic scrutiny linked DEGs with neurite formation and neuronal transmission. Specifically, neuritogenesis and proliferation of neuronal processes were predicted to be hampered in the wtCLN1 overexpressing cell line, and these findings were corroborated by morphological investigations. Palmitoylation survey identified 113 palmitoylated protein-encoding genes in SH-p.wtCLN1, including 25 ones simultaneously assigned to axonal growth and synaptic compartments. A remarkable decrease in the expression of palmitoylated proteins, functionally related to axonal elongation (GAP43, CRMP1 and NEFM and of the synaptic marker SNAP25, specifically in SH-p.wtCLN1 cells was confirmed by immunoblotting. Subsequent, bioinformatic network survey of DEGs assigned to the synaptic annotations linked 81 DEGs, including 23 ones encoding for palmitoylated proteins. Results obtained in this experimental setting outlined two affected functional modules (connected to

  9. The gene cutA of Fusarium fujikuroi, encoding a protein of the haloacid dehalogenase family, is involved in osmotic stress and glycerol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Jorge; Castrillo, Marta; Avalos, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Survival of micro-organisms in natural habitats depends on their ability to adapt to variations in osmotic conditions. We previously described the gene cut-1 of Neurospora crassa, encoding a protein of the haloacid dehalogenase family with an unknown function in the osmotic stress response. Here we report on the functional analysis of cutA, the orthologous gene in the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium fujikuroi. cutA mRNA levels increased transiently after exposure to 0.68 M NaCl and were reduced upon return to normal osmotic conditions; deletion of the gene resulted in a partial reduction in tolerance to osmotic stress. ΔcutA mutants contained much lower intracellular levels of glycerol than the wild-type, and did not exhibit the increase following hyper-osmotic shock expected from the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) response. cutA is linked and divergently transcribed with the putative glycerol dehydrogenase gene gldB, which showed the same regulation by osmotic shock. The intergenic cutA/gldB regulatory region contains putative stress-response elements conserved in other fungi, and both genes shared other regulatory features, such as induction by heat shock and by illumination. Photoinduction was also observed in the HOG response gene hogA, and was lost in mutants of the white collar gene wcoA. Previous data on glycerol production in Aspergillus spp. and features of the predicted CutA protein lead us to propose that F. fujikuroi produces glycerol from dihydroxyacetone, and that CutA is the enzyme involved in the synthesis of this precursor by dephosphorylation of dihydroxyacetone-3P.

  10. CHIR99021 promotes self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells by modulation of protein-encoding gene and long intergenic non-coding RNA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yongyan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Ai, Zhiying [Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); College of Life Sciences, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Yao, Kezhen [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Cao, Lixia; Du, Juan; Shi, Xiaoyan [Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); College of Life Sciences, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Guo, Zekun, E-mail: gzk@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zhylab@hotmail.com [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-10-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely in vitro and differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. These unique properties make them exceptionally valuable for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, the practical application of ESCs is limited because it is difficult to derive and culture ESCs. It has been demonstrated that CHIR99021 (CHIR) promotes self-renewal and enhances the derivation efficiency of mouse (m)ESCs. However, the downstream targets of CHIR are not fully understood. In this study, we identified CHIR-regulated genes in mESCs using microarray analysis. Our microarray data demonstrated that CHIR not only influenced the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by stabilizing β-catenin, but also modulated several other pluripotency-related signaling pathways such as TGF-β, Notch and MAPK signaling pathways. More detailed analysis demonstrated that CHIR inhibited Nodal signaling, while activating bone morphogenetic protein signaling in mESCs. In addition, we found that pluripotency-maintaining transcription factors were up-regulated by CHIR, while several developmental-related genes were down-regulated. Furthermore, we found that CHIR altered the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and long intergenic non-coding RNAs. Quantitative real-time PCR results were consistent with microarray data, suggesting that CHIR alters the expression pattern of protein-encoding genes (especially transcription factors), epigenetic regulatory genes and non-coding RNAs to establish a relatively stable pluripotency-maintaining network. - Highlights: • Combined use of CHIR with LIF promotes self-renewal of J1 mESCs. • CHIR-regulated genes are involved in multiple pathways. • CHIR inhibits Nodal signaling and promotes Bmp4 expression to activate BMP signaling. • Expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and lincRNAs is altered by CHIR.

  11. [Abnormal floral meristem development in transgenic tomato plants do not depend on the expression of genes encoding defense-related PR-proteins and antimicrobial peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliluev, M R; Chaban, I A; Kononenko, N V; Baranova, E N; Dolgov, S V; Kharchenko, P N; Poliakov, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the morphological and cytoembryological analyses of the tomato plants transformed with the genes encoding chitin-binding proteins (ac and RS-intron-Shir) from Amaranthus caudatus L. andA. retroflexus L., respectively, as well as the gene amp2 encoding hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from Stellaria media L., have been performed. The transgenic lines were adapted to soil and grown the greenhouse. The analysis of putative transgenic tomato plants revealed several lines that did not differ phenotypically from the wild type plants and three lines with disruption in differentiation of the inflorescence shoot and the flower, as well as the fruit formation (modified plants of each line were transformed with a single gene as noted before). Abnormalities in the development of the generative organs were maintained for at least six vegetative generations. These transgenic plants were shown to be defective in the mail gametophyte formation, fertilization, and, consequently, led to parthenocarpic fruits. The detailed analysis of growing ovules in the abnormal transgenic plants showed that the replacement tissue was formed and proliferated instead of unfertilized embryo sac. The structure of the replacement tissue differed from both embryonic and endosperm tissue of the normal ovule. The formation of the replacement tissue occurred due to continuing proliferation of the endothelial cells that lost their ability for differentiation. The final step in the development of the replacement tissue was its death, which resulted in the cell lysis. The expression of the genes used was confirmed by RT-PCR in all three lines with abnormal phenotype, as well as in several lines that did not phenotypically differ from the untransformed control. This suggests that abnormalities in the organs of the generative sphere in the transgenic plants do not depend on the expression of the foreign genes that were introduced in the tomato genome. Here, we argue that agrobacterial

  12. Study of genes induced by ionizing radiations at Arabidopsis thaliana: identification and molecular characterization of the ATGR1 gene, a new gene encoding a protein involved in plant cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveaux, Yves

    1999-01-01

    DNA damage, that can be experimentally introduced by ionizing radiation (IR), induces complex signal transduction pathways leading to cell recovery or, alternatively to programmed cell death if damages are too severe. To identify the inducible components of the response to genotoxic stress in plants, we have screened by Differential Display for mRNAs that rapidly and strongly accumulate after IR treatment in A. thaliana cells. We have characterized ATGR1, a new single copy Arabidopsis gene encoding a PEST-box protein of unknown function. In unstressed plant organs the ATGR1 mRNA is hardly detectable, whereas the protein is present in extracts prepared from roots, shoot meristems and inflorescences, that all contain large amounts of actively dividing cells. This pattern is confirmed by immuno localisation on tissue sections that shows constitutive ATGR1 protein expression covering the root elongation zone, the shoot meristem, leaf primordial and the ovules of developing flowers. Histochemical analysis of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the ATGR1 promoter, demonstrate that the developmental and tissue-specific profile of ATGR1 protein expression is conferred by the gene promoter. The massive, transient and dose-dependent accumulation of ATGR1 transcripts after IR treatment observed in all plant organs does not lead to significant changes in ATGR1 protein pattern. Stable ATGR1 protein overexpression, as exemplified by transgenic A. thaliana plants that contain a 35S promoter-ATGR1 gene fusion, does not induce notable changes of the overall ATGR1 protein level, but leads to male and female sterility. The cause of sterility is a lack of correct chromosome assembly and distribution at the stage metaphase II of meiosis. Taken together our results show that i) ATGR1 gene expression is associated to cell division during plant development ii) the ATGR1 protein level is regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level iii

  13. Rj4, a Gene Controlling Nodulation Specificity in Soybeans, Encodes a Thaumatin-Like Protein But Not the One Previously Reported1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fang; Yang, Shengming; Liu, Jinge

    2016-01-01

    Rj4 is a dominant gene in soybeans (Glycine max) that restricts nodulation by many strains of Bradyrhizobium elkanii. The soybean-B. elkanii symbiosis has a low nitrogen-fixation efficiency, but B. elkanii strains are highly competitive for nodulation; thus, cultivars harboring an Rj4 allele are considered favorable. Cloning the Rj4 gene is the first step in understanding the molecular basis of Rj4-mediated nodulation restriction and facilitates the development of molecular tools for genetic improvement of nitrogen fixation in soybeans. We finely mapped the Rj4 locus within a small genomic region on soybean chromosome 1, and validated one of the candidate genes as Rj4 using both complementation tests and CRISPR/Cas9-based gene knockout experiments. We demonstrated that Rj4 encodes a thaumatin-like protein, for which a corresponding allele is not present in the surveyed rj4 genotypes, including the reference genome Williams 82. Our conclusion disagrees with the previous report that Rj4 is the Glyma.01G165800 gene (previously annotated as Glyma01g37060). Instead, we provide convincing evidence that Rj4 is Glyma.01g165800-D, a duplicated and unique version of Glyma.01g165800, that has evolved the ability to control symbiotic specificity. PMID:26582727

  14. Rj4, a Gene Controlling Nodulation Specificity in Soybeans, Encodes a Thaumatin-Like Protein But Not the One Previously Reported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fang; Yang, Shengming; Liu, Jinge; Zhu, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Rj4 is a dominant gene in soybeans (Glycine max) that restricts nodulation by many strains of Bradyrhizobium elkanii. The soybean-B. elkanii symbiosis has a low nitrogen-fixation efficiency, but B. elkanii strains are highly competitive for nodulation; thus, cultivars harboring an Rj4 allele are considered favorable. Cloning the Rj4 gene is the first step in understanding the molecular basis of Rj4-mediated nodulation restriction and facilitates the development of molecular tools for genetic improvement of nitrogen fixation in soybeans. We finely mapped the Rj4 locus within a small genomic region on soybean chromosome 1, and validated one of the candidate genes as Rj4 using both complementation tests and CRISPR/Cas9-based gene knockout experiments. We demonstrated that Rj4 encodes a thaumatin-like protein, for which a corresponding allele is not present in the surveyed rj4 genotypes, including the reference genome Williams 82. Our conclusion disagrees with the previous report that Rj4 is the Glyma.01G165800 gene (previously annotated as Glyma01g37060). Instead, we provide convincing evidence that Rj4 is Glyma.01g165800-D, a duplicated and unique version of Glyma.01g165800, that has evolved the ability to control symbiotic specificity. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. The impact of primer sets on detection of the gene encoding biofilm-associated protein (Bap) in Acinetobacter baumannii: in silico and in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodori, M; Douraghi, M; Yaseri, M; Rahbar, M

    2017-04-01

    The Acinetobacter baumannii virulence protein Bap is encoded by a large gene and contains both variable sequence and repetitive modules. To date, four primer sets targeting different regions of bap have been designed, but no study has evaluated all these primers simultaneously for detection of bap. Here, we assessed the effect of primer sets Bap I-IV, on detection of bap both in silico and in vitro. Using the primer set Bap II, all 143 tested strains yielded an amplicon corresponding to the bap gene. This primer set showed the highest sensitivity (100, 95% CI: 97·9-100%) compared to the other primer sets. This study demonstrates that primer set Bap II performs with optimal efficiency for detection of the bap gene among different strains. This study investigated the effect of nucleotide variation on PCR detection of the bap gene in various Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Since bap is the target gene for many detection assays, this variation can affect the detection efficiency. Here we present a primer set Bap II with optimal detection efficiency amongst 143 different strains, as shown by in silico and in vitro evidence. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Isolation and characterization of the rat gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Arnberg, A. C.; Malingré, H.; Moerer, P.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) varies strongly between different organs and between different regions within organs. To permit further studies on the regulation of GDH expression, we isolated and characterized the rat gene encoding the GDH protein. This gene contains 13 exons and

  17. Identification and characterization of the novel gene GhDBP2 encoding a DRE-binding protein from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Jin, Longguo; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    A cDNA encoding one novel DRE-binding protein, GhDBP2, was isolated from cotton seedlings. It is classified into the A-6 group of DREB subfamily based on multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic characterization. Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we found that the GhDBP2 transcripts were greatly induced by drought, NaCl, low temperature and ABA treatments in cotton cotyledons. The DNA-binding properties of GhDBP2 were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), showing that GhDBP2 successfully binds to the previously characterized DRE cis-element as well as the promoter region of the LEA D113 gene. Consistent with its role as a DNA-binding protein, GhDBP2 is preferentially localized to the nucleus of onion epidermal cells. In addition, when GhDBP2 is transiently expressed in tobacco cells, it activates reporter gene expression driven by the LEA D113 promoter. Taken together, our results indicate that GhDBP2 is a DRE-binding transcriptional activator involved in activation of down-stream genes such as LEA D113 expression through interaction with the DRE element, in response to environmental stresses as well as ABA treatment.

  18. The Additional sex combs gene of Drosophila encodes a chromatin protein that binds to shared and unique Polycomb group sites on polytene chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, D A; Milne, T A; Hodgson, J W; Shellard, J; Salinas, C A; Kyba, M; Randazzo, F; Brock, H W

    1998-04-01

    The Additional sex combs (Asx) gene of Drosophila is a member of the Polycomb group of genes, which are required for maintenance of stable repression of homeotic and other loci. Asx is unusual among the Polycomb group because: (1) one Asx allele exhibits both anterior and posterior transformations; (2) Asx mutations enhance anterior transformations of trx mutations; (3) Asx mutations exhibit segmentation phenotypes in addition to homeotic phenotypes; (4) Asx is an Enhancer of position-effect variegation and (5) Asx displays tissue-specific derepression of target genes. Asx was cloned by transposon tagging and encodes a protein of 1668 amino acids containing an unusual cysteine cluster at the carboxy terminus. The protein is ubiquitously expressed during development. We show that Asx is required in the central nervous system to regulate Ultrabithorax. ASX binds to multiple sites on polytene chromosomes, 70% of which overlap those of Polycomb, polyhomeotic and Polycomblike, and 30% of which are unique. The differences in target site recognition may account for some of the differences in Asx phenotypes relative to other members of the Polycomb group.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum. XIUHONG YANG, CHAO SUN, YUANLEI HU and ZHONGPING LIN. *. College of Life Sciences, National Key Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, Peking.

  20. Characterization of the enhanced bone regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament stem cells engineered to express the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Im-Hee; Lee, Si-Ho; Jun, Choong-Man; Oh, Namsik; Yun, Jeong-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) are considered an appropriate cell source for therapeutic strategies. The aims of this study were to investigate the sustainability of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) secretion and the bone regenerative capacity of hPDLSCs that had been genetically modified to express the gene encoding BMP2 (BMP2). hPDLSCs isolated from healthy third molars were transduced using replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding BMP2 (hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2), and the cellular characteristics and osteogenic potentials of hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 successfully secreted BMP2, formed colonies, and expressed immunophenotypes similar to their nontransduced counterparts. As to their osteogenic potential, hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 formed greater mineralized nodules and exhibited significantly higher levels of expression of BMP2 and the gene encoding alkaline phosphatase, and formed more and better quality bone than other hPDLSC-containing or recombinant human BMP2-treated groups, being localized at the initial site until 8 weeks. The findings of the present study demonstrate that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 effectively promote osteogenesis not only in vitro but also in vivo. The findings also suggest that hPDLSCs can efficiently carry and deliver BMP2, and that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 could be used in an attractive novel therapeutic approach for the regeneration of deteriorated bony defects.

  1. Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes encoding products homologous to cysteine cluster proteins or plant lipid transfer proteins are identified in Astragalus sinicus L. by suppressive subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Min-Xia; Wei, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Da-Song; Zhou, Jun-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes have been revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with two mRNA populations of infected and uninfected control roots of Astragalus sinicus. Eleven of them encode small polypeptides showing homology to cysteine cluster proteins (CCPs) that contain a putative signal peptide and conserved cysteine residues. Among these CCP-like genes, AsG257 codes for a homologue of the defensin 2 family and AsD255 contains a scorpion toxin-like domain at the C-terminus. Sequence analysis of a genomic AsD255 fragment which was isolated revealed that one intron separates the first exon encoding the signal peptide from the second exon encoding the cysteine cluster domain of this nodulin. Another two genes, AsE246 and AsIB259, encode two different products similar to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Virtual northern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that the other genes except AsIB259 and AsC2411 were expressed exclusively in inoculated roots and that their expression was 2-4 d later than that of the leghaemoglobin (Lb) gene during nodule development. Transcription of AsIB259 was also detected in uninfected control roots but with a significant decline in expression and a temporal expression similar to Lb. AsC2411 had a basal expression in control roots identified by RT-PCR. Sequence alignment showed that the putative proteins AsE246 and AsIB259 show lower homology with LTPs from legumes than with those from other plants.

  2. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  3. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of three homoeologous Ta14S genes encoding 14-3-3 proteins in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguo Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize Ta14S homoeologs and assess their functions in wheat seed development. The genomic and cDNA sequences of three Ta14S homoeologous genes encoding 14-3-3 proteins were isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that the three homoeologs consisted of five exons and four introns and were very highly conserved in the coding regions and in exon/intron structure, whereas the cDNA sequences were variable in the 5′ and 3′-UTR. The three genes, designated as Ta14S-2A, Ta14S-2B and Ta14S-2D, were located in homoeologous group 2 chromosomes. The polypeptide chains of the three Ta14S genes were highly similar. These genes were most homologous to Hv14A from barley. Real-time quantitative PCR indicated that the three Ta14S genes were differentially expressed in different organs at different developmental stages and all exhibited greater expression in primary roots of 1-day-old germlings than in other tissues. Comparison of the expression patterns of the three homoeologous genes at different times after pollination also revealed that their expression was developmentally regulated. The transcription of Ta14S-2B was clearly higher during seed germination, whereas expressions of Ta14S-2A and Ta14S-2D were up-regulated at the beginning of seed imbibition (0–12 h, but declined thereafter. The results suggested that the three Ta14S homoeologous genes have regulatory roles in seed development and germination.

  4. PHH1, a novel gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a protein similar to plant blue-light photoreceptors and microbial photolyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P D; Batschauer, A; Hays, J B

    1996-11-27

    A cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana similar to microbial photolyase genes, and designated AT-PHH1, was isolated using a photolyase-like cDNA from Sinapsis alba (SA-PHR1) as a probe. Multiple isolations yielded only PHH1 cDNAs, and a few blue-light-receptor CRY1 (HY4) cDNAs (also similar to microbial photolyase genes), suggesting the absence of any other highly similar Arabidopsis genes. The AT-PHH1 and SA-PHR1 cDNA sequences predict 89% identity at the protein level, except for an AT-PHH1 C-terminal extension (111 amino acids), also not seen in microbial photolyases. AT-PHH1 and CRY1 show less similarity (54% p4erein identity), including respective C-terminal extensions that are themselves mostly dissimilar. Analysis of fifteen AT-PHH1 genomic isolates reveals a single gene, with three introns in the coding sequence and one in the 5'-untranslated leader. Full-length AT-PHH1, and both AT-PHH1 and AT-PHH1 delta C-513 (truncated to be approximately the size of microbial photolyase genes) cDNAs, were overexpressed, respectively, in yeast and Escherichia coli mutants hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. The absence of significant effects on resistance suggests either that any putative AT-PHH1 DNA repair activity requires cofactors/chromophores not present in yeast or E. coli, or that AT-PHH1 encodes a blue-light/ultraviolet-A receptor rather than a DNA repair protein.

  5. PLS1, a gene encoding a tetraspanin-like protein, is required for penetration of rice leaf by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clergeot, Pierre-Henri; Gourgues, Mathieu; Cots, Joaquim; Laurans, F.; Latorse, Marie-Pascale; Pépin, Régis; Tharreau, Didier; Notteghem, Jean-Loup; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2001-01-01

    We describe in this study punchless, a nonpathogenic mutant from the rice blast fungus M. grisea, obtained by plasmid-mediated insertional mutagenesis. As do most fungal plant pathogens, M. grisea differentiates an infection structure specialized for host penetration called the appressorium. We show that punchless differentiates appressoria that fail to breach either the leaf epidermis or artificial membranes such as cellophane. Cytological analysis of punchless appressoria shows that they have a cellular structure, turgor, and glycogen content similar to those of wild type before penetration, but that they are unable to differentiate penetration pegs. The inactivated gene, PLS1, encodes a putative integral membrane protein of 225 aa (Pls1p). A functional Pls1p-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was detected only in appressoria and was localized in plasma membranes and vacuoles. Pls1p is structurally related to the tetraspanin family. In animals, these proteins are components of membrane signaling complexes controlling cell differentiation, motility, and adhesion. We conclude that PLS1 controls an appressorial function essential for the penetration of the fungus into host leaves. PMID:11391010

  6. Comparative analysis and molecular characterization of a gene BANF1 encoded a DNA-binding protein during mitosis from the Giant Panda and Black Bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yichun; Hou, Yi-Ling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wan-Ru; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Barrier to autointegration factor 1 (BANF1) is a DNA-binding protein found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells that functions to establish nuclear architecture during mitosis. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of BANF1 were cloned from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus mupinensis) using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cDNA of the BANF1 cloned from Giant Panda and Black Bear is 297 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 270 bp encoding 89 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence from Giant Panda is 521 bp, from Black Bear is 536 bp, which were found both to possess 2 exons. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to some mammalian species studied. Topology prediction showed there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Casein kinase II phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Giant Panda, and there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Black Bear. The BANF1 gene can be readily expressed in E. coli. Results showed that the protein BANF1 fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 14 kD polypeptide that formed inclusion bodies. The expression products obtained could be used to purify the proteins and study their function further.

  7. Neuron-specific specificity protein 4 bigenomically regulates the transcription of all mitochondria- and nucleus-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Dhar, Shilpa; Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-11-01

    Neurons are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism for their energy supply, and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a key energy-generating enzyme in the mitochondria. A unique feature of COX is that it is one of only four proteins in mammalian cells that are bigenomically regulated. Of its thirteen subunits, three are encoded in the mitochondrial genome and ten are nuclear-encoded on nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multisubunit, bigenomic enzyme poses a distinct challenge. In recent years, we found that nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) mediate such bigenomic coordination. The latest candidate is the specificity factor (Sp) family of proteins. In N2a cells, we found that Sp1 regulates all 13 COX subunits. However, we discovered recently that in primary neurons, it is Sp4 and not Sp1 that regulates some of the key glutamatergic receptor subunit genes. The question naturally arises as to the role of Sp4 in regulating COX in primary neurons. The present study utilized multiple approaches, including chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, knockdown and over-expression of Sp4, as well as functional assays to document that Sp4 indeed functionally regulate all 13 subunits of COX as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B. The present study discovered that among the specificity family of transcription factors, it is the less known neuron-specific Sp4 that regulates the expression of all 13 subunits of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) enzyme in primary neurons. Sp4 also regulates the three mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M) and a COX assembly protein SURF-1 in primary neurons. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Isolation and characterization of BetaM protein encoded by ATP1B4 - a unique member of the Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunit gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestov, Nikolay B. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Zhao, Hao [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Basrur, Venkatesha [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Modyanov, Nikolai N., E-mail: nikolai.modyanov@utoledo.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Structural properties of BetaM and Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits are sharply different. {yields} BetaM protein is concentrated in nuclear membrane of skeletal myocytes. {yields} BetaM does not associate with a Na,K-ATPase {alpha}-subunit in skeletal muscle. {yields} Polypeptide chain of the native BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases. {yields} BetaM in neonatal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B. -- Abstract: ATP1B4 genes represent a rare instance of the orthologous gene co-option that radically changed functions of encoded BetaM proteins during vertebrate evolution. In lower vertebrates, this protein is a {beta}-subunit of Na,K-ATPase located in the cell membrane. In placental mammals, BetaM completely lost its ancestral role and through acquisition of two extended Glu-rich clusters into the N-terminal domain gained entirely new properties as a muscle-specific protein of the inner nuclear membrane possessing the ability to regulate gene expression. Strict temporal regulation of BetaM expression, which is the highest in late fetal and early postnatal myocytes, indicates that it plays an essential role in perinatal development. Here we report the first structural characterization of the native eutherian BetaM protein. It should be noted that, in contrast to structurally related Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits, the polypeptide chain of BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases that greatly complicated its isolation. Nevertheless, using a complex of protease inhibitors, a sample of authentic BetaM was isolated from pig neonatal skeletal muscle by a combination of ion-exchange and lectin-affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Results of the analysis of the BetaM tryptic digest using MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry have demonstrated that native BetaM in neonatal skeletal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B and comprised of 351 amino acid residues. Isolated BetaM protein was

  9. Isolation and characterization of BetaM protein encoded by ATP1B4 - a unique member of the Na,K-ATPase β-subunit gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, Nikolay B.; Zhao, Hao; Basrur, Venkatesha; Modyanov, Nikolai N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Structural properties of BetaM and Na,K-ATPase β-subunits are sharply different. → BetaM protein is concentrated in nuclear membrane of skeletal myocytes. → BetaM does not associate with a Na,K-ATPase α-subunit in skeletal muscle. → Polypeptide chain of the native BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases. → BetaM in neonatal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B. -- Abstract: ATP1B4 genes represent a rare instance of the orthologous gene co-option that radically changed functions of encoded BetaM proteins during vertebrate evolution. In lower vertebrates, this protein is a β-subunit of Na,K-ATPase located in the cell membrane. In placental mammals, BetaM completely lost its ancestral role and through acquisition of two extended Glu-rich clusters into the N-terminal domain gained entirely new properties as a muscle-specific protein of the inner nuclear membrane possessing the ability to regulate gene expression. Strict temporal regulation of BetaM expression, which is the highest in late fetal and early postnatal myocytes, indicates that it plays an essential role in perinatal development. Here we report the first structural characterization of the native eutherian BetaM protein. It should be noted that, in contrast to structurally related Na,K-ATPase β-subunits, the polypeptide chain of BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases that greatly complicated its isolation. Nevertheless, using a complex of protease inhibitors, a sample of authentic BetaM was isolated from pig neonatal skeletal muscle by a combination of ion-exchange and lectin-affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Results of the analysis of the BetaM tryptic digest using MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry have demonstrated that native BetaM in neonatal skeletal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B and comprised of 351 amino acid residues. Isolated BetaM protein was also characterized by SELDI-TOF mass

  10. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Lampert, F.; Kaneko, Y.; Slater, R.; Kroes, W. G.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Ludwig, W. D.; Karpas, A.

    1993-01-01

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). We report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell,

  11. Epididymal cysteine-rich secretory protein 1 encoding gene is expressed in murine hair follicles and downregulated in mice overexpressing Hoxc13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ron L; Tkatchenko, Tatiana V; Pruett, Nathanael D; Potter, Christopher S; Jacobs, Donna F; Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2005-12-01

    Members of the Hox gene family of transcriptional regulators are believed to play essential roles in hair follicle differentiation, although little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating these putative control functions. Transgenic mice overexpressing Hoxc13 in hair follicles (GC13 mice) exhibit complex phenotypic alterations including hair shaft defects and alopecia, as well as severe epidermal abnormalities. To identify some of the genetic pathways affected by Hoxc13 overexpression in hair, we performed large-scale differential gene expression analysis on the skin of 5-d GC13 versus normal FVB mice using DNA chip assays. A surprising result of these experiments was the identification of the epididymal cysteine-rich secretory protein 1 (Crisp1) gene as one of the genes with the greatest expression differential, in this case with greater than 20-fold downregulation in skin from GC13 mice. Crisp1 encodes a secreted protein that has originally been found to be abundantly expressed in the epididymis, where it plays a role in sperm maturation. We have localized Crisp1 mRNA in 5-d postnatal murine scapular skin by in situ hybridization, showing its expression to be restricted to the medulla of the hair shaft. Furthermore, we provide evidence for specific interaction of Hoxc13 with at least one cognate binding site found in the Crisp1 promoter region, thus supporting the concept of a Hoxc13/Crisp1 regulatory relationship. In summary, these data establish the hair as a novel site for Crisp1 expression where its functional role remains to be determined.

  12. Expansion of genes encoding piRNA-associated argonaute proteins in the pea aphid: diversification of expression profiles in different plastic morphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Ling Lu

    Full Text Available Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs are known to regulate transposon activity in germ cells of several animal models that propagate sexually. However, the role of piRNAs during asexual reproduction remains almost unknown. Aphids that can alternate sexual and asexual reproduction cycles in response to seasonal changes of photoperiod provide a unique opportunity to study piRNAs and the piRNA pathway in both reproductive modes. Taking advantage of the recently sequenced genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we found an unusually large lineage-specific expansion of genes encoding the Piwi sub-clade of Argonaute proteins. In situ hybridisation showed differential expressions between the duplicated piwi copies: while Api-piwi2 and Api-piwi6 are "specialised" in germ cells their most closely related copy, respectively Api-piwi5 and Api-piwi3, are expressed in the somatic cells. The differential expression was also identified in duplicated ago3: Api-ago3a in germ cells and Api-ago3b in somatic cells. Moreover, analyses of expression profiles of the expanded piwi and ago3 genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that expressions varied according to the reproductive types. These specific expression patterns suggest that expanded aphid piwi and ago3 genes have distinct roles in asexual and sexual reproduction.

  13. The SlZRT1 Gene Encodes a Plasma Membrane-Located ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-Like Protein Transporter in the Ectomycorrhizal Fungus Suillus luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Coninx

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential micronutrient but may become toxic when present in excess. In Zn-contaminated environments, trees can be protected from Zn toxicity by their root-associated micro-organisms, in particular ectomycorrhizal fungi. The mechanisms of cellular Zn homeostasis in ectomycorrhizal fungi and their contribution to the host tree’s Zn status are however not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize transporters involved in Zn uptake in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Suillus luteus, a cosmopolitan pine mycobiont. Zn uptake in fungi is known to be predominantly governed by members of the ZIP (Zrt/IrtT-like protein family of Zn transporters. Four ZIP transporter encoding genes were identified in the S. luteus genome. By in silico and phylogenetic analysis, one of these proteins, SlZRT1, was predicted to be a plasma membrane located Zn importer. Heterologous expression in yeast confirmed the predicted function and localization of the protein. A gene expression analysis via RT-qPCR was performed in S. luteus to establish whether SlZRT1 expression is affected by external Zn concentrations. SlZRT1 transcripts accumulated almost immediately, though transiently upon growth in the absence of Zn. Exposure to elevated concentrations of Zn resulted in a significant reduction of SlZRT1 transcripts within the first hour after initiation of the exposure. Altogether, the data support a role as cellular Zn importer for SlZRT1 and indicate a key role in cellular Zn uptake of S. luteus. Further research is needed to understand the eventual contribution of SlZRT1 to the Zn status of the host plant.

  14. Recent positive selection has acted on genes encoding proteins with more interactions within the whole human interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Pierre; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Pybus, Marc; Fares, Mario A; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Laayouni, Hafid

    2015-04-02

    Genes vary in their likelihood to undergo adaptive evolution. The genomic factors that determine adaptability, however, remain poorly understood. Genes function in the context of molecular networks, with some occupying more important positions than others and thus being likely to be under stronger selective pressures. However, how positive selection distributes across the different parts of molecular networks is still not fully understood. Here, we inferred positive selection using comparative genomics and population genetics approaches through the comparison of 10 mammalian and 270 human genomes, respectively. In agreement with previous results, we found that genes with lower network centralities are more likely to evolve under positive selection (as inferred from divergence data). Surprisingly, polymorphism data yield results in the opposite direction than divergence data: Genes with higher centralities are more likely to have been targeted by recent positive selection during recent human evolution. Our results indicate that the relationship between centrality and the impact of adaptive evolution highly depends on the mode of positive selection and/or the evolutionary time-scale. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Identification and Comparative Analysis of Genes Encoding Outer Membrane Proteins P2 and P5 in Haemophilus parsuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a serious swine pathogen but little is known about how it causes disease. A related human pathogen, Haemophilus influenzae, has been better studied and many of its virulence factors have been identified. Two of these, outer membrane proteins P2 and P5, have been shown to ha...

  16. Genes encoding heterotrimeric G-proteins are associated with gray matter volume variations in the medial frontal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavarría-Siles, I.M.; Rijpkema, M.; Arias-Vasquez, A.; Verhage, M.; Franke, B.; Fernández, G.; Posthuma, D.

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled signal transduction mediates most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters; this signaling system transduces a large variety of extracellular stimuli into neurons and is the most widely used mechanism for cell communication at the synaptic level. The heterotrimeric

  17. Genes Encoding Heterotrimeric G-proteins Are Associated with Gray Matter Volume Variations in the Medial Frontal Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavarria-Siles, I.; Rijpkema, Mark; Lips, E.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Verhage, M.; Franke, B.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Posthuma, D.

