WorldWideScience

Sample records for gender studies

  1. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  2. Romanistik und gender studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schlünder

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Die beiden Bände bieten ein breites Spektrum von Beiträgen zur französischen, italienischen und spanischen Literaturwissenschaft. Gedankliche Grundlage der im einzelnen unterschiedlichen Ansätze und Zielsetzungen ist ein im Anschluß an Judith Butler gender-reflektierendes, diskursives Konzept von Geschlecht, dessen wissenschaftsgeschichtliche Herleitung und Perspektiven Renate Kroll einleitend darlegt. Die einzelnen Artikel beschäftigen sich zum einen mit literarischen Strategien, die Schriftstellerinnen vom Mittelalter bis zur Gegenwart erprobt haben, und hinterfragen dabei die Rolle weiblicher Autoren in Literaturgeschichte und Literaturgeschichtsschreibung. Zum anderen widmen sie sich den literarischen Inszenierungs- und Repräsentationsformen von Weiblichkeit und stellen darüber einen Bezug zur Lebenswelt der behandelten Autorinnen her.

  3. Konformitas Gender (Studi Kritik atas Kesetaraan Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmatiar Pasya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lately, the issues relating to gender equality are being hotly discussed. One theindicators of this is the legalization effort of RUU-KKG in the law of the State. Thisissue was raised because the Feminists see that there is an imbalance in rotes betweenwomen and men, as well as in the realm of social, political, economic, and households.This patriarchal culture engenders women to always be under-emphasized in their statusand positions in these fields. So they’re not able to do similiar roles as men. This issue isreinforced not only by academics through a scientific approach but also by some religiousfigures. Some of them assess that the equality between men and women has been enshrinedin the Qur’an. Therefore, the assessment of both is not only by gender, but piety. As wellit doesn’t make much difference in regards to the idea of equality. Because the Qur’anitself equates to both in carrying out tasks in life. This paper will examine whether theissues in regards to gender equality in the Qur’an amounts to absolute equality orequality that not necessarily takes the same form.

  4. Gender-Bending Anthropological Studies of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambach, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Outlines some future research directions in anthropology and education as they relate to gender issues. Studying how gender and education can be linked to more general values embedded in social organization seems an important area to explore. An example would be exploring how the teacher-student relationship reflects gendered relations of…

  5. Flexibility of Gender Stereotypes: Italian Study on Comparative Gender-consistent and Gender-inconsistent Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Sagone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this study is flexibility in gender stereotyping linked to attribution of toys, socio-cognitive traits, and occupations in 160 Italian children aged 6 to 12 years. We used the Gender Toys Choice, the Gender Traits Choice, and the Gender Jobs Choice, a selected set of colored cards containing masculine and feminine stimuli to assign to a male or female or both male and female silhouette (the flexible-choice technique. In order to verify the change of flexibility in gender stereotyping, we made use of four cartoon stories with male and female characters with typical or atypical traits and performing gender-consistent or gender-inconsistent activities. Results indicated that the exposure to cartoon stories with gender-inconsistent information rather than cartoon stories with gender-consistent information increased flexibility in gender stereotyping, showing age differences in favor of children aged 11-12. Implications in relation to the developmental-constructivist approach were noted.

  6. Examining Gender Bias in Studies of Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Crowden, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the presence of a gender bias in studies of innovation. Using the Innovation Systems Research Network (ISRN) and its interview guide as a case study, this research project examines how accurately and completely such innovation studies present gender differences in the innovation process.

  7. Gender Studies transdisziplinär gestalten Designing Trans-Disciplinary Gender Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Schmitz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Robin Bauer und Helene Götschel stellen am Beispiel des Curriculum-Projektes „Degendering Science“ Inhalte und Didaktiken für transdisziplinäre Lehrkonzepte vor, um Naturwissenschaften und Gender Studies in einen konstruktiven Dialog zu bringen. Dieses Buch ist mit seinen vielen Beispielen eine Hilfestellung für alle Lehrenden der Gender Studies und es liefert wichtige Anregungen zu aktuellen Herausforderungen und Strategien bei der Institutionalisierung der Gender Studies.On the basis of the curriculum project, “Degendering Science,” Robin Bauer and Helene Götschel propose didactics and contents for trans-disciplinary pedagogical concepts that bring the natural sciences and Gender Studies into a constructive dialogue. Because of its many examples, this book will be helpful for all instructors of Gender Studies and offers important strategies and stimulation for approaching current challenges in the institutionalization of Gender Studies.

  8. A Longitudinal Study of Gender-Related Cognition and Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anne; Shirley, Louisa; Candy, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Gender schema theory proposes that children's acquisition of gender labels and gender stereotypes informs gender-congruent behaviour. Most previous studies have been cross-sectional and do not address the temporal relationship between knowledge and behaviour. We report the results of a longitudinal study of gender knowledge and sex-typed behaviour…

  9. Case Study Report about Gender Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Agustin, Lise Rolandsen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this national case study report is to take a closer look at the use of Gender Impact Assessments in Denmark in order to describe the Danish implementation of this specific Gender Mainstreaming method. By way of analyzing two selected cases (two law proposals put forward by The Danish...... Ministry of Employment and the Danish Ministry of Transport, respectively) the aim is to assess the transformative potential of GIA as it is performed in Denmark....

  10. Gendering China studies: peripheral perspectives, central questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kloet, J.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the connections between the field of China studies and the field of gender and sexuality studies. It engages with three questions. First, why is it that theoretical, conceptual and methodological cross-fertilization between China studies and cultural studies remains quite

  11. Gender Equality a case study of Sweden : Gender Equality Gender Equity and policies of combating inequality at workplace to make the society equal.

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan, Tipu

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyses Gender Equality, Gender Equity and policies of combating inequality at workplace to make the society equal as a case study of Sweden. The aim of paper is see the gender equality, gender equity, discrimination against women at workplace and to describe the policies combating inequality in the welfare state of Sweden. This work highlights the gender equality in terms of institutionalizing gender equality, gender equity, gender and pay gap, parental leave, gender and the pensi...

  12. A review on gender linguistics studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Moradi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gender linguistics is a cynosure branch within the framework of language sociology and it deals with the effect that the gender, as a variable, has on the creation of lingual diversities. Because a great many of the social-cultural concepts, including gender, are multifaceted, one-dimensional and absolute perceptions of such concepts lead to some sort of superficiality, particularly in research areas. The present article, firstly, deals with the presentation of the notions opined by two prominent figures of the field, namely Robin Lakoff, 1975 and Deborah Tannen, 1990. Then, it is attempted, through a probe into the most recent studies carried out in the years from 2008 to 2016, to elaborate more on this study field. The results of the study are indicative of the idea that the applied linguistics researchers are more interested, than the others, in the survey of the gender effect and role in language and this effect has been, especially, evaluated regarding the second language learning but this field of study is found with numerous shortcomings the most important of which is the negligence of the propounded gender-related theories.

  13. Does Gender Matter? an Exploratory Study of Perspectives Across Genders, Age and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, Sherrie; Wong, Pia Lindquist

    2009-11-01

    Using a convenience sample and survey research methods, the authors seek to better understand how perspectives on gender are shaped by individuals' age, level of education and gender. Study participants responded in writing to scenarios and survey questions, revealing their personal views on gender as an identity category and as a marker in the social hierarchy. Analysis indicated that there were differences between male and female views on these dimensions of gender, and that age and educational levels were also influential. While younger respondents from both genders demonstrated flexibility in their definitions of gender and expressed strong support for gender equality, they were noticeably lacking in their knowledge of the historical context of gender relations and did not show the skills required to realise their ideals of gender equality, especially when compared to older respondents of both genders with higher levels of educational attainment.

  14. Neuroimaging studies in people with gender incongruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Guillamon, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The current review gives an overview of brain studies in transgender people. First, we describe studies into the aetiology of feelings of gender incongruence, primarily addressing the sexual differentiation hypothesis: does the brain of transgender individuals resemble that of their natal sex, or that of their experienced gender? Findings from neuroimaging studies focusing on brain structure suggest that the brain phenotypes of trans women (MtF) and trans men (FtM) differ in various ways from control men and women with feminine, masculine, demasculinized and defeminized features. The brain phenotypes of people with feelings of gender incongruence may help us to figure out whether sex differentiation of the brain is atypical in these individuals, and shed light on gender identity development. Task-related imaging studies may show whether brain activation and task performance in transgender people is sex-atypical. Second, we review studies that evaluate the effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on the brain. This type of research provides knowledge on how changes in sex hormone levels may affect brain structure and function.

  15. A Required Course in Gender Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Theresa J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the origins, goals, structures, and evaluations for a required course in gender studies at the university at which she teaches. This article will be of assistance to faculty members who may be interested in beginning a discussion of how such a course can be implemented at their own institutions. The course,…

  16. Gender Differences and Leadership: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    cost to future development of theory , strategy, and operations? This study analyzed gender differences in leadership as inferred from current research... management is basically a left brained logical approach toward controlling things: leadership is more a right brained, intuitive visionary approach towards...attribute frequently discussed in management and leadership literature. 13 Other research, however, indicates women do score a little higher on other

  17. Gender, Class and Rurality: Australian Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Lia; Pini, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The interrelationship between gender and class in rural spaces has received little attention. While rural scholars have focused on the implications for class from processes of gentrification and agricultural and rural restructuring, these analyses have remained largely ungendered. Similarly, feminist rural studies have rarely explored subjectivity…

  18. Studies in Gender and Development in Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim and Scope Studies in Gender and Development in Africa (SIGADA) is a ... lived realities and activisms on gender issues in development with the view to ... analytical work including issues, claims, arguments; implications/relevance etc.) vi.

  19. Studies in Gender and Development in Africa - Vol 2 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies in Gender and Development in Africa - Vol 2 (2008) ... I don't love my husband” Advice Columns as Teaching Resource for Gender and Sexuality: Experiences from the University of Cape Coast, Ghana ... Current Issue Atom logo

  20. Opinions and Strategies in Mainstreaming Gender Studies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    education and strategies for successful mainstreaming of gender education. ... the benefits or otherwise of inclusion of Gender Studies in tertiary institutions in Nigeria. .... Ireland and adds that is it better to co-ordinate it rather than have twelve.

  1. Studies in Gender and Development in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIGADA is a trans-disciplinary publication that prioritizes gender as a development issue. It is a forum for sharing research, resources, aesthetic expressions, lived realities and activisms that privilege and promote gender issues in development as well as contribute towards gender equality and social justice in Africa.

  2. Individual differences in gendered person perception: a multifactorial study

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    M.A. The psychological study of gender has evolved to comprise both dispositional and social cognitive perspectives (Morawski, 1987). Recent theoretical debates within these fields have centred on multifactorial and unifactorial conceptions of gendered factors (Spence, 1993), and the cognitive representation of gender (Howard & Hollander, 1997). This study aimed to investigate specific phenomena implicated in the above approaches. Firstly, it assessed the influence of using gender as a bas...

  3. Differences in Study Motivation within and between Genders: An Examination by Gender Typicality among Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantieghem, Wendelien; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2018-01-01

    Despite boys' educational underachievement, gender differences in study motivation have received little research attention. Guided by self-determination theory and the identity-based motivation model, this study investigates differences in study motivation between boys and girls, as well as within each gender. To adequately consider these…

  4. Gender theories or theories and gender? If and how feminist gender studies became a new science field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise Matos

    Full Text Available This article seeks to define what would be the order of gender studies within the Brazilian academic setting today. Given three sets of distinct reflections, the article tries to explore gender initially understood as a "theme" and a "concept" to subvert it and postulate gender today as a new scientific field. These three sets of reflections refer to: 1 the place of the current art of gender and feminist studies in Brazilian academic reflections; 2 the consequent attempt to explain and delimit the theoretical conceptions in these studies, which includes the objective of going beyond a mere concept, tool or analytic construction, establishing a new field of study in social and human sciences and even a new epistemology in the sciences; and 3 the discussions of the implications and consequences that such an initiative would have on the sciences, in addition to bringing contributions to a feminist epistemology as well as postulating a science with a multicultural and emancipating character.

  5. Gender Inequality and Trade Liberalization: A Case Study of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Naeem; Hyder, Kalim

    2006-01-01

    The main focus of this study is to explore the impact of trade liberalization on gender inequalities in Pakistan. The overall gender inequality based on three dimensions, including labour market, education and health facilities are analyzed in this paper using data from 1973 to 2005. Exports and imports to GDP ratio, per capita GDP, and number of girls’ school to number of boys’ school ratio are identified as important determinants of overall gender inequality in Pakistan and gender inequalit...

  6. A review on gender linguistics studies

    OpenAIRE

    Roozbeh Moradi

    2017-01-01

    Gender linguistics is a cynosure branch within the framework of language sociology and it deals with the effect that the gender, as a variable, has on the creation of lingual diversities. Because a great many of the social-cultural concepts, including gender, are multifaceted, one-dimensional and absolute perceptions of such concepts lead to some sort of superficiality, particularly in research areas. The present article, firstly, deals with the presentation of the notions opined by two promi...

  7. Gender Analysis On Islamic Texts: A Study On Its Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchammad Ichsan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gender equality movement is spreading all over the world, including in Indonesia where Muslim gender activists have made hard efforts to ensure gender fairness and equality among people. One of their efforts is emphasizing the urgency of reinterpreting Islamic texts. They insist on the reinterpretation of Islamic texts based on gender perspective and analysis due to the existence of many Islamic texts that trespass the principles of gender equality and fairness they have been fighting for. This paper aims at assuring and examining the accuracy of using gender perspective as a tool for analyzing the Islamic text. It is found that using gender perspective and analysis for reinterpreting Islamic texts is not in line with the Islamic principles and will only produce laws and points of views which deviate from Islamic teachings. To reach the goals of this study, a descriptive-analytical approach is employed.

  8. Gender Representation in Online Media. Case Study: the Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Gavriliu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The gender is a biological aspect which has migrated into a social concept with a major impact over the masculine or feminine identities, created by the society in itself. The media are a way of identity (reconstruction, our purpose being focused on a linguistic analysis of the media content of a Romanian online journal column – the interview, obtaining in this way classes of gender representation in the online medium. The application of the socio-psychological concept of gender on the journalistic texts is made through content analysis, obtaining in this way categories, types, domains of predilection, gender status. Social gender representations with their stereotypes and their innovations represent a poor explored domain when speaking of their transpositions in media. Our study aims to take into consideration a content – gender projection approach, in an objective perspective, based on a content analysis through gender representation in Romanian online content.

  9. [Psychological gender in clinical depression. Preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpitalak, Malwina; Prochwicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Psychosocial and social theories of mood disorders indicate that factors connected with women's gender roles could create a higher risk of depression. The fact that social role is an important factor associated with depressive disorders suggests that not only a biological but also a psychological gender influences the vulnerability to depression. Gender schema theory was applied to investigate a role of femininity in depressive disorders. It was predicted that patients who identify themselves with the traditional feminine gender role will be more depressed than androgynous and undifferentiated patients or individuals with high level of masculinity. Sixty one patients suffering from affective disorder participated in this research. The Polish adaptation of Bem Sex - Role Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory were used to investigate the association between psychological gender and symptoms of depression. The results indicated that there is a significant connection between the type of psychological gender and the level of depression. The highest level of depression was shown by undifferentiated patients, femininity was also found to be associated with a great number of depressive symptoms. These findings also suggest that androgynous individuals and patients with a high level of masculinity tend to be less depressed. Psychological gender is an important factor which interacts to create a higher depression risk in men and women.

  10. Beyond dichotomies: Gender and intersecting inequalities in climate change studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoudi, Houria; Locatelli, Bruno; Vaast, Chloe; Asher, Kiran; Brockhaus, Maria; Basnett Sijapati, Bimbika

    2016-12-01

    Climate change and related adaptation strategies have gender-differentiated impacts. This paper reviews how gender is framed in 41 papers on climate change adaptation through an intersectionality lens. The main findings show that while intersectional analysis has demonstrated many advantages for a comprehensive study of gender, it has not yet entered the field of climate change and gender. In climate change studies, gender is mostly handled in a men-versus-women dichotomy and little or no attention has been paid to power and social and political relations. These gaps which are echoed in other domains of development and gender research depict a 'feminization of vulnerability' and reinforce a 'victimization' discourse within climate change studies. We argue that a critical intersectional assessment would contribute to unveil agency and emancipatory pathways in the adaptation process by providing a better understanding of how the differential impacts of climate change shape, and are shaped by, the complex power dynamics of existing social and political relations.

  11. Gender-based education during clerkships: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Leerdam L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lotte van Leerdam, Lianne Rietveld, Doreth Teunissen, Antoine Lagro-JanssenDepartment of Primary and Community Care, Gender and Women's Health, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsObjectives: One of the goals of the medical master's degree is for a student to become a gender-sensitive doctor by applying knowledge of gender differences in practice. This study aims to investigate, from the students’ perspective, whether gender medicine has been taught in daily practice during clerkship.Methods: A focus group study was conducted among 29 medical students from Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, who had just finished either their internal medicine or surgical clerkships. Data were analyzed in line with the principles of constant comparative analysis.Results: Four focus groups were conducted with 29 participating students. Clinical teachers barely discuss gender differences during students’ clerkships. The students mentioned three main explanatory themes: insufficient knowledge; unawareness; and minor impact. As a result, students feel that they have insufficient competencies to become gender-sensitive doctors.Conclusion: Medical students at our institution perceive that they have received limited exposure to gender-based education after completing two key clinical clerkships. All students feel that they have insufficient knowledge to become gender-sensitive doctors. They suppose that their clinical teachers have insufficient knowledge regarding gender sensitivity, are unaware of gender differences, and the students had the impression that gender is not regarded as an important issue. We suggest that the medical faculty should encourage clinical teachers to improve their knowledge and awareness of gender issues.Keywords: medical education, clerkship, gender, hidden curriculum, clinical teachers

  12. Gender issues in livestock production: a case study of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupawaenda, Anna C; Chawatama, Shingirai; Muvavarirwa, Plaxidia

    2009-10-01

    The importance of main streaming gender issues in development programmes is now recognized by governments and development agents. This paper evaluates the role of gender in smallholder livestock production using Zimbabwe as a case study. It draws on several studies and assesses the gender dimension in terms of access and control, decision making and, division of labour. It is shown that for mainly traditional and historical reasons men continue to dominate livestock production although the situation is gradually changing. Men eclipse women in terms of ownership of more valuable stock, the making of decisions and the control of livestock production. This suggests that gender is important in livestock production and must be considered among other factors. The complexity of the system is noted but more gender disaggregated quantitative data is required if gender is to be effectively mainstreamed in livestock development programmes.

  13. “No, Gender doesn’t make a Difference…?” Studying Negotiations and Gender in Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Lotte Bloksgaard

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on methodological challenges and strategies with regard to studying gender in organizations. Work organizations are often thought, theorized and talked about as gender-neutral arenas and, therefore, gender is often seen as irrelevant and of no importance in modern work-life. There is also often a discrepancy in relation to gender between discourse and practice, which makes it difficult to capture the significance of gender in organizations by the interview method alone. O...

  14. Occupational therapists' perceptions of gender - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedberg, Gunilla M; Björk, Mathilda; Hensing, Gunnel

    2010-10-01

    Women and men are shaped over the courses of their lives by culture, society and human interaction according to the gender system. Cultural influences on individuals' social roles and environment are described in occupational therapy literature, but not specifically from a gender perspective. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how a sample of occupational therapists perceives the 'gender' concept. Four focus group interviews with 17 occupational therapists were conducted. The opening question was: 'How do you reflect on the encounter with a client depending on whether it is a man or a woman?' The transcribed interviews were analysed and two main themes emerged: 'the concept of gender is tacit in occupational therapy' and 'client encounters'. The occupational therapists expressed limited theoretical knowledge of 'gender'. Furthermore, the occupational therapists seemed to be 'doing gender' in their encounters with the clients. For example, in their assessment of the client, they focussed their questions on different spheres: with female clients, on the household and family; with male clients, on their paid work. This study demonstrated that occupational therapists were unaware of the possibility that they were 'doing gender' in their encounters with clients. There is a need to increase occupational therapists' awareness of their own behaviour of 'doing gender'. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate whether gendered perceptions will shorten or lengthen a rehabilitation period and affect the chosen interventions, and in the end, the outcome for the clients. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2010 Australian Association of Occupational Therapists.

  15. Gender Theories or Theories and Gender? If and how Feminist Gender Studies became a New Science Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise Matos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to define what would be the order of gender studies within the Brazilian academic setting today. Given three sets of distinct reflections, the article tries to explore gender initially understood as a “theme” and a “concept” to subvert it and postulate gender today as a new scientific field. These three sets of reflections refer to: 1 the place of the current art of gender and feminist studies in Brazilian academic reflections; 2 the consequent attempt to explain and delimit the theoretical conceptions in these studies, which includes the objective of going beyond a mere concept, tool or analytic construction, establishing a new field of study in social and human sciences and even a new epistemology in the sciences; and 3 the discussions of the implications and consequences that such an initiative would have on the sciences, in addition to bringing contributions to a feminist epistemology as well as postulating a science with a multicultural and emancipating character.

  16. Gender Identity and Gender Role in DSD Patients Raised as Females: A Preliminary Outcome Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Oya; Kutlug, Seyhan; Uysal, Omer; Alikasifoglu, Mujgan; Inceoglu, Derya

    2013-01-01

    Gender identity and gender role are expected to be consistent with gender assignment for optimal DSD management outcome. To our knowledge, our study is the first to attempt evaluation of gender related outcomes in Turkish DSD patients. After receiving institutional ethical board approval and subject (or parent) informed consent, subjects with DSD raised as girls (22 patients 46 XX DSD, 11 patients 46 XY DSD) answered 566 questions of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) questionnaire including 60-item Masculinity-Femininity (MF) subscale which was the focus in this study. Controls (n: 50) were females similar to the probands in age, level of education, relationship status, and having a job or not also answered all questions. The answers were evaluated by a trained psychologist (Derya Inceoglu) on MMPI. For statistical purposes, seven findings were obtained from the data related to the MF subscale from the patients and controls. Of these seven findings (S1-S7), two were associated with masculinity (S3-S4) and another two were associated with femininity (S5-S6). In DSD patients, the percentages of masculinity findings were significantly higher when compared to controls (p gender change to male; only these two patients had the finding stating that sexual impulses could come to existence as actions (S7). In conclusion efforts to identify modifiable factors with negative impact and thus modifying them, and professional guidance may be important in minimizing the encountered gender related problems in DSD patients.

  17. Gender, CSR and Feminist Organization Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosser, Kate; Moon, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    contribution is to extend Garriga and Mele’s (2004) mapping of CSR theory to interrogate, and inform, extant gender and CSR scholarship. Both these exercises suggest research gaps and possible new theoretical, empirical and methodological research directions. Ultimately, we consider that really innovative...

  18. Gender in health technology assessment: pilot study on agency approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Dimitra; Zentner, Annette; Storz-Pfennig, Philipp; Busse, Reinhard

    2011-07-01

    Gender as a social construct is a recognized health determinant. Because best practice in reporting health technology assessment (HTA) clearly specifies the need to appraise a technology's social impact within the target population, the extent to which gender issues are taken into account in HTA production is of interest, not only in light of equitable practices but also for reasons of effectiveness. The aim of this study is to provide a first assessment of the degree of gender sensitivity shown by HTA agencies around the world today. The Web sites of sixty HTA agencies were analyzed. The consideration of gender aspects was specifically looked for in each agency's general mission statement, its priority setting process, and its methodological approach. Additionally, specific gender-oriented initiatives not belonging to any of the aforementioned categories were identified. Of the sixty agencies, less than half mention a commitment to addressing the social implication of health technologies. Only fifteen institutions make information on their priority setting principles available on their Web sites and gender was an issue in two of those cases. Data on methodology were obtainable online from 18 agencies, two of which mentioned gender issues explicitly. Finally, gender-oriented initiatives were identified by thirteen agencies. A gender-sensitive approach is apparently rarely adopted in current HTA production. Exceptional practices and relevant tools do exist and could serve as examples to be promoted by international collaborative networks.

  19. Gender Representation in Japanese EFL Textbooks--A Corpus Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jackie F. K.

    2018-01-01

    This paper seeks to investigate whether the Japanese government's attempt to promote a 'gender-equal' society in recent decades and the improved status of women are reflected in patterns of gender representation in Japanese English as a foreign language textbooks. The study made an analysis of four popular series of English language textbooks…

  20. Peer Group Status of Gender Dysphoric Children: A Sociometric Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallien, M.S.C.; Veenstra, R.; Kreukels, B.P.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    In this sociometric study, we aimed to investigate the social position of gender-referred children in a naturalistic environment. We used a peer nomination technique to examine their social position in the class and we specifically examined bullying and victimization of gender dysphoric children. A

  1. Scandinavian Approaches to Gender Equality in Academia: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how Denmark, Norway, and Sweden approach issues of gender equality in research differently. Based on a comparative document analysis of gender equality activities in six Scandinavian universities, together with an examination of the legislative and political frameworks surrounding these activities, the article provides new…

  2. Gender wage gap studies : consistency and decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kunze, Astrid

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical literature on the gender wage gap, with particular attention given to the identification of the key parameters in human capital wage regression models. This is of great importance in the literature for two main reasons. First, the main explanatory variables in the wage model, i.e., measures of work experience and the time-out-of-work, are endogenous. As a result, applying traditional estimators may lead to inconsistent parameter estimates. Secon...

  3. Gender Performativity through Musicking: Examples from a Norwegian Classroom Study

    OpenAIRE

    Onsrud, Silje Valde

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article is based on findings from the doctoral thesis Gender at Stake: A Study of Secondary School Pupils’ Musicking. The study explores how pupils stage and construct gender through the music they perform in the lower-secondary school music education in Norway. The observations and interviews of four music teaching practices in two urban lower-secondary schools that provided the qualitative data of the study are intended to highlight both the teachers’ and the pupils’ perspe...

  4. Gendered Choices : Fields of study of adolescents in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van der Vleuten, M.

    2018-01-01

    Choosing a field of study is an important decision in determining future educational trajectories and occupations, and we know that boys and girls make different field of study choices. Girls are underrepresented in gender-stereotypical masculine fields like science and technology, whereas boys are underrepresented in gender-stereotypical feminine fields like education or health-related fields. This dissertation provides insight in the different ways in which adolescents’ social environment a...

  5. GENDER IDENTITY AND GENDER ROLE IN DSD PATIENTS RAISED AS FEMALES:A PRELIMINARY OUTCOME STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya eErcan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Gender identity and gender role are expected to be consistent with gender assignment for optimal DSD management outcome. To our knowledge, our study is the first to attempt evaluation of gender related outcomes in Turkish DSD patients.After receiving institutional ethical board approval and subject (or parent informed consent, subjects with DSD raised as girls (22 patients 46 XX DSD,11 patients 46XY DSD answered 566 questions of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI questionnaire including 60- item Masculinity-Femininity (MF subscale which was the focus in this study. Controls (n:50 were females similar to the probands in age, level of education, relationship status and having a job or not also answered all questions. The answers were evaluated by a trained psychologist(D.I. on MMPI .For statistical purposes, 7 findings were obtained from the data related to the MF subscale from the patients and controls. Of these 7 findings (S1-S7, two were associated with masculinity (S3-S4 and another two were associated with femininity (S5-S6In DSD patients, the percentages of masculinity findings were significantly higher when compared to controls (p< 0.001 and p< 0.001 for S3 and S4 respectively. In controls, the percentages of femininity findings were significantly higher when compared to DSD females (p< 0.001 and p< 0.001 for S5 and S6 respectively.There was no significant difference between 46XX DSD patients and 46XY DSD patients with respect to the percentage of any of the 7 findings. Two patients requested gender change to male;only these two patients had the finding stating that sexual impulses could come to existence as actions(S7.In conclusion efforts to identify modifiable factors with negative impact and thus modifying them, and professional guidance may be important in minimizing the encountered gender related problems in DSD patients

  6. Gender and teacher training in Early Childhood Education studies

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    Alfonso Romero Díaz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a research study funded by the European Union that aims to improve early childhood teacher training in gender-related topics. Spain has made considerable headway with the inclusion of gender mainstreaming in the political agenda. However, as we point out in this paper, this issue is still not a priority in vocational training for early childhood education. A series of qualitative interviews and a quantitative questionnaire revealed a lack of training, materials and sensitivity, all needed for the introduction of gender and sexual diversity issues.

  7. (En)Gendering Videogame Development: A Feminist Approach to Gender, Education, and Game Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahya, Negin; Jenson, Jennifer; Fong, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Few studies compare educational programming designed on principles of inclusive pedagogy and feminist practice for both girls and boys. Broadly defined, inclusive pedagogy refers to theory and practice in education that is adaptable and responsive to the intersections of difference (class, race, culture, gender, sexuality, ability) and aims to…

  8. Gender differences in major depressive disorder : Results from the Netherlands study of depression and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuch, Jerome J. J.; Roest, Annelieke M.; Nolen, Willem A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Jonge, Peter

    Background: Although an overall gender difference in prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) has been well established, several questions concerning gender differences in the clinical manifestation of depression remain. This study aims to identify gender differences in psychopathology,

  9. Gender, Major and Wage. A Study of the Gender Pay Gap among Italian University Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Cantalini Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In Italian labour market women are paid less than men. The qualitative dimension of education, namely the field of study, might be considered as one of the most important factor behind these wage inequalities, since men and women unequally distribute across university majors and women are more likely to hold a degree in not lucrative fields. In this paper we analyze the gender wage gap among early-career Italian university graduates. First, we investigate the main factors behind women's econo...

  10. Gender Influences on Students' Study Abroad Participation and Intercultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Amanda; Cook, Trevor; Miller, Emily; LePeau, Lucy A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of gender in study abroad participation rates and intercultural competence. The researchers aimed to identify the differences in intercultural competence between men and women and those who have and have not studied abroad. A mixed methods survey indicated there are significant…

  11. An Empirical Study about China: Gender Equity in Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Staver, John R.

    A data base representing a random sample of more than 10,000 grade 9 students in an SISS (Second IEA Science Study) Extended Study (SES), a key project supported by the China State Commission of Education in the late 1980s, was employed in this study to investigate gender equity in student science achievement in China. This empirical data analysis…

  12. The study of athletes' body perception and gender role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Gulsum

    2011-12-01

    In this study, it has been aimed to examine athletes' body perception and gender role. 120 male athletes and 120 non-athletic male university students participated in the study voluntarily. In the study, as the data collecting means, The Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire-MBSRQ was used in order to determine males' body perception levels, BEM Sex Role Inventory-BSRI was used to determine gender roles and Personal Information Form developed by the researcher was used to ascertain personal features of the subjects. When the athletes' body perception levels are examined, the features of physical competence orientation, health orientation, appearance evaluation, fitness evaluation, health evaluation and body areas satisfaction have been found to be higher than non-athletes' (p orientation (p > 0.05). When gender roles are examined, athletes have been found to have higher values than non-athletes' in terms of masculinity, femininity and social desirability (p gender role, it is also thought that athletes care about health, appearance and physical competence and are glad of body parts because of their muscled body structure developing due to the exercises and have flexible personality to show feminine and masculine features that the environment needs in terms of gender role.

  13. Gender differences in visuospatial planning: an eye movements study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, Valentina; Basso, Demis; Cutini, Simone; Bisiacchi, Patrizia

    2010-01-20

    Gender studies report a male advantage in several visuospatial abilities. Only few studies however, have evaluated differences in visuospatial planning behaviour with regard to gender. This study was aimed at exploring whether gender may affect the choice of cognitive strategies in a visuospatial planning task and, if oculomotor measures could assist in disentangling the cognitive processes involved. A computerised task based on the travelling salesperson problem paradigm, the Maps test, was used to investigate these issues. Participants were required to optimise time and space of a path travelling among a set of sub-goals in a spatially constrained environment. Behavioural results suggest that there are no gender differences in the initial visual processing of the stimuli, but rather during the execution of the plan, with males showing a shorter execution time and a higher path length optimisation than females. Males often showed changes of heuristics during the execution while females seemed to prefer a constant strategy. Moreover, a better performance in behavioural and oculomotor measures seemed to suggest that males are more able than females in either the optimisation of spatial features or the realisation of the planned scheme. Despite inconclusive findings, the results support previous research and provide insight into the level of cognitive processing involved in navigation and planning tasks, with regard to the influence of gender.

  14. Gender Stereotyping and Female Pupils' Perception of Studying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender Stereotyping and Female Pupils' Perception of Studying Advanced Level Sciences: A Survey of One Province in Zimbabwe. C Pinias, VS Matswetu. Abstract. In spite of advances in the field of science and technology, females are still under-represented in the sciences. The study sought to explore the perceptions of ...

  15. Gender Differences in Perceptions of Studying for the GCSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Lynne; Hallam, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This study explored gender differences in perceptions of studying for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE). The sample comprised 644 pupils drawn from eight schools in Outer London, UK. The schools encompassed pupils who could be regarded as high, middle and low achievers drawn from co-educational and single-sex schools. Pupils…

  16. Gendered Choices : Fields of study of adolescents in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vleuten, M.

    2018-01-01

    Choosing a field of study is an important decision in determining future educational trajectories and occupations, and we know that boys and girls make different field of study choices. Girls are underrepresented in gender-stereotypical masculine fields like science and technology, whereas boys are

  17. Sex Stereotyping of Infants: A Review of Gender Labeling Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Marilyn; Karraker, Katherine Hildebrandt

    1989-01-01

    Reviews studies of adult and child response to male and female infants based on preconceived sex stereotypes. Evaluates overall conclusions from studies. Indicates that knowledge of infant's gender is not a consistent determinant of adults' reactions but more strongly influences children's reactions. Considers implications for sex role…

  18. A comparative gender study of the factors affecting motivation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study is to identify the key factors of motivation for professional and paraprofessional library staff based on their gender and to identify how they rate the various motivational factors. The descriptive survey method was employed and five university libraries were selected for the study. The respondents ...

  19. Gendered Pathways to Burnout: Results from the SALVEO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, Nancy; Marchand, Alain; Bilodeau, Jaunathan; Durand, Pierre; Demers, Andrée; Haines, Victor Y

    2018-02-19

    Burnout is a pervasive mental health problem in the workforce, with mounting evidence suggesting ties with occupational and safety outcomes such as work injuries, critical events and musculoskeletal disorders. While environmental [work and non-work, work-to-family conflict (WFC)] and individual (personality) pathways to burnout are well documented, little is known about how gender comes to influence such associative patterns. The aim of the study consisted in examining gendered pathways to burnout. Data were derived from the SALVEO study, a cross-sectional study of 2026 workers from 63 workplaces from the province of Québec (Canada). Data were analyzed using multilevel path analysis. Direct effects of gendered pathways were evidenced for work (e.g. decision latitude) and non-work (e.g. child-related strains) environmental pathways, as well as for individual pathways (i.e. internal locus of control). Indirect effects of gendered pathways were also evidenced, with women reporting higher levels of burnout compared to men due to lower levels of decision latitude and of self-esteem, as well as higher levels of WFC. Women also reported lower burnout levels through investing more time into domestic tasks, which could represent a recovery strategy to highly demanding work. WFC further mediated the associations between working hours and burnout, as well as the between irregular work schedules and burnout. These result suggest than men distinctively reported higher levels of burnout due to the specific nature of their work contract negatively impacting on WFC, and incidentally, on their mental health. Study results supported our hypotheses positing that gender distinctively shapes environmental and individual pathways to burnout. OHS prevention efforts striving for better mental health outcomes in the workforce could relevantly be informed by a gendered approach to burnout.

  20. Conference Essay: The Relationship between Gender Studies and Discourse Studies: Synergies, Frictions, and Pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiner, Bettina; Dinsleder, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    The interdisciplinary conference "Gender Studies Meets Discourse Studies Meets Gender Studies: Entanglements, Affinities, Tensions, and Open Questions" focused on the relationship between gender studies and discourse studies. On the one hand this essay provides insights into the conference debates, and on the other it critically discusses the contributions. The following three key aspects provide guidelines for reconstructing and developing the arguments: 1. theoretical perspectives on the re...

  1. “No, Gender doesn’t make a Difference…?” Studying Negotiations and Gender in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Bloksgaard

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on methodological challenges and strategies with regard to studying gender in organizations. Work organizations are often thought, theorized and talked about as gender-neutral arenas and, therefore, gender is often seen as irrelevant and of no importance in modern work-life. There is also often a discrepancy in relation to gender between discourse and practice, which makes it difficult to capture the significance of gender in organizations by the interview method alone. On the basis of two empirical studies, focusing on the significance of gender in negotiations of wage and parental leave in the work place, the article explores some of the challenges and complexities involved when researching gender as a social category of difference, which produces inequalities in organizations. Furthermore, the article demonstrates and discusses how applying and combining different methods and research strategies – for example following specific negotiations to a conclusion - provide insight into the production of gender in discourse and practice at the work place level. Thus, the article argues that reflexivity and methodological plurality are important when studying gender in work organizations.

  2. A study on gender differences influencing on online buying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirnima Negahdari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the diffusion of the Internet as a retail and distribution channel has undergone a great growth. This paper presents an empirical investigation on the effects of gender differences on online buying. The study explored gender differences among 13 factors concerning the internet buyer. With regard to factors and consistent with Hypothesis and sub hypothesis, differences were detected across genders using t-student tests and the findings were in alignment with the ANOVA test. For data collection and final testing of the E-SAT model a questionnaire was designed and distributed among 100 randomly people who resided in Iran. The analysis show that merchandising, security and company items gained more scores for men than women in online shopping.

  3. Gender Dysphoria and Gender Change in Disorders of Sex Development/Intersex Conditions: Results From the dsd-LIFE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Köhler, Birgit; Nordenström, Anna; Roehle, Robert; Thyen, Ute; Bouvattier, Claire; de Vries, Annelou L C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2018-05-01

    Information on the psychosexual outcome of individuals with disorders of sex development (DSDs) and intersex conditions is of great importance for sex assignment at birth of newborns with DSD. To assess gender change and gender dysphoria in a large sample of individuals with different DSDs. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 14 European centers with 1,040 participants (717 female-identifying and 311 male-identifying persons and 12 persons identifying with another gender) with different forms of DSD. The cohort (mean age = 32.36 years, SD = 13.57) was divided into 6 major subgroups: women with 45,X DSD and variants (Turner syndrome; n = 325), men with 47,XXY DSD and variants (Klinefelter syndrome; n = 219), women with XY DSD without androgen effects (n = 107) and with androgen effects (n = 63), men with XY DSD (n = 87), and women with 46,XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia (n = 221). Data on psychosexual outcome were gathered by medical interviews and questionnaires. Gender change and gender dysphoria. Although gender changes were reported by 5% of participants, only in 1% (3% if those with Klinefelter and Turner syndromes-conditions in which gender issues are not prominent-are excluded) did the gender change take place after puberty and was likely initiated by the patient. 39 participants (4%) reported gender variance: between male and female, a gender other than male or female, or gender queer, alternating gender roles, or a gender expression that differed from the reported gender. This group had lower self-esteem and more anxiety and depression than the other participants. Clinicians should be aware of and sensitive to the possibility that their patients with DSD not only might have transgender feelings and a desire to change gender, but also identify as different from male or female. The complexity of their feelings might require counseling for some patients. The study is unique in the large number of participants from many different clinics, with

  4. A Conceptual Study on Pedagogical Formation Students: Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Sinem; Ünal, Fatma; Köksal, Eda Çürükvelioglu

    2017-01-01

    While the biological differences accepted by the individuals themselves are seen as sex differences, at the point of socializing the society culture, the differences in the ways of behavior, emotion, and role which are taught are seen as "acceptable" according to the sex are seen as gender role differences. This study aimed to…

  5. International Journal of Language, Literature and Gender Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    2016-10-12

    Oct 12, 2016 ... emerging from on-going studies of gender inequality in political representation. These ... aspiring political office holders, women-focused non-governmental organizations and ... (a) The consideration and the making of recommendations to a State Commission ..... Governance as theory: Five propositions.

  6. Gender Differences in Poverty : A Cross-National Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiepking, Pamala; Maas, Ineke

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe and explain country differences in the effect of gender on the risk of becoming poor, using data from the Luxembourg Income Study on 22 industrialized countries. Although in most countries women are more likely to become poor than men, this is not the case for all

  7. Gender differences in poverty: a cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiepking, P.; Maas, W.A.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe and explain country differences in the effect of gender on the risk of becoming poor, using data from the Luxembourg Income Study on 22 industrialized countries. Although in most countries women are more likely to become poor than men, this is not the case for all

  8. Gender preference and perinatal depression in Turkey: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk Cankorur, Vesile; Duman, Berker; Taylor, Clare; Stewart, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Child gender preference is important in some cultures and has been found to modify risk for antenatal and postnatal depression. We investigated discrepancies in the child gender preference between participating women and other key family members and the extent to which these predicted perinatal depression. In a large cohort study of perinatal depression in urban and rural Turkey, participants had been asked about child gender preferences: their own, and those of their husband, parents, and parents in-law. Of 730 participants recruited in their third trimester (94.6% participation), 578 (79.2%) were reassessed at a mean (SD) 4.1 (3.3) months after childbirth, and 488 (66.8%) were reassessed at 13.7 (2.9) months. No associations were found between any gender preference reported in the antenatal period and depression at any examination. On the other hand, we found associations of antenatal depression with differences in participant-reported gender preference and that reported for their mother-in-law (OR 1.81, 1.08-3.04). This non-agreement also predicted depression at the 4 month (OR 2.24, 1.24-4.03) and 14 month (OR 2.07, 1.05-4.04) post-natal examinations. These associations with postnatal depression persisted after adjustment for a range of covariates (ORs 3.19 (1.54-6.59) and 3.30 (1.49-7.33) respectively). Reported disagreement in child gender preferences between a woman and her mother-in-law was a predictor of post-natal depression and may reflect wider family disharmony as an underlying factor.

  9. Gender preference and perinatal depression in Turkey: A cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesile Senturk Cankorur

    Full Text Available Child gender preference is important in some cultures and has been found to modify risk for antenatal and postnatal depression. We investigated discrepancies in the child gender preference between participating women and other key family members and the extent to which these predicted perinatal depression.In a large cohort study of perinatal depression in urban and rural Turkey, participants had been asked about child gender preferences: their own, and those of their husband, parents, and parents in-law. Of 730 participants recruited in their third trimester (94.6% participation, 578 (79.2% were reassessed at a mean (SD 4.1 (3.3 months after childbirth, and 488 (66.8% were reassessed at 13.7 (2.9 months.No associations were found between any gender preference reported in the antenatal period and depression at any examination. On the other hand, we found associations of antenatal depression with differences in participant-reported gender preference and that reported for their mother-in-law (OR 1.81, 1.08-3.04. This non-agreement also predicted depression at the 4 month (OR 2.24, 1.24-4.03 and 14 month (OR 2.07, 1.05-4.04 post-natal examinations. These associations with postnatal depression persisted after adjustment for a range of covariates (ORs 3.19 (1.54-6.59 and 3.30 (1.49-7.33 respectively.Reported disagreement in child gender preferences between a woman and her mother-in-law was a predictor of post-natal depression and may reflect wider family disharmony as an underlying factor.

  10. How Well Does Botswana's Social Studies Curriculum Articulate Gender Issues? A Preliminary Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boikhutso, Keene

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I discuss the extent to Botswana's social studies curriculum is gendered thus more likely to reproduce gender inequalities. The paper locates gender issues within the broader context of male-dominated patriarchal society. It applies content analysis to establish whether or not the Social Studies syllabuses articulate gender issues. I…

  11. Gender interaction in coed physical education: a study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Canan

    2009-01-01

    Although there has been a long-standing debate about whether a single-sex or mixed-sex environment is better for students in many Western countries, coeducation is one of the taken-for-granted issues in the modern Turkish education system. This study examined commonly expressed concerns about gender equity in a mixed-sex environment within the context of physical education (PE) in Turkey. The purpose of the study was to examine teacher-student interaction in the coed PE classroom, focusing on gender-stereotyped beliefs. Participants consisted of two PE teachers and 37 eighth-grade students from a private school situated in suburban Ankara Turkey. The modified observational instrument with the combination of Teacher-Student Interaction (TSI) and Interactions for Sex Equity in Classroom Teaching Observation System (INTERSECT) was used to assess teacher-student interaction in the classroom. In order to understand students' and teachers' gender-stereotyped beliefs, individual interviews were also conducted. The findings of this study indicated that both male and female PE teachers interact more frequently with boys, and this interaction was influenced by gender-stereotyped beliefs of both teachers and students. In sum, similar to many other western countries, the movement toward coeducation in Turkey has not automatically brought equal opportunities for girls or boys in PE.

  12. Same-Gender and Cross-Gender Likeability : Associations With Popularity and Status Enhancement: The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.K.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Lindenberg, S.M.; Veenstra, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the associations of popularity, substance use, athletic abilities, physical attractiveness, and physical and relational aggression with likeability by same-gender and cross-gender peers among early adolescents (N = 3,312; M age = 13.60, with 92.7% of the participants in the 12-14

  13. Same-Gender and Cross-Gender Likeability: Associations with Popularity and Status Enhancement--The TRAILS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Veenstra, Rene

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the associations of popularity, substance use, athletic abilities, physical attractiveness, and physical and relational aggression with likeability by same-gender and cross-gender peers among early adolescents (N = 3,312; M age = 13.60, with 92.7% of the participants in the 12-14 age range). Data collection consisted of peer…

  14. MEDIA DAN GENDER (Studi Deskriptif Representasi Stereotipe Perempuan dalam Iklan di Televisi Swasta)

    OpenAIRE

    Yanti Dwi Astuti

    2016-01-01

    Gender stereotypes in television advertising have become a topic of a long debate, especially among media scholars. The case became a serious problem, because of gender bias ads will affect the way we think about the role and way of functioning of gender in society. This study describes how television commercials have given gender role stereotypes against women. It is becoming important to be studied further to see how people receive messages about gender norms. This study uses descriptive an...