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled signal transduction mediates most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters; this signaling system transduces a large variety of extracellular stimuli into neurons and is the most widely used mechanism for cell communication at the synaptic level. The heterotrimeric

  18. Novel biallelic mutations in the PNPT1 gene encoding a mitochondrial-RNA-import protein PNPase cause delayed myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, R; Arai-Ichinoi, N; Kikuchi, A; Matsuhashi, T; Numata-Uematsu, Y; Uematsu, M; Fujii, Y; Murayama, K; Ohtake, A; Abe, T; Kure, S

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that impaired transcription or mitochondrial translation of small RNAs can cause abnormal myelination. A polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) encoded by PNPT1 facilitates the import of small RNAs into mitochondria. PNPT1 mutations have been reported in patients with neurodevelopmental diseases with mitochondrial dysfunction. We report here 2 siblings with PNPT1 mutations who presented delayed myelination as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. We identified compound heterozygous mutations (c.227G>A; p.Gly76Asp and c.574C>T; p.Arg192*) in PNPT1 by quartet whole-exome sequencing. Analyses of skin fibroblasts from the patient showed that PNPase expression was markedly decreased and that import of the small RNA RNaseP into mitochondria was impaired. Exogenous expression of wild-type PNPT1, but not mutants, rescued ATP production in patient skin fibroblasts, suggesting the pathogenicity of the identified mutations. Our cases expand the phenotypic spectrum of PNPT1 mutations that can cause delayed myelination. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca......D) encoding N-acetylglucosamine-l-phosphate uridyltransferase upstream of prs, and a gene homologous to ctc downstream of prs. cDNA synthesis with a B. caldolyticus gcaD-prs-ctc-specified mRNA as template, followed by amplification utilising the polymerase chain reaction indicated that the three genes are co......-transcribed. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a high similarity among PRPP synthases across a wide phylogenetic range. An E. coli strain harbouring the B. caldolyticus prs gene in a multicopy plasmid produced PRPP synthase activity 33-fold over the activity of a haploid B. caldolyticus strain. B. caldolyticus...

  20. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding a chemosensory protein from Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) ... The BtabCSP amino acid residues deduced from the respective full-length cDNA shares four conserved cysteine motifs with known CSPs from other insects. Homology ...

  1. Identification and expression analysis of cDNA encoding chitinase-like protein (CLP) gene in Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Xu, G J; Su, H; Gao, X G; Li, Y F; Bao, X B; Liu, W D; He, C B

    2014-12-18

    Chitinase-like proteins (CLP) are important members of the glycoside hydrolase family 18 (GH18) and are involved in growth control and remodeling processes. In this study, a CLP transcript was isolated and sequenced from the Japanese scallop (Mizuhopecten yessoensis) after screening expressed sequence tags. The full-length complementary DNA of M. yessoensis CLP (My-Clp1) was 1555 bp in length, consisting of a 75-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 160-bp 3'-UTR, and a 1320-bp open reading frame bearing characteristics of the GH18 family. The My-Clp1 protein was well conserved, with similar domain structures and architecture across species (e.g., from mollusks to mammals). Expression analysis in healthy tissues and across developmental stages revealed a strong preference for expression; My-Clp1 was abundantly expressed in the mantle and throughout metamorphosis, which suggests the involvement of My-Clp1 in the synthesis of extracellular components, and tissue degeneration and remodeling. My-Clp1 expression was induced after infection with a bacterial pathogen, Vibrio anguillarum, suggesting its involvement in immunity against this intracellular pathogen.

  2. Genomewide analysis of NBS-encoding genes in kiwi fruit (Actinidia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YINGJUN LI

    Identification of NBS-encodings and gene family classification of kiwi fruit. Kiwi fruit (A. chinensis) assembly and annotation ... There were three criteria to classify gene family. Both the coverage (aligned sequence/gene lengths) and iden- ... Number of identified NBS-encoding genes in kiwi fruit. Predicted protein domain.

  3. Genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins localized in the conjugative transfer region of plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 participate in modulating transfer and affect conjugation from different donors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana eBrom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among sequenced genomes, it is common to find a high proportion of genes encoding proteins that cannot be assigned a known function. In bacterial genomes, genes related to a similar function are often located in contiguous regions. The presence of genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins (chp in such a region may suggest that they are related to that particular function. Plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 is a conjugative plasmid containing a segment of approximately 30 Kb encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer. In addition to genes responsible for Dtr (DNA transfer and replication, Mpf (Mating pair formation and regulation, it has two chp-encoding genes (RHE_PA00163 and RHE_PA00164 and a transcriptional regulator (RHE_PA00165. RHE_PA00163 encodes an uncharacterized protein conserved in bacteria that presents a COG4634 conserved domain, and RHE_PA00164 encodes an uncharacterized conserved protein with a DUF433 domain of unknown function. RHE_PA00165 presents a HTH_XRE domain, characteristic of DNA-binding proteins belonging to the xenobiotic response element family of transcriptional regulators. Interestingly, genes similar to these are also present in transfer regions of plasmids from other bacteria. To determine if these genes participate in conjugative transfer, we mutagenized them and analyzed their conjugative phenotype. A mutant in RHE_PA00163 showed a slight (10 times but reproducible increase in transfer frequency from Rhizobium donors, while mutants in RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 lost their ability to transfer the plasmid from some Agrobacterium donors. Our results indicate that the chp-encoding genes located among conjugation genes are indeed related to this function. However, the participation of RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 is only revealed under very specific circumstances, and is not perceived when the plasmid is transferred from the original host. RHE_PA00163 seems to be a fine-tuning modulator for conjugative

  4. The LuWD40-1 gene encoding WD repeat protein regulates growth and pollen viability in flax (Linum Usitatissimum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    Full Text Available As a crop, flax holds significant commercial value for its omega-3 rich oilseeds and stem fibres. Canada is the largest producer of linseed but there exists scope for significant yield improvements. Implementation of mechanisms such as male sterility can permit the development of hybrids to assist in achieving this goal. Temperature sensitive male sterility has been reported in flax but the leakiness of this system in field conditions limits the production of quality hybrid seeds. Here, we characterized a 2,588 bp transcript differentially expressed in male sterile lines of flax. The twelve intron gene predicted to encode a 368 amino acid protein has five WD40 repeats which, in silico, form a propeller structure with putative nucleic acid and histone binding capabilities. The LuWD40-1 protein localized to the nucleus and its expression increased during the transition and continued through the vegetative stages (seed, etiolated seedling, stem while the transcript levels declined during reproductive development (ovary, anthers and embryonic morphogenesis of male fertile plants. Knockout lines for LuWD40-1 in flax failed to develop shoots while overexpression lines showed delayed growth phenotype and were male sterile. The non-viable flowers failed to open and the pollen grains from these flowers were empty. Three independent transgenic lines overexpressing the LuWD40-1 gene had ∼80% non-viable pollen, reduced branching, delayed flowering and maturity compared to male fertile genotypes. The present study provides new insights into a male sterility mechanism present in flax.

  5. The Ancestral Gene for Transcribed, Low-Copy Repeats in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Region Encodes a Large Protein Implicated in Protein Trafficking that is Deficient in Mice with Neuromuscular and

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Transcribed, low-copy repeat elements are associated with the breakpoint regions of common deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. We report here the identification of the ancestral gene ( HERC2 ) and a family of duplicated, truncated copies that comprise these low-copy repeats. This gene encodes a highly conserved giant protein, HERC2, that is distantly related to p532 (HERC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) implicated in vesicular trafficking. The mouse genome contains a single Herc2 locus, located in the jdf2 (juvenile development and fertility-2) interval of chromosome 7C. We have identified single nucleotide splice junction mutations in Herc2 in three independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced jdf2 mutant alleles, each leading to exon skipping with premature termination of translation and/or deletion of conserved amino acids. Therefore, mutations in Herc2 lead to the neuromuscular secretory vesicle and sperm acrosome defects, other developmental abnormalities and juvenile lethality of jdf2 mice. Combined, these findings suggest that HERC2 is an important gene encoding a GEF involved in protein trafficking and degradation pathways in the cell.

  6. Expression of the putA gene encoding proline dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus is independent of NtrC regulation but requires an Lrp-like activator protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuntje, B; Masepohl, B; Klipp, W

    1995-11-01

    Four Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants unable to grow with proline as the sole nitrogen source were isolated by random Tn5 mutagenesis. The Tn5 insertions were mapped within two adjacent chromosomal EcoRI fragments. DNA sequence analysis of this region revealed three open reading frames designated selD, putR, and putA. The putA gene codes for a protein of 1,127 amino acid residues which is homologous to PutA of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. The central part of R. capsulatus PutA showed homology to proline dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Put1) and Drosophila melanogaster (SlgA). The C-terminal part of PutA exhibited homology to Put2 (pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase) of S. cerevisiae and to aldehyde dehydrogenases from different organisms. Therefore, it seems likely that in R. capsulatus, as in enteric bacteria, both enzymatic steps for proline degradation are catalyzed by a single polypeptide (PutA). The deduced amino acid sequence of PutR (154 amino acid residues) showed homology to the small regulatory proteins Lrp, BkdR, and AsnC. The putR gene, which is divergently transcribed from putA, is essential for proline utilization and codes for an activator of putA expression. The expression of putA was induced by proline and was not affected by ammonia or other amino acids. In addition, putA expression was autoregulated by PutA itself. Mutations in glnB, nifR1 (ntrC), and NifR4 (ntrA encoding sigma 54) had no influence on put gene expression. The open reading frame located downstream of R. capsulatus putR exhibited strong homology to the E. coli selD gene, which is involved in selenium metabolism. R. capsulatus selD mutants exhibited a Put+ phenotype, demonstrating that selD is required neither for viability nor for proline utilization.

  7. The L83L ORF of African swine fever virus strain Georgia encodes for a non-essential gene that interacts with host protein IL-1ß

    Science.gov (United States)

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a contagious and frequently lethal disease of pigs that produces significant economic consequences to the swine industry. ASFV genome encodes for more than 150 genes, but only a few of them have been studied in detail. Here we report the characterization of op...

  8. The chloroplast gene encoding ribosomal protein S4 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii spans an inverted repeat--unique sequence junction and can be mutated to suppress a streptomycin dependence mutation in ribosomal protein S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph-Anderson, B L; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W; Huang, C; Liu, X Q

    1995-05-10

    The ribosomal protein gene rps4 was cloned and sequenced from the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The N-terminal 213 amino acid residues of the S4 protein are encoded in the single-copy region (SCR) of the genome, while the C-terminal 44 amino acid residues are encoded in the inverted repeat (IR). The deduced 257 amino acid sequence of C. reinhardtii S4 is considerably longer (by 51-59 residues) than S4 proteins of other photosynthetic species and Escherichia coli, due to the presence of two internal insertions and a C-terminal extension. A short conserved C-terminal motif found in all other S4 proteins examined is missing from the C. reinhardtii protein. In E. coli, mutations in the S4 protein suppress the streptomycin-dependent (sd) phenotype of mutations in the S12 protein. Because we have been unable to identify similar S4 mutations among suppressors of an sd mutation in C. reinhardtii S12 obtained using UV mutagenesis, we made site-directed mutations [Arg68 (CGT) to Leu (CTG and CTT)] in the wild-type rps4 gene equivalent to an E. coli Gln53 to Leu ribosomal ambiguity mutation (ram), which suppresses the sd phenotype and decreases translational accuracy. These mutants were tested for their ability to transform the sd S12 mutation of C. reinhardtii to streptomycin independence. The streptomycin-independent isolates obtained by biolistic transformation all possessed the original sd mutation in rps12, but none had the expected donor Leu68 mutations in rps4. Instead, six of 15 contained a Gln73 (CAA) to Pro (CCA) mutation five amino acids downstream from the predicted mutant codon, irrespective of rps4 donor DNA. Two others contained six- and ten-amino acid, in-frame insertions at S4 positions 90 and 92 that appear to have been induced by the biolistic process itself. Eight streptomycin-independent isolates analyzed had wild-type rps4 genes and may possess mutations identical to previously isolated suppressors of sd that define at least two

  9. The effects of gamma irradiation on growth and expression of genes encoding DNA repair-related proteins in Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra var. italica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiguchi, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Tokihiko; Yoshida, Kazumasa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, to elucidate the mechanisms of adaptation and tolerance to ionizing radiation in woody plants, we investigated the various biological effects of γ-rays on the Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra L. var. italica Du Roi). We detected abnormal leaf shape and color, fusion, distorted venation, shortened internode, fasciation and increased axillary shoots in γ-irradiated poplar plants. Acute γ-irradiation with a dose of 100 Gy greatly reduced the height, stem diameter and biomass of poplar plantlets. After receiving doses of 200 and 300 Gy, all the plantlets stopped growing, and then most of them withered after 4–10 weeks of γ-irradiation. Comet assays showed that nuclear DNA in suspension-cultured poplar cells had been damaged by γ-rays. To determine whether DNA repair-related proteins are involved in the response to γ-rays in Lombardy poplars, we cloned the PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4, PnPCNA and PnOGG1 cDNAs and investigated their mRNA expression. The PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4 and PnPCNA mRNAs were increased by γ-rays, but the PnOGG1 mRNA was decreased. Moreover, the expression of PnLIG4, PnKU70 and PnRAD51 was also up-regulated by Zeocin known as a DNA cleavage agent. These observations suggest that the morphogenesis, growth and protective gene expression in Lombardy poplars are severely affected by the DNA damage and unknown cellular events caused by γ-irradiation. - Highlights: ► Gamma rays caused morphological change and growth inhibition to Lombardy poplar. ► The nuclear DNA of Lombardy poplar was broken by γ-rays or Zeocin. ► Six cDNAs encoding DNA repair-related proteins were cloned from the Lombardy poplar. ► The expression level of those genes was increased or decreased by γ-rays. ► Some genes having been increased by γ-rays were also up-regulated by Zeocin.

  10. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  11. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed Highly Expressed Genes Encoding Secondary Metabolite Pathways and Small Cysteine-Rich Proteins in the Sclerotium of Lignosus rhinocerotis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yeng Y Yap

    Full Text Available Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke Ryvarden (tiger milk mushroom has long been known for its nutritional and medicinal benefits among the local communities in Southeast Asia. However, the molecular and genetic basis of its medicinal and nutraceutical properties at transcriptional level have not been investigated. In this study, the transcriptome of L. rhinocerotis sclerotium, the part with medicinal value, was analyzed using high-throughput Illumina HiSeqTM platform with good sequencing quality and alignment results. A total of 3,673, 117, and 59,649 events of alternative splicing, novel transcripts, and SNP variation were found to enrich its current genome database. A large number of transcripts were expressed and involved in the processing of gene information and carbohydrate metabolism. A few highly expressed genes encoding the cysteine-rich cerato-platanin, hydrophobins, and sugar-binding lectins were identified and their possible roles in L. rhinocerotis were discussed. Genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glucans, six gene clusters encoding four terpene synthases and one each of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase, and 109 transcribed cytochrome P450 sequences were also identified in the transcriptome. The data from this study forms a valuable foundation for future research in the exploitation of this mushroom in pharmacological and industrial applications.

  12. Cloning of a mitogen-inducible gene encoding a kappa B DNA-binding protein with homology to the rel oncogene and to cell-cycle motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bours, V; Villalobos, J; Burd, P R; Kelly, K; Siebenlist, U

    1990-11-01

    We have cloned and characterized a mitogen-inducible gene isolated from human T cells that predicts a protein of 968 amino acids. The amino-terminal domain has regions homologous to the oncogene rel and to the developmentally important gene dorsal of Drosophila. The carboxy-terminal domain contains repeat structures found in a variety of proteins that are involved in cell-cycle control of yeast and in tissue differentiation in Drosophila and Ceanorhabditis elegans, as well as in the putative human oncogene bcl-3 and in the ankyrin protein. A truncated form of the product of this gene translated in vitro is a DNA-binding protein which interacts specifically with the kappa B binding site found in many inducible genes, including the enhancer in human immunodeficiency virus. This gene is yet another in a growing list of important regulatory molecules whose expression is transcriptionally induced upon cellular activation.

  13. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    this antigen is a good candidate for development as a vaccine to prevent or control P. carinii infection. We have cloned and sequenced seven related but unique genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of rat P. carinii. Partial amino acid sequencing confirmed the identity of these genes. Based on Southern...... blot studies using chromosomal or restricted DNA, the major surface glycoproteins are the products of a multicopy family of genes. The predicted protein has an M(r) of approximately 123,000, is relatively rich in cysteine residues (5.5%) that are very strongly conserved, and contains a well conserved...

  14. Identification and use of genes encoding amatoxin and phallotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen, Heather E.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptide toxins and toxin production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Amanita species encoding Amanita peptides, specifically relating to amatoxins and phallotoxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for detecting Amanita peptide toxin genes for identifying Amanita peptide-producing mushrooms and for diagnosing suspected cases of mushroom poisoning. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for diagnosing and monitoring suspected cases of mushroom poisoning in patients.

  15. Analysis of the role of the gene bipA, encoding the major endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein in the secretion of homologous and heterologous proteins in black Aspergilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Gemeren, I.A. van; Drint-Kuijvenhoven, J.; Hessing, J.G.M.; Muijlwijk van - Harteveld, G.M.; Beijersbergen, A.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    1998-01-01

    The function of the endoplasmic-reticulum-localized chaperone binding protein (BiP) in relation to protein secretion in filamentous fungi was studied. It was shown that the overproduction of several homologous and heterologous recombinant proteins by Aspergillus strains induces the expression of

  16. Characterization of plasmids carrying the blaOXA-24/40 carbapenemase gene and the genes encoding the AbkA/AbkB proteins of a toxin/antitoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda, Noraida; Gato, Eva; Roca, Ignasi; López, María; de Alegría, Carlos Ruíz; Fernández Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Pachón, Jerónimo; Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Vila, Jordi; Bou, Germán; Tomás, María

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) is a major source of nosocomial infections in Spain associated with the production of OXA-58-like or OXA-24/40-like β-lactamase enzymes. We analysed the plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene in CRAb isolates obtained a decade apart. The presence of β-lactamases was screened for by PCR (metallo-β-lactamases, carbapenem-hydrolysing class D β-lactamases, GES and KPC) in 101 CRAb isolates obtained in two multicentre studies (GEIH/REIPI-Ab-2000 and GEIH/REIPI-Ab-2010; n = 493 Acinetobacter spp). We analysed the distribution and characterization of the plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene and sequenced two plasmids, AbATCC223p (2000) and AbATCC329p (2010) from A. baumannii ATCC 17978 transformants. Acquisition of the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene was the main mechanism underlying resistance to carbapenems (48.7% in 2000 compared with 51.6% in 2010). This gene was mainly isolated in ST2 A. baumannii strains in both studies, although some novel STs (ST79 and ST80) appeared in 2010. The gene was located in plasmids (8-12 kbp) associated with the repAci2 or repAci2/repGR12 types. The sequences of AbATCC223p (8840 bp) and AbATCC329p (8842 bp) plasmids were similar, particularly regarding the presence of the genes encoding the AbkA/AbkB proteins associated with the toxin/antitoxin system. Moreover, the abkA/abkB gene sequences (>96% identity) were also located in plasmids harbouring the bla(OXA-58)-like gene. The action of OXA-24/40 and OXA-58 β-lactamase-like enzymes represents the main mechanism underlying resistance to carbapenems in Spain in the last decade. AbkA/AbkB proteins in the toxin/antitoxin system may be involved in the successful dissemination of plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene, and probably also the bla(OXA-58)-like gene, thus contributing to the plasmid stability. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  17. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus

  18. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-11-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus.

  19. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe map1 gene encodes an SRF/MCM1-related protein required for P-cell specific gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Friis, T; Kjaerulff, S

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergo mating and meiosis when starved for a nitrogen source. In this process a P and and M cell first mate to generate a diploid zygote, which subsequently enters meiosis and sporulates. The P mating type is controlled by the mat1-Pc gene at the mating type...

  20. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z.

    1990-01-01

    We have synthesized 32 P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies

  1. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  2. Amplifikasi Gen Penyandi Protein Fusion Virus Tetelo dari Spesimen Lapangan dengan Metode OneStep RT-PCR. (AMPIFICATION OF FUSION PROTEIN ENCODING GENE OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS FROM FIELD SPECIMENS BY ONESTEP RT-PCR METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Haryanto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tetelo or Newcastle Disease (ND  virus is belong to the family Paramyxoviridae, which has a singlestranded RNA (ss RNA genome and it has viral envelope.  The viral envelope consists of two majorproteins, namely Haemagglutinin/Neuraminidase (H/N and Fusion (F protein. Molecular diagnosticmethods OneStep RT-PCR is a commonly diagnostic tool that used to diagnose of Tetelo in poultry. In thisstudy the diagnosis of Tetelo is accomplished by amplification of F protein encoding gene of Tetelo virusdirectly from field specimens without inoculation and propagation of Tetelo virus into embryonated chickeneggs. The objective of this study is to conduct rapid diagnosis of Tetelo virus directly from the field specimensbased on the amplification of the F gene by a OneStep RT-PCR method, so that the results of this study canbe used to assist in the identification of Tetelo virus directly from the field specimens. The results showedthat from the 15 samples of virus which isolated from tracheal swabs of clinical poultry showing symptomsof Tetelo virus infection, a total of 12 samples from 15 tested sampels (80% are positive tested for Tetelovirus infection. They were indicated by the amplification product of DNA fragments in size of 362 bp.OneStep RT-PCR is a method for rapid and effective diagnosis which can be used  to diagnose of Tetelovirus directly from field specimens.

  3. Rapid changes induced in developmental programmes of the maize embryo detected by analysis of the expression of genes encoding proline-rich proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josè-Estanyol, M; Puigdomènech, P

    1998-02-06

    The pattern of expression of two genes coding for proline-rich proteins, zmHyPRP and zmHRGP, in Zea mays is modified when the embryogenesis programme is altered by placing the embryos in conditions which promote either precocious germination or callogenesis. zmHyPRP gene expression is rapidly arrested when the embryogenesis programme is altered. zmHRGP mRNA is highly induced in scutellum within a few hours of callogenesis or precocious germination.

  4. Identification of two Arabidopsis genes encoding a peroxisomal oxidoreductase-like protein and an acyl-CoA synthetase-like protein that are required for responses to pro-auxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewski, Andrew A G; Zhou, Wenxu; Smith, Steven M; Bussell, John D

    2009-03-01

    Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid (2,4-DB) are metabolised by peroxisomal beta-oxidation to active auxins that inhibit root growth. We screened Arabidopsis mutants for resistance to IBA and 2,4-DB and identified two new 2,4-DB resistant mutants. The mutant genes encode a putative oxidoreductase (SDRa) and a putative acyl-activating enzyme (AAE18). Both proteins are localised to peroxisomes. SDRa is coexpressed with core beta-oxidation genes, but germination, seedling growth and the fatty acid profile of sdra seedlings are indistinguishable from wild type. The sdra mutant is also resistant to IBA, but aae18 is not. AAE18 is the first example of a gene required for response to 2,4-DB but not IBA. The closest relative of AAE18 is AAE17. AAE17 is predicted to be peroxisomal, but an aae17 aae18 double mutant responded similarly to aae18 for all assays. We propose that AAE18 is capable of activating 2,4-DB but IBA activating enzymes remain to be discovered. We present an updated model for peroxisomal pro-auxin metabolism in Arabidopsis that includes SDRa and AAE18.

  5. The tomato I gene for Fusarium wilt resistance encodes an atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein whose function is nevertheless dependent on SOBIR1 and SERK3/BAK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Do, Huong T T; Bru, Pierrick; de Sain, Mara; Thatcher, Louise F; Rep, Martijn; Jones, David A

    2017-03-01

    We have identified the tomato I gene for resistance to the Fusarium wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and show that it encodes a membrane-anchored leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein (LRR-RLP). Unlike most other LRR-RLP genes involved in plant defence, the I gene is not a member of a gene cluster and contains introns in its coding sequence. The I gene encodes a loopout domain larger than those in most other LRR-RLPs, with a distinct composition rich in serine and threonine residues. The I protein also lacks a basic cytosolic domain. Instead, this domain is rich in aromatic residues that could form a second transmembrane domain. The I protein recognises the Fol Avr1 effector protein, but, unlike many other LRR-RLPs, recognition specificity is determined in the C-terminal half of the protein by polymorphic amino acid residues in the LRRs just preceding the loopout domain and in the loopout domain itself. Despite these differences, we show that I/Avr1-dependent necrosis in Nicotiana benthamiana depends on the LRR receptor-like kinases (RLKs) SERK3/BAK1 and SOBIR1. Sequence comparisons revealed that the I protein and other LRR-RLPs involved in plant defence all carry residues in their last LRR and C-terminal LRR capping domain that are conserved with SERK3/BAK1-interacting residues in the same relative positions in the LRR-RLKs BRI1 and PSKR1. Tyrosine mutations of two of these conserved residues, Q922 and T925, abolished I/Avr1-dependent necrosis in N. benthamiana, consistent with similar mutations in BRI1 and PSKR1 preventing their interaction with SERK3/BAK1. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Genes optimized by evolution for accurate and fast translation encode in Archaea and Bacteria a broad and characteristic spectrum of protein functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkl Rainer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many microbial genomes, a strong preference for a small number of codons can be observed in genes whose products are needed by the cell in large quantities. This codon usage bias (CUB improves translational accuracy and speed and is one of several factors optimizing cell growth. Whereas CUB and the overrepresentation of individual proteins have been studied in detail, it is still unclear which high-level metabolic categories are subject to translational optimization in different habitats. Results In a systematic study of 388 microbial species, we have identified for each genome a specific subset of genes characterized by a marked CUB, which we named the effectome. As expected, gene products related to protein synthesis are abundant in both archaeal and bacterial effectomes. In addition, enzymes contributing to energy production and gene products involved in protein folding and stabilization are overrepresented. The comparison of genomes from eleven habitats shows that the environment has only a minor effect on the composition of the effectomes. As a paradigmatic example, we detailed the effectome content of 37 bacterial genomes that are most likely exposed to strongest selective pressure towards translational optimization. These effectomes accommodate a broad range of protein functions like enzymes related to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle, ATP synthases, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, chaperones, proteases that degrade misfolded proteins, protectants against oxidative damage, as well as cold shock and outer membrane proteins. Conclusions We made clear that effectomes consist of specific subsets of the proteome being involved in several cellular functions. As expected, some functions are related to cell growth and affect speed and quality of protein synthesis. Additionally, the effectomes contain enzymes of central metabolic pathways and cellular functions sustaining microbial life under stress situations. These

  7. Immunoglobulin γ light-chain-related genes 14.1 and 16.1 are expressed in pre-B cells and may encode the human immunoglobulin ω light-chain protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, G.F.; Evans, R.J.; Stafford-Hollis, J.M.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; McKearn, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Human pre-B cells, which produce immunoglobulin heavy chain but do not produce immunoglobulin light chain, are shown to contain a 1-kilobase transcript homologous to immunoglobulin λ light-chain genes. Detailed analysis of RNA and cDNA clones derived from these transcripts reveals that they originate from the distinct immunoglobulin λ-like genes 14.1/16.1. Sequence analysis of these clones reveals a long open reading frame, beginning with an ATG, capable of encoding a protein of 214 amino acids with an unprocessed molecular weight of 22,944. The C-terminal half of this predicted protein is highly homologous to immunoglobulin λ light-chain joining and constant region protein sequence, while the amino-terminal end does not share homology with variable regions. Antisera raised against a peptide whose sequence was predicted from the 14.1 cDNA sequence identifies a 22-kDa protein in human pre-B cells. Immunoprecipitation of immunoglobulin μ-chain from these pre-B cells with anti-immunoglobulin μ antibody coprecipitates a 22-kDa protein, which is a candidate for the human immunoglobulin ω light-chain protein and may be the protein product of the 14.1/16.1 genes

  8. Development of Lactococcus lactis encoding fluorescent proteins, GFP, mCherry and iRFP regulated by the nisin-controlled gene expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Jaramillo, E; Garza-Morales, R; Loera-Arias, M J; Saucedo-Cardenas, O; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R; McNally, L R; Gomez-Gutierrez, J G

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are useful reporter molecules for a variety of biological systems. We present an alternative strategy for cloning reporter genes that are regulated by the nisin-controlled gene expression (NICE) system. Lactoccocus lactis was genetically engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP), mCherry or near-infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP). The reporter gene sequences were optimized to be expressed by L. lactis using inducible promoter pNis within the pNZ8048 vector. Expression of constructions that carry mCherry or GFP was observed by fluorescence microscopy 2 h after induction with nisin. Expression of iRFP was evaluated at 700 nm using an infrared scanner; cultures induced for 6 h showed greater iRFP expression than non-induced cultures or those expressing GFP. We demonstrated that L. lactis can express efficiently GFP, mCherry and iRFP fluorescent proteins using an inducible expression system. These strains will be useful for live cell imaging studies in vitro or for imaging studies in vivo in the case of iRFP.

  9. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increases encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor gene expression, although not that of the protein itself, in the temporal cortex of rats,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Silva Julian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is mainly characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH during sleep, being associated with several complications. Exposure to IH is the most widely used animal model of sleep apnea, short-term IH exposure resulting in cognitive and neuronal impairment. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF is a hypoxia-sensitive factor acting as a neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and antiangiogenic agent. Our study analyzed performance on learning and cognitive tasks, as well as PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression in specific brain structures, in rats exposed to long-term IH. Methods: Male Wistar rats were exposed to IH (oxygen concentrations of 21-5% for 6 weeks-the chronic IH (CIH group-or normoxia for 6 weeks-the control group. After CIH exposure, a group of rats were allowed to recover under normoxic conditions for 2 weeks (the CIH+N group. All rats underwent the Morris water maze test for learning and memory, PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and temporal cortex being subsequently assessed. Results: The CIH and CIH+N groups showed increased PEDF gene expression in the temporal cortex, PEDF protein expression remaining unaltered. PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression remained unaltered in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Long-term exposure to IH did not affect cognitive function. Conclusions: Long-term exposure to IH selectively increases PEDF gene expression at the transcriptional level, although only in the temporal cortex. This increase is probably a protective mechanism against IH-induced injury.

  10. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increases encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor gene expression, although not that of the protein itself, in the temporal cortex of rats*,**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Guilherme Silva; de Oliveira, Renato Watanabe; Favaro, Vanessa Manchim; de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes; Perry, Juliana Cini; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is mainly characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, being associated with several complications. Exposure to IH is the most widely used animal model of sleep apnea, short-term IH exposure resulting in cognitive and neuronal impairment. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a hypoxia-sensitive factor acting as a neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and antiangiogenic agent. Our study analyzed performance on learning and cognitive tasks, as well as PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression in specific brain structures, in rats exposed to long-term IH. Methods: Male Wistar rats were exposed to IH (oxygen concentrations of 21-5%) for 6 weeks-the chronic IH (CIH) group-or normoxia for 6 weeks-the control group. After CIH exposure, a group of rats were allowed to recover under normoxic conditions for 2 weeks (the CIH+N group). All rats underwent the Morris water maze test for learning and memory, PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and temporal cortex being subsequently assessed. Results: The CIH and CIH+N groups showed increased PEDF gene expression in the temporal cortex, PEDF protein expression remaining unaltered. PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression remained unaltered in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Long-term exposure to IH did not affect cognitive function. Conclusions: Long-term exposure to IH selectively increases PEDF gene expression at the transcriptional level, although only in the temporal cortex. This increase is probably a protective mechanism against IH-induced injury. PMID:25750673

  11. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increases encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor gene expression, although not that of the protein itself, in the temporal cortex of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Guilherme Silva; Oliveira, Renato Watanabe de; Favaro, Vanessa Manchim; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes de; Perry, Juliana Cini; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is mainly characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, being associated with several complications. Exposure to IH is the most widely used animal model of sleep apnea, short-term IH exposure resulting in cognitive and neuronal impairment. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a hypoxia-sensitive factor acting as a neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and antiangiogenic agent. Our study analyzed performance on learning and cognitive tasks, as well as PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression in specific brain structures, in rats exposed to long-term IH. Male Wistar rats were exposed to IH (oxygen concentrations of 21-5%) for 6 weeks-the chronic IH (CIH) group-or normoxia for 6 weeks-the control group. After CIH exposure, a group of rats were allowed to recover under normoxic conditions for 2 weeks (the CIH+N group). All rats underwent the Morris water maze test for learning and memory, PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and temporal cortex being subsequently assessed. The CIH and CIH+N groups showed increased PEDF gene expression in the temporal cortex, PEDF protein expression remaining unaltered. PEDF gene expression and PEDF protein expression remained unaltered in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Long-term exposure to IH did not affect cognitive function. Long-term exposure to IH selectively increases PEDF gene expression at the transcriptional level, although only in the temporal cortex. This increase is probably a protective mechanism against IH-induced injury.

  12. The Arabidopsis gene YS1 encoding a DYW protein is required for editing of rpoB transcripts and the rapid development of chloroplasts during early growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenbin; Cheng, Yuxiang; Yap, Aaron; Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure; Delannoy, Etienne; Hammani, Kamel; Small, Ian; Huang, Jirong

    2009-04-01

    Virescence, a phenotype in which leaves green more slowly than usual, is recognized to play a role in protection from photo-oxidative damage before healthy chloroplasts are developed. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying virescence will provide insights into how the development of chloroplasts is controlled. In this study, we find that knockout alleles of Yellow Seedlings 1 (YS1) in Arabidopsis lead to a virescent phenotype, which disappears by 3 weeks after germination. The ys1 mutation resulted in marked decreases in photosynthetic capacity and photosynthetic pigment complexes, and disturbed ultrastructure of thylakoid membranes in 8-day-old seedlings. However, cotyledons of ys1 seedlings pre-treated in the dark for 5 days turn green almost as fast as the wild type in light, revealing that the developmental defects in ys1 are limited to the first few days after germination. Inspection of all known plastid RNA editing and splicing events revealed that YS1 is absolutely required for editing of site 25992 in rpoB transcripts encoding the beta subunit of the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP). YS1 is a nuclear-encoded chloroplast-localized pentatricopeptide repeat protein differing from previously described editing factors in that it has a C-terminal DYW motif. A defect in PEP activity is consistent with the changes in plastid transcript patterns observed in ys1 seedlings. We conclude that the activity of PEP containing RpoB translated from unedited transcripts is insufficient to support rapid chloroplast differentiation. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Homology, paralogy and function of DGF-1, a highly dispersed Trypanosoma cruzi specific gene family and its implications for information entropy of its encoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Silvia Y; da Silva, Claudio V; Mortara, Renato A; Burleigh, Barbara A; Briones, Marcelo R S

    2009-05-01

    Surface adhesion proteins are essential for Trypanosoma cruzi invasion of mammalian cells. Here we show that Dispersed Gene Family-1 (DGF-1) members, previously identified as nuclear repeated sequences present in several chromosomes and comprising the third largest T. cruzi specific gene family, have conserved adhesin motifs including four segments with significant similarity to human beta 7 integrin. Flow cytometry and biotinylation assays with anti-DGF-1 antibodies indicated that, as expected, DGF-1 members are expressed on the trypomastigote surface. The DGF-1 genealogy, inferred using T. cruzi Genome Project data and network phylogeny algorithms, suggests that this gene family is separated in at least three groups with differential distribution of functional domains. To identify which members of this gene family are expressed we used a combined approach of RT-PCR and codon usage profiles, showing that expressed members have a very biased codon usage favoring GC, whereas non-expressed members have a homogeneous distribution. Shannon information entropy was used to measure sequence variability and revealed four major high entropy segments in the extracellular domain of DGF-1 overlapping with important putative functional modules of the predicted proteins. Testing for natural selection, however, indicated that these high entropy segments were not under positive selection, which contradicts the notion that positive selection is the cause of high variability in specific domains of a protein relative to other less variable regions in the same molecule. We conjectured that members of the DGF-1 family might be associated with the ability of T. cruzi to bind extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin and laminin, and speculated on mechanisms that would be generating the localized diversity in these molecules in the absence of selection.

  14. IrML – a gene encoding a new member of the ML protein family from the hard tick, Ixodes ricinus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáčková, J.; Rudenko, Natalia; Golovchenko, Maryna; Havlíková, S.; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2010), s. 410-418 ISSN 1081-1710 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/06/1479; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * tick * ML-domain containing protein * in situ hybridization * gene expression * ML (MD-2-related lipid-recognition) domain Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.256, year: 2010

  15. Disruption of the gene encoding the latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein 4 (LTBP-4) causes abnormal lung development, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner-Kock, Anja; Thorey, Irmgard S.; Koli, Katri; Wempe, Frank; Otte, Jürgen; Bangsow, Thorsten; Kuhlmeier, Katharina; Kirchner, Thomas; Jin, Shenchu; Keski-Oja, Jorma; von Melchner, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) are multifunctional growth factors that are secreted as inactive (latent) precursors in large protein complexes. These complexes include the latency-associated propeptide (LAP) and a latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein (LTBP). Four isoforms of LTBPs (LTBP-1–LTBP-4) have been cloned and are believed to be structural components of connective tissue microfibrils and local regulators of TGF-β tissue deposition and signaling. By using a gene trap strategy that selects for integrations into genes induced transiently during early mouse development, we have disrupted the mouse homolog of the human LTBP-4 gene. Mice homozygous for the disrupted allele develop severe pulmonary emphysema, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer. These highly tissue-specific abnormalities are associated with profound defects in the elastic fiber structure and with a reduced deposition of TGF-β in the extracellular space. As a consequence, epithelial cells have reduced levels of phosphorylated Smad2 proteins, overexpress c-myc, and undergo uncontrolled proliferation. This phenotype supports the predicted dual role of LTBP-4 as a structural component of the extracellular matrix and as a local regulator of TGF-β tissue deposition and signaling. PMID:12208849

  16. Properties of virion transactivator proteins encoded by primate cytomegaloviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a betaherpesvirus that causes severe disease in situations where the immune system is immature or compromised. HCMV immediate early (IE gene expression is stimulated by the virion phosphoprotein pp71, encoded by open reading frame (ORF UL82, and this transactivation activity is important for the efficient initiation of viral replication. It is currently recognized that pp71 acts to overcome cellular intrinsic defences that otherwise block viral IE gene expression, and that interactions of pp71 with the cell proteins Daxx and ATRX are important for this function. A further property of pp71 is the ability to enable prolonged gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes. Non-human primate cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of pp71, but there is currently no published information that addresses their effects on gene expression and modes of action. Results The UL82 homolog encoded by simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV, strain Colburn, was identified and cloned. This ORF, named S82, was cloned into an HSV-1 vector, as were those from baboon, rhesus monkey and chimpanzee cytomegaloviruses. The use of an HSV-1 vector enabled expression of the UL82 homologs in a range of cell types, and permitted investigation of their abilities to direct prolonged gene expression from quiescent genomes. The results show that all UL82 homologs activate gene expression, and that neither host cell type nor promoter target sequence has major effects on these activities. Surprisingly, the UL82 proteins specified by non-human primate cytomegaloviruses, unlike pp71, did not direct long term expression from quiescent HSV-1 genomes. In addition, significant differences were observed in the intranuclear localization of the UL82 homologs, and in their effects on Daxx. Strikingly, S82 mediated the release of Daxx from nuclear domain 10 substructures much more rapidly than pp71 or the other proteins tested. All

  17. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development......The major surface antigen of Pneumocystis carinii, a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, is an abundant glycoprotein that functions in host-organism interactions. A monoclonal antibody to this antigen is protective in animals, and thus...... blot studies using chromosomal or restricted DNA, the major surface glycoproteins are the products of a multicopy family of genes. The predicted protein has an M(r) of approximately 123,000, is relatively rich in cysteine residues (5.5%) that are very strongly conserved, and contains a well conserved...

  18. Recombinant vectors construction for cellobiohydrolase encoding gene constitutive expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontina GURGU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellobiohydrolases (EC 3.2.1.91 are important exo enzymes involved in cellulose hydrolysis alongside endoglucanases (EC 3.2.1.4 and β-glucosidases (EC 3.2.1.21. Heterologous cellobiohydrolase gene expression under constitutive promoter control using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host system is of great importance for a successful SSF process. From this point of view, the main objective of the work was to use Yeplac181 expression vector as a recipient for cellobiohdrolase - cbhB encoding gene expression under the control of the actin promoter, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two hybridvectors, YEplac-Actp and YEplac-Actp-CbhB, were generated usingEscherichia coli XLI Blue for the cloning experiments. Constitutive cbhB gene expression was checked by proteine gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE after insertion of these constructs into Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  19. The milkweed pod1 Gene Encodes a KANADI Protein That Is Required for Abaxial/Adaxial Patterning in Maize Leaves[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Héctor; Johnston, Robyn; Gerhold, Abigail; Foster, Toshi; Hake, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Leaf primordia initiate from the shoot apical meristem with inherent polarity; the adaxial side faces the meristem, while the abaxial side faces away from the meristem. Adaxial/abaxial polarity is thought to be necessary for laminar growth of leaves, as mutants lacking either adaxial or abaxial cell types often develop radially symmetric lateral organs. The milkweed pod1 (mwp1) mutant of maize (Zea mays) has adaxialized sectors in the sheath, the proximal part of the leaf. Ectopic leaf flaps develop where adaxial and abaxial cell types juxtapose. Ectopic expression of the HD-ZIPIII gene rolled leaf1 (rld1) correlates with the adaxialized regions. Cloning of mwp1 showed that it encodes a KANADI transcription factor. Double mutants of mwp1-R with a microRNA-resistant allele of rld1, Rld1-N1990, show a synergistic phenotype with polarity defects in sheath and blade and a failure to differentiate vascular and photosynthetic cell types in the adaxialized sectors. The sectored phenotype and timing of the defect suggest that mwp1 is required late in leaf development to maintain abaxial cell fate. The phenotype of mwp1; Rld1 double mutants shows that both genes are also required early in leaf development to delineate leaf margins as well as to initiate vascular and photosynthetic tissues. PMID:18757553

  20. Combinational deletion of three membrane protein-encoding genes highly attenuates yersinia pestis while retaining immunogenicity in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Erova, Tatiana E; Popov, Vsevolod L; Baze, Wallace B; van Lier, Christina J; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Andersson, Jourdan A; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-04-01

    Previously, we showed that deletion of genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and MsbB attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 in mouse and rat models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. While Lpp activates Toll-like receptor 2, the MsbB acyltransferase modifies lipopolysaccharide. Here, we deleted the ail gene (encoding the attachment-invasion locus) from wild-type (WT) strain CO92 or its lpp single and Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutants. While the Δail single mutant was minimally attenuated compared to the WT bacterium in a mouse model of pneumonic plague, the Δlpp Δail double mutant and the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant were increasingly attenuated, with the latter being unable to kill mice at a 50% lethal dose (LD50) equivalent to 6,800 LD50s of WT CO92. The mutant-infected animals developed balanced TH1- and TH2-based immune responses based on antibody isotyping. The triple mutant was cleared from mouse organs rapidly, with concurrent decreases in the production of various cytokines and histopathological lesions. When surviving animals infected with increasing doses of the triple mutant were subsequently challenged on day 24 with the bioluminescent WT CO92 strain (20 to 28 LD50s), 40 to 70% of the mice survived, with efficient clearing of the invading pathogen, as visualized in real time by in vivo imaging. The rapid clearance of the triple mutant, compared to that of WT CO92, from animals was related to the decreased adherence and invasion of human-derived HeLa and A549 alveolar epithelial cells and to its inability to survive intracellularly in these cells as well as in MH-S murine alveolar and primary human macrophages. An early burst of cytokine production in macrophages elicited by the triple mutant compared to WT CO92 and the mutant's sensitivity to the bactericidal effect of human serum would further augment bacterial clearance. Together, deletion of the ail gene from the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant severely attenuated Y. pestis CO92 to evoke pneumonic plague in a

  1. Combinational Deletion of Three Membrane Protein-Encoding Genes Highly Attenuates Yersinia pestis while Retaining Immunogenicity in a Mouse Model of Pneumonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, Bethany L.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Baze, Wallace B.; van Lier, Christina J.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Motin, Vladimir L.; Chauhan, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that deletion of genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and MsbB attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 in mouse and rat models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. While Lpp activates Toll-like receptor 2, the MsbB acyltransferase modifies lipopolysaccharide. Here, we deleted the ail gene (encoding the attachment-invasion locus) from wild-type (WT) strain CO92 or its lpp single and Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutants. While the Δail single mutant was minimally attenuated compared to the WT bacterium in a mouse model of pneumonic plague, the Δlpp Δail double mutant and the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant were increasingly attenuated, with the latter being unable to kill mice at a 50% lethal dose (LD50) equivalent to 6,800 LD50s of WT CO92. The mutant-infected animals developed balanced TH1- and TH2-based immune responses based on antibody isotyping. The triple mutant was cleared from mouse organs rapidly, with concurrent decreases in the production of various cytokines and histopathological lesions. When surviving animals infected with increasing doses of the triple mutant were subsequently challenged on day 24 with the bioluminescent WT CO92 strain (20 to 28 LD50s), 40 to 70% of the mice survived, with efficient clearing of the invading pathogen, as visualized in real time by in vivo imaging. The rapid clearance of the triple mutant, compared to that of WT CO92, from animals was related to the decreased adherence and invasion of human-derived HeLa and A549 alveolar epithelial cells and to its inability to survive intracellularly in these cells as well as in MH-S murine alveolar and primary human macrophages. An early burst of cytokine production in macrophages elicited by the triple mutant compared to WT CO92 and the mutant's sensitivity to the bactericidal effect of human serum would further augment bacterial clearance. Together, deletion of the ail gene from the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant severely attenuated Y. pestis CO92 to evoke pneumonic plague in a

  2. Construction, expression and immunoassay detection of recombinant plasmid encoding fusion protein of Roman chicken complement C3d and Newcastle disease virus F gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D; Niu, Z-X

    2008-12-01

    The terminal degradation product (C3d) of mammalian complement component C3 plays an important role in modulation of the adaptive immune response through the interaction with complement receptor type 2 (CR2) on B cells. In this study, the gene fragment coding for the complement protein C3d (chC3d) from Roman chicken was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein for its application in the vaccine study of chicken, and for in vitro experiments. The chC3d fragment strengthened B-cell responses when complexed with antigen. Three potential vaccine construct units were engineered to contain two, four and six copies of chC3d coding gene linked to the F gene of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an economically important pathogen of chicken that is classified as a list A contagious disease of poultry by the Office International des Epizooties. The cloned chC3d protein and different repeats of C3d proteins in addition to the F gene of NDV were generated separately in Escherichia coli and chicken embryo fibroblast cells with the help of expression vectors. All recombinant proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Analysis of the immunogenicity of different repeats of C3d revealed that chC3d had an enhancing effect on the immunogenicity of antigens, and that six or more repeats of C3d may be necessary for efficient enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. To date, published research into the adjuvant activities of C3d has been limited to experiments in mice, rabbits and cattle. The adjuvant properties of C3d have not been assessed in poultry using homologous C3d in association with antigens relevant to the target species. The Roman chicken C3d fusion proteins described in this study is the first report and will provide a basis for immunization trials in chicken, studies of receptor binding and cell activation of chicken lymphocytes, and investigations of new types of vaccines, including recombinant vaccines and DNA vaccines for future use against other

  3. LETM1, a novel gene encoding a putative EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein, flanks the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) critical region and is deleted in most WHS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endele, S; Fuhry, M; Pak, S J; Zabel, B U; Winterpacht, A

    1999-09-01

    Deletions within human chromosome 4p16.3 cause Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), which is characterized by severe mental and developmental defects. It is thought that haploinsufficiency of more than one gene contributes to the complex phenotype. We have cloned and characterized a novel gene (LETM1) that is deleted in nearly all WHS patients. LETM1 encodes a putative member of the EF-hand family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins. The protein contains two EF-hands, a transmembrane domain, a leucine zipper, and several coiled-coil domains. On the basis of its possible Ca(2+)-binding property and involvement in Ca(2+) signaling and/or homeostasis, we propose that haploinsufficiency of LETM1 may contribute to the neuromuscular features of WHS patients. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. A new heterogeneous family of telomerically encoded Cryptosporidium proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Maha; Hunter, Paul R; McDonald, Vincent; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Tyler, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is predominantly caused by two closely related species of protozoan parasites the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and anthroponotic Cryptosporidium hominis which diverge phenotypically in respect to host range and virulence. Using comparative genomics we identified two genes displaying overt heterogeneity between species. Although initial work suggested both were species specific, Cops-1 for C. parvum and Chos-1 for C. hominis, subsequent study identified an abridged ortholog of Cops-1 in C. hominis. Cops-1 and Chos-1 showed limited, but significant, similarity to each other and share common features: (i) telomeric location: Cops-1 is the last gene on chromosome 2, whilst Chos-1 is the first gene on chromosome 5, (ii) encode circa 50-kDa secreted proteins with isoelectric points above 10, (iii) are serine rich, and (iv) contain internal nucleotide repeats. Importantly, Cops-1 sequence contains specific SNPs with good discriminatory power useful epidemiologically. C. parvum-infected patient sera recognized a 50-kDa protein in antigen preparations of C. parvum but not C. hominis, consistent with Cops-1 being antigenic for patients. Interestingly, anti-Cops-1 monoclonal antibody (9E1) stained oocyst content and sporozoite surface of C. parvum only. This study provides a new example of protozoan telomeres as rapidly evolving contingency loci encoding putative virulence factors. PMID:23467513

  5. A consistent and potentially exploitable response during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells from osteoarthritis patients to the protein encoded by the susceptibility gene GDF5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Madhushika; Tselepi, Maria; Bloxham, Robert; Plöger, Frank; Reynard, Louise N; Loughlin, John

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disease characterised by the focal loss of the protective cartilage layer at the ends of the bones. It is painful, disabling, multifactorial and polygenic. The growth differentiation factor 5 gene GDF5 was one of the first reported OA susceptibility signals that showed consistent association to OA, with the transcript single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs143383 demonstrating association in Asians and Europeans. The functional effect of the signal is reduced expression of the gene. The GDF5 protein is an extracellular matrix signalling molecule that is active during chondrogenesis and in mature chondrocytes. Due to the functional impact of the susceptibility, we previously assessed the effect of supplementing chondrocytes from OA patients with exogenous GDF5. Their response was highly discordant, precluding the application of GDF5 as a simple means of attenuating the genetic deficit. Since GDF5 is also active during development, we have now assessed the effect of exogenous GDF5 on bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are undergoing chondrogenesis during cartilage disc formation. MSCs from healthy donors and OA patients were studied and the effect of GDF5 was assessed by measuring the wet mass of the discs, by histological staining, and by monitoring the change in expression of anabolic, catabolic and hypertrophic protein-coding genes. The MSCs expressed the three principal GDF5 receptor genes and responded in a significantly anabolic manner (increase in wet mass, p = 0.0022; Bonferroni corrected p = 0.018) to a variant form of GDF5 that targets the most abundantly expressed receptor, BMPR-IA. GDF5 elicited significant (p < 0.05) changes in the expression of anabolic, catabolic and hypertrophic genes with several consistent effects in healthy donors and in OA patients. Our data implies that, unlike OA chondrocytes, OA MSCs do respond in a predictable, anabolic manner to GDF5, which could therefore provide a

  6. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  7. Organization of the gene encoding human lysosomal beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreau, H; Bonten, E; Zhou, X Y; D'Azzo, A

    1991-09-01

    Human beta-galactosidase precursor mRNA is alternatively spliced into an abundant 2.5-kb transcript and a minor 2.0-kb species. These templates direct the synthesis of the classic lysosomal beta-D-galactosidase enzyme and of a beta-galactosidase-related protein with no enzymatic activity. Mutations in the beta-galactosidase gene result in the lysosomal storage disorders GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome. To analyze the genetic lesions underlying these syndromes we have isolated the human beta-galactosidase gene and determined its organization. The gene spans greater than 62.5 kb and contains 16 exons. Promoter activity is located on a 236-bp Pst I fragment which works in a direction-independent manner. A second Pst I fragment of 851 bp located upstream from the first negatively regulates initiation of transcription. The promoter has characteristics of a housekeeping gene with GC-rich stretches and five potential SP1 transcription elements on two strands. We identified multiple cap sites of the mRNA, the major of which maps 53 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon. The portion of the human pre-mRNA undergoing alternative splicing is encoded by exons II-VII. Sequence analysis of equivalent mouse exons showed an identical genomic organization. However, translation of the corresponding differentially spliced murine transcript is interrupted in its reading frame. Thus, the mouse gene cannot encode a beta-galactosidase-related protein in a manner similar to the human counterpart. Differential expression of the murine beta-galactosidase transcript is observed in different mouse tissues.

  8. fexA, a Novel Staphylococcus lentus Gene Encoding Resistance to Florfenicol and Chloramphenicol

    OpenAIRE

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Schwarz, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The Staphylococcus lentus plasmid pSCFS2 carries a novel florfenicol-chloramphenicol resistance gene, designated fexA, encoding a protein of 475 amino acids with 14 transmembrane domains. The FexA protein differs from all previously known proteins involved in the efflux of chloramphenicol and florfenicol. Induction of fexA expression by chloramphenicol and florfenicol occurs via translational attenuation.

  9. Genetic background has a major effect on the penetrance and severity of craniofacial defects in mice heterozygous for the gene encoding the nucleolar protein Treacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael James

    2004-04-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a craniofacial disorder that results from mutations in TCOF1, which encodes the nucleolar protein Treacle. The severity of the clinical features exhibits wide variation and includes hypoplasia of the mandible and maxilla, abnormalities of the external ears and middle ear ossicles, and cleft palate. To determine the in vivo function of Treacle, we previously generated Tcof1 heterozygous mice on a mixed C57BL/6 and 129 background. These mice exhibited a lethal phenotype, which included abnormal development of the maxilla, absence of the eyes and nasal passages, and neural tube defects. Here, we show that placing the mutation onto different genetic backgrounds has a major effect on the penetrance and severity of the craniofacial and other defects. The offspring exhibit markedly variable strain-dependent phenotypes that range from extremely severe and lethal in a mixed CBA/Ca and 129 background, to apparently normal and viable in a mixed BALB/c and 129 background. In the former case, in addition to a profoundly severe craniofacial phenotype, CBA-derived heterozygous mice also exhibited delayed ossification of the long bones, rib fusions, and digit anomalies. The results of our studies indicate that factors in the different genetic backgrounds contribute extensively to the Tcof1 phenotype. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Rare mutations and potentially damaging missense variants in genes encoding fibrillar collagens and proteins involved in their production are candidates for risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavi P Modi

    Full Text Available Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM is the leading identifiable cause of preterm birth with ~ 40% of preterm births being associated with PPROM and occurs in 1% - 2% of all pregnancies. We hypothesized that multiple rare variants in fetal genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis would associate with PPROM, based on the assumption that impaired elaboration of matrix proteins would reduce fetal membrane tensile strength, predisposing to unscheduled rupture. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES on neonatal DNA derived from pregnancies complicated by PPROM (49 cases and healthy term deliveries (20 controls to identify candidate mutations/variants. Genotyping for selected variants from the WES study was carried out on an additional 188 PPROM cases and 175 controls. All mothers were self-reported African Americans, and a panel of ancestry informative markers was used to control for genetic ancestry in all genetic association tests. In support of the primary hypothesis, a statistically significant genetic burden (all samples combined, SKAT-O p-value = 0.0225 of damaging/potentially damaging rare variants was identified in the genes of interest-fibrillar collagen genes, which contribute to fetal membrane strength and integrity. These findings suggest that the fetal contribution to PPROM is polygenic, and driven by an increased burden of rare variants that may also contribute to the disparities in rates of preterm birth among African Americans.

  11. Rare mutations and potentially damaging missense variants in genes encoding fibrillar collagens and proteins involved in their production are candidates for risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Bhavi P; Teves, Maria E; Pearson, Laurel N; Parikh, Hardik I; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Sheth, Nihar U; York, Timothy P; Romero, Roberto; Strauss, Jerome F

    2017-01-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is the leading identifiable cause of preterm birth with ~ 40% of preterm births being associated with PPROM and occurs in 1% - 2% of all pregnancies. We hypothesized that multiple rare variants in fetal genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis would associate with PPROM, based on the assumption that impaired elaboration of matrix proteins would reduce fetal membrane tensile strength, predisposing to unscheduled rupture. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on neonatal DNA derived from pregnancies complicated by PPROM (49 cases) and healthy term deliveries (20 controls) to identify candidate mutations/variants. Genotyping for selected variants from the WES study was carried out on an additional 188 PPROM cases and 175 controls. All mothers were self-reported African Americans, and a panel of ancestry informative markers was used to control for genetic ancestry in all genetic association tests. In support of the primary hypothesis, a statistically significant genetic burden (all samples combined, SKAT-O p-value = 0.0225) of damaging/potentially damaging rare variants was identified in the genes of interest-fibrillar collagen genes, which contribute to fetal membrane strength and integrity. These findings suggest that the fetal contribution to PPROM is polygenic, and driven by an increased burden of rare variants that may also contribute to the disparities in rates of preterm birth among African Americans.

  12. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed Ramírez-Sánchez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa, average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81 aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230 nt. Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400 nt. Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520 aa, whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240 aa. Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes.

  13. Ectopic overexpression of castor bean LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) in Arabidopsis triggers the expression of genes that encode regulators of seed maturation and oil body proteins in vegetative tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Kyeong-Ryeol; Kim, Eun Ha; Lee, Sang-Min; Roh, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jong-Bum

    2013-01-01

    The LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) gene plays critically important regulatory roles during both early and late embryonic development. Here, we report the identification of the LEC2 gene from the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis), and characterize the effects of its overexpression on gene regulation and lipid metabolism in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. LEC2 exists as a single-copy gene in castor bean, is expressed predominantly in embryos, and encodes a protein with a conserved B3 domain, but different N- and C-terminal domains to those found in LEC2 from Arabidopsis. Ectopic overexpression of LEC2 from castor bean under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in Arabidopsis plants induces the accumulation of transcripts that encodes five major transcription factors (the LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1), LEAFY COTYLEDON1-LIKE (L1L), FUSCA3 (FUS3), and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3) transcripts for seed maturation, and WRINKELED1 (WRI1) transcripts for fatty acid biosynthesis), as well as OLEOSIN transcripts for the formation of oil bodies in vegetative tissues. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants that express the LEC2 gene from castor bean show a range of dose-dependent morphological phenotypes and effects on the expression of LEC2-regulated genes during seedling establishment and vegetative growth. Expression of castor bean LEC2 in Arabidopsis increased the expression of fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) and induced the accumulation of triacylglycerols, especially those containing the seed-specific fatty acid, eicosenoic acid (20:1(Δ11)), in vegetative tissues.

  14. Ectopic overexpression of castor bean LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) in Arabidopsis triggers the expression of genes that encode regulators of seed maturation and oil body proteins in vegetative tissues☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Kyeong-Ryeol; Kim, Eun Ha; Lee, Sang-Min; Roh, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jong-Bum

    2013-01-01

    The LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) gene plays critically important regulatory roles during both early and late embryonic development. Here, we report the identification of the LEC2 gene from the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis), and characterize the effects of its overexpression on gene regulation and lipid metabolism in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. LEC2 exists as a single-copy gene in castor bean, is expressed predominantly in embryos, and encodes a protein with a conserved B3 domain, but different N- and C-terminal domains to those found in LEC2 from Arabidopsis. Ectopic overexpression of LEC2 from castor bean under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in Arabidopsis plants induces the accumulation of transcripts that encodes five major transcription factors (the LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1), LEAFY COTYLEDON1-LIKE (L1L), FUSCA3 (FUS3), and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3) transcripts for seed maturation, and WRINKELED1 (WRI1) transcripts for fatty acid biosynthesis), as well as OLEOSIN transcripts for the formation of oil bodies in vegetative tissues. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants that express the LEC2 gene from castor bean show a range of dose-dependent morphological phenotypes and effects on the expression of LEC2-regulated genes during seedling establishment and vegetative growth. Expression of castor bean LEC2 in Arabidopsis increased the expression of fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) and induced the accumulation of triacylglycerols, especially those containing the seed-specific fatty acid, eicosenoic acid (20:1Δ11), in vegetative tissues. PMID:24363987

  15. Tlys, a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and Tind) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA......-binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and Tind transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding...... sites of F55 are included within a tandem-repeated sequence overlapping the transcription start sites and/or the B recognition element of the pertinent genes. The strongest binding was observed with the promoters of T5 and T6, and an apparent cooperativity in binding was observed with the Tind promoter...

  16. GsCML27, a Gene Encoding a Calcium-Binding Ef-Hand Protein from Glycine soja, Plays Differential Roles in Plant Responses to Bicarbonate, Salt and Osmotic Stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chen

    Full Text Available Calcium, as the most widely accepted messenger, plays an important role in plant stress responses through calcium-dependent signaling pathways. The calmodulin-like family genes (CMLs encode Ca2+ sensors and function in signaling transduction in response to environmental stimuli. However, until now, the function of plant CML proteins, especially soybean CMLs, is largely unknown. Here, we isolated a Glycine soja CML protein GsCML27, with four conserved EF-hands domains, and identified it as a calcium-binding protein through far-UV CD spectroscopy. We further found that expression of GsCML27 was induced by bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GsCML27 in Arabidopsis enhanced plant tolerance to bicarbonate stress, but decreased the salt and osmotic tolerance during the seed germination and early growth stages. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of GsCML27 decreases salt tolerance through modifying both the cellular ionic (Na+, K+ content and the osmotic stress regulation. GsCML27 ectopic expression also decreased the expression levels of osmotic stress-responsive genes. Moreover, we also showed that GsCML27 localized in the whole cell, including cytoplasm, plasma membrane and nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts and onion epidermal cells, and displayed high expression in roots and embryos. Together, these data present evidence that GsCML27 as a Ca2+-binding EF-hand protein plays a role in plant responses to bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses.

  17. GsCML27, a Gene Encoding a Calcium-Binding Ef-Hand Protein from Glycine soja, Plays Differential Roles in Plant Responses to Bicarbonate, Salt and Osmotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Dan; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lei; Liu, Ailin; Jia, Bowei; Xiao, Jialei; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, as the most widely accepted messenger, plays an important role in plant stress responses through calcium-dependent signaling pathways. The calmodulin-like family genes (CMLs) encode Ca2+ sensors and function in signaling transduction in response to environmental stimuli. However, until now, the function of plant CML proteins, especially soybean CMLs, is largely unknown. Here, we isolated a Glycine soja CML protein GsCML27, with four conserved EF-hands domains, and identified it as a calcium-binding protein through far-UV CD spectroscopy. We further found that expression of GsCML27 was induced by bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GsCML27 in Arabidopsis enhanced plant tolerance to bicarbonate stress, but decreased the salt and osmotic tolerance during the seed germination and early growth stages. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of GsCML27 decreases salt tolerance through modifying both the cellular ionic (Na+, K+) content and the osmotic stress regulation. GsCML27 ectopic expression also decreased the expression levels of osmotic stress-responsive genes. Moreover, we also showed that GsCML27 localized in the whole cell, including cytoplasm, plasma membrane and nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts and onion epidermal cells, and displayed high expression in roots and embryos. Together, these data present evidence that GsCML27 as a Ca2+-binding EF-hand protein plays a role in plant responses to bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses.

  18. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding the major surface protein 5 (MSP5) of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and potential application for serodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, A Rick; Barbet, Anthony F; Sorenson, Heather L; Strik, Nicole I; Wamsley, Heather L; Wong, Susan J; Chandrashaker, Ramaswamy; Gaschen, Frédéric P; Luckshander, Nicole; Bjöersdorff, Annelli

    2006-12-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum (formerly known as the human granulocytic ehrlichia, Ehrlichia equi and Ehrlichia phagocytophila) is an obligate intracellular organism causing clinical disease in humans and various species of domestic animals. The objectives of this investigation were to sequence and clone the major surface protein 5 (MSP5) of A phagocytophilum and to evaluate the suitability of this antigen in the serologic diagnosis of anaplasmosis in humans and dogs. The msp5 gene of A phagocytophilum was sequenced, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The predicted amino acid sequence homology of the various MSP5/major antigenic protein 2 orthologs was compared among various Anaplasma and Ehrlichia species. Recombinant MSP5 of A phagocytophilum was used in an ELISA to detect antibodies in serum samples from humans and dogs infected with the organism. Serum samples from 104 individuals previously diagnosed with A phagocytophilum infection, as well as samples from clinically healthy humans, were tested. In addition, multiple samples from 4 dogs experimentally infected with 2 different geographic isolates of A phagocytophilum and 5 dogs naturally infected with a Swiss isolate were tested using ELISA. Using this group of immunofluorescent antibody test-positive and immunofluorescent antibody test-negative samples, we found the overall agreement between assays to be >90%. These results indicate that recombinant MSP5 has potential for use as a diagnostic test antigen to detect infection with A phagocytophilum in both dogs and humans. However, sequence similarities among orthologs of MSP5 in related species of anaplasma and ehrlichia suggest that cross-reactivity among these pathogens is likely if the entire peptide is used as a test antigen.

  19. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RAT GENE ENCODING GLUTAMATE-DEHYDROGENASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAS, AT; ARNBERG, AC; MALINGRE, H; MOERER, P; CHARLES, R; MOORMAN, AFM; LAMERS, WH

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) varies strongly between different organs and between different regions within organs. To permit further studies on the regulation of GDH expression, we isolated and characterized the rat gene encoding the GDH protein. This gene contains 13 exons and

  20. IQCJ-SCHIP1, a novel fusion transcript encoding a calmodulin-binding IQ motif protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwasnicka-Crawford, Dorota A.; Carson, Andrew R.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of transcripts that span two adjacent, independent genes is considered rare in the human genome. This study characterizes a novel human fusion gene named IQCJ-SCHIP1. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is the longest isoform of a complex transcriptional unit that bridges two separate genes that encode distinct proteins, IQCJ, a novel IQ motif containing protein and SCHIP1, a schwannomin interacting protein that has been previously shown to interact with the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) protein. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is located on the chromosome 3q25 and comprises a 1692-bp transcript encompassing 11 exons spanning 828 kb of the genomic DNA. We show that IQCJ-SCHIP1 mRNA is highly expressed in the brain. Protein encoded by the IQCJ-SCHIP1 gene was localized to cytoplasm and actin-rich regions and in differentiated PC12 cells was also seen in neurite extensions

  1. The Hansenula polymorpha per6 mutant is affected in two adjacent genes which encode dihydroxyacetone kinase and a novel protein, Pak1p, involved in peroxisome integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Heide, Meis van der; Baerends, Richard J.S.; Rechinger, Karl-Björn; Nicolay, Klaas; Kiel, Jan A.K.W.; Veenhuis, Marten

    The Hansenula polymorpha per6-210 mutant is impaired in respect of growth on methanol (Mut–) and is characterized by aberrant peroxisome formation. The functionally complementing DNA fragment contains two open reading frames. The first encodes dihydroxyacetone kinase (DAK), a cytosolic enzyme

  2. Sequence and functional conservation of the intergenic region between the head-to-head genes encoding the small heat shock proteins alphaB-crystallin and HspB2 in the mammalian lineage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doerwald, L.; Rheede, T. van; Dirks, R.P.H.; Madsen, O.; Rexwinkel, R; Genesen, S.T. van; Martens, G.J.M.; Jong, W.W.W. de; Lubsen, N.H.