  15. Study of palatal rugae pattern in gender identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Balgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to determine the gender differences in rugae pattern with regards to the length, number, and shape. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients (25 males, 25 females aged 30-50 years were randomly selected from the routine outpatient department at Sinhgad Dental College and Hospital. Maxillary impressions were made using alginate hydrocolloid and cast in dental stone. Palatal rugae pattern were then evaluated under the parameters such as length, number, and shape. Results: The association of rugae pattern (length, number, shape and the gender was analyzed using Chi-square test for qualitative variable and t-test for quantitative variable. The average length of the rugae was greater in males than in females. The average numbers of rugae were same in both males and females. Straight pattern was commonly seen in females than in males. Analysis showed significant difference with parameters like length and shape (straight pattern in both the males and females. Conclusion: As the analysis showed significant difference with the length and shape of rugae patterns in both males and females, rugoscopy, thereby could be an important tool for gender identification. The study will be continued with larger sample size to expand knowledge about gender differences in palatal rugae patterns.

  16. Women Authors with/without Gender Studies: the Gendered Regimes of Authority in Hungarian Literary Criticism Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Györgyi Horváth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While in contemporary Hungarian literature women authors are constantly emerging and make themselves much more visible than ever before, the gender bias underlying literary evaluations seem to remain nearly intact. In her study Györgyi Horváth discusses three aspects of the gendered regimes of authority in order to give deeper insights into how gender bias re-produces within the Hungarian context. First, she focuses on lists of literary prize winners and critical rankings of published works (showing how many women writers are present on such lists in absolute numbers and in what percentages, and how their numbers have changed over time. Secondly, she explores the practice of critique writing itself, by analyzing the book review pages in two literary journals between 2007 and 2009 focusing on cases when the issue of “gender” itself comes up in the rhetoric of critics trying to underpin their aesthetic judgments on a given work. And finally, she examines briefly the attitude of contemporary women writers towards Gender Studies. Horváth concludes that Gender Studies in Hungary has not contributed significantly to increasing the prestige of contemporary women writers, most of whom, in turn, do not want to be involved with Gender Studies or feminism at all. She also points out that at present in Hungary there is a general blindness in understanding how gender/power relations permeate aesthetic judgments.

  17. Exploiting Hypertext’s Potential for Teaching Gender Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Zalbidea Paniagua

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2012v8n1p104 The aim of this article is to show what feminist electronic literature can contribute to the study of gender theories and feminist literature. The study of feminist hypertext fictions and the use of hypertext as a teaching tool are facilitated by the intrinsic characteristics of the electronic medium, complementing the electronic medium and providing alternative possibilities in the learning process: collaborative authorship, multivocality, textual openness, non-hierarchical and rhizomatic structures, neo-kathartic effects and open publishing. Teaching feminist electronic literature using the hypertext offers the possibility of updating and discussing gender through a medium that permits rearranging the hypertext, better organized analyses of intertextuality and fostering the study through association and connections, which is the way the human brain works. The teaching method proposed pursues the objective of studying narratives about gender taking advantage of the new technologies without losing dialogues in class as intuitive learning process.

  18. Descriptive Study of Gender Dysphoria in Japanese Individuals with Male-to-Female Gender Identity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Shinohara, Yoshie; Nakatsuka, Mikiya

    2018-01-01

    We focus on Japanese individuals with gender identity disorder (GID), especially male-to-female (MTF) GID, who have experienced difficulty in adapting to social life. We clarify what gender dysphoria is, and we examine methods of intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 individuals with MTF-GID from August 2015 to April 2017. We categorized the subjects’experiences regarding dysphoria into the ‘Onset of gender dysphoria,’ ‘Experience of feeling gender dysphoria,’ and ‘C...

  19. A MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF THE SELLA TURCICA; GENDER EFFECT

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Mohamed Elsayed Ali SAKRAN *1, Mohammad Afzal KHAN 2, Faris Mohammed Nour ALTAF 3, Hassan Elsiddig Hassan FARAGALLA 4, Amal Yousif Ahmed Elhaj MUSTAFA 5, Muhammad Mazhar HIJAZI 6, Rayan Abdulshakur NIYAZI 7, Abrar Jamal TAWAKUL 8, Abeer Zubair MALEBARI 9, Amal AbdulAziz SALEM 10.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: Precise anatomical knowledge of the sella turcica is important for neurologists and surgeons operating in the region of cavernous sinus or the surrounding structures. The current study was undertaken to record normal morphometric parameters for future reference and to determine if there is any significance difference in the sella turcica morphometry regarding the gender. Methodology: A Morphometric analysis of the Sella Turcica and structures in vicinity were done...

  20. KONSTRUKSI ISU GENDER DALAM POLITIK: STUDI KASUS PEMILIHAN UMUM 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Sutarso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction issue of women in politics is built on the assumption of representation, which states that the number of women in representative institutions is not proportional when compared with the number of women voters. Discourse Affirmative Action is an effort to increase the number of women’s political participation in representative institutions. Although a lot of resistance or support, affirmative action is included in the Election Law 12 of 2003 failed to increase the number of legislative candidates who sit in Parliament significantly. Study of women’s issues in Election 2004 has the urgency to understand gender issues, because legislative elections are followed by direct presidential election confronts Megawati Sukarnoputri with Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. Competition both have crystallized the issue of gender in politics, whether that support on the one hand and women who refused leaders on the other. Construction is not only built on political arguments, but also social, cultural and religious.

  1. Studi Perbedaan Niat Beli Green Electricity Product Berdasarkan Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tias Andarini Indarwati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Consumers adapt to this situation by considering environmental issue when shopping and  by their purchase behavior. The aims of this paper are examines of differences of environment awareness and purchase intentions between male and female of students of Surabaya State University. Secondly, examines also role linearly of environment awareness on purchase intentions. Examines role linearly of environment awareness on purchase intentions of green electricity product using simple linier regression analysis. The results indicate that there are no differences of environment awareness and purchase intentions at the students of Surabaya State University by gender. And finally, environmental awareness has also positive effect on purchase intentions. The results of this study have implications for marketers in identifying, designing, and managing marketing mix with consider discrepancy of purchase intentions in the green electricity product by gender.

  2. Workplace Bullying Among Family Physicians: A Gender Focused Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Linda P; Gallagher-Garza, Shalena; Gebhard, Roberta E; Harrison, Suzanne L; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2016-09-01

    Continuing gender disparities within the medical profession have raised concerns about the extent to which women physicians face an inhospitable work environment. The purpose of this study was to examine the types and frequency of workplace bullying reported by a national sample of family physicians employed in academic settings, as related to gender. Data for this study were gathered as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAMF) Educational Research Alliance (CERA) omnibus electronic survey. Respondents completed questions addressing sociodemographic and practice characteristics, general experience with bullying, types of bullying, actions in response to bullying, and outcomes. A total of 1065 academic family physicians (male = 56.8%; female = 43.2%), mostly non-Hispanic white (84.2%) or Asian (5.3%) and between the ages 30 and 60 (58.7%) completed the CERA survey. One in 10 respondents acknowledged bullying someone in the workplace; 30% had been personally bullied in the workplace. Compared to men, female physicians were more likely to report being bullied overall and, specifically, to experience having their opinions ignored, lack of recognition for good work, feeling pressured not to claim rightful benefits, and being given unmanageable workloads. Despite some gender differences in actions taken, outcomes for each kind of action were the same for men and women.

  3. Making a gender difference: Case studies of gender mainstreaming in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, P.; Benschop, Y. W. M.; de Haes, J. C. J. M.; Lagro-Janssen, A. L. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Curricula are accommodated to the interests of new groups after pressure from social movements outside institutions. A Dutch national project to integrate gender-gender mainstreaming (GM)-in all medical curricula started in 2002 and finished in 2005. GM is a long-term strategy which aims

  4. Making a gender difference: Case studies of gender mainstreaming in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, P.; Benschop, Y.W.M.; Haes, J.C.J.M. de; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curricula are accommodated to the interests of new groups after pressure from social movements outside institutions. A Dutch national project to integrate gender-gender mainstreaming (GM)-in all medical curricula started in 2002 and finished in 2005. GM is a long-term strategy which aims

  5. Gender Studies Course at UG/PG Levels and Gender Awareness Training to Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Moly

    2014-01-01

    While the UGC is committed to the cause of promoting gender equity through higher education and is in the process of reviewing the existing arrangements in the campuses of higher learning to ensure the freedom, safety and security of girls and women, the proactive role of teachers in solving the problems of gender based violence and other…

  6. Descriptive Study of Gender Dysphoria in Japanese Individuals with Male-to-Female Gender Identity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yoshie; Nakatsuka, Mikiya

    2018-04-01

    We focus on Japanese individuals with gender identity disorder (GID), especially male-to-female (MTF) GID, who have experienced difficulty in adapting to social life. We clarify what gender dysphoria is, and we examine methods of intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 individuals with MTF-GID from August 2015 to April 2017. We categorized the subjects'experiences regarding dysphoria into the 'Onset of gender dysphoria,' 'Experience of feeling gender dysphoria,' and 'Changes due to receiving medical care.' The subjects reported experiencing great pain and distress because they did not fully understand that they were experiencing dysphoria and could not align their gender identity and their self-identity. All subjects described their experiences of dysphoria as negative. Additionally, all said that the dysphoria was alleviated by a medical intervention such as visiting a gender clinic, receiving a diagnosis and treatment, and changing their physical sex to the sex congruent with their gender identity. The provision of information at the gender clinic and the physical changes achieved by medical intervention exerted a positive effect both mentally and socially on the subjects, who suffered various physical, mental and social problems.

  7. Gender Variance in Childhood and Sexual Orientation in Adulthood: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, T.D.; van den Ende, J..; Verhulst, F.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Several retrospective and prospective studies have reported on the association between childhood gender variance and sexual orientation and gender discomfort in adulthood. In most of the retrospective studies, samples were drawn from the general population. The samples in the

  8. The Impact of Course Title and Instructor Gender on Student Perceptions and Interest in a Women's and Gender Studies Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoor, Jennifer R.; Lehmiller, Justin J.

    2014-01-01

    Diversity awareness has enormous benefits, and universities in the United States increasingly require students to complete diversity-related courses. Prior research has demonstrated that students' initial attitudes toward these courses affect their subsequent engagement, as well as the quality of their learning experience; however, very little research has examined how these initial attitudes are formed. We conducted an experiment to examine this issue in the context of a women's and gender studies course in psychology. Participants read one of two identical course descriptions that varied only the course title (i.e., Psychology of Gender versus Psychology of Women) and instructor gender. Participants perceived a women-titled course to be narrowly focused compared to an identical gender-titled course and were more interested in taking the gender-titled course. Instructor gender had no effects on any of the variables. Additionally, female participants had more positive attitudes toward the course than male participants, regardless of title. Exploratory mediation analyses indicated that the main effects of course title and participant gender were mediated by perceptions of course content. Implications for improving student experiences and interest in diversity-related courses are discussed. PMID:25268353

  9. Gender variance in childhood and sexual orientation in adulthood: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensma, Thomas D; van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2013-11-01

    Several retrospective and prospective studies have reported on the association between childhood gender variance and sexual orientation and gender discomfort in adulthood. In most of the retrospective studies, samples were drawn from the general population. The samples in the prospective studies consisted of clinically referred children. In understanding the extent to which the association applies for the general population, prospective studies using random samples are needed. This prospective study examined the association between childhood gender variance, and sexual orientation and gender discomfort in adulthood in the general population. In 1983, we measured childhood gender variance, in 406 boys and 473 girls. In 2007, sexual orientation and gender discomfort were assessed. Childhood gender variance was measured with two items from the Child Behavior Checklist/4-18. Sexual orientation was measured for four parameters of sexual orientation (attraction, fantasy, behavior, and identity). Gender discomfort was assessed by four questions (unhappiness and/or uncertainty about one's gender, wish or desire to be of the other gender, and consideration of living in the role of the other gender). For both men and women, the presence of childhood gender variance was associated with homosexuality for all four parameters of sexual orientation, but not with bisexuality. The report of adulthood homosexuality was 8 to 15 times higher for participants with a history of gender variance (10.2% to 12.2%), compared to participants without a history of gender variance (1.2% to 1.7%). The presence of childhood gender variance was not significantly associated with gender discomfort in adulthood. This study clearly showed a significant association between childhood gender variance and a homosexual sexual orientation in adulthood in the general population. In contrast to the findings in clinically referred gender-variant children, the presence of a homosexual sexual orientation in

  10. [Bipolar disorder and criminality: a comparative study by gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bram, N; Rafrafi, R; Ben Romdhane, I; Ridha, R

    2013-12-01

    Unlike schizophrenia, the impact of gender on the criminality of patients with bipolar disorder has received little attention. To estimate the sex ratio in relation to acts committed by forensic bipolar patients and evaluate the impact of gender on the characteristics of this crime. A comparative study by gender, conducted at the psychiatric hospital Razi has included all patients with bipolar disorder hospitalized between 1990 and 2010 after being relaxed for mental illness, owing to the Tunisian penal code. The total number of patients was 36 and the sex ratio of 3.5.A suicide history was four times more common in women. Alcohol abuse was found only in men. Relapses were more frequent in women (3.06 I year against 1.14 I year, p = 0.02). Rapid cycling and comorbid anxiety were noted only in female patients. Filicide and prostitution were committed exclusively by women, economic crimes and sexual assaults were the preserve of men. The male offenses were more impulsive and unpremeditated (p = 0.04). Although sex ratio is in favor of men, women's representation in the violence induced by bipolar disorder is significant, resulting, particularly during depressive phases, by serious and deadly acts. Preventive measures of acting out in bipolar patients must be supported and especially adapted to the genre

  11. Gender Dysphoria and Social Anxiety: An Exploratory Study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergero-Miguel, Trinidad; García-Encinas, María A; Villena-Jimena, Amelia; Pérez-Costillas, Lucía; Sánchez-Álvarez, Nicolás; de Diego-Otero, Yolanda; Guzman-Parra, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Social anxiety in gender dysphoria is still under investigation. To determine the prevalence and associated factors of social anxiety in a sample of individuals with gender dysphoria. A cross-sectional design was used in a clinical sample attending a public gender identity unit in Spain. The sample consisted of 210 individuals (48% trans female and 52% trans male). Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) for diagnosis of social anxiety disorder, Structured Clinical Interview, Exposure to Violence Questionnaire (EVQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and Functional Social Support Questionnaire (Duke-UNC-11). Of the total sample, 31.4% had social anxiety disorder. Social anxiety disorder was highly correlated with age (r = -0.181; CI = 0.061-0.264; P = .009) and depression (r = 0.345; CI = 0.213-0.468; P social anxiety disorder. This study highlights the necessity of implementing actions to prevent and treat social anxiety in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gender isn't an issue! Case studies of exemplary practice in promoting gender equality and diversity in local authorities

    OpenAIRE

    Broussine, M.; Fox, P.

    2005-01-01

    Report of an inquiry, the aims of which were:\\ud \\ud 1)Develop case studies which demonstrate exemplary practice in progress towards gender equality in five selected local authorities. \\ud \\ud 2)Identify the systemic and cultural factors, working styles and practices and processes that contribute to good practice in gender equality and diversity. \\ud \\ud 3)Point local authorities to best practice so that they might learn from a process which has identified and celebrated achievement.

  13. Road Map for Gender Equality in the FCC Study

    CERN Document Server

    Genevieve Guinot

    2015-01-01

    Plan towards defining well scoped deliverables on gender specific communication for discussion, mapping of country context and organisational practices and the establishment of a focused task-force on gender equality in participating institutes.

  14. Guys and Dolls: A Qualitative Study of Teachers' Views of Gendered Play in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on data collected for a larger study investigating kindergarten teachers' online discussions of play, the present qualitative study examines teachers' discussions of gender. Findings suggest that teachers' project onto their kindergarten students many of their own gender prejudices about play. These teachers reinforced gendered attitudes…

  15. Do Sex Differences Define Gender-Related Individual Differences within the Sexes? Evidence from Three Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Studied three different criteria of within-sex, gender-related individual differences taken from three studies. Data showed that items displaying large sex differences tended also to correlate most strongly with independent gender-related criteria within the sexes. Discusses assessment implications for gender-related and other group-related…

  16. Truth commissions and gender: A South African case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa's gendered past was never substantially addressed by the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) despite attempts by women's groups to ensure its inclusion.. The TRC's treatment of gender was in part constrained by its 'gender-blind' mandate, which ignored the different experiences and ...

  17. Studies in Gender and Development in Africa: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIGADA is a trans-disciplinary publication that prioritizes gender as a development issue. It is a forum for sharing research, resources, aesthetic expressions, lived realities and activisms that privilege and promote gender issues in development as well as contribute towards gender equality and social justice in Africa.

  18. CHALLENGES IN THE STUDIES OF COMPARATIVE CONSTRUCTIONS OF GENDER EQUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnblom, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Why are comparisons interesting, or what are comparisons all about? In this article, the comparative ambition in the social constructivist tradition is scrutinized, and the other articles of the issue are used as examples of what is seen as principle problems of comparative studies. The first part of the article deals with the need of reflexivity in order for the researcher to avoid implicit notions of «good gender equality» or «real feminism». In the second part, the problems of comparative ...

  19. Using Gender Schema Theory to Examine Gender Equity in Computing: a Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, Denise E.

    Women continue to constitute a minority of computer science majors in the United States and Canada. One possible contributing factor is that most Web sites, CD-ROMs, and other digital resources do not reflect girls' design and content preferences. This article describes a pilot study that considered whether gender schema theory can serve as a framework for investigating girls' Web site design and content preferences. Eleven 14- and 15-year-old girls participated in the study. The methodology included the administration of the Children's Sex-Role Inventory (CSRI), Web-surfing sessions, interviews, and data analysis using iterative pattern coding. On the basis of their CSRI scores, the participants were divided into feminine-high (FH) and masculine-high (MH) groups. Data analysis uncovered significant differences in the criteria the groups used to evaluate Web sites. The FH group favored evaluation criteria relating to graphic and multimedia design, whereas the MH group favored evaluation criteria relating to subject content. Models of the two groups' evaluation criteria are presented, and the implications of the findings are discussed.

  20. Gender equality in couples and self-rated health - A survey study evaluating measurements of gender equality and its impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörlin, Ann; Lindholm, Lars; Ng, Nawi; Ohman, Ann

    2011-08-26

    Men and women have different patterns of health. These differences between the sexes present a challenge to the field of public health. The question why women experience more health problems than men despite their longevity has been discussed extensively, with both social and biological theories being offered as plausible explanations. In this article, we focus on how gender equality in a partnership might be associated with the respondents' perceptions of health. This study was a cross-sectional survey with 1400 respondents. We measured gender equality using two different measures: 1) a self-reported gender equality index, and 2) a self-perceived gender equality question. The aim of comparison of the self-reported gender equality index with the self-perceived gender equality question was to reveal possible disagreements between the normative discourse on gender equality and daily practice in couple relationships. We then evaluated the association with health, measured as self-rated health (SRH). With SRH dichotomized into 'good' and 'poor', logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with the outcome. For the comparison between the self-reported gender equality index and self-perceived gender equality, kappa statistics were used. Associations between gender equality and health found in this study vary with the type of gender equality measurement. Overall, we found little agreement between the self-reported gender equality index and self-perceived gender equality. Further, the patterns of agreement between self-perceived and self-reported gender equality were quite different for men and women: men perceived greater gender equality than they reported in the index, while women perceived less gender equality than they reported. The associations to health were depending on gender equality measurement used. Men and women perceive and report gender equality differently. This means that it is necessary not only to be conscious of the methods and measurements

  1. Video Gaming and Gender Dysphoria: Some Case Study Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Mark D.; Arcelus, Jon; Bouman, Walter Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Video gaming has become an established area of psychological research over the last two decades. Over\\ud the past few years there has been increasing research into online gender swapping, showing that for many groups\\ud or individuals it can have positive psychological benefits (e.g., as a way to explore gender roles and boundaries in a safe environment). To date, no research has ever examined online gender swapping among individuals with gender dysphoria – people with acknowledged gender-ide...

  2. The effect of gender medicine education in GP training: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielissen, Patrick; Verdonk, Petra; Waard, Magreet Wieringa-de; Bottema, Ben; Lagro-Janssen, Toine

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the change in general practitioner (GP) trainees' gender awareness following a modular gender medicine programme or a mainstream gender medicine programme. In 2007, a prospective study was conducted in three cohorts of in total 207 GP trainees who entered GP training in the Netherlands. The outcome measure was the Nijmegen Gender Awareness in Medicine Scale and a 16-item gender knowledge questionnaire. Two gender medicine teaching methods were compared: a modular approach (n = 75) versus a mainstream approach (n = 72). Both strategies were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). Statistical analysis included analysis of variance and t-tests. The overall response rates for the modular, mainstream and control cohort were 78, 72 and 82 %, respectively. There was a significant difference in change in gender knowledge scores between the modular cohort compared with the mainstream and control cohort (p = 0.049). There were no statistical differences between the cohorts on gender sensitivity and gender role ideology. At entry and end, female GP trainees demonstrated significantly higher gender awareness than male GP trainees. A modular teaching method is not a more favourable educational method to teach gender medicine in GP training. Female GP trainees are more gender aware, but male GP trainees are not unaware of gender-related issues.

  3. Gender, gender roles and completion of nursing education: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katrina; Muldoon, Orla T; Moutray, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    The current worldwide nursing shortage and high attrition of nursing students remain a challenge for the nursing profession. The aim of this paper was to investigate how key psychological attributes and constructions differentiate between completers and non-completers of nursing education. A questionnaire including measures of gender role identity and perceived gender appropriateness of careers was administered to 384 students early in the first year of the course. At the end of the programme attrition rates were obtained. The findings indicate that males were more likely to leave the course than females. Furthermore, those who completed the course tended to view nursing as more appropriate for women, in contrast to the non-completers who had less gender typed views. The female-dominated nature of nursing, prevalent stereotypes and gender bias inherent in nursing education seem to make this an uncomfortable place for males and those with less gendered typed views. Whilst it is acknowledged that attrition is undoubtedly a complex issue with many contributing factors, the nursing profession need to take steps to address this bias to ensure their profession is open equally to both female and male recruits. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gender, religion, and the experience of suffering: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K

    2013-12-01

    This article explores how gender and religious belief come together in an elderly woman's experience of suffering. It is based on qualitative research that explored experiences of suffering in a group of community-dwelling elders (80+) living in a North American city. We use the case study method to introduce themes that show suffering's uniqueness to the individual whose narrative we report, as well as similarity to themes that emerged in other participants' narratives. In this case, an elderly woman's gender and religious identities merge in her stories of suffering, which include the memory of a childhood disability and an incident of clergy abuse that occurred 70 years previously. A key finding in this paper is that key themes in her story of suffering, which are disablement and clergy abuse, resonate to the general themes of suffering found in our study, which are (1) threats to personal identity; (2) loss of a valued item, quality, or relationship; and (3) a lack of control over self or the circumstances of life.

  5. Proteomic study on gender differences in aging kidney of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristobal Susana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to analyze sex differences in mice aging kidney. We applied a proteomic technique based on subfractionation, and liquid chromatography coupled with 2-DE. Samples from male and female CD1-Swiss outbred mice from 28 weeks, 52 weeks, and 76 weeks were analysed by 2-DE, and selected proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Results This proteomic analysis detected age-related changes in protein expression in 55 protein-spots, corresponding to 22 spots in males and 33 spots in females. We found a protein expression signature (PES of aging composed by 8 spots, common for both genders. The identified proteins indicated increases in oxidative and proteolytic proteins and decreases in glycolytic proteins, and antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion Our results provide insights into the gender differences associated to the decline of kidney function in aging. Thus, we show that proteomics can provide valuable information on age-related changes in expression levels of proteins and related modifications. This pilot study is still far from providing candidates for aging-biomarkers. However, we suggest that the analysis of these proteins could suggest mechanisms of cellular aging in kidney, and improve the kidney selection for transplantation.

  6. Desisting and persisting gender dysphoria after childhood: a qualitative follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, T.D.; Biemond, R.; de Boer, F.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to obtain a better understanding of the developmental trajectories of persistence and desistence of childhood gender dysphoria and the psychosexual outcome of gender dysphoric children. Twenty five adolescents (M age 15.88, range 14-18), diagnosed with a Gender

  7. The Effect of Gender on Students' Sustainability Consciousness: A Nationwide Swedish Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Daniel; Gericke, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    This study extends previous environmental education research on gender differences by investigating the gender gap between boys' and girls' sustainability consciousness. The issue of whether the gender gap in environmental education can be identified also in sustainability education is addressed. It has been suggested that Education for…

  8. "Gender Utopias?": U.S. Student Reflections on Studying Abroad in Norway and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmeyer, Kristjane; Teig, Trisha; Bedera, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a study abroad experience in Norway and Sweden that was designed to explore gender equality in two of the world's most gender-progressive countries. Course readings explored the work of feminist sociologists and asked students to think critically about gender equality from a cross-cultural perspective. Students met with…

  9. Study on Gender-Related Speech Communication in Classical Chinese Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinhe; Qin, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Gender, formed in men and women's growth which is constrained by social context, is tightly tied to the distinction which is presented in the process of men and women's language use. Hence, it's a new breakthrough for studies on gender and difference by analyzing gender-related speech communication on the background of ancient Chinese culture.

  10. Introduction to Special Issue "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomfield, Kim; Gmel, Gerhard; Wilsnack, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a series of articles reporting results from the EU concerted action "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study" which examined differences in drinking among women and men in 13 European and two non-European countries. The gender gap...... analyses the smallest gender differences in drinking behaviour were found in Nordic countries, followed by western and central European countries, with the largest gender differences in countries with developing economies....

  11. A Semiotic Analysis of the Gender Equality Paradigm. Case study: the Gender Pay Gap Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Manolache

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the new European space of identity, attitude and action challenges, syntagms such as “unity in diversity” or “equal pay for work of equal value” have become identitarian brands for social groups with a high-level of self-awareness. Having the social semiotics (Kress, van Leeuwen [1996] 2006 as theoretical background, we focused our analysis on the gender equality paradigm. The empirical data were provided by four visual texts of the Gender Pay Gap campaign, initiated by the European Commission in March 2009, in order to map the new European “puzzle-space” . The analysis showed the importance of compositional, representational and interactive meanings within the European discourse on equality of chances and gender.

  12. Gender swapping and socializing in cyberspace: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zaheer; Griffiths, Mark D

    2008-02-01

    Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are one of the most interesting innovations in the area of online computer gaming. Given the relative lack of research in the area, the main aims of the study were to examine (a) the impact of online gaming (e.g., typical playing behavior) in the lives of online gamers, (b) the effect of online socializing in the lives of gamers, and (c) why people engage in gender swapping. A self-selecting sample of 119 online gamers ranging from 18 to 69 years of age (M = 28.5 years) completed a questionnaire. The results showed that just over one in five gamers (21%) said they preferred socializing online to offline. Significantly more male gamers than female gamers said that they found it easier to converse online than offline. It was also found that 57% of gamers had engaged in gender swapping, and it is suggested that the online female persona has a number of positive social attributes in a male-oriented environment.

  13. Feminist theory and the study of gender and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Sandra

    1987-12-01

    This paper considers the three main Western feminist theoretical frameworks — liberal, socialist and radical — and their educational applications. Examples of studies using each approach are discussed. Liberal feminists writing about education use concepts of equal opportunities, socialization, sex roles and discrimination. Their strategies involve altering socialization practices, changing attitudes and making use of relevant legislation. Critics of the liberal school point to conceptual limitations and the liberal reluctance to confront power and patriarchy. Socialist feminists analyze the role of the school in the perpetuation of gender divisions under capitalism. Major concepts are socio-cultural reproduction and to a lesser extent acceptance of and resistance to gender-based patterns of behaviour. So far socialist-feminist educational writing is mainly theoretical rather than practical and has therefore been criticized for its over-determinism and insufficient empiric foundation. Radical feminists in education have concentrated mainly on the male monopolization of knowledge and culture and on sexual politics in schools. Strategies involve putting women's and girls' concerns first, through separate-sex groups when necessary. Critics argue that radical feminism tends towards biological reductionism, description rather than explanation and also contains methodological weaknesses. Mutual criticism of perspectives seems less destructive in educational writing than in some other categories of feminist scholarship. All the theoretical frameworks are subject to the same pressures including the oppressive power of structures, the resilience of individuals, and the tension between universality (how women are the same) and diversity (how women differ on attributes like class and race).

  14. Making a gender difference: Case studies of gender mainstreaming in medical - www-publicatie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, P.; Benschop, Y.W.M.; Haes, J.C.J.M. de; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curricula are accommodated to the interests of new groups after pressure from social movements outside institutions. A Dutch national project to integrate gender–gender mainstreaming (GM)–in all medical curricula started in 2002 and finished in 2005. GM is a long-term strategy which aims

  15. Effect of orthostasis on endothelial function: a gender comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandu Goswami

    Full Text Available As the vascular endothelium has multiple functions, including regulation of vascular tone, it may play a role in the pathophysiology of orthostatic intolerance. We investigated the effect of orthostasis on endothelial function using EndoPAT®, a non-invasive and user-independent method, and across gender. As sex steroid hormones are known to affect endothelial function, this study examined the potential effect of these hormones on the endothelial response to orthostasis by including females at different phases of the menstrual cycle (follicular and luteal-where the hormone balance differs, and females taking an oral contraceptive. A total of 31 subjects took part in this study (11 males, 11 females having normal menstrual cycles and 9 females taking oral contraceptive. Each subject made two visits for testing; in the case of females having normal menstrual cycles the first session was conducted either 1-7 (follicular or 14-21 days (luteal after the start of menstruation, and the second session two weeks later, i.e., during the other phase, respectively. Endothelial function was assessed at baseline and following a 20-min orthostatic challenge (active standing. The EndoPAT® index increased from 1.71 ± 0.09 (mean ± SEM at baseline to 2.07 ± 0.09 following orthostasis in females (p<0.001. In males, the index increased from 1.60 ± 0.08 to 1.94 ± 0.13 following orthostasis (p<0.001. There were no significant differences, however, in the endothelial response to orthostasis between females and males, menstrual cycle phases and the usage of oral contraceptive. Our results suggest an increased vasodilatatory endothelial response following orthostasis in both females and males. The effect of gender and sex hormones on the endothelial response to orthostasis appears limited. Further studies are needed to determine the potential role of this post orthostasis endothelial response in the pathophysiology of orthostatic intolerance.

  16. Cubans abroad: a gendered case study on international migrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Sarmiento, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Cubans who have migrated since the 1990s after living for two decades or more in their country of origin left with an embedded gender ideology that they acquired in a society where gender relations were undergoing radical transformations. As a result, Cuban feminization of migrations has its peculiarities. In this context, there are three issues to consider: explaining how gender relations attained in Cuba, as part of the overall attitudes gained since childhood, influenced Cuban migrants who have left the island permanently since 1990, introduced uniqueness in their migration processes, and made up a different feminization of migration; identifying the features of Cuban social structure that shaped the gender ideology of Cuban migrants; and producing new knowledge about Cuban international migration processes by using a gender perspective and by analyzing the gender relations prevailing in the years before the crisis of the 1990s, as well as since the beginning of the twenty-first century. The first part of this article focuses on gender distinctiveness of recent Cuban migrants, and the second summarizes some traits of the Cuban social structure—mainly referred to female employment—that could explain the gender training of the migrants.

  17. institutionalising gender and women's studies at the university of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Rwandan Journal of Education - Volume 2 - Issue 1. 4 ... gaps in existing gender equity initiatives in the university, challenges associated with operationalising existing .... 1 See for example Britwum (2002) on the gender profile of UCC as well as Prah (2002) ..... sensitisation and not to mounting and teaching courses.

  18. Truth commissions and gender: A South African case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    groups and activists led the Commission to take up gender in ad hoc ways, such ... evaluating the Commission, it is possible to see how its ad hoc approach to gender ... on 'hearing the experiences of victims of gross violations from the people.

  19. A Case Study of Gender Neutral Policies in University Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Gender neutral housing is an innovative new policy being developed in colleges around the country. One reason to create these policies is an attempt to meet the unique needs and challenges of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. As the number of gender neutral housing policies in the United States continues to rise, research has been…

  20. Advancing gender equality to improve HIV prevention: A study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other environmental factors influencing intervention activities include the role that insecure funding for gender plays in undermining the capacity of practitioners to design interventions based on their local knowledge and experience by forcing NGOs to adapt to the priorities of international donors. Keywords: gender, HIV ...

  1. Electricity's effect on gender equality in rural Zanzibar, Tanzania : case study for Gender and Energy World Development Report Background Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winther, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    This anthropological case study on the introduction of electricity in rural Zanzibar around 1990 discusses to what extent and how women became empowered in the process. What factors contributed to increased gender equality during the uptake of electricity and related appliances – and what were the

  2. PERKEMBANGAN STUDI PEREMPUAN, KRITIK, DAN GAGASAN SEBUAH PERSPEKTIF UNTUK STUDI GENDER KE DEPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. I. N. Marhaeni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The efforts to improve gender equity and equality have been taken place for yearssince the struggle of R.A. Kartini. Up to present, the efforts are still in place, however, notyet gain expected results. Preservation of gender inequality can be reproduced in family,society, as well as in the country.The increasing attention to gender is forced by women conference conducted by theUN. Four paradigms are identified: 1 Women in Develoment (WID concept thatemerging researches on womwn participation in development process; 2 Gender andDevelopment (GAD concept in which female is related to male; 3 Women’sempowerment; 4 Gender Mainstreaming. All of these paradigms have been implemented,but the results are not as expected.This condition reflects the needs of more critical attention in the implementation.For instances by considering women heterogeneity in terms of culture, social, andeconomis values, and thus it is necessary to take a need assessment in individual andinstitution levels. Men are also needed to take participation in gender studies to avoid bias.It ia also important to carry out program of education information communication tospread the information about women programs that have been and will be conducted toimprove women participation. Also, government commitment is crucial to increase gendersensitivity in public bureaucracy

  3. Sex, gender role orientation, gender role attitudes and suicidal thoughts in three generations. A general population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kate; Sweeting, Helen; Keoghan, Margaret; Platt, Stephen

    2006-08-01

    Suicide and other suicidal behaviours are markedly (though differently) patterned by gender. The increase in young male suicide rates in many countries has heightened interest in whether suicidal behaviours and ideation (thoughts) are related to masculinity. Relatively little research has explored the relationship between gender role attitudes and orientation and suicidal behaviours and ideation. Most research in this area has been conducted with young people. We investigated whether gender role orientation (masculinity and femininity scores) and gender role attitudes were related to the reporting of serious suicidal thoughts in three generations (early adulthood, and early and late middle age) in a community sample. Subjects (653 men and women aged around 23 years, 754 aged around 43 years, 722 aged around 63 years) completed home interviews with nurses as part of an ongoing longitudinal community-based study of social factors and health. These included measures of suicidal ideation (thoughts), attitudes to traditional gender roles, and a validated measure of gender role orientation (masculinity and femininity scores). The prevalence of serious suicidal thoughts was higher in early adulthood (10% men, 15% women) than in early (4% men, 8% women) and late (6% men, 5% women) middle age. In early adulthood only sex was significantly related to suicidal thoughts, with women at higher risk (adjusted OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.01-3.00). In early middle age masculinity scores were negatively related to suicidal thoughts (adjusted OR for each unit increase in score 0.65: 95% CI 0.46-0.93), and more traditional views on gender roles were positively associated with suicidal thoughts (adjusted OR 1.48: 95% CI 1.07-2.04). In late middle age trends were in the same direction as in early middle age, but were not statistically significant. Femininity scores were unrelated to serious suicidal thoughts at any age. The high rates of suicidal thoughts amongst men and women in early adulthood

  4. The pedadogy of gender studies : Between experience-based learning and scholarly dialogue

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Anna; Werner, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This specific text deals with the education methods of gender studies. It discusses what happens in a gender studies classroom, what the processes of learning and challenges are like and what are considered to be the important pedagogical aspects. It also discusses how instructors of gender studies work in various ways to create good conditions for learning, for all students, and it brings out difficult issues in learning processes involving critiques of power, as well as the strengths of gen...

  5. Gender, Emotion Work, and Relationship Quality: A Daily Diary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Melissa A.; McDaniel, Brandon T.; Pollitt, Amanda M.; Totenhagen, Casey J.

    2015-01-01

    We use the gender relations perspective from feminist theorizing to investigate how gender and daily emotion work predict daily relationship quality in 74 couples (148 individuals in dating, cohabiting, or married relationships) primarily from the southwest U.S. Emotion work is characterized by activities that enhance others’ emotional well-being. We examined emotion work two ways: trait (individuals’ average levels) and state (individuals’ daily fluctuations). We examined actor and partner effects of emotion work and tested for gender differences. As outcome variables, we included six types of daily relationship quality: love, commitment, satisfaction, closeness, ambivalence, and conflict. This approach allowed us to predict three aspects of relationship quality: average levels, daily fluctuations, and volatility (overall daily variability across a week). Three patterns emerged. First, emotion work predicted relationship quality in this diverse set of couples. Second, gender differences were minimal for fixed effects: Trait and state emotion work predicted higher average scores on, and positive daily increases in, individuals’ own positive relationship quality and lower average ambivalence. Third, gender differences were more robust for volatility: For partner effects, having a partner who reported higher average emotion work predicted lower volatility in love, satisfaction, and closeness for women versus greater volatility in love and commitment for men. Neither gender nor emotion work predicted average levels, daily fluctuations, or volatility in conflict. We discuss implications and future directions pertaining to the unique role of gender in understanding the associations between daily emotion work and volatility in daily relationship quality for relational partners. PMID:26508808

  6. Is Gender Mainstreamed? : A study of the European Commission's use of gender mainstreaming in development policies

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The EU has long expressed a will to be a normative power and to externally promote the values it views as important. Seeing as the EU collectively is the largest donor of foreign aid in the world, development policies are a perfect platform for doing this. One value that has gained ground in recent years is the notion of gender equality. Bearing this in mind, this thesis explores how the EU’s largest institutional donor of foreign aid, the European Commission, has chosen to promote the value ...

  7. Effects of Medical Interventions on Gender Dysphoria and Body Image: A Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    van de Grift, Tim C.; Elaut, Els; Cerwenka, Susanne C.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; De Cuypere, Griet; Richter-Appelt, Hertha; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P.C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study from the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence is to investigate the status of all individuals who had applied for gender confirming interventions from 2007 to 2009, irrespective of whether they received treatment. The current article describes the study protocol, the effect of medical treatment on gender dysphoria and body image, and the predictive value of (pre)treatment factors on posttreatment outcomes. Methods Data were col...

  8. Gender Division and Utilization of Natural Resources: A Case Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It farther focuses on gendered decision-making and negotiation over the ... Roles of men and women in natural resources use, management and ... Special attention should be paid on treating male and female on rational and equal basis.

  9. PROBLEMATIKA TAFSIR FEMINIS: Studi Kritis Konsep Kesetaraan Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Adian Husaini; Rahmatul Husni

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Gender equality is a discourse that is still warm to be discussed by Muslim feminists. Initiators and supporters of gender equality often questioned about Islamic laws that were considered to be unfair since they had positioned men and women differently such as the obligotary for  adhan (call for prayer), the Friday prayers, the number of goats in aqiqah (welcoming celebretion of child’s birth), and the compulsory of breastfeeding and caring for the child. Through content analysis, ...

  10. Perempuan dan Narasi Kekerasan: Studi Kritis Peran Gender dalam Deradikalisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghofur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Radicalism is a process initiated from the ideas and teachings that stem from individual stages. Hence, the early detection effort in deradicalization by involving women can run effectively, regarding the fact that women play a vital role in the family, particularly in shaping the character of children. Unfortunately, the role of women in preventing, or actually in promoting and participating, terrorism and political violence seems to be neglected. This qualitative study attempts to examine the role of women in preventing radicalization and at the same time promoting and participat-ing to alleviate terrorism and political violence. The findings of the study reveal that the role of women in the deradicali-zation can be done in a number of strategies, although not restricted, such as reduction of gender inequality and disparity, giving women a greater role to participate in a multi-field of social realm, strengthening the well-being to prevent radicalization, making women as leaders who hold moderate and tolerant values in education, especially within, though not limited, the family environment, and initiating peace through women’s reproductive functions.

  11. Voice Quality and Gender Stereotypes: A Study of Lebanese Women with Reinke's Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Nayla; Portes, Cristel; Lancia, Leonardo; Legou, Thierry; Baider, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Women with Reinke's edema (RW) report being mistaken for men during telephone conversations. For this reason, their masculine-sounding voices are interesting for the study of gender stereotypes. The study's objective is to verify their complaint and to understand the cues used in gender identification. Method Using a self-evaluation study,…

  12. The Relationship between Gender Type in Mentorship and Mentees’ Advancement: An Empirical Study in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman ISMAIL

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between gender type in mentorship and mentees’ advancement using 153 usable questionnaires gathered from employees who worked in a public university in East Malaysia, Malaysia. The results of exploratory factor analysis confirmed that the measurement scales used in this study satisfactorily meet the standards of validity and reliability analyses. Next, the outcomes of stepwise regression analysis showed four important findings: firstly, interaction between same-gender positively and significantly correlated with mentees’ career. Secondly, interaction between cross-gender positively and signifycantly correlated with mentees’ career. Thirdly, interaction between same-gender positively and significantly correlated with mentees’ psychosocial. Fourthly, interaction between cross-gender positively and significantly correlated with mentees’ psychosocial.Further, this result demonstrates that gender type does act as an important antecedent of mentees’ career and psychosocial in the mentoring programme model of the organizational sample. In addition, discussion, implications and conclusion are elaborated.

  13. Gender in Engineering Studies at Brazilian Technical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima Sobreira, Josimeire

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The research on a Technological University of Brazil, among students in Engineering, revealed that women occupy no more than 12 % (in general of the places at the Institution. The university study that the girls most prefer is the Engineering of Buildings and the other one, where there are the least number of women, is Mechanics Engineering. The qualitative research with the students, made by interviews, showed that there is a gender discrimination among them. The boys do not consider their schoolmates competents for the exact sciences. The girls have to do a greater effort than the boys to success and to be respected by them. But even so they recognize that will not have the same opportunities of work that the men will. However, gender changes among the students are evidences that women have reached important places at the technological field.La investigación en una Universidad Tecnológica de Brasil entre estudiantes de los cursos de ingeniería ha mostrado que las mujeres no ocupan más que 12 % (en general de las plazas de la Institución. El curso con más estudiantes es el de Ingeniería Civil, mientras el curso con el más pequeño número de mujeres es el de Mecánica. La metodología de la investigación ha sido cualitativa. Las entrevistas con chicas-chicos de los cursos investigados revelaron que hay discriminación entre los estudiantes que no consideran a sus compañeras de curso competentes para los estudios de ciencias exactas. Para que sean respetadas ellas tienen que estudiar mucho más que ellos, pero, aunque logren muy buenas evaluaciones, reconocen que en el mercado laboral tendrán menos oportunidades de trabajo que sus colegas. Entretanto, los cambios de género entre los y las estudiantes evidencian que las mujeres están conquistando espacios importantes.

  14. Participant Action Research in Political, Psychological, and Gender Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lucia Obando-Salazar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative methodology is used in social and intervention research because it facilitates a deeper analysis of causal factors and development of alternative solutions to social problems. Based on the findings of three studies in the field of political and gender psychology, this article focuses on Participant Action Research (PAR as a useful qualitative approach to deal with social phenomena, such as racism, violence against women, and the problem of children and youth who have been dislocated as the result of armed conflict and sheltered by the Colombian government's program for persons relocated to civil society. This article is composed of three parts. The first part offers historical and theoretical background to the Action Research (AR paradigm, its validation criteria and their meaning for the development of the Latin American rendering of Participant Action Research (PAR. The second part synthesizes trends in the AR approach in the United States and Germany, discusses feminist research and compares these to trends in PAR in Latin America. The third part is a description of Participant Action Research as an intervention method, including features, models, goals, and concepts. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs060438

  15. Advancing gender equality to improve HIV prevention: A study of practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mannell, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Addressing gender inequality as a social driver of HIV risk and vulnerability has become a key activity of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in South Africa. This paper sheds light on the factors that influence gender and HIV prevention activities in this context. A multisite ethnographic study including 150 hours of participant observation and 32 in-depth interviews was conducted with 26 NGOs carrying out gender and HIV prevention interventions. Using thematic network a...

  16. Gender-related factors influencing tuberculosis control in shantytowns: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Onifade, Dami A; Bayer, Angela M; Montoya, Rosario; Haro, Marie; Alva, Jessica; Franco, Jessica; Sosa, Rosario; Valiente, Betty; Valera, Enit; Ford, Carolyn M; Acosta, Colleen D; Evans, Carlton A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background There is evidence that female gender is associated with reduced likelihood of tuberculosis diagnosis and successful treatment. This study aimed to characterize gender-related barriers to tuberculosis control in Peruvian shantytowns. Methods We investigated attitudes and experiences relating gender to tuberculosis using the grounded theory approach to describe beliefs amongst key tuberculosis control stakeholders. These issues were explored in 22 semi-structured interviews ...

  17. Gender Differences in Emotion Regulation: An fMRI Study of Cognitive Reappraisal

    OpenAIRE

    McRae, Kateri; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Mauss, Iris B.; Gabrieli, John J. D.; Gross, James J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Despite strong popular conceptions of gender differences in emotionality and striking gender differences in the prevalence of disorders thought to involve emotion dysregulation, the literature on the neural bases of emotion regulation is nearly silent regarding gender differences (Gross, 2007; Ochsner & Gross, in press). The purpose of the present study was to address this gap in the literature. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we asked male and female particip...

  18. Participation without Parity in U.S. Higher Education: Gender, Fields of Study, and Institutional Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ann L.; Baker, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    While women now earn more bachelor's degrees than men in many parts of the world, large gender gaps persist in fields of study, and women remain underrepresented in the most prestigious institutions. This study updates and extends the literature on gender disparities in higher education by comparing the selectivity of the institutions where men…

  19. Implementing Feminist Theory in Engineering: Obstacles within the Gender Studies Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udén, Maria K.