    2004-01-01

    An unexpected feature of the large mammalian genome is the frequent occurrence of closely linked head-to-head gene pairs. Close apposition of such gene pairs has been suggested to be due to sharing of regulatory elements. We show here that the head-to-head gene pair encoding two small heat shock

  3. The effects of gamma irradiation on growth and expression of genes encoding DNA repair-related proteins in Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra var. italica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Tokihiko; Yoshida, Kazumasa

    2012-07-01

    In this study, to elucidate the mechanisms of adaptation and tolerance to ionizing radiation in woody plants, we investigated the various biological effects of γ-rays on the Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra L. var. italica Du Roi). We detected abnormal leaf shape and color, fusion, distorted venation, shortened internode, fasciation and increased axillary shoots in γ-irradiated poplar plants. Acute γ-irradiation with a dose of 100Gy greatly reduced the height, stem diameter and biomass of poplar plantlets. After receiving doses of 200 and 300Gy, all the plantlets stopped growing, and then most of them withered after 4-10 weeks of γ-irradiation. Comet assays showed that nuclear DNA in suspension-cultured poplar cells had been damaged by γ-rays. To determine whether DNA repair-related proteins are involved in the response to γ-rays in Lombardy poplars, we cloned the PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4, PnPCNA and PnOGG1 cDNAs and investigated their mRNA expression. The PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4 and PnPCNA mRNAs were increased by γ-rays, but the PnOGG1 mRNA was decreased. Moreover, the expression of PnLIG4, PnKU70 and PnRAD51 was also up-regulated by Zeocin known as a DNA cleavage agent. These observations suggest that the morphogenesis, growth and protective gene expression in Lombardy poplars are severely affected by the DNA damage and unknown cellular events caused by γ-irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of GhAPm, a gene encoding the μ subunit of the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex that is associated with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Dawei; Guo, Sandui

    2011-06-01

    The clathrin-associated adaptor protein (AP) complexes are the primary clathrin adaptors that contribute to the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The GhAPm gene (GenBank accession number: GU359054), which encodes the medium subunit of the AP complexes, was cloned from cotton by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). The full-length cDNA was 1590 bp in size and encoded an open reading frame (ORF) of 416 amino acids with a molecular weight of 46 kDa. The GhAPm protein shared 81-85% identity at the amino acid level with the AP complex μ subunits isolated from Vitis vinifera, Glycine max, Populus trichocarpa, Ricinus communis and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. The corresponding genomic DNA, containing eight exons and seven introns, was isolated and analyzed. Also, a 5'-flanking region was analyzed, and a group of putative cis-acting elements were identified. DNA gel blot analysis showed that there is only one GhAPm gene in the cotton genome. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhAPm is expressed in the root, stem, leaf, petal, ovule, and fiber. However, the interesting finding is that GhAPm expression level was shown to increase steadily as the cotton fiber develops. In 30 DPA fibers, expression increases sharply and arrives at a peak then the expression levels decrease rapidly. Based on these data, we propose that GhAPm has a critical role in cotton membrane trafficking and fiber development.

  6. Data on the presence or absence of genes encoding essential proteins for ochratoxin and fumonisin biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus welwitschiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pelisson Massi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the multiplex PCR data for the presence/absence of genes involved in OTA and FB2 biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger/Aspergillus welwitschiae strains isolated from different food substrates in Brazil. Among the 175 strains analyzed, four mPCR profiles were found: Profile 1 (17% highlights strains harboring in their genome the pks, radH and the fum8 genes. Profile 2 (3.5% highlights strains harboring genes involved in OTA biosynthesis i.e. radH and pks. Profile 3 (51.5% highlights strains harboring the fum8 gene. Profile 4 (28% highlights strains not carrying the genes studied herein. This research content is supplemental to our original research article, “Prospecting for the incidence of genes involved in ochratoxin and fumonisin biosynthesis in Brazilian strains of A. niger and A. welwitschiae” [1].

  7. Polymorphisms in the genes encoding chemokine receptor 5, interleukin-10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 contribute to cytomegalovirus reactivation and disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Juergen; Steffens, Michael; Arlt, Eva-Maria; Toliat, Mohammad-Reza; Mezger, Markus; Suk, Anita; Wienker, Thomas F; Hebart, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Boeckh, Michael; Ljungman, Per; Trenschel, Rudolf; Einsele, Hermann

    2006-05-01

    We analyzed 90 polymorphisms in 17 genes related to immune function for association with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) reactivation and disease in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We found relevant markers (i) in CCR5 and IL-10 genes conferring a higher risk for the development of HCMV disease and (ii) in the MCP1 gene associated with HCMV reactivation. Testing of high-risk patients for the presence of these single-nucleotide polymorphisms might be useful for individualizing antiviral prophylaxis.

  8. Characterization of a Soil Metagenome-Derived Gene Encoding Wax Ester Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Ji-Hye; Chung, Eunsook; So, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-02-01

    A soil metagenome contains the genomes of all microbes included in a soil sample, including those that cannot be cultured. In this study, soil metagenome libraries were searched for microbial genes exhibiting lipolytic activity and those involved in potential lipid metabolism that could yield valuable products in microorganisms. One of the subclones derived from the original fosmid clone, pELP120, was selected for further analysis. A subclone spanning a 3.3 kb DNA fragment was found to encode for lipase/esterase and contained an additional partial open reading frame encoding a wax ester synthase (WES) motif. Consequently, both pELP120 and the full length of the gene potentially encoding WES were sequenced. To determine if the wes gene encoded a functioning WES protein that produced wax esters, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was conducted using ethyl acetate extract from an Escherichia coli strain that expressed the wes gene and was grown with hexadecanol. The ethyl acetate extract from this E. coli strain did indeed produce wax ester compounds of various carbon-chain lengths. DNA sequence analysis of the full-length gene revealed that the gene cluster may be derived from a member of Proteobacteria, whereas the clone does not contain any clear phylogenetic markers. These results suggest that the wes gene discovered in this study encodes a functional protein in E. coli and produces wax esters through a heterologous expression system.

  9. Overexpression of DR-nm23, a protein encoded by a member of the nm23 gene family, inhibits granulocyte differentiation and induces apoptosis in 32Dc13 myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, D; Martinez, R; Melotti, P; Casella, I; Peschle, C; Cucco, C; Spampinato, G; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Calabretta, B

    1995-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia evolves in two clinically distinct stages: a chronic and a blast crisis phase. The molecular changes associated with chronic phase to blast crisis transition are largely unknown. We have identified a cDNA clone, DR-nm23, differentially expressed in a blast-crisis cDNA library, which has approximately 70% sequence similarity to the putative metastatic suppressor genes, nm23-H1 and nm23-H2. The deduced amino acid sequence similarity to the proteins encoded by these two latter genes is approximately 65% and includes domains and amino acid residues (the leucine zipper-like and the RGD domain, a serine and a histidine residue in the NH2- and in the COOH-terminal portion of the protein, respectively) postulated to be important for nm23 function. DR-nm23 mRNA is preferentially expressed at early stages of myeloid differentiation of highly purified CD34+ cells. Its constitutive expression in the myeloid precursor 32Dc13 cell line, which is growth-factor dependent for both proliferation and differentiation, results in inhibition of granulocytic differentiation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and causes apoptotic cell death. These results are consistent with a role for DR-nm23 in normal hematopoiesis and raise the possibility that its overexpression contributes to differentiation arrest, a feature of blastic transformation in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7638209

  10. Distribution of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among nasal-carriage and invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabat, Artur; Melles, Damian C; Martirosian, Gayane; Grundmann, Hajo; Belkum, Alex van; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2006-01-01

    The sdr locus was found in all 497 investigated Staphylococcus aureus strains, although in 29 strains it contained only the sdrC gene (sdrD negative, sdrE negative). The sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile was exclusive to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains (Fisher's

  11. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene.

  12. DNA binding sites recognised in vitro by a knotted class 1 homeodomain protein encoded by the hooded gene, k, in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krusell, L; Rasmussen, I; Gausing, K

    1997-01-01

    of knotted1 from maize was isolated from barley seedlings and expressed as a maltose binding protein fusion in E. coli. The purified HvH21-fusion protein selected DNA fragments with 1-3 copies of the sequence TGAC. Gel shift experiments showed that the TGAC element was required for binding and the results...

  13. RNAi-based silencing of genes encoding the vacuolar- ATPase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNAi-based silencing of genes encoding the vacuolar- ATPase subunits a and c in pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella). Ahmed M. A. Mohammed. Abstract. RNA interference is a post- transcriptional gene regulation mechanism that is predominantly found in eukaryotic organisms. RNAi demonstrated a successful ...

  14. Distribution of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among nasal-carriage and invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Sabat, Artur; Melles, Damian C; Martirosian, Gayane; Grundmann, Hajo; Belkum, Alex van; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2006-01-01

    The sdr locus was found in all 497 investigated Staphylococcus aureus strains, although in 29 strains it contained only the sdrC gene (sdrD negative, sdrE negative). The sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile was exclusive to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains (Fisher's exact test; P = 0.0005) and was not found in the strains collected from bone infections (P = 0.0019). We also found a strong association between the presence of the sdrD gene and methicillin-resis...

  15. Distribution of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among nasal-carriage and invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Artur; Melles, Damian C; Martirosian, Gayane; Grundmann, Hajo; van Belkum, Alex; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2006-03-01

    The sdr locus was found in all 497 investigated Staphylococcus aureus strains, although in 29 strains it contained only the sdrC gene (sdrD negative, sdrE negative). The sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile was exclusive to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains (Fisher's exact test; P = 0.0005) and was not found in the strains collected from bone infections (P = 0.0019). We also found a strong association between the presence of the sdrD gene and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains (P < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that MSSA strains with the newly uncovered sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile have a substantially decreased potential to establish bone infection.

  16. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Karlyshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection.

  17. fexA, a Novel Staphylococcus lentus Gene Encoding Resistance to Florfenicol and Chloramphenicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Schwarz, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The Staphylococcus lentus plasmid pSCFS2 carries a novel florfenicol-chloramphenicol resistance gene, designated fexA, encoding a protein of 475 amino acids with 14 transmembrane domains. The FexA protein differs from all previously known proteins involved in the efflux of chloramphenicol and florfenicol. Induction of fexA expression by chloramphenicol and florfenicol occurs via translational attenuation.   PMID:14742219

  18. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is only...... expressed in M cells and the gene product is responsible for the secretion of the mating pheromone. M-factor, a nonapeptide that is S-farnesylated and carboxy-methylated on its C-terminal cysteine residue. The predicted Mam1 protein is highly homologous to mammalian multiple drug-resistance proteins...

  19. The Drosophila melanogaster DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for functionally non-redundant protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Eike; Wecklein, Heike; Stark, Felix; Jauch, Mandy; Raabe, Thomas

    2006-06-07

    Genes encoding for the two evolutionary highly conserved subunits of a heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme are present in all examined eukaryotic genomes. Depending on the organism, multiple transcription units encoding for a catalytically active CK2alpha subunit and/or a regulatory CK2beta subunit may exist. The phosphotransferase activity of members of the protein kinase CK2alpha family is thought to be independent of second messengers but is modulated by interaction with CK2beta-like proteins. In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, one gene encoding for a CK2alpha subunit and three genes encoding for CK2beta-like proteins are present. The X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for several CK2beta protein isoforms due to alternative splicing of its primary transcript. We addressed the question whether CK2beta-like proteins are redundant in function. Our in vivo experiments show that variations of the very C-terminal tail of CK2beta isoforms encoded by the X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit influence their functional properties. In addition, we find that CK2beta-like proteins encoded by the autosomal D. melanogaster genes CK2betates and CK2beta' cannot fully substitute for a loss of CK2beta isoforms encoded by DmCK2beta.

  20. Expression in bacteria of the gene encoding the gp43 antigen of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: Immunological reactivity of the recombinant fusion proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Diniz, Susana N.; Carvalho, Katia C.; Cisalpino, Patricia S.; Silveira, Jose F.; Travassos, Luiz Rodolpho [UNIFESP; Puccia, Rosana [UNIFESP

    2002-01-01

    gp43 is the major diagnostic antigen of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) in humans. In the present study, cDNA of the gp43 gene (PbGP43) was obtained by reverse transcriptase PCR, inserted into a pGEX vector in frame with the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene, and expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. Immunoblotting showed that all sera from patients with chronic pulmonary and acute lymphatic forms of PCM reacted with the recombinant fus...

  1. Construction and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding fusion protein of murine complement C3d-p28 and GP5 gene of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deqing; Xia, Qingxiang; Wu, Jiaqiang; Liu, Dong; Wang, Xiaolong; Niu, Zhongxiang

    2011-01-17

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has recently caused catastrophic losses in swine industry worldwide. The commercial vaccines only provide a limited protection against PRRSV infection. At present, DNA vaccine is the focus on the new vaccines. The gene fragment (p28) coding for the molecular adjuvants complement protein C3d (mC3d) from BALB/c mouse was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein for its application in the vaccine study of mice. Three potential vaccines construct units were engineered to contain two, four and six copies of mC3d-p28 coding gene linked to the GP5 gene of PRRSV and one vaccine expressing GP5 alone (pcDNA3.1-GP5) was constructed. Subsequently, the vaccines' abilities to elicit the humoral and cellular immune responses were investigated in mice. These results showed that significantly enhanced GP5-specific ELISA antibody, GP5-specific neutralizing antibody, IFN-γ level, and IL-4 level, could be induced in mice immunized with DNA construct units encoding the pcDNA3.1-C3d-p28.n-GP5 than those received DNA vaccine expressing GP5 alone (pcDNA3.1-GP5). Analysis of the immunogenicity of different repeats of mC3d-p28 revealed that mC3d-p28 had an enhancing effect on the immunogenicity of antigens, and that six or more repeats of mC3d-p28 may be necessary for efficient enhancement of antigen specific immune responses. This approach may provide a new strategy for the development of efficient vaccines against the PRRSV for pigs in the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tetrahymena gene encodes a protein that is homologous with the liver-specific F-antigen and associated with membranes of the Golgi apparatus and transport vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummel, R; Nørgaard, P; Andreasen, P H

    1992-01-01

    of the Golgi apparatus and transport vesicles pointing to a role of TF-ag in membrane trafficking. Transcription of the TF-ag gene, as determined by run-on analyses, was only detectable in growing cells, and following transfer to starvation condition pre-existing TF-ag mRNA was rapidly degraded. The abundance...

  3. Bioinformatics analysis and detection of gelatinase encoded gene in Lysinibacillussphaericus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Shahimi, Safiyyah; Khalid, Rozida Mohd.; Ayob, Mohd. Khan; Bakar, Mohd. Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis toward genome sequence of Lysinibacillussphaericus (L. sphaericus) to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. L. sphaericus was isolated from soil and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and bovine gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species of meat, respectively. The main focus of this research is to identify the gelatinase encoded gene within the bacteria of L. Sphaericus using bioinformatics analysis of partially sequence genome. From the research study, three candidate gene were identified which was, gelatinase candidate gene 1 (P1), NODE_71_length_93919_cov_158.931839_21 which containing 1563 base pair (bp) in size with 520 amino acids sequence; Secondly, gelatinase candidate gene 2 (P2), NODE_23_length_52851_cov_190.061386_17 which containing 1776 bp in size with 591 amino acids sequence; and Thirdly, gelatinase candidate gene 3 (P3), NODE_106_length_32943_cov_169.147919_8 containing 1701 bp in size with 566 amino acids sequence. Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed and namely as, F1, R1, F2, R2, F3 and R3 were targeted short sequences of cDNA by PCR. The amplicons were reliably results in 1563 bp in size for candidate gene P1 and 1701 bp in size for candidate gene P3. Therefore, the results of bioinformatics analysis of L. Sphaericus resulting in gene encoded gelatinase were identified.

  4. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostlund, Cecilia [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Guan, Tinglu [Department of Cell Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Figlewicz, Denise A. [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hays, Arthur P. [Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Worman, Howard J. [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Gerace, Larry [Department of Cell Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Schirmer, Eric C., E-mail: e.schirmer@ed.ac.uk [Department of Cell Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JR (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  5. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostlund, Cecilia; Guan, Tinglu; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Hays, Arthur P.; Worman, Howard J.; Gerace, Larry; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  6. SNARE-encoding genes VdSec22 and VdSso1 mediate protein secretion required for full virulence in Verticillium dahliae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteins that mediate cellular and subcellular membrane fusion are key factors in vesicular trafficking in all eukaryotic cells, including the secretion and transport of plant pathogen virulence factors. In this study, we identified vesicle fusion components that included 22 soluble N-ethylmaleimide...

  7. The glyoxysomal and plastid molecular chaperones (70-kDa heat shock protein) of watermelon cotyledons are encoded by a single gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimmer, Bernhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Klei, Ida van der; Veenhuis, Marten; Gietl, Christine

    1997-01-01

    The monoclonal a-70-kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) antibody recognizes in crude extracts from watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) cotyledons with molecular masses of 70 and 72 KDa, Immunocytochemistry on watermelon cotyledon tissue and on isolated glyoxysomes identified hsp70s in the matrix of

  8. The Mycoplasma pneumoniae MPN229 gene encodes a protein that selectively binds single-stranded DNA and stimulates Recombinase A-mediated DNA strand exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Sluijter (Marcel); T.A. Hoogenboezem (Thomas); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); C. Vink (Cornelis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Mycoplasma pneumoniae has previously been characterized as a micro-organism that is genetically highly stable. In spite of this genetic stability, homologous DNA recombination has been hypothesized to lie at the basis of antigenic variation of the major surface protein, P1,

  9. Genes encoding novel lipid transporters and their use to increase oil production in vegetative tissues of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changcheng; Fan, Jilian; Yan, Chengshi; Shanklin, John

    2017-12-26

    The present invention discloses a novel gene encoding a transporter protein trigalactosyldiacylglycerol-5 (TGD5), mutations thereof and their use to enhance TAG production and retention in plant vegetative tissue.

  10. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H, H', and F are members of a ubiquitously expressed subfamily of related but distinct proteins encoded by genes mapping to different chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Rasmussen, H H; Vorum, H

    1995-01-01

    and keratinocytes. In normal human keratinocytes, the expression level of H was unaffected by treatment with several substances tested including two second messengers and seven cytokines. Likewise the expression level of F was independent of these substances, although it was strikingly down-regulated by long term......Molecular cDNA cloning, two-dimensional gel immunoblotting, and amino acid microsequencing identified three sequence-unique and distinct proteins that constitute a subfamily of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins corresponding to hnRNPs H, H', and F. These proteins share...... for ribohomopolymer binding studies. Each qRRM repeat bound poly(rG), while only the NH2-terminal qRRM bound poly(rC) and poly(rU). None of the repeats bound detectable amounts of poly(rA). The expression levels of hnRNPs H and F were differentially regulated in pairs of normal and transformed fibroblasts...

  11. A gene encoding a protein with a proline-rich domain (MtPPRD1), revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH), is specifically expressed in the Medicago truncatula embryo axis during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Sophie; Viau, Laure; Lelièvre, Eric; Limami, Anis M

    2005-03-01

    A gene MtPPRD1, encoding a protein of 132 amino acids containing a proline-rich domain (PRD), has been revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with two mRNA populations of embryo axes harvested immediately before and after radicle emergence. Although at the protein level MtPPRD1 showed low homology with plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), it did exhibit the eight cysteine residues conserved in all plant LTPs, a characteristic signature that allows the formation of a hydrophobic cavity adapted for loading hydrophobic molecules. Expression studies of MtPPRD1 have been carried out by quantitative real time RT-PCR throughout germination and post-germination processes in control seeds and seeds in which germination was delayed by abscisic acid (ABA) or the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulphoximine (MSX) treatments. The results showed that MtPPRD1 expression is developmentally regulated, induced in the embryo axis immediately before radicle emergence, reaches its maximum expression and declines during the early post-germination phase. Organ specificity studies showed that, except for a low and probably constitutive expression in roots, MtPPRD1 is specifically expressed in the embryo axis. Based on both experimental and in silico studies several putative roles are proposed for MtPPRD1 in Medicago truncatula, this protein can intervene (i) as an LTP in membrane biogenesis and regulation of the intracellular fatty acid pool by binding and transferring fatty acids and phospholipids between membranes, (ii) in the control of a developmental process specific to late germination and to early phases of post-germination, and (iii) and/or pathogen defence.

  12. Characterization of a gene family encoding SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain proteins with lectin-like and heme-binding properties from Schistosoma japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaristus Chibunna Mbanefo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (K D = 1.605×10(-6 M and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation, and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted.

  13. Cloning and expression of clt genes encoding milk-clotting proteases from Myxococcus xanthus 422.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poza, M; Prieto-Alcedo, M; Sieiro, C; Villa, T G

    2004-10-01

    The screening of a gene library of the milk-clotting strain Myxococcus xanthus 422 constructed in Escherichia coli allowed the description of eight positive clones containing 26 open reading frames. Only three of them (cltA, cltB, and cltC) encoded proteins that exhibited intracellular milk-clotting ability in E. coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pichia pastoris expression systems.

  14. TIR-X and TIR-NBS proteins: two new families related to disease resistance TIR-NBS-LRR proteins encoded in Arabidopsis and other plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Blake C; Morgante, Michele; Michelmore, Richard W

    2002-10-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain is found in one of the two large families of homologues of plant disease resistance proteins (R proteins) in Arabidopsis and other dicotyledonous plants. In addition to these TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) R proteins, we identified two families of TIR-containing proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis Col-0 genome. The TIR-X (TX) family of proteins lacks both the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and the leucine rich repeats (LRRs) that are characteristic of the R proteins, while the TIR-NBS (TN) proteins contain much of the NBS, but lack the LRR. In Col-0, the TX family is encoded by 27 genes and three pseudogenes; the TN family is encoded by 20 genes and one pseudogene. Using massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS), expression was detected at low levels for approximately 85% of the TN-encoding genes. Expression was detected for only approximately 40% of the TX-encoding genes, again at low levels. Physical map data and phylogenetic analysis indicated that multiple genomic duplication events have increased the numbers of TX and TN genes in Arabidopsis. Genes encoding TX, TN and TNL proteins were demonstrated in conifers; TX and TN genes are present in very low numbers in grass genomes. The expression, prevalence, and diversity of TX and TN genes suggests that these genes encode functional proteins rather than resulting from degradation or deletions of TNL genes. These TX and TN proteins could be plant analogues of small TIR-adapter proteins that function in mammalian innate immune responses such as MyD88 and Mal.

  15. A deep auto-encoder model for gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rui; Wen, Jia; Quitadamo, Andrew; Cheng, Jianlin; Shi, Xinghua

    2017-11-17

    Gene expression is a key intermediate level that genotypes lead to a particular trait. Gene expression is affected by various factors including genotypes of genetic variants. With an aim of delineating the genetic impact on gene expression, we build a deep auto-encoder model to assess how good genetic variants will contribute to gene expression changes. This new deep learning model is a regression-based predictive model based on the MultiLayer Perceptron and Stacked Denoising Auto-encoder (MLP-SAE). The model is trained using a stacked denoising auto-encoder for feature selection and a multilayer perceptron framework for backpropagation. We further improve the model by introducing dropout to prevent overfitting and improve performance. To demonstrate the usage of this model, we apply MLP-SAE to a real genomic datasets with genotypes and gene expression profiles measured in yeast. Our results show that the MLP-SAE model with dropout outperforms other models including Lasso, Random Forests and the MLP-SAE model without dropout. Using the MLP-SAE model with dropout, we show that gene expression quantifications predicted by the model solely based on genotypes, align well with true gene expression patterns. We provide a deep auto-encoder model for predicting gene expression from SNP genotypes. This study demonstrates that deep learning is appropriate for tackling another genomic problem, i.e., building predictive models to understand genotypes' contribution to gene expression. With the emerging availability of richer genomic data, we anticipate that deep learning models play a bigger role in modeling and interpreting genomics.

  16. Constitutive heterologous overexpression of a TIR-NB-ARC-LRR gene encoding a putative disease resistance protein from wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata in Arabidopsis and tobacco enhances resistance to phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yao, Liping; Singer, Stacy D; Muhammad, Hanif; Li, Zhi; Wang, Xiping

    2017-03-01

    Plants use resistance (R) proteins to detect pathogen effector proteins and activate their innate immune response against the pathogen. The majority of these proteins contain an NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4) domain along with a leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and some also bear a toll interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a TIR-NB-ARC-LRR R protein (VpTNL1) (GenBank accession number KX649890) from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession "Baihe-35-1", which was identified previously from a transcriptomic analysis of leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (PM; Erysiphe necator (Schw.)). The VpTNL1 transcript was found to be highly induced in V. pseudoreticulata following inoculation with E. necator, as well as treatment with salicylic acid (SA). Sequence analysis demonstrated that the deduced amino acid sequence contained a TIR domain at the N-terminus, along with an NB-ARC and four LRRs domains within the C-terminus. Constitutive expression of VpTNL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type or dwarf phenotype. Intriguingly, the phenotypically normal transgenic lines displayed enhanced resistance to Arabidopsis PM, Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Similarly, constitutive expression of VpTNL1 in Nicotiana tabacum was found to confer enhanced resistance to tobacco PM, Erysiphe cichoacearum DC. Subsequent isolation of the VpTNL1 promoter and deletion analysis indicated that TC-rich repeats and TCA elements likely play an important role in its response to E. necator and SA treatment, respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that VpTNL1 contributes to PM resistance in grapevine and provide an interesting gene target for the future amelioration of grape via breeding and/or biotechnology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutations in LCA5, encoding the ciliary protein lebercilin, cause Leber congenital amaurosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; Koenekoop, R.K.; Mohamed, M.D.; Arts, H.H.; Boldt, K.; Towns, K.V.; Sedmak, T.; Beer, M. de; Nagel-Wolfrum, K.; McKibbin, M.; Dharmaraj, S.; Lopez, I.; Ivings, L.; Williams, G.A.; Springell, K.; Woods, C.G.; Jafri, H.; Rashid, Y.; Strom, T.M.; Zwaag, B. van der; Gosens, I.; Kersten, F.F.J.; Wijk, E. van; Veltman, J.A.; Zonneveld, M.N.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Maumenee, I.H.; Wolfrum, U.; Cheetham, M.E.; Ueffing, M.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Inglehearn, C.F.; Roepman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) causes blindness or severe visual impairment at or within a few months of birth. Here we show, using homozygosity mapping, that the LCA5 gene on chromosome 6q14, which encodes the previously unknown ciliary protein lebercilin, is associated with this disease. We

  18. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, HHVs have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs), which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show

  19. Translational control and differential RNA decay are key elements regulating postsegregational expression of the killer protein encoded by the parB locus of plasmid R1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, K; Helin, K; Christensen, O W

    1988-01-01

    The parB locus of plasmid R1, which mediates plasmid stability via postsegregational killing of plasmid-free cells, encodes two genes, hok and sok. The hok gene product is a potent cell-killing protein. The hok gene is regulated at the translational level by the sok gene-encoded repressor, a small...

  20. Gene cluster encoding cholate catabolism in Rhodococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, William W; Wilbrink, Maarten H; Casabon, Israël; Stewart, Gordon R; Liu, Jie; van der Geize, Robert; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2012-12-01

    Bile acids are highly abundant steroids with important functions in vertebrate digestion. Their catabolism by bacteria is an important component of the carbon cycle, contributes to gut ecology, and has potential commercial applications. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grows well on cholate, as well as on its conjugates, taurocholate and glycocholate. The transcriptome of RHA1 growing on cholate revealed 39 genes upregulated on cholate, occurring in a single gene cluster. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed that selected genes in the cluster were upregulated 10-fold on cholate versus on cholesterol. One of these genes, kshA3, encoding a putative 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylase, was deleted and found essential for growth on cholate. Two coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases encoded in the cluster, CasG and CasI, were heterologously expressed. CasG was shown to transform cholate to cholyl-CoA, thus initiating side chain degradation. CasI was shown to form CoA derivatives of steroids with isopropanoyl side chains, likely occurring as degradation intermediates. Orthologous gene clusters were identified in all available Rhodococcus genomes, as well as that of Thermomonospora curvata. Moreover, Rhodococcus equi 103S, Rhodococcus ruber Chol-4 and Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 each grew on cholate. In contrast, several mycolic acid bacteria lacking the gene cluster were unable to grow on cholate. Our results demonstrate that the above-mentioned gene cluster encodes cholate catabolism and is distinct from a more widely occurring gene cluster encoding cholesterol catabolism.

  1. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the.

  2. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  3. RNAi-based silencing of genes encoding the vacuolar- ATPase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... Spodoptera exigua larval development by silencing chitin synthase gene with RNA interference. Bull. Entomol. Res. 98:613-619. Dow JAT (1999). The Multifunctional Drosophila melanogaster V-. ATPase is encoded by a multigene family. J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 31:75-83. Fire A, Xu SQ, Montgomery MK, ...

  4. Construction and Immunogenicity of DNA Vaccines Encoding Fusion Protein of Porcine IFN-λ1 and GP5 Gene of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luping Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV has been mainly responsible for the catastrophic economic losses in pig industry worldwide. The commercial vaccines only provide a limited protection against PRRSV infection. Thus, the focus and direction is to develop safer and more effective vaccines in the research field of PRRS. The immune modulators are being considered to enhance the effectiveness of PRRSV vaccines. IFN-λ1 belongs to type III interferon, a new interferon family. IFN-λ1 is an important cytokine with multiple functions in innate and acquired immunity. In this study, porcine IFN-λ1 (PoIFN-λ1 was evaluated for its adjuvant effects on the immunity of a DNA vaccine carrying the GP5 gene of PRRSV. Groups of mice were immunized twice at 2-week interval with 100 μg of the plasmid DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-SynORF5, pcDNA3.1-PoIFN-λ1-SynORF5, and the blank vector pcDNA3.1, respectively. The results showed that pcDNA3.1-PoIFN-λ1-SynORF5 can significantly enhance GP5-specific ELISA antibody, PRRSV-specific neutralizing antibody, IFN-γ level, and lymphocyte proliferation ratherthan the responses induced by pcDNA3.1-SynORF5. Therefore, type III interferon PoIFN-λ1 could enhance the immune responses of DNA vaccine of PRRSV, highlighting the potential value of PoIFN-λ1 as a molecular adjuvant in the prevention of PRRSV infection.

  5. Ty3 GAG3 and POL3 genes encode the components of intracellular particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, L J; Chalker, D L; Orlinsky, K J; Sandmeyer, S B

    1992-01-01

    Ty3 is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae retrotransposon that integrates near the transcription initiation sites of polymerase III-transcribed genes. It is distinct from the copialike Ty1 and Ty2 retrotransposons of S. cerevisiae in both the sequences of encoded proteins and gene order. It is a member of the gypsylike family of retrotransposons which resemble animal retroviruses. This study was undertaken to investigate the nucleocapsid particle of a transpositionally active gypsylike retrotransposo...

  6. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoping; Meyers, Blake C; Kozik, Alexander; West, Marilyn AL; Morgante, Michele; St Clair, Dina A; Bent, Andrew F; Michelmore, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    was found for at least 12 genes, 11 of which encode TIR-NBS-LRR proteins. There was no obvious correlation between expression pattern, phylogenetic relationship or genomic location of the NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes studied. Conclusion Transcripts of many NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes were defined. Most were present at low levels and exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns. Expression data are consistent with most Arabidopsis NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes functioning in plant defense responses but do not preclude other biological roles. PMID:17956627

  7. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Clair Dina A

    2007-10-01

    alternative splicing was found for at least 12 genes, 11 of which encode TIR-NBS-LRR proteins. There was no obvious correlation between expression pattern, phylogenetic relationship or genomic location of the NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes studied. Conclusion Transcripts of many NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes were defined. Most were present at low levels and exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns. Expression data are consistent with most Arabidopsis NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes functioning in plant defense responses but do not preclude other biological roles.

  8. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoping; Meyers, Blake C; Kozik, Alexander; West, Marilyn A L; Morgante, Michele; St Clair, Dina A; Bent, Andrew F; Michelmore, Richard W

    2007-10-23

    found for at least 12 genes, 11 of which encode TIR-NBS-LRR proteins. There was no obvious correlation between expression pattern, phylogenetic relationship or genomic location of the NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes studied. Transcripts of many NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes were defined. Most were present at low levels and exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns. Expression data are consistent with most Arabidopsis NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes functioning in plant defense responses but do not preclude other biological roles.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria preferentially expresses PfEMP1 encoded by group A var genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, A.; Magistrado, P.; Sharp, S.; Joergensen, L.; Lavstsen, T.; Chiucchiuini, A.; Salanti, A.; Vestergaard, L.S.; Lusingu, J.P.; Hermsen, R.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Christensen, J.; Nielsen, M.A.; Hviid, L.; Sutherland, C.J.; Staalsoe, T.; Theander, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSAs) like the var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family are responsible for antigenic variation and infected red blood cell (RBC) cytoadhesion in P. falciparum malaria. Parasites causing severe malaria in

  10. Genetic variants in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes influence AIDS progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sher L Hendrickson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial genome includes only 13 coding genes while nuclear-encoded genes account for 99% of proteins responsible for mitochondrial morphology, redox regulation, and energetics. Mitochondrial pathogenesis occurs in HIV patients and genetically, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups with presumed functional differences have been associated with differential AIDS progression.Here we explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within 904 of the estimated 1,500 genes that specify nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (NEMPs influence AIDS progression among HIV-1 infected patients. We examined NEMPs for association with the rate of AIDS progression using genotypes generated by an Affymetrix 6.0 genotyping array of 1,455 European American patients from five US AIDS cohorts. Successfully genotyped SNPs gave 50% or better haplotype coverage for 679 of known NEMP genes. With a Bonferroni adjustment for the number of genes and tests examined, multiple SNPs within two NEMP genes showed significant association with AIDS progression: acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 4 (ACSM4 on chromosome 12 and peroxisomal D3,D2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (PECI on chromosome 6.Our previous studies on mitochondrial DNA showed that European haplogroups with presumed functional differences were associated with AIDS progression and HAART mediated adverse events. The modest influences of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes found in the current study add support to the idea that mitochondrial function plays a role in AIDS pathogenesis.

  11. Differential roles of two SARP-encoding regulatory genes during tylosin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Neil; Stratigopoulos, George; Cundliffe, Eric

    2002-01-01

    The tylosin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces fradiae is remarkable in harbouring at least five regulatory genes, two of which (tylS and tylT) encode proteins of the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family. The aim of the present work was to assess the respective contributions of TylS and TylT to tylosin production. A combination of targeted gene disruption, fermentation studies and gene expression analysis via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) suggests that tylS is essential for tylosin production and controls the expression of tylR (previously shown to be a global activator of the biosynthetic pathway) plus at least one other gene involved in polyketide metabolism or regulation thereof. This is the first demonstration of a SARP acting to control another regulatory gene during antibiotic biosynthesis. In contrast, tylT is not essential for tylosin production.

  12. Environmental cycle of antibiotic resistance encoded genes: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. ghanbari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes enter the environment in different ways. The release of these factors into the environment has increased concerns related to public health. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in the environmental resources. In this systematic review, the data were extracted from valid sources of information including ScienceDirect, PubMed, Google Scholar and SID. Evaluation and selection of articles were conducted on the basis of the PRISMA checklist. A total of 39 articles were included in the study, which were chosen from a total of 1249 papers. The inclusion criterion was the identification of genes encoding antibiotic resistance against the eight important groups of antibiotics determined by using the PCR technique in the environmental sources including municipal and hospital wastewater treatment plants, animal and agricultural wastes, effluents from treatment plants, natural waters, sediments, and drinking waters. In this study, 113 genes encoding antibiotic resistance to eight groups of antibiotics (beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, macrolides, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, glycopeptides and quinolones were identified in various environments. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in all the investigated environments. The investigation of microorganisms carrying these genes shows that most of the bacteria especially gram-negative bacteria are effective in the acquisition and the dissemination of these pollutants in the environment. Discharging the raw wastewaters and effluents from wastewater treatments acts as major routes in the dissemination of ARGs into environment sources and can pose hazards to public health.

  13. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  14. Agrobacterium T-DNA-encoded protein Atu6002 interferes with the host auxin response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Benoît; Gizatullina, Diana I.; Babst, Benjamin A.; Gifford, Andrew N.; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Summary Several genes in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens transferred (T) DNA encode proteins that are involved in developmental alterations leading to the formation of tumors in infected plants. We investigated the role of the protein encoded by the Atu6002 gene, the function of which is completely unknown. The Atu6002 expression occurs in Agrobacterium-induced tumors, and is also activated upon activation of plant cell division by growth hormones. Within the expressing plant cells, the Atu6002 protein is targeted to the plasma membrane. Interestingly, constitutive ectopic expression of Atu6002 in transgenic tobacco plants lead to a severe developmental phenotype characterized by stunted growth, shorter internodes, lanceolate leaves, increased branching, and modified flower morphology. These Atu6002-expressing plants also displayed impaired response to auxin. However, auxin cellular uptake and polar transport were not significantly inhibited in these plants, suggesting that Atu6002 interferes with auxin perception or signaling pathways. PMID:24128370

  15. The gene encoding topoisomerase I from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, K; Kilbey, B

    1995-09-22

    Part of the topoisomerase I (TopoI)-encoding gene from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) was isolated by PCR from cDNA using oligodeoxyribonucleotides modelled on the highly conserved regions of sequence from other species. The entire TopoI gene was obtained by screening a Pf K1 HindIII-EcoRI genomic library in lambda NM1149 with a random-labeled heterologous probe from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TopoI gene. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 2520 nt encoding a deduced protein of 839 amino acids (aa) with no detectable introns. The Pf TopoI aa sequence has about 40% identity with most eukaryotic TopoI homologues. The gene is located as a single copy on chromosome 5 and Northern analysis identified a transcript of 3.8 kb.

  16. Novel Alleles of Two Tightly Linked Genes Encoding Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Proteins (VrPGIP1 and VrPGIP2 Associated with the Br Locus That Confer Bruchid (Callosobruchus spp. Resistance to Mungbean (Vigna radiata Accession V2709

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anochar Kaewwongwal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nearly all mungbean cultivars are completely susceptible to seed bruchids (Callosobruchus chinensis and Callosobruchus maculatus. Breeding bruchid-resistant mungbean is a major goal in mungbean breeding programs. Recently, we demonstrated in mungbean (Vigna radiata accession V2802 that VrPGIP2, which encodes a polygalacturonase inhibiting protein (PGIP, is the Br locus responsible for resistance to C. chinensis and C. maculatus. In this study, mapping in mungbean accession V2709 using a BC11F2 population of 355 individuals revealed that a single major quantitative trait locus, which controlled resistance to both C. chinensis and C. maculatus, was located in a 237.35 Kb region of mungbean chromosome 5 that contained eight annotated genes, including VrPGIP1 (LOC106760236 and VrPGIP2 (LOC106760237. VrPGIP1 and VrPGIP2 are located next to each other and are only 27.56 Kb apart. Sequencing VrPGIP1 and VrPGIP2 in “V2709” revealed new alleles for both VrPGIP1 and VrPGIP2, named VrPGIP1-1 and VrPGIP2-2, respectively. VrPGIP2-2 has one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 554 of wild type VrPGIP2. This SNP is a guanine to cystine substitution and causes a proline to arginine change at residue 185 in the VrPGIP2 of “V2709”. VrPGIP1-1 has 43 SNPs compared with wild type and “V2802”, and 20 cause amino acid changes in VrPGIP1. One change is threonine to proline at residue 185 in VrPGIP1, which is the same as in VrPGIP2. Sequence alignments of VrPGIP2 and VrPGIP1 from “V2709” with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris PGIP2 revealed that residue 185 in VrPGIP2 and VrPGIP1 contributes to the secondary structures of proteins that affect interactions between PGIP and polygalacturonase, and that some amino acid changes in VrPGIP1 also affect interactions between PGIP and polygalacturonase. Thus, tightly linked VrPGIP1 and VrPGIP2 are the likely genes at the Br locus that confer bruchid resistance in mungbean “V2709”.

  17. The exception proves the rule? Dual targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins into endosymbiotic organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudisch, Bianca; Langner, Uwe; Garz, Ingo; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells harbor two types of endosymbiotic organelle: mitochondria and chloroplasts. As a consequence of endosymbiotic gene transfer, the majority of their proteins are encoded in the nucleus and post-translationally 're'-imported into the respective target organelle. The corresponding transport signals are usually selective for a single organelle, but several proteins are transported into both the mitochondria and chloroplasts. To estimate the number of proteins with such dual targeting properties in Arabidopsis, we classified the proteins encoded by nuclear genes of endosymbiotic origin according to the respective targeting specificity of their N-terminal transport signals as predicted by the TargetP software package. Selected examples of the resulting protein classes were subsequently analyzed by transient transformation assays as well as by in organello protein transport experiments. It was found that most proteins with high prediction values for both organelles show dual targeting with both experimental approaches. Unexpectedly, however, dual targeting was even found among those proteins that are predicted to be localized solely in one of the two endosymbiotic organelles. In total, among the 16 candidate proteins analyzed, we identified 10 proteins with dual targeting properties. This unexpectedly high proportion suggests that such transport properties are much more abundant than anticipated. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Exhaustive search of linear information encoding protein-peptide recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelil, Abdellali; Dubreuil, Benjamin; Levy, Emmanuel D; Michnick, Stephen W

    2017-04-01

    High-throughput in vitro methods have been extensively applied to identify linear information that encodes peptide recognition. However, these methods are limited in number of peptides, sequence variation, and length of peptides that can be explored, and often produce solutions that are not found in the cell. Despite the large number of methods developed to attempt addressing these issues, the exhaustive search of linear information encoding protein-peptide recognition has been so far physically unfeasible. Here, we describe a strategy, called DALEL, for the exhaustive search of linear sequence information encoded in proteins that bind to a common partner. We applied DALEL to explore binding specificity of SH3 domains in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using only the polypeptide sequences of SH3 domain binding proteins, we succeeded in identifying the majority of known SH3 binding sites previously discovered either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, we discovered a number of sites with both non-canonical sequences and distinct properties that may serve ancillary roles in peptide recognition. We compared DALEL to a variety of state-of-the-art algorithms in the blind identification of known binding sites of the human Grb2 SH3 domain. We also benchmarked DALEL on curated biological motifs derived from the ELM database to evaluate the effect of increasing/decreasing the enrichment of the motifs. Our strategy can be applied in conjunction with experimental data of proteins interacting with a common partner to identify binding sites among them. Yet, our strategy can also be applied to any group of proteins of interest to identify enriched linear motifs or to exhaustively explore the space of linear information encoded in a polypeptide sequence. Finally, we have developed a webserver located at http://michnick.bcm.umontreal.ca/dalel, offering user-friendly interface and providing different scenarios utilizing DALEL.

  19. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    The major surface antigen of Pneumocystis carinii, a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, is an abundant glycoprotein that functions in host-organism interactions. A monoclonal antibody to this antigen is protective in animals, and thus...... hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development...... of novel approaches to the control of this pathogen....

  20. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    微软用户

    2012-01-12

    families. The recombinant BtabCSP was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli cells. This is the first report on the existence of chemosensory protein-coding gene in whiteflies. It will help us to elucidate the molecular.

  1. PREVALENCE OF TOXIN ENCODING GENES IN ESCHERICHIACOLI ISOLATES FROM URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS INSLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanca Starčič-Erjavec

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods 110 uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains (UPEC obtained from the Institute of Microbiology and Immunology of the Medical Faculty in Ljubljana were screened by PCR withprimers specific for the following toxin encoding genes: hlyA (haemolysin, cnf1 (cytotoxicnecrotising factor 1, usp (uropathogenic specific protein USP and ibeA (invasin. Dotblot hybridisation experiments were performed to validate the PCR assays.Results In 44% of the strains usp gene sequences were detected. The prevalence of hlyA and cnf1was 25% and 23%, respectively. Only 9% of the strains harbored ibeA. The majority of thetested toxin encoding genes was found in strains belonging to the B2 phylogenetic group.Conclusions The toxin encoding genes hlyA, cnf1 and usp were strongly co-associated. Further, we founda statistically significant co-association of ibeA and usp. The prevalence of the testedtoxin encoding genes in E. coli strains from urinary tract infections isolated in Slovenia iscomparable to those from studies in other geographic regions.

  2. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is only...... expressed in M cells and the gene product is responsible for the secretion of the mating pheromone. M-factor, a nonapeptide that is S-farnesylated and carboxy-methylated on its C-terminal cysteine residue. The predicted Mam1 protein is highly homologous to mammalian multiple drug-resistance proteins...... and to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE6 gene product, which mediates export of a-factor mating pheromone. We show that STE6 can also mediate secretion of M-factor in S. pombe....

  3. Metagenomic Analysis of Apple Orchard Soil Reveals Antibiotic Resistance Genes Encoding Predicted Bifunctional Proteins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Justin J.; Moe, Luke A.; Converse, Brandon J.; Smart, Keith D.; Berklein, Flora C.; McManus, Patricia S.; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the diversity and origins of antibiotic resistance genes, we identified resistance genes in the soil in an apple orchard using functional metagenomics, which involves inserting large fragments of foreign DNA into Escherichia coli and assaying the resulting clones for expressed functions. Among 13 antibiotic-resistant clones, we found two genes that encode bifunctional proteins. One predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to ceftazidime and contains a natural fusion between a predicted transcriptional regulator and a β-lactamase. Sequence analysis of the entire metagenomic clone encoding the predicted bifunctional β-lactamase revealed a gene potentially involved in chloramphenicol resistance as well as a predicted transposase. A second clone that encodes a predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to kanamycin and contains an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase domain fused to a second acetyltransferase domain that, based on nucleotide sequence, was predicted not to be involved in antibiotic resistance. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator fused to a β-lactamase and of an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase fused to an acetyltransferase not involved in antibiotic resistance. PMID:20453147

  4. Ixodes ticks belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex encode a family of anticomplement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daix, V; Schroeder, H; Praet, N; Georgin, J-P; Chiappino, I; Gillet, L; de Fays, K; Decrem, Y; Leboulle, G; Godfroid, E; Bollen, A; Pastoret, P-P; Gern, L; Sharp, P M; Vanderplasschen, A

    2007-04-01

    The alternative pathway of complement is an important innate defence against pathogens including ticks. This component of the immune system has selected for pathogens that have evolved countermeasures. Recently, a salivary protein able to inhibit the alternative pathway was cloned from the American tick Ixodes scapularis (Valenzuela et al., 2000; J. Biol. Chem. 275, 18717-18723). Here, we isolated two different sequences, similar to Isac, from the transcriptome of I. ricinus salivary glands. Expression of these sequences revealed that they both encode secreted proteins able to inhibit the complement alternative pathway. These proteins, called I. ricinus anticomplement (IRAC) protein I and II, are coexpressed constitutively in I. ricinus salivary glands and are upregulated during blood feeding. Also, we demonstrated that they are the products of different genes and not of alleles of the same locus. Finally, phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that ticks belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex encode a family of relatively small anticomplement molecules undergoing diversification by positive Darwinian selection.

  5. Degradation of Benzene by Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 and 1YB2 Is Catalyzed by Enzymes Encoded in Distinct Catabolism Gene Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Morales, Daiana; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Jáuregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2, a benzene and toluene degrader, and Pseudomonas veronii 1YB2, a benzene degrader, have previously been shown to be key players in a benzene-contaminated site. These strains harbor unique catabolic pathways for the degradation of benzene comprising a gene cluster encoding an isopropylbenzene dioxygenase where genes encoding downstream enzymes were interrupted by stop codons. Extradiol dioxygenases were recruited from gene clusters comprising genes encoding a 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase necessary for benzene degradation but typically absent from isopropylbenzene dioxygenase-encoding gene clusters. The benzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase-encoding gene was not clustered with any other aromatic degradation genes, and the encoded protein was only distantly related to dehydrogenases of aromatic degradation pathways. The involvement of the different gene clusters in the degradation pathways was suggested by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Resistance to β-Lactams in Neisseria ssp Due to Chromosomally Encoded Penicillin-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapun, André; Morlot, Cécile; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2016-09-28

    Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are human pathogens that cause a variety of life-threatening systemic and local infections, such as meningitis or gonorrhoea. The treatment of such infection is becoming more difficult due to antibiotic resistance. The focus of this review is on the mechanism of reduced susceptibility to penicillin and other β-lactams due to the modification of chromosomally encoded penicillin-binding proteins (PBP), in particular PBP2 encoded by the penA gene. The variety of penA alleles and resulting variant PBP2 enzymes is described and the important amino acid substitutions are presented and discussed in a structural context.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a polyethylene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    detoxification enzymes (glutathione S-transferase, soluble epoxide hydrolase, catalase and superoxide dismutase). The second group contains protein factors involved in the regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, which probably function in stress responses such as protein kinases, transcription factors and ...

  8. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasugi Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA, and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the DNA methylation status of 899 nuclear mt genes in the liver, brain, and heart tissues of mouse, and identified 636 nuclear mt genes carrying tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs. These nuclar mt genes are involved in various mitochondrial functions and they also include genes related to human diseases. T-DMRs regulate the expression of nuclear mt genes. Nuclear mt genes with tissue-specific hypomethylated T-DMRs were characterized by enrichment of the target genes of specific transcription factors such as FOXA2 in the liver, and CEBPA and STAT1 in the brain. Conclusions A substantial proportion of nuclear mt genes contained T-DMRs, and the DNA methylation status of numerous T-DMRs should underlie tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions.

  9. Identification of protein features encoded by alternative exons using Exon Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Aubé, Fabien; Dulaurier, Louis; Benoit-Pilven, Clara; Rey, Amandine; Poret, Arnaud; Chautard, Emilie; Mortada, Hussein; Desmet, François-Olivier; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Moreno-Garcia, Maira Alejandra; Goillot, Evelyne; Janczarski, Stéphane; Mortreux, Franck; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Auboeuf, Didier

    2017-06-01

    Transcriptomic genome-wide analyses demonstrate massive variation of alternative splicing in many physiological and pathological situations. One major challenge is now to establish the biological contribution of alternative splicing variation in physiological- or pathological-associated cellular phenotypes. Toward this end, we developed a computational approach, named "Exon Ontology," based on terms corresponding to well-characterized protein features organized in an ontology tree. Exon Ontology is conceptually similar to Gene Ontology-based approaches but focuses on exon-encoded protein features instead of gene level functional annotations. Exon Ontology describes the protein features encoded by a selected list of exons and looks for potential Exon Ontology term enrichment. By applying this strategy to exons that are differentially spliced between epithelial and mesenchymal cells and after extensive experimental validation, we demonstrate that Exon Ontology provides support to discover specific protein features regulated by alternative splicing. We also show that Exon Ontology helps to unravel biological processes that depend on suites of coregulated alternative exons, as we uncovered a role of epithelial cell-enriched splicing factors in the AKT signaling pathway and of mesenchymal cell-enriched splicing factors in driving splicing events impacting on autophagy. Freely available on the web, Exon Ontology is the first computational resource that allows getting a quick insight into the protein features encoded by alternative exons and investigating whether coregulated exons contain the same biological information. © 2017 Tranchevent et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Characterization of dacC, which encodes a new low-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Murray, T; Popham, D L

    1998-01-01

    The pbp gene (renamed dacC), identified by the Bacillus subtilis genome sequencing project, encodes a putative 491-residue protein with sequence homology to low-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins. Use of a transcriptional dacC-lacZ fusion revealed that dacC expression (i) is initiated...... and sporulated identically to wild-type cells, and dacC and wild-type spores had the same heat resistance, cortex structure, and germination and outgrowth kinetics. Expression of dacC in Escherichia coli showed that this gene encodes an approximately 59-kDa membrane-associated penicillin-binding protein which...

  11. BAGE: a new gene encoding an antigen recognized on human melanomas by cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boël, P; Wildmann, C; Sensi, M L; Brasseur, R; Renauld, J C; Coulie, P; Boon, T; van der Bruggen, P

    1995-02-01

    Several tumor antigens are recognized by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) on human melanoma MZ2-MEL. Some of them are encoded by genes MAGE-1 and MAGE-3, which are not expressed in normal tissues except in testis. Here, we report the identification of a new gene that codes for another of these antigens. This gene, named BAGE, codes for a putative protein of 43 aa and seems to belong to a family of several genes. The antigen recognized by the autologous CTL consists of BAGE-encoded peptide AARAVFLAL bound to an HLA-Cw 1601 molecule. Gene BAGE is expressed in 22% of melanomas, 30% of infiltrating bladder carcinomas, 10% of mammary carcinomas, 8% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, and 6% of non-small cell lung carcinomas. Like the MAGE genes, it is silent in normal tissues with the exception of testis. Because of its tumor-specific expression, the BAGE-encoded antigen may prove useful for cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Production of cyanophycin in Rhizopus oryzae through the expression of a cyanophycin synthetase encoding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meussen, Bas J; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Sanders, Johan P M; Graaff, Leo H de

    2012-02-01

    Cyanophycin or cyanophycin granule peptide is a protein that results from non-ribosomal protein synthesis in microorganisms such as cyanobacteria. The amino acids in cyanophycin can be used as a feedstock in the production of a wide range of chemicals such as acrylonitrile, polyacrylic acid, 1,4-butanediamine, and urea. In this study, an auxotrophic mutant (Rhizopus oryzae M16) of the filamentous fungus R. oryzae 99-880 was selected to express cyanophycin synthetase encoding genes. These genes originated from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, and a codon optimized version of latter gene. The genes were under control of the pyruvate decarboxylase promoter and terminator elements of R. oryzae. Transformants were generated by the biolistic transformation method. In only two transformants both expressing the cyanophycin synthetase encoding gene from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was a specific enzyme activity detected of 1.5 mU/mg protein. In one of these transformants was both water-soluble and insoluble cyanophycin detected. The water-soluble fraction formed the major fraction and accounted for 0.5% of the dry weight. The water-insoluble CGP was produced in trace amounts. The amino acid composition of the water-soluble form was determined and constitutes of equimolar amounts of arginine and aspartic acid.

  13. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  14. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae enolase-related regions encode proteins that are active enolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblatt, M J; Richard Albert, J; Mattie, S; Zakaib, J; Dayanandan, S; Hanic-Joyce, P J; Joyce, P B M

    2013-02-01

    In addition to two genes (ENO1 and ENO2) known to code for enolase (EC4.2.1.11), the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome contains three enolase-related regions (ERR1, ERR2 and ERR3) which could potentially encode proteins with enolase function. Here, we show that products of these genes (Err2p and Err3p) have secondary and quaternary structures similar to those of yeast enolase (Eno1p). In addition, Err2p and Err3p can convert 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate, with kinetic parameters similar to those of Eno1p, suggesting that these proteins could function as enolases in vivo. To address this possibility, we overexpressed the ERR2 and ERR3 genes individually in a double-null yeast strain lacking ENO1 and ENO2, and showed that either ERR2 or ERR3 could complement the growth defect in this strain when cells are grown in medium with glucose as the carbon source. Taken together, these data suggest that the ERR genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode a protein that could function in glycolysis as enolase. The presence of these enolase-related regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and their absence in other related yeasts suggests that these genes may play some unique role in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further experiments will be required to determine whether these functions are related to glycolysis or other cellular processes. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Genes regulation encoding ADP/ATP carrier in yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebohacova, M.

    2000-01-01

    Genes encoding a mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis were investigated. AAC2 is coding for the major AAC isoform in S. cerevisiae. We suggest that AAC2 is a member of a syn-expression group of genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation proteins. Within our previous studies on the regulation of the AAC2 transcription an UAS (-393/-268) was identified that is essential for the expression of this gene. Two functional regulatory cis-elements are located within this UAS -binding sites for an ABFl factor and for HAP2/3/4/5 heteromeric complex. We examined relative contributions and mutual interactions of the ABFl and HAP2/3/4/5 factors in the activation of transcription from the UAS of the AAC2 gene. The whole UAS was dissected into smaller sub-fragments and tested for (i) the ability to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in vitro, (ii) the ability to confer heterologous expression using AAC3 gene lacking its own promoter, and (iii) the expression of AAC3-lacZ fusion instead of intact AAC3 gene. The obtained results demonstrated that: a) The whole UAS as well as sub-fragment containing only ABF1-binding site are able to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in oxygen- and heme- dependent manner. The experiments with antibody against the ABF1 showed that the ABF1 factor is one of the proteins binding to AAC2 promoter. We have been unsuccessful to prove the binding of cellular proteins to the HAP2/3/4/5-binding site. However, the presence of HAP2/3/4/5-binding site is necessary to drive a binding of cellular proteins to the ABF1-binding site in carbon source-dependent manner. b) The presence of both ABF1- and HAP2/3/4/5-binding sites and original spacing between them is necessary to confer the growth of Aaac2 mutant strain on non- fermentable carbon source when put in front of AAC3 gene introduced on centromeric vector to Aaac2 mutant strain. c) For the activation of AAC3-lacZ expression on

  16. Cloning and functional characterization of the gene encoding the transcription factor Acel in the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUBÉN POLANCO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report we describe the isolation and characterization of a gene encoding the transcription factor Acel (Activation protein of cup 1 Expression in the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Pc-acel encodes a predicted protein of 633 amino acids containing the copper-fist DNA binding domain typically found in fungal transcription factors such as Acel, Macl and Haal from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Pc-acel gene is localized in Scaffold 5, between coordinates 220841 and 222983. A S. cerevisiae acel null mutant strain unable to grow in high-copper medium was fully complemented by transformation with the cDNA of Pc-acel. Moreover, Northern blot hybridization studies indicated that Pc-acel cDNA restores copper inducibility of the yeast cup 1 gene, which encodes the metal-binding protein metallothionein implicated in copper resistance. To our knowledge, this is first report describing an Acel transcription factor in basidiomycetes

  17. Secretion Trap Tagging of Secreted and Membrane-Spanning Proteins Using Arabidopsis Gene Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Juana M. Arroyo; Cristina Yordan; W. Richard McCombie; Robert A. Martienssen

    2003-01-01

    Secreted and membrane-spanning proteins play fundamental roles in plant development but pose challenges for genetic identification and characterization. We describe a "secretion trap" screen for gene trap insertions in genes encoding proteins routed through the secretory pathway. The gene trap transposon encodes a ß-glucuronidase reporter enzyme...

  18. Interspecies transfer of the penicillin-binding protein 3-encoding gene ftsI between Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus can confer reduced susceptibility to β-lactam antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Annette; Witherden, Elizabeth A; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Tristram, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in ftsI, encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, can cause decreased β-lactam susceptibility in Haemophilus influenzae. Sequencing of ftsI from clinical strains has indicated interspecies recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus. This study documented apparently unrestricted homologous recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus in vitro. Transfer of ftsI from resistant isolates conferred similar but not identical increases in the MICs of susceptible strains of H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding for a nucleotidase from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Gálvez-Valdivieso, Gregorio; Caballo, Cristina; Lambert, Rocío; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Nucleotidases are phosphatases that catalyze the removal of phosphate from nucleotides, compounds with an important role in plant metabolism. A phosphatase enzyme, with high affinity for nucleotides monophosphate previously identified and purified in embryonic axes from French bean, has been analyzed by MALDI TOF/TOF and two internal peptides have been obtained. The information of these peptide sequences has been used to search in the genome database and only a candidate gene that encodes for the phosphatase was identified (PvNTD1). The putative protein contains the conserved domains (motif I-IV) for haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases superfamily. The residues involved in the catalytic activity are also conserved. A recombinant protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli has shown molybdate resistant phosphatase activity with nucleosides monophosphate as substrate, confirming that the identified gene encodes for the phosphatase with high affinity for nucleotides purified in French bean embryonic axes. The activity of the purified protein was inhibited by adenosine. The expression of PvNTD1 gene was induced at the specific moment of radicle protrusion in embryonic axes. The gene was also highly expressed in young leaves whereas the level of expression in mature tissues was minimal. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  20. A corm-specific gene encodes tarin, a major globulin of taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, I C; Castro, L A; Neshich, G; de Almeida, E R; de Sá, M F; Mello, L V; Monte-Neshich, D C

    1995-04-01

    A gene encoding a globulin from a major taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm protein family, tarin (G1, ca. 28 kDa) was isolated from a lambda Charon 35 library, using a cDNA derived from a highly abundant corm-specific mRNA, as probe. The gene, named tar1, and the corresponding cDNA were characterized and compared. No introns were found. The major transcription start site was determined by primer extension analysis. The gene has an open reading frame (ORF) of 765 bp, and the deduced amino acid sequence indicated a precursor polypeptide of 255 residues that is post-translationally processed into two subunits of about 12.5 kDa each. The deduced protein is 45% homologous to curculin, a sweet-tasting protein found in the fruit pulp of Curculigo latifolia and 40% homologous to a mannose-binding lectin from Galanthus nivalis. Significant similarity was also found at the nucleic acid sequence level with genes encoding lectins from plant species of the Amaryllidaceae and Lilliaceae families.

  1. [Cloning and structure of gene encoded alpha-latrocrustoxin from the Black widow spider venom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilevich, V N; Luk'ianov, S A; Grishin, E V

    1999-07-01

    The primary structure of the crusta gene encoding alpha-latrocrustoxin (alpha-LCT), a high molecular mass neurotoxin specific to crustaceans, was determined in the black widow spider Latrodectus mactans tredicimguttatus genome. The total length of the sequenced DNA was 4693 bp. The structural part of the black widow spider chromosome gene encoding alpha-LCT does not contain introns. The sequenced DNA contains a single extended open reading frame (4185 bp) and encodes a protein precursor of alpha-LCT, comprising 1395 aa. We assume the Met residue at position -10 relative to the N-terminal residue of Glu1 of the mature toxin to be the first one in the protein precursor. The calculated molecular mass of the precursor (156147 Da) exceeds that of the mature toxin by approximately 30 kDa. These data are in agreement with the notion that over the course of maturation the protein precursor undergoes double processing--cleavage of a decapeptide from the N-terminal part and of a approximately 200-aa fragment from the C-terminal part. alpha-LCT displayed a number of imperfect ankyrin-like repeats and areas of structural homology with earlier studied latrotoxins; the highest homology degree (62%) was revealed with alpha-latroinsectotoxin (alpha-LIT).

  2. Characterization of a gene encoding cellulase from uncultured soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jin; Lee, Chang-Muk; Han, Bo-Ram; Kim, Min-Young; Yeo, Yun-Soo; Yoon, Sang-Hong; Koo, Bon-Sung; Jun, Hong-Ki

    2008-05-01

    To detect cellulases encoded by uncultured microorganisms, we constructed metagenomic libraries from Korean soil DNAs. Screenings of the libraries revealed a clone pCM2 that uses carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as a sole carbon source. Further analysis of the insert showed two consecutive ORFs (celM2 and xynM2) encoding proteins of 226 and 662 amino acids, respectively. A multiple sequence analysis with the deduced amino acid sequences of celM2 showed 36% sequence identity with cellulase from the Synechococcus sp., while xynM2 had 59% identity to endo-1,4-beta-xylanase A from Cellulomonas pachnodae. The highest enzymatic CMC hydrolysis was observable at pH 4.0 and 45 degrees C with recombinant CelM2 protein. Although the enzyme CelM2 additionally hydrolyzed avicel and xylan, no substrate hydrolysis was observed on oligosaccharides such as cellobiose, pNP-beta-cellobioside, pNP-beta-glucoside, and pNP-beta-xyloside. These results showed that CelM2 is a novel endo-type cellulase.

  3. 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins orthologous with pSymA-encoded proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: hypothetical roles in plant host interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L David Kuykendall

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021, a nitrogen-fixing, root-nodulating bacterial microsymbiont of alfalfa, has a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids including 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential 'accessory' genes for nitrogen fixation (nif, nodulation and host specificity (nod. A related bacterium, psyllid-vectored 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,' is an obligate phytopathogen with a reduced genome that was previously analyzed for genes orthologous to genes on the S. meliloti circular chromosome. In general, proteins encoded by pSymA genes are more similar in sequence alignment to those encoded by S. meliloti chromosomal orthologs than to orthologous proteins encoded by genes carried on the 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' genome. Only two 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins were identified as having orthologous proteins encoded on pSymA but not also encoded on the chromosome of S. meliloti. These two orthologous gene pairs encode a Na(+/K+ antiporter (shared with intracellular pathogens of the family Bartonellacea and a Co++, Zn++ and Cd++ cation efflux protein that is shared with the phytopathogen Agrobacterium. Another shared protein, a redox-regulated K+ efflux pump may regulate cytoplasmic pH and homeostasis. The pSymA and 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' orthologs of the latter protein are more highly similar in amino acid alignment compared with the alignment of the pSymA-encoded protein with its S. meliloti chromosomal homolog. About 182 pSymA encoded proteins have sequence similarity (≤ E-10 with 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins, often present as multiple orthologs of single 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins. These proteins are involved with amino acid uptake, cell surface structure, chaperonins, electron transport, export of bioactive molecules, cellular homeostasis, regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and synthesis of amino acids and metabolic cofactors. The presence of multiple orthologs defies mutational

  4. Genome analysis and identification of gelatinase encoded gene in Enterobacter aerogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahimi, Safiyyah; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Khalid, Rozida Abdul; Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Lamri, Mohd Fadly; Bakar, Mohd Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, bioinformatic analysis towards genome sequence of E. aerogenes was done to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hot spring water and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and fish gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species gelatine, respectively. Enterobacter aerogenes was partially genome sequenced resulting in 5.0 mega basepair (Mbp) total size of sequence. From pre-process pipeline, 87.6 Mbp of total reads, 68.8 Mbp of total high quality reads and 78.58 percent of high quality percentage was determined. Genome assembly produced 120 contigs with 67.5% of contigs over 1 kilo base pair (kbp), 124856 bp of N50 contig length and 55.17 % of GC base content percentage. About 4705 protein gene was identified from protein prediction analysis. Two candidate genes selected have highest similarity identity percentage against gelatinase enzyme available in Swiss-Prot and NCBI online database. They were NODE_9_length_26866_cov_148.013245_12 containing 1029 base pair (bp) sequence with 342 amino acid sequence and NODE_24_length_155103_cov_177.082458_62 which containing 717 bp sequence with 238 amino acid sequence, respectively. Thus, two paired of primers (forward and reverse) were designed, based on the open reading frame (ORF) of selected genes. Genome analysis of E. aerogenes resulting genes encoded gelatinase were identified.