    2017-01-01

    Scholars have noted that there is hesitation to utilise findings from gender studies in engineering education. Issues within gender studies may be part of the matching problem. Debates concerning two concepts for new engineering paradigms are investigated: "care" and "heterogeneity." Their appeals and the respective…

  20. Gender Equity in Picture Books in Preschool Classrooms: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Michelle B.; McBride, Brent A.

    A study examined the frequency with which males and females are represented in picture books available in preschool classrooms. Three areas were examined: pronoun usage and gender of characters; the frequency of gender-neutral pronouns and characters; and written text compared to teachers' wording when reading aloud. The study involved 11 head and…

  1. Gender Performativity in the Community College: A Case Study of Female Backline Classified Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Samantha Rose

    2012-01-01

    This case study explored the gendered performances of five female backline classified staff members who work in non-traditional fields within a community college. More specifically, this study defined gendered behaviors at a community college, and explored how these behaviors have affected the identities of women working in non-traditional fields…

  2. Come Closer to Feminism: Gratitude as Activist Encounter in Women's and Gender Studies 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Many teachers of introductory women's and gender studies find themselves in the position of introducing bad news to an already hostile audience. To deal directly with this dilemma, author Katie Hogan has approached student resistance to women's and gender studies (WGST) with carefully constructed syllabi designed to encourage…

  3. Teacher-Student Interactions: Four Case Studies of Gender in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathryn; Nicaise, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand gender interactions between teachers and students in high school physical education. Gender interactions were explored in relation to the theory of reflective practice. Interview data were examined as four case studies using individual and cross-case inductive analysis. Two common themes emerged: (a)…

  4. Introduction to Special Issue "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomfield, Kim; Gmel, Gerhard; Wilsnack, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    and global level. Country surveys were independently conducted and then centralized at one institution for further data standardization and processing. Several results indicated that the greater the societal gender equality in a country, the smaller the gender differences in drinking behavior. In most...... analyses the smallest gender differences in drinking behaviour were found in Nordic countries, followed by western and central European countries, with the largest gender differences in countries with developing economies.......This paper provides an introduction to a series of articles reporting results from the EU concerted action "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study" which examined differences in drinking among women and men in 13 European and two non-European countries. The gender gap...

  5. [A questionnaire study of the relationship between gender and chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, N; Thiele, A; Eberhardt, B

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gender role orientation and the prevalence of chronic pain. The individual gender role orientation in a sample of 45 chronic pain patients (ICD 10 diagnosis, F 45.4) was compared to gender role orientation in a matched, pain-free control group. Gender role orientation was assessed by questionnaires on the self-attribution of stereotypic gender traits (GEPAQ) and on the extent of agreement with traditional feminine and masculine role norms (MRNS, FRNS). Group differences were compared by multivariate analysis. In accordance with the hypothesis, results confirmed that pain patients showed stronger feminine and weaker masculine role orientations than healthy controls. Pain patients additionally ascribed to themselves more 'feminine' (e.g. worried, nervous) and less 'masculine' (e.g. aggressive, cynical) traits. Sociopsychological variables of gender role orientation were related to chronic pain in the groups observed. An integrated model consisting of psychodynamic, sociological, and sociopsychological factors is proposed.

  6. Gender Effects in a Multischool Alcohol Media Literacy Study With Preadolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chloe S; Howard, Steven J; Kervin, Lisa K; Jones, Sandra C

    2018-06-01

    Alcohol media literacy (AML) programs have achieved positive results for alcohol prevention; however, gender may moderate program effectiveness. This study investigated gender differences for an Australian AML intervention. Fifth and sixth graders ( N = 165), allocated to an intervention or wait-list control group, participated in an AML program. Student questionnaires were administered at three time points. The intervention resulted in significantly higher media deconstruction skills but did not lead to less preference for branded merchandise or greater understanding of persuasive intent, and these effects did not differ by gender. Gender differences were present in social norms for drinking and alcohol expectancies. AML education likely has appeal and benefit to both genders as it connects with students' lifeworlds. Social norms may be more difficult to shift for males due to a more ingrained drinking culture. Future research could explore contextual factors responsible for gender differences.

  7. Gender Identities and Female Students' Learning Experiences in Studying English as Second Language at a Pakistani University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Irfan Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine how female students' roles as learners are influenced by their socially constructed gender identities and gender roles in studying English as Second Language (ESL) at a public sector university of Pakistan. The aim is to understand how female students' gender identities and gender roles affect their learning. With an…

  8. The erasure of gender in academic surgery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Fiona; Rice, Kathleen; Christian, Jennifer; Seemann, Natashia; Baxter, Nancy; Moulton, Carol-Anne; Cil, Tulin

    2016-10-01

    The number of women in surgery has steadily increased, yet their numbers in academic surgery positions and in high-ranking leadership roles remain low. To create strategies to address and improve this problem, it is essential to examine how gender plays into the advancement of a woman's career in academic surgery. Focus group (1) and one-on-one qualitative interviews (8) were conducted with women academic surgeons from various subspecialties in a large university setting. Interviews examined women surgeons' accounts of their experiences as women in surgery. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and coded thematically. NVivo10 software was used for cross-referencing of data and categorization of data into themes. Focus group data suggested that gender discrimination was pervasive in academic surgery. However, in interviews, most interviewees strongly disavowed the possibility that their gender had any bearing on their professional lives. These surgeons attempted to distance themselves from the possibility of discrimination by suggesting that differences in men and women surgeons' experiences are due to personality issues and personal choices. However, their narratives highlighted deep contradiction; they both affirmed and denied the relevance of gender for their experience as surgeons. As overt acts of discrimination become less acceptable in society, it does not necessarily disappear but rather manifests itself in covert forms. By disavowing and distancing themselves from discrimination, these women exposed the degree to which these issues continue to be pervasive in surgery. Women surgeons' ability to both identify and resist discrimination was hobbled by narratives of individualism, gender equality, and normative ideas of gender difference. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Gender bias in hospital leadership: a qualitative study on the experiences of women CEOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soklaridis, Sophie; Kuper, Ayelet; Whitehead, Cynthia R; Ferguson, Genevieve; Taylor, Valerie H; Zahn, Catherine

    2017-04-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of gender bias among women hospital CEOs and explore to what these female leaders attribute their success within a male-dominated hospital executive leadership milieu. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study involved 12 women hospital CEOs from across Ontario, Canada. Purposeful sampling techniques and in-depth qualitative interview methods were used to facilitate discussion around experiences of gender and leadership. Findings Responses fell into two groups: the first group represented the statement "Gender inequality is alive and well". The second group reflected the statement "Gender inequity is not significant, did not happen to me, and things are better now". This group contained a sub-group with no consciousness of systemic discrimination and that claimed having no gendered experiences in their leadership journey. The first group described gender issues in various contexts, from the individual to the systemic. The second group was ambivalent about gender as a factor impacting leadership trajectories. Originality/value Representations of women's leadership have become detached from feminism, with major consequences for women. This study reveals how difficult it is for some women CEOs to identify gender bias. The subtle everyday norms and practices within the workplace make it difficult to name and explain gender bias explicitly and may explain the challenges in understanding how it might affect a woman's career path.

  10. Sexuality and gender role in autism spectrum disorder: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejerot, Susanne; Eriksson, Jonna M

    2014-01-01

    The 'extreme male brain theory of autism' describes an extreme male pattern of cognitive traits defined as strong systemising abilities paired with empathising weaknesses in autism spectrum disorder. However, beyond these cognitive traits, clinical observations have suggested an ambiguous gender-typed pattern regarding several sexually dimorphic traits. The aim of the present study was to investigate if patterns of non-cognitive sexually dimorphic traits differed between the autism spectrum disorder and control groups. Fifty adults with autism spectrum disorder and intelligence within the normal range, and 53 neurotypical controls responded to questions on gender role, self-perceived gender typicality and gender identity, as well as sexuality. Measures used were a Swedish modification of the Bem Sex Role Inventory and questions on sexuality and gender designed for the purpose of this study. Our results showed that one common gender role emerged in the autism spectrum disorder group. Masculinity (e.g. assertiveness, leadership and competitiveness) was weaker in the autism spectrum disorder group than in the controls, across men and women. Self-perceived gender typicality did not differ between the groups but tomboyism and bisexuality were overrepresented amongst women with autism spectrum disorder. Lower libido was reported amongst both male and female participants with autism spectrum disorder compared with controls. We conclude that the extreme male patterns of cognitive functions in the autistic brain do not seem to extend to gender role and sexuality. A gender-atypical pattern for these types of characteristics is suggested in autism spectrum disorder.

  11. Sexuality and gender role in autism spectrum disorder: a case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Bejerot

    Full Text Available The 'extreme male brain theory of autism' describes an extreme male pattern of cognitive traits defined as strong systemising abilities paired with empathising weaknesses in autism spectrum disorder. However, beyond these cognitive traits, clinical observations have suggested an ambiguous gender-typed pattern regarding several sexually dimorphic traits. The aim of the present study was to investigate if patterns of non-cognitive sexually dimorphic traits differed between the autism spectrum disorder and control groups. Fifty adults with autism spectrum disorder and intelligence within the normal range, and 53 neurotypical controls responded to questions on gender role, self-perceived gender typicality and gender identity, as well as sexuality. Measures used were a Swedish modification of the Bem Sex Role Inventory and questions on sexuality and gender designed for the purpose of this study. Our results showed that one common gender role emerged in the autism spectrum disorder group. Masculinity (e.g. assertiveness, leadership and competitiveness was weaker in the autism spectrum disorder group than in the controls, across men and women. Self-perceived gender typicality did not differ between the groups but tomboyism and bisexuality were overrepresented amongst women with autism spectrum disorder. Lower libido was reported amongst both male and female participants with autism spectrum disorder compared with controls. We conclude that the extreme male patterns of cognitive functions in the autistic brain do not seem to extend to gender role and sexuality. A gender-atypical pattern for these types of characteristics is suggested in autism spectrum disorder.

  12. Special Colloquium : Looking at High Energy Physics from a gender studies perspective

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Human actors, workplace cultures and knowledge production: Gender studies analyse the social constructions and cultural representations of gender. Using methods and tools from the humanities and social science, we look at all areas, including the natural sciences and technology, science education and research labs. After a short introduction to gender studies, the main focus of my talk will be the presentation of selected research findings on gender and high energy physics. You will hear about an ongoing research project on women in neutrino physics and learn about a study on the world of high energy physicists characterised by "rites of passage" and "male tales" told during a life in physics. I will also present a study on how the HEP community communicates, and research findings on the naming culture in HEP. Getting to know findings from another field on your own might contribute to create a high energy physics culture that is fair and welcoming to all genders.

  13. Sickness absence in gender-equal companies A register study at organizational level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öhman Ann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differences in sickness absence between men and women in Sweden have attracted a great deal of interest nationally in the media and among policymakers over a long period. The fact that women have much higher levels of sickness absence has been explained in various ways. These explanations are contextual and one of the theories points to the lack of gender equality as an explanation. In this study, we evaluate the impact of gender equality on health at organizational level. Gender equality is measured by an index ranking companies at organizational level; health is measured as days on sickness benefit. Methods Gender equality was measured using the Organizational Gender Gap Index or OGGI, which is constructed on the basis of six variables accessible in Swedish official registers. Each variable corresponds to a key word illustrating the interim objectives of the "National Plan for Gender Equality", implemented by the Swedish Parliament in 2006. Health is measured by a variable, days on sickness benefit, also accessible in the same registers. Results We found significant associations between company gender equality and days on sickness benefit. In gender-equal companies, the risk for days on sickness benefit was 1.7 (95% CI 1.6-1.8 higher than in gender-unequal companies. The differences were greater for men than for women: OR 1.8 (95% CI 1.7-2.0 compared to OR 1.4 (95% CI 1.3-1.5. Conclusions Even though employees at gender-equal companies had more days on sickness benefit, the differences between men and women in this measure were smaller in gender-equal companies. Gender equality appears to alter health patterns, converging the differences between men and women.

  14. Migration, Trauma, PTSD: A Gender Study in Morrison's Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Leila Tafreshi; Yahya, Wan Roselezam Wan

    2014-01-01

    Toni Morrison is an acknowledged master of trauma literature, however trauma theory and a gender response to trauma remain largely unaccounted for her migration literature, specifically "Jazz" (1992). In her novel, two migrant women are affected by the same trauma, a crime of passion. But they choose different reactions and coping…

  15. Gender & Education Association: A Case Study in Feminist Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on feminist activist academics who were instrumental in creating the UK Gender & Education Association at the turn of the twenty-first century. Drawing on my own intellectual biography (David, M. E. 2003. "Personal and Political: Feminisms, Sociology and Family Lives" Stoke-on-Trent. Trentham Books.) linked to…

  16. Gender, Cross-border Migrant Workers and Citizenship : Case Study ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Burmese women workers in Thai border factories are generally excluded from the benefits and protection that define citizenship entitlements. ... have little or no access to basic services, including health and education for themselves or their dependents. ... New funding opportunity for gender equality and climate change.

  17. Introduction to special issue 'Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: a Multi-national Study'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Kim; Gmel, Gerhard; Wilsnack, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a series of articles reporting results from the EU concerted action "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study" which examined differences in drinking among women and men in 13 European and two non-European countries. The gender gap in alcohol drinking is one of the few universal gender differences in human social behavior. However, the size of these differences varies greatly from one society to another. The papers in this issue examine, across countries, (1) men's and women's drinking patterns, (2) the prevalence of men's and women's experience of alcohol-related problems, (3) gender differences in social inequalities in alcohol use and abuse, (4) gender differences in the influence of combinations of social roles on heavy alcohol use, and (5) how societal-level factors predict women's and men's alcohol use and problems on a regional and global level. Country surveys were independently conducted and then centralized at one institution for further data standardization and processing. Several results indicated that the greater the societal gender equality in a country, the smaller the gender differences in drinking behavior. In most analyses the smallest gender differences in drinking behaviour were found in Nordic countries, followed by western and central European countries, with the largest gender differences in countries with developing economies.

  18. The gender gap in mobility: A global cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechakra-Tahiri Samia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that women have greater mobility disability than men. The goals of this research were: 1 to assess the gender gap in mobility difficulty in 70 countries; 2 to determine whether the gender gap is explained by sociodemographic and health factors; 3 to determine whether the gender gap differs across 6 regions of the world with different degrees of gender equality according to United Nations data. Methods Population-based data were used from the World Health Survey (WHS conducted in 70 countries throughout the world. 276,647 adults aged 18 years and over were recruited from 6 world regions. Mobility was measured by asking the level of difficulty people had moving around in the last 30 days and then creating a dichotomous measure (no difficulty, difficulty. The human development index and the gender-related development index for each country were obtained from the United Nations Development Program website. Poisson regression with Taylor series linearized variance estimation was used. Results Women were more likely than men to report mobility difficulty (38% versus 27%, P  Conclusions These are the first world-wide data to examine the gender gap in mobility. Differences in chronic diseases are the main reasons for this gender gap. The gender gap seems to be greater in regions with the largest loss of human development due to gender inequality.

  19. How to achieve gender diversity in top management : A qualitative study of gender equal companies listed on the Swedish stock exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Sarri, Tove; Troeng, Linnea

    2016-01-01

    Alarming statistics provides that only 10,2 percentage of companies listed on the Swedish stock exchange has achieved gender equality in their top management. The fact is that women being discriminated, since men dominates these positions of power. The study is of a qualitative nature and aims to achieve a deeper understanding and knowledge contribution of how gender equal companies´ has achieved this gender diversity in their top management. Sweden's highest ranking business leaders has been...

  20. Deconstructing Masculinity: A Qualitative Study of College Men's Masculine Conceptualizations and Gender Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank, III

    2008-01-01

    Informed by the constructionist epistemological perspective, the purpose of this study was to examine socially constructed conceptualizations of masculinity and gender performance among 12 culturally diverse undergraduate men. The participants espoused seemingly productive conceptualizations of masculinity, yet their gendered behaviors were…

  1. A study on gender mainstreaming: the case of a rural university in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on gender mainstreaming: the case of a rural university in Limpopo Province ... for promoting gender equality in institutions of higher learning worldwide, not ... UNIVEN makes use of the Employment Equity Act of 1998, but it is not clear ...

  2. Gender Gap or Program Gap? Students' Negotiations of Study Practice in a Course in Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Staffan; Johansson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This study of achievement differences, as reflected by course grades, on a third-semester electromagnetism course at a Swedish research university was motivated by instructor concerns about gender inequalities. Quantitative analysis showed a gender gap in course grades between female and male students for the period of fall 2007 to spring 2013.…

  3. Gender Divergence in Academics' Representation and Research Productivity: A Nigerian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opesade, Adeola Omobola; Famurewa, Kofoworola Folakemi; Igwe, Ebelechukwu Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Gender equity is increasingly seen as an indicator of development and global acceptance in networks of higher education. Despite this, gender divergence in research productivity of academics coupled with under-representation of women in science has been reported to beset female's scholarly activities. Previous studies provide differing results,…

  4. Gender Differences in Children's Language: A Meta-Analysis of Slovenian Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic-Umek, Ljubica; Fekonja-Peklaj, Urška

    2017-01-01

    Child gender has been proved to affect toddlers'/children's language development in several studies, but its effect was not found to be stable across different ages or various aspects of language ability. The effect of gender on toddler's, children's and adolescents' language ability was examined in the present meta-analysis of ten Slovenian…

  5. Gender and Subject Choice: An Empirical Study on Undergraduate Students' Majors in Phnom Penh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dom, Vannak; Yi, Gihong

    2018-01-01

    The empirical study on 610 undergraduate students between the age of 16 to 25 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, was set to examine the relationship of gender and subject choice. The findings have revealed that women were overrepresented in non-science subjects and their gender identity has strong connection with subject choice (*** p < 0.001). The study…

  6. Gender Disparity at Elementary Education Level in Jammu and Kashmir: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Showkeen Bilal Ahmad; Khan, Zebun Nisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on a study to explore gender disparity at elementary education level in Jammu and Kashmir. Gender disparity in education refers to differences in outcomes observed between two sexes. Education disparities can be seen in different enrolment rates, dropout rates, and survival rates among the sexes. The central government and…

  7. Exploring Gender through Education Abroad Programs: A Graduate Student Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dian D.; Williams, Terry E.; Cartwright, Matthew; Jourian, T. J.; Monter, Marie; Weatherford, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This case study explores how graduate students who attended a short-term education abroad program understood gender as a result of participation in the trip. Findings reveal that students' understandings of gender are influenced by in and out of class contexts. Implications for faculty and education abroad practitioners are shared to deepen and…

  8. Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Homicide: A Nationwide Register-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizmann-Henelius, Ghitta; Gronroos, Matti; Putkonen, Hanna; Eronen, Markku; Lindberg, Nina; Hakkanen-Nyholm, Helina

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined gender differences in intimate partner homicide (IPH) and offender characteristics with the focus on putative gender-specific risk factors in a nationwide consecutive sample of homicide offenders. Data on all offenders (N = 642; 91 females, 551 males) convicted of homicide and subjected to a forensic psychiatric…

  9. Women Faculty in Higher Education: A Case Study on Gender Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Teri; Nix, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of female faculty members in higher education to ascertain their views regarding gender bias in the workplace. A questionnaire was used to collect data from the participants regarding their beliefs of the value and productivity of their work, possible disparity in treatment based on gender, constraints put on…

  10. A study in pink : What determines the success of gender-specific advertising?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenko, Anna; Drost, Willemijn

    2014-01-01

    Gender-specific marketing gains importance as women become more influential as consumers. The study investigated an efficiency of two approaches to gender-specific marketing: designing a stereotypically “feminine” product and priming an interdependent self-construal with an advertising scenario.

  11. Gender and Women Development Initiatives in Bangladesh: A Study of Rural Mother Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, K M Rabiul; Emmelin, Maria; Lindberg, Lene; Wamala, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Women-focused development initiatives have become a controversial issue connected with women's health and welfare. Previous studies indicated that development initiatives might increase women's workload, family conflict, and marital violence. This study explored the gendered characteristics of a development initiative Rural Mother Center in Bangladesh. Data incorporated policy document and interviews of social workers working with the mother centers in two northwest subdistricts. The qualitative content analysis of data emerged a general theme of expanding women's responsibility while maintaining male privilege explaining gendered design and practice of the development initiative. The theme was supported by two gendered categories related to the design: (a) essentializing women's participation; (b) maintaining traditional gender, and four categories related to the practice; (c) inadequate gender knowledge and skills; (d) reinforcing traditional gender; (e) using women for improving office performance; and (f) upholding male privilege. The study suggests that though women-focused development initiatives need to be embraced with gender-redistributive policies, the social workers should be trained for attaining gender-transformative motivation and competencies.

  12. A secondary meta-synthesis of qualitative studies of gender and access to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Jan E; King-Shier, Kathryn M; Spaling, Melisa A; Duncan, Amanda S; Jaglal, Susan B; Stone, James A; Clark, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    To discuss issues in the theorization and study of gender observed during a qualitative meta-synthesis of influences on uptake of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation services. Women and men can equally benefit from secondary prevention/cardiac rehabilitation and there is a need to understand gender barriers to uptake. Meta-method analysis secondary to meta-synthesis. For the meta-synthesis, a systematic search was performed to identify and retrieve studies published as full papers during or after 1995 and contained: a qualitative research component wholly or in a mixed method design, extractable population specific data or themes for referral to secondary prevention programmes and adults ≥18 years. Databases searched between January 1995-31 October 2011 included: CSA Sociological Abstracts, EBSCOhost CINAHL, EBSCOhost Gender Studies, EBSCOhost Health Source Nursing: Academic Edition, EBSCOhost SPORTDiscus, EBSCOhost SocINDEX. Studies were reviewed against inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies were subject to quality appraisal and standardized data extraction. Of 2264 screened articles, 69 were included in the meta-method analysis. Only four studies defined gender or used gender theories. Findings were mostly presented as inherently the characteristic of gendered worldviews of participants. The major themes suggest a mismatch between secondary prevention/cardiac rehabilitation services and consumers' needs, which are usually portrayed as differing according to gender but may also be subject to intersecting influences such as age or socioeconomic status. There is a persistent lack of theoretically informed gender analysis in qualitative literature in this field. Theory-driven gender analysis will improve the conceptual clarity of the evidence base for gender-sensitive cardiac rehabilitation programme development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Gender awareness among physicians – the effect of specialty and gender. A study of teachers at a Swedish medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamberg Katarina

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important goal for medical education today is professional development including gender equality and awareness of gender issues. Are medical teachers prepared for this task? We investigated gender awareness among physician teachers, expressed as their attitudes towards the role of gender in professional relationships, and how it varied with physician gender and specialty. We discuss how this might be related to the gender climate and sex segregation in different specialties. Method Questionnaires were sent to all 468 specialists in the clinical departments and in family medicine, who were engaged in educating medical students at a Swedish university. They were asked to rate, on visual analogue scales, the importance of physician and patient gender in consultation, of preceptor and student gender in clinical tutoring and of physician gender in other professional encounters. Differences between family physicians, surgical, and non-surgical hospital doctors, and between women and men were estimated by chi-2 tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The response rate was 65 %. There were differences between specialty groups in all investigated areas mainly due to disparities among men. The odds for a male family physician to assess gender important were three times higher, and for a male non-surgical doctor two times higher when compared to a male surgical doctor. Female teachers assessed gender important to a higher degree than men. Among women there were no significant differences between specialty groups. Conclusions There was an interaction between physician teachers' gender and specialty as to whether they identified gender as important in professional relationships. Male physicians, especially from the surgical group, assessed gender important to a significantly lower degree than female physicians. Physicians' degree of gender awareness may, as one of many factors, affect working climate and the

  14. PROBLEMATIKA TAFSIR FEMINIS: Studi Kritis Konsep Kesetaraan Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adian Husaini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Gender equality is a discourse that is still warm to be discussed by Muslim feminists. Initiators and supporters of gender equality often questioned about Islamic laws that were considered to be unfair since they had positioned men and women differently such as the obligotary for  adhan (call for prayer, the Friday prayers, the number of goats in aqiqah (welcoming celebretion of child’s birth, and the compulsory of breastfeeding and caring for the child. Through content analysis, this study tried not only to elaborate a number of products of reintepretation based on Qur'anic Hermeneutics version of the female models but also show the history of the ideology of feminism and the inappropriateness of using hermeneutical exegesis. Feminism departed from the ideology of hatred as a form of resistance against the oppression of women that occurred in Western Christian civilization in th past. Hermeneutical exegesis approach also came from an academic Christian tradition that considered Bible text not as a God’s revelation. Both conditions were diametrically opposed to the fact in the Islamic tradition. The text of the Qur’an in Islam, was not a cultural product, but as a revelation of God to human being in the world. Historically,  Islam never surpressed to women, but it placed women in a glorious position. Meanwhile, different roles given to men and women were aimed at getting maximum benefits to the world so that they could work together and complement each other to achieve happiness in the world and the hereafter.الملخص :أصبح موضوع المساواة بين الرجل والمرأة موضوع حديث حارّ بين نساء النسوية المسلمات. قد تتسائل مؤسِّسات المذهب النسوي ومؤيّدوها الشريعة الإسلامية التي – في نظرهن – لم تكن عادلة وتضع الرجل والمرأة في مستوى ومكان غير متواز ، مثل

  15. Gender, citizenship and dementia care: a scoping review of studies to inform policy and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Ruth; Gjernes, Trude; Lotherington, Ann-Therese; Obstefelder, Aud

    2018-01-01

    Gender is a neglected dimension in public discourse related to people with dementia. Those living with this condition are typically portrayed in policies and strategies in gender neutral terms as 'people with dementia' and 'family carers' as if gender does not matter, when clearly it does. The purpose of this scoping review was to take stock of knowledge about gender differences in relation to dementia care to inform policy and future research. The work is grounded in a feminist perspective to citizenship, as this provide a lens with which to expose and examine gendered assumptions within dementia studies. A search of four databases, including CINAHL, Web of Science, Medline and Cochrane was conducted using systematic techniques between May and July 2014. A repeat search was conducted in February 2015. We found a significant amount of valuable research concerned with gender differences in relation to dementia care published from 1990 to 2014; the majority of which lacks a feminist citizenship perspective. Moreover, a disproportionate number of studies focused solely on caregivers rather than citizens with dementia. As such, questions about gender equality are not being raised and the voices of men and women with dementia are silent. Thus we argue for increased gender-sensitivity in policy making and recommend that social scientists inject a feminist citizenship perspective into their work. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The gender gap in mobility: a global cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechakra-Tahiri, Samia Djemâa; Freeman, Ellen E; Haddad, Slim; Samson, Elodie; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria

    2012-08-02

    Several studies have demonstrated that women have greater mobility disability than men. The goals of this research were: 1) to assess the gender gap in mobility difficulty in 70 countries; 2) to determine whether the gender gap is explained by sociodemographic and health factors; 3) to determine whether the gender gap differs across 6 regions of the world with different degrees of gender equality according to United Nations data. Population-based data were used from the World Health Survey (WHS) conducted in 70 countries throughout the world. 276,647 adults aged 18 years and over were recruited from 6 world regions. Mobility was measured by asking the level of difficulty people had moving around in the last 30 days and then creating a dichotomous measure (no difficulty, difficulty). The human development index and the gender-related development index for each country were obtained from the United Nations Development Program website. Poisson regression with Taylor series linearized variance estimation was used. Women were more likely than men to report mobility difficulty (38% versus 27%, P gap in mobility difficulty, while the Western Pacific region, with the smallest loss of human development due to gender inequality, had the smallest gender gap in mobility difficulty. These are the first world-wide data to examine the gender gap in mobility. Differences in chronic diseases are the main reasons for this gender gap. The gender gap seems to be greater in regions with the largest loss of human development due to gender inequality.

  17. A study on association and correlation of lip and finger print pattern analysis for gender identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surapaneni Ratheesh Kumar Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Lip print analysis is a challenging area in the personal identification during forensic dentistry examination. The study revealed the weaker correlation and approachable significance of lip and finger print pattern in gender identification. Future studies should be encouraged in the direction of software based identification for lip and finger print analysis in gender identification. Such studies may benefit this study pattern in more accurate way.

  18. Attitudes towards patient gender among psychiatric hospital staff: results of a case study with focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Silvia; Kilian, Reinhold; Becker, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    There is an increasing awareness of gender-related issues in psychiatry. However, empirical findings on attitudes of psychiatric staff towards patient gender are limited. Gender-related issues are particularly relevant in the debate about mixed versus segregated sex wards, yet while the appropriateness of mixed-sex wards is questioned in Great Britain this is not the case in Germany. To investigate attitudes of psychiatric staff towards both patient gender and mixed versus segregated sex wards, we conducted a case study using focus groups with members of professional teams. We evaluated the transition process from two single-sex wards to two mixed-sex wards in a 330-bed psychiatric hospital in a rural area in south Germany. Staff described female patients as more externally oriented, motivating of others, demanding, and even sexually aggressive. Male patients, on the other hand, were described as more quiet, modest, or lazy. Furthermore, participants described the mixing process as a positive development whereas they did not see a need for gender-separated wards in order to protect vulnerable female patients. Some gender descriptions by professionals are "reversed" in comparison with gender stereotypes supposed to be present in wider society. The perception of crossed gender norms may affect staff attitudes towards the vulnerability of female patients in psychiatric settings and the provision of single-sex wards in in-patient psychiatric care. Practical implications are discussed against the background of a high rate of female patients with sexual abuse histories.

  19. Gender violence has no frontiers. Comparative study about Colombian and Spain violence social standards of genders (2004-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Londoño Toro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared analysis about the Spanish and Colombian normative systems that aim for the women’s rights protection for addressing gender-based violence. The goal of this study is to build proposals that reinforce the existent instruments and allow sharing good normative practices. The advances in regulation and institutional reinforcement impulsed by women organizations can be underlined, and the actions that fortify the confidence in the procedures are highlighted, because they stop the re victimization and assure the accomplishment of the normative frameworks.

  20. Effects of different steps in gender reassignment therapy on psychopathology: a prospective study of persons with a gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylens, Gunter; Verroken, Charlotte; De Cock, Sanne; T'Sjoen, Guy; De Cuypere, Griet

    2014-01-01

    At the start of gender reassignment therapy, persons with a gender identity disorder (GID) may deal with various forms of psychopathology. Until now, a limited number of publications focus on the effect of the different phases of treatment on this comorbidity and other psychosocial factors. The aim of this study was to investigate how gender reassignment therapy affects psychopathology and other psychosocial factors. This is a prospective study that assessed 57 individuals with GID by using the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) at three different points of time: at presentation, after the start of hormonal treatment, and after sex reassignment surgery (SRS). Questionnaires on psychosocial variables were used to evaluate the evolution between the presentation and the postoperative period. The data were statistically analyzed by using SPSS 19.0, with significance levels set at P < 0.05. The psychopathological parameters include overall psychoneurotic distress, anxiety, agoraphobia, depression, somatization, paranoid ideation/psychoticism, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility, and sleeping problems. The psychosocial parameters consist of relationship, living situation, employment, sexual contacts, social contacts, substance abuse, and suicide attempt. A difference in SCL-90 overall psychoneurotic distress was observed at the different points of assessments (P = 0.003), with the most prominent decrease occurring after the initiation of hormone therapy (P < 0.001). Significant decreases were found in the subscales such as anxiety, depression, interpersonal sensitivity, and hostility. Furthermore, the SCL-90 scores resembled those of a general population after hormone therapy was initiated. Analysis of the psychosocial variables showed no significant differences between pre- and postoperative assessments. A marked reduction in psychopathology occurs during the process of sex reassignment therapy, especially after the initiation of hormone therapy. © 2013

  1. Childhood gender-typed behavior and adolescent sexual orientation: A longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gu; Kung, Karson T F; Hines, Melissa

    2017-04-01

    Lesbian and gay individuals have been reported to show more interest in other-sex, and/or less interest in same-sex, toys, playmates, and activities in childhood than heterosexual counterparts. Yet, most of the relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies or from prospective studies of clinically referred, extremely gender nonconforming children. In addition, findings are mixed regarding the relation between childhood gender-typed behavior and the later sexual orientation spectrum from exclusively heterosexual to exclusively lesbian/gay. The current study drew a sample (2,428 girls and 2,169 boys) from a population-based longitudinal study, and found that the levels of gender-typed behavior at ages 3.5 and 4.75 years, although less so at age 2.5 years, significantly and consistently predicted adolescents' sexual orientation at age 15 years, both when sexual orientation was conceptualized as 2 groups or as a spectrum. In addition, within-individual change in gender-typed behavior during the preschool years significantly related to adolescent sexual orientation, especially in boys. These results suggest that the factors contributing to the link between childhood gender-typed behavior and sexual orientation emerge during early development. Some of those factors are likely to be nonsocial, because nonheterosexual individuals appear to diverge from gender norms regardless of social encouragement to conform to gender roles. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Voice Quality and Gender Stereotypes: A Study of Lebanese Women With Reinke's Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Nayla; Portes, Cristel; Lancia, Leonardo; Legou, Thierry; Baider, Fabienne

    2016-12-01

    Women with Reinke's edema (RW) report being mistaken for men during telephone conversations. For this reason, their masculine-sounding voices are interesting for the study of gender stereotypes. The study's objective is to verify their complaint and to understand the cues used in gender identification. Using a self-evaluation study, we verified RW's perception of their own voices. We compared the acoustic parameters of vowels produced by 10 RW to those produced by 10 men and 10 women with healthy voices (hereafter referred to as NW) in Lebanese Arabic. We conducted a perception study for the evaluation of RW, healthy men's, and NW voices by naïve listeners. RW self-evaluated their voices as masculine and their gender identities as feminine. The acoustic parameters that distinguish RW from NW voices concern fundamental frequency, spectral slope, harmonicity of the voicing signal, and complexity of the spectral envelope. Naïve listeners very often rate RW as surely masculine. Listeners may rate RW's gender incorrectly. These incorrect gender ratings are correlated with acoustic measures of fundamental frequency and voice quality. Further investigations will reveal the contribution of each of these parameters to gender perception and guide the treatment plan of patients complaining of a gender ambiguous voice.

  3. Feminist Ethnography on International Migration: From Acculturation Studies to Gender Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethel V. Kosminsky

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to analyze the book Italianos no mundo rural paulista, by João Baptista Borges Pereira (1974, one of the earliest Brazilian ethnographic international migration researches, based on the acculturation theory, in order to corroborate its contribution to the feminist ethnography. We focus on the use of gender as a central category on the international migration studies, thus empowering the Feminist Ethnography.

  4. Gender and determinants of smoking cessation: A longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Prescott, Eva; Godtfredsen, Nina

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The less favorable trend in smoking prevalence in women compared to men may be due to lower cessation rates. We analyzed determinants of spontaneous smoking cessation with particular reference to gender differences. METHODS: Data on smoking were collected by questionnaire in three...... the relation of determinants to having quit after 5 and 10-16 years. RESULTS: The prevalence of quitting was 12 and 22% at first and second follow-up, respectively. At both reexaminations, quitting smoking was positively associated with male sex and cigar smoking and negatively associated with the amount...

  5. Interpersonal Conflict in Collaborative Writing: What We Can Learn from Gender Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Mary M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how gender studies reveal psychological and cultural sources of interpersonal conflict during collaboration. Notes that an awareness of these conflict sources enables scholars and teachers in technical communication to predict and ease interpersonal conflict among collaborators. (MM)

  6. Trust in leadership in sport: An empirical study of ethnicity and gender

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated how ethnicity and gender affect the perceived ... in the questionnaire were measured on a 5-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 ... higher perceptions of the coach's competence than athletes with a non-White coach.

  7. Gender and hemispheric differences in temporal lobe epilepsy: a VBM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria Teresa Castilho Garcia; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Britto, Fernanda Dos Santos; Sandim, Gabriel Barbosa; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    Gender differences are recognized in the functional and anatomical organization of the human brain. Differences between genders are probably expressed early in life, when differential rates of cerebral maturation occur. Sexual dimorphism has been described in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Several voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have shown that TLE-MTS extends beyond mesial temporal structures, and that there are differences in the extent of anatomical damage between hemispheres, although none have approached gender differences. Our aim was to investigate gender differences and anatomical abnormalities in TLE-MTS. VBM5 was employed to analyze gender and hemispheric differences in 120 patients with TLE-MTS and 50 controls. VBM abnormalities were more widespread in left-TLE; while in women changes were mostly seen in temporal areas, frontal regions were more affected in men. Our study confirmed that gender and laterality are important factors determining the nature and severity of brain damage in TLE-MTS. Differential rates of maturation between gender and hemispheres may explain the distinct areas of anatomical damage in men and women. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Scientific careers and gender differences. A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Gouthier

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, much effort has been devoted to explore the causes of the decline in number of university matriculations of science students and to identify gender differences in career choice. Yet, the problem extends to the fulfillment of career plans: given their professional expectations and their attitudes when choosing a career, girls are much less likely to pursue scientific careers such as engineering or physics. Evidence of this is provided by the social research carried out within the framework of the GAPP project (Gender Awareness Participation Process. The Gapp project is intended to investigate differences between girls and boys in their perception of science careers and to propose a range of innovative and concrete participatory activities involving scientists, engineers and professionals from the public and private S&T sectors. In this letter, we report a synthesis of the results of the social research conducted as first step of the project: exploring how the perceptions of science professions affect interest, motivation and subject choice at school, at the university and consequently in their career.

  9. Gender differences in emotional responses: a psychophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marta; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2012-02-28

    Gender differences in emotional responses have been investigated in two groups of students, 22 males and 21 females. Participants watched a set of sixty emotional standardized slides divided into pleasant, neutral and unpleasant, while Startle reflex, Evoked Potentials, Heart Rate, facial EMG and Skin Conductance were recorded. Startle reflex amplitude, an index modulated by amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex and sensitive to aversive emotional stimuli, was overall larger in women. In addition, startle emotion modulation was greater in women with respect to men. Slow Evoked Potentials (400-800 ms), a measure representing the cognitive component of the emotional response, revealed gender differences in the left prefrontal site, with women showing greater positivity to unpleasant compared with pleasant slides while men had greater positivity to pleasant vs. neutral slides. Women, compared with men, perceived all slides as less pleasant and reported greater arousal to unpleasant condition. Results are in line with known functional brain differences, at level of limbic and paralimbic structures, between men and women, and point to biologically grounded greater sensitivity and vulnerability of women to adverse/stressful events. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Childhood gender-typed behavior and adolescent sexual orientation: A longitudinal population-based study.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gu; Kung, Karson TF; Hines, Melissa Marie

    2017-01-01

    Lesbian and gay individuals have been reported to show more interest in other-sex, and/or less interest in same-sex, toys, playmates, and activities in childhood than heterosexual counterparts. Yet, most of the relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies or from prospective studies of clinically-referred, extremely gender nonconforming children. In addition, findings are mixed regarding the relationship between childhood gender-typed behavior and the later sexual orientation spectrum f...

  11. Why girls play digital games: an empirical study into the relations between gender, motivations and genre

    OpenAIRE

    Van Looy, Jan; Courtois, Cédric; Vermeulen, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have explored the motivations for playing different game genres such as MMO (Yee, 2006a, 2006b) and FPS (Jansz & Tanis, 2007). Others have taken steps towards creating an integrated framework for use across genres (Sherry, Lucas, Greenberg, & Lachlan, 2006). Despite the strong gender bias of the game industry, however, none of these studies have tackled the issue of gender differences in motivations. This paper aims to fill this gap by exploring the relation b...

  12. Study on workplace bu llying exposure among Romanian employees. Gender differences

    OpenAIRE

    TEODORA MAIDANIUC-CHIRILĂ

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identify workplace bullying exposure among Romanian employees taking into account the possible gender differences in the exposure to stress and the exposure to workplace bullying. The results of the present study revealed a percentage of workplace bullying exposure of 1.6%. This percentage reflects the number of bullying acts encountered in workplace settings with a frequency of at least once a week during a period of at least six months and revealed no gender differences i...

  13. Sexuality and Gender Role in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejerot, Susanne; Eriksson, Jonna M.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘extreme male brain theory of autism’ describes an extreme male pattern of cognitive traits defined as strong systemising abilities paired with empathising weaknesses in autism spectrum disorder. However, beyond these cognitive traits, clinical observations have suggested an ambiguous gender-typed pattern regarding several sexually dimorphic traits. The aim of the present study was to investigate if patterns of non-cognitive sexually dimorphic traits differed between the autism spectrum disorder and control groups. Fifty adults with autism spectrum disorder and intelligence within the normal range, and 53 neurotypical controls responded to questions on gender role, self-perceived gender typicality and gender identity, as well as sexuality. Measures used were a Swedish modification of the Bem Sex Role Inventory and questions on sexuality and gender designed for the purpose of this study. Our results showed that one common gender role emerged in the autism spectrum disorder group. Masculinity (e.g. assertiveness, leadership and competitiveness) was weaker in the autism spectrum disorder group than in the controls, across men and women. Self-perceived gender typicality did not differ between the groups but tomboyism and bisexuality were overrepresented amongst women with autism spectrum disorder. Lower libido was reported amongst both male and female participants with autism spectrum disorder compared with controls. We conclude that the extreme male patterns of cognitive functions in the autistic brain do not seem to extend to gender role and sexuality. A gender-atypical pattern for these types of characteristics is suggested in autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24498228

  14. Gender-related factors influencing tuberculosis control in shantytowns: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onifade, Dami A; Bayer, Angela M; Montoya, Rosario; Haro, Marie; Alva, Jessica; Franco, Jessica; Sosa, Rosario; Valiente, Betty; Valera, Enit; Ford, Carolyn M; Acosta, Colleen D; Evans, Carlton A

    2010-06-29

    There is evidence that female gender is associated with reduced likelihood of tuberculosis diagnosis and successful treatment. This study aimed to characterize gender-related barriers to tuberculosis control in Peruvian shantytowns. We investigated attitudes and experiences relating gender to tuberculosis using the grounded theory approach to describe beliefs amongst key tuberculosis control stakeholders. These issues were explored in 22 semi-structured interviews and in four focus group discussions with 26 tuberculosis patients and 17 healthcare workers. We found that the tuberculosis program was perceived not to be gender discriminatory and provided equal tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment care to men and women. This contrasted with stereotypical gender roles in the broader community context and a commonly expressed belief amongst patients and healthcare workers that female health inherently has a lower priority than male health. This belief was principally associated with men's predominant role in the household economy and limited employment for women in this setting. Women were also generally reported to experience the adverse psychosocial and economic consequences of tuberculosis diagnosis more than men. There was a common perception that women's tuberculosis care was of secondary importance to that of men. This reflected societal gender values and occurred despite apparent gender equality in care provision. The greatest opportunities for improving women's access to tuberculosis care appear to be in improving social, political and economic structures, more than tuberculosis program modification.

  15. Women's gender role orientation predicts their drinking patterns: a follow-up study of Czech women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka, Ludek; Csémy, Ladislav

    2008-06-01

    Evaluation of the hypothesis that women's non-traditional gender role orientation contributes to drinking patterns typical for men. A two-wave prospective study with data collected in 1992 and 1997. The data reflect Czech women's changing gender role orientation and their drinking patterns during a historical period of post-totalitarian societal transformation. A representative cohort of 497 Prague women aged 30-59 years in 1997. Face-to-face interview data on drinking patterns and individually collected original questionnaire on gender role orientation. An analysis of the principal components of the gender role orientation questionnaire has led to four components, designated as egalitarianism, liberalism, feminism and hedonism. Constructed role orientation scales had Cronbachs's alpha reliabilities ranging from 0.57 to 0.74. With possible confounders controlled (thanks mainly to the prospective design), non-traditional gender role orientation components assessed in 1992 predicted the usual quantities of alcohol women have consumed per occasion in 1997, as well as three hazardous drinking patterns (occasional use of > or = 96 g alcohol, usual use of > or = 48 g and daily intake of > or = 40 g). Specifically, women's usual quantity per occasion and occasional use of > or = 96 g were predicted by egalitarianism and hedonism, and hedonism predicted usual use of > or = 48 g as well as average daily intake of > or = 40 g ethanol. Women's gender role orientation can be associated with their drinking patterns with non-traditional gender role identification being associated with greater likelihood of hazardous drinking.

  16. Gender-related factors influencing tuberculosis control in shantytowns: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alva Jessica

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that female gender is associated with reduced likelihood of tuberculosis diagnosis and successful treatment. This study aimed to characterize gender-related barriers to tuberculosis control in Peruvian shantytowns. Methods We investigated attitudes and experiences relating gender to tuberculosis using the grounded theory approach to describe beliefs amongst key tuberculosis control stakeholders. These issues were explored in 22 semi-structured interviews and in four focus group discussions with 26 tuberculosis patients and 17 healthcare workers. Results We found that the tuberculosis program was perceived not to be gender discriminatory and provided equal tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment care to men and women. This contrasted with stereotypical gender roles in the broader community context and a commonly expressed belief amongst patients and healthcare workers that female health inherently has a lower priority than male health. This belief was principally associated with men's predominant role in the household economy and limited employment for women in this setting. Women were also generally reported to experience the adverse psychosocial and economic consequences of tuberculosis diagnosis more than men. Conclusions There was a common perception that women's tuberculosis care was of secondary importance to that of men. This reflected societal gender values and occurred despite apparent gender equality in care provision. The greatest opportunities for improving women's access to tuberculosis care appear to be in improving social, political and economic structures, more than tuberculosis program modification.