  5. Cloning and characterization of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides) myostatin encoding gene and its promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie; Bai, Junjie; Wang, Lin

    2008-08-01

    Myostatin or GDF-8, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, has been demonstrated to be a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. In the present study, we obtained a 5.64 kb sequence of myostatin encoding gene and its promoter from largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides). The myostatin encoding gene consisted of three exons (488 bp, 371 bp and 1779 bp, respectively) and two introns (390 bp and 855 bp, respectively). The intron-exon boundaries were conservative in comparison with those of mammalian myostatin encoding genes, whereas the size of introns was smaller than that of mammals. Sequence analysis of 1.569 kb of the largemouth bass myostatin gene promoter region revealed that it contained two TATA boxes, one CAAT box and nine putative E-boxes. Putative muscle growth response elements for myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), serum response factor (SRF), activator protein 1 (AP1), etc., and muscle-specific Mt binding site (MTBF) were also detected. Some of the transcription factor binding sites were conserved among five teleost species. This information will be useful for studying the transcriptional regulation of myostatin in fish.

  6. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. L. Smith

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX, encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/ containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and

  7. Co-transcriptional folding is encoded within RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós István

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the existing RNA structure prediction programs fold a completely synthesized RNA molecule. However, within the cell, RNA molecules emerge sequentially during the directed process of transcription. Dedicated experiments with individual RNA molecules have shown that RNA folds while it is being transcribed and that its correct folding can also depend on the proper speed of transcription. Methods The main aim of this work is to study if and how co-transcriptional folding is encoded within the primary and secondary structure of RNA genes. In order to achieve this, we study the known primary and secondary structures of a comprehensive data set of 361 RNA genes as well as a set of 48 RNA sequences that are known to differ from the originally transcribed sequence units. We detect co-transcriptional folding by defining two measures of directedness which quantify the extend of asymmetry between alternative helices that lie 5' and those that lie 3' of the known helices with which they compete. Results We show with statistical significance that co-transcriptional folding strongly influences RNA sequences in two ways: (1 alternative helices that would compete with the formation of the functional structure during co-transcriptional folding are suppressed and (2 the formation of transient structures which may serve as guidelines for the co-transcriptional folding pathway is encouraged. Conclusions These findings have a number of implications for RNA secondary structure prediction methods and the detection of RNA genes.

  8. Isolation and characterization of the gene encoding the starch debranching enzyme limit dextrinase from germinating barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Lok, Finn; Planchot, Véronique

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding the starch debranching enzyme limit dextrinase, LD, from barley (Hordeum vulgare), was isolated from a genomic phage library using a barley cDNA clone as probe. The gene encodes a protein of 904 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 98.6 kDa. This is in agreement...... with a value of 105 kDa estimated by SDS;;PAGE, The coding sequence is interrupted by 26 introns varying in length from 93 bp to 825 bp. The 27 exons vary in length from 53 bp to 197 bp. Southern blot analysis shows that the limit dextrinase gene is present as a single copy in the barley genome. Gene...... expression is high during germination and the steady state transcription level reaches a maximum at day 5 of germination. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to the protein sequence of limit dextrinase purified from germinating malt, as determined by automated N-terminal sequencing of tryptic...

  9. Isolation and characterization of the gene encoding the starch debranching enzyme limit dextrinase from germinating barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Lok, Finn; Planchot, Véronique

    1999-01-01

    with a value of 105 kDa estimated by SDS;;PAGE, The coding sequence is interrupted by 26 introns varying in length from 93 bp to 825 bp. The 27 exons vary in length from 53 bp to 197 bp. Southern blot analysis shows that the limit dextrinase gene is present as a single copy in the barley genome. Gene......The gene encoding the starch debranching enzyme limit dextrinase, LD, from barley (Hordeum vulgare), was isolated from a genomic phage library using a barley cDNA clone as probe. The gene encodes a protein of 904 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 98.6 kDa. This is in agreement...... expression is high during germination and the steady state transcription level reaches a maximum at day 5 of germination. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to the protein sequence of limit dextrinase purified from germinating malt, as determined by automated N-terminal sequencing of tryptic...

  10. Asthma and genes encoding components of the vitamin D pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raby Benjamin A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants at the vitamin D receptor (VDR locus are associated with asthma and atopy. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in other genes of the vitamin D pathway are associated with asthma or atopy. Methods Eleven candidate genes were chosen for this study, five of which code for proteins in the vitamin D metabolism pathway (CYP27A1, CYP27B1, CYP2R1, CYP24A1, GC and six that are known to be transcriptionally regulated by vitamin D (IL10, IL1RL1, CD28, CD86, IL8, SKIIP. For each gene, we selected a maximally informative set of common SNPs (tagSNPs using the European-derived (CEU HapMap dataset. A total of 87 SNPs were genotyped in a French-Canadian family sample ascertained through asthmatic probands (388 nuclear families, 1064 individuals and evaluated using the Family Based Association Test (FBAT program. We then sought to replicate the positive findings in four independent samples: two from Western Canada, one from Australia and one from the USA (CAMP. Results A number of SNPs in the IL10, CYP24A1, CYP2R1, IL1RL1 and CD86 genes were modestly associated with asthma and atopy (p IL10 and VDR genes as well as in the IL10 and IL1RL1 genes were associated with asthma (p IL10 and CYP24A1 genes were again modestly associated with asthma and atopy (p IL10 and VDR was replicated in CAMP, but not in the other populations. Conclusion A number of genes involved in the vitamin D pathway demonstrate modest levels of association with asthma and atopy. Multilocus models testing genes in the same pathway are potentially more effective to evaluate the risk of asthma, but the effects are not uniform across populations.

  11. Nitrilase and Fhit homologs are encoded as fusion proteins in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarsky, Yuri; Campiglio, Manuela; Siprashvili, Zurab; Druck, Teresa; Sedkov, Yurii; Tillib, Sergei; Draganescu, Alexandra; Wermuth, Peter; Rothman, Joel H.; Huebner, Kay; Buchberg, Arthur M.; Mazo, Alexander; Brenner, Charles; Croce, Carlo M.

    1998-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene FHIT encompasses the common human chromosomal fragile site at 3p14.2 and numerous cancer cell biallelic deletions. To study Fhit function we cloned and characterized FHIT genes from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. Both genes code for fusion proteins in which the Fhit domain is fused with a novel domain showing homology to bacterial and plant nitrilases; the D. melanogaster fusion protein exhibited diadenosine triphosphate (ApppA) hydrolase activity expected of an authentic Fhit homolog. In human and mouse, the nitrilase homologs and Fhit are encoded by two different genes: FHIT and NIT1, localized on chromosomes 3 and 1 in human, and 14 and 1 in mouse, respectively. We cloned and characterized human and murine NIT1 genes and determined their exon-intron structure, patterns of expression, and alternative processing of their mRNAs. The tissue specificity of expression of murine Fhit and Nit1 genes was nearly identical. Because fusion proteins with dual or triple enzymatic activities have been found to carry out specific steps in a given biochemical or biosynthetic pathway, we postulate that Fhit and Nit1 likewise collaborate in a biochemical or cellular pathway in mammalian cells. PMID:9671749

  12. Annotation and analysis of malic enzyme genes encoding for multiple isoforms in the fungus Mucor circinelloides CBS 277.49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Zhang, Yingtong; Chen, Wei; Ratledge, Colin; Song, Yuanda

    2012-05-01

    Based on the newly-released genomic data of Mucor circinelloides CBS 277.49, we have annotated five genes encoding for malic enzyme: all code for proteins that contain conserved domains/motifs for malic acid binding, NAD(+) binding and NAD(P)(+) binding. Phylogenetic analysis for malic enzyme genes showed that genes ID 78524 and 11639 share ~80% amino acid identity and are grouped in cluster 1; genes ID 182779, 186772 and 116127 share ~66% amino acid identity are grouped in cluster 2. Genes ID 78524, 11639 and 166127 produce proteins that are localized in the mitochondrion, while the products from genes 182779 and 186772 are localized in the cytosol. Based on the comparative analysis published previously by Song et al. (Microbiology 147:1507-1515, 2001), we propose that malic enzyme genes ID 78524, 166127, 182779, 186772, 11639, respectively, represent protein isoforms I, II, III/IV, V, and VI.

  13. Direct Pathogenic Effects of HERV-encoded Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Tranberg; Møller-Larsen, Anné; Petersen, Thor

    in increased amounts on B cells from MS patients. Furthermore, the amount of anti-HERV antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with MS is increased when compared with healthy controls. Aim: The overall aim of this project is to investigate the potential role of HERVs in the development of MS......Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). MS is mediated by the immune system but the etiology of the disease remains unknown. Retroviral envelope (Env) proteins, encoded by human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), are expressed...... of Env-induced apoptosis/necrosis in CNS cells will be performed by both DNA fragmentation ELISA and qPCR. Furthermore, the cellular localization of HERV-antigens on cells from patients with MS will be determined by confocal microscopy. A flow cytometric/confocal method has been optimized...

  14. NOF1 encodes an Arabidopsis protein involved in the control of rRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwana Harscoët

    Full Text Available The control of ribosomal RNA biogenesis is essential for the regulation of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the characterization of NOF1 that encodes a putative nucleolar protein involved in the control of rRNA expression in Arabidopsis. The gene has been isolated by T-DNA tagging and its function verified by the characterization of a second allele and genetic complementation of the mutants. The nof1 mutants are affected in female gametogenesis and embryo development. This result is consistent with the detection of NOF1 mRNA in all tissues throughout plant life's cycle, and preferentially in differentiating cells. Interestingly, the closely related proteins from zebra fish and yeast are also necessary for cell division and differentiation. We showed that the nof1-1 mutant displays higher rRNA expression and hypomethylation of rRNA promoter. Taken together, the results presented here demonstrated that NOF1 is an Arabidopsis gene involved in the control of rRNA expression, and suggested that it encodes a putative nucleolar protein, the function of which may be conserved in eukaryotes.

  15. Selection and characterization of forest soil metagenome genes encoding lipolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kyung Sik; Lim, He Kyoung; Chung, Eu Jin; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Cho, Kwang Yun; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2007-10-01

    A metagenome is a unique resource to search for novel microbial enzymes from the unculturable microorganisms in soil. A forest soil metagenomic library using a fosmid and soil microbial DNA from Gwangneung forest, Korea, was constructed in Escherichia coli and screened to select lipolytic genes. A total of seven unique lipolytic clones were selected by screening of the 31,000-member forest soil metagenome library based on tributyrin hydrolysis. The ORFs for lipolytic activity were subcloned in a high copy number plasmid by screening the secondary shortgun libraries from the seven clones. Since the lipolytic enzymes were well secreted in E. coli into the culture broth, the lipolytic activity of the subclones was confirmed by the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate using culture broth. Deduced amino acid sequence analysis of the identified ORFs for lipolytic activity revealed that 4 genes encode hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in lipase family IV. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 4 proteins were clustered with HSL in the database and other metagenomic HSLs. The other 2 genes and 1 gene encode non-heme peroxidase-like enzymes of lipase family V and a GDSL family esterase/lipase in family II, respectively. The gene for the GDSL enzyme is the first description of the enzyme from metagenomic screening.

  16. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  17. The gene encoding acyl-CoA-binding protein is subject to metabolic regulation by both sterol regulatory element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Bloksgaard, Maria; Duran-Sandoval, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    that ACBP expression is significantly lower in livers from PPARalpha knock-out mice than in livers from wild type mice. In conclusion, expression of ACBP in rodent hepatocytes is subject to dual metabolic regulation by PPARalpha and SREBP-1c, which may reflect the need for ACBP during lipogenic as well...... observation that ACBP expression in rodent liver is down-regulated by fasting, and we show that insulin but not glucose is the inducer of ACBP expression in primary rat hepatocytes. In keeping with the regulation by insulin, we show that ACBP is a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) target...

  18. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more...... that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non...... evidence that, for many of the complex diseases studied here, common genetic associations implicate regions encoding proteins that physically interact in a preferential manner, in line with observations in Mendelian disease....

  19. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: The DAMAGE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; van 't Riet, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes...

  20. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB Gene Encodes a Diheme Ferric Reductase ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria. PMID:21705608

  1. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB gene encodes a diheme ferric reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K; O'Brian, Mark R

    2011-08-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria.

  2. [Cloning, prokaryotic expression and antibacterial assay of Tenecin gene encoding an antibacterial peptide from Tenebrio molitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yu-xin; Li, Chao-pin

    2011-12-01

    To clone tenecin gene, an antibacterial peptide gene, from Tenebrio molitor for its prokaryotic expression and explore the molecular mechanism for regulating the expression of antibacterial peptide in Tenebrio molitor larvae. The antibacterial peptide was induced from the larvae of Tenebrio molitor by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli DH-5α (1×10(8)/ml). RT-PCR was performed 72 h after the injection to clone Tenecin gene followed by sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. The recombinant expression vector pET-28a(+)-Tenecin was constructed and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) cells and the expression of tenecin protein was observed after IPTG induction. Tenecin expression was detected in transformed E.coli using SDS-PAGE after 1 mmol/L IPTG induction. Tenecin gene, which was about 255 bp in length, encoded Tenecin protein with a relative molecular mass of 9 kD. Incubation of E.coli with 80, 60, 40, and 20 µg/ml tenecin for 18 h resulted in a diameter of the inhibition zone of 25.1∓0.03, 20.7∓0.06, 17.2∓0.11 and 9.3∓0.04 mm, respectively. Tenecin protein possesses strong antibacterial activity against E. coli DH-5α, which warrants further study of this protein for its potential as an antibacterial agent in clinical application.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a glutathione S-transferase encoding gene from Opisthorchis viverrini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eursitthichai, Veerachai; Viyanant, Vithoon; Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Sobhon, Prasert; Tesana, Smarn; Upatham, Suchart Edward; Hofmann, Annemarie; Korge, Günter; Grams, Rudi

    2004-12-01

    An adult stage Opisthorchis viverrini cDNA library was constructed and screened for abundant transcripts. One of the isolated cDNAs was found by sequence comparison to encode a glutathione S-transferase (GST) and was further analyzed for RNA expression, encoded protein function, tissue distribution and cross-reactivity of the encoded protein with other trematode protein counterparts. The cDNA has a size of 893 bp and encodes a GST of 213 amino acids length (OV28GST). The most closely-related GST of OV28GST among those published for trematodes is a 28 kDa GST of Clonorchis sinensis as shown by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. Northern analysis of total RNA with a gene-specific probe revealed a 900 nucleotide OV28GST transcriptional product in the adult parasite. Through RNA in situ hybridization OV28GST RNA was detected in the parenchymal cells of adult parasites. This result was confirmed by immunolocalization of OV28GST with an antiserum generated in a mouse against bacterially-produced recombinant OV28GST. Both, purified recombinant and purified native OV28GST were resolved as 28 kDa proteins by SDS-PAGE. Using the anti-recOV28GST antiserum, no or only weak cross-reactivity was observed in an immunoblot of crude worm extracts against the GSTs of Schistosoma mansoni, S. japonicum, S. mekongi, Eurytrema spp. and Fasciola gigantica. The enzyme activity of the purified recombinant OV28GST was verified by a standard 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) based activity assay. The present results of our molecular analysis of OV28GST should be helpful in the ongoing development of diagnostic applications for opisthorchiasis viverrini.

  4. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Alok; Datta, Subhojit; Thakur, Shallu; Shukla, Alok; Ansari, Jamal; Sujayanand, G K; Chaturvedi, Sushil K; Kumar, P A; Singh, N P

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping and generation of chimeric insecticidal crystal protein is an emerging area of insect pest management. The lepidopteran insect pest, gram pod borer ( Helicoverpa armigera H.) wreaks havoc to chickpea crop affecting production. Lepidopteran insects were reported to be controlled by Bt ( cryI ) genes. We designed a plant codon optimized chimeric Bt gene ( cry1Aabc ) using three domains from three different cry1A genes (domains I, II, and III from cry1Aa , cry1Ab , and cry1Ac , respectively) and expressed it under the control of a constitutive promoter in chickpea ( cv . DCP92-3) to assess its effect on gram pod borer. A total of six transgenic chickpea shoots were established by grafting into mature fertile plants. The in vitro regenerated (organogenetic) shoots were selected based on antibiotic kanamycin monosulfate (100 mg/L) with transformation efficiency of 0.076%. Three transgenic events were extensively studied based on gene expression pattern and insect mortality across generations. Protein expression in pod walls, immature seeds and leaves (pre- and post-flowering) were estimated and expression in pre-flowering stage was found higher than that of post-flowering. Analysis for the stable integration, expression and insect mortality (detached leaf and whole plant bioassay) led to identification of efficacious transgenic chickpea lines. The chimeric cry1Aabc expressed in chickpea is effective against gram pod borer and generated events can be utilized in transgenic breeding program.

  5. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Das

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Domain swapping and generation of chimeric insecticidal crystal protein is an emerging area of insect pest management. The lepidopteran insect pest, gram pod borer (Helicoverpa armigera H. wreaks havoc to chickpea crop affecting production. Lepidopteran insects were reported to be controlled by Bt (cryI genes. We designed a plant codon optimized chimeric Bt gene (cry1Aabc using three domains from three different cry1A genes (domains I, II, and III from cry1Aa, cry1Ab, and cry1Ac, respectively and expressed it under the control of a constitutive promoter in chickpea (cv. DCP92-3 to assess its effect on gram pod borer. A total of six transgenic chickpea shoots were established by grafting into mature fertile plants. The in vitro regenerated (organogenetic shoots were selected based on antibiotic kanamycin monosulfate (100 mg/L with transformation efficiency of 0.076%. Three transgenic events were extensively studied based on gene expression pattern and insect mortality across generations. Protein expression in pod walls, immature seeds and leaves (pre- and post-flowering were estimated and expression in pre-flowering stage was found higher than that of post-flowering. Analysis for the stable integration, expression and insect mortality (detached leaf and whole plant bioassay led to identification of efficacious transgenic chickpea lines. The chimeric cry1Aabc expressed in chickpea is effective against gram pod borer and generated events can be utilized in transgenic breeding program.

  6. Detection of the mosquitocidal toxin genes encoding Cry11 proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis using a novel PCR-RFLP method Detección de genes que codifican proteínas mosquitocidas Cry11 de Bacillus thuringiensis mediante un método de PCR-RFLP novedoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Sauka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method for detection of cry11 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis was established. Based on the analysis of conserved regions of the cry11 genes, 2 oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 1459-bp fragment of the cry11Aa gene, and a 1471-bp of the cry11Ba and cry11Bb genes. The amplification products were digested with restriction endonuclease HinfI. Exotic B. thuringiensis strains and native isolates collected from soils, leaves and stored product dust of Argentina were analyzed to study the distribution of cry11 genes. The PCR-RFLP patterns revealed the detection of cry11 genes in 3 of 64 exotic strains and in 10 of 107 native B. thuringiensis isolates tested. Just the cry11Aa gene subclass was detected among these bacteria. Since the methodology was also developed to detect cry11Ba and cry11Bb genes, an experimental future confirmation will be required. Based on the results obtained, the PCR-RFLP method presented may be a valuable tool for specific detection of the mosquitocidal toxin genes encoding Cry11 proteins from B. thuringiensis.En el presente estudio se estableció una estrategia basada en la amplificación génica (PCR y el posterior análisis de restricción (RFLP para detectar todos los genes cry11 de Bacillus thuringiensis informados hasta ahora. De acuerdo con el análisis de las regiones conservadas en los genes cry11, se diseñaron dos cebadores para amplificar un fragmento de 1459 pb de los genes cry11Aa y un fragmento de 1471 pb de los genes cry11Ba y cry11Bb. Los productos de la amplificación fueron digeridos con la enzima de restricción HinfI. Se analizaron cepas exóticas de B. thuringiensis y aislamientos nativos de Argentina obtenidos a partir de muestras de suelos, hojas y polvillo de silos, para estudiar la distribución de los genes cry11. Los patrones de PCR-RFLP revelaron la presencia de genes cry11 en 3 de las 64 cepas ex

  7. RPG: the Ribosomal Protein Gene database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Akihiro; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2004-01-01

    RPG (http://ribosome.miyazaki-med.ac.jp/) is a new database that provides detailed information about ribosomal protein (RP) genes. It contains data from humans and other organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharo myces cerevisiae, Methanococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli. Users can search the database by gene name and organism. Each record includes sequences (genomic, cDNA and amino acid sequences), intron/exon structures, genomic locations and information about orthologs. In addition, users can view and compare the gene structures of the above organisms and make multiple amino acid sequence alignments. RPG also provides information on small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that are encoded in the introns of RP genes.

  8. Identification and cloning of two insecticidal protein genes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most widely applied type of microbial pesticide due to its high specificity and environmental safety. The activity of Bt is largely attributed to the insecticidal crystal protein encoded by the cry genes. Different insecticidal crystal proteins of Bt have different bioactivity against distinct agricultural ...

  9. The early UL31 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has a nuclear localization signal sequence at the C-terminus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seongman; Chul Ahn, Byung; O' Callaghan, Dennis J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932 (United States); Kim, Seong Kee, E-mail: skim1@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932 (United States)

    2012-10-25

    The amino acid sequence of the UL31 protein (UL31P) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has homology to that of the ICP8 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Here we show that the UL31 gene is synergistically trans-activated by the IEP and the UL5P (EICP27). Detection of the UL31 RNA transcript and the UL31P in EHV-1-infected cells at 6 h post-infection (hpi) as well as metabolic inhibition assays indicated that UL31 is an early gene. The UL31P preferentially bound to single-stranded DNA over double-stranded DNA in gel shift assays. Subcellular localization of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-UL31 fusion proteins revealed that the C-terminal 32 amino acid residues of the UL31P are responsible for the nuclear localization. These findings may contribute to defining the role of the UL31P single-stranded DNA-binding protein in EHV-1 DNA replication.

  10. The early UL31 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has a nuclear localization signal sequence at the C-terminus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seongman; Chul Ahn, Byung; O’Callaghan, Dennis J.; Kim, Seong Kee

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the UL31 protein (UL31P) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has homology to that of the ICP8 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Here we show that the UL31 gene is synergistically trans-activated by the IEP and the UL5P (EICP27). Detection of the UL31 RNA transcript and the UL31P in EHV-1-infected cells at 6 h post-infection (hpi) as well as metabolic inhibition assays indicated that UL31 is an early gene. The UL31P preferentially bound to single-stranded DNA over double-stranded DNA in gel shift assays. Subcellular localization of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)–UL31 fusion proteins revealed that the C-terminal 32 amino acid residues of the UL31P are responsible for the nuclear localization. These findings may contribute to defining the role of the UL31P single-stranded DNA-binding protein in EHV-1 DNA replication.

  11. Nonvirus encoded proteins could be embedded into Bombyx mori cypovirus polyhedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Ling; Xue, Ren-Yu; Cao, Guang-Li; Meng, Xiang-Kun; Zhu, Yue-Xiong; Pan, Zhong-Hua; Gong, Cheng-Liang

    2014-01-01

    To explore whether the nonvirus encoded protein could be embedded into Bombyx mori cypovirus (BmCPV) polyhedra. The stable transformants of BmN cells expressing a polyhedrin (Polh) gene of BmCPV were constructed by transfection with a non-transposon derived vector containing a polh gene. The polyhedra were purified from the midguts of BmCPV-infected silkworms and the transformed BmN cells, respectively. The proteins embedded into polyhedra were determined by mass spectrometry analysis. Host derived proteins were detected in the purified polyhedra. Analysis of structure and hydrophilicity of embedded proteins indicated that the hydrophilic proteins, in structure, were similar to the left-handed structure of polyhedrin or the N-terminal domain of BmCPV structural protein VP3, which were easily embedded into the BmCPV polyhedra. The lysate of polyhedra purified from the infected transformation of BmN cells with modified B. mori baculovirus BmPAK6 could infect BmN cells, indicating that B. mori baculovirus could be embedded into BmCPV polyhedra. Both the purified polyhedra and its lysate could be coloured by X-gal, indicating that the β-galactosidase expressed by BmPAK6 could be incorporated into BmCPV polyhedra. These results suggested that some heterologous proteins and baculovirus could be embedded into polyhedra in an unknown manner.

  12. Isolation and sequence analysis of the gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase from Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merico, A; Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Porro, D; Ranzi, B M; Compagno, C

    2001-06-30

    The ZbTPI1 gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) was cloned from a Zygosaccharomyces bailii genomic library by complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae tpi1 mutant strain. The nucleotide sequence of a 1.5 kb fragment showed an open reading frame (ORF) of 746 bp, encoding a protein of 248 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shares a high degree of homology with TIMs from other yeast species, including some highly conserved regions. The analysis of the promoter sequence of the ZbTPI1 revealed the presence of putative motifs known to have regulatory functions in S. cerevisiae. The GenBank Accession No. of ZbTPI1 is AF325852. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Identification and characterization of the Vibrio anguillarum prtV gene encoding a new metalloprotease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zhaolan; Guo, Dongsheng; Mao, Yunxiang; Ye, Xuhong; Zou, Yuxia; Xiao, Peng; Hao, Bin

    2010-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a prtV-like gene from Vibrio anguillarum M3 strain. This prtV gene encodes a putative protein of 918 amino acids, and is highly homologous to the V. cholerae prtV gene. We found that a prtV insertion mutant strain displayed lower gelatinase activity on gelatin agar, lower protease activity against azocasein, and lower activity for four glycosidases. This prtV mutant strain also had increased activity for two esterases in its extracellular products, as analyzed by the API ZYM system. In addition, the prtV mutant strain exhibited decreased growth in turbot intestinal mucus and reduced hemolytic activity on turbot erythrocytes. Infection experiments showed that the LD50 of the prtV mutant strain increased by at least 1 log compared to the wild-type in turbot fish. We propose that prtV plays an important role in the pathogenesis of V. anguillarum.

  14. Cloning of the mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, O; Yasui, Y; Sakai, Y; Watanabe, T; Ishii, K; Yanagihara, S; Andoh, T

    1993-03-30

    The mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 3512 bp was determined. The cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 767 amino acids (aa), which is 2 aa longer than its human counterpart. Overall aa sequence homology between the mouse and human, and between the mouse and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) sequences was 96% and 42%, respectively. The mouse TopI gene was mapped at position 54.5 on chromosome 2 from linkage analyses of a three-point cross test with Geg, Ada, and a as marker genes.

  15. New recombinant bacterium comprises a heterologous gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and/or an up-regulated native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase, useful for producing ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY FOCUS - BIOTECHNOLOGY - Preparation (claimed): Producing recombinant bacterium having enhanced ethanol production characteristics when cultivated in growth medium comprising glycerol comprises: (a) transforming a parental bacterium by (i) the insertion of a heterologous gene encoding...

  16. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  17. FGF-2 antisense RNA encodes a nuclear protein with MutT-like antimutator activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A W; Too, C K; Knee, R; Wilkinson, M; Murphy, P R

    1997-10-20

    Bidirectional transcription of the basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) gene gives rise to multiple polyadenylated sense mRNAs and a unique 1.5 kb antisense transcript (FGF-AS) which is complementary to the 3'-untranslated region of the FGF-2 mRNA. The rat FGF-AS cDNA encodes a novel 35 kDa nuclear protein (GFG) with homology to the MutT family of antimutator NTPases. Antibodies against the deduced amino acid sequence of GFG detected intense immunoreactivity in the nuclei of adult rat hepatocytes. Subcellular fractionation and Western blotting confirmed the presence of a 35 kDa immunoreactive protein in the nuclear fraction and, to a lesser extent, in the mitochondrial fractions of rat liver homogenates. Recombinant GFG suppressed the spontaneous mutation rate of MutT-deficient E. coli in a complementation assay. In-frame deletion of the 53 amino acids encompassing the MutT domain eliminated this activity, confirming the catalytic function of this region in the FGF antisense gene product. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the FGF-AS transcript encodes a functional nuclear protein with MutT-related enzymatic activity.

  18. The gene Sr33, an ortholog of barley Mla genes, encodes resistance to wheat stem rust race Ug99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Sambasivam; Moore, John; Ayliffe, Michael; Bansal, Urmil; Wang, Xiaojing; Huang, Li; Deal, Karin; Luo, Mingcheng; Kong, Xiuying; Bariana, Harbans; Mago, Rohit; McIntosh, Robert; Dodds, Peter; Dvorak, Jan; Lagudah, Evans

    2013-08-16

    Wheat stem rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, afflicts bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). New virulent races collectively referred to as "Ug99" have emerged, which threaten global wheat production. The wheat gene Sr33, introgressed from the wild relative Aegilops tauschii into bread wheat, confers resistance to diverse stem rust races, including the Ug99 race group. We cloned Sr33, which encodes a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat protein. Sr33 is orthologous to the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Mla mildew resistance genes that confer resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The wheat Sr33 gene functions independently of RAR1, SGT1, and HSP90 chaperones. Haplotype analysis from diverse collections of Ae. tauschii placed the origin of Sr33 resistance near the southern coast of the Caspian Sea.

  19. Ne2 encodes protein(s) and the altered RuBisCO could be the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si Rui Pan

    2017-06-17

    Jun 17, 2017 ... [Pan S. R., Pan X. L., Pan Q. Y., Shi Y. H., Zhang L., Fan Y. and Xue Y. R. 2017 Ne2 encodes protein(s) and the altered RuBisCO could be the proteomics leader of hybrid necrosis in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). J. Genet. 96, 261–271]. Introduction. The world is facing the challenge of producing more wheat.

  20. Large-scale analysis of NBS domain-encoding resistance gene analogs in Triticeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhia Bouktila

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins containing nucleotide binding sites (NBS encoded by plant resistance genes play an important role in the response of plants to a wide array of pathogens. In this paper, an in silico search was conducted in order to identify and characterize members of NBS-encoding gene family in the tribe of Triticeae. A final dataset of 199 sequences was obtained by four search methods. Motif analysis confirmed the general structural organization of the NBS domain in cereals, characterized by the presence of the six commonly conserved motifs: P-loop, RNBS-A, Kinase-2, Kinase-3a, RNBS-C and GLPL. We revealed the existence of 11 distinct distribution patterns of these motifs along the NBS domain. Four additional conserved motifs were shown to be significantly present in all 199 sequences. Phylogenetic analyses, based on genetic distance and parsimony, revealed a significant overlap between Triticeae sequences and Coiled coil-Nucleotide binding site-Leucine rich repeat (CNL-type functional genes from monocotyledons. Furthermore, several Triticeae sequences belonged to clades containing functional homologs from non Triticeae species, which has allowed for these sequences to be functionally assigned. The findings reported, in this study, will provide a strong groundwork for the isolation of candidate R-genes in Triticeae crops and the understanding of their evolution.

  1. ORF 2 from the Bacillus cereus linear plasmid pBClin15 encodes a DNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabell, F B; Egge-Jacobsen, W; Risøen, P A; Kolstø, A-B; Økstad, O A

    2009-01-01

    To isolate and identify DNA-binding protein(s) with affinity for the mobile chromosomal repeat element bcr1 in Bacillus cereus group bacteria. A biotinylated bcr1 element was immobilized to streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and used to pull out a 20 kDa DNA-binding protein from a whole cell protein extract of B. cereus ATCC 14579. The protein was identified as the product of ORF 2 encoded by the bacteriophage-related autonomously replicating linear genetic element pBClin15 carried by the strain. DNA binding was not bcr1-specific. By Northern blotting ORF 2 was co-transcribed with ORF 1, and also in certain instances with ORF 3 by transcriptional readthrough of the terminator located between ORF 2 and ORF 3. ORF 2 from pBClin15 encodes a DNA-binding protein. ORF 2 is co-transcribed with its upstream gene ORF 1, and in a subset of the transcripts also with the downstream gene ORF 3 through alternative transcription termination. The B. cereus group contains bacterial species of medical and economic importance. Bacteriophages or phage-encoded proteins from these bacteria have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents. Understanding the biology of bacteriophage-related genetic elements through functional characterization of their genes is of high relevance.

  2. Ty3 GAG3 and POL3 genes encode the components of intracellular particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L J; Chalker, D L; Orlinsky, K J; Sandmeyer, S B

    1992-03-01

    Ty3 is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae retrotransposon that integrates near the transcription initiation sites of polymerase III-transcribed genes. It is distinct from the copialike Ty1 and Ty2 retrotransposons of S. cerevisiae in both the sequences of encoded proteins and gene order. It is a member of the gypsylike family of retrotransposons which resemble animal retroviruses. This study was undertaken to investigate the nucleocapsid particle of a transpositionally active gypsylike retrotransposon. Characterization of extracts from cells in which Ty3 expression was induced showed the presence of Ty3 nucleoprotein complexes, or viruslike particles, that migrated on linear sucrose gradients with a size of 156S. These particles are composed of Ty3 RNA, full-length, linear DNA, and proteins. In this study, antibodies raised against peptides predicted from the Ty3 sequence were used to identify Ty3-encoded proteins. These include the capsid (26 kDa), nucleocapsid (9 kDa), and reverse transcriptase (55 kDa) proteins. Ty3 integrase proteins of 61 and 58 kDa were identified previously (L. J. Hansen and S. B. Sandmeyer, J. Virol. 64:2599-2607, 1990). Reverse transcriptase activity associated with the particles was measured by using exogenous and endogenous primer-templates. Immunofluorescence studies of cells overexpressing Ty3 revealed cytoplasmic clusters of immunoreactive proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Ty3 viruslike particles are about 50 nm in diameter. Thus, despite the unusual position specificity of Ty3 upstream of tRNA-coding regions, aspects of the Ty3 life cycle are fundamentally similar to those of retroviruses.

  3. Atypical DNA methylation of genes encoding cysteine-rich peptides in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Wanhui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plants, transposons and non-protein-coding repeats are epigenetically silenced by CG and non-CG methylation. This pattern of methylation is mediated in part by small RNAs and two specialized RNA polymerases, termed Pol IV and Pol V, in a process called RNA-directed DNA methylation. By contrast, many protein-coding genes transcribed by Pol II contain in their gene bodies exclusively CG methylation that is independent of small RNAs and Pol IV/Pol V activities. It is unclear how the different methylation machineries distinguish between transposons and genes. Here we report on a group of atypical genes that display in their coding region a transposon-like methylation pattern, which is associated with gene silencing in sporophytic tissues. Results We performed a methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis to search for targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana and identified several members of a gene family encoding cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs. In leaves, the CRP genes are silent and their coding regions contain dense, transposon-like methylation in CG, CHG and CHH contexts, which depends partly on the Pol IV/Pol V pathway and small RNAs. Methylation in the coding region is reduced, however, in the synergid cells of the female gametophyte, where the CRP genes are specifically expressed. Further demonstrating that expressed CRP genes lack gene body methylation, a CRP4-GFP fusion gene under the control of the constitutive 35 S promoter remains unmethylated in leaves and is transcribed to produce a translatable mRNA. By contrast, a CRP4-GFP fusion gene under the control of a CRP4 promoter fragment acquires CG and non-CG methylation in the CRP coding region in leaves similar to the silent endogenous CRP4 gene. Conclusions Unlike CG methylation in gene bodies, which does not dramatically affect Pol II transcription, combined CG and non-CG methylation in CRP coding regions is likely to

  4. Regulation of the ald Gene Encoding Alanine Dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding l-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of l-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of l-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of l-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by l-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N2-ATC-N2-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N2-GTT-N2-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of l-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine. PMID:23749971

  5. Identification of Genes Encoding Granule-Bound Starch Synthase Involved in Amylose Metabolism in Banana Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weixin; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage. PMID:24505384

  6. Identification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase involved in amylose metabolism in banana fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Miao

    Full Text Available Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage.

  7. Identification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase involved in amylose metabolism in banana fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongxia; Sun, Peiguang; Liu, Weixin; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage.

  8. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  9. Effects of TCDD on the expression of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lynn, Scott G.; LaPres, John J.; Zacharewski, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 μg/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 h) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change| > 1.5 and P-value < 0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a sigmoidal or exponential dose-response profile (0.03 to 300 μg/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 h. Dose-responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of all 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity.

  10. A highly conserved NB-LRR encoding gene cluster effective against Setosphaeria turcica in sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tom

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungal pathogen Setosphaeria turcica causes turcicum or northern leaf blight disease on maize, sorghum and related grasses. A prevalent foliar disease found worldwide where the two host crops, maize and sorghum are grown. The aim of the present study was to find genes controlling the host defense response to this devastating plant pathogen. A cDNA-AFLP approach was taken to identify candidate sequences, which functions were further validated via virus induced gene silencing (VIGS, and real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to address evolutionary events. Results cDNA-AFLP analysis was run on susceptible and resistant sorghum and maize genotypes to identify resistance-related sequences. One CC-NB-LRR encoding gene GRMZM2G005347 was found among the up-regulated maize transcripts after fungal challenge. The new plant resistance gene was designated as St referring to S. turcica. Genome sequence comparison revealed that the CC-NB-LRR encoding St genes are located on chromosome 2 in maize, and on chromosome 5 in sorghum. The six St sorghum genes reside in three pairs in one locus. When the sorghum St genes were silenced via VIGS, the resistance was clearly compromised, an observation that was supported by real-time PCR. Database searches and phylogenetic analysis suggest that the St genes have a common ancestor present before the grass subfamily split 50-70 million years ago. Today, 6 genes are present in sorghum, 9 in rice and foxtail millet, respectively, 3 in maize and 4 in Brachypodium distachyon. The St gene homologs have all highly conserved sequences, and commonly reside as gene pairs in the grass genomes. Conclusions Resistance genes to S. turcica, with a CC-NB-LRR protein domain architecture, have been found in maize and sorghum. VIGS analysis revealed their importance in the surveillance to S. turcica in sorghum. The St genes are highly conserved in sorghum, rice, foxtail millet, maize and

  11. Fluorescent proteins as genetically encoded FRET biosensors in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Garcia, Alan Pardo; Schmid, Johannes A

    2015-10-16

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  12. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Hochreiter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a cleavage; (b conformational-change; (c mechanical force and (d changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  13. The immune gene repertoire encoded in the purple sea urchin genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Taku; Loza-Coll, Mariano; Messier, Cynthia; Majeske, Audrey J; Cohen, Avis H; Terwilliger, David P; Buckley, Katherine M; Brockton, Virginia; Nair, Sham V; Berney, Kevin; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Anderson, Michele K; Pancer, Zeev; Cameron, R Andrew; Smith, L Courtney; Rast, Jonathan P

    2006-12-01

    Echinoderms occupy a critical and largely unexplored phylogenetic vantage point from which to infer both the early evolution of bilaterian immunity and the underpinnings of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Here we present an initial survey of the purple sea urchin genome for genes associated with immunity. An elaborate repertoire of potential immune receptors, regulators and effectors is present, including unprecedented expansions of innate pathogen recognition genes. These include a diverse array of 222 Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes and a coordinate expansion of directly associated signaling adaptors. Notably, a subset of sea urchin TLR genes encodes receptors with structural characteristics previously identified only in protostomes. A similarly expanded set of 203 NOD/NALP-like cytoplasmic recognition proteins is present. These genes have previously been identified only in vertebrates where they are represented in much lower numbers. Genes that mediate the alternative and lectin complement pathways are described, while gene homologues of the terminal pathway are not present. We have also identified several homologues of genes that function in jawed vertebrate adaptive immunity. The most striking of these is a gene cluster with similarity to the jawed vertebrate Recombination Activating Genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/2). Sea urchins are long-lived, complex organisms and these findings reveal an innate immune system of unprecedented complexity. Whether the presumably intense selective processes that molded these gene families also gave rise to novel immune mechanisms akin to adaptive systems remains to be seen. The genome sequence provides immediate opportunities to apply the advantages of the sea urchin model toward problems in developmental and evolutionary immunobiology.

  14. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding...

  15. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the gene encoding the extracellular metalloprotease of Aeromonas caviae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, K; Toma, C; Honma, Y

    2000-01-01

    A gene (apk) encoding the extracellular protease of Aeromonas caviae Ae6 has been cloned and sequenced. For cloning the gene, the DNA genomic library was screened using skim milk LB agar. One clone harboring plasmid pKK3 was selected for sequencing. Nucleotide sequencing of the 3.5 kb region of pKK3 revealed a single open reading frame (ORF) of 1,785 bp encoding 595 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide contained a putative 16-amino acid signal peptide followed by a large propeptide. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified recombinant protein (APK) was consistent with the DNA sequence. This result suggested a mature protein of 412 amino acids with a molecular mass of 44 kDa. However, the molecular mass of purified recombinant APK revealed 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, suggesting that further processing at the C-terminal region took place. The 2 motifs of zinc binding sites deduced are highly conserved in the APK as well as in other zinc metalloproteases including Vibrio proteolyticus neutral protease, Emp V from Vibrio vulnificus, HA/P from Vibrio cholerae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by EDTA, Zincov, 1,10-phenanthroline and tetraethylenepentamine while unaffected by the other inhibitors tested. The protease showed maximum activity at pH 7.0 and was inactivated by heating at 80 C for 15 min. These results together suggest that APK belongs to the thermolysin family of metalloendopeptidases.

  16. Three synonymous genes encode calmodulin in a reptile, the Japanese tortoise, Clemmys japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji Shimoda

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Three distinct calmodulin (CaM-encoding cDNAs were isolated from a reptile, the Japanese tortoise (Clemmys japonica, based on degenerative primer PCR. Because of synonymous codon usages, the deduced amino acid (aa sequences were exactly the same in all three genes and identical to the aa sequence of vertebrate CaM. The three cDNAs, referred to as CaM-A, -B, and -C, seemed to belong to the same type as CaMI, CaMII, and CaMIII, respectively, based on their sequence identity with those of the mammalian cDNAs and the glutamate codon biases. Northern blot analysis detected CaM-A and -B as bands corresponding to 1.8 kb, with the most abundant levels in the brain and testis, while CaM-C was detected most abundantly in the brain as bands of 1.4 and 2.0 kb. Our results indicate that, in the tortoise, CaM protein is encoded by at least three non-allelic genes, and that the ‘multigene-one protein' principle of CaM synthesis is applicable to all classes of vertebrates, from fishes to mammals.

  17. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes between Brassica species and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingyin; Tehrim, Sadia; Zhang, Fengqi; Tong, Chaobo; Huang, Junyan; Cheng, Xiaohui; Dong, Caihua; Zhou, Yanqiu; Qin, Rui; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi

    2014-01-03

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes with the nucleotide binding site (NBS) play an important role in offering resistance to pathogens. The availability of complete genome sequences of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa provides an important opportunity for researchers to identify and characterize NBS-encoding R genes in Brassica species and to compare with analogues in Arabidopsis thaliana based on a comparative genomics approach. However, little is known about the evolutionary fate of NBS-encoding genes in the Brassica lineage after split from A. thaliana. Here we present genome-wide analysis of NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana. Through the employment of HMM search and manual curation, we identified 157, 206 and 167 NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis among 3 species classified NBS-encoding genes into 6 subgroups. Tandem duplication and whole genome triplication (WGT) analyses revealed that after WGT of the Brassica ancestor, NBS-encoding homologous gene pairs on triplicated regions in Brassica ancestor were deleted or lost quickly, but NBS-encoding genes in Brassica species experienced species-specific gene amplification by tandem duplication after divergence of B. rapa and B. oleracea. Expression profiling of NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs indicated the differential expression pattern of retained orthologous gene copies in B. oleracea and B. rapa. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis of CNL type NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs among 3 species suggested that orthologous genes in B. rapa species have undergone stronger negative selection than those in B .oleracea species. But for TNL type, there are no significant differences in the orthologous gene pairs between the two species. This study is first identification and characterization of NBS-encoding genes in B. rapa and B. oleracea based on whole genome sequences. Through tandem duplication and whole genome

  18. Oncoprotein AEG-1 is an Endoplasmic Reticulum RNA Binding Protein Whose Interactome is Enriched In Organelle Resident Protein-Encoding mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jack C-C; Reid, David W; Hoffman, Alyson M; Sarkar, Devanand; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2018-02-07

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), an oncogene whose overexpression promotes tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and enhanced chemoresistance, is thought to function primarily as a scaffolding protein, regulating PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Here we report that AEG-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident integral membrane RNA-binding protein (RBP). Examination of the AEG-1 RNA interactome by HITS-CLIP and PAR-CLIP methodologies revealed a high enrichment for endomembrane organelle-encoding transcripts, most prominently those encoding ER resident proteins, and within this cohort, for integral membrane protein-encoding RNAs. Cluster mapping of the AEG-1/RNA interaction sites demonstrated a normalized rank order interaction of coding sequence > 5' untranslated region, with 3' untranslated region interactions only weakly represented. Intriguingly, AEG-1/membrane protein mRNA interaction sites clustered downstream of encoded transmembrane domains, suggestive of a role in membrane protein biogenesis. Secretory and cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs were also represented in the AEG-1 RNA interactome, with the latter category notably enriched in genes functioning in mRNA localization, translational regulation, and RNA quality control. Bioinformatic analyses of RNA binding motifs and predicted secondary structure characteristics indicate that AEG-1 lacks established RNA binding sites though shares the property of high intrinsic disorder commonly seen in RBPs. These data implicate AEG-1 in the localization and regulation of secretory and membrane protein-encoding mRNAs and provide a framework for understanding AEG-1 function in health and disease. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Characterization of the FKBP12-Encoding Genes in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Falloon

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis, largely caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, is responsible for a growing number of deaths among immunosuppressed patients. Immunosuppressants such as FK506 (tacrolimus that target calcineurin have shown promise for antifungal drug development. FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs form a complex with calcineurin in the presence of FK506 (FKBP12-FK506 and inhibit calcineurin activity. Research on FKBPs in fungi is limited, and none of the FKBPs have been previously characterized in A. fumigatus. We identified four orthologous genes of FKBP12, the human FK506 binding partner, in A. fumigatus and designated them fkbp12-1, fkbp12-2, fkbp12-3, and fkbp12-4. Deletional analysis of the four genes revealed that the Δfkbp12-1 strain was resistant to FK506, indicating FKBP12-1 as the key mediator of FK506-binding to calcineurin. The endogenously expressed FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein localized to the cytoplasm and nuclei under normal growth conditions but also to the hyphal septa following FK506 treatment, revealing its interaction with calcineurin. The FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein didn't localize at the septa in the presence of FK506 in the cnaA deletion background, confirming its interaction with calcineurin. Testing of all deletion strains in the Galleria mellonella model of aspergillosis suggested that these proteins don't play an important role in virulence. While the Δfkbp12-2 and Δfkbp12-3 strains didn't show any discernable phenotype, the Δfkbp12-4 strain displayed slight growth defect under normal growth conditions and inhibition of the caspofungin-mediated "paradoxical growth effect" at higher concentrations of the antifungal caspofungin. Together, these results indicate that while only FKBP12-1 is the bona fide binding partner of FK506, leading to the inhibition of calcineurin in A. fumigatus, FKBP12-4 may play a role in basal growth and the caspofungin-mediated paradoxical growth response. Exploitation of differences between A

  20. A gene encoding phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase from Acetobacter aceti and some properties of its disruptant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, T; Kashima, Y; Kosugi, A; Koizumi, Y; Yanagida, F; Udaka, S

    2001-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major component of membranes not only in eukaryotes, but also in several bacteria, including Acetobacter. To identify the PC biosynthetic pathway and its role in Acetobacter sp., we have studied Acetobacter aceti IFO3283, which is characterized by high ethanol oxidizing ability and high resistance to acetic acid. The pmt gene of A. aceti, encoding phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (Pmt), which catalyzes methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to PC, has been cloned and sequenced. One recombinant plasmid that complemented the PC biosynthesis was isolated from a gene library of the genomic DNA of A. aceti. The pmt gene encodes a polypeptide with molecular mass of either 25125, 26216, or 29052 for an about 27-kDa protein. The sequence of this gene showed significant similarity (44.3% identity in the similar sequence region) with the Rhodobacter sphaeroides pmtA gene which is involved in PE N-methylation. When the pmt gene was expressed in E. coli, which lacks PC, the Pmt activity and PC formation were clearly demonstrated. A. aceti strain harboring an interrupted pmt allele, pmt::Km, was constructed. The pmt disruption was confirmed by loss of Pmt and PC, and by Southern blot analyses. The null pmt mutant contained no PC, but tenfold more PE and twofold more phosphatidylglycerol (PG). The pmt disruptant did not show any dramatic effects on growth in basal medium supplemented with ethanol, but the disruption caused slow growth in basal medium supplemented with acetate. These results suggest that the lack of PC in the A. aceti membrane may be compensated by the increases of PE and PG by an unknown mechanism, and PC in A. aceti membrane is related to its acetic acid tolerance.

  1. Cis and trans interactions between genes encoding PAF1 complex and ESCRT machinery components in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joana; Lydall, David

    2018-03-22

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a commonly used model organism for understanding eukaryotic gene function. However, the close proximity between yeast genes can complicate the interpretation of yeast genetic data, particularly high-throughput data. In this study, we examined the interplay between genes encoding components of the PAF1 complex and VPS36, the gene located next to CDC73 on chromosome XII. The PAF1 complex (Cdc73, Paf1, Ctr9, Leo1, and Rtf1, in yeast) affects RNA levels by affecting transcription, histone modifications, and post-transcriptional RNA processing. The human PAF1 complex is linked to cancer, and in yeast, it has been reported to play a role in telomere biology. Vps36, part of the ESCRT-II complex, is involved in sorting proteins for vacuolar/lysosomal degradation. We document a complex set of genetic interactions, which include an adjacent gene effect between CDC73 and VPS36 and synthetic sickness between vps36Δ and cdc73Δ, paf1Δ, or ctr9Δ. Importantly, paf1Δ and ctr9Δ are synthetically lethal with deletions of other components of the ESCRT-II (SNF8 and VPS25), ESCRT-I (STP22), or ESCRT-III (SNF7) complexes. We found that RNA levels of VPS36, but not other ESCRT components, are positively regulated by all components of the PAF1 complex. Finally, we show that deletion of ESCRT components decreases the telomere length in the S288C yeast genetic background, but not in the W303 background. Together, our results outline complex interactions, in cis and in trans, between genes encoding PAF1 and ESCRT-II complex components that affect telomere function and cell viability in yeast.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Pan, Jin; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-03-01

    A gene ( NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop) D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA). The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVScl to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  3. Nuclear scaffold attachment sites within ENCODE regions associate with actively transcribed genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mignon A Keaton

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The human genome must be packaged and organized in a functional manner for the regulation of DNA replication and transcription. The nuclear scaffold/matrix, consisting of structural and functional nuclear proteins, remains after extraction of nuclei and anchors loops of DNA. In the search for cis-elements functioning as chromatin domain boundaries, we identified 453 nuclear scaffold attachment sites purified by lithium-3,5-iodosalicylate extraction of HeLa nuclei across 30 Mb of the human genome studied by the ENCODE pilot project. The scaffold attachment sites mapped predominately near expressed genes and localized near transcription start sites and the ends of genes but not to boundary elements. In addition, these regions were enriched for RNA polymerase II and transcription factor binding sites and were located in early replicating regions of the genome. We believe these sites correspond to genome-interactions mediated by transcription factors and transcriptional machinery immobilized on a nuclear substructure.

  4. [Cloning of y3 gene encoding a tobacco mosaic virus inhibitor from Coprinus comatus and transformation to Nicotiana tabacum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueren; He, Tao; Zhang, Gaina; Hao, Jianguo; Jia, Jingfen

    2010-02-01

    The protein Y3 was a TMV inhibitor which was encoded by y3 gene. The aim of this work was to clone the full length of y3 gene from Coprinus comatus and to reveal its inhibitory function to TMV in in vivo conditions. We amplified the unknown 5'- terminal cDNA sequence of y3 gene with 5'- Full RACE Core Set (TaKaRa), obtained the full length of this gene by RT-PCR, constructed the expression plasmid pCAMBIA1301-y3 via inserting gene y3 sequence, CaMV 35 S promoter, and NOS terminator at MCS and transformed it into Nicotiana tabacum via agrobacterium-mediation. The full length of y3 gene was 534 bps including one ORF encoding 130 amino acid residues (GenBank Accession No. GQ859168; EMBL FN546262). The cDNA sequence and its deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity (94%) to the published fragment of y3 gene sequence. Northern blot analysis proved the transcription of y3 gene in transgenic tobacco plants. The transgenic plants inoculated with TMV expressed the inhibitory activity to TMV. We cloned the full length of y3 gene and obtained transgenic tobacco plants. The expression of y3 gene in transgenic plants improved the inhibitory activity to TMV. The cloning and expression analysis of y3 gene might provide background information for future studying of y3 gene.

  5. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought.

  6. Mitochondrial Genes of Dinoflagellates Are Transcribed by a Nuclear-Encoded Single-Subunit RNA Polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ying Teng

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are a large group of algae that contribute significantly to marine productivity and are essential photosynthetic symbionts of corals. Although these algae have fully-functioning mitochondria and chloroplasts, both their organelle genomes have been highly reduced and the genes fragmented and rearranged, with many aberrant transcripts. However, nothing is known about their RNA polymerases. We cloned and sequenced the gene for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial polymerase (RpoTm of the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra and showed that the protein presequence targeted a GFP construct into yeast mitochondria. The gene belongs to a small gene family, which includes a variety of 3'-truncated copies that may have originated by retroposition. The catalytic C-terminal domain of the protein shares nine conserved sequence blocks with other single-subunit polymerases and is predicted to have the same fold as the human enzyme. However, the N-terminal (promoter binding/transcription initiation domain is not well-conserved. In conjunction with the degenerate nature of the mitochondrial genome, this suggests a requirement for novel accessory factors to ensure the accurate production of functional mRNAs.

  7. Optimized Mitochondrial Targeting of Proteins Encoded by Modified mRNAs Rescues Cells Harboring Mutations in mtATP6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall Marcelo Chin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Mitochondrial disease may be caused by mutations in the protein-coding genes of the mitochondrial genome. A promising strategy for treating such diseases is allotopic expression—the translation of wild-type copies of these proteins in the cytosol, with subsequent translocation into the mitochondria, resulting in rescue of mitochondrial function. In this paper, we develop an automated, quantitative, and unbiased screening platform to evaluate protein localization and mitochondrial morphology. This platform was used to compare 31 mitochondrial targeting sequences and 15 3′ UTRs in their ability to localize up to 9 allotopically expressed proteins to the mitochondria and their subsequent impact on mitochondrial morphology. Taking these two factors together, we synthesized chemically modified mRNAs that encode for an optimized allotopic expression construct for mtATP6. These mRNAs were able to functionally rescue a cell line harboring the 8993T > G point mutation in the mtATP6 gene. : Allotopic expression of proteins normally encoded by mtDNA is a promising therapy for mitochondrial disease. Chin et al. use an unbiased and high-content imaging-based screening platform to optimize allotopic expression. Modified mRNAs encoding for the optimized allotopic expression constructs rescued the respiration and growth of mtATP6-deficient cells. Keywords: mitochondria, mitochondrial disease, mRNA, modified mRNA, ATP6, allotopic expression, rare disease, gene therapy, screening, high content imaging

  8. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina M de Munnik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, human herpesviruses have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs, which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show highest homology to human chemokine receptors, which play a key role in the immune system. Importantly, vGPCRs have acquired unique properties such as constitutive activity and the ability to bind a broad range of human chemokines. This allows vGPCRs to hijack human proteins and modulate cellular signaling for the benefit of the virus, ultimately resulting in immune evasion and viral dissemination to establish a widespread and lifelong infection. Knowledge on the mechanisms by which herpesviruses reprogram cellular signaling might provide insight in the contribution of vGPCRs to viral survival and herpesvirus-associated pathologies.

  9. The Novel Gene CRNDE Encodes a Nuclear Peptide (CRNDEP Which Is Overexpressed in Highly Proliferating Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Michal Szafron

    Full Text Available CRNDE, recently described as the lncRNA-coding gene, is overexpressed at RNA level in human malignancies. Its role in gametogenesis, cellular differentiation and pluripotency has been suggested as well. Herein, we aimed to verify our hypothesis that the CRNDE gene may encode a protein product, CRNDEP. By using bioinformatics methods, we identified the 84-amino acid ORF encoded by one of two CRNDE transcripts, previously described by our research team. This ORF was cloned into two expression vectors, subsequently utilized in localization studies in HeLa cells. We also developed a polyclonal antibody against CRNDEP. Its specificity was confirmed in immunohistochemical, cellular localization, Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments, as well as by showing a statistically significant decrease of endogenous CRNDEP expression in the cells with transient shRNA-mediated knockdown of CRNDE. Endogenous CRNDEP localizes predominantly to the nucleus and its expression seems to be elevated in highly proliferating tissues, like the parabasal layer of the squamous epithelium, intestinal crypts or spermatocytes. After its artificial overexpression in HeLa cells, in a fusion with either the EGFP or DsRed Monomer fluorescent tag, CRNDEP seems to stimulate the formation of stress granules and localize to them. Although the exact role of CRNDEP is unknown, our preliminary results suggest that it may be involved in the regulation of the cell proliferation. Possibly, CRNDEP also participates in oxygen metabolism, considering our in silico results, and the correlation between its enforced overexpression and the formation of stress granules. This is the first report showing the existence of a peptide encoded by the CRNDE gene.

  10. SSU1 encodes a plasma membrane protein with a central role in a network of proteins conferring sulfite tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, D; Bakalinsky, A T

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSU1 gene was isolated based on its ability to complement a mutation causing sensitivity to sulfite, a methionine intermediate. SSU1 encodes a deduced protein of 458 amino acids containing 9 or 10 membrane-spanning domains but has no significant similarity to other proteins in public databases. An Ssu1p-GEP fusion protein was localized to the plasma membrane. Multicopy suppression analysis, undertaken to explore relationships among genes previously implicated in sulfite metabolism, suggests a regulatory pathway in which SSU1 acts downstream of FZF1 and SSU3, which in turn act downstream of GRR1. PMID:9294463

  11. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report for the first time the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding GGPPS (Jc-GGPPS) from Jatropha curcas L. The full-length cDNA was 1414 base pair (bp), with an 1110-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 370- amino-acids polypeptide. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Jc-GGPPS is a member of the ...

  12. The pkaB Gene Encoding the Secondary Protein Kinase A Catalytic Subunit Has a Synthetic Lethal Interaction with pkaA and Plays Overlapping and Opposite Roles in Aspergillus nidulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Min; Rierson, Sara; Seo, Jeong-Ah; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2005-01-01

    Filamentous fungal genomes contain two distantly related cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A catalytic subunits (PKAs), but only one PKA is found to play a principal role. In Aspergillus nidulans, PkaA is the primary PKA that positively functions in vegetative growth and spore germination but negatively controls asexual sporulation and production of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin. In this report, we present the identification and characterization of pkaB, encoding the secondary PKA in A. nidulans. Although deletion of pkaB alone does not cause any apparent phenotypic changes, the absence of both pkaB and pkaA is lethal, indicating that PkaB and PkaA are essential for viability of A. nidulans. Overexpression of pkaB enhances hyphal proliferation and rescues the growth defects caused by ΔpkaA, indicating that PkaB plays a role in vegetative growth signaling. However, unlike ΔpkaA, deletion of pkaB does not suppress the fluffy-autolytic phenotype resulting from ΔflbA. While upregulation of pkaB rescues the defects of spore germination resulting from ΔpkaA in the presence of glucose, overexpression of pkaB delays spore germination. Furthermore, upregulation of pkaB completely abolishes spore germination on medium lacking a carbon source. In addition, upregulation of pkaB enhances the level of submerged sporulation caused by ΔpkaA and reduces hyphal tolerance to oxidative stress. In conclusion, PkaB is the secondary PKA that has a synthetic lethal interaction with PkaA, and it plays an overlapping role in vegetative growth and spore germination in the presence of glucose but an opposite role in regulating asexual sporulation, germination in the absence of a carbon source, and oxidative stress responses in A. nidulans. PMID:16087751

  13. Expression of the Vibrio cholerae gene encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase is under control of ToxR, the cholera toxin transcriptional activator.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsot, C; Mekalanos, J J

    1991-01-01

    The toxR gene of Vibrio cholerae encodes a transcriptional activator required for the expression of the cholera toxin genes (ctxAB) and more than 15 other genes encoding secreted or membrane proteins. The latter group includes virulence genes involved in the biogenesis of the TCP pilus, the accessory colonization factor, and such ToxR-activated genes as tagA, mutations in which cause no detectable virulence defect in the suckling mouse model. To analyze the regulation of expression and the st...

  14. Operon Gene Order Is Optimized for Ordered Protein Complex Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan N.; Bergendahl, L. Therese; Marsh, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The assembly of heteromeric protein complexes is an inherently stochastic process in which multiple genes are expressed separately into proteins, which must then somehow find each other within the cell. Here, we considered one of the ways by which prokaryotic organisms have attempted to maximize the efficiency of protein complex assembly: the organization of subunit-encoding genes into operons. Using structure-based assembly predictions, we show that operon gene order has been optimized to match the order in which protein subunits assemble. Exceptions to this are almost entirely highly expressed proteins for which assembly is less stochastic and for which precisely ordered translation offers less benefit. Overall, these results show that ordered protein complex assembly pathways are of significant biological importance and represent a major evolutionary constraint on operon gene organization. PMID:26804901

  15. Comparisons of the M1 genome segments and encoded μ2 proteins of different reovirus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Michelle M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reovirus M1 genome segment encodes the μ2 protein, a structurally minor component of the viral core, which has been identified as a transcriptase cofactor, nucleoside and RNA triphosphatase, and microtubule-binding protein. The μ2 protein is the most poorly understood of the reovirus structural proteins. Genome segment sequences have been reported for 9 of the 10 genome segments for the 3 prototypic reoviruses type 1 Lang (T1L, type 2 Jones (T2J, and type 3 Dearing (T3D, but the M1 genome segment sequences for only T1L and T3D have been previously reported. For this study, we determined the M1 nucleotide and deduced μ2 amino acid sequences for T2J, nine other reovirus field isolates, and various T3D plaque-isolated clones from different laboratories. Results Determination of the T2J M1 sequence completes the analysis of all ten genome segments of that prototype. The T2J M1 sequence contained a 1 base pair deletion in the 3' non-translated region, compared to the T1L and T3D M1 sequences. The T2J M1 gene showed ~80% nucleotide homology, and the encoded μ2 protein showed ~71% amino acid identity, with the T1L and T3D M1 and μ2 sequences, respectively, making the T2J M1 gene and μ2 proteins amongst the most divergent of all reovirus genes and proteins. Comparisons of these newly determined M1 and μ2 sequences with newly determined M1 and μ2 sequences from nine additional field isolates and a variety of laboratory T3D clones identified conserved features and/or regions that provide clues about μ2 structure and function. Conclusions The findings suggest a model for the domain organization of μ2 and provide further evidence for a role of μ2 in viral RNA synthesis. The new sequences were also used to explore the basis for M1/μ2-determined differences in the morphology of viral factories in infected cells. The findings confirm the key role of Ser/Pro208 as a prevalent determinant of differences in factory morphology

  16. Characterization of dacC, which encodes a new low-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Murray, T; Popham, D L

    1998-01-01

    The pbp gene (renamed dacC), identified by the Bacillus subtilis genome sequencing project, encodes a putative 491-residue protein with sequence homology to low-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins. Use of a transcriptional dacC-lacZ fusion revealed that dacC expression (i) is initiated...... at the end of stationary phase; (ii) depends strongly on transcription factor sigmaH; and (iii) appears to be initiated from a promoter located immediately upstream of yoxA, a gene of unknown function located upstream of dacC on the B. subtilis chromosome. A B. subtilis dacC insertional mutant grew...

  17. Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria preferentially expresses PfEMP1 encoded by group A var genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Magistrado, Pamela; Sharp, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSAs) like the var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family are responsible for antigenic variation and infected red blood cell (RBC) cytoadhesion in P. falciparum malaria. Parasites causing severe malaria...... in nonimmune patients tend to express a restricted subset of VSA (VSA(SM)) that differs from VSA associated with uncomplicated malaria and asymptomatic infection (VSA(UM)). We compared var gene transcription in unselected P. falciparum clone 3D7 expressing VSA(UM) to in vitro-selected sublines expressing VSA......(SM) to identify PfEMP1 responsible for the VSA(SM) phenotype. Expression of VSA(SM) was accompanied by up-regulation of Group A var genes. The most prominently up-regulated Group A gene (PFD1235w/MAL7P1.1) was translated into a protein expressed on the infected RBC surface. The proteins encoded by Group A var...

  18. The frequency of genes encoding three putative group B streptococcal virulence factors among invasive and colonizing isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borchardt Stephanie M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS causes severe infections in very young infants and invasive disease in pregnant women and adults with underlying medical conditions. GBS pathogenicity varies between and within serotypes, with considerable variation in genetic content between strains. Three proteins, Rib encoded by rib, and alpha and beta C proteins encoded by bca and bac, respectively, have been suggested as potential vaccine candidates for GBS. It is not known, however, whether these genes occur more frequently in invasive versus colonizing GBS strains. Methods We screened 162 invasive and 338 colonizing GBS strains from different collections using dot blot hybridization to assess the frequency of bca, bac and rib. All strains were defined by serotyping for capsular type, and frequency differences were tested using the Chi square test. Results Genes encoding the beta C protein (bac and Rib (rib occurred at similar frequencies among invasive and colonizing isolates, bac (20% vs. 23%, and rib (28% vs. 20%, while the alpha (bca C protein was more frequently found in colonizing strains (46% vs, invasive (29%. Invasive strains were associated with specific serotype/gene combinations. Conclusion Novel virulence factors must be identified to better understand GBS disease.