  17. Following the time course of face gender and expression processing: a task-dependent ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Conroy, Berenice; Aguado, Luis; Fernández-Cahill, María; Romero-Ferreiro, Verónica; Diéguez-Risco, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of task demands and the interaction between gender and expression in face perception were studied using event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants performed three different tasks with male and female faces that were emotionally inexpressive or that showed happy or angry expressions. In two of the tasks (gender and expression categorization) facial properties were task-relevant while in a third task (symbol discrimination) facial information was irrelevant. Effects of expression were observed on the visual P100 component under all task conditions, suggesting the operation of an automatic process that is not influenced by task demands. The earliest interaction between expression and gender was observed later in the face-sensitive N170 component. This component showed differential modulations by specific combinations of gender and expression (e.g., angry male vs. angry female faces). Main effects of expression and task were observed in a later occipito-temporal component peaking around 230 ms post-stimulus onset (EPN or early posterior negativity). Less positive amplitudes in the presence of angry faces and during performance of the gender and expression tasks were observed. Finally, task demands also modulated a positive component peaking around 400 ms (LPC, or late positive complex) that showed enhanced amplitude for the gender task. The pattern of results obtained here adds new evidence about the sequence of operations involved in face processing and the interaction of facial properties (gender and expression) in response to different task demands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gender Differences in Emotion Regulation: An fMRI Study of Cognitive Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Kateri; Ochsner, Kevin N; Mauss, Iris B; Gabrieli, John J D; Gross, James J

    2008-04-01

    Despite strong popular conceptions of gender differences in emotionality and striking gender differences in the prevalence of disorders thought to involve emotion dysregulation, the literature on the neural bases of emotion regulation is nearly silent regarding gender differences (Gross, 2007; Ochsner & Gross, in press). The purpose of the present study was to address this gap in the literature. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we asked male and female participants to use a cognitive emotion regulation strategy (reappraisal) to down-regulate their emotional responses to negatively valenced pictures. Behaviorally, men and women evidenced comparable decreases in negative emotion experience. Neurally, however, gender differences emerged. Compared with women, men showed (a) lesser increases in prefrontal regions that are associated with reappraisal, (b) greater decreases in the amygdala, which is associated with emotional responding, and (c) lesser engagement of ventral striatal regions, which are associated with reward processing. We consider two non-competing explanations for these differences. First, men may expend less effort when using cognitive regulation, perhaps due to greater use of automatic emotion regulation. Second, women may use positive emotions in the service of reappraising negative emotions to a greater degree. We then consider the implications of gender differences in emotion regulation for understanding gender differences in emotional processing in general, and gender differences in affective disorders.

  19. The Role of Age and Gender in the Choice of Address Forms: A Sociolinguistic Study

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    Mahzad Mardiha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study is to investigate the impact of gender as well as age on the choice of forms of address in Persian. The hypothesis is that variation in the forms of address is related not only to gender of the interlocutors but also to the age of them. For this study, 30 university students- 15 males and 15 females- participated in this process that all of them were asked to fill out a questionnaire presented in the appendix. The results of the data analysis indicate that both men and women use address forms of formality (Šoma more frequently in addressing the older people from both genders that shows age is more significant than gender in determining the pronouns in address system of Persian.

  20. The effect of gender bias on medical students and career choices: a cross-sectional study

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    AKANKSHA GARG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor, Gender equality amongst healthcare professionals is no doubt paramount to allow both equal opportunity and provision of good quality healthcare. The General Medical Council encourages that all colleagues should be treated fairly, but studies have previously demonstrated gender bias against female medical students (1. Whether this might have any impact on the students’ decision-making process and career pathways has yet to be explored. We aimed to evaluate whether doctors gave students gender-specific advice and the extent to which this advice influenced the students. Furthermore, we explored whether students felt their gender affected their career choices. We carried out a cross-sectional national study of British clinical medical students. A standardised questionnaire was completed by 94 students (54.3% female. The response rate was 88.7%. Results showed that 43.6% (n=41 of students received career advice based purely on their gender, and 63.4% (n=26 of these said that this would influence their career choices. Importantly, 82.9% (n=34 of the students who received gender-specific advice were female. Additionally, 41.2% (n=21 of females felt their gender would restrict their career choices compared with only 11.6% (n=5 of males (p=0.00142. 37.3% (n=19 of females thought their gender would unfairly disadvantage their career progression compared to 4.65% (n=2 of males (p=0.00016. Our results highlighted that doctors gave more gender-specific advice to females compared to males, and that this advice significantly impacts students’ decision making process. Furthermore, females disproportionately felt their careers would be disadvantaged and restricted compared with males. This shows an enormous disparity between male and female attitudes towards medical careers. This can have both long and short-term effects on training, career choices and patient interaction. Further research investigating why females feel their gender will

  1. Double dissociation between syntactic gender and picture naming processing: a brain stimulation mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidorreta, Jose Garbizu; Garcia, Roser; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Duffau, Hugues

    2011-03-01

    Neural foundations of syntactic gender processing remain poorly understood. We used electrostimulation mapping in nine right-handed awake patients during surgery for a glioma within the left hemisphere, to study whether the cortico-subcortical structures involved in naming versus syntactic gender processing are common or distinct. In French, the article determines the grammatical gender. Thus, the patient was asked to perform a picture naming task and to give the appropriate article for each picture, with and without stimulation. Cortical stimulation elicited reproducible syntactic gender disturbances in six patients, in the inferior frontal gyrus (three cases), and in the posterior middle temporal gyrus (three cases). Interestingly, no naming disorders were generated during stimulation of the syntactic sites, while cortical areas inducing naming disturbances never elicited grammatical gender errors when stimulated. Moreover, at the subcortical level, stimulation of the white matter lateral to the caudate nucleus induced gender errors in three patients, with no naming disorders. Using cortico-subcortical electrical mapping in awake patients, we demonstrate for the first time (1) a double dissociation between syntactic gender and naming processing, supporting independent network model rather than serial theory, (2) the involvement of the left inferior frontal gyrus, especially the pars triangularis, and the posterior left middle temporal gyrus in grammatical gender processing, (3) the existence of white matter pathways, likely a sub-part of the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, underlying a large-scale distributed cortico-subcortical circuit which might selectively sub-serve syntactic gender processing, even if interconnected with parallel sub-networks involved in naming (semantic and phonological) processing. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Authorship of Books and Gender Sensitivity: A Case Study of NCAM Library Collections

    OpenAIRE

    Oyeniyi, J. Oluwakemi; Olaifa, Taye Paul; Uzokwe, Chuka Christian

    2014-01-01

    Gender imbalances is not just reflected in education from the surface level, but more narrowly, highly established and sensitive in book publishing. This paper examines the level of gender imbalances and sensitivity in book publishing using NCAM library collection as a case study. The researchers used 446 textbooks with 802 authors to establish the difference in the number of male authors in comparison with that of female authors in textbook publishing. Recommendation on how to bridge the gap...

  3. Annual Assessment of Longitudinal Studies and Injury Surveillance for Gender Integration in the Army, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    each Service to develop and implement validated, occupation-specific physical performance requirements (i.e., gender -neutral occupational standards...Studies and Injury Surveillance for Gender Integration in the Army, 2016 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Health Surveillance Branch, Defense Health Agency) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER WBS 0047783 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  4. Gender, the body and organization studies: que(e)rying empirical research

    OpenAIRE

    De Souza, Eloisio Moulin; Brewis, Jo; Rumens, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Even in organization studies scholarship that treats gender as performative and fluid, a certain ‘crystallization’ of gender identities as somehow unproblematic and stable may occur because of our methodological decision-making, and especially our categorization of participants. Mobilizing queer theory — and Judith Butler's work on the heterosexual matrix and performativity in particular — as a conceptual lens, we examine this crystallization, suggesting it is based on two implicit assumption...

  5. An Exploratory Study of Gender and Changes in Alcohol Consumption: A Qualitative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Bullers

    2012-01-01

    Consistent research shows that men drink more, and more often than women, although recent findings suggest that this gender difference may be diminishing. This exploratory qualitative analysis offers a “micro” perspective on the possible attitudes, beliefs, and social interactions that underlie these aggregate findings. Using semi-structured qualitative interviews with 18 men and women from three age and ethnic groups, this study explores changes in behaviors and attitudes regarding gender an...

  6. MEDIA DAN GENDER (Studi Deskriptif Representasi Stereotipe Perempuan dalam Iklan di Televisi Swasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanti Dwi Astuti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gender stereotypes in television advertising have become a topic of a long debate, especially among media scholars. The case became a serious problem, because of gender bias ads will affect the way we think about the role and way of functioning of gender in society. This study describes how television commercials have given gender role stereotypes against women. It is becoming important to be studied further to see how people receive messages about gender norms. This study uses descriptive analytical method that aims to describe forms of stereotypical representations of women in television commercials. Research results obtained are in the advertising power generating imaging products has been taking part in cultivating stereotypes that have been embedded in women. Social symbols that had been attached to female and then processed further creatively by the advertisers to bring more products to be offered by the willingness of consumers. Products are offered in the form of soaps, detergents, Handbody, supplements are powerful medicine, food and other women always use the icon as a significant sales tool. Key Words: Media, Gender, Stereotipe, Commercials, Television

  7. Effects of Medical Interventions on Gender Dysphoria and Body Image: A Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Grift, Tim C; Elaut, Els; Cerwenka, Susanne C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; De Cuypere, Griet; Richter-Appelt, Hertha; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study from the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence is to investigate the status of all individuals who had applied for gender confirming interventions from 2007 to 2009, irrespective of whether they received treatment. The current article describes the study protocol, the effect of medical treatment on gender dysphoria and body image, and the predictive value of (pre)treatment factors on posttreatment outcomes. Data were collected on medical interventions, transition status, gender dysphoria (Utrecht Gender Dysphoria Scale), and body image (Body Image Scale for transsexuals). In total, 201 people participated in the study (37% of the original cohort). At follow-up, 29 participants (14%) did not receive medical interventions, 36 hormones only (18%), and 136 hormones and surgery (68%). Most transwomen had undergone genital surgery, and most transmen chest surgery. Overall, the levels of gender dysphoria and body dissatisfaction were significantly lower at follow-up compared with clinical entry. Satisfaction with therapy responsive and unresponsive body characteristics both improved. High dissatisfaction at admission and lower psychological functioning at follow-up were associated with persistent body dissatisfaction. Hormone-based interventions and surgery were followed by improvements in body satisfaction. The level of psychological symptoms and the degree of body satisfaction at baseline were significantly associated with body satisfaction at follow-up.

  8. Gender Differences in Output Quality and Quantity under Competition and Time Constraints: Evidence from a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Shurchkov

    2009-01-01

    Gender gaps in income and level of position in the workplace are widespread. One explanation for this inequality is that the genders perform differently under competitive conditions, as previous experimental studies have found a significant gender gap in competitive tasks that are perceived to favor men. In this paper, we use a verbal task that is perceived to favor women and find no gender difference under competition per se. We also reject the hypothesis that a .stereotype threat. explains ...

  9. Gender gap or program gap? Students' negotiations of study practice in a course in electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Staffan; Johansson, Anders

    2016-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] This study of achievement differences, as reflected by course grades, on a third-semester electromagnetism course at a Swedish research university was motivated by instructor concerns about gender inequalities. Quantitative analysis showed a gender gap in course grades between female and male students for the period of fall 2007 to spring 2013. Dynamics behind this gap were explored through interpretative discourse analysis on interviews of 21 students who had recently passed the course. A recurring pattern was identified in the interviews. Students described studying electromagnetism as either studying to pass or studying to learn. Their choice of practice was influenced by the significance recognized in the course, which primarily was discussed in relation to program affiliation. Students stressed that perceived differences, in their study context, were larger between students affiliated with different programs than between male and female students on the same program. This was supported by quantitative analysis of course grades in relation to study programs, where the grade difference between female and male students on the same program in most cases were not statistically significant. The gender gap in grades for the whole course was related to different achievements on different programs. Programs further from the discipline of physics had lower mean grades and also enrolled a larger fraction of female students. Society-wide gender differences in interest and study choice are reflected in the grades on this single course. These results displace the achievement gap from the level of individuals to that of programs, and the gender gap from a difference in achievement to a difference in study choice. We discuss the implications of this shift of perspective in relation to gender differences for both research and teaching.

  10. Gender Issues in the Implementation of Social Studies Curriculum in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezieobi, Dan I.; Oyeoku, E. K.; Ezegbe, B. N.; Igbo, Janeth

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated gender issues in the implementation of social studies curriculum in Nigerian universities. The subjects for the study comprised of all the 200 final-year sandwich social studies students of University of Port-Harcourt in the 2009 contact session. Five research questions guided the study. Researchers developed questionnaire…

  11. Educational standardization and gender differences in mathematics achievement: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Hanna; Livneh, Idit

    2013-03-01

    We argue that between-country variations in the gender gap in mathematics are related to the level of educational system standardization. In countries with standardized educational systems both genders are exposed to similar knowledge and are motivated to invest in studying mathematics, which leads to similar achievements. We hypothesize that national examinations and between-teacher uniformity in covering major mathematics topics are associated with a smaller gender gap in a country. Based on Trends of International Mathematical and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003, we use multilevel regression models to compare the link of these two factors to the gender gap in 32 countries, controlling for various country characteristics. The use of national examinations and less between-teacher instructional variation prove major factors in reducing the advantage of boys over girls in mathematics scores and in the odds of excelling. Factors representing gender stratification, often analyzed in comparative gender-gap research in mathematics, are at most marginal in respect of the gap. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recession, employment and self-rated health: a study on the gender gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Palacio, I; Carrera-Lasfuentes, P; Sánchez-Recio, R; Alonso, J P; Rabanaque, M J

    2018-01-01

    Employment status and economic recession have been associated with negative effects on self-rated health, and this effect differs by gender. We analysed the effects of the Spanish economic recession in terms of self-rated health, its differential effect among genders and its influence on gender gap. Repeated cross-sectional study using Spanish health surveys (2001-2014). Logistic regression models were conducted to explore the association between self-rated health and employment status and its evolution over time and gender. To test the impact of the economic recession, pooled data regression models were conducted. In this study, we considered 104,577 subjects. During the last 15 years, women have entered the labour market, leading to wide changes in the Spanish traditional family roles. Instead of an increasing proportion of women workers, gender employment differences persist. Therefore, in 2014, the prevalence of workers was 55.77% in men, whereas in women, it was 44.01%. Self-rated health trends during the economic recession differ by gender, with women improving slightly their self-rated health from a low self-rated health prevalence of 38.76% in 2001 to 33.78% in 2014. On the contrary, men seem more vulnerable to employment circumstances, which have led to substantial reduction in the gender gap. Although a gender gap persists, the change in socio-economic roles seems to increase women's self-rated health, reducing this gap. It is important to promote women's labour market inclusion, even in economic recession periods. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neoliberalizm polskich 'gender studies'. Czy to 'backlash' odbiera nam słuchaczki/słuchaczy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Duda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available "Neoliberalism of Polish 'gender studies'. Is 'backlash' a reaction, which collects our students?" In this text I present today’s condition of Polish gender studies that are conducted as postgraduate studies. In most of the cities it is impossible to form groups of students. It is believed that “responsible” for this state are backlash and campaign called “gender ideology”. Unfortunately these problems with enrollment have appeared earlier. In my presentation I describe the neoliberal shape of chargeable postgraduate studies that are conducted in large cities. Joining these groups depends on economic factors and free time of the students. An important aspect is also practical dimension of gender studies – students should develop themselves and their abilities. In accordance with the guidelines of postgraduate studies students should improve their professional skills. There is also a problem with the language of information/promotion campaign, as we use it as an instrument to encourage people to take part in these group activities. The language very often uses capitalist and stereotypical concepts profit and investment in yourself. The presentation is the critical voice of lecturer, who was teaching gender studies in Warsaw and was participating in forming “genders” in Poznan and Szczecin.

  14. Disability Is a Feminist Issue: Bringing Together Women’s and Gender Studies and Disability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Piepmeier

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper tracks a series of conversations between a women's and gender studies professor and two of her undergraduate students, all of whom are interested in disability studies. We explore the links between disability and feminism, and to think through the possibilities of having disability studies become part of the academy. Our primarily positive interactions with the academic institution and our interest in disability studies has led to our argument that disability is in fact a feminist issue. Disability studies has allowed each of us to re-conceptualize our own relationships to feminist theory, and shaped our ability to envision a better academic environment for all students.  Keywords: feminist disability studies, intersectionality, pedagogy, mental disability

  15. The gendered impact of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a qualitative study of patients' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Ida; Dellenborg, Lisen; Ringström, Gisela; Simrén, Magnus; Jakobsson Ung, Eva

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the impact of irritable bowel syndrome on daily life from a gender perspective. Irritable bowel syndrome is a common functional disorder, characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhoea and/or constipation. Sufferers experience negative emotions due to unpredictable symptoms and sometimes feel trivialized by healthcare professionals. The sufferers' experience of living with this disorder has never been explored from a gender perspective. A qualitative, interpretative method was used. A qualitative, hermeneutic method was applied. Interviews were conducted with 19 patients in 2011 and analysed in a constructionist gender framework. Constructionist gender theory views gender and identity as cultural constructs that develop through interplay between the individual and his/her social context and cultural norms. The main theme to emerge from the interviews was as follows: 'A normative framework of femaleness and maleness leads to suffering for persons with irritable bowel syndrome'. This consists of three interwoven themes: 'Being forced to abandon gender illusions'; 'Being forced to transcend taboos' and 'Reinforced suffering in healthcare encounters'. Men demonstrated masculinity by stressing the importance of being solid family providers while women spoke of nurturing and relational responsibilities in line with traditional notions of femininity. The experience of living with irritable bowel syndrome differs between men and women due to differing societal expectations, life situation and the everyday construction of gender identities. Gender stereotyping by healthcare professionals perpetuates rather than alleviates the suffering experienced by men and women with irritable bowel syndrome. In healthcare encounters, women risk being trivialized and men risk being overlooked due to the 'female health concern' label attached to irritable bowel syndrome. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Sex-Specific Effects of Gender Identification on Pain Study Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos Feijó, Larissa; Tarman, Guliz Zeynep; Fontaine, Charlotte; Harrison, Richard; Johnstone, Tom; Salomons, Tim

    2018-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies show sex differences in pain responses, with women more sensitive to nociceptive stimulation and more vulnerable to long-term pain conditions than men. Because of evidence that men are culturally reinforced for the ability to endure (or under-report) pain, some of these findings might be explained by sociocultural beliefs about gender-appropriate behavior. One potential manifestation of these effects might be differential participation in pain studies, with men adhering to stereotypical masculine roles viewing participation as a way to demonstrate their masculinity. To test this possibility, we assessed gender identification in 137 healthy participants. At the end of the assessment, they were asked if they would like to participate in other research studies. Interested participants were then asked to participate in a study involving administration of pain-evoking stimulation. We compared individuals who agreed to participate in the pain study with those who declined. We observed a significant Sex × Participation interaction in masculine gender identification, such that men (but not women) who agreed to participate identified significantly more with masculine gender. Among masculine gender traits examined, we found that high levels of aggression and competitiveness were the strongest predictors of pain study participation. Our results suggest that men in pain studies might have higher levels of masculine gender identification than the wider male population. Taken together with previous findings of lower levels of pain sensitivity (or reporting) in masculine-identifying male participants, these results suggest an explanation for some of the sex-related differences observed in pain responses. To examine whether sex and gender affect willingness to participate in pain studies, we assessed gender identification in men and women, then attempted to recruit them to participate in a pain study. Men who agree to participate

  17. The influence of students' gender on equity in Peer Physical Examination: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vnuk, Anna K; Wearn, Andy; Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-08-01

    Peer Physical Examination (PPE) is an educational tool used globally for learning early clinical skills and anatomy. In quantitative research, there are differences in students' preferences and actual participation in PPE by gender. This novel study qualitatively explores the effect that gender has on medical students' experiences of learning physical examination through PPE. We employ an interpretative approach to uncover the PPE experiences of students from a European, graduate-entry medical school. Volunteers participated in either individual or group interviews. The data were transcribed, de-identified and analysed using thematic analysis. There was evidence of gender inequity in PPE, with students describing significant imbalances in participation. Male students adopted roles that generated significant personal discomfort and led to fewer experiences as examiners. Assumptions were made by tutors and students about gender roles: male students' ready acceptance of exposure to be examined and female students' need to be protected from particular examinations. In contrast with the first assumption, male students did feel coerced or obliged to be examined. Students described their experiences of taking action to break down the gender barrier. Importantly, students reported that tutors played a role in perpetuating inequities. These findings, whilst relating to one university, have implications for all settings where PPE is used. Educators should be vigilant about gender issues and the effect that they may have on students' participation in PPE to ensure that students are not disadvantaged in their learning.

  18. Water Gender Indicators in Agriculture: A Study of Horticultural Farmer Organizations in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Alice Centrone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to contribute to the debate on gender equality and water within the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs 5 and 6. Farmers organizations are often considered key stakeholders whose participation should be fostered to achieve a good water governance in agriculture and irrigation programs. Nonetheless, many water management interventions tackle participation as an instrumental and formal process. A common assumption is that granting sufficient space for women in water management will automatically ensure a greater gender empowerment. Nevertheless, often low importance is given to assessing who really actively participates and benefits from water development projects, favoring the technical aspects. This paper addresses the articulation between gender, water management and indicators, using male, female and mixed farmer organizations as touchstones in three regions of Senegal. The authors defines a system of water gender indicators grouped into five sections. The first results show more similarities between mixed and female organizations, while the main gender inequalities are visible in the water technique and economic domains. Thanks to this study, we can see how a gender-based analysis may allow to more deeply understand some more or less “hidden” water governance mechanisms and their related implications in terms of project management and policy making.

  19. Gender differences in the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder: a study of 7354 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanti, Alina; Bobeck, Christian; Osterman, Maja; Kardell, Mathias; Tidemalm, Dag; Runeson, Bo; Lichtenstein, Paul; Landén, Mikael

    2015-03-15

    Gender differences in treatment that are not supported by empirical evidence have been reported in several areas of medicine. Here, the aim was to evaluate potential gender differences in the treatment for bipolar disorder. Data was collected from the Swedish National Quality Assurance Register for bipolar disorder (BipoläR). Baseline registrations from the period 2004-2011 of 7354 patients were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to study the impact of gender on interventions. Women were more often treated with antidepressants, lamotrigine, electroconvulsive therapy, benzodiazepines, and psychotherapy. Men were more often treated with lithium. There were no gender differences in treatment with mood stabilizers as a group, neuroleptics, or valproate. Subgroup analyses revealed that ECT was more common in women only in the bipolar I subgroup. Contrariwise, lamotrigine was more common in women only in the bipolar II subgroup. As BipoläR contains data on outpatient treatment of persons with bipolar disorder in Sweden, it is unclear if these findings translate to inpatient care and to outpatient treatment in other countries. Men and women with bipolar disorder receive different treatments in routine clinical settings in Sweden. Gender differences in level of functioning, bipolar subtype, or severity of bipolar disorder could not explain the higher prevalence of pharmacological treatment, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychotherapy in women. Our results suggest that clinicians׳ treatment decisions are to some extent unduly influenced by patients׳ gender. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nurses' work role in the context of gender and Chinese culture: an online forum study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi

    2010-06-01

    Nurses in Taiwan are seen as "angels in white." This image conveys that nurses are caring, kind, patient, and full of love. Another popular image of nurses is that of a candle, which implies that nurses bring light to others by sacrificing their "self." These images also reflect accurately the traditional role of women in the Chinese patriarchal society. Hence, gender and culture effects on nurses' perceptions of their work role cannot be ignored. The purpose of this article was to explore nurses' perceptions of their work role on the basis of the perspectives of Chinese gender role and culture. This study was conducted using a Web-based online forum for 4 weeks. Twenty nurses completed discussions of questions in four topic areas. Thematic analysis was used to analyze data. Three themes were identified: (a) gendered work, (b) low social status, and (c) tensions among nurses. Findings indicate that certain stereotypes regarding gender roles in Taiwanese society constrained the professional growth of nurses and nursing. The social status of nurses was found to be relatively low, and nurses were at a relatively high risk of developing powerless behaviors. Nursing leaders and administrators should understand the impact of gender and Chinese culture on nursing and pay attention to the situation of nurses to provide more gender-sensitive and positive work environments for nurses.

  1. Investigation of gender role behaviors in boys with hypospadias: comparative study with unaffected boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ji Yean; Han, Sang Won; Chung, Kyong-Mee; Lee, Hyeyoung; Cho, Sang Hee

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was (1) to investigate gender role behaviors of boys with hypospadias compared with groups of unaffected boys and girls using parental reports and direct observations; and (2) to directly observe effects of socialization (mothers' presence) on children's gender role behaviors. Ages of 19 children with hypospadias ranged from 3 to 7 years, and each of them were matched to controls of unaffected boys and girls by age. All the children participated with their mothers. Children's gender role behaviors and their mothers' behaviors were evaluated using an observation coding system. Mothers also completed questionnaires regarding their children's gender role behaviors. Results indicated no atypical gender role behavior for the boys with hypospadias and no direct effects of socialization on their gender role behaviors. However, differences were found in negative communicative behaviors between boys with hypospadias and unaffected boys, suggesting a possible role of socialization. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Thinking Beyond the Categories: On the Diasporisation of Gender Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Kron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In diesem Beitrag wird das Potential des Konzepts „Diaspora“ für eine feministische Methodologie diskutiert. Die Überlegungen gehen von der Beobachtung aus, dass die Mehrheit der Geschlechter- und Intersektionalitätsforschung in Deutschland innerhalb eines nationalen Rahmens arbeitet. Entsprechend fehlt ihr das Bewusstsein von den globalen Verknüpfungen und der konstitutiven Bedeutung von Migration für die europäischen Gesellschaften seit den Zeiten von Kolonisation und Sklavenhandel. Es gibt deshalb innerhalb der Geschlechterforschung eine Tendenz, Differenzen zu essentialisieren, obwohl das erklärte Ziel die Analyse sozialer Ungleichheiten ist. Nach einem kursorischen Überblickt über die Konzepte, die Gesellschaft aus der Perspektive der Bewegung und Diasporisierung betrachten – wie Édouard Glissant’s ‚créolisation‘, Paul Gilroy’s ‚black Atlantic‘ ebenso wie Peter Linebaugh’s und Markus Rediker’s ‚red Atlantic‘ – werden in diesem Artikel drei feministische Ansätze aus den 1980er und 1990er Jahren wieder aufgegriffen, die Elemente von dem, was als diasporische feministische Methode bezeichnet werden kann, enthalten: Es handelt sich um Angela Davis’ analytische Methode der Perspektivität, Avtar Brahs Auffassung vom ‚diaspora space‘ und Gloria Anzaldúas ‚border thinking‘. Im letzten Abschnitt des Beitrags wird gezeigt, wie diese konzeptionellen Instrumente zu einem besseren Verständnis interdependenter und globalisierter sozialer Ungleichheiten beitragen, indem sie Gender- und Intersektionalitätsstudien um die Diaspora-Perspektive erweitern.

  3. Does Grammatical Gender Influence Perception? A Study of Polish and French Speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haertlé Izabella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Can the perception of a word be influenced by its grammatical gender? Can it happen that speakers of one language perceive an object to have masculine features, while speakers of another language perceive the same object to have feminine features? Previous studies suggest that this is the case, and also that there is some supra-language gender categorisation of objects as natural/feminine and artefact/masculine. This study was an attempt to replicate these findings on another population of subjects. This is the first Polish study of this kind, comparing the perceptions of objects by Polish- and French-speaking individuals. The results of this study show that grammatical gender may cue people to assess objects as masculine or feminine. However, the findings of some previous studies, that feminine features are more often ascribed to natural objects than artifacts, were not replicated.

  4. Delusions of Gender - Gender Benders

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlig, Louise; Zampetis, Marios Stylianos; Lochte, Frans; Ahmed, Samira M.; Karlsen, Luna Maria Stjerneby

    2014-01-01

    “Taking Cordelia Fine’s Delusions of Gender as it point of departure, together with popular gender theories by Simon Baron-Cohen and Louann Brizendine, we raise the following question: how strong is the foundation of biological determinism and how can we decide?” In this project the point of departure is taken in Cordelia Fine’s book Delusions of Gender. Fine brings forth several published scientific studies on gender differences, and she systematically debunks them one by one. This research ...

  5. Gender Differences in the Formation of a Field of Study Choice Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigal Alon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Women now surpass men in overall rates of college graduation in many industrialized countries, but sex segregation in fields of study persists. In a world where gender norms have changed but gender stereotypes remain strong, we argue that men’s and women’s attitudes and orientations toward fields of study in college are less constrained by gendered institutions than is the ranking of these fields. Accordingly, the sex segregation in the broader choice set of majors considered by college applicants may be lower than the sex segregation in their first preference field of study selection. With unique data on the broader set of fields considered by applicants to elite Israeli universities, we find support for this theory. The factors that drive the gender gap in the choice of field of study, in particular labor market earnings, risk aversion, and the sex composition of fields, are weaker in the broad set of choices than in the first choice. The result is less segregation in considered majors than in the first choice and, more broadly, different gender patterns in the decision process for the set of considered majors and for the first choice. We consider the theoretical implications of these results.

  6. Does gender discrimination impact regular mammography screening? Findings from the race differences in screening mammography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Amy B; Kasl, Stanislav V; Jones, Beth A

    2008-03-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine if gender discrimination, conceptualized as a negative life stressor, is a deterrent to adherence to mammography screening guidelines. African American and white women (1451) aged 40-79 years who obtained an index screening mammogram at one of five urban hospitals in Connecticut between October 1996 and January 1998 were enrolled in this study. This logistic regression analysis includes the 1229 women who completed telephone interviews at baseline and follow-up (average 29.4 months later) and for whom the study outcome, nonadherence to age-specific mammography screening guidelines, was determined. Gender discrimination was measured as lifetime experience in seven possible situations. Gender discrimination, reported by nearly 38% of the study population, was significantly associated with nonadherence to mammography guidelines in women with annual family incomes of > or =$50,000 (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.33, 2.98) and did not differ across racial/ethnic group. Our findings suggest that gender discrimination can adversely influence regular mammography screening in some women. With nearly half of women nonadherent to screening mammography guidelines in this study and with decreasing mammography rates nationwide, it is important to address the complexity of nonadherence across subgroups of women. Life stressors, such as experiences of gender discrimination, may have considerable consequences, potentially influencing health prevention prioritization in women.

  7. Gender Differences in Children’s Language: A Meta-Analysis of Slovenian Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič-Umek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Child gender has been proved to affect toddlers’/children’s language development in several studies, but its effect was not found to be stable across different ages or various aspects of language ability. The effect of gender on toddler’s, children’s and adolescents’ language ability was examined in the present meta-analysis of ten Slovenian studies (nine cross-sectional studies and one longitudinal study. The ten studies were published between 2004 and 2016 and included a total of 3,657 toddlers, children and adolescents, aged from 8 months to 15 years. The language outcome measures refer to different aspects of language ability, including vocabulary, mean length of utterance, sentence complexity, language expression and comprehension, storytelling ability and metalinguistic awareness. Across the studies, language ability was assessed using different approaches and instruments, most of which were standardised on samples ofSlovenian speaking children. Based on the reported arithmetic means and standard deviations, the effect sizes of gender for each of the included studies were calculated, as well as the average effect size of gender across the different studies. The findings of the meta-analysis showed that the effect size of gender on toddlers’/children’s/adolescents’ language largely depended on their age and the aspect of language measured. The effect sizes increased with children’s increasing age. All significant effects proved to be in favour of girls. The findings were interpreted in relation to the characteristics of language development and social cultural factors that can contribute to gender differences in language ability.

  8. A Study on Gendered Portrayals in Children's Picture Books with Mathematical Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R. Ladd

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes sexism in children's picture books that incorporate mathematical problems and problem-solving into the plot to determine if children's earliest reading material is affecting the achievement gap between males and females in this subject area. The study focused not just on overall totals of male and female characters, but also analyzed which genders most often portrayed gender stereotyped behaviors and personality traits and which characters were most often shown with mathematical skills. The findings of the study show that there were twice as many male as female characters, and the math problem-solving was generally done by males in the majority of titles.

  9. [Gender identity disorders or andromimetic behaviour in a victim of incest--a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegza, Magdalena; Leksowska, Aleksandra; Pudlo, Robert; Badura-Brzoza, Karina; Matysiakiewicz, Jerzy; Gierlotka, Zbigniew; Gorczyca, Piotr W

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, it is becoming increasingly difficult to clearly classify the issues associated with the phenomenon of gender dysphoria due to the fact that one identifies oneself in the context of increasingly fluid categories of gender identity-- an intrinsic sense of being a woman or a man. The authors present a woman whose internal problems connected with her sexuality and incomplete identification with the role attributed to her gender originate from her family history. Long-lasting, traumatic experiences of incestuous abuse and violence on the part of close relatives disturbed her development in many areas of personality and functioning. The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis of the existence of gender identity disorder accompanied by depressive disorders. In addition to the medical history, the study of patient's problems included the following diagnostic tools: the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and the Rorschach Inkblot Test in a CSR Exner system (TPA). The study revealed that as for sexual identification, the patient unambiguously identifies herself as a woman. Her behaviour to become like a man does not deny her sex, or even involve a temporary need of belonging to the opposite sex. It should be interpreted in the broader context of her traumatic experiences, not just sexual, but also concerning different aspects of a female gender role.

  10. A Gendered Analysis of the Brahmaputra Dialogue : A study of the relation between transboundary water management and gender norms

    OpenAIRE

    Lexén, Tove

    2017-01-01

    Transboundary water management (TWM) regards how internationally shared waters are managed. Recently, TWM processes have been researched from the perspective of gender inclusivity. In line with this trend, this thesis is investigating to what extent the Transboundary Policy Dialogue for Improved Water Governance in Brahmaputra River (the Brahmaputra Dialogue) about the Brahmaputra River is gender sensitive. The Brahmaputra River is shared by China, India, Bhutan and Bangladesh. The management...

  11. Vital New Matters: The Speculative Turn in the Study of Religion and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Reid-Bowen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an introduction to a new trend in continental philosophy, the turn toward metaphysics, realism and speculative philosophy.  This stands in sharp contrast with the anitrealist and correlationist traditions that have held sway since Kant’s Copernican Revolution in 1781.  It is claimed that the study of religion and gender has been shaped by the antirealist legacy of Kant, but there are good reasons for taking account of the new ‘speculative turn’.  Two examples from the leading exponent of this turn, speculative realism, are introduced, and some provisional notes toward applying these to the gender-critical turn in the study of religion are considered.  Research notes on the current state of the Goddess movement serve as a test case for the introduction of an object-oriented ontology into religious and gender studies.

  12. Gender Prototype Representation in Media: Case Study of Hamshahri’s Events Page

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Sadat Moini Far

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides family and education system, media also affects on the socializing process. What media represent is mutually affected and affective with culture. However, there are some times when media’s effect on society is especially important. For example, people with restricted social interactions would spend more time watching TV; thus what they watch not only entertains, but also has educational effects on them, this is the same for journals with habitual readers. Reviewing Hamshahri’s events page, this study attempts to study social construction of gender prototypes. Applying gender role theory and theory of gender sociability, this study would offer a hybrid model. As results show, men are more inclined to commit a crime, and women are usually the object of crimes. The most sensible prototype is that men are represented as “aggressive and raper”, while women are the victims. Described prototypes are both descriptive and normative.

  13. "Knife before wife": an exploratory study of gender and the UK medical profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen; Clark, Donna

    2008-01-01

    The paper aims to explore the increasing feminisation of the medical profession and career progression of women in the medical profession. Furthermore, the paper explores the implications of gender segregation in the medical profession for health service provision. The paper presents an overview of studies in this area and draws upon primary, empirical research with medical practitioners and medical students. However, unlike most other studies the sample includes male and female participants. The research involved elite interviews and self-completion questionnaires in order to provide perspectives of both male and female medical practitioners and medical students. The findings are consistent with those of other studies; that gender discrimination and segregation is still prevalent in the medical profession. But there are significant differences in perceptions between the genders. Moreover, it is concluded that the gendered career structure and organisational culture of the health sector and medical profession create a role conflict between personal and professional lives. The current difficulties in reconciling this role conflict create barriers to the career progression of women in the medical profession. Further research in this area could include a longitudinal study of medical students and the impact of changes in the design of medical training and career structures to assess whether these changes enable female career progression in the medical profession. Further analysis is needed of gendered practices and career development in specific specialist areas, and the role of the medical profession, NHS and Royal Colleges should play in addressing gender and career progression in medicine. Gender segregation (vertical and horizontal) in the medical profession will have implications for the attraction, retention and increased shortages of practitioners in hospital and surgical specialities with the resultant economic and health provision inefficiencies. The paper

  14. Personality and the gender gap in self-employment: a multi-nation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obschonka, Martin; Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva; Terracciano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    What role does personality play in the pervasive gender gap in entrepreneurship across the globe? This two-study analysis focuses on self-employment in the working population and underlying gender differences in personality characteristics, thereby considering both single trait dimensions as well as a holistic, configural personality approach. Applying the five-factor model of personality, Study 1, our main study, investigates mediation models in the prediction of self-employment status utilizing self-reported personality data from large-scaled longitudinal datasets collected in the U.S., Germany, the U.K., and Australia (total N = 28,762). Study 2 analyzes (observer-rated) Big Five data collected in 51 cultures (total N = 12,156) to take a more global perspective and to explore the pancultural universality of gender differences in entrepreneurial personality characteristics. Across the four countries investigated in Study 1, none of the major five dimension of personality turned out as a consistent and robust mediator. In contrast, the holistic, configural approach yielded consistent and robust mediation results. Across the four countries, males scored higher on an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile, which in turn predicted self-employment status. These results suggest that gender differences in the intra-individual configuration of personality traits contribute to the gender gap in entrepreneurship across the globe. With the restriction of limited representativeness, the data from Study 2 suggest that the gender difference in the entrepreneurship-prone personality profile (males score higher) is widespread across many cultures, but may not exist in all. The results are discussed with an emphasis on implications for research and practice, which a particular focus on the need for more complex models that incorporate the role of personality.

  15. Personality and the Gender Gap in Self-Employment: A Multi-Nation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obschonka, Martin; Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva; Terracciano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    What role does personality play in the pervasive gender gap in entrepreneurship across the globe? This two-study analysis focuses on self-employment in the working population and underlying gender differences in personality characteristics, thereby considering both single trait dimensions as well as a holistic, configural personality approach. Applying the five-factor model of personality, Study 1, our main study, investigates mediation models in the prediction of self-employment status utilizing self-reported personality data from large-scaled longitudinal datasets collected in the U.S., Germany, the U.K., and Australia (total N = 28,762). Study 2 analyzes (observer-rated) Big Five data collected in 51 cultures (total N = 12,156) to take a more global perspective and to explore the pancultural universality of gender differences in entrepreneurial personality characteristics. Across the four countries investigated in Study 1, none of the major five dimension of personality turned out as a consistent and robust mediator. In contrast, the holistic, configural approach yielded consistent and robust mediation results. Across the four countries, males scored higher on an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile, which in turn predicted self-employment status. These results suggest that gender differences in the intra-individual configuration of personality traits contribute to the gender gap in entrepreneurship across the globe. With the restriction of limited representativeness, the data from Study 2 suggest that the gender difference in the entrepreneurship-prone personality profile (males score higher) is widespread across many cultures, but may not exist in all. The results are discussed with an emphasis on implications for research and practice, which a particular focus on the need for more complex models that incorporate the role of personality. PMID:25089706

  16. Gender stereotypes in occupational choice: a cross-sectional study on a group of Italian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaci, Tiziana; Pellerone, Monica; Ledda, Caterina; Presti, Giovambattista; Squatrito, Valeria; Rapisarda, Venerando

    2017-01-01

    Gender beliefs represent cultural schemas for interpreting or making sense of the social and employment world, as they can influence attitudes, career aspirations, and the vocational decision process of young people, especially the adolescence. This study examined the influence of gender stereotypes on the choice of career in adolescents. A group of 120 students were recruited to complete an ad hoc questionnaire, Scale of Perceived Occupational Self-Efficacy, and Semantic Differentials. The objectives of the study were to analyze the relationship between occupational self-efficacy and professional preference; to measure the influence of independent variables, such as age and gender, on the representation that students have of themselves and of the profession; and to identify the predictor variables of self-efficacy in the vocational decision. Data showed that the distance between professional identity and social identity increases with age. Results underline that males seem to perceive themselves more self-efficient in military, scientific-technological, and agrarian professions than females. Furthermore, the type of job performed by parents appears to be a self-efficacy predictor variable in the choice of professions in the services area. Individuals' perceived occupational self-efficacy, gender, age, and parents' profession have implications for exploratory behavior. The conditions that make gender differences salient are more likely to favor self-representations of the career and consistent assessments with these representations.

  17. Gender effects in alcohol dependence: an fMRI pilot study examining affective processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Claudia B; Anthenelli, Robert M; Eliassen, James C; Nelson, Erik; Lisdahl, Krista M

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) has global effects on brain structure and function, including frontolimbic regions regulating affective processing. Preliminary evidence suggests alcohol blunts limbic response to negative affective stimuli and increases activation to positive affective stimuli. Subtle gender differences are also evident during affective processing. Fourteen abstinent AD individuals (8 F, 6 M) and 14 healthy controls (9 F, 5 M), ages 23 to 60, were included in this facial affective processing functional magnetic resonance imaging pilot study. Whole-brain linear regression analyses were performed, and follow-up analyses examined whether AD status significantly predicted depressive symptoms and/or coping. Fearful Condition-The AD group demonstrated reduced activation in the right medial frontal gyrus, compared with controls. Gender moderated the effects of AD in bilateral inferior frontal gyri. Happy Condition-AD individuals had increased activation in the right thalamus. Gender moderated the effects of AD in the left caudate, right middle frontal gyrus, left paracentral lobule, and right lingual gyrus. Interactive AD and gender effects for fearful and happy faces were such that AD men activated more than control men, but AD women activated less than control women. Enhanced coping was associated with greater activation in right medial frontal gyrus during fearful condition in AD individuals. Abnormal affective processing in AD may be a marker of alcoholism risk or a consequence of chronic alcoholism. Subtle gender differences were observed, and gender moderated the effects of AD on neural substrates of affective processing. AD individuals with enhanced coping had brain activation patterns more similar to controls. Results help elucidate the effects of alcohol, gender, and their interaction on affective processing. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. Gender stereotypes in management: a comparative study of communist and postcommunist Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curşeu, Petru Lucian; Boroş, Smaranda

    2011-08-01

    This study sets out to investigate the changes in the perception of women in leading positions in communist and postcommunist Romania. The study uses a noninvasive paradigm of analyzing the content of obituaries for women and men in leading positions published in a national journal, and shows that the gender gap in management widened during the postcommunist period. In postcommunist Romania, women are perceived as being less able to lead/manage and more relational in their leadership style as compared to men, while in the communist period the gender differences were not significant.

  19. Innovative Solutions for Companies to Reduce Gender Gaps (UK Study Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei ANGHELUTA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years the gender gap has been a complex reality having economic implications and social decisiveness. No matter the percentage recently decreased, we still confront with social discriminations. In this paper we focused on the UK labour market so we developed a case study for a logistics company, using classification of the employees in different pay bands. Based on this study we created a state of the art human resource tool that can be applied worldwide and that help firms to analyse the root causes and to reduce the gender gap.

  20. Staff attitudes towards sexuality in relation to gender of people with intellectual disability: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rhea; Gore, Nick; McCarthy, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Research has found staff attitudes regarding the sexuality of people with intellectual disability (ID) to be negative but influenced by several factors. The current study aimed to examine whether gender of people with ID affects such attitudes. Semistructured interviews were completed with 10 staff members and analysed using thematic analysis. Results indicated 3 themes: Women are perceived as sexually innocent, men as more sexually motivated, and motivations for sexual relationships are perceived to differ between men and women with ID. The study indicates unfavourable attitudes towards sexuality in individuals with ID that correlate with traditional, restricted gender stereotypes. The identification of these themes highlights the importance of considering gender when supporting the sexuality of people with ID.

  1. Occupational Health and Role of Gender: A Study in Informal Sector Fisheries of Udupi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Pooja; Kamath, Ramachandra; Tiwari, Rajnarayan

    2017-01-01

    Fisherwomen are informal sector workers involved in post-harvest operations and are mostly engaged in peeling, trading, and processing of fish. High degree of wage disparity and gender inequalities results in different socioeconomic status of fisherwomen and fishermen. This study aimed to identify gender issues and their effect on the health status of fisherwomen. The present cross-sectional included 171 fishermen and fisherwomen. Interview technique was used to collect information using a predesigned proforma. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 15.0. Fifty-five percent of the participants complained of work-related health problems. A total of 63.9% of women had occupational health problems compared to 48.5% of the men ( P workplace. A total of 53.8% were paid on piece-rate basis. This study identified many occupational and gender issues in the informal sector.

  2. Social Competence, Cultural Orientations and Gender Differences: A Study of Mandarin-English Bilingual Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yonggang; Wyver, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether host and heritage cultural orientations were associated with Chinese preschoolers' social competence and whether such associations varied across gender in Western contexts. Ninety-six Chinese-Australian children aged 36-69 months from 15 childcare centres in Sydney participated in the study. The General Ethnicity…

  3. The Role of Women's/Gender Studies in the Changing Lives of British Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Gill; Whitelegg, Liz; Rowbotham, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the role played by part-time Women's/Gender Studies (WGS) courses in women's lives in the UK through interviews with 35 women who were among 8000 students who studied one of the UK Open University's undergraduate interdisciplinary WGS courses between 1983 and 1999. A thematic analysis of these interviews shows how these mainly…

  4. "Pink Is a Girl's Color": A Case Study of Bilingual Kindergarteners' Discussions about Gender Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Jung

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of an empirical study that examined young bilingual students' discussions of picture books dealing with gender themes in a Spanish/English bilingual classroom. The study focused on the reading of five picture books by sixteen 5-year-old Mexican-origin children at a small charter school. The data were collected by…

  5. Assessing the Utility of Diagnostic Criteria: A Multisite Study on Gender Identity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, M.C.S.; Kreukels, B.P.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Richter-Appelt, H.; De Cuypere, G.; Haraldsen, I.R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies involving patients with gender identity disorder (GID) are inconsistent with regard to outcomes and often difficult to compare because of the vague descriptions of the diagnostic process. A multisite study is needed to scrutinize the utility and generality of different aspects of the

  6. Assessing the utility of diagnostic criteria: a multi-site study on gender identity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, Muirne; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy; Richter-Appelt, Hertha; De Cuypere, Griet; Haraldsen, Ira R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Studies involving patients with gender identity disorder (GID) are inconsistent with regard to outcomes and often difficult to compare because of the vague descriptions of the diagnostic process. A multisite study is needed to scrutinize the utility and generality of different aspects

  7. Mapping Women's and Gender Studies in the Academic Field in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Milica Antic

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to map the development of women's and gender studies (WGS) in the academic field in Slovenia. Slovenia is the first of the former Yugoslav state republics in which WGS have succeeded in entering the academic field and becoming part of institutionalised university study. In this paper we will ask the following…

  8. Childhood Gender-Typed Behavior and Adolescent Sexual Orientation: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gu; Kung, Karson T. F.; Hines, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Lesbian and gay individuals have been reported to show more interest in other-sex, and/or less interest in same-sex, toys, playmates, and activities in childhood than heterosexual counterparts. Yet, most of the relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies or from prospective studies of clinically referred, extremely gender nonconforming…

  9. Intra-gender subjugation among women in Nigeria: a study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intra-gender subjugation among women in Nigeria: a study of Stephanie Okere's Dry. ... Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies ... However, the oppression of the woman has not been totally a man's affair as history has shown that women also undergo oppression and subjugation in the hands of fellow ...

  10. Gender Ratio and Cognitive Profiles in Dyslexia: A Cross-National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Juan E.; de la Cadena, Claudia Garcia; Siegel, Linda S.; O'Shanahan, Isabel; Garcia, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze possible gender-related differences in the prevalence of dyslexia. A cross-national comparison of Spain and Guatemala was conducted. Both countries speak the same language but have a different standard of living and educational level. A second purpose of this study was to analyze the cognitive profile of…

  11. Gendered Migration and the Urban Informal Sector: A Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined gendered migration patterns in Mwanza City, Tanzania as well as the impacts of differentials of men's and women's migration on their absorption in the urban informal sector, their access to assets, adaptation to city life and their livelihood and also their role in development of origin areas. The study ...

  12. Gender Stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellemers, Naomi

    2018-01-04

    There are many differences between men and women. To some extent, these are captured in the stereotypical images of these groups. Stereotypes about the way men and women think and behave are widely shared, suggesting a kernel of truth. However, stereotypical expectations not only reflect existing differences, but also impact the way men and women define themselves and are treated by others. This article reviews evidence on the nature and content of gender stereotypes and considers how these relate to gender differences in important life outcomes. Empirical studies show that gender stereotypes affect the way people attend to, interpret, and remember information about themselves and others. Considering the cognitive and motivational functions of gender stereotypes helps us understand their impact on implicit beliefs and communications about men and women. Knowledge of the literature on this subject can benefit the fair judgment of individuals in situations where gender stereotypes are likely to play a role.

  13. A Study of Gender Differences in the Attitude of Mathematically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study is to investigate the differences in the attitude of boys and girls who are mathematically gifted or mathematically non-gifted in the Nigerian senior secondary schools. The population for the study was made up Senior Secondary Three students (SS3) of a school in Osun State. The study sample was made ...

  14. Gendered transitions to adulthood by college field of study in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqi Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Field of study may influence the timing of transitions to the labor market, marriage, and parenthood among college graduates. Research to date has yet to study how field of study is associated with the interweaving of these transitions in the USA. Objective: The current study examines gendered influences of college field of study on transitions to a series of adult roles, including full-time work, marriage, and parenthood. Methods: We use Cox proportional hazards models and multinomial logistic regression to examine gendered associations between field of study and the three transitions among college graduates of the NLSY97 (National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohort. Results: Men majoring in STEM achieve early transitions to full-time work, marriage, and parenthood; women majoring in STEM show no significant advantage in finding full-time work and delayed marriage and childbearing; women in business have earlier transitions to full-time work and marriage than women in other fields, demonstrating an advantage similar to that of men in STEM. Conclusions: The contrast between men and women in STEM shows that transition to adulthood remains gendered; the contrast between women in STEM and women in business illustrates that a prestigious career may not necessarily delay family formation. Contribution: The paper shows how stratification by field of study creates gendered demographic outcomes for college graduates. It also demonstrates that women's decisions regarding marriage and parenthood do not uniformly respond to the economic prospect of their work.

  15. Sex differences in face gender recognition: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueting; Gao, Xiaochao; Han, Shihui

    2010-04-23

    Multiple level neurocognitive processes are involved in face processing in humans. The present study examined whether the early face processing such as structural encoding is modulated by task demands that manipulate attention to perceptual or social features of faces and such an effect, if any, is different between men and women. Event-related brain potentials were recorded from male and female adults while they identified a low-level perceptual feature of faces (i.e., face orientation) and a high-level social feature of faces (i.e., gender). We found that task demands that required the processing of face orientations or face gender resulted in modulations of both the early occipital/temporal negativity (N170) and the late central/parietal positivity (P3). The N170 amplitude was smaller in the gender relative to the orientation identification task whereas the P3 amplitude was larger in the gender identification task relative to the orientation identification task. In addition, these effects were much stronger in women than in men. Our findings suggest that attention to social information in faces such as gender modulates both the early encoding of facial structures and late evaluative process of faces to a greater degree in women than in men.

  16. Advancing gender equality to improve HIV prevention: A study of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannell, Jenevieve

    2016-12-01

    Addressing gender inequality as a social driver of HIV risk and vulnerability has become a key activity of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in South Africa. This paper sheds light on the environmental factors that influence gender and HIV activities in this context. A multisite ethnographic study including 150 hours of participant observation and 32 in-depth interviews was conducted with 26 NGOs carrying out gender and HIV prevention interventions. Using thematic network analysis, 108 different intervention activities were identified, categorised and further analysed to explore environmental factors that influence the design and delivery of these activities. The findings highlight how practitioners draw on different theories of change about how to address the gender inequalities that contribute to HIV risk and vulnerability, which in turn influence the way interventions are delivered. Despite these theoretical differences, commonalities arise in practitioners' use of popular narratives about the right to health and lived experiences of AIDS to ensure interventions are contextually relevant and to gain buy-in from participants. Other environmental factors influencing intervention activities include the role that insecure funding for gender plays in undermining the capacity of practitioners to design interventions based on their local knowledge and experience by forcing NGOs to adapt to the priorities of international donors.

  17. An Study on the Relationship Between Gender Believes and Family Function of Kourd and Fars Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    صدیقه خانی مجد

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to study comparatively the relationship between gender beliefs and the family function of Kurdish and Fars students. Correlational research method was employed in order to examine the relationship between variables. 200 students from each ethnicity (100 male 100 female and in total 400 students were selected from university of Kermanshah and Shahid beheshti University based on convenience sampling. Respondents completed Bem Sex Roles Inventory (Bem, 1974 and Family Assessment Device (Epstein, Bishop, Baldwin, 1983. Mean of scores for family function subscales and gender roles were computed and compared for independent samples. Also Pearson Correlation Coefficient between family function components and gender beliefs were measured. Findings revealed that there was not any signifycant relationship between gender roles’ beliefs and family function in Fars students. In Kourd students, significant relationship between androgynous belief and problem solving factor was found. Also we obtained significant relationship between the absolutely feminine belief and problem solving, affective involvement, affective responsiveness, behavior control, and family general function. Comparison of the family function of Kurdish with Fars indicated significant differences between groups in affective involvement factor. Based on the obtained findings, it can be concluded that national and cultural elements are effective elements that can impact the relationship between gender believes and family function. It also can be imagined that Kourds and Fars families are different in affective involvement criterion between their members and showing their interests and sentiments to the other members of the family.

  18. Gender differences in natural language factors of subjective intoxication in college students: an experimental vignette study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Ash; Schlauch, Robert C; Bartholow, Bruce D; Sher, Kenneth J

    2013-12-01

    Examining the natural language college students use to describe various levels of intoxication can provide important insight into subjective perceptions of college alcohol use. Previous research (Levitt et al., Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2009; 33: 448) has shown that intoxication terms reflect moderate and heavy levels of intoxication and that self-use of these terms differs by gender among college students. However, it is still unknown whether these terms similarly apply to other individuals and, if so, whether similar gender differences exist. To address these issues, the current study examined the application of intoxication terms to characters in experimentally manipulated vignettes of naturalistic drinking situations within a sample of university undergraduates (n = 145). Findings supported and extended previous research by showing that other-directed applications of intoxication terms are similar to self-directed applications and depend on the gender of both the target and the user. Specifically, moderate intoxication terms were applied to and from women more than men, even when the character was heavily intoxicated, whereas heavy intoxication terms were applied to and from men more than women. The findings suggest that gender differences in the application of intoxication terms are other-directed as well as self-directed and that intoxication language can inform gender-specific prevention and intervention efforts targeting problematic alcohol use among college students. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  19. Gender and psychiatric diagnosis: a 5-year retrospective study in a Nigerian Federal Medical Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbir, T M; Oyigeya, M; Audu, M; Dapap, D D; Goar, S G

    2010-01-01

    The role of gender in psychiatry disorders is becoming increasingly important. This study is therefore, aimed at identifying gender pattern of admissions to a public mental health centre with regards to demographic characteristic, psychiatry diagnosis and length of stay on admission. In this retrospective study Hospital records of 388 patients admitted at the psychiatric section of the Federal Medical Centre (FMC) Makurdi, between January, 2004 and December, 2008 were studied for gender differences regarding demographic attributes, length of stay and psychiatry diagnoses. Findings revealed that more men than women were admitted overall. Most men (56%) were less than 30 years old whereas 60.6% of women were within 30-59 years aged bracket. For men the main diagnosis was schizophrenia (30.5%), followed by substance related disorders (16.5%) then depression (14.0%); for women the main diagnosis was also schizophrenia (30.3%), this was followed by depression (24.5%), only one woman was diagnosed with substance related disorder. A statistically significant association was also found between having a personality disorder and being a male (p = 0.009). Most female were single and belong to the lowest occupational group. There was no significant difference in the gender distribution of patients with respect to length of stay on admission (p = 0.161). The results revealed how psychiatry diagnosis is significantly influence by gender issues. We therefore recommend that; for a more effective psychiatry formulation, it is imperative to pay attention to gender issues that may affect the development of psychopathology.

  20. Tracking the Gender Pay Gap: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Cheryl B.; Gross, Louis J.; Johnson, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a short introduction to standard considerations in the formal study of wages and illustrates the use of multiple regression and resampling simulation approaches in a case study of faculty salaries at one university. Multiple regression is especially beneficial where it provides information on strength of association, specific…

  1. A Danish study of gender difference in scientific productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Dorte

    Several studies have shown that female researchers have a lower publication productivity and research performance, however a recent published study based on 852 researchers publication data from 2003-2005 (van Arensbergen et al. 2012) found that the performance difference has leveled out...... for the younger generation of researchers (196 men and 160 women) in the social sciences. The aim of this study is to investigate to what extend a similar tendency can be found among young female researchers in Denmark. Publication performance, in this study, is defined as the number of publications......), the present study shows that differences in publication performance between male and female researchers exist in Denmark. We find that when we compare research productivity among researchers in similar academic positions and in similar research areas, the male researchers still outperform their female...

  2. Gender inequities in health: an exploratory qualitative study of Saudi women's perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaemni, Asmaa; Theobald, Sally; Faragher, Brian; Jehan, Kate; Tolhurst, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore Saudi Arabian women's perceptions of how gendered social structures affect their health by understanding their perceptions of these influences on their health relative to those on men's health. Qualitative methods, including focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth individual interviews (IDIs) were conducted with 66 married women in Riyadh, the capital city. Participants were purposively sampled for maximum variation, including consideration of socio-economic status, age, educational level, health status and the use of healthcare. The majority of women perceived their health to be worse than men's and attributed this to their childbearing, domestic and care-giving roles, restrictions on their mobility, poverty and psychological stress related to their responsibilities for children, and marital conflict. A minority of participants felt that men's health was worse than women's and related this to their gendered roles as "breadwinners," greater mobility and masculine norms and identities. Gender equity should be a health policy priority to improve women's health.

  3. Gender imbalance in infant mortality: a cross-national study of social structure and female infanticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Kana; Crenshaw, Edward M

    2006-01-01

    Sex differentials in infant mortality vary widely across nations. Because newborn girls are biologically advantaged in surviving to their first birthday, sex differentials in infant mortality typically arise from genetic factors that result in higher male infant mortality rates. Nonetheless, there are cases where mortality differentials arise from social or behavioral factors reflecting deliberate discrimination by adults in favor of boys over girls, resulting in atypical male to female infant mortality ratios. This cross-national study of 93 developed and developing countries uses such macro-social theories as modernization theory, gender perspectives, human ecology, and sociobiology/evolutionary psychology to predict gender differentials in infant mortality. We find strong evidence for modernization theory, human ecology, and the evolutionary psychology of group process, but mixed evidence for gender perspectives.

  4. Sedentary risk factors across genders and job roles within a university campus workplace: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether sedentary job role and gender are reflected by sedentary risk factors within a university campus. Following institutional ethical approval, 80 U.K. university campus employees were recruited, and 34 of them (age 47.8 ± 11.9 years, height 169 ± 1.0 cm, body mass 72.0 ± 14.1 kg) were measured for their systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), blood glucose (Glu), total serum blood cholesterol (Cho), dominant (DHG) and nondominant handgrip strength (NHG), body fat percentage (Fat%), trunk flexibility (Flex), peak cardiorespiratory capacity (V.O2max), and answered a physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ). The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA with job role and gender as independent factors, and each measured risk as a dependent factor. Gender had significant effects (pworkplace.

  5. Work, Gender and Public Policies: A Women's Experience Study on Polo Naval of Rio Grande

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Socoowski de Anello e Silva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is the product of reflections from the dissertation project on gender and employment. The aim of this study is to examine in what way the occupation of jobs generated in the Polo Naval of Rio Grande-RS by women. For to understand this hiring dynamics, the starting point is the conceptualization of the categories work and gender in social and legal perspectives to arrive in the discussion of public policies guided by these categories. The following will be describe the scenario that will give factual support for empirical research with the partial discussion of the data already collected.

  6. International Journal of Language, Literature and Gender Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    The study sought to determine errors made by students undergoing the ... subject throughout primary and secondary school and a medium of classroom ... Nigerian universities lack the requisite competence and communicative skills and in.

  7. Gendered transitions to adulthood by college field of study in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Siqi Han; Dmitry Tumin; Zhenchao Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Field of study may influence the timing of transitions to the labor market, marriage, and parenthood among college graduates. Research to date has yet to study how field of study is associated with the interweaving of these transitions in the USA. Objective: The current study examines gendered influences of college field of study on transitions to a series of adult roles, including full-time work, marriage, and parenthood. Methods: We use Cox proportional hazards models and ...

  8. Medical students' perceptions in relation to ethnicity and gender: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seale Clive

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The British medical student population has undergone rapid diversification over the last decades. This study focuses on medical students' views about their experiences in relation to ethnicity and gender during their undergraduate training within the context of the hidden curriculum in one British medical school as part of a wider qualitative research project into undergraduate medical education. Method We interviewed 36 undergraduate medical students in one British Medical School, across all five years of training using a semi-structured interview schedule. We selected them by random and quota sampling, stratified by sex and ethnicity and used the whole medical school population as a sampling frame. Data analyses involved the identification of common themes, reported by means of illustrative quotations and simple counts. Results The students provided information about variations patterned by gender in their motivation and influences when deciding to study medicine. Issues in relation to ethnicity were: gaining independence from parents, perceived limitations to career prospects, incompatibility of some religious beliefs with some medical practices and acquired open-mindedness towards students and patients from different ethnic backgrounds. Despite claiming no experiences of gender difference during medical training, female and male students expressed gender stereotypes, e.g. that women bring particularly caring and sympathetic attitudes to medicine, or that surgery requires the physical strength and competitiveness stereotypically associated with men that are likely to support the continuation of gender differentiation in medical careers. Conclusion The key themes identified in this paper in relation to ethnicity and to gender have important implications for medical educators and for those concerned with professional development. The results suggest a need to open up aspects of these relatively covert elements of student

  9. Medical students' perceptions in relation to ethnicity and gender: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempp, Heidi; Seale, Clive

    2006-03-08

    The British medical student population has undergone rapid diversification over the last decades. This study focuses on medical students' views about their experiences in relation to ethnicity and gender during their undergraduate training within the context of the hidden curriculum in one British medical school as part of a wider qualitative research project into undergraduate medical education. We interviewed 36 undergraduate medical students in one British Medical School, across all five years of training using a semi-structured interview schedule. We selected them by random and quota sampling, stratified by sex and ethnicity and used the whole medical school population as a sampling frame. Data analyses involved the identification of common themes, reported by means of illustrative quotations and simple counts. The students provided information about variations patterned by gender in their motivation and influences when deciding to study medicine. Issues in relation to ethnicity were: gaining independence from parents, perceived limitations to career prospects, incompatibility of some religious beliefs with some medical practices and acquired open-mindedness towards students and patients from different ethnic backgrounds. Despite claiming no experiences of gender difference during medical training, female and male students expressed gender stereotypes, e.g. that women bring particularly caring and sympathetic attitudes to medicine, or that surgery requires the physical strength and competitiveness stereotypically associated with men that are likely to support the continuation of gender differentiation in medical careers. The key themes identified in this paper in relation to ethnicity and to gender have important implications for medical educators and for those concerned with professional development. The results suggest a need to open up aspects of these relatively covert elements of student culture to scrutiny and debate and to take an explicitly wider view

  10. Gender stereotypes in occupational choice: a cross-sectional study on a group of Italian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaci T

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tiziana Ramaci,1 Monica Pellerone,1 Caterina Ledda,2 Giovambattista Presti,1 Valeria Squatrito,1 Venerando Rapisarda2 1Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, “Kore” University of Enna, Enna, 2Occupational Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy Background: Gender beliefs represent cultural schemas for interpreting or making sense of the social and employment world, as they can influence attitudes, career aspirations, and the vocational decision process of young people, especially the adolescence.Materials and methods: This study examined the influence of gender stereotypes on the choice of career in adolescents. A group of 120 students were recruited to complete an ad hoc questionnaire, Scale of Perceived Occupational Self-Efficacy, and Semantic Differentials. The objectives of the study were to analyze the relationship between occupational self-efficacy and professional preference; to measure the influence of independent variables, such as age and gender, on the representation that students have of themselves and of the profession; and to identify the predictor variables of self-efficacy in the vocational decision.Results: Data showed that the distance between professional identity and social identity increases with age. Results underline that males seem to perceive themselves more self-efficient in military, scientific–technological, and agrarian professions than females. Furthermore, the type of job performed by parents appears to be a self-efficacy predictor variable in the choice of professions in the services area.Conclusion: Individuals’ perceived occupational self-efficacy, gender, age, and parents’ profession have implications for exploratory behavior. The conditions that make gender differences salient are more likely to favor self-representations of the career and consistent assessments with these representations. Keywords: adolescent, gender stereotypes, occupational

  11. KETIDAKADILAN GENDER DALAM PEMBANGUNAN PERTANIAN : STUDI PANDANGAN POLITIK PEREMPUAN ANGGOTA LEGISLATIF DI KABUPATEN KUDUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Yuliani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini ingin mengidentifikasi bentuk-bentuk kesenjangan gender dalam pembangunan pertaniandi Kabupaten Kudus serta seberapa jauh pandangan politik perempaun anggota legislatif di Kudus menjangkau pembangunan di bidang pertanian. Penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan studi kasusdan fenomenologis. Penelitian ini menyimpulkan bahwa dalam pengambil keputusan, tidak ada kebijakankhusus untuk perempuan, tetapi arah kebijakan menujukesetaraan gender di mana perempuan sudah mulai terlibat aktif dalam gabungan kelompok tani tetapijumlah perempuan yang diakses teknologi baru ataumodal pertanian dari pemerintah dan wanita yangmengelola pertanian, masih kurang dari laki-laki. Dalammenyikapi hal ini legislator perempuan menyatakan perlunya pendidikan khusus sesuai dengan potensi petani lingkungan perempuan, sehingga mereka memiliki rasa kepercayaan diri dan mendapatkan posisi tawar yanglebih baik. Kata kunci: Perempuan legislator; kesenjangan gender;pertanian   This article investigates the women legislator facing  gender gap in faming developmen in Kudus Central Java. This reasearch used a case study and phenomenological approach. The congclution of this article are women farm workers are always behind the men in terms oftecnological access. In the level of decicion maker, thereis no specific policy for women, but the policy directionis towards the gender equality where women have startedto be involved actively in the Joint Group of Farmers butthe number of women that accessed new technologiesor farming capital from government and women whomanage agricultural, still less than male. In addressingthis matter of women legislators expressed the needfor special education in accordance with the potentialof neighborhood women farmers, empowering womenthrough cooperatives and recitation, and revitalize thePKK as a means of distributing information, so they havemore capability, resulting sense of confidence and gain a better bargaining position. Keywords

  12. Gender and Campus Violence: A Study of University of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is an attempt to investigate the incidence of violence among university students using University of Lagos as a case study. A questionnaire on different kinds of violence was administered to 446 students of the university. In addition, four focus group discussion sessions were conducted to assess the types of ...

  13. International Journal of Language, Literature and Gender Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    2016-10-12

    Oct 12, 2016 ... The problem this study focuses on the simple and progressive aspect. ... denotes definite past time i.e. 'What took place at a given time or in a give place ... other verbs are in the v+o form i.e. the non-third person singular form.

  14. Racing risk, gendering responsibility: a qualitative study of how ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Individuals' perceptions of risk have implications for whether and how they engage with protective strategies. This study investigated how sexual risk, specifically HIV and pregnancy and responsibility for these risks were constructed in discussions across five groups of youth in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The qualitative ...

  15. Do ELT Coursebooks Still Suffer from Gender Inequalities? A Case Study from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demira, Yusuf; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Gender discrimination is still a hot debate running in the periphery of education. One way it is imposed on students is through printed materials and coursebooks, particularly those used for foreign language teaching given their rich linguistic content and content-based nature. This paper reports on a study which investigated gender…

  16. An Empirical Study of Gender Gap in Children Schooling in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Empirical Study of Gender Gap in Children Schooling in Nigeria. Olanrewaju Olaniyan. Abstract. African Journal of Economic Policy Vol10(1) 2003: 117-131. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajep.v10i1.24245 · AJOL African ...

  17. Gender, Confinement, and Freedom: Team Teaching Introduction to Women's Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Heidi M.; Dewitt, Amy L.; Brasher, Sally M.

    2016-01-01

    In 1993, writing about their years of feminist collaboration, Carey Kaplan and Ellen Cronan Rose explained that while they sometimes found such endeavors challenging, ultimately they were "exhilarating, consoling, and precious" (559). In the years since then, those working in women and gender studies have continued to advocate for…

  18. Teaching Gender Studies via Open and Distance Learning in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jessica; Byrne, Deirdre; Koenig-Visagie, Leandra

    2013-01-01

    The University of South Africa (UNISA) has recently redesigned its honors degree in Gender Studies. The course design team members have been mindful of three key factors while redesigning this degree. First, we are aligning our course design with the demands of open and distance learning (ODL) and UNISA's institutional move to online delivery of…

  19. Paradox of Student Gender: A Case Study of Economic Education from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Qiao, Fangbin; Li, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    In many Chinese universities and colleges, female students outperform male students in social science subjects. This paper presents a case study, which examines gender difference in economic education in a Chinese university. We look at a sample of students from the Chinese university and find that holding constant observed student…

  20. The Intersection of Dominican Values and Women's and Gender Studies Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Tara M.

    2016-01-01

    The missions of Women's and Gender Studies programs coincide directly with Dominican values in their commitments to fostering compassion and justice. Just as Dominican clergy during the civil rights movement challenged false notions of biological, cultural, and social difference that contributed to racist practices, Dominican educators today…

  1. The Legacy and Impact of Open University Women's/Gender Studies: 30 Years On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Gill; Whitelegg, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In 1983, the UK Open University (OU) offered its first women's/gender studies (WGS) course. Although a late entrant to the area, OU WGS courses were influential nationally and internationally for many feminists and WGS teachers and scholars. Not only did OU WGS courses have the largest WGS student cohort of any UK institution with over 8000…

  2. University Transitions and Gender: From Choice of Studies to Academic Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Alícia; Hernàndez, Francesc Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Based on the results of the authors' research using a case study of a Spanish university, the sociological component of gender is an important factor in building transitions at university. When the authors refer to university transitions they are talking about two periods. Firstly, they refer to the transition of undergraduate students from upper…

  3. Leadership Effectiveness of University Deans in Lebanon and Egypt: A Study of Gender and Leadership Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhourani, Lina G.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that women managers in the United States were considered more effective when they were rated higher than men in factors related to transformational leadership. Given that culture and a woman's position within a culture are different in the Middle East, this study was designed to examine the impact of gender on the effectiveness…

  4. Musicians Crossing Musical Instrument Gender Stereotypes: A Study of Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Harold F.; Hafeli, Mary; Sears, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined computer-mediated communication (CMC) -- blogs and responses to YouTube postings -- to better understand how CMCs reflect adolescents' attitudes towards musicians playing instruments that cross gender stereotypes. Employing purposive sampling, we used specific search terms, such as "girl drummer", to identify a…

  5. Gender Differences in Factors Related to Parenting Styles: A Study of High Performing Science Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Carol; Lewko, John H.

    1994-01-01

    Examined parenting styles within families of high performing science students and explored gender differences in the factors associated with authoritative parenting style. Found that the authoritative parenting style was predominant among study participants and that a greater number of family-related variables emerge for females, whereas more…

  6. Peripheral arterial disease, gender, and depression in the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grenon, S. Marlene; Cohen, Beth E.; Smolderen, Kim; Vittinghoff, Eric; Whooley, Mary A.; Hiramoto, Jade

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in women, risk factors for PAD in women are not well understood. Methods Gender-specific risk factors for PAD were examined in a prospective cohort study of 1024 patients (184 women and 840 men) with stable coronary artery

  7. Immigrant Status, Gender, and School Burnout in Finnish Lower Secondary School Students: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Read, Sanna; Minkkinen, Jaana; Kinnunen, Jaana M.; Rimpelä, Arja

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study among 9223 students from grade 7 and grade 9 (age 13-14 and 15-16) was to assess whether immigrant status and gender are associated with the level and change (slope) in school burnout among lower secondary school students in the Helsinki metropolitan area. Ninety-seven percent of the variation in school burnout…

  8. Gender Differences in the Development of Dieting from Adolescence to Early Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Soest, Tilmann; Wichstrom, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in the development of dieting among a representative sample of 1,368 Norwegian boys and girls. The respondents were followed over 3 time points from ages 13/14 to 20/21. Latent growth curve analyses were conducted showing that girls' dieting scores increased while boys' scores remained constant. Gender…

  9. Sustainable Student Retention and Gender Issues in Mathematics for ICT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divjak, Blazenka; Ostroski, Mirela; Hains, Violeta Vidacek

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the research whose specific objective is to improve student retention in mathematics included in the first-year ICT study programme by means of improving teaching methods, with an emphasis on gender issues. Two principal reasons for this research are, first, the fact that first-year mathematics courses are often viewed as…

  10. Gender studies and Equal Opportunity: the Interdepartmental Observatory of the university of Salerno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Tortora

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper wants to retrace the path of the Gender Studies and Equal Opportunity Observatory, founded at University of Salerno (OGEPO in 2011, and the projects realised up to now through  scientifical and cultural initiatives with an inter-disciplinary approach.

  11. Gender composition of college graduates by field of study and early fertility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bičáková, Alena; Jurajda, Štěpán

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2017), s. 1323-1343 ISSN 1569-5239 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G130 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : field-of-study gender segregation * college graduates * fertility Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics , Econometrics Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2016

  12. Gender composition of college graduates by field of study and early fertility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bičáková, Alena; Jurajda, Štěpán

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2017), s. 1323-1343 ISSN 1569-5239 Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : field-of-study gender segregation * college graduates * fertility Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics , Econometrics Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2016

  13. The Energy-Gender Nexus: A Case Study among Urban and Peri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in Southern Ethiopia with the objective of investigating the linkages between energy and gender among urban female-headed households (FHHs) residing both in and surrounding parts of Arba-Minch Town. The research design is mainly based on the quantitative methods and complemented with ...

  14. Perceiving Age and Gender in Unfamiliar Faces: An fMRI Study on Face Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Holger; Kloth, Nadine; Gullmar, Daniel; Reichenbach, Jurgen R.; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient processing of unfamiliar faces typically involves their categorization (e.g., into old vs. young or male vs. female). However, age and gender categorization may pose different perceptual demands. In the present study, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the activity evoked during age vs. gender…

  15. Gender Differences in the Field of Information Security Technology Management: A Qualitative, Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marcia L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored why there are so few senior women in the information security technology management field and whether gender played a part in the achievement of women in the field. Extensive interviews were performed to capture the lived experiences of successful women in the field regarding the obstacles and common denominators of…

  16. Effect of Partner's Gender on Early Pretend Play: A Preliminary Study of Singapore Chinese Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Mengguo; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the developmental trend of pretend play behaviour and the effect of partner's gender in Singaporean preschoolers. Peer dyadic play among 70 children, ranging in age from three to five years, was observed in a standardised toy play context. Videotaped recordings of the play were analysed using two scales--the Smilansky Scale for…

  17. Gender, Parental Beliefs and Children's Mathematics Performance: Insights from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Colin

    2014-01-01

    With reports of declining participation in mathematics related careers and low female participation rates, the issue of gender differences in mathematics remains relevant. This study seeks to examine the relationship between: children's sex, parents' beliefs regarding their children's education, and, the children's mathematics performance. Through…

  18. Serendipity? Are There Gender Differences in the Adoption of Computers? A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon-Gerstenfeld, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a study about the effect of learning styles of patent examiners on adoption of computers. Subjects' amount of computer use was a function of learning style, age, comfort after training, and gender. Findings indicate that women showed a greater propensity to adopt than men. Discusses implications for further research. (JS)

  19. Muscle Dysmorphia, Gender Role Stress, and Sociocultural Influences: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readdy, Tucker; Watkins, Patti Lou; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2011-01-01

    Our study explored the contribution of gender role stress (GRS) and sociocultural appearance demands to symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD) in a college sample of 219 women and 154 men. For women, five GRS subscales, sociocultural appearance demands, age, and frequency of aerobic exercise predicted MD symptoms (model R[superscript 2] = 0.33;…

  20. Gender Equality in Media Content and Operations: Articulating Academic Studies and Policy--A Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Mirta Edith

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Mirta Lourenço explains the prospects when higher education studies interface with UNESCO for policy change. The baseline is that education institutions' articulation with media organizations, media professionals, policy-makers, and civil society groups is essential to achieve gender equality in and through media.

  1. Gender and smoking-related risk of lung cancer. The Copenhagen Center for Prospective Population Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Osler, M; Hein, H O

    1998-01-01

    Our aim was to compare risk of lung cancer associated with smoking by gender and histologic type. A total of 30,874 subjects, 44% women, from three prospective population-based studies with initial examinations between 1964 and 1992 were followed until 1994 through the National Cancer Registry...

  2. Gender roles in the tomato value chain: a case study of Kilolo district ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In both study areas the identified actors were input suppliers, producers, transporters, coolies, brokers, traders and consumers. Box/crate/tenga makers were identified in Kilolo District but not in Dodoma Municipality. Different gender categories like youth, middle and old aged people of both sexes play different roles in the ...

  3. The impact of gender, culture, and sexuality on Mauritian nursing: Nursing as a non-gendered occupational identity or masculine field? Qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollup, Oddvar

    2014-05-01

    International studies have generally defined nursing as a female-dominated occupation. The almost absence of male nurses seems universal, except as a privileged minority occupying positions within nursing specialties ('islands of masculinity'). Nursing is associated with relatively low status owing to gender and income, and is also influenced by cultural perceptions of social status, the nature of the work and sexuality. This study aims to describe and analyse how gender and cultural perceptions influenced the development of nursing in Mauritius. This paper examines why nursing in Mauritius became gendered in different ways due to the impact of gender equivalence in the work force, the gendered segregation in clinical practice and the absence of caring feminisation in nursing. This qualitative study is based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews and convenience sampling. The sample includes nurses working at five hospitals. They all come from the central and southern part of Mauritius. The data were collected over a five-month period during 2006. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 nurses, both men (27) and women (20), of different grades, ages, religions and ethnic backgrounds. Nursing practice is gender segregated, influenced and supported by cultural traditions and perceptions of gender relations, sexuality and touch in nursing. However, the professional identity and role is considered non-gendered, implied by the title of 'nursing officer' and the presence of male nurses who constitute almost 50 percent of the work force. Male nurses do not face similar barriers deterring them from entering nursing profession. Nursing did not develop the image of women's work and a low status job in Mauritius. The nursing profession in Mauritius has been shaped by a different 'history of origin', social, cultural and societal conditions on the basis of the absence of gender imbalance in the work force and caring feminisation in nursing. Moreover, the

  4. Nina Degele: Gender/Queer Studies. München: UTB Fink 2008. — Franziska Schößler: Einführung in die Gender Studies. Berlin: Akademie Verlag 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Kahlert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nina Degele und Franziska Schößler treiben mit ihren Einführungsbüchern in die Gender Studies beziehungsweise in die Gender/Queer Studies die Disziplinierung dieser neuen Wissensfelder voran. Ausgehend von ihren jeweiligen Herkunftsdisziplinen (Soziologie und Literaturwissenschaft legen sie übersichtliche Überblicke vor, die explizit für die Hochschullehre konzipiert sind. Beide Bücher leisten einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Kanonisierung der Gender Studies als akademisches Fach, bleiben aber in ihrer Konzeption stark den Herkunftsdisziplinen ihrer Verfasserinnen verhaftet. Hier stößt die viel beschworene Interdisziplinarität der Gender Studies an ihre Grenzen.Nina Degele and Franziska Schößler promote the disciplinary establishment of new fields of knowledge with their introductory books in Gender Studies and Gender/Queer Studies. Using their individual home disciplines (sociology and literary studies as a starting point, they present clear overviews of these new fields of knowledge explicitly conceived for use in higher education. Both books contribute to the canonization of Gender Studies as an academic discipline, however they remain in their conception strongly attached to the home disciplines of their authors. It is here that the often-touted interdisciplinarity of Gender Studies reaches its limits.

  5. Health and Care Utilization of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Youth: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, G Nicole; McMorris, Barbara J; Gower, Amy L; Coleman, Eli; Eisenberg, Marla E

    2018-02-05

    Transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) adolescents have difficulty accessing and receiving health care compared with cisgender youth, yet research is limited by a reliance on small and nonrepresentative samples. This study's purpose was to examine mental and physical health characteristics and care utilization between youth who are TGNC and cisgender and across perceived gender expressions within the TGNC sample. Data came from the 2016 Minnesota Student Survey, which consisted of 80 929 students in ninth and 11th grade ( n = 2168 TGNC, 2.7%). Students self-reported gender identity, perceived gender expression, 4 health status measures, and 3 care utilization measures. Chi-squares and multiple analysis of covariance tests (controlling for demographic covariates) were used to compare groups. We found that students who are TGNC reported significantly poorer health, lower rates of preventive health checkups, and more nurse office visits than cisgender youth. For example, 62.1% of youth who are TGNC reported their general health as poor, fair, or good versus very good or excellent, compared with 33.1% of cisgender youth (χ 2 = 763.7, P presentation was perceived as very congruent with their birth-assigned sex were less likely to report poorer health and long-term mental health problems compared with those with other gender presentations. Health care utilization differs between TGNC versus cisgender youth and across gender presentations within TGNC youth. With our results, we suggest that health care providers should screen for health risks and identify barriers to care for TGNC youth while promoting and bolstering wellness within this community. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. First-Year Study Success in Economics and Econometrics: The Role of Gender, Motivation, and Math Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ivo J. M.; Rowaan, Wietske

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigate the relationships among gender, math skills, motivation, and study success in economics and econometrics. They find that female students have stronger intrinsic motivation, yet lower study confidence than their male counterparts. They also find weak evidence for a gender gap over the entire first-year…

  7. Association between gender inequality index and child mortality rates: a cross-national study of 138 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinda, Ethel Mary; Rajkumar, Anto P; Enemark, Ulrika

    2015-03-09

    Gender inequality weakens maternal health and harms children through many direct and indirect pathways. Allied biological disadvantage and psychosocial adversities challenge the survival of children of both genders. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has recently developed a Gender Inequality Index to measure the multidimensional nature of gender inequality. The global impact of Gender Inequality Index on the child mortality rates remains uncertain. We employed an ecological study to investigate the association between child mortality rates and Gender Inequality Indices of 138 countries for which UNDP has published the Gender Inequality Index. Data on child mortality rates and on potential confounders, such as, per capita gross domestic product and immunization coverage, were obtained from the official World Health Organization and World Bank sources. We employed multivariate non-parametric robust regression models to study the relationship between these variables. Women in low and middle income countries (LMICs) suffer significantly more gender inequality (p Gender Inequality Index (GII) was positively associated with neonatal (β = 53.85; 95% CI 41.61-64.09), infant (β = 70.28; 95% CI 51.93-88.64) and under five mortality rates (β = 68.14; 95% CI 49.71-86.58), after adjusting for the effects of potential confounders (p gender inequality and child mortality. We present the socio-economic problems, which sustain higher gender inequality and child mortality in LMICs. We further discuss the potential solutions pertinent to LMICs. Dissipating gender barriers and focusing on social well-being of women may augment the survival of children of both genders.

  8. Metacognitive Language Learning Strategies Use, Gender, and Learning Achievement: a Correlation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlam Bouirane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between metacognitive language learning strategies (MLLS and gender and achievement of EFL students. Metacognitive language learning strategies are crucial for students of English as a foreign language to learn effectively. The theoretical issues discuss metacognitive language learning strategies in particular, and language learning strategies (LLS in general. The practical research took place at the English language department at Farhat Abbes University, Sétif, Algeria, with third year students learning English as a foreign language. The study hypothesized that there is a positive correlation between metacognitive language learning strategies use and achievement. Two main parts following a qualitative design constitute the body of the present research. The first part uses the Metacognitive Language Learning Strategies Questionnaire (MLLSQ to account for differences in the reported frequency of metacognitive strategies use across all the students, and across gender differences. The second part uses interviews to account for the use of these strategies at the individual level, in their relation to the students’ gender and achievement in language learning. The results of the first part revealed a significant use of metacognitive strategies among all the students and significant differences between male students and female students in the frequency of use of these strategies. Moreover, the results of the second part reflected more significant differences in the use of Metacognitive strategies at the level of gender and learning achievement. The study concludes by bringing together key findings and some suggestions for further research.

  9. Gender effect on clinical features of achalasia: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdavinia Mahboobeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achalasia is a well-characterized esophageal motor disorder but the rarity of the disease limits performing large studies on its demographic and clinical features. Methods Prospectively, 213 achalasia patients (110 men and 103 women were enrolled in the study. The diagnosis established by clinical, radiographic, and endoscopic as well as manometry criteria. All patients underwent a pre-designed clinical evaluation before and within 6 months after the treatment. Results Solid dysphagia was the most common clinical symptom in men and women. Chest pain was the only symptom which was significantly different between two groups and was more complained by women than men (70.9% vs. 54.5% P value= 0.03. Although the occurrence of chest pain significantly reduced after treatment in both groups (P Conclusion It seems that chest pain is the distinct symptom of achalasia which is affected by sex as well as age and does not relate to the duration of illness, LESP and the type of treatment achalasia patients receive.

  10. The Saudi Arabian International Student Experience: From a Gender-Segregated Society to Studying in a Mixed-Gender Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, Ahmed; Nyland, Berenice

    2013-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia gender segregation is a cultural practice that occurs across all public and private domains. This segregation has shaped the lives of Saudi citizens and is driven socially through cultural and religious discourses and politically through regulation and policy. For Saudi students undertaking their education in western countries, the…

  11. A Case Study of Gendered Play in Preschools: How Early Childhood Educators' Perceptions of Gender Influence Children's Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to explore children's play in relation to gender stereotypes and beliefs and practices of educators in preschool settings. A feminist poststructuralist approach framed the design of the research and data were collected in two settings through predetermined categories of play during periods of spontaneous free play. The question…

  12. STUDI GENDER: JARINGAN SOSIAL PENGEMIS ANAK PEREMPUAN DI KOTA BUKITTINGGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenita Yatim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beggar is part of the big city problem in Indonesia. Bukittinggi in West Sumatera was not immune from this problem, especially on the children who become beggar. These beggars have pattern of work that make up the social network. Descriptive qualitative research was employed in this study where it involve the children who become beggars. The aim is to explore the ponomenon and the types of social network among the girls beggar. The data of this reserarch are acquired from the girls who run her live as the beggar who are regularly settled and stay aroud the Jam Gadang clock Tower.  Finally, this research conclude that the shape of a social network that is developed by child gepeng in Bukittinggi are: 1 sosial network based on kinship, 2 social network are formed by social groups in the pattern of vertical relationships, 3 social network are formed in new social groups in order to meet the needs of each.

  13. Gender and Doctoral Studies: The Perceptions of Ph.D. Students in an American University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz-Costes, Beth; Helmke, Laura Andrews; Ulku-Steiner, Beril

    2006-01-01

    Twenty students enrolled in Ph.D. programmes were interviewed to examine the role of gender in their academic experiences. Gender was examined in three ways: gender of the student, gender of the student's faculty supervisor and gender make-up of the faculty within the student's department or academic unit. All students reported the importance of…

  14. A gender study investigating physics self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively the influence of self-efficacy in predicting success and then to qualitatively explore the development of self-efficacy. In the initial quantitative studies, I explore the utility of self-efficacy in predicting the success of introductory physics students, both women and men. Results indicate that self-efficacy is a significant predictor of success for all students. I then disaggregate the data to examine how self-efficacy develops differently for women and men in the introductory physics course. Results show women rely on different sources of self-efficacy than do men, and that a particular instructional environment, Modeling Instruction, has a positive impact on these sources of self-efficacy. In the qualitative phase of the project, this dissertation focuses on the development of self-efficacy. Using the qualitative tool of microanalysis, I introduce a methodology for understanding how self-efficacy develops moment-by-moment using the lens of self-efficacy opportunities. I then use the characterizations of self-efficacy opportunities to focus on a particular course environment and to identify and describe a mechanism by which Modeling Instruction impacts student self-efficacy. Results indicate that the emphasizing the development and deployment of models affords opportunities to impact self-efficacy. The findings of this dissertation indicate that introducing key elements into the classroom, such as cooperative group work, model development and deployment, and interaction with the instructor, create a mechanism by which instructors can impact the self-efficacy of their students. Results from this study indicate that

  15. Future gender relations in global restructuring processes case study evidence from knowledge-intensive, manufacturing and service occupations

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Nierling

    2008-01-01

    Global restructuring processes have not only strong implications for European working and living realities, but also have specific outcomes with regard to gender relations. The following contribution analyses in which way global restructuring shapes current gender relations in order to identify important trends and developments for future gender (in)equalities at the workplace. On the basis of a large qualitative study on global restructuring and impacts on different occupational groups it ar...

  16. Study of Adolescents Perceived Parenting Styles Based on their Gender and Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    صادق تقی لو

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Parenting styles play a major role in determining the life styles of adolescents and that is why they share a special significance. The present study was done with the aim to investigate adolescents’ perceived parenting styles based on their gender and age. The study was conducted by a post-event method and with a sample size of 623 subjects (311 female and 312 male, who were selected by the multistage sampling method. Data were analyzed, after being collected by the Baumrind Parenting Styles Questionnaire, using multivariate analysis of variance. The results indicated that the main effects of gender and age are significant at 0.01 level. Parents’ interaction with boys is more authoritarian and with girls more authoritative; also compared with adolescents less than 17 years, they interact with adolescents 17 years old more permissively. The interaction effects of gender and age were significant at 0.05 level only in the permissive parenting style. This means that unlike the girls, parents use more and more the permissive parenting style along with increasing age of adolescent teenage boys. It was concluded that the interaction patterns of parents with children are not fixed and these patterns vary according to gender and age of the children.

  17. Integrating Gender into World Bank Financed Transport Programs : Component 1. Case Study Summary and Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    IC Net

    2004-01-01

    The World Bank in November 2001 commissioned IC Net Limited of Japan to carry out a study titled 'Integrating Gender into World Bank Financed Transport Programs' in accord with the terms of reference (TOR) issued in June 2001. The study was financed by a grant from the Japanese Large Studies Trust Fund. The contract came into effect on 15 December 2001 and covers the period to 15 June 2004...

  18. Gender differences in major depressive disorder: results from the Netherlands study of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Jérôme J J; Roest, Annelieke M; Nolen, Willem A; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Jonge, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Although an overall gender difference in prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) has been well established, several questions concerning gender differences in the clinical manifestation of depression remain. This study aims to identify gender differences in psychopathology, treatment, and public health consequences in patients with MDD. Baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including 1115 participants (364 men, 751 women, mean age 41 years) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of current MDD. Characteristics studied included symptom profiles, comorbidity, treatment, and public health consequences. Women reported a younger age of onset of single (27.8 years vs. 31.6 years; p=0.001) and recurrent MDD (24.8 years vs. 27.6 years; p=0.014), a higher comorbidity of panic disorder with agoraphobia (24.9% vs. 17.3%; p=0.006) and life-time overall anxiety disorder (77.6% vs. 71.4%; p=0.029) than men. More men than women suffered from comorbid alcohol dependence or abuse (48.1% vs. 24.5%; pdepression in women (24.6% vs. 17.3%; p=0.009) was found. Women were treated more frequently by an alternative caretaker (20.6% vs. 14.8%; p=0.025), men more often in mental health care organizations (61.0% vs. 53.7%; p=0.025). No gender differences in frequency of medication use or counseling were found. Cross sectional design. Main gender differences in the clinical presentation of MDD concerned a younger age of onset, higher anxiety and lower alcohol use comorbidity and higher prevalence of atypical depression in women. These differences were accompanied by differences in health care use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of gender and genetics on emotion processing in Parkinson's disease - A multimodal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Heller

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson's disease (PD has been suggested to affect males and females differently. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common and disabling in PD. However, previous studies focusing on emotion recognition in PD have neglected the confounder of gender and lack evidence on the underlying endocrinal and genetic mechanisms. Moreover, while there are many imaging studies on emotion processing in PD, gender-related analyses of neural data are scarce. We therefore aimed at exploring the interplay of the named factors on emotion recognition and processing in PD. Methods: 51 non-demented PD patients (26 male and 44 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC; 25 male were examined clinically and neuropsychologically including an emotion recognition task (Ekman 60faces test. A subsample of 25 patients and 31 HC underwent task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI comprised of videos of emotional facial expressions. To examine the impact of hormones and genetics on emotion processing, blood samples were taken for endocrinal (testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and genetic testing (5-HTTLPR, Val158Met COMT polymorphisms. Results: No group or gender differences emerged regarding cognitive abilities. Male but not female PD patients exhibited confined impairments in recognizing the emotion anger accompanied by diminished neural response to facial expressions (e.g. in the putamen and insula. Endocrinologically, fear recognition was positively correlated with estrogen levels in female patients, while on the genetic level we found an effect of Val158Met COMT genotype on the recognition of fear in PD patients. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that impaired emotion processing in PD specifically affects male patients, and that hormones and genetics contribute to emotion recognition performance. Further research on the underlying neural, endocrinological and genetic mechanisms of specific symptoms in PD is of clinical relevance, as it

  20. Association of gender disadvantage factors and gender preference with antenatal depression in women: a cross-sectional study from rural Maharashtra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidhaye, Pallavi; Shidhaye, Rahul; Phalke, Vaishali

    2017-06-01

    Maternal depression is a major public health problem in low- and middle-income countries including India. Very few studies have assessed association of various risk factors with antenatal depression in rural Indian women, especially the effect of marital conflict, gender disadvantage and gender preference on antenatal depression. This paper describes the prevalence of probable antenatal depression in rural Maharashtra, a state in the western part of India and specifically assesses the association of marital and gender disadvantage factors and gender preference for a male child with antenatal depression. Primary Health Centre-based cross-sectional survey of antenatal women in rural Maharashtra was carried out. The outcome of interest was a probable diagnosis of depression in antenatal women which was measured using the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS). Data were analyzed using simple and multiple logistic regression. 302 women in their antenatal period were included in this study. The outcome of antenatal depression (EPDS > 12) was found in 51 women (16.9%, 95% CI 12.6-21.1%). Feeling pressurized to deliver a male child was strongly associated with the outcome of antenatal depression (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 3.0; 95% CI 1.4-6.5). Unsatisfactory reaction of in-laws to dowry (adjusted OR 11.2; 95% CI 2.4-52.9) and difficult relationship with in-laws (adjusted OR 5.3; 95% CI 2.4-11.6) were also significantly associated with antenatal depression. Our findings demonstrate that antenatal depression in rural women of Western Maharashtra is associated with gender disadvantage factors, especially related to preference for a male child. The agenda to improve maternal mental health should be ultimately linked to address the broader social development goals and gender empowerment.

  1. Gender equity and equality on Korean student scientists: A life history narrative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Changsoo

    Much research, including that by Koreans (e.g., Mo, 1999), agrees on two major points relating to the inequitable and unequal condition of women in the scientific community: (1) the fact that the under-representation of women in the scientific community has been taken for granted for years (e.g., Rathgeber, 1998), and (2) documenting women's lives has been largely excluded in women's studies (e.g., Sutton, 1998). The basis for the design of this study relates to the aforementioned observations. This study addresses two major research questions: how do social stereotypes exist in terms of gender equity and equality in the South Korean scientific and educational fields, and how do these stereotypes influence women and men's socializations, in terms of gender equity and equality, in the South Korean scientific and educational fields? To investigate the research questions, this qualitative study utilizes a life history narrative approach in examining various theoretical perspectives, such as critical theory, post-structuralism, and postmodernism. Through the participants' perceptions and experiences in the scientific community and in South Korean society, this study fords gendered stereotypes, practices, and socializations in school, family, and the scientific community. These findings demonstrate asymmetric gendered structures in South Korea. Moreover, with the comparison among male and female participants, this study shows how they perceive and experience differently in school, family, and the scientific community. This study attempts to understand the South Korean scientific community as represented by four student scientists through social structures. Education appears to function significantly as an hegemonic power in conveying legitimating ideologies. This process reproduces man-centered social structures, especially in the scientific community. This suggests that to emancipate women's under-representations in the scientific community, educational administrators

  2. HIV testing and tolerance to gender based violence: a cross-sectional study in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gari

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of social relations and gender-based conflicts on the uptake of HIV testing in the South and Central provinces of Zambia. We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study of 1716 randomly selected individuals. Associations were examined using mixed-effect multivariable logistic regression. A total of 264 men (64% and 268 women (56% had never tested for HIV. The strongest determinants for not being tested were disruptive couple relationships (OR = 2.48 95% CI = 1.00-6.19; tolerance to gender-based violence (OR = 2.10 95% CI = 1.05-4.32 and fear of social rejection (OR = 1.48 95% CI = 1.23-1.80. In the Zambian context, unequal power relationships within the couple and the community seem to play a pivotal role in the decision to test which until now have been largely underestimated. Policies, programs and interventions to rapidly increase HIV testing need to urgently address gender-power inequity in relationships and prevent gender-based violence to reduce the negative impact on the lives of couples and families.

  3. Gender differences in regional cerebral activity during the perception of emotion: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Alex; Siedentopf, Christian M; Ischebeck, Anja; Rettenbacher, Maria A; Verius, Michael; Felber, Stephan; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2006-08-15

    Whether men activate different brain regions during various emotions compared to women or whether gender differences exist in transient emotional states has been the subject of only few studies. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate gender differences during the perception of positive or negative emotions. The experiment comprised two emotional conditions (pleasant/unpleasant visual stimuli) during which fMRI data were acquired. Altogether, 38 healthy volunteers (19 males, 19 females) were investigated. When subtracting the activation values of men from those of women, suprathreshold positive signal changes were detected in the right posterior cingulate, the left putamen and the left cerebellum during positive mood induction, and in bilateral superior temporal gyri and cerebellar vermis during negative mood induction. The subtraction of activation values of women from those of men yielded no significant differences. Our findings suggest gender-related neural responses to emotional stimuli and could contribute to the understanding of mechanisms underlying gender-related vulnerability of the prevalence and severity of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Depression, Sex and Gender Roles in Older Adult Populations: The International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Afshin; Ahmed, Tamer; Freire, Aline do N Falcão; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria; Guerra, Ricardo O

    2016-01-01

    To assess the associations between gender roles and depression in older men and women and whether gender roles are independent risk factors for depression. International cross-sectional study of adults between 65 and 74 years old (n = 1,967). Depression was defined by a score of 16 or over in the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). A validated 12-item Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) was used to classify participants in gender roles (Masculine, Feminine, Androgynous, and Undifferentiated) using research site medians of femininity and masculinity as cut-off points. Poisson regressions were fitted to estimate the prevalence ratios (PR) of depression for each gender role compared to the masculine role, adjusting for sex, sufficiency of income, education, marital status, self-rated health, and chronic conditions. Among men, 31.2% were androgynous, 26% were masculine, 14.4% were feminine, and 28.4% were undifferentiated; among women, the corresponding percentages were 32.7%, 14.9%, 27%, and 25.4%. Both in men and in women, depressive symptoms (CES-D≥16) were more prevalent in those endorsing the undifferentiated type, compared to masculine, feminine or androgynous groups. However, after adjusting for potential confounders, compared to the masculine group only those endorsing the androgynous role were 28% less likely to suffer from depression: PR of 0.72 (95% CI: 0.55-0.93). In fully adjusted models, prevalence rates of depression were not different from masculine participants in the two other gender groups of feminine and undifferentiated. Androgynous roles were associated with lower rates of depression in older adults, independently of being a man or a woman.

  5. Depression, Sex and Gender Roles in Older Adult Populations: The International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Vafaei

    Full Text Available To assess the associations between gender roles and depression in older men and women and whether gender roles are independent risk factors for depression.International cross-sectional study of adults between 65 and 74 years old (n = 1,967. Depression was defined by a score of 16 or over in the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D. A validated 12-item Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI was used to classify participants in gender roles (Masculine, Feminine, Androgynous, and Undifferentiated using research site medians of femininity and masculinity as cut-off points. Poisson regressions were fitted to estimate the prevalence ratios (PR of depression for each gender role compared to the masculine role, adjusting for sex, sufficiency of income, education, marital status, self-rated health, and chronic conditions.Among men, 31.2% were androgynous, 26% were masculine, 14.4% were feminine, and 28.4% were undifferentiated; among women, the corresponding percentages were 32.7%, 14.9%, 27%, and 25.4%. Both in men and in women, depressive symptoms (CES-D≥16 were more prevalent in those endorsing the undifferentiated type, compared to masculine, feminine or androgynous groups. However, after adjusting for potential confounders, compared to the masculine group only those endorsing the androgynous role were 28% less likely to suffer from depression: PR of 0.72 (95% CI: 0.55-0.93. In fully adjusted models, prevalence rates of depression were not different from masculine participants in the two other gender groups of feminine and undifferentiated.Androgynous roles were associated with lower rates of depression in older adults, independently of being a man or a woman.

  6. Gender and race influence metabolic benefits of fitness in children: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Vanessa A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing obesity and poor cardiovascular fitness (CVF contribute to higher rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in children. While the relative contributions of fitness and body fat on development of insulin resistance (IR in children and adolescents remains unresolved, gender- and race-specific differences likely exist in the degree to which CVF influences IR and risk for T2DM. Better understanding of how gender and race affect interactions between body fat, CVF, and metabolic health would be helpful in designing effective and targeted strategies to reduce obesity-associated disease risk. We evaluated whether metabolic benefits of fitness on reducing inflammation and insulin resistance (IR are affected by gender and race. Methods This cross-sectional study included 203 healthy children (mean age 12.2 y, 50% male, 46% non-Hispanic white (NHW, 54% racially diverse (RD. Fasting insulin, glucose, hsCRP, and adiponectin were measured; race was self-reported; cardiovascular fitness (CVF was evaluated by the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run. Associations between inflammation and gender, race, and CVF were evaluated using analysis of covariance. Multivariate regression analysis identified independent predictors of IR. Results Fitness and inflammation were inversely related in both males and females (p Conclusions In middle school children, the beneficial effects of fitness vary based on gender and race. High CVF has an enhanced anti-inflammatory effect in male and RD children. While BMI is the strongest predictor of IR in the study group as a whole, fitness is a significant predictor of IR only in males, and race is a significant predictor of IR only in females.

  7. Gendered Sources of Distress and Resilience among Afghan Refugees in Northern California: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Stempel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have emphasized the influence of resettlement factors on the mental health of refugees resettling in developed countries. However, little research has addressed gender differences in the nature and influence of resettlement stressors and sources of resilience. We address this gap in knowledge by investigating how gender moderates and mediates the influence of several sources of distress and resilience among 259 Afghan refugees residing in Northern California (USA. Gender moderated the effects of four factors on levels of distress. Intimate and extended family ties have little correlation with men’s distress levels, but are strongly associated with lower distress for women. English ability is positively associated with lower distress for women, but not men. In terms of gender ideology, traditionally oriented women and egalitarian men have lower levels of distress. And experiencing greater dissonant acculturation increases distress for men, but not women. The influence of gender interaction terms is substantial and patterns may reflect difficulty adapting to a different gender order. Future studies of similar populations should investigate gender differences in sources of distress and resilience, and efforts to assist new arrivals might inform them of changes in gender roles they may experience, and facilitate opportunities to renegotiate gender roles.

  8. Gendered Sources of Distress and Resilience among Afghan Refugees in Northern California: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempel, Carl; Sami, Nilofar; Koga, Patrick Marius; Alemi, Qais; Smith, Valerie; Shirazi, Aida

    2016-12-28

    Recent studies have emphasized the influence of resettlement factors on the mental health of refugees resettling in developed countries. However, little research has addressed gender differences in the nature and influence of resettlement stressors and sources of resilience. We address this gap in knowledge by investigating how gender moderates and mediates the influence of several sources of distress and resilience among 259 Afghan refugees residing in Northern California (USA). Gender moderated the effects of four factors on levels of distress. Intimate and extended family ties have little correlation with men's distress levels, but are strongly associated with lower distress for women. English ability is positively associated with lower distress for women, but not men. In terms of gender ideology, traditionally oriented women and egalitarian men have lower levels of distress. And experiencing greater dissonant acculturation increases distress for men, but not women. The influence of gender interaction terms is substantial and patterns may reflect difficulty adapting to a different gender order. Future studies of similar populations should investigate gender differences in sources of distress and resilience, and efforts to assist new arrivals might inform them of changes in gender roles they may experience, and facilitate opportunities to renegotiate gender roles.

  9. A framework and methods for incorporating gender-related issues in wildlife risk assessment: gender-related differences in metal levels and other contaminants as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna

    2007-05-01

    Gender plays a role in the genetics, physiology, morphology, and behavior of organisms, and thus influences the uptake, fate, and effects of contaminants in organisms. There are a number of chemical analysis tools, as well as biological approaches to understanding the influence of gender on contaminant levels and effects in wildlife. Biological approaches occur at all levels, from mutagenesis, gene expression and biochemistry, to physiology, morphology and development, to pathology and behavior. Information on the effects of gender at all these levels is essential for model building, risk assessment, and developing biomonitoring plans. Gender influences both internal and external fate and effects. However, bioaccumulation and effects cannot occur without exposure, which is mediated by behavior, bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and absorption. Gender influences a number of individual features (size, nutrition, genetics, hormones), that in turn affect niche differentiation, leading back to differences in exposure and susceptibility. Both sexes have a variety of methods of ridding the body of contaminants, through the bile, urine, exhaled air, and sloughing of epidermal structures (skin, hair, feathers). Females can also rid their body of contaminants through egg contents and egg shells, or mammals by transfer to the developing fetus and through breast milk. The availability of contaminant data in wildlife depends partly on the ease of identification of the sexes by either external or internal examination. Thus, there are more data on contaminant levels in birds and mammals than in fish. Surprisingly, metal levels are not uniformly low in females, even when they are morphologically smaller than males. For 43 studies of metals in vertebrates, females had higher levels in 30 cases where there were significant differences (and males were higher in only 14 cases). Females usually had higher levels of mercury than males. Review of the literature suggests that authors

  10. GENDER COGNITION IN RELIGIOUS DISCOURSE: A STUDY OF FRAMING IN THEMATIC HOLY KORAN INTERPRETATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dadang S. Anshori

    2016-01-01

    The study is aimed at describing gender cognition phenomenon in religious discourse in thematic interpretation (tafsir) of the Holy Koran published by the Ministry of Religious Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia. Each interpretation book as a written discourse is different from each other due to author’s cognition frame. This study employs a constructive qualitative approach with technical framing analysis. The data are language data (religious text) that are obtainable from thematic interp...

  11. Innovative Solutions for Companies to Reduce Gender Gaps (UK Study Case)

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei ANGHELUTA; Larisa MIHOREANU; Carmen COSTEA

    2016-01-01

    For many years the gender gap has been a complex reality having economic implications and social decisiveness. No matter the percentage recently decreased, we still confront with social discriminations. In this paper we focused on the UK labour market so we developed a case study for a logistics company, using classification of the employees in different pay bands. Based on this study we created a state of the art human resource tool that can be applied worldwide and that help firms to analys...

  12. Female Gender Scheme is Disturbed by Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Qualitative Study From Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Nasiri Amiri, Fatemeh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Mohammadpour Thamtan, Reza Ali; Shiva, Niloofar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting up to one in every five women of reproductive age. The majority of researches on PCOS focus on its biomedical aspects, often overlooking and neglecting women’s own perceptions and experiences. Objectives: This study aimed to explore women’s perception and experiences that influence their personal gender role. Patients and Methods: This research is a qualitative study by conventional content analysis. Semi...

  13. Gendered transitions to adulthood by college field of study in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Siqi; Tumin, Dmitry; Qian, Zhenchao

    2016-01-01

    Field of study may influence the timing of transitions to the labor market, marriage, and parenthood among college graduates. Research to date has yet to study how field of study is associated with the interweaving of these transitions in the USA. The current study examines gendered influences of college field of study on transitions to a series of adult roles, including full-time work, marriage, and parenthood. We use Cox proportional hazards models and multinomial logistic regression to examine gendered associations between field of study and the three transitions among college graduates of the NLSY97 (National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) cohort. Men majoring in STEM achieve early transitions to full-time work, marriage, and parenthood; women majoring in STEM show no significant advantage in finding full-time work and delayed marriage and childbearing; women in business have earlier transitions to full-time work and marriage than women in other fields, demonstrating an advantage similar to that of men in STEM. The contrast between men and women in STEM shows that transition to adulthood remains gendered; the contrast between women in STEM and women in business illustrates that a prestigious career may not necessarily delay family formation.

  14. Gendered transitions to adulthood by college field of study in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Siqi; Tumin, Dmitry; Qian, Zhenchao

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field of study may influence the timing of transitions to the labor market, marriage, and parenthood among college graduates. Research to date has yet to study how field of study is associated with the interweaving of these transitions in the USA. OBJECTIVE The current study examines gendered influences of college field of study on transitions to a series of adult roles, including full-time work, marriage, and parenthood. METHODS We use Cox proportional hazards models and multinomial logistic regression to examine gendered associations between field of study and the three transitions among college graduates of the NLSY97 (National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) cohort. RESULTS Men majoring in STEM achieve early transitions to full-time work, marriage, and parenthood; women majoring in STEM show no significant advantage in finding full-time work and delayed marriage and childbearing; women in business have earlier transitions to full-time work and marriage than women in other fields, demonstrating an advantage similar to that of men in STEM. CONCLUSIONS The contrast between men and women in STEM shows that transition to adulthood remains gendered; the contrast between women in STEM and women in business illustrates that a prestigious career may not necessarily delay family formation. PMID:29075146

  15. Behavioral intention and its relationship with gender: a study of green school students in Surakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrudin, I. A.; Karyanto, P.; Ramli, M.

    2018-05-01

    The environmental problems faced today have had a great impact on human beings. The root causes of all environmental problems are related to injudicious human behavior. Since human behavior is determined by Behavioral Intention (BI), it is crucial to examine the role of BI with regard to the study of environmentally friendly behavior. As such, in this research, BI was scrutinized; in particular, this study aimed to identify the factors affecting the particular degree of BI from the perspective of gender. This study was conducted with 334 high school student participants in the district of Surakarta, Indonesia. According to the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) result, the BI possessed by high school students does not sufficiently promote environmentally friendly behavior. This research also found that there is no significant link between BI and gender.

  16. A Study on Gendered Portrayals in Children's Informational Books with Scientific Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R. Ladd

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes gender bias in children's informational books about science and science careers to determine how these early resources are affecting the disparity between males and females in science and engineering fields. The study focused on the number of male and female scientists both in pictures and text, and how much space was devoted to discussion of scientists of each gender. Overall, the findings of the study show that only 18% of the pictured scientists were female as well as only 16% of the scientists discussed in the text. These numbers are below current industry data that puts the number of females working in science and engineering fields at 26%.

  17. Barriers to Gender Diversity in Software Development Education: Actionable Insights from a Danish Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borsotti, Valeria

    2018-01-01

    This paper contributes to the growing literature on the gender gap in computer science education by focusing on an exploratory case study conducted at the IT University of Copenhagen (ITU), Denmark. The specific objective of this study was to draw on existing research in order to empirically...... investigate the main sociocultural barriers to female participation in the bachelor of Software Development at ITU, and to generate insights that would inform concrete and effective interventions. This investigation takes the form of an exploratory case study, providing insights into influential factors...... such as students’ perceptions, attitudes and behavior towards software development education and gender differences in pre-university coding skills. Empirical evidence has been collected through semi-structured interviews with 38 students (undergraduate and high school) and surveys with 395 students (undergraduate...

  18. Crossing the Threshold in Introductory Women's and Gender Studies Courses: An Assessment of Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Holly; Launius, Christie

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) project in the introductory women's and gender studies course, occasioned by a curricular redesign to focus the course on four threshold concepts within the field: the social construction of gender, privilege and oppression, intersectionality, and feminist praxis. The authors…

  19. Gender-Related Risk and Protective Factors for Depressive Symptoms and Disordered Eating in Adolescence: A 4-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Fatima; Seoane, Gloria; Senra, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between intrapersonal risk (low self-esteem, perfectionism and body dissatisfaction) and interpersonal protection (social support) appears relevant for delineating gender-specific pathways that lead to both depressive and eating psychopathology. The aims of this longitudinal study were to examine gender differences in the levels of…

  20. Are We "There" Yet? the Treatment of Gender and Feminism in Technical, Business, and Workplace Writing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kate; Rumsey, Suzanne Kesler; Amidon, Stevens

    2016-01-01

    This article reexamines the treatment of gender and feminism in technical, business, and workplace writing studies--areas in which the three of us teach. Surprisingly, the published discourse of our field seems to implicitly minimize the gendered nature of business and technical writing workplaces and classrooms. To understand this apparent lack…

  1. Frazzled by Facebook? An Exploratory Study of Gender Differences in Social Network Communication among Undergraduate Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; Lougheed, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although a majority of young adults are members of at least one social networking site, peer reviewed research examining gender differences in social networking communication is sparse. This study examined gender differences in social networking, particularly for Facebook use, among undergraduates. A survey was distributed to 268 college students…

  2. Organizational Commitment of Teachers: A Meta-Analysis Study for the Effect of Gender and Marital Status in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çogaltay, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    This meta-analysis summarizes the influence of Turkish teacher's gender and marital status on their perception of organizational commitment. In total, 30 independent research studies conducted across the country are investigated to analyze the relations between gender and organizational commitment, i.e., a sample group of 11,724 participants. In…

  3. Diversity management: a gender study and race in great brazilian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednéia Batista do Prado Gonçalves

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, there is an artificial dealing to the theme of diversity in organizations, particularly with regard to the human side (Thomas, 1996. In developed countries like the United States, for example, the study of diversity has had more focus and relevance. In Brazil, this is hindered by bumping into racial prejudices and gender issues that does not allow the advancements and applicability in organizations. The aim of the study was to analyze the 30 largest companies listed on Exame magazine as the diversity of gender and race has been treated by conducting a reflection on gender and race issues in relation to the work of women and blacks occupations of management positions and higher ranking in companies. Methodologically, we carried out a documentary analysis of the Social Balance of the 30 largest domestic companies or operating in Brazil in dealings theme diversity. They were selected on the official website of the 30 largest companies, based on Exame Magazine - Biggest and Best, base year 2013, the Social Report the years 2011-2013, the study of the evolution of the percentage of women and blacks in senior positions was made by calculations of descriptive statistics: sample division into quartiles and average calculation. One can observe a slight variation between the percentage over the years studied, which did not significantly alter the positions occupied by women and blacks in senior positions in the sample. It is expected that this study will contribute to the critical view of the issues related to gender and race in organizations.

  4. Reducing the gender achievement gap in college science: a classroom study of values affirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Akira; Kost-Smith, Lauren E; Finkelstein, Noah D; Pollock, Steven J; Cohen, Geoffrey L; Ito, Tiffany A

    2010-11-26

    In many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, women are outperformed by men in test scores, jeopardizing their success in science-oriented courses and careers. The current study tested the effectiveness of a psychological intervention, called values affirmation, in reducing the gender achievement gap in a college-level introductory physics class. In this randomized double-blind study, 399 students either wrote about their most important values or not, twice at the beginning of the 15-week course. Values affirmation reduced the male-female performance and learning difference substantially and elevated women's modal grades from the C to B range. Benefits were strongest for women who tended to endorse the stereotype that men do better than women in physics. A brief psychological intervention may be a promising way to address the gender gap in science performance and learning.

  5. Implementing feminist theory in engineering: obstacles within the gender studies tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udén, Maria K.

    2017-05-01

    Scholars have noted that there is hesitation to utilise findings from gender studies in engineering education. Issues within gender studies may be part of the matching problem. Debates concerning two concepts for new engineering paradigms are investigated: care and heterogeneity. Their appeals and the respective complications which they tend to be associated with are revisited. Two examples are explored in detail. The tensions revealed lead to the contents of technical work. More social sciences content in engineering education is sometimes suggested, as a way to support more humane approaches. But, if the calculations that decide how many bolts of what dimension are to be put where are 'masculinist reductionism', it still remains that someone will have to do those calculations. Is emphasis on social issues really what we want from engineers?

  6. Cohort profile: Study of Transition, Outcomes and Gender (STRONG) to assess health status of transgender people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Virginia P; Nash, Rebecca; Hunkeler, Enid; Contreras, Richard; Cromwell, Lee; Becerra-Culqui, Tracy A; Getahun, Darios; Giammattei, Shawn; Lash, Timothy L; Millman, Andrea; Robinson, Brandi; Roblin, Douglas; Silverberg, Michael J; Slovis, Jennifer; Tangpricha, Vin; Tolsma, Dennis; Valentine, Cadence; Ward, Kevin; Winter, Savannah; Goodman, Michael

    2017-12-27

    The Study of Transition, Outcomes and Gender (STRONG) was initiated to assess the health status of transgender people in general and following gender-affirming treatments at Kaiser Permanente health plans in Georgia, Northern California and Southern California. The objectives of this communication are to describe methods of cohort ascertainment and data collection and to characterise the study population. A stepwise methodology involving computerised searches of electronic medical records and free-text validation of eligibility and gender identity was used to identify a cohort of 6456 members with first evidence of transgender status (index date) between 2006 and 2014. The cohort included 3475 (54%) transfeminine (TF), 2892 (45%) transmasculine (TM) and 89 (1%) members whose natal sex and gender identity remained undetermined from the records. The cohort was matched to 127 608 enrollees with no transgender evidence (63 825 women and 63 783 men) on year of birth, race/ethnicity, study site and membership year of the index date. Cohort follow-up extends through the end of 2016. About 58% of TF and 52% of TM cohort members received hormonal therapy at Kaiser Permanente. Chest surgery was more common among TM participants (12% vs 0.3%). The proportions of transgender participants who underwent genital reconstruction surgeries were similar (4%-5%) in the two transgender groups. Results indicate that there are sufficient numbers of events in the TF and TM cohorts to further examine mental health status, cardiovascular events, diabetes, HIV and most common cancers. STRONG is well positioned to fill existing knowledge gaps through comparisons of transgender and reference populations and through analyses of health status before and after gender affirmation treatment. Analyses will include incidence of cardiovascular disease, mental health, HIV and diabetes, as well as changes in laboratory-based endpoints (eg, polycythemia and bone density), overall and in relation to

  7. Engagement, Persistence, and Gender in Computer Science: Results of a Smartphone ESM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, Carolina; Perez-Felkner, Lara; Brown, Kevin; Schneider, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    While the underrepresentation of women in the fast-growing STEM field of computer science (CS) has been much studied, no consensus exists on the key factors influencing this widening gender gap. Possible suspects include gender differences in aptitude, interest, and academic environment. Our study contributes to this literature by applying student engagement research to study the experiences of college students studying CS, to assess the degree to which differences in men and women's engagement may help account for gender inequity in the field. Specifically, we use the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to evaluate in real-time the engagement of college students during varied activities and environments. Over the course of a full week in fall semester and a full week in spring semester, 165 students majoring in CS at two Research I universities were “beeped” several times a day via a smartphone app prompting them to fill out a short questionnaire including open-ended and scaled items. These responses were paired with administrative and over 2 years of transcript data provided by their institutions. We used mean comparisons and logistic regression analysis to compare enrollment and persistence patterns among CS men and women. Results suggest that despite the obstacles associated with women's underrepresentation in computer science, women are more likely to continue taking computer science courses when they felt challenged and skilled in their initial computer science classes. We discuss implications for further research. PMID:28487664

  8. Engagement, Persistence, and Gender in Computer Science: Results of a Smartphone ESM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, Carolina; Perez-Felkner, Lara; Brown, Kevin; Schneider, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    While the underrepresentation of women in the fast-growing STEM field of computer science (CS) has been much studied, no consensus exists on the key factors influencing this widening gender gap. Possible suspects include gender differences in aptitude, interest, and academic environment. Our study contributes to this literature by applying student engagement research to study the experiences of college students studying CS, to assess the degree to which differences in men and women's engagement may help account for gender inequity in the field. Specifically, we use the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to evaluate in real-time the engagement of college students during varied activities and environments. Over the course of a full week in fall semester and a full week in spring semester, 165 students majoring in CS at two Research I universities were "beeped" several times a day via a smartphone app prompting them to fill out a short questionnaire including open-ended and scaled items. These responses were paired with administrative and over 2 years of transcript data provided by their institutions. We used mean comparisons and logistic regression analysis to compare enrollment and persistence patterns among CS men and women. Results suggest that despite the obstacles associated with women's underrepresentation in computer science, women are more likely to continue taking computer science courses when they felt challenged and skilled in their initial computer science classes. We discuss implications for further research.

  9. Engagement, Persistence, and Gender in Computer Science: Results of a Smartphone ESM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Milesi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available While the underrepresentation of women in the fast-growing STEM field of computer science (CS has been much studied, no consensus exists on the key factors influencing this widening gender gap. Possible suspects include gender differences in aptitude, interest, and academic environment. Our study contributes to this literature by applying student engagement research to study the experiences of college students studying CS, to assess the degree to which differences in men and women's engagement may help account for gender inequity in the field. Specifically, we use the Experience Sampling Method (ESM to evaluate in real-time the engagement of college students during varied activities and environments. Over the course of a full week in fall semester and a full week in spring semester, 165 students majoring in CS at two Research I universities were “beeped” several times a day via a smartphone app prompting them to fill out a short questionnaire including open-ended and scaled items. These responses were paired with administrative and over 2 years of transcript data provided by their institutions. We used mean comparisons and logistic regression analysis to compare enrollment and persistence patterns among CS men and women. Results suggest that despite the obstacles associated with women's underrepresentation in computer science, women are more likely to continue taking computer science courses when they felt challenged and skilled in their initial computer science classes. We discuss implications for further research.

  10. Gender on the brain: a case study of science communication in the new media environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliodhna O'Connor

    Full Text Available Neuroscience research on sex difference is currently a controversial field, frequently accused of purveying a 'neurosexism' that functions to naturalise gender inequalities. However, there has been little empirical investigation of how information about neurobiological sex difference is interpreted within wider society. This paper presents a case study that tracks the journey of one high-profile study of neurobiological sex differences from its scientific publication through various layers of the public domain. A content analysis was performed to ascertain how the study was represented in five domains of communication: the original scientific article, a press release, the traditional news media, online reader comments and blog entries. Analysis suggested that scientific research on sex difference offers an opportunity to rehearse abiding cultural understandings of gender. In both scientific and popular contexts, traditional gender stereotypes were projected onto the novel scientific information, which was harnessed to demonstrate the factual truth and normative legitimacy of these beliefs. Though strains of misogyny were evident within the readers' comments, most discussion of the study took pains to portray the sexes' unique abilities as equal and 'complementary'. However, this content often resembled a form of benevolent sexism, in which praise of women's social-emotional skills compensated for their relegation from more esteemed trait-domains, such as rationality and productivity. The paper suggests that embedding these stereotype patterns in neuroscience may intensify their rhetorical potency by lending them the epistemic authority of science. It argues that the neuroscience of sex difference does not merely reflect, but can actively shape the gender norms of contemporary society.

  11. Gender on the brain: a case study of science communication in the new media environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Cliodhna; Joffe, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research on sex difference is currently a controversial field, frequently accused of purveying a 'neurosexism' that functions to naturalise gender inequalities. However, there has been little empirical investigation of how information about neurobiological sex difference is interpreted within wider society. This paper presents a case study that tracks the journey of one high-profile study of neurobiological sex differences from its scientific publication through various layers of the public domain. A content analysis was performed to ascertain how the study was represented in five domains of communication: the original scientific article, a press release, the traditional news media, online reader comments and blog entries. Analysis suggested that scientific research on sex difference offers an opportunity to rehearse abiding cultural understandings of gender. In both scientific and popular contexts, traditional gender stereotypes were projected onto the novel scientific information, which was harnessed to demonstrate the factual truth and normative legitimacy of these beliefs. Though strains of misogyny were evident within the readers' comments, most discussion of the study took pains to portray the sexes' unique abilities as equal and 'complementary'. However, this content often resembled a form of benevolent sexism, in which praise of women's social-emotional skills compensated for their relegation from more esteemed trait-domains, such as rationality and productivity. The paper suggests that embedding these stereotype patterns in neuroscience may intensify their rhetorical potency by lending them the epistemic authority of science. It argues that the neuroscience of sex difference does not merely reflect, but can actively shape the gender norms of contemporary society.

  12. A Longitudinal Study of Children's Theory of Mind, Self-Concept, and Gender-Role Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosacki, Sandra Leanne

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the longitudinal relations between theory of mind (ToM) understanding, self-perceptions, and perceptions of gender-role orientation in 28 school-aged children, (16 girls, 12 boys, aged 8-12 years). Theory of mind and perceptions of self were assessed at Time 1 (T1, M = 8 y 5 m) and two years later at Time 2 (T2, M = 10 y 4…

  13. Medical students' perceptions in relation to ethnicity and gender: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Seale, C; Lempp, H

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The British medical student population has undergone rapid diversification over the last decades. This study focuses on medical students' views about their experiences in relation to ethnicity and gender during their undergraduate training within the context of the hidden curriculum in one British medical school as part of a wider qualitative research project into undergraduate medical education. Method We interviewed 36 undergraduate medical students in one British Medica...

  14. Sexuality and Gender Role in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bejerot, Susanne; Eriksson, Jonna M.

    2014-01-01

    The 'extreme male brain theory of autism' describes an extreme male pattern of cognitive traits defined as strong systemising abilities paired with empathising weaknesses in autism spectrum disorder. However, beyond these cognitive traits, clinical observations have suggested an ambiguous gender-typed pattern regarding several sexually dimorphic traits. The aim of the present study was to investigate if patterns of non-cognitive sexually dimorphic traits differed between the autism spectrum d...

  15. Feminism and the Academy. Exploring the Politics of Institutionalization in Gender Studies in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Liinason, Mia

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis is to analyze the process of institutionalization and neo-/interdisciplinarization in Women’s/Gender/Feminist Studies (WGFS) in Sweden, and the construction of feminist knowledge within this process. Furthermore, the thesis aims to contribute to the feminist debates on academic feminism as a transformative project. Three questions have guided the research process: 1) How has feminist knowledge been organized and institutionalized into the academy? 2) What are the e...

  16. Gender on the Brain: A Case Study of Science Communication in the New Media Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Cliodhna; Joffe, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research on sex difference is currently a controversial field, frequently accused of purveying a ‘neurosexism’ that functions to naturalise gender inequalities. However, there has been little empirical investigation of how information about neurobiological sex difference is interpreted within wider society. This paper presents a case study that tracks the journey of one high-profile study of neurobiological sex differences from its scientific publication through various layers of the public domain. A content analysis was performed to ascertain how the study was represented in five domains of communication: the original scientific article, a press release, the traditional news media, online reader comments and blog entries. Analysis suggested that scientific research on sex difference offers an opportunity to rehearse abiding cultural understandings of gender. In both scientific and popular contexts, traditional gender stereotypes were projected onto the novel scientific information, which was harnessed to demonstrate the factual truth and normative legitimacy of these beliefs. Though strains of misogyny were evident within the readers’ comments, most discussion of the study took pains to portray the sexes’ unique abilities as equal and ‘complementary’. However, this content often resembled a form of benevolent sexism, in which praise of women’s social-emotional skills compensated for their relegation from more esteemed trait-domains, such as rationality and productivity. The paper suggests that embedding these stereotype patterns in neuroscience may intensify their rhetorical potency by lending them the epistemic authority of science. It argues that the neuroscience of sex difference does not merely reflect, but can actively shape the gender norms of contemporary society. PMID:25354280

  17. A Study of Age and Gender seen through Mobile Phone Usage Patterns in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Sarraute, Carlos; Blanc, Pablo; Burroni, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone usage provides a wealth of information, which can be used to better understand the demographic structure of a population. In this paper we focus on the population of Mexican mobile phone users. Our first contribution is an observational study of mobile phone usage according to gender and age groups. We were able to detect significant differences in phone usage among different subgroups of the population. Our second contribution is to provide a novel methodology to predict demogra...

  18. Un/Doing Gender? A Case Study of School Policy and Practice in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Monisha

    2009-01-01

    This article explores an attempt to disrupt gender inequality in a unique, low-cost private school in Ndola, Zambia. It examines deliberate school policies aimed at "undoing gender" or fostering greater gender equity. These include efforts to maintain gender parity at all levels of the school and the requirement that both young men and…

  19. The use of maxillary sinus dimensions in gender determination: a thin-slice multidetector computed tomography assisted morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Sayin, Ibrahim; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2014-05-01

    Gender determination is an important step in identification. For gender determination, anthropometric evaluation is one of the main forensic evaluations. In the present study, morphometric analysis of maxillary sinuses was performed to determine gender. For morphometric analysis, coronal and axial paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) scan with 1-mm slice thickness was used. For this study, 140 subjects (70 women and 70 men) were enrolled (age ranged between 18 and 63). The size of each subject's maxillary sinuses was measured in anteroposterior, transverse, cephalocaudal, and volume directions. In each measurement, the size of the maxillary sinus is significantly small in female gender (P discrimination analysis was performed, the accuracy rate was detected as 80% for women and 74.3% for men with an overall rate of 77.15%. With the use of 1-mm slice thickness CT, morphometric analysis of maxillary sinuses will be helpful for gender determination.

  20. Intrapreneur organizational culture and gender manager: an empirical study on SMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica García Solarte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to empirically identify the relationship between the gender manager of the SMEs and the characteristics of the intrapreneurculture. The empirical study was conducted using a sample of 600 SMEs in the region of Murcia (Spain. The intrapreneur culture is analyzed considering theclassification of Galvez and Garcia (2011. The results show that companies The results show that companies directed by women promoted greater extentthan men intrapreneur characteristics of culture such as: autonomy and risk taking, teamwork, compensation and support to management. The implicationsof our research are relevant and can help public authorities and managers to the analysis and development of policies that promote gender equity withinorganizations.

  1. Sibling influences on gender development in middle childhood and early adolescence: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, S M; Updegraff, K A; Helms-Erikson, H; Crouter, A C

    2001-01-01

    The development of gender role qualities (attitudes, personality, leisure activities) from middle childhood to early adolescence was studied to determine whether siblings' gender role qualities predicted those of their sisters and brothers. Participants were 198 firstborn and second-born siblings (Ms = 10 years 9 months and 8 years 3 months, respectively, in Year 1) and their parents. Families were interviewed annually for 3 years. Firstborn siblings' qualities in Year 1 predicted second-born children's qualities in Year 3 when both parent and child qualities in Year 1 were controlled, a pattern consistent with a social learning model of sibling influence. Parental influence was more evident and sibling influence less evident in predicting firstborns' qualities; for firstborns, sibling influences suggested a de-identification process.

  2. Gender Differences in Radiation Dose from Nuclear Cardiology Studies Across the World: Findings from the International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lynn; Dorbala, Sharmila; Paez, Diana; Shaw, Leslee J.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Better, Nathan; Bokhari, Nadia; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Mercuri, Mathew; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate gender-based differences in nuclear cardiology practice, globally, with particular focus on laboratory volume, radiation dose, protocols, and best practices. BACKGROUND It is unclear if gender-based differences exist in radiation exposure for nuclear cardiology procedures. METHODS In a large multicenter observational cross-sectional study encompassing 7911 patients in 65 countries, radiation effective dose was estimated for each examination. Patient-level best practices relating to radiation exposure were compared between genders. Analysis of covariance was utilized to determine any difference in radiation exposure according to gender, region, and the interaction between gender and region. Linear, logistic, and hierarchical regression models were developed to evaluate gender-based differences in radiation exposure and laboratory adherence to best practices. We also included the United Nations’ gender inequality and human development indices as covariates in multivariable models. RESULTS The proportion of MPI studies performed in women varied between countries, however there was no significant correlation with gender inequality index. Globally, mean effective dose for nuclear cardiology procedures was only slightly lower in women (9.6±4.5 mSv) than in men (10.3±4.5 mSv men, pnuclear cardiology procedures, only small differences were observed between genders worldwide. Regional variations noted in MPI use and radiation dose offer potential opportunities to address gender-related differences in delivery of nuclear cardiology care. PMID:27056156

  3. GENDER COGNITION IN RELIGIOUS DISCOURSE: A STUDY OF FRAMING IN THEMATIC HOLY KORAN INTERPRETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang S. Anshori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at describing gender cognition phenomenon in religious discourse in thematic interpretation (tafsir of the Holy Koran published by the Ministry of Religious Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia. Each interpretation book as a written discourse is different from each other due to author’s cognition frame. This study employs a constructive qualitative approach with technical framing analysis. The data are language data (religious text that are obtainable from thematic interpretation of the Koran of the Ministry of Religious Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia. Data analysis was performed on the following topics: the origins of the creation of men and women, women's leadership, women and inheritance rights, women and ownership, and women's testimony. The research findings show: (1 The lingual and religious discourse containing gender cognition are present in the forms of words, phrases, and sentences. The lingual form of religious discourse is related to the meaning of technical vocabulary that contains appropriate understanding of the discourse topic. (2 Discourse representing gender cognition is found on three topics: women leadership (nation leadership, waris (inheritance, and women’s testimony. In terms of inheritance and women’s testimony, this interpretation refers to conditions that are explicitly stated in the Holy Koran. Meanwhile, this interpretation views leadership of the nation as more worthy to be given to men than women. book looks is more worthy of leadership in the countries was given to men than women.

  4. Choosing a Surgeon: An Exploratory Study of Factors Influencing Selection of a Gender Affirmation Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettner, Randi; Ettner, Frederic; White, Tonya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting a healthcare provider is often a complicated process. Many factors appear to govern the decision as to how to select the provider in the patient-provider relationship. While the possibility of changing primary care physicians or specialists exists, decisions regarding surgeons are immutable once surgery has been performed. This study is an attempt to assess the importance attached to various factors involved in selecting a surgeon to perform gender affirmation surgery (GAS). It was hypothesized that owing to the intimate nature of the surgery, the expense typically involved, the emotional meaning attached to the surgery, and other variables, decisions regarding choice of surgeon for this procedure would involve factors other than those that inform more typical healthcare provider selection or surgeon selection for other plastic/reconstructive procedures. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to individuals who had undergone GAS and individuals who had undergone elective plastic surgery to assess decision-making. Results: The results generally confirm previous findings regarding how patients select providers. Conclusion: Choosing a surgeon to perform gender-affirming surgery is a challenging process, but patients are quite rational in their decision-making. Unlike prior studies, we did not find a preference for gender-concordant surgeons, even though the surgery involves the genital area. Providing strategies and resources for surgical selection can improve patient satisfaction.

  5. Gender Differences in the Consequences of Divorce: A Study of Multiple Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    In this study, I examined gender differences in the consequences of divorce by tracing annual change in 20 outcome measures covering four domains: economic, housing and domestic, health and well-being, and social. I used data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) and fixed-effects panel regression models on a sample of N = 18,030 individuals initially observed in a marital union, N = 1,220 of whom divorced across the observation period (1984-2015). Three main findings emerged from the analysis. First, men were more vulnerable to short-term consequences of divorce for subjective measures of well-being, but postdivorce adaptation alleviated gender differences in these outcomes. Second, a medium-term view on multiple outcomes showed more similarity than differences between women and men. The medium-term consequences of divorce were similar in terms of subjective economic well-being; mental health, physical health, and psychological well-being; residential moves, homeownership, and satisfaction with housework; and chances of repartnering, social integration with friends and relatives, and feelings of loneliness. Third, the key domain in which large and persistent gender differences emerged were women's disproportionate losses in household income and associated increases in their risk of poverty and single parenting. Taken together, these findings suggest that men's disproportionate strain of divorce is transient, whereas women's is chronic.

  6. The Primacy of Discourse in the Study of Gender in Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Olga; LaMarre, Andrea; Rice, Carla

    2017-09-01

    Family therapists and scholars increasingly adopt poststructural and postmodern conceptions of social reality, challenging the notion of stable, universal dynamics within family members and families and favoring a view of reality as produced through social interaction. In the study of gender and diversity, many envision differences as social constructed rather than as "residing" in people or groups. There is a growing interest in discourse or people's everyday use of language and how it may reflect and advance interests of dominant groups in a society. Despite this shift from structures to discourse, therapists struggle to locate the dynamics of power in concrete actions and interactions. By leaving undisturbed the social processes through which gendered and other subjectivities and relations of power are produced, therapists may inadvertently become complicit in the very dynamics of power they seek to undermine. In this article, we argue that discourse analysis can help family therapy scholars and practitioners clarify the link between language and power. We present published examples of discourse analytic studies of gender and sexism and examine the relevance of these ideas for family therapy practice and research. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  7. A Pilot Study Exploring Gender Differences in Residents’ Strategies for Establishing Mentoring Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C. McNamara, M.D., MSc

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground Mentoring is important throughout a physician’s career and has been noted to be particularly important during residency training. Other studies suggest that women may experience difficulty in finding mentors.Purpose This study explored gender-specific differences in residents’ mentoring experiences.Methods The authors conducted two focus groups at the University of Pittsburgh in July, 2004. One group was composed of 12 female residents; the other was composed of nine male residents. Discussions were audiotaped and transcribed. Two investigators coded the transcripts and identified emerging themes.Results Residents of both genders cited multiple barriers to mentoring. Men´s strategies for findingmentors were more numerous than women´s and included identifying mentors through research,similar interests, friendship, and networking. Female strategies were limited and included identifying mentors through “word of mouth” and work experiences. Women described more passiveapproaches for finding a mentor than men.Conclusions Female residents may lack strategies and initiatives for finding mentors. Residency programs should create opportunities for residents to develop mentoring relationships, with special attention paid to gender differences

  8. Sex/Gender Differences in Cotinine Levels Among Daily Smokers in the Pennsylvania Adult Smoking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allshine; Krebs, Nicolle M; Zhu, Junjia; Sun, Dongxiao; Stennett, Andrea; Muscat, Joshua E

    2017-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine sex/gender differences in smoke exposure and to quantify the role of potential predictors including puffing behaviors, nicotine dependence, and non-nicotinic factors. The Pennsylvania Adult Smoking Study (PASS) of 332 adult cigarette smokers utilized portable handheld topography devices to capture the smokers' profiles in a naturalistic environment. Sex/gender differences in salivary biomarkers were modeled using ANCOVA to account for measures of dependence (Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence, nicotine metabolite ratio [3-hydroxycotinine/cotinine]), and nondependence covariates including anthropomorphic factors and stress. The Blinder-Oaxaca method was used to decompose the sex/gender differences in nicotine uptake due to covariates. Men had significantly higher cotinine levels (313.5 ng/mL vs. 255.8 ng/mL, p < 0.01), cotinine +3-hydroxycotinine levels, (0.0787 mol/L vs. 0.0675 mol/L, p = 0.01), puff volumes (52.95 mL vs. 44.77 mL, p < 0.01), and a lower nicotine metabolite ratio (0.396 vs. 0.475, p = 0.01) than women. The mean Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence score did not differ between men and women (p = 0.24). Women had a higher mean Hooked on Tobacco Checklist score than men (7.64 vs. 6.87, p < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, nicotine metabolite levels were not significantly different by sex. Decomposition results show that ten predictors can explain 83% of the sex/gender differences in cotinine uptake. Height was the greatest contributor to these differences, followed by average puff volume. Conclusion and Impact: The higher levels of nicotine metabolites in men, compared to women, can be explained by height, weight, puff volume, and nicotine metabolism.

  9. Influence of Gender on the Performance of Cardiopulmonary Rescue Teams: A Randomized, Prospective Simulator Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, Simon Adrian; Schumacher, Cleo; Legeret, Corinne; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert Karl; Marsch, Stephan; Hunziker, Sabina

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about the influence of gender on resuscitation performance which may improve future education in resuscitation. The aim of this study was to compare female and male rescuers in regard to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and leadership performance. Prospective, randomized simulator study. High-fidelity patient simulator center of the medical ICU, University Hospitals Basel (Switzerland). Two hundred sixteen volunteer medical students (108 females and 108 males) of two Swiss universities in teams of three. None. We analyzed data on the group and the individual level separately. The primary outcome on the group level was the hands-on time within the first 180 seconds after the onset of the cardiac arrest. Compared with male-only teams, female-only teams showed less hands-on time (mean ± SD) (87 ± 41 vs 109 ± 33 s; p = 0.037) and a longer delay before the start of chest compressions (109 ± 77 vs 70 ± 56 s; p = 0.038). Additionally, female-only teams showed a lower leadership performance in different domains and fewer unsolicited cardiopulmonary resuscitation measures compared with male-only teams. On the individual level, which was assessed in mixed teams only, female gender was associated with a lower number of secure leadership statements (3 ± 2 vs 5 ± 3; p = 0.027). Results were confirmed in regression analysis adjusted for team composition. We found important gender differences, with female rescuers showing inferior cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance, which can partially be explained by fewer unsolicited cardiopulmonary resuscitation measures and inferior female leadership. Future education of rescuers should take gender differences into account.

  10. The case for addressing gender and power in sexuality and HIV education: a comprehensive review of evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Nicole A

    2015-03-01

    Curriculum-based sexuality and HIV education is a mainstay of interventions to prevent STIs, HIV and unintended pregnancy among young people. Evidence links traditional gender norms, unequal power in sexual relationships and intimate partner violence with negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes. However, little attention has been paid to analyzing whether addressing gender and power in sexuality education curricula is associated with better outcomes. To explore whether the inclusion of content on gender and power matters for program efficacy, electronic and hand searches were conducted to identify rigorous sexuality and HIV education evaluations from developed and developing countries published between 1990 and 2012. Intervention and study design characteristics of the included interventions were disaggregated by whether they addressed issues of gender and power. Of the 22 interventions that met the inclusion criteria, 10 addressed gender or power, and 12 did not. The programs that addressed gender or power were five times as likely to be effective as those that did not; fully 80% of them were associated with a significantly lower rate of STIs or unintended pregnancy. In contrast, among the programs that did not address gender or power, only 17% had such an association. Addressing gender and power should be considered a key characteristic of effective sexuality and HIV education programs.

  11. Gender identification and sex reassignment surgery in the trans population: a survey study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giami, Alain; Beaubatie, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Drawing from controversies between medical, legal, and associative actors about the obligation of sex reassignment surgeries (SRS) for people who intend to change their civil status, this article discusses the role that medical procedures, and particularly SRS, play in contemporary gender identifications and transition pathways in France. In 2010, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research conducted a national survey in order to study the sociodemographic characteristics, access to medical, and psychological care, and state of health among trans individuals. After a long period of ethnographic work during which a partnership was established with trans actors to map the social, medical, and political landscape of trans communities, a questionnaire was developed and distributed between July and October 2010 in collaboration with most of the trans organizations and public and private health professionals operating in France. Overall, 381 self-identified trans individuals returned the anonymous self-administered questionnaire. The results highlighted the heterogeneity of the trans population, whose definition cannot be reduced to a group of individuals undergoing standardized hormonal treatments and SRS. Two central indicators, sex assigned at birth and gender self-identification, enabled us to describe and analyze different medical and legal pathways with a particular focus on SRS, which is often compulsory for a change of civil status in France. Although SRS remains an important factor in an individual's subjective evaluation of the success of the transition pathway, its practice varies depending on one's sex assigned at birth and gender identification.

  12. THE EFFECT OF GENDER ON JOB SATISFACTION: A STUDY ON CIVIL SERVANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya FİDAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction refers to the pleasure a person gets from their job, the feeling of satisfaction and the quality of life. The main aim of this study is to examine the effect of gender on job satisfaction, which is an important factor for both organizations and employees. Job satisfaction can be defined as the feeling that the human resources feel about their work and it has an important place among the concepts that affect the success of organizations such as business efficiency, employee attendance and performance. In this context, job satisfaction levels of the employees in a public institution in Karabük and the effect of gender on job satisfaction were examined using the job satisfaction scale. Data were gathered through a questionnaire and analyzed by using frequency and percentage distribution. According to the findings, it was found that some concepts in the job satisfaction scale were meaningfully differentiated from gender. It could be claimed that if the managers take the concepts that were found to be meaningful into consideration, it will increase the motivation of human resources and will serve creating viable organizations.

  13. Is Science Built on the Shoulders of Women? A Study of Gender Differences in Contributorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Benoit; Larivière, Vincent; Sugimoto, Thomas; Sugimoto, Cassidy R

    2016-08-01

    Women remain underrepresented in the production of scientific literature, and relatively little is known regarding the labor roles played by women in the production of knowledge. This study examined labor roles by gender using contributorship data from science and medical journals published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS), which require each author to indicate their contribution to one or more of the following tasks: (1) analyzed the data, (2) conceived and designed the experiments, (3) contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools, (4) performed the experiments, and (5) wrote the paper. The authors analyzed contribution data from more than 85,000 articles published between 2008 and 2013 in PLOS journals with respect to gender using both descriptive and regression analyses. Gender was a significant variable in determining the likelihood of performing a certain task associated with authorship. Women were significantly more likely to be associated with performing experiments, and men were more likely to be associated with all other authorship roles. This holds true controlling for academic age: Although experimentation was associated with academically younger scholars, the gap between male and female contribution to this task remained constant across academic age. Inequalities were observed in the distribution of scientific labor roles. These disparities have implications for the production of scholarly knowledge, the evaluation of scholars, and the ethical conduct of science. Adopting the practice of identifying contributorship rather than authorship in scientific journals will allow for greater transparency, accountability, and equitable allocation of resources.

  14. [Concepts of gender, masculinity and healthcare: a study of primary healthcare professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, Rosana; Couto, Márcia Thereza; Silva, Geórgia Sibele Nogueira da; Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Gomes, Romeu; Santos Figueiredo, Wagner dos; Valença, Otávio Augusto; Pinheiro, Thiago Félix

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzes concepts of gender and masculinity among Primary Healthcare professionals in four Brazilian States (Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, São Paulo). It is based on two perspectives: the meanings associated with being a man and the relations between masculinity and healthcare. This qualitative study is part of a multicentric investigation, which used triangulation methods as a benchmark. Sixty-nine in-depth interviews carried out among health professionals with higher education were analyzed. The discourses (re)produce the notion that health facilities are "feminized spaces". Within the daily routine, this notion is translated as reinforcing the idea that the male body is not a locus of this care, as opposed to the female body which is considered a locus of care. The presence of a hegemonic pattern of masculinity is prominent among professionals' representations of men and seems to influence the latter, in their lack of commitment with healthcare. The existence of a stereotyped gender model (re)produces disparities between men and women in healthcare and compromises the visibility of other meanings and expressions of gender identities.

  15. Association of Mandible Anatomy with Age, Gender, and Dental Status: A Radiographic Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chole, Revant H.; Patil, Ranjitkumar N.; Balsaraf Chole, Swati; Gondivkar, Shailesh; Gadbail, Amol R.; Yuwanati, Monal B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Gonial angle and antegonial region are important landmarks in mandible which is influenced by gender, age, and dental status. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gonial angle, antegonial angle, and antegonial depth and to investigate their relationship to gender, age group, and dental status. Materials and Methods. A total of 1060 panoramic radiographs were evaluated: the dentulous group, 854 subjects and the edentulous group, 206 subjects. The patients were grouped into six age groups of 10-years each. Gonial angle, antegonial angle, and antegonial depth were measured from panoramic radiographs. Results and Discussion. Corelation of age with gonial angle, antegonial angle and antegonial depth was not significant. Significant difference in mandibular angle was found between males and females. Males had significantly smaller antegonial angle and greater antegonial depth than females. Significant difference was found for gonial angle, antegonial angle, and antegonial depth between right and left sides of mandible. Conclusion. Gonial angle, antegonial angle, and antegonial depth can be implicated as a forensic tool for gender determination but not suitable for age determination

  16. Beyond a man's world: contributions from considering gender in the study of bus drivers' work activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Liliana; Nogueira, Sónia; Lacomblez, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Bus driving is a typically male occupation undergoing a process of feminization. Although men remain a majority, women's integration has raised some questions, namely, related to work organization or its impact on health. This paper focuses on the contributions of assuming a gender perspective in the analysis of the bus driving occupation and the conditions under which it is performed. Twenty female and 158 male bus drivers. Qualitative and quantitative approaches were combined. Ergonomic work analysis and individual interviews were used, as well as INSAT (Work and Health Questionnaire). Difficulties inherent to the work activity were highlighted, in terms of working hours and management of "peripheral tasks", with implications for the balance between professional and personal life. These difficulties were reported differently by men and women, although both made themselves clear about the impact on their career and health. Taking gender into consideration has enabled an enrichment of the questions that guide the analysis of this work activity, and contributed to a new perspective on the work performed by this occupational group as well as a new approach to study the history of the transport industry by proposing as focus of analysis issues related to "gender mobility".

  17. A Study of Hand Back Skin Texture Patterns for Personal Identification and Gender Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human hand back skin texture (HBST is often consistent for a person and distinctive from person to person. In this paper, we study the HBST pattern recognition problem with applications to personal identification and gender classification. A specially designed system is developed to capture HBST images, and an HBST image database was established, which consists of 1,920 images from 80 persons (160 hands. An efficient texton learning based method is then presented to classify the HBST patterns. First, textons are learned in the space of filter bank responses from a set of training images using the -minimization based sparse representation (SR technique. Then, under the SR framework, we represent the feature vector at each pixel over the learned dictionary to construct a representation coefficient histogram. Finally, the coefficient histogram is used as skin texture feature for classification. Experiments on personal identification and gender classification are performed by using the established HBST database. The results show that HBST can be used to assist human identification and gender classification.

  18. Gender differences in brain development in Chinese children and adolescents: a structural MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Jin, Zhen; Chen, Kewei; Peng, Danling; Yao, Li

    2008-03-01

    Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), this study systematically investigated gender differences in brain development through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 158 Chinese normal children and adolescents aged 7.26 to 22.80 years (mean age 15.03+/-4.70 years, 78 boys and 80 girls). Gender groups were matched for measures of age, handedness, education level. The customized brain templates, including T I-weighted image and gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM)/cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) prior probability maps, were created from all participants. Results showed that the total intracranial volume (TIV), global absolute GM and global WM volume in girls were significantly smaller than those in boys. The hippocampus grew faster in girls than that in boys, but the amygdala grew faster in boys than that in girls. The rate of regional GM decreases with age was steeper in the left superior parietal lobule, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, left precuneus, and bilateral supramarginal gyrus in boys compared to girls, which was possibly related to better spatial processing ability in boys. Regional GM volumes were greater in bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. Regional WM volumes were greater in the left temporal lobe, right inferior parietal and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. The gender differences in the temporal and frontal lobe maybe be related to better language ability in girls. These findings may aid in understanding the differences in cognitive function between boys and girls.

  19. Gender and Feminist Studies in Brazil: An Analysis of Revista Estudos Feministas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Diniz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Revista Estudos Feministas (REF is one of the most important gender and feminist journals in Brazil. This article describes the author background and the subjects of the articles published in REF from 1992 to 2002. It was analysed the title, abstracts and keywords of the articles and the topics of the dossier, totalising 20 editorials, 105 articles and 20 dossiers. The classification and indexation of the material was guided by the controlled vocabulary of the “Tesauro para Estudos de Gênero e sobre Mulheres”, from Fundação Carlos Chagas. The results show that 95% of the authors are women, and that 54% are from Socials Sciences. There are articles in all thematic areas suggested by the Tesauro except on “Science and Technology” and “Education”, with a concentration on the following thematic areas: “Socials Sciences and Culture” (26%, “Language, Literature, Religion and Philosophy” (17% and “History and Social Transformation” (17%. The most discussed topics were in this order: sexual division of work, literary analysis, reproduction, and feminist theory. The analysis of REF suggests that gender and feminist research is a solitary activity, with a few number of articles published in partnership. There is a strong preference for qualitative methodologies (92%. This article aims to facilitate the process of identification some marginal areas in the gender and feminist studies in Brazil, empowering the educational and political work of the journal.

  20. Gender Differences in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Hospital-Based Multicenter Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Bueno Alves

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gender differences are well described for patients with ischemic stroke. Conversely, sex disparities in stroke presentation, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH were not previously studied. Our objective was to compare the frequency of risk factors, management patterns, symptoms at presentation, complication rates, and outcomes between genders in patients with ICH in Fortaleza, Brazil. Methods: Data were prospectively collected from patients admitted to 19 hospitals in Fortaleza with a diagnosis of ICH by trained research coordinators from June 2009 to October 2010. Daily visits to the selected hospitals were performed, and all patients admitted with a diagnosis of ICH were prospectively evaluated. Results: We evaluated 364 patients, 47.5% of whom were women. Men were younger (59.3 ± 14.58 years vs. 66.3 ± 14.6 years, p Conclusion: Overall risk factors for ICH in men and women were similar in our series. Men had a higher frequency of alcohol abuse and smoking. Women were older, had an increased time length from symptoms onset to hospital admission and had a worse prognosis at discharge. A better understanding of the gender disparities in patients with ICH will hopefully lead to better outcomes in both sexes in the future.

  1. Marital Status and Frailty in Older People: Gender Differences in the Progetto Veneto Anziani Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Caterina; Veronese, Nicola; Maggi, Stefania; Baggio, Giovannella; De Rui, Marina; Bolzetta, Francesco; Zambon, Sabina; Sartori, Leonardo; Perissinotto, Egle; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Manzato, Enzo; Sergi, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Marital status has been associated with disability and mortality, but its potential role as a factor influencing frailty has yet to be thoroughly investigated. The analysis of gender-related differences in the relationship between marital status and frailty is another interesting matter that remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of our study was to examine the association between marital status and the incidence of frailty in a cohort of older men and women over a 4.4-year follow-up. A sample of 1887 subjects older than 65 years, enrolled under the Progetto Veneto Anziani (Pro.V.A.) and with no evidence of frailty at baseline, were grouped by marital status. The incidence of frailty after 4.4 years was measured as the presence of at least three of the Fried criteria. After the follow-up period, 414 (21.9%) new cases of frailty were identified. Multivariate logistic regression models demonstrated that male gender carried a higher risk of developing frailty among men who had never married (odds ratio [OR] = 3.84, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.76-5.35; p gender, widows had significantly lower odds of becoming frail than married women (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66-0.91, p = 0.002). The determinants of frailty more influenced by marital status were unintentional weight loss, low daily energy expenditure, and exhaustion. Marital status seems to significantly influence the onset of frailty, with some gender-specific differences. Unmarried men were at higher risk of frailty, while widowed women carried a lower risk of becoming frail than married women.

  2. The impact of gender stereotypes on the evaluation of general practitioners' communication skills: an experimental study using transcripts of physician-patient encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Jennifer; Demmel, Ralf

    2007-12-01

    The present study has been designed to test for the effect of physicians' gender on the perception and assessment of empathic communication in medical encounters. Eighty-eight volunteers were asked to assess six transcribed interactions between physicians and a standardized patient. The effects of physicians' gender were tested by the experimental manipulation of physicians' gender labels in transcripts. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two testing conditions: (1) perceived gender corresponds to the physician's true gender; (2) perceived gender differs from the physician's true gender. Empathic communication was assessed using the Rating Scales for the Assessment of Empathic Communication in Medical Interviews. A 2 (physician's true gender: female vs. male)x2 (physician's perceived gender: female vs. male)x2 (rater's gender: female vs. male) mixed multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) yielded a main effect for physician's true gender. Female physicians were rated higher on empathic communication than male physicians irrespective of any gender labels. The present findings suggest that gender differences in the perception of physician's empathy are not merely a function of the gender label. These findings provide evidence for differences in male and female physicians' empathic communication that cannot be attributed to stereotype bias. Future efforts to evaluate communication skills training for general practitioners may consider gender differences.

  3. Gender in facial representations: a contrast-based study of adaptation within and between the sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruç, Ipek; Guo, Xiaoyue M; Barton, Jason J S

    2011-01-18

    Face aftereffects are proving to be an effective means of examining the properties of face-specific processes in the human visual system. We examined the role of gender in the neural representation of faces using a contrast-based adaptation method. If faces of different genders share the same representational face space, then adaptation to a face of one gender should affect both same- and different-gender faces. Further, if these aftereffects differ in magnitude, this may indicate distinct gender-related factors in the organization of this face space. To control for a potential confound between physical similarity and gender, we used a Bayesian ideal observer and human discrimination data to construct a stimulus set in which pairs of different-gender faces were equally dissimilar as same-gender pairs. We found that the recognition of both same-gender and different-gender faces was suppressed following a brief exposure of 100 ms. Moreover, recognition was more suppressed for test faces of a different-gender than those of the same-gender as the adaptor, despite the equivalence in physical and psychophysical similarity. Our results suggest that male and female faces likely occupy the same face space, allowing transfer of aftereffects between the genders, but that there are special properties that emerge along gender-defining dimensions of this space.

  4. Gender Stereotyping in Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hussain

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gender stereotyping and gender role development is one of the debatable concerns to sociologists especially those who are interested in sociology of gender. This study attempts to investigate the role of family inculcating gender stereotyping in Pakhtun culture and its impact on gender role development conducted in public-sector universities of Malakand Division, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. The data were collected through in-depth interview method using interview guide as a tool of data collection. A sample size of 24 respondents consisting male and female students and teachers (8 samples from each university through purposive sampling technique was selected from three universities in the region, that is, University of Malakand, University of Swat, and Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University Sharingal (main campus. The collected information has been analyzed qualitatively where primary information has been linked with secondary data for further elaboration and attainment of grounded facts. The study reveals that gender stereotyping and gender role formation are sociocultural and relational constructs, which are developed and inculcated in the institutional network, social interaction, and social relationships especially in family. The study indicated that in family sphere, gender stereotyping and gender role formation are the outcome of gender socialization, differential familial environment, and parents’ differential role with children. The study recommends that gender-balanced familial environment, adopting the strategy of gender mainstreaming and positive role of media, can overcome gender stereotyping and reduce its impacts on gender and social role formation.

  5. Influence of parental perception of school safety and gender on children's physical activity in Mexico: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Amy; Soltero, Erica G; Barquera, Simón; Lévesque, Lucie; Jauregui, Edtna; López Y Taylor, Juan; Lee, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    This cross sectional study aims to determine the effects of gender and parental perception of safety at school on children's physical activity (PA) levels. Parents of school aged Mexican children residing in Guadalajara, Mexico City, and Puerto Vallarta, completed surveys about their children's PA measures. The physical activity indicators were evaluated using linear and logistical regression models. Analysis did not indicate that gender moderated the relationship between parental perception of safety and PA measures, but significant gender issues exist with girls participating less than boys in the three measures of PA in this study (p<0.001). Results suggest the need for additional interventions promoting physical activity in girls in Mexico.

  6. Global architecture of gestational diabetes research: density-equalizing mapping studies and gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Richter, Theresa; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Gerber, Alexander; Bundschuh, Matthias; Jaque, Jenny; Groneberg, David A

    2016-04-04

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with substantial morbidity for mothers and their offspring. While clinical and basic research activities on this important disease grow constantly, there is no concise analysis of global architecture of GDM research. Hence, it was the objective of this study to assess the global scientific performance chronologically, geographically and in relation to existing research networks and gender distribution of publishing authors. On the basis of the New Quality and Quantity Indices in Science (NewQIS) platform, scientometric methods were combined with modern visualizing techniques such as density equalizing mapping, and the Web of Science database was used to assess GDM-related entries from 1900 to 2012. Twelve thousand five hundred four GDM-related publications were identified and analyzed. The USA (4295 publications) and the UK (1354 publications) dominated the field concerning research activity, overall citations and country-specific Hirsch-Index, which quantified the impact of a country's published research on the scientific community. Semi-qualitative indices such as country-specific citation rates ranked New Zealand and the UK at top positions. Annual collaborative publications increased steeply between the years 1990 and 2012 (71 to 1157 respectively). Subject category analysis pointed to a minor interest of public health issues in GDM research. Gender analysis in terms of publication authorship revealed a clear dominance of the male gender until 2005; then a trend towards gender equity started and the activity of female scientists grew visibly in many countries. The country-specific gender analysis revealed large differences, i.e. female scientists dominated the scientific output in the USA, whereas the majority of research was published by male authors in countries such as Japan. This study provides the first global sketch of GDM research architecture. While North-American and Western-European countries were

  7. Explaining gender differences in non-fatal suicidal behaviour among adolescents: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Jeanette

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While suicide is the second leading cause of death among young people in most industrial countries, non-fatal suicidal behaviour is also a very important public health concern among adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in prevalence and emotional and behavioural correlates of suicidal behaviour in a representative school-based sample of adolescents. Methods A cross-sectional design was used to assess suicidal behaviour and various areas of emotional and behavioural problems by using a self-report booklet including the Youth Self-Report. One hundred sixteen schools in a region of Southern Germany agreed to participate. A representative sample of 5,512 ninth-grade students was studied. Mean age was 14.8 years (SD 0.73; 49.8% were female. Results Serious suicidal thoughts were reported by 19.8% of the female students and 10.8% of the females had ever attempted suicide. In the male group, 9.3% had a history of suicidal thoughts and 4.9% had previously attempted suicide. Internalizing emotional and behavioural problems were shown to be higher in the female group (difference of the group means 4.41 while externalizing emotional and behavioural problems slightly predominated in male students (difference of the group means -0.65. However, the total rate of emotional and behavioural problems was significantly higher in the adolescent female group (difference of the group means 4.98. Using logistic regression models with suicidal thoughts or attempted suicide as dependent variables, the pseudo-R2 of gender alone was only 2.7% or 2.3%, while it was 30% or 23.2% for emotional and behavioural problems measured by the YSR syndrome scales. By adding gender to the emotional and behavioural problems only an additional 0.3% of information could be explained. Conclusions The findings suggest that gender differences in non-fatal suicidal behaviour among adolescents can to a large extent be explained by the

  8. The interplay of gender and social background: A longitudinal study of interaction effects in reading attitudes and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael; McElvany, Nele

    2017-11-15

    Researchers often report and discuss gender differences. However, recent research has drawn attention to interaction effects between gender and other social categories. This study analysed the development of disparities in students' reading-related self-concept, intrinsic motivation, and behaviour, as they relate to differences in gender and socio-economic family background. Drawing on expectancy-value theory, we regarded reading-related self-concept, motivation, and behaviour as key to explaining the growing differences between boys and girls in adolescence. Specifically, we focused on the interaction between gender and socio-economic background in children, which has been discussed in the context of moderating gender differences but not in the context of reading-related attitudes and behaviour. The investigation is based on a longitudinal sample of N = 717 German students between third and sixth grades. We used questionnaire data from both students and parents. To compare students' development across time, we applied multigroup latent growth curve models. We found evidence of increasing gender differences, which were also moderated by the socio-economic status (SES) of parents: a gender gap either already existed (intrinsic motivation and reading behaviour) or intensified (reading self-concept and reading behaviour) between third and sixth grades. The interaction of gender and SES seemed particularly important for reading self-concept, with the gender gap growing less substantially for higher-SES children. Moreover, this pattern persisted for reading self-concept, even when controlling for achievement differences. The results provide evidence that gender, social background, and the interaction of the two are relevant for development in the domain of reading, even in young children. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Study of Adolescents Perceived Parenting Styles Based on their Gender and Age

    OpenAIRE

    صادق تقی لو

    2017-01-01

    Parenting styles play a major role in determining the life styles of adolescents and that is why they share a special significance. The present study was done with the aim to investigate adolescents’ perceived parenting styles based on their gender and age. The study was conducted by a post-event method and with a sample size of 623 subjects (311 female and 312 male), who were selected by the multistage sampling method. Data were analyzed, after being collected by the Baumrind Parenting Style...

  10. Gender differences in psychiatric diagnoses in older people with intellectual disability: a register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmon, Anna; Sandberg, Magnus; Ahlström, Gerd

    2017-05-22

    Gender differences regarding psychiatric ill-health are well known in the general population. However, not much research is done on people with intellectual disability, and especially not among older people with intellectual disability. People with intellectual disability aged 55+ years in 2012 in Sweden were identified through a register containing information on those receiving support and service for this type of disability. The cohort comprised 3609 women and 4327 men with mean age 65 and 64 years, respectively. Information on psychiatric diagnoses was collected from the National Patient Register for the period 2002-2012. Potential gender differences were evaluated both for diagnostic categories (e.g. affective disorders) and single diagnoses (e.g. depressive episodes). The most common diagnoses among women were in the diagnostic category affective disorders, and among men in psychotic disorders. The majority of both women (72%) and men (71%) had diagnoses in only one diagnostic category. Women were more likely than men to have at least one diagnosis of dementia (odds ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.83) or affective disorders (1.33, 1.21-1.58) during the study period. They were, however, less likely to have at least one diagnosis of alcohol/substance use related disorder (0.59, 0.43-0.80). No gender differences were found for diagnoses of psychotic (1.04, 0.86-1.27) or anxiety disorders (1.15, 0.94-1.40). Regarding single diagnoses, women were more likely than men to have had at least one diagnosis of unspecified nonorganic psychosis (1.75, 1.23-2.50), depressive episode (1.47, 1.19-1.82), recurrent depressive disorder (1.53, 1.06-2.22), other anxiety disorder (1.34, 1.06-1.69), or dementia in Alzheimer disease (2.50, 1.40-4.49), but less likely to be diagnosed with psychiatric and behavioral disorders due to use of alcohol (0.41, 0.27-0.61). As in the general population, there seem to be gender differences with respect to several types of

  11. Politeness, emotion, and gender: A sociophonetic study of voice pitch modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Ikuko

    The present dissertation is a cross-gender and cross-cultural sociophonetic exploration of voice pitch characteristics utilizing speech data derived from Japanese and American speakers in natural conversations. The roles of voice pitch modulation in terms of the concepts of politeness and emotion as they pertain to culture and gender will be investigated herein. The research interprets the significance of my findings based on the acoustic measurements of speech data as they are presented in the ERB-rate scale (the most appropriate scale for human speech perception). The investigation reveals that pitch range modulation displayed by Japanese informants in two types of conversations is closely linked to types of politeness adopted by those informants. The degree of the informants' emotional involvement and expressions reflected in differing pitch range widths plays an important role in determining the relationship between pitch range modulation and politeness. The study further correlates the Japanese cultural concept of enryo ("self-restraint") with this phenomenon. When median values were examined, male and female pitch ranges across cultures did not conspicuously differ. However, sporadically occurring women's pitch characteristics which culturally differ in width and height of pitch ranges may create an 'emotional' perception of women's speech style. The salience of these pitch characteristics appears to be the source of the stereotypically linked sound of women's speech being identified as 'swoopy' or 'shrill' and thus 'emotional'. Such women's salient voice characteristics are interpreted in light of camaraderie/positive politeness. Women's use of conspicuous paralinguistic features helps to create an atmosphere of camaraderie. These voice pitch characteristics promote the establishment of a sense of camaraderie since they act to emphasize such feelings as concern, support, and comfort towards addressees, Moreover, men's wide pitch ranges are discussed in view

  12. A Statistical Study of Serum Cholesterol Level by Gender and Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharu, Bhikhari Prasad; Tsokos, Chris P

    2017-07-25

    Cholesterol level (CL) is growing concerned as health issue in human health since it is considered one of the causes in heart diseases. A study of cholesterol level can provide insight about its nature and characteristics. A cross-sectional study. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANS) II was conducted on a probability sample of approximately 28,000 persons in the USA and cholesterol level is obtained from laboratory results. Samples were selected so that certain population groups thought to be at high risk of malnutrition. Study included 11,864 persons for CL cases with 9,602 males and 2,262 females with races: whites, blacks, and others. Non-parametric statistical tests and goodness of fit test have been used to identify probability distributions. The study concludes that the cholesterol level exhibits significant racial and gender differences in terms of probability distributions. The study has concluded that white people are relatively higher at risk than black people to have risk line and high risk cholesterol. The study clearly indicates that black males normally have higher cholesterol. Females have lower variation in cholesterol than males. There exists gender and racial discrepancies in cholesterol which has been identified as lognormal and gamma probability distributions. White individuals seem to be at a higher risk of having high risk cholesterol level than blacks. Females tend to have higher variation in cholesterol level than males.

  13. Is There Gender Difference between Learning Disabled Students' Performances in Mathematical Activities? (Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Karimi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that mathematics disorder is a learning disorder. Children with this disorder have math skills is much lower than mean for their age, intelligence, and education. The disorder affects the child's success at school. It is thought that up to 7% of children have this disorder. It affects boys and girls equally. It is also caused dyscalculia. The cause of this disorder is not known. Like other learning disorders, it occurs more in some families. Mathematics disorder may also be the result of damage in certain parts of the brain. It also has led to a weak understanding of mathematical concepts and increased realization of mathematics. In this study, it is tried that studied gender difference between learning disabled students' performances in mathematical activities. Findings indicated that there is not meaningful difference between genders. Since this research was case study, it seems that this difference will be indicated in vast studies. Then it suggests that have to do more study in this field for its causes.

  14. Sustainable student retention and gender issues in mathematics for ICT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divjak, Blazenka; Ostroski, Mirela; Vidacek Hains, Violeta

    2010-04-01

    This article reports on the research whose specific objective is to improve student retention in mathematics included in the first-year ICT study programme by means of improving teaching methods, with an emphasis on gender issues. Two principal reasons for this research are, first, the fact that first-year mathematics courses are often viewed as an obstacle for retention in studying ICT, and second, the fact that female students are strongly underrepresented in ICT. Furthermore, according to recently introduced research, changes in pedagogy and the content of mathematics have been evaluated. Those changes are directed towards competency-based and student-centred education and are heavily supported by technology-based learning. Although only minor gender differences in different skills have been detected, the pass rate for female students is constantly higher than that for male students. Therefore, the reasons for the better performance of female students have been investigated taking into account both the motivation for study and learning styles. The primary sources of data used in the first year of research comprised questionnaires (n = 130) together with classroom and on-line assessment material for 263 students. In the next year, 160 students of Information Systems participated in the survey, the central topic of which was the motivation for study. Additionally, the research focused on finding out if the motivation factors are gender specific. The research was conducted in Croatia where no research on a similar topic had been previously available. In terms of the specific features of the socio-cultural environment, conducting such a research in Croatia proved to be worthwhile, particularly considering the possibility of comparing the obtained results with those arising from other environments.

  15. Assessment of effect of age, gender, and dentoalveolar changes on mandibular morphology: A digital panoramic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sairam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With progressive development in the growth and function of the jaws, changes are observed in size as well as shape of the mandible, which vary on the basis of age, gender, and dental status. The objective of this study was to evaluate and assess the morphological changes of the mandible, with varying age, gender, and dental status, using panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using digital panoramic radiographs taken by Kodak 8000c digital panoramic and cephalometric system on 150 patients, comprising fifty edentulous individuals (above 50 years of age, fifty old dentate individuals (above 50 years of age, and fifty young dentate individuals (below 25 years of age. All the mandibular measurements (gonial angle, ramus length, condylar length (CL, ramus notch depth, and cortical bone thickness were carried out using RadiAnt DICOM VIEWER 2.2.9 (32-bit software. The measurements were then subjected to paired t-test, Tukey's multiple post hoc procedures, and multiple linear regression analysis. Results: Descriptive statistics for all the parameters on the right and left sides of the mandible in both males and females were analyzed. A statistical significance of P < 0.05 was observed for all the variables except one variable (CL. Conclusion: In the present study, all the variables showed increased measurements in males except gonial angle, which was found to be wider in females, indicating that women tend to get affected by varying dental statuses than men. Hence, the parameters used in this study may act as good indicators for the assessment of the effect of age, gender, and dental status on mandibular morphology.

  16. Gender differences in cerebral metabolism for color processing in mice: A PET/MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njemanze, Philip C; Kranz, Mathias; Amend, Mario; Hauser, Jens; Wehrl, Hans; Brust, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Color processing is a central component of mammalian vision. Gender-related differences of color processing revealed by non-invasive functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound suggested right hemisphere pattern for blue/yellow chromatic opponency by men, and a left hemisphere pattern by women. The present study measured the accumulation of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) in mouse brain using small animal positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) with statistical parametric mapping (SPM) during light stimulation with blue and yellow filters compared to darkness condition. PET revealed a reverse pattern relative to dark condition compared to previous human studies: Male mice presented with left visual cortex dominance for blue through the right eye, while female mice presented with right visual cortex dominance for blue through the left eye. We applied statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to examine gender differences in activated architectonic areas within the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex and related cortical and sub-cortical areas that lead to the striatum, medial thalamus and other brain areas. The metabolic connectivity of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex evoked by blue stimulation spread through a wide range of brain structures implicated in viscerosensory and visceromotor systems in the left intra-hemispheric regions in male, but in the right-to-left inter-hemispheric regions in female mice. Color functional ocular dominance plasticity was noted in the right eye in male mice but in the left eye in female mice. This study of color processing in an animal model could be applied in the study of the role of gender differences in brain disease.

  17. Of beauties, beaus, and beasts : studying women's and men's actual and imagined experiences of sexual and gender harassment

    OpenAIRE

    Vanselow, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Evidence from five studies focusing on different factors that influence interpretation of different behaviors constituting different forms of sexual harassment and gender harassment is presented. Six factors of influence were studied: (1) physical attractiveness and (2) quality of financial resources of the harasser, (3) gender and (4) attitudes of the harassee, (5) interpreting derogatory versus interpreting "flirtatious" behavior, and (6) interpreting actual harassment versus interpreting i...

  18. Relationship between the morphological variation of sella turcica with age and gender: A digital radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talkad Subbaiah Mahesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sella turcica is a saddle-shaped concavity located in the middle cranial fossa of the skull. The exact dimensions of sella turcica are an important consideration in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of diseases related to the pituitary gland and brain. The sella turcica size and morphology is different from person to person. Thus, obtaining any data in this regard will be a great help in detecting abnormalities within this anatomic area. Aim: The objective of this study was to find out the correlation between the morphological variations of sella turcica with age and gender. Materials and Methods: Study sample consisted of 311 cephalograms of patients with age ranging 6–40 years. The contour of the sella turcica was traced and the linear measurements – length, depth, and diameter of sella turcica – were measured according to Silverman. Results: Morphology of sella turcica appeared to be normal shape in 27.3% of the study population followed by combination (26.7%, irregular (15.8%, pyramidal (10.6%, bridge (10%, oblique anterior wall (5.5%, and double contour (4.2%. Gender-wise comparison of the linear measurement was not statistically significant. Among the linear measurement, the parameter depth and diameter were statistically significant (P < 0.001 when correlated with age. On comparison of shape of sella turcica with linear measurements, the parameter length was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: There is no significant relationship between the linear measurements and gender. There exists a significant relationship between the mean depth and mean diameter with age. That is, as age increases, the depth and diameter increase. There is a significant relationship between the length and the different shapes of sella turcica.

  19. Gender Discrimination in Educational Personnel: A Case Study of Gweru Urban District Secondary Schools, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matope, Nogget

    2012-01-01

    Gender discrimination in educational institutions persists, despite the vigorous pursuit of policies and programmes to reduce the varying degrees of gender inequity in Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe is a signatory to international agreements and conventions which promote gender equity with a thrust towards increased access to education for girls and females.…

  20. Religion and Gender Roles in Africa: A Case Study of Religion and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender roles are the apportioning of certain roles to a particular sex by society. This is quite different from gender disparity which promotes the ideology that one sex is better than the other. They are gender ideologies which can be deconstructed. In some primal cultures however, they were imbued with religious undertones ...

  1. Experimental Study of Gender Effects on Language Use in College Students' Email to Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Tate, Shurita; Daugherty, Timothy K.; Bartkoski, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotal reports have arisen regarding gender bias in electronic communication on college campuses. In an experiment designed to test language use in different gender contexts, participants were asked to compose an email to a professor whose gender had been experimentally manipulated. Female students, but not male students, displayed lower…

  2. Gender & performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röttger, K.; Buchheim, E.; Groot, M.; Jonker, E.; Müller-Schirmer, A.; de Vos, M.; Walhout, E.; van der Zande, H.

    2012-01-01

    This Yearbook for Women’s History (Jaarboek voor Vrouwengeschiedenis) examines the theme of gender and performance. It is supervised by guest editor Kati Röttger, professor in Theatre Studies at the University of Amsterdam. The term performance - a temporary and active presentation, expression, or

  3. The Effect of Gender on Stress Factors: An Exploratory Study among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Calvarese

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between gender and reactions to stress among university students. University students were surveyed on how they typically responded when under perceived stress. There were significant differences between males and females concerning their reactions to stress. Overall, more females experienced higher levels of depression, frustration, and anxiety than their male counterparts when reacting to stress. Males also tended to have other psychological reactions different from those listed on the survey. In addition, while the stress reaction of anger was barely statistically insignificant, more females expressed anger than males as a reaction to stress.

  4. Crossing the Gender Gap: A Study of Female Participation and Performance in Advanced Maths and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseltine, Jessica

    2006-10-01

    A statistical analysis of enrollment in AP maths and sciences in the Abilene Independent School District, between 2000 and 2005, studied the relationship between gender, enrollment, and performance. Data suggested that mid-scoring females were less likely than their male counterparts to enroll in AP-level courses. AISD showed higher female : male score ratios than national and state averages but no improvement in enrollment comparisons. Several programs are suggested to improve both participation and performance of females in upper-level math and science courses.

  5. The Danish Gender Wage Gap in the 1980s: A Panel Data Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Smith, Nina

    1996-01-01

    In Denmark the equal pay act was put into force in 1976, but the relative pay of female workers is still considerably below the level of male workers in most occupational and educational groups, and the decline of the aggregate gender wage gap seems to have stagnated since the late 1970s....... In this study different explanations of this evidence are investigated empirically based on the estimation of a human capital model on a panel sample of Danish wage earners observed during the period 1979-1990. Udgivelsesdato: APR...

  6. Gender differences in sex life issues A population-based study of migraine sufferers

    OpenAIRE

    Sumanen, Markku PT; Ojanlatva, Ansa; Rantala, Anna; Sillanmäki, Lauri H; Mattila, Kari J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Migraine is considered to have a negative influence on sex life. The present study was to analyse the perceptions of importance of and satisfaction with sex life as well as the expression of interest in sex among people having migraines in a prospective follow-up mail survey in 1998 and 2003. Methods The random sample was stratified according to gender and age in four age groups (20–24, 30–34, 40–44, and 50–54 years). Altogether 25 898 individuals responded to the baseline...

  7. PENGARUH SOSIALISASI GENDER TERHADAP PEMBENTUKAN POLA PIKIR PEREMPUAN ACEH (Studi Kasus di Banda Aceh dan Aceh Besar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miskahuddin Miskahuddin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Discourse on gender is not depleted as discussed and studied scientifically until now. Debate in academic circles about gender are already accustomed discussed and no longer be something foreign. Even today there are efforts to encourage all of the activities and programs should be concerned with aspects of gender equality. Development of previously unknown information about only the consumption of the current academic has penetrated up to the village level, and unknown to many people , both lay and the learned knowledge. This occurs because of the reality of gender socialization undertaken by various parties, including government agencies through the empowerment of women and children , as well as by non-governmental organizations ( local and international NGOs . Many people received information about the gender , clearly establish its own thinking paradigm for women in Aceh . To see about women thinking about gender Aceh after getting the socialization of NGOs , the research was conducted.Keywords : Influence , Socialization , Gender

  8. The effect of gender on the clinical clerkship experiences of female medical students: results from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaria, Palav; Abedin, Sakena; Nunez-Smith, Marcella

    2009-07-01

    To characterize how female medical students perceive the role of gender within their medical education during the transition to the clinical curriculum. In 2006-2007, the authors conducted a qualitative study consisting of in-depth interviews with 12 third-year female medical students completing their first clinical clerkship. Participants were purposefully selected from a single New England medical school to represent a range of ages, ethnicities, and prior life experiences. Participants (1) struggled to define their role on the wards and often defaulted to stereotypical gender roles, (2) perceived differences in the nature of their workplace relationships compared with the nature of male medical students' workplace relationships, (3) had gendered expectations of male and female physicians that shaped their interactions with clinical supervisors, (4) felt able to negotiate uncomfortable situations with patients but felt unable to negotiate uncomfortable situations with supervisors and attendings, and (5) encountered a "gender learning curve" on the wards that began to shape their self-view as future female physicians. Despite increased numbers of women in medicine, issues of gender continue to have a substantial impact on the medical education of female students. Institutions can design interventions about gender issues in medicine that expand beyond a focus on sexual harassment to address the complex ways in which students are affected by issues of gender.

  9. Gender effects on phonological processing and reading development in Northern Sotho children learning to read in English: A case study of Grade 3 learners

    OpenAIRE

    Carien Wilsenach; Patricia Makaure

    2018-01-01

    Gender differences in reading development are a global phenomenon, with girls typically performing better than boys. Some studies have reported gender differences favouring girls in reading comprehension in South Africa, but little systematic evidence exists about gender differences in the cognitive-linguistic abilities that underlie reading development. This study investigated the effect of gender on phonological processing and reading development in Northern Sotho–English bilingual children...

  10. Can motivations for studying dentistry inform us about gender and BME differences in dental academic careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waylen, A; Barnes, O; Kenyon, P; Neville, P

    2017-01-13

    There are various motivators that prompt people to study dentistry but there is evidence that the salience of each varies according to gender and black and minority ethnic (BME) group. Given the current focus on inequality within the science, technology, engineering, medicine and mathematics (STEMM) academic disciplines where dentistry sits, it is important to understand the relevance of different motivators to different social groups if inequality is to be overcome. We carried out a survey of dental students from 11 out of the 18 dental schools in the UK to find out what prompted them to study dentistry. Our findings showed that most people make a personal choice to study dentistry and follow a patient-focused career while the prospect of an academic career was important for less than half of our sample. Differences according to gender and BME group were apparent but did not follow these trends. In order to continue to improve the diversity within dental academia dental schools should consider the different preferences of the workforce and work to broaden its potential.

  11. Is an Ideal Sense of Humor Gendered? A Cross-National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Sümeyra; Faghihi, Nafiseh; Vaid, Jyotsna

    2018-01-01

    To explore lay conceptions of characteristics of an ideal sense of humor as embodied in a known individual, our study examined elicited written narratives by male and female participants from three different countries of origin: United States, Iran, and Turkey. As reported in an earlier previous study with United States-based participants (Crawford and Gressley, 1991), our study also found that the embodiment of an ideal sense of humor was predominantly a male figure. This effect was more pronounced for male than for female participants but did not differ by country. Relative mention of specific humor characteristics differed by participant gender and by country of origin. Whereas all groups mentioned creativity most often as a component of an ideal sense of humor, this attribute was mentioned significantly more often by Americans than by the other two groups; hostility/sarcasm was also mentioned significantly more often by Americans than Turkish participants who mentioned it more often than Iranian participants. Caring was mentioned significantly more often by Americans and Iranians than by Turkish participants. These findings show a shared pattern of humor characteristics by gender but group differences in the relative prominence given to specific humor characteristics. Further work is needed to corroborate the group differences observed and to pinpoint their source.

  12. Female Gender Scheme is Disturbed by Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Qualitative Study From Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri Amiri, Fatemeh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Mohammadpour Thamtan, Reza Ali; Shiva, Niloofar

    2014-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting up to one in every five women of reproductive age. The majority of researches on PCOS focus on its biomedical aspects, often overlooking and neglecting women's own perceptions and experiences. This study aimed to explore women's perception and experiences that influence their personal gender role. This research is a qualitative study by conventional content analysis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 reproductive aged women with PCOS, recruited from the reproductive endocrinology research center. , in-depth interviews were continued to reach data saturation. The study was carried out at the reproductive endocrinology research center of Shahid Beheshti University in Tehran All the interviews were recorded and transcribed, and qualitative content analysis of the data was conducted manually. Four themes were identified. Content analysis of the interviews revealed these women mainly perceived themselves with lack of physical attractiveness, loss of womanhood, interruption of sexual role and disruption of fertility potential, feelings were related to symptoms e.g. 'excess' hair; absent or disrupted menstrual cycle, obesity and infertility commonly experienced by women with PCOS. Women with PCOS are challenged in their perceptions of themselves as "feminine" because of their hairy appearance, irregular menses and lack of fertility and this influences their gender roles. Medical practitioners must understand how PCOS precisely affects women's roles and initiate management aimed at reconstructing their "womanhood", along with their medical treatment.

  13. Physical activity and gender: comparative study between adolescents from Monterrey, Mexico and Zaragoza, Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Ceballos Gurrola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare medium energy expenditure and levels of physical activity between adolescents from Monterrey, Mexico and Zaragoza, Spain taking into consideration variables such as gender, type of school, and time of the week.  Methods: adolescent students of 12 to 17 years of age from public and private schools in Monterrey (N= 396 and Zaragoza (N= 394.  The Four-by-One-Day Physical Activity Questionnaire was used and a .89 reliability with a test-retest because the test was adapted to this study.  Results: In Zaragoza as well as in Monterrey there is a significant number of students with low levels of physical activity.  Almost half of the students have been classified as inactive and very inactive.  The energy expenditure was very similar for both cities: Monterrey 37.52 ± 2.12 kcal/kg/day and Zaragoza 37.66 ± 2.95 kcal/kg/day.  Conclusions: Regarding gender, men show greater levels of physical activity than women.  This data coincides with the majority of the studies.  Students perform a higher level of physical activity during school days than during weekends.

  14. What is Gender Equality? A General Review of Gender Politics and Gendered Bodies in Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Yoriko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the connections among the concepts of sex, gender, and bodies because understanding their meanings is essential for gender studies and feminist theory, especially with relation to gender politics in sports.

  15. Gender Wage Gap: Discrimination or Different Preferences of Men and Women? A Case Study of Ostrava, Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzana Machová; Lenka Filipová

    2013-01-01

    This paper was written as a part of a research project studying problem of wage determinant measuring and wage discrimination considering different wage requirements of men and women. The wage determinants and gender wage discrimination are analyzed using a probit model. The whole analysis is methodologically based on Mincer’s Wage Regression and Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition of gender wage gap. The wage variables include, aside from standard personal characteristics, dummies for institution...

  16. Report of Case Studies on Gender Equality as a Focus Point of National and Nativist Discourses (Deliverable 9.7)

    OpenAIRE

    Siim, Birte; Kriszan, Andrea; Ámon, Kata; Knijn, Trudie; Broek, Hans Peter van den; Caponia, Tiziana; Gal, John; Halevy, Dana; Sipic, Josip; Unger, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of WP9.7 is to analyse ‘cross-national case studies on gender equality as the focus of national and nativist discourses’. This deliverable is based on the national reports on the rhetoric of populist radical right parties from the seven selected countries, i.e. Croatia, Denmark, the Netherlands, Hungary, Germany, Italy and Spain, together with Israel. The objective of this synthesis report is to identify similarities and divergences in framing migration, mobility, gender and f...

  17. The challenges to gender integration in the career fire services: a comparative case study of men in nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    pdf. 191 David F. Burrelli, Women in the Armed Forces (CRS Report No. 92008) ( Washington , DC: Congressional Research Service, 1998), 1, https...IB92008) Washington , DC: Congressional Research Service, 1998. https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=718051. Carreiras, Helena. Gender and the Military: Women ...GENDER INTEGRATION IN THE CAREER FIRE SERVICES: A COMPARATIVE CASE STUDY OF MEN IN NURSING by Anna L. Schermerhorn-Collins March 2017

  18. A gender analysis of a national community health workers program: A case study of Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizada, Said Ahmad Maisam; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn; Labonté, Ronald

    2018-05-07

    Gender equity can be a neglected issue in health system reforms. This paper explores the multiple layered gender dynamics of the Afghan Community Health Worker (CHW) Program within broader health system reforms in Afghanistan using a qualitative research design. We interviewed policy makers, health managers, CHWs and community members in 16 sites in 2013 and 2014. We found that gendered societal norms interact and influence the Afghan CHW program in a dynamic way. Gendered social norms around the division of labour tend to privilege women in terms of access to resources at the community level, but it is men who hold leadership positions that ultimately decide how the resources are to be distributed. The Afghan Ministry of Public Health expresses a commitment to gender equity, but policies on gender are restricted to reproductive health, thus constraining a gender-equity approach as focused on maternal and child health. Our explicit gender analysis not only reveals gender inequities in the Afghan CHW Program and the broader health system, it also uncovers how a highly gendered division of health labour provides some opportunities for women's empowerment that can disrupt patriarchal role constraints and broader gender inequities.

  19. Un/doing Gender? a Case Study of School Policy and Practice in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Monisha

    2009-11-01

    This article explores an attempt to disrupt gender inequality in a unique, low-cost private school in Ndola, Zambia. It examines deliberate school policies aimed at "undoing gender" or fostering greater gender equity. These include efforts to maintain gender parity at all levels of the school and the requirement that both young men and women carry out cleaning tasks generally viewed as "women's work". Observations, interviews, student diaries and surveys from this school and from government schools provide the basis for a comparison, indicating how the former strives to interrupt the transmission of gender inequalities as well as how students respond to these practices. The findings suggest that the pedagogical practices deployed by this school have generally succeeded in destabilising norms of gender subordination and gender-based violence, though the replicability of these practices is interrogated given broader questions about the country's public resources and political will.

  20. The gender imbalance in academic medicine: a study of female authorship in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Reena; Rajashekhar, Praveen; Lavin, Victoria L; Parry, Joanne; Attwood, James; Holdcroft, Anita; Sanders, David S

    2009-08-01

    A shortfall exists of female doctors in senior academic posts in the United Kingdom. Career progression depends on measures of esteem, including publication in prestigious journals. This study investigates gender differences in first and senior authorship in six peer-reviewed British journals and factors that are associated with publication rates. Data was collected on United Kingdom first and senior authors who had published in the British Medical Journal, Lancet, British Journal of Surgery, Gut, British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and the Archives of Diseases in Childhood. Authorship and gender were quantified for 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2004 (n=6457). In addition, selected questions from the Athena Survey of Science Engineering and Technology (ASSET2006), web-based doctor's self-report of publications were also analysed (n=1162). Female first authors increased from 10.5% in 1970 to 36.5% in 2004 (p<0.001) while female senior authors only increased from 12.3% to 16.5% (p=0.046). Within individual journals, the largest rise was in British Journal of Obstetric and Gynaecology with 4.5- and 3-fold increases for first and senior authors, respectively. In contrast, female senior authors marginally declined in Gut and Lancet by 2.8% and 2.2%, respectively. ASSET2006 identified that female respondents who were parents were less likely to have publications as sole (p=0.02) and joint authors (p<0.001) compared to male respondents. Female respondents with care responsibilities for parents/partner also had less publications as lead authors compared to those without carer responsibilities (p<0.001). The increase in UK female first authors is encouraging. In contrast, there is considerable lag and in some specialties a decline in female senior authors. Factors that could narrow the gender gap in authorship should be sought and addressed.

  1. A qualitative study on perceptions of surgical careers in Rwanda: A gender-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sojung; Lin, Yihan; Kansayisa, Grace; Costas-Chavarri, Ainhoa

    2018-01-01

    Access to surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) remains deficient without an adequate workforce. There is limited understanding of the gender gap in surgical trainees in LMICs. In Rwanda, females fill only one of 20 positions available. Understanding surgeons' experiences and perceptions of surgical careers may help facilitate support for females to contribute to the global surgical workforce. We performed qualitative analysis on perceptions of surgical careers through semi-structured interviews of all female surgeons (n = 6) and corresponding male surgeons (n = 6) who are training or have trained at University of Rwanda. Transcripts were analyzed with code structure formed through an integrated approach. Question categories formed the deductive framework, while theoretical saturation was reached through inductive grounded theory. Themes were organized within two key points of the career timeline. First, for developing interest in surgery, three main themes were identified: role models, patient case encounters, and exposure to surgery. Second, for selecting and sustaining surgical careers, four main themes emerged: social expectations about roles within the family, physical and mental challenges, professional and personal support, and finances. All female surgeons emphasized gender assumptions and surgical working culture as obstacles, with a corresponding strong sense of self-confidence and internal motivation that drew them to select and maintain careers in surgery. Family, time, and physical endurance were cited as persistent challenges for female participants. Our study reveals concepts for further exploration about gendered perceptions of surgical careers. Efforts to improve support for female surgical careers as a strategy for shaping surgical work culture and professional development in Rwanda should be considered. Such strategies may be beneficial for improving the global surgical workforce.

  2. Gallstone disease and obesity: a population-based study on abdominal fat distribution and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmard, Amir Reza; Merat, Shahin; Kooraki, Soheil; Ashraf, Mahya; Keshtkar, Abbas; Sharafkhah, Maryam; Jafari, Elham; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Existing evidence suggests the visceral fat is more metabolically active than subcutaneous fat. We aimed to investigate the value of subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue thickness (VAT) for prediction of gallstone disease (GSD) in general population by focus on gender differences and comparison with body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). In this cross-sectional survey, 1,494 subjects (51.4 % men), aged above 50, randomly selected from Golestan Cohort Study residing in Gonbad City, Iran, underwent anthropometric measurements and abdominal ultrasonography. Prevalence of GSD was 17.8% (95% CI 15.9-19.8). Following adjustment for age and then other potential risk factors, all obesity indices, except for SAT, were associated with GSD in women with the highest odds ratio observed in WHtR (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.22-1.89). In contrast, WHR was the only associated index in men (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.08-2.06). The trend of increasing obesity measures across the quartiles with the risk of GSD was significant in subgroups of WHtR and BMI in women and WHR in men. No significant association was found between SAT and GSD in men or women. The best anthropometric indicators of the risk of GSD may differ by gender. In men, WHR might be the only preferred index to estimate risk of GSD. WHtR, WHR, VAT and BMI are associated with GSD risk in women, although WHtR might better explain this risk. SAT is the poor indicator for identifying subjects with GSD in both genders.

  3. Gender similarities and differences in brain activation strategies: Voxel-based meta-analysis on fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRyalat, Saif Aldeen

    2017-01-01

    Gender similarities and differences have long been a matter of debate in almost all human research, especially upon reaching the discussion about brain functions. This large scale meta-analysis was performed on functional MRI studies. It included more than 700 active brain foci from more than 70 different experiments to study gender related similarities and differences in brain activation strategies for three of the main brain functions: Visual-spatial cognition, memory, and emotion. Areas that are significantly activated by both genders (i.e. core areas) for the tested brain function are mentioned, whereas those areas significantly activated exclusively in one gender are the gender specific areas. During visual-spatial cognition task, and in addition to the core areas, males significantly activated their left superior frontal gyrus, compared with left superior parietal lobule in females. For memory tasks, several different brain areas activated by each gender, but females significantly activated two areas from the limbic system during memory retrieval tasks. For emotional task, males tend to recruit their bilateral prefrontal regions, whereas females tend to recruit their bilateral amygdalae. This meta-analysis provides an overview based on functional MRI studies on how males and females use their brain.

  4. Do we have proportionate gender in policy making? A Study based on key Government Institutions of SAARC Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Nabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Women empowerment has remained a long standing issue for practitioners and policy makers at all levels even in the present modern known era of modernization. The basic objective of this study is to assess gender equality in the top sphere of the SAARC key governmental institutions from the recruitment and selection perspective. This study has used secondary data collected from the official websites of the governments and its affiliated key institutions. The unique feature of this study is that it analyzes gender inequality phenomena form the recruitment and selection perspective. An extensive gap has been identified between male and female top executives serving in key government institutions, which is not only a serious challenge for the global gender equality policy but also a serious question on government gender selection polices in the region. The notion of male dominance clearly prevails in the current scenario of the gender representation in government institutions, which remains a serious challenge for the gender equality. It has been concluded that a special focus is needed to prioritize the selection mechanism for females in top power structure of these governments especially in SAARC region.

  5. Gender and Age Related Effects While Watching TV Advertisements: An EEG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Cartocci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to show how the variation of the EEG frontal cortical asymmetry is related to the general appreciation perceived during the observation of TV advertisements, in particular considering the influence of the gender and age on it. In particular, we investigated the influence of the gender on the perception of a car advertisement (Experiment 1 and the influence of the factor age on a chewing gum commercial (Experiment 2. Experiment 1 results showed statistically significant higher approach values for the men group throughout the commercial. Results from Experiment 2 showed significant lower values by older adults for the spot, containing scenes not very enjoyed by them. In both studies, there was no statistical significant difference in the scene relative to the product offering between the experimental populations, suggesting the absence in our study of a bias towards the specific product in the evaluated populations. These evidences state the importance of the creativity in advertising, in order to attract the target population.

  6. Impact of Pregnancy and Gender on Internal Medicine Resident Evaluations: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Megan L; Elrashidi, Muhamad Y; Halvorsen, Andrew J; McDonald, Furman S; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-06-01

    Pregnancy and its impact on graduate medical training are not well understood. To examine the effect of gender and pregnancy for Internal Medicine (IM) residents on evaluations by peers and faculty. This was a retrospective cohort study. All IM residents in training from July 1, 2004-June 30, 2014, were included. Female residents who experienced pregnancy and male residents whose partners experienced pregnancy during training were identified using an existing administrative database. Mean evaluation scores by faculty and peers were compared relative to pregnancy (before, during, and after), accounting for the gender of both the evaluator and resident in addition to other available demographic covariates. Potential associations were assessed using mixed linear models. Of 566 residents, 117 (20.7%) experienced pregnancy during IM residency training. Pregnancy was more common in partners of male residents (24.7%) than female residents (13.2%) (p = 0.002). In the post-partum period, female residents had lower peer evaluation scores on average than their male counterparts (p = 0.0099). A large number of residents experience pregnancy during residency. Mean peer evaluation scores were lower after pregnancy for female residents. Further study is needed to fully understand the mechanisms behind these findings, develop ways to optimize training throughout pregnancy, and explore any unconscious biases that may exist.

  7. The effect of gender on medical students' aspirations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Jess; Tully, Mary Patricia; Dornan, Tim

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect of gender on medical students' aspirations. The study design included purposive sampling and interim data interpretation to guide recruitment of medical students with a wide spectrum of opinions. Data were collected through audio-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth exploratory interviews, which were transcribed verbatim. Qualitative analysis was carried out by a female medical student researcher. Her evolving interpretation was constantly compared against the original data by male (doctor) and female (pharmacist) staff researchers in a systematic search for internal corroboration or disconfirmation. Causal associations consistently present in the data are reported. Six male and six female medical students in Years 3 and 4 shared a wish to achieve a work-life balance that allowed them to devote time to bringing up children while contributing usefully to society as doctors. However, women were readier to compromise professional attainment within their personal work-life balances. Their readiness derived from gendered stereotypes of women's social and professional roles, a lack of female professional role models, womens' greater awareness of the tensions between career and family, various other informal social influences, and a lack of positive career advice to counterbalance these influences. Better career advice and more flexible work opportunities are needed if the two-thirds of medical students who are women are to contribute specialist as well as generalist expertise to the medical workforce.

  8. Internationalität in Gender Studies – Reflexionen aus Indien und der Türkei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Segebart

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Der audiovisuelle Beitrag Internationalität in Gender Studies – Reflexionen aus Indien und der Türkei stellt durch die Darstellung sehr persönlicher individueller Sichtweisen und Erfahrungen die Spannbreite von Positionen zum Thema dar. Theoretische Reflexionen werden nicht unbedingt untermauert, aber auch nicht negiert. Der Beitrag will innerhalb des Jahrbuchs daran erinnern, dass hinter den theoretischen Debatten Menschen stehen, die sich miteinander austauschen und auseinandersetzen wollen. Multidirektionale Transfers sind erwünscht sowie eine ständige kritische Auseinandersetzung über das Wie. Duygu Aloglu aus Ankara, Türkei und Lavinia Mawlong aus Shillong und Mumbai, Indien promovieren am Institut für Geographische Wissenschaften an der FU Berlin. Sie sprechen über ihre persönliche Sichtweise auf das Thema Internationalisierung von Gender Studies, fokussieren speziell auf die Situation in der Türkei und in Indien und betten dies in ihren eigenen persönlichen Hintergrund ein. Die Interviews wurden auf Englisch und separat geführt. Sie sind im Film zusammengefügt worden.

  9. Age, gender, and percentage of circulating osteoprogenitor (COP) cells: The COP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardene, Piumali; Al Saedi, Ahmed; Singh, Lakshman; Bermeo, Sandra; Vogrin, Sara; Phu, Steven; Suriyaarachchi, Pushpa; Pignolo, Robert J; Duque, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    Circulating osteoprogenitor (COP) cells are blood-borne cells which express a variety of osteoblastic markers and are able to form bone nodules in vivo. Whereas a high percentage of COP cells (%COP) is associated with vascular calcification, low %COP has been associated with disability and frailty. However, the reference range of %COP in age- and gender-matching populations, and the age-related changes in %COP remain unknown. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 144 healthy volunteers in Western Sydney (20-90year-old, 10 male and 10 female subjects per decade). %COP was quantified by flow cytometry. A high inter-and intra-rater reliability was found. In average, in this healthy population average of %COP was 0.42. There was no significant difference in %COP among the age groups. Similarly, no significant difference was found in %COP with gender, weight, height or BMI. In addition, we identified a normal reference range of %COP of 0.1-3.8%. In conclusion, in addition to the identification of steady levels of COP cells with age, we also identified a normal reference range of %COP, which could be used in future studies looking at musculoskeletal diseases in older populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gender and Age Related Effects While Watching TV Advertisements: An EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartocci, Giulia; Cherubino, Patrizia; Rossi, Dario; Modica, Enrica; Maglione, Anton Giulio; di Flumeri, Gianluca; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show how the variation of the EEG frontal cortical asymmetry is related to the general appreciation perceived during the observation of TV advertisements, in particular considering the influence of the gender and age on it. In particular, we investigated the influence of the gender on the perception of a car advertisement (Experiment 1) and the influence of the factor age on a chewing gum commercial (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 results showed statistically significant higher approach values for the men group throughout the commercial. Results from Experiment 2 showed significant lower values by older adults for the spot, containing scenes not very enjoyed by them. In both studies, there was no statistical significant difference in the scene relative to the product offering between the experimental populations, suggesting the absence in our study of a bias towards the specific product in the evaluated populations. These evidences state the importance of the creativity in advertising, in order to attract the target population.

  11. Gender-related asymmetric brain vasomotor response to color stimulation: a functional transcranial Doppler spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njemanze, Philip C

    2010-11-30

    The present study was designed to examine the effects of color stimulation on cerebral blood mean flow velocity (MFV) in men and women. The study included 16 (8 men and 8 women) right-handed healthy subjects. The MFV was recorded simultaneously in both right and left middle cerebral arteries in Dark and white Light conditions, and during color (Blue, Yellow and Red) stimulations, and was analyzed using functional transcranial Doppler spectroscopy (fTCDS) technique. Color processing occurred within cortico-subcortical circuits. In men, wavelength-differencing of Yellow/Blue pairs occurred within the right hemisphere by processes of cortical long-term depression (CLTD) and subcortical long-term potentiation (SLTP). Conversely, in women, frequency-differencing of Blue/Yellow pairs occurred within the left hemisphere by processes of cortical long-term potentiation (CLTP) and subcortical long-term depression (SLTD). In both genders, there was luminance effect in the left hemisphere, while in men it was along an axis opposite (orthogonal) to that of chromatic effect, in women, it was parallel. Gender-related differences in color processing demonstrated a right hemisphere cognitive style for wavelength-differencing in men, and a left hemisphere cognitive style for frequency-differencing in women. There are potential applications of fTCDS technique, for stroke rehabilitation and monitoring of drug effects.

  12. Not so ‘invisible’: A Qualitative Case Study Exploring Gender Relations and Farm Management Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Carolyn Mackrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative case study explored farm management practices by women cotton growers who used computer-based information systems, most particularly the agricultural farm management software, CottonLOGIC, within the Australian cotton industry. This study found that, although gender differences and inequalities persist in rural parts of the region, the agency of women cotton growers ensures not only a sustainable future for themselves and their families, but also for the broader cotton industry as a whole. The use of farm management software by women cotton farmers was informed by Connell’s theoretical framework of gender relations (2002. The findings suggested that, women’s active participation in family farm partnerships and their acquisition of technological skills through the use of farm management software like CottonLOGIC, meant that all cotton growers benefit through the feminizing of specific farm management practices in family farm enterprises. This, therefore, has significant implications for developing the cotton industry into a truly sustainable entity.

  13. Influence of Self-Concept, Study Habit and Gender on Attitude and Achievement of Secondary School Students in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoru, Usman; Ramon, Olosunde Gbolagade

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-concept, attitude of the students towards mathematics, and math achievement. Also, this study investigated the influence of study habits on achievement; study habits on attitude of students to mathematics. The influence of gender and self-concept and study habit group on achievement and attitude…

  14. Peculiarities of Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Garduno, Sylvia Aide Figueroa; Kovacova, Nikola; Arjona, Ruben Campos

    2017-01-01

    This project challenges the essentialist notions of gender in fantasy genre. The trilogy of Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children will shed light on the shifting patterns of gender performativity in fantasy. To drive our analysis, we will resort to Judith Butler’s theory of gender performativity, Joseph Campbell’s monomyth and William Indick’s study of fantasy and myth.

  15. Gender and respiratory findings in workers occupationally exposed to organic aerosols: A meta analysis of 12 cross-sectional studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustajbegovic Jadranka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender related differences in respiratory disease have been documented. The aim of this study was to investigate gender related differences in respiratory findings by occupation. We analyzed data from 12 of our previously published studies. Methods Three thousand and eleven (3011 workers employed in "organic dust" industries (1379 female and 1632 male were studied. A control group of 806 workers not exposed to any kind of dust were also investigated (male = 419, female = 387. Acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and lung function were measured. The weighted average method and the Mantel-Haentszel method were used to calculate the odds ratios of symptoms. Hedge's unbiased estimations were used to measure lung function differences between men and women. Results There were high prevalences of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms in all the "dusty" studied groups compared to controls. Significantly less chronic cough, chronic phlegm as well as chronic bronchitis were found among women than among men after the adjustments for smoking, age and duration of employment. Upper respiratory tract symptoms by contrast were more frequent in women than in men in these groups. Significant gender related lung function differences occurred in the textile industry but not in the food processing industry or among farmers. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that in industries processing organic compounds there are gender differences in respiratory symptoms and lung function in exposed workers. Whether these findings represent true physiologic gender differences, gender specific workplace exposures or other undefined gender variables not defined in this study cannot be determined. These data do not suggest that special limitations for women are warranted for respiratory health reasons in these industries, but the issue of upper respiratory irritation and disease warrants further study.

  16. Gender and respiratory findings in workers occupationally exposed to organic aerosols: a meta analysis of 12 cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, E Neil; Zuskin, Eugenija; Moshier, Erin L; Godbold, James; Mustajbegovic, Jadranka; Pucarin-Cvetkovic, Jasna; Chiarelli, Angelo

    2009-01-12

    Gender related differences in respiratory disease have been documented. The aim of this study was to investigate gender related differences in respiratory findings by occupation. We analyzed data from 12 of our previously published studies. Three thousand and eleven (3011) workers employed in "organic dust" industries (1379 female and 1632 male) were studied. A control group of 806 workers not exposed to any kind of dust were also investigated (male = 419, female = 387). Acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and lung function were measured. The weighted average method and the Mantel-Haentszel method were used to calculate the odds ratios of symptoms. Hedge's unbiased estimations were used to measure lung function differences between men and women. There were high prevalences of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms in all the "dusty" studied groups compared to controls. Significantly less chronic cough, chronic phlegm as well as chronic bronchitis were found among women than among men after the adjustments for smoking, age and duration of employment. Upper respiratory tract symptoms by contrast were more frequent in women than in men in these groups. Significant gender related lung function differences occurred in the textile industry but not in the food processing industry or among farmers. The results of this study suggest that in industries processing organic compounds there are gender differences in respiratory symptoms and lung function in exposed workers. Whether these findings represent true physiologic gender differences, gender specific workplace exposures or other undefined gender variables not defined in this study cannot be determined. These data do not suggest that special limitations for women are warranted for respiratory health reasons in these industries, but the issue of upper respiratory irritation and disease warrants further study.

  17. No association between gender inequality and peak HIV prevalence in developing countries - an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chris R; Buyze, Jozefien

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of both gender inequality and HIV prevalence vary considerably both within all developing countries and within those in sub-Saharan Africa. We test the hypothesis that the extent of gender inequality is associated with national peak HIV prevalence. Linear regression was used to test the association between national peak HIV prevalence and three markers of gender equality - the gender-related development index (GDI), the gender empowerment measure (GEM), and the gender inequality index (GII). No evidence was found of a positive relationship between gender inequality and HIV prevalence, either in the analyses of all developing countries or those limited to Africa. In the bivariate analyses limited to Africa, there was a positive association between the two measures of gender "equality" and peak HIV prevalence (GDI: coefficient 28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.1-46.8; GEM: coefficient 54.8, 95% CI 20.5-89.1). There was also a negative association between the marker of gender "inequality" and peak HIV prevalence (GII: coefficient -66.9, 95% CI -112.8 to -21.0). These associations all disappeared on multivariate analyses. We could not find any evidence to support the hypothesis that variations in the extent of gender inequality explain variations in HIV prevalence in developing countries.

  18. Gender Differences In Giving Directions: A Case Study Of English Literature Students At Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjoo Hong Sing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have said that there are differences in the ways people give direction between males and females, especially in spatial task (cardinal directions, topography, mileage, building, right/left markers (e.g., Lawton, 2001; Dabbs et al., 1998. Here, the thesis investigates what differences occur between both genders in giving direction. The respondents are 25 females and 25 males of fifth semester Binus University students majoring in English Literature. The respondents answered with a certain route from Binus’s Anggrek Campus to Senayan City. The study was conducted by qualitative and quantitative method. From the data analysis, the writer discovered that gender does affect in selecting the key words in explaining direction it is found that there were differences in choosing key words in giving direction between females and males. The difference is women use more than twice spatial references than men do. In terms of verbal abilities, it was confirmed that female use longer explanation. However, in other aspects such as serial orientation and maintenance words, the result is inconclusive. 

  19. Gender and leprosy: case studies in Indonesia, Nigeria, Nepal and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkevisser, Corlien M; Lever, Peter; Alubo, Ogoh; Burathoki, Kamala; Idawani, Cut; Moreira, Tatiana M A; Patrobas, Phillip; Yulizar, Media

    2009-03-01

    There appear to be regional differences in gender ratios of leprosy patients being diagnosed and treated. In Asian countries, more men than women are registered whilst in Africa female patients outnumber males. The Netherlands Leprosy Relief (NLR) therefore initiated research into factors underlying these regional gender differences. Between 1997 and 1999, leprosy control teams in Indonesia, Nigeria, Nepal and Brazil supported by social/public health scientists, conducted comparative exploratory research. They looked at three groups of potential explanatory factors: biological, socio-cultural/economic and service-related. The studies were partially quantitative (analysis of the records of patients who according to prescription could have completed treatment) and partially qualitative (interviews/focus group discussions with patients, their relatives, community members and health staff on perceptions of leprosy, its socio-economic consequences, treatment and cure). Biological factors appeared similar in the four countries: irrespective of the M/F ratio, more men than women were registered with multibacillary (MB) leprosy. Strong traditions, the low status of women, their limited mobility, illiteracy and poor knowledge of leprosy appeared to be important sociocultural factors explaining why women were under reporting. Yet, accessible, well reputed services augmented female participation and helped to diminish stigma, which in three out of the four societies seemed greater for women than for men. These positive effects could still be higher if the services would enhance community and patient education with active participation of patients and ex-patients themselves.

  20. A field study on thermal comfort in an Italian hospital considering differences in gender and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ferraro, S; Iavicoli, S; Russo, S; Molinaro, V

    2015-09-01

    The hospital is a thermal environment where comfort must be calibrated by taking into account two different groups of people, that is, patients and medical staff. The study involves 30 patients and 19 medical staff with a view to verifying if Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) index can accurately predict thermal sensations of both groups also taking into account any potential effects of age and gender. The methodology adopted is based on the comparison between PMV values (calculated according to ISO 7730 after having collected environmental data and estimated personal parameters) and perceptual judgments (Actual Mean Vote, AMV), expressed by the subjects interviewed. Different statistical analyses show that PMV model finds his best correlation with AMV values in a sample of male medical staff under 65 years of age. It has been observed that gender and age are factors that must be taken into account in the assessment of thermal comfort in the hospital due to very weak correlation between AMV and PMV values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of gender on pain perception and analgesic consumption in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: An observational study

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    Aziza M Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence regarding gender affecting the response to pain and its treatment is inconsistent in literature. The objective of this prospective, observational study was to determine the effect of gender on pain perception and postoperative analgesic consumption in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: We recruited 60 male and 60 female patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were observed for additional intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Numerical rating scale was documented at 10 min interval for 1 h in post-anesthesia recovery room and at 4, 8, and 12 h postoperatively. Boluses of tramadol given as rescue analgesia were also noted. There were no dropouts. Results: The mean pain scores were significantly higher in female patients at 20 and 30 min following surgery. Mean dose of tramadol consumption was significantly higher in female patients for the first postoperative hour (P = 0.002, but not in the later period. Conclusion: Female patients exhibited greater intensity of pain and required higher doses of analgesics compared to males in in the immediate postoperative period in order to achieve a similar degree of analgesia.

  2. Gender differences in sex life issues – A population-based study of migraine sufferers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojanlatva Ansa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is considered to have a negative influence on sex life. The present study was to analyse the perceptions of importance of and satisfaction with sex life as well as the expression of interest in sex among people having migraines in a prospective follow-up mail survey in 1998 and 2003. Methods The random sample was stratified according to gender and age in four age groups (20–24, 30–34, 40–44, and 50–54 years. Altogether 25 898 individuals responded to the baseline and 19 626 to the follow-up questionnaire (75.8% response rate. We examined as to how the perceptions of sex life of those suffering from migraine changed during a 5-year follow-up. Conditional logistic regression was used to analyse the data of the responses on self-reported migraine in the baseline and follow-up surveys (N = 2 977, 79.2% women. Each person with migraine was assigned a gender- and age-matched control in the analysis. Results All three outcome variables tended to decrease in value. Importance of sex life was higher among men with migraine than among their controls. Among women migraine lessened interest in sex life. Conclusion Our findings suggested that migraine has a different impact on sex life among women from that among men.

  3. Estudos de gênero: uma sociologia feminista? Gender studies: a feminist sociology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila Scavone

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo faz uma breve reflexão das implicações políticas e científicas dos estudos de gênero " não só com o objetivo de resgatar o seu lugar legítimo na construção de uma sociologia de gênero e/ou feminista, como de re-lembrar a sua não-neutralidade mostrando como eles emergiram de um diálogo do movimento social com as teorias. Discute-se parte desse diálogo e pontuam-se as inovações conceituais que eles propiciaram às Ciências Sociais.This article dwells on the political and scientific implications of Gender and Feminist Studies - aiming not only at rescuing its legitimate place in the construction of a Gender and/or Feminist Sociology, as well as remembering its non-neutrality - showing how they emerged from a dialog between the social movement theory and the theories. Part of this dialog is discussed and the conceptual innovations that they have enhanced in Social Sciences are emphasized.

  4. World-wide architecture of osteoporosis research: density-equalizing mapping studies and gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, D; Mäule, L-S; Klingelhöfer, D; Schöffel, N; Gerber, A; Jaque, J M; Groneberg, D A

    2016-10-01

    While research activities on osteoporosis grow constantly, no concise description of the global research architecture exists. Hence, we aim to analyze and depict the world-wide scientific output on osteoporosis combining bibliometric tools, density-equalizing mapping projections and gender analysis. Using the NewQIS platform, we analyzed all osteoporosis-related publications authored from 1900 to 2012 and indexed by the Web of Science. Bibliometric details were analyzed related to quantitative and semi-qualitative aspects. The majority of 57 453 identified publications were original research articles. The USA and Western Europe dominated the field regarding cooperation activity, publication and citation performance. Asia, Africa and South America played a minimal role. Gender analysis revealed a dominance of male scientists in almost all countries except Brazil. Although the scientific performance on osteoporosis is increasing world-wide, a significant disparity in terms of research output was visible between developed and low-income countries. This finding is particularly concerning since epidemiologic evaluations of future osteoporosis prevalences predict enormous challenges for the health-care systems in low-resource countries. Hence, our study underscores the need to address these disparities by fostering future research endeavors in these nations with the aim to successfully prevent a growing global burden related to osteoporosis.

  5. Gender differences in the cognitive control of emotion: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kathrin; Pauly, Katharina; Kellermann, Thilo; Seiferth, Nina Y; Reske, Martina; Backes, Volker; Stöcker, Tony; Shah, N Jon; Amunts, Katrin; Kircher, Tilo; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    2007-09-20

    The interaction of emotion and cognition has become a topic of major interest. However, the influence of gender on the interplay between the two processes, along with its neural correlates have not been fully analysed so far. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study we induced negative emotion using negative olfactory stimulation while male (n=21) and female (n=19) participants performed an n-back verbal working memory task. Based on findings indicating increased emotional reactivity in women, we expected the female participants to exhibit stronger activation in characteristically emotion-associated areas during the interaction of emotional and cognitive processing in comparison to the male participants. Both groups were found to be significantly impaired in their working memory performance by negative emotion induction. However, fMRI analysis revealed distinct differences in neuronal activation between groups. In men, cognitive performance under negative emotion induction was associated with extended activation patterns in mainly prefrontal and superior parietal regions. In women, the interaction between emotion and working memory yielded a significantly stronger response in the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) compared to their male counterparts. Our data suggest that in women the interaction of verbal working memory and negative emotion is associated with relative hyperactivation in more emotion-associated areas whereas in men regions commonly regarded as important for cognition and cognitive control are activated. These results provide new insights in gender-specific cerebral mechanisms.

  6. Workplace harassment patterning, gender, and utilization of professional services: findings from a US national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Candice A; Rospenda, Kathleen M; Richman, Judith A

    2007-03-01

    This study constitutes the first national longitudinal survey to address the relationship between workplace harassment and service utilization. We examine how patterns of sexual harassment and generalized workplace harassment are linked to utilization of mental health, health, legal, spiritual, and work-related services, and whether and how gender influences these relationships. Data derive from a random digit dial telephone survey with a continental US sample of employed adults. Eligibility criteria were being 18 years of age or over, and being employed at least 20 h per week at some time in the 12 months prior to the wave 1 survey. Out of 4116 households with eligible individuals, 2151 agreed to participate at wave 1. At wave 2, 1418 participated, thus, the overall response rate was 34.5%. We show that the patterning of workplace harassment over two time points (chronic, remission, onset, never harassed) is associated with the use of different types of services. Gender partially moderated the relationship between workplace harassment and services.

  7. A study on the impact of campaign finance, political capital and gender on electoral performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Wilhelm Speck

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the association between political finance and electoral performance in the 2010 Brazilian elections for state and federal deputies. It also investigates the interaction effect of incumbency and gender on this association. We conclude: (i there is a positive and statistically significant association between political finance and electoral performance, yet the intensity of this association varies according to the type of candidate; (ii the association is stronger for challengers than for incumbents – thus extending the "Jacobson effect" to the Brazilian case; and (iii the association is stronger for women than for men – which suggests an extension of the idea underlying the "Jacobson effect". The association between finance and electoral performance tends to be stronger for candidates facing electoral disadvantages, whether these stem from limited political capital, gender discrimination, or any other factor not studied here resulting in a similar effect. Political finance works as a tool that, to some extent, may counteract the negative effect of such factors on electoral performance.

  8. Gender and Race in the Timing of Requests for Ethics Consultations: A Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Bethany; Gorka, Christine; Miller, Keith; Pointer, Carolyn A; Hinze, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical ethics consultants are expected to "reduce disparities, discrimination, and inequities when providing consultations," but few studies about inequities in ethics consultation exist.1 The objectives of this study were (1) to determine if there were racial or gender differences in the timing of requests for ethics consultations related to limiting treatment, and (2) if such differences were found, to identify factors associated with that difference and the role, if any, of ethics consultants in mitigating them. The study was a mixed methods retrospective study of consultation summaries and hospital and ethics center data on 56 age-and gender-matched Caucasian and African American Medicare patients who received ethics consultations related to issues around limiting medical treatment in the period 2011 to 2014. The average age of patients was 70.9. Consultation requests for females were made significantly earlier in their stays in the hospital (6.57 days) than were consultation requests made for males (16.07 days). For African American patients, the differences in admission-to-request intervals for female patients (5.93 days) and male patients (18.64 days) were greater than for Caucasian male and female patients. Differences in the timing of a consultation were not significantly correlated with the presence of an advance directive, the specialty of the attending physician, or the reasons for the consult request. Ethics consultants may have mitigated problems that developed during the lag in request times for African American males by spending more time, on average, on those consultations (316 minutes), especially more time, on average, than on consultations with Caucasian females (195 minutes). Most consultations (40 of 56) did result in movement toward limiting treatment, but no statistically significant differences were found among the groups studied in the movement toward limiting treatment. The average number of days from consult to discharge or death were

  9. Rigidity in Gender-Typed Behaviors in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Study of Ethnic Minority Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruble, Diane; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine; Shrout, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    A key prediction of cognitive theories of gender development concerns developmental trajectories in the relative strength or rigidity of gender typing. To examine these trajectories in early childhood, 229 children (African American, Mexican, Dominican) were followed annually from age 3 to 5 and gender-stereotypical appearance, dress-up play, toy play, and sex segregation were examined. High gender-typing was found across ethnic group, and most behaviors increased in rigidity, especially from age 3 to 4. In addressing controversy surrounding the stability and structure of gender-typing it was found that from year to year, most behaviors showed moderately stable individual differences. Behaviors were uncorrelated within age, but showed more concordance in change across time, suggesting that aspects of gender-typing are multidimensional but still show coherence. PMID:23432471

  10. Rigidity in gender-typed behaviors in early childhood: a longitudinal study of ethnic minority children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, May Ling; Ruble, Diane; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine; Shrout, Patrick E

    2013-01-01

    A key prediction of cognitive theories of gender development concerns developmental trajectories in the relative strength or rigidity of gender typing. To examine these trajectories in early childhood, 229 children (African American, Mexican American, and Dominican American) were followed annually from age 3 to 5 years, and gender-stereotypical appearance, dress-up play, toy play, and sex segregation were examined. High gender-typing was found across ethnic groups, and most behaviors increased in rigidity, especially from age 3 to 4 years. In addressing controversy surrounding the stability and structure of gender-typing it was found that from year to year, most behaviors showed moderately stable individual differences. Behaviors were uncorrelated within age but showed more concordance in change across time, suggesting that aspects of gender-typing are multidimensional, but still show coherence. © 2013 The Authors. Child Development © 2013 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  11. Psychological functioning in adolescents referred to specialist gender identity clinics across Europe: a clinical comparison study between four clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Nastasja M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Carmichael, Polly; de Vries, Annelou L C; Dhondt, Karlien; Laridaen, Jolien; Pauli, Dagmar; Ball, Juliane; Steensma, Thomas D

    2018-07-01

    Adolescents seeking professional help with their gender identity development often present with psychological difficulties. Existing literature on psychological functioning of gender diverse young people is limited and mostly bound to national chart reviews. This study examined the prevalence of psychological functioning and peer relationship problems in adolescents across four European specialist gender services (The Netherlands, Belgium, the UK, and Switzerland), using the Child Behavioural Checklist (CBCL) and the Youth Self-Report (YSR). Differences in psychological functioning and peer relationships were found in gender diverse adolescents across Europe. Overall, emotional and behavioural problems and peer relationship problems were most prevalent in adolescents from the UK, followed by Switzerland and Belgium. The least behavioural and emotional problems and peer relationship problems were reported by adolescents from The Netherlands. Across the four clinics, a similar pattern of gender differences was found. Birth-assigned girls showed more behavioural problems and externalising problems in the clinical range, as reported by their parents. According to self-report, internalising problems in the clinical range were more prevalent in adolescent birth-assigned boys. More research is needed to gain a better understanding of the difference in clinical presentations in gender diverse adolescents and to investigate what contextual factors that may contribute to this.

  12. Gender and language in online job advertisements - a cross-cultural study

    OpenAIRE

    Hodel, Lea; Formanowicz, Magdalena Maria; Sczesny, Sabine; Valdrova, Jana; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate the use of gender-fair language from a cross-linguistic perspective. Specifically, we are interested in whether the use of gender-fair language correlates with socio-economic rankings of gender equality and with structural features of a language. We decided to analyze online job advertisements, as they reflect common language use and can easily be compared across languages. Moreover, formulations in job advertisements have been shown to impact personn...

  13. A Study of Gender Performativity in Virginia Woolf's Orlando: a Mocking Biography

    OpenAIRE

    M., Moslehi; N., Niazi

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims at concentrating on Judith Butler’s theory of gender as performance and how Virginia Woolf challenges the assumptions of heterosexuality in Virginia Woolf’s Orlando (1992). Woolf rebels against the traditional view of gender as two separate categories by presenting Orlando as an androgynous and bisexual character. Orlando’s transformation from male to female and exhibition of the characteristics of both feminist and masculinity expose how gender norms are socially insti...

  14. Gender Stereotyping and Self-Stereotyping Attitudes: A Large Field Study of Managers

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Tor; Smith, Nina; Smith, Valdemar

    2017-01-01

    The dearth of women in top managerial positions is characterized by a high persistence and insensitivity to changes and differences in institutions and policies. This suggests it could be caused by slowly changing social norms and attitudes in the labor market, such as gender stereotypes and gender identity. This paper examines gender stereotypes and self-stereotyping in a large cross section of (about 2,970) managers at different job levels in (1,875) Danish private-sector firms. The survey ...

  15. Religiosity, Gender, and Natural Disasters: A Qualitative Study of Disaster-Stricken Regions in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabizadeh, Sanaz; Jahangiri, Katayoun; Khani Jazani, Reza

    2018-06-01

    While religiosity is emerging as one of the more important subjects in disaster management, identifying gender differences in using religion as a coping method has attracted very little attention. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of religiosity on disaster-affected women and men in the setting of Iran. A field-based investigation using a qualitative approach was carried out to achieve the study's purpose. Data were collected using in-depth unstructured interviews with 25 participants who had been damaged by recent disasters. Two themes, negative and positive effects of religiosity, and five categories were extracted from the data. Women may be influenced by religion more than men, and thus, they can play key roles in strengthening the positive effects of religiosity.

  16. A study of social information control affordances and gender difference in Facebook self-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Feng-Yang; Tseng, Chih-Yi; Tseng, Fan-Chuan; Lin, Cathy S

    2013-09-01

    Affordances refer to how interface features of an IT artifact, perceived by its users in terms of their potentials for action, may predict the intensity of usage. This study investigates three social information affordances for expressive information control, privacy information control, and image information control in Facebook. The results show that the three affordances can significantly explain how Facebook's interface designs facilitate users' self-presentation activities. In addition, the findings reveal that males are more engaged in expressing information than females, while females are more involved in privacy control than males. A practical application of our study is to compare and contrast the level of affordances offered by various social network sites (SNS) like Facebook and Twitter, as well as differences in online self-presentations across cultures. Our approach can therefore be useful to investigate how SNS design features can be tailored to specific gender and culture needs.

  17. A study of changes in bone metabolism in cases of gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Yoon Taek; Oda, Hiromi

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of increasing estrogen and decreasing androgen in males and increasing androgen and decreasing estrogen in females on bone metabolism in patients with gender identity disorder (GID). We measured and examined bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism markers retrospectively in GID patients who were treated in our hospital. In addition, we studied the effects of treatment on those who had osteoporosis. Patients who underwent a change from male to female (MtF) showed inhibition of bone resorption and increased L2-4 BMD whereas those who underwent a change from female to male (FtM) had increased bone resorption and decreased L2-4 BMD. Six months after administration of risedronate to FtM patients with osteoporosis, L2-4 BMD increased and bone resorption markers decreased. These results indicate that estrogen is an important element with regard to bone metabolism in males.

  18. Gender Beliefs and Embedded Gendered Values in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilson, Anette; Folkesson, Anne-Mari; Lindberg, Ingeborg Moqvist

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore practitioners' gender beliefs and how gendered values are embedded in Swedish preschool practice. The research question is: What beliefs about gender and the associated values, can be identified in practitioners' talk when they discuss gender issues? The study is informed by Bronwyn Davies' theoretical ideas…

  19. Gender Inequality Prevents Abused Women from Seeking Care Despite Protection Given in Gender-Based Violence Legislation: A Qualitative Study from Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umubyeyi, Aline; Persson, Margareta; Mogren, Ingrid; Krantz, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Despite its burden on a person's life, Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is known to be poorly recognised and managed in most countries and communities. This study aimed to explore health care professionals' experiences of the health care seeking processes of women exposed to intimate partner violence in Rwanda. Six focus group discussions were conducted in three district hospitals and three mental health units in Rwanda. A sample of 43 health care professionals with various professions and length of work experience, who regularly took care of patients subjected to IPV, was selected for focus group discussions. The analysis was performed using qualitative content analysis. The theme "Gendered norms and values defeat the violence legislation in women's health care seeking when women are abused" expressed the health care professionals' experiences of the double-faced situation which women exposed to IPV met in their help seeking process. Positive initiatives to protect women were identified, but the potential for abused women to seek help and support was reduced because of poverty, gender inequality with prevailing strong norms of male superiority, and the tendency to keep abuse as a private family matter. Legislative measures have been instituted to protect women from abuse. Still many Rwandan women do not benefit from these efforts. The role of the health care services needs to be reinforced as an important and available resource for help and support for abused women but further legislative changes are also needed. Initiatives to further improve gender equality, and institutionalised collaboration between different sectors in society would contribute to protecting women from IPV.

  20. Gender Inequality Prevents Abused Women from Seeking Care Despite Protection Given in Gender-Based Violence Legislation: A Qualitative Study from Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Umubyeyi

    Full Text Available Despite its burden on a person's life, Intimate Partner Violence (IPV is known to be poorly recognised and managed in most countries and communities. This study aimed to explore health care professionals' experiences of the health care seeking processes of women exposed to intimate partner violence in Rwanda.Six focus group discussions were conducted in three district hospitals and three mental health units in Rwanda