  19. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  20. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  1. Demonstration of expression of a neuropeptide-encoding gene in crustacean hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Su-Hua; Chen, Yan-Jhou; Huang, Shao-Yen; Tsai, Wei-Shiun; Wu, Hsin-Ju; Hsu, Tsan-Ting; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) was originally identified in a neuroendocrine system-the X-organ/sinus gland complex. In this study, a cDNA (Prc-CHH) encoding CHH precursor was cloned from the hemocyte of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Analysis of tissues by a CHH-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the presence of CHH in hemocytes, the levels of which were much lower than those in the sinus gland, but 2 to 10 times higher than those in the thoracic and cerebral ganglia. Total hemocytes were separated by density gradient centrifugation into layers of hyaline cell (HC), semi-granular cell (SGC), and granular cell (GC). Analysis of extracts of each layer using ELISA revealed that CHH is present in GCs (202.8±86.7 fmol/mg protein) and SGCs (497.8±49.4 fmol/mg protein), but not in HCs. Finally, CHH stimulated the membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity of hemocytes in a dose-dependent manner. These data for the first time confirm that a crustacean neuropeptide-encoding gene is expressed in cells essential for immunity and its expression in hemocytes is cell type-specific. Effect of CHH on the membrane-bound GC activity of hemocyte suggests that hemocyte is a target site of CHH. Possible functions of the hemocyte-derived CHH are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The zebrafish moonshine gene encodes transcriptional intermediary factor 1gamma, an essential regulator of hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Ransom

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is precisely orchestrated by lineage-specific DNA-binding proteins that regulate transcription in concert with coactivators and corepressors. Mutations in the zebrafish moonshine (mon gene specifically disrupt both embryonic and adult hematopoiesis, resulting in severe red blood cell aplasia. We report that mon encodes the zebrafish ortholog of mammalian transcriptional intermediary factor 1gamma (TIF1gamma (or TRIM33, a member of the TIF1 family of coactivators and corepressors. During development, hematopoietic progenitor cells in mon mutants fail to express normal levels of hematopoietic transcription factors, including gata1, and undergo apoptosis. Three different mon mutant alleles each encode premature stop codons, and enforced expression of wild-type tif1gamma mRNA rescues embryonic hematopoiesis in homozygous mon mutants. Surprisingly, a high level of zygotic tif1gamma mRNA expression delineates ventral mesoderm during hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor formation prior to gata1 expression. Transplantation studies reveal that tif1gamma functions in a cell-autonomous manner during the differentiation of erythroid precursors. Studies in murine erythroid cell lines demonstrate that Tif1gamma protein is localized within novel nuclear foci, and expression decreases during erythroid cell maturation. Our results establish a major role for this transcriptional intermediary factor in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells in vertebrates.

  3. The pyrH gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris encoding UMP kinase is transcribed as part of an operon including the frr1 gene encoding ribosomal recycling factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadskov-Hansen, Steen Lüders; Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    2000-01-01

    establishing the ability of the encoded protein to synthesize UDP. The pyrH gene in L. lactis is flanked downstream by frr1 encoding ribosomal recycling factor 1 and upstream by an open reading frame, orfA, of unknown function. The three genes were shown to constitute an operon transcribed in the direction orf......A-pyrH-frr1 from a promoter immediately in front of orfA. This operon belongs to an evolutionary highly conserved gene cluster, since the organization of pyrH on the chromosomal level in L. lactis shows a high resemblance to that found in Bacillus subtilis as well as in Escherichia coli and several other...

  4. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level.

  5. Genetic characterization of psp encoding the DING protein in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xue-Xian

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DING proteins constitute a conserved and broadly distributed set of proteins found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals (including humans. Characterization of DING proteins from animal and plant tissues indicated ligand-binding ability suggesting a role for DING proteins in cell signaling and biomineralization. Surprisingly, the genes encoding DING proteins in eukaryotes have not been identified in the eukaryotic genome or EST databases. Recent discovery of a DING homologue (named Psp here in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the physiological roles of DING proteins. P. fluorescens SBW25 is a model bacterium that can efficiently colonize plant surfaces and enhance plant health. In this report we genetically characterize Psp with a focus on conditions under which psp is expressed and the protein exported. Results Psp is closely related to the periplasmic Pi binding component of the ABC-type phosphate transporter system (Pst. psp is flanked by a gene cluster predicted to function as a type II protein secretion system (Hxc. Deletion analysis combined with chromosomally integrated 'lacZ fusions showed that both psp and pstC are induced by Pi limitation and that pstC is required for competitive growth of the bacterium in Pi limited medium. hxcR is not regulated by Pi limitation. Psp was detected (using anti-DING serum in the supernatant of wild-type culture but was greatly reduced in the supernatant of an isogenic strain carrying an hxcR mutation (ΔhxcR. A promoter fusion between hxcR and a promoterless copy of a gene ('dapB essential for growth in the plant environment showed that expression of hxcR is elevated during colonization of sugar beet seedlings. A similar analysis of psp showed that it is not induced in the plant environment. Conclusion Psp gene is expressed under conditions of Pi limitation. It is an exoprotein secreted mainly via the Hxc type II secretion

  6. Genetic characterization of psp encoding the DING protein in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Xian; Scott, Ken; Meffin, Rebecca; Rainey, Paul B

    2007-12-18

    DING proteins constitute a conserved and broadly distributed set of proteins found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals (including humans). Characterization of DING proteins from animal and plant tissues indicated ligand-binding ability suggesting a role for DING proteins in cell signaling and biomineralization. Surprisingly, the genes encoding DING proteins in eukaryotes have not been identified in the eukaryotic genome or EST databases. Recent discovery of a DING homologue (named Psp here) in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the physiological roles of DING proteins. P. fluorescens SBW25 is a model bacterium that can efficiently colonize plant surfaces and enhance plant health. In this report we genetically characterize Psp with a focus on conditions under which psp is expressed and the protein exported. Psp is closely related to the periplasmic Pi binding component of the ABC-type phosphate transporter system (Pst). psp is flanked by a gene cluster predicted to function as a type II protein secretion system (Hxc). Deletion analysis combined with chromosomally integrated 'lacZ fusions showed that both psp and pstC are induced by Pi limitation and that pstC is required for competitive growth of the bacterium in Pi limited medium. hxcR is not regulated by Pi limitation. Psp was detected (using anti-DING serum) in the supernatant of wild-type culture but was greatly reduced in the supernatant of an isogenic strain carrying an hxcR mutation (DeltahxcR). A promoter fusion between hxcR and a promoterless copy of a gene ('dapB) essential for growth in the plant environment showed that expression of hxcR is elevated during colonization of sugar beet seedlings. A similar analysis of psp showed that it is not induced in the plant environment. Psp gene is expressed under conditions of Pi limitation. It is an exoprotein secreted mainly via the Hxc type II secretion system, whose expression is elevated on plant surfaces

  7. Variation in the Gene Encoding the Serotonin Transporter is Associated with a Measure of Sociopathy in Alcoholics

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, Aryeh I.; Conner, Tamlin S.; Anton, Raymond F.; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Covault, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the association between a measure of sociopathy and 5-HTTLPR genotype in a sample of individuals from Project MATCH, a multi-center alcohol treatment trial. 5-HTTLPR, an insertion/deletion polymorphism in SLC6A4, the gene encoding the serotonin transporter protein, results in functionally distinct long (L) and short (S) alleles. The S allele has been associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders and symptoms including alcohol dependence, but it is unknown wheth...

  8. Excretion of putrescine by the putrescine-ornithine antiporter encoded by the potE gene of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashiwagi, K; Miyamoto, S; Suzuki, F; Kobayashi, H; Igarashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Excretion of putrescine from Escherichia coli was assessed by measuring its uptake into inside-out membrane vesicles. The vesicles were prepared from wild-type E. coli or E. coli transformed with plasmids containing one of the three polyamine transport systems. The results indicate that excretion of putrescine is catalyzed by the putrescine transport protein, encoded by the potE gene located at 16 min on the E. coli chromosome. Loading of ornithine (or lysine) inside the vesicles was essentia...

  9. Developmentally regulated expression of a human ''finger'' - containing gene encoded by the 5' half of the ret transforming gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M.; Inaguma, Y.; Hiai, H.; Hirose, F.

    1988-04-01

    The authors isolated and sequenced a cDNA clone of the human gene encoded by the 5' half of the ret transforming gene. The nucleotide sequence indicates that it encodes a protein with ''finger'' structures which represent putative metal- and nucleic acid-binding domains. Transcriptions of this gene was detected at high levels in a variety of human and rodent tumor cell lines, mouse testis, and embryos. In addition, a unique transcript was observed in testis RNA. When the expression of the unique transcript was examined at different stages of spermatogenesis, a striking increase in mRNA levels accompanied progression from meiotic prophase pachytene spermatocytes to postmeiotic round spermatids. This finger-containing gene may thus function in male germ cell development.

  10. Effects of deoxycycline induced lentivirus encoding FasL gene on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-mediated apoptosis plays a critical role in deletion of activated T cells. This study aimed to construct the lentivirus encoding FasL gene induced by deoxycycline and evaluate its effects on apoptosis of Th1 cells. A plasmid expression system encoding FasL was constructed through utilizing the ...

  11. Molecular characterization of genes encoding cytosolic Hsp70s in the zygomycete fungus Rhizopus nigricans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černila, Boštjan; Črešnar, Bronislava; Breskvar, Katja

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that some stressors, including steroid hormones 21-OH progesterone and testosterone, stimulate the accumulation of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) population in the zygomycete filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans. In this study we report the cloning of 3 R nigricans hsp70 genes (Rnhsp70-1, Rnhsp70-2, and Rnhsp70-3) encoding cytosolic Hsp70s. With a Southern blot experiment under high stringency conditions we did not detect any additional highly homologous copies of the cytosolic hsp70 genes in the R nigricans genome. Sequence analyses showed that all 3 genes contain introns within the open reading frame. The dynamics of the R nigricans molecular response to progesterone, 21-OH progesterone, and testosterone, as well as to heat shock, copper ions, hydrogen peroxide, and ethanol was studied by temporal analysis of Rnhsp70-1 and Rnhsp70-2 mRNA accumulation. Northern blot experiments revealed that the Rnhsp70-2 transcript level is not affected by testosterone, whereas mRNA levels of both genes are rapidly increased with all the other stressors studied. Moreover, the decrease of transcript levels is notably delayed in ethanol stress, and a difference is observed between the profiles of Rnhsp70-1 and Rnhsp70-2 transcripts during heat stress. PMID:15115284

  12. EXPRESSION OF B-XYLOSIDASE ENCODING GENE IN PHIS/ BACILLUS MEGATERIUM MS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sri sumarsih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available b-Xylosidase encoding gene from G. thermoleovorans IT-08 had been expressed in the pHIS1525/ B. megaterium MS941 system. The b-xylosidase gene (xyl was inserted into plasmid pHIS1525 and propagated in E. coli DH10b. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into B. megaterium MS941 by protoplast transformation. Transformants were selected by growing the recombinant cells on solid LB medium containing tetracycline (10 µg/ ml. The expression of the b-xylosidase gene was assayed by overlaid the recombinant B. megaterium MS941 cell with agar medium containing 0.2% ethylumbelliferyl-b-D-xyloside (MUX. This research showed that the b-xylosidase gene was succesfully sub-cloned in pHIS1525 system and expressed by the recombinant B. megaterium MS941. Theaddition of 0.5% xylose into the culture medium could increase the activity of recombinantactivity of recombinant of recombinantb-xylosidase by 2.74 fold. The recombinant B. megaterium MS941 secreted 75.56% of the expressed b-xylosidase into culture medium. The crude extract b-xylosidase showed the optimum activity at 50° C and pH 6. The recombinant b-xylosidase was purified from culture supernatant by affinity chromatographic method using agarose containing Ni-NTA (Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid. The pure b-xylosidase showed a specific activity of 10.06 Unit/mg protein and relative molecular weight ± 58 kDa.

  13. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Jens Jacob; Nielsen, Marit Nyholm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Georgopoulos, Costa; Ang, Debbie; Lundemose, Jytte Banner; Niezen-Koning, Klary; Eiberg, Hans; Yang, Huanming; Kolvraa, Steen; Bolund, Lars; Gregersen, Niels

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups for

  14. Rapid duplication and loss of nbs-encoding genes in eurosids II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, W.; Gu, L.; Yang, S.; Zhang, X.; Memon, S.

    2015-01-01

    Eurosids basically evolved from the core Eudicots Rosids. The Rosids consist of two large assemblages, Eurosids I (Fabids) and Eurosids II (Malvids), which belong to the largest group of Angiosperms, comprising of >40,000 and ∼ 15,000 species, respectively. Although the evolutionary patterns of the largest class of disease resistance genes consisting of a nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) have been studied in many species, systemic research of NBS-encoding genes has not been performed in different orders of Eurosids II. Here, five Eurosids II species, Gossypium raimondii, Theobroma cacao, Carica papaya, Citrus clementina, and Arabidopsis thaliana, distributing in three orders, were used to gain insights into the evolutionary patterns of the NBS-encoding genes. Our data showed that frequent copy number variations of NBS-encoding genes were found among these species. Phylogenetic tree analysis and the numbers of the NBS-encoding genes in the common ancestor of these species showed that species-specific NBS clades, including multi-copy and single copy numbers are dominant among these genes. However, not a single clade was found with only five copies, which come from all of the five species, respectively, suggesting rapid turn-over with birth and death of the NBS-encoding genes among Eurosids II species. In addition, a strong positive correlation was observed between the Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR)) type NBS-encoding genes and species-specific genes, indicating rapid gene loss and duplication. Whereas, non- TIR type NBS-encoding genes in these five species showed two distinct evolutionary patterns. (author)

  15. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... synthase (crtB), phytoene desaturase (crtL) and lycopene cyclase. (crtY). It also retains a chloramphenicol resistance gene. Cells of E. coli containing this plasmid produce and accumulate β-carotene, resulting in yellow colonies. The plasmid, pTrc-ATIPI, retains an ampicillin resistance gene and an IPI gene ...

  16. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding a putative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... Peanut Ubiquitin gene (Luo et al. 2005) was used as the internal control. Expression data of the target gene was normalized with internal control using the 2. –ΔΔCT method (Livak and Schmittgen 2001). Lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase gene from Arachis hypogaea. 1031. J. Biosci. 37(6), December 2012 ...

  17. Enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus spp. from bulk goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Daniele G; Sousa, Francisca G C; Borges, Maria F; Givisiez, Patrícia E N; Queiroga, Rita C R E; Souza, Evandro L; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Oliveira, Celso J B

    2013-02-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated as the main Staphylococcus species causing human food poisoning, recent studies have shown that coagulase-negative Staphylococcus could also harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes. Such organisms are often present in goat milk and are the most important mastitis-causing agents. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes among coagulase-positive (CoPS) and coagulase-negative (CoNS) staphylococci isolated from raw goat milk produced in the semi-arid region of Paraiba, the most important region for goat milk production in Brazil. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were screened in 74 staphylococci isolates (30 CoPS and 44 CoNS) by polymerase chain reaction targeting the genes sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were found in nine (12.2%) isolates, and four different genes (sea, sec, seg, and sei) were identified amongst the isolates. The most frequent genes were seg and sei, which were often found simultaneously in 44.5% of the isolates. The gene sec was the most frequent among the classical genes, and sea was found only in one isolate. All CoPS isolates (n=7) harboring enterotoxigenic genes were identified as S. aureus. The two coagulase-negative isolates were S. haemolyticus and S. hominis subsp. hominis and they harbored sei and sec genes, respectively. A higher frequency of enterotoxin-encoding genes was observed amongst CoPS (23.3%) than CoNS (4.5%) isolates (pgoat milk should not be ignored because it has a higher occurrence in goat milk and enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in some isolates.

  18. The MAP kinase-encoding gene MgFus3 of the non-appressorium phytopathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola is required for penetration and in vitro pycnidia formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousin, A.; Mehrabi, R.; Guilleroux, M.; Dufresne, M.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Waalwijk, C.; Langin, T.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    In eukaryotes, a family of serine/threonine protein kinases known as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) is involved in the transduction of a variety of extracellular signals and in the regulation of growth and development. We identified a MAPK-encoding gene in Mycosphaerella graminicola

  19. A flax-retting endopolygalacturonase-encoding gene from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhizhuang; Wang, Shaozhao; Bergeron, Hélène; Zhang, Jianchun; Lau, Peter C K

    2008-11-01

    A polygalacturonase from the filamentous fungus Rhizopus oryzae strain sb (NRRL 29086), previously shown to be effective in the retting of flax fibers, was shown by the analysis of its reaction products on polygalacturonic acid to be an endo-type. By zymogram analysis, the enzyme in the crude culture filtrate appeared as two active species of 37 and 40 kD. The endopolygalacturonase-encoding gene was cloned in Escherichia coli and its translated 383-amino acid sequence found to be identical to that of a presumed exopolygalacturonase found in R. oryzae strain YM9901 and 96% identical to a hypothetical protein (RO3G_04731.1) in the sequenced genome of R. oryzae strain 99-880. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of an unique cluster of Rhizopus polygalacturonase sequences that are separate from other fungal polygalacturonases. Conservation of 12 cysteines appears to be a special feature of this family of Rhizopus polygalacturonase sequences.

  20. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  1. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  2. Expression of cbsA encoding the collagen-binding S-protein of Lactobacillus crispatus JCM5810 in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, B.; Sillanpää, J.; Smit, E.; Korhonen, T.K.; Pouwels, P.H.

    2000-01-01

    The cbsA gene encoding the collagen-binding S-layer protein of Lactobacillus crispatus JCM5810 was expressed in L. casei ATCC 393T. The S-protein was not retained on the surface of the recombinant bacteria but was secreted into the medium. By translational fusion of CbsA to the cell wall sorting

  3. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding...... syntaxin-1B(6), that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees(7,8) identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations....... Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes....

  4. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  5. Genome segment S8 of grass carp hemorrhage virus encodes a virion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, T; Zhang, J; Lu, R; Zhu, Z

    2001-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome segment S8 of grass carp hemorrhage virus (GCHV) was determined from cDNA corresponding to the viral genomic RNA. It is 1,287 nucleotides in length and contains a large open reading frame that could encode a protein of 409 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 44 kD. The S8 was expressed using the pET fusion protein vector and detected by Western blotting analysis using the chicken egg IgY against intact GCHV particles, indicating that S8 encodes a virion protein. Amino acid sequence comparisons revealed that the protein encoded by S8 is closely related to protein sigma2 of mammalian reovirus, suggesting that the deduced protein of S8 is an inner capsid protein. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  7. Distinct Patterns of Gene Gain and Loss: Diverse Evolutionary Modes of NBS-Encoding Genes in Three Solanaceae Crop Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lan-Hua; Zhou, Guang-Can; Sun, Xiao-Qin; Lei, Zhao; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Xue, Jia-Yu; Hang, Yue-Yu

    2017-05-05

    Plant resistance conferred by nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance genes plays a key role in the defense against various pathogens throughout the entire plant life cycle. However, comparative analyses for the systematic evaluation and determination of the evolutionary modes of NBS-encoding genes among Solanaceae species are rare. In this study, 447, 255, and 306 NBS-encoding genes were identified from the genomes of potato, tomato, and pepper, respectively. These genes usually clustered as tandem arrays on chromosomes; few existed as singletons. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three subclasses [TNLs (TIR-NBS-LRR), CNLs (CC-NBS-LRR), and RNLs (RPW8-NBS-LRR)] each formed a monophyletic clade and were distinguished by unique exon/intron structures and amino acid motif sequences. By comparing phylogenetic and systematic relationships, we inferred that the NBS-encoding genes in the present genomes of potato, tomato, and pepper were derived from 150 CNL, 22 TNL, and 4 RNL ancestral genes, and underwent independent gene loss and duplication events after speciation. The NBS-encoding genes therefore exhibit diverse and dynamic evolutionary patterns in the three Solanaceae species, giving rise to the discrepant gene numbers observed today. Potato shows a "consistent expansion" pattern, tomato exhibits a pattern of "first expansion and then contraction," and pepper presents a "shrinking" pattern. The earlier expansion of CNLs in the common ancestor led to the dominance of this subclass in gene numbers. However, RNLs remained at low copy numbers due to their specific functions. Along the evolutionary process of NBS-encoding genes in Solanaceae, species-specific tandem duplications contributed the most to gene expansions. Copyright © 2017 Qian et al.

  8. The yeast ISN1 (YOR155c gene encodes a new type of IMP-specific 5'-nucleotidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitter Jean-Marie

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purine salvage enzyme inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP-specific 5'-nucleotidase catalyzes degradation of IMP to inosine. Although this enzymatic activity has been purified and characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding IMP 5'-nucleotidase had not been identified. Results Mass spectrometry analysis of several peptides of this enzyme purified from yeast allowed identification of the corresponding gene as YOR155c, an open reading frame of unknown function, renamed ISN1. The deduced Isn1p sequence was clearly not homologous to 5'-nucleotidases from other species. However, significant similarities to Isn1p were found in proteins of unknown function from Neurospora crassa, Plasmodium falciparum and several yeast species. Knock-out of ISN1 resulted in the total loss of IMP-specific 5'-nucleotidase activity, thus confirming that the ISN1 gene indeed encodes the enzymatic activity purified from yeast. In vivo studies revealed that, when IMP is overproduced through constitutive activation of the IMP de novo synthesis pathway, ISN1 is required for excretion of inosine and hypoxanthine in the medium. Conclusion We have identified a new yeast gene, ISN1 (YOR155c, as encoding IMP-specific 5'-nucleotidase activity. The ISN1 gene defines a new type of 5'-nucleotidase which was demonstrated to be functional in vivo.

  9. Genomics and physiology of a marine flavobacterium encoding a proteorhodopsin and a xanthorhodopsin-like protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Riedel

    Full Text Available Proteorhodopsin (PR photoheterotrophy in the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95 has previously been investigated, showing no growth stimulation in the light at intermediate carbon concentrations. Here we report the genome sequence of strain PRO95 and compare it to two other PR encoding Dokdonia genomes: that of strain 4H-3-7-5 which shows the most similar genome, and that of strain MED134 which grows better in the light under oligotrophic conditions. Our genome analysis revealed that the PRO95 genome as well as the 4H-3-7-5 genome encode a protein related to xanthorhodopsins. The genomic environment and phylogenetic distribution of this gene suggest that it may have frequently been recruited by lateral gene transfer. Expression analyses by RT-PCR and direct mRNA-sequencing showed that both rhodopsins and the complete β-carotene pathway necessary for retinal production are transcribed in PRO95. Proton translocation measurements showed enhanced proton pump activity in response to light, supporting that one or both rhodopsins are functional. Genomic information and carbon source respiration data were used to develop a defined cultivation medium for PRO95, but reproducible growth always required small amounts of yeast extract. Although PRO95 contains and expresses two rhodopsin genes, light did not stimulate its growth as determined by cell numbers in a nutrient poor seawater medium that mimics its natural environment, confirming previous experiments at intermediate carbon concentrations. Starvation or stress conditions might be needed to observe the physiological effect of light induced energy acquisition.

  10. Vaccination with DNA encoding an immunodominant myelin basic protein peptide targeted to Fc of immunoglobulin G suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobell, A; Weissert, R; Storch, M K; Svanholm, C; de Graaf, K L; Lassmann, H; Andersson, R; Olsson, T; Wigzell, H

    1998-05-04

    We explore here if vaccination with DNA encoding an autoantigenic peptide can suppress autoimmune disease. For this purpose we used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is an autoaggressive disease in the central nervous system and an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Lewis rats were vaccinated with DNA encoding an encephalitogenic T cell epitope, guinea pig myelin basic protein peptide 68-85 (MBP68-85), before induction of EAE with MBP68-85 in complete Freund's adjuvant. Compared to vaccination with a control DNA construct, the vaccination suppressed clinical and histopathological signs of EAE, and reduced the interferon gamma production after challenge with MBP68-85. Targeting of the gene product to Fc of IgG was essential for this effect. There were no signs of a Th2 cytokine bias. Our data suggest that DNA vaccines encoding autoantigenic peptides may be useful tools in controlling autoimmune disease.

  11. Kallmann syndrome: mutations in the genes encoding prokineticin-2 and prokineticin receptor-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dodé

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2 and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2, respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome.

  12. Growth Characteristics of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and Expression of Methyltransferase Encoding Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Kröninger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis of the human gut revealed the presence a seventh order of methanogens referred to as Methanomassiliicoccales. Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis is the only member of this order that grows in pure culture. Here, we show that the organism has a doubling time of 1.8 d with methanol + H2 and a growth yield of 2.4 g dry weight/mol CH4. M. luminyensis also uses methylamines + H2 (monomethylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine with doubling times of 2.1–2.3 d. Similar cell yields were obtained with equimolar concentrations of methanol and methylamines with respect to their methyl group contents. The transcript levels of genes encoding proteins involved in substrate utilization indicated increased amounts of mRNA from the mtaBC2 gene cluster in methanol-grown cells. When methylamines were used as substrates, mRNA of the mtb/mtt operon and of the mtmBC1 cluster were found in high abundance. The transcript level of mtaC2 was almost identical in methanol- and methylamine-grown cells, indicating that genes for methanol utilization were constitutively expressed in high amounts. The same observation was made with resting cells where methanol always yielded the highest CH4 production rate independently from the growth substrate. Hence, M. luminyensis is adapted to habitats that provide methanol + H2 as substrates.

  13. Occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus aureus causing mastitis in lactating goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneelly H. Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxins are the leading cause of human food poisoning worldwide. Staphylococcus spp. are the main mastitis-causing agents in goats and frequently found in high counts in goat milk. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus aureus associated with mastitis in lactating goats in Paraiba State, Brazil. Milk samples (n=2024 were collected from 393 farms. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 55 milk samples. Classical (sea, seb, sec, sed, see and novel (seg, seh, sei enterotoxin-encoding genes were investigated by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR. From thirty-six tested isolates, enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in 7 (19.5% S. aureus. The gene encoding enterotoxin C (seC was identified in six isolates, while seiwas observed in only one isolate. The genes sea, seb, sed, see, seg and seh were not observed amongst the S. aureus investigated in this study. In summary, S. aureus causing mastitis in goats can harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes and seC was the most frequent gene observed amongst the investigated isolates. This finding is important for surveillance purposes, since enterotoxin C should be investigated in human staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks caused by consumption of goat milk and dairy products.

  14. Global gene expression during stringent response in Corynebacterium glutamicum in presence and absence of the rel gene encoding (pppGpp synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinowski Jörn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The stringent response is the initial reaction of microorganisms to nutritional stress. During stringent response the small nucleotides (pppGpp act as global regulators and reprogram bacterial transcription. In this work, the genetic network controlled by the stringent response was characterized in the amino acid-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results The transcriptome of a C. glutamicum rel gene deletion mutant, unable to synthesize (pppGpp and to induce the stringent response, was compared with that of its rel-proficient parent strain by microarray analysis. A total of 357 genes were found to be transcribed differentially in the rel-deficient mutant strain. In a second experiment, the stringent response was induced by addition of DL-serine hydroxamate (SHX in early exponential growth phase. The time point of the maximal effect on transcription was determined by real-time RT-PCR using the histidine and serine biosynthetic genes. Transcription of all of these genes reached a maximum at 10 minutes after SHX addition. Microarray experiments were performed comparing the transcriptomes of SHX-induced cultures of the rel-proficient strain and the rel mutant. The differentially expressed genes were grouped into three classes. Class A comprises genes which are differentially regulated only in the presence of an intact rel gene. This class includes the non-essential sigma factor gene sigB which was upregulated and a large number of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism which were downregulated. Class B comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX in both strains, independent of the rel gene. A large number of genes encoding ribosomal proteins fall into this class, all being downregulated. Class C comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX only in the rel mutant. This class includes genes encoding putative stress proteins and global transcriptional regulators that might be

  15. Cloning of a gene encoding glycosyltransferase from Pueraria lobata

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-03

    Jan 3, 2011 ... These results suggest that, the PlUGT1 protein can be expressed efficiently in the P. pastoris expression system and may supply a new economic and convenient way for the production of PlUGT1 protein. Key words: Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi, glycosyltransferase, cloning, expression, Pichia pastoris.

  16. Cloning of a gene encoding glycosyltransferase from Pueraria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , fusion protein migrated as a single protein band with a molecular weight of 55 kDa. A yeast expression vector pPICZA-PlUGT1 was constructed and was transformed into Pichia pastoris strain GS115. Several recombinants containing ...

  17. Molecular evolution of genes encoding ribonucleases in ruminant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalone, E; Beintema, J J; Sasso, M P; Carsana, A; Palmieri, M; Vento, M T; Furia, A

    1995-12-01

    Phylogenetic analysis, based on the primary structures of mammalian pancreatic-type ribonucleases, indicated that gene duplication events, which occurred during the evolution of ancestral ruminants, gave rise to the three paralogous enzymes present in the bovine species. Herein we report data that demonstrate the existence of the orthologues of the bovine pancreatic, seminal, and cerebral ribonucleases coding sequences in the genomes of giraffe and sheep. The "seminal" sequence is a pseudogene in both species. We also report an analysis of the transcriptional expression of ribonuclease genes in sheep tissues. The data presented support a model for positive selection acting on the molecular evolution of ruminant ribonuclease genes.

  18. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  19. A novel GDNF-inducible gene, BMZF3, encodes a transcriptional repressor associated with KAP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Chikage; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Kawase, Yukari; Sato, Tomoko; Morinaga, Takatoshi; Fukuda, Naoyuki; Enomoto, Atsushi; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    The Krueppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise the largest family of zinc finger transcription factors that function as transcriptional repressors. In the study of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-RET signaling, we have identified bone marrow zinc finger 3 (BMZF3), encoding a KRAB-ZFP, as a GDNF-inducible gene by differential display analysis. The expression of BMZF3 transcripts in the human neuroblastoma cell line TGW increased 1 h after GDNF stimulation, as determined by Northern blotting and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The BMZF3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity in the KRAB domain. BMZF3 interacts with a co-repressor protein, KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP-1), through the KRAB domain and siRNA-mediated knockdown of KAP-1 abolished the transcriptional repressor activity of BMZF3, indicating that KAP-1 is necessary for BMZF3 function. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated silencing of BMZF3 inhibited cell proliferation. These findings suggest that BMZF3 is a transcriptional repressor induced by GDNF that plays a role in cell proliferation

  20. tassel-less1 encodes a boron channel protein required for inflorescence development in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, April; Holloway, Beth; Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary; Yu, GongXin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Meeley, Robert; Llaca, Victor; Butler, Karlene; Stefani, Tony; Jaqueth, Jennifer; Li, Bailin

    2014-06-01

    tassel-less1 (tls1) is a classical maize (Zea mays) inflorescence mutant. Homozygous mutant plants have no tassels or very small tassels, and ear development is also impaired. Using a positional cloning approach, ZmNIP3;1 (a NOD26-like intrinsic protein) was identified as the candidate gene for tls1. The ZmNIP3;1 gene is completely deleted in the tls1 mutant genome. Two Mutator-insertional TUSC alleles of ZmNIP3;1 exhibited tls1-like phenotypes, and allelism tests confirmed that the tls1 gene encodes ZmNIP3;1. Transgenic plants with an RNA interference (RNAi) construct to down-regulate ZmNIP3;1 also showed tls1-like phenotypes, further demonstrating that TLS1 is ZmNIP3;1. Sequence analysis suggests that ZmNIP3;1 is a boron channel protein. Foliar application of boron could rescue the tls1 phenotypes and restore the normal tassel and ear development. Gene expression analysis indicated that in comparison with that of the wild type or tls1 plants treated with boron, the transition from the vegetative to reproductive phase or the development of the floral meristem is impaired in the shoot apical meristem of the tls1 mutant plants. It is concluded that the tls1 mutant phenotypes are caused by impaired boron transport, and boron is essential for inflorescence development in maize. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Modifier Genes for Mouse Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Protein alpha (vibrator) That Bypass Juvenile Lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Concepcion, Dorothy; Johannes, Frank; Lo, Yuan Hung; Yao, Jay; Fong, Jerry; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) mediate lipid signaling and membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Loss-of-function mutations of the gene encoding PITP alpha in mice result in a range of dosage-sensitive phenotypes, including neurological dysfunction, neurodegeneration, and

  2. Genes encoding chimeras of Neurospora crassa erg-3 and human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    digested with SmaI and SspI and self-ligated to generate. pSAC86 which eliminated the SacI site present in the. Multiple Cloning Site (MCS). Plasmid pBH86 contains a modified version of the erg-3 gene in which the intronic. HindIII site was destroyed (Prakash et al 1999). pMOD86 contains the erg-3 gene of Neurospora in ...

  3. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  4. spn-F encodes a novel protein that affects oocyte patterning and bristle morphology in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Uri; Bar, Dikla; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2006-04-01

    The anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes of the Drosophila embryo are established during oogenesis through the activities of Gurken (Grk), a Tgfalpha-like protein, and the Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr). spn-F mutant females produce ventralized eggs similar to the phenotype produced by mutations in the grk-Egfr pathway. We found that the ventralization of the eggshell in spn-F mutants is due to defects in the localization and translation of grk mRNA during mid-oogenesis. Analysis of the microtubule network revealed defects in the organization of the microtubules around the oocyte nucleus. In addition, spn-F mutants have defective bristles. We cloned spn-F and found that it encodes a novel coiled-coil protein that localizes to the minus end of microtubules in the oocyte, and this localization requires the microtubule network and a Dynein heavy chain gene. We also show that Spn-F interacts directly with the Dynein light chain Ddlc-1. Our results show that we have identified a novel protein that affects oocyte axis determination and the organization of microtubules during Drosophila oogenesis.

  5. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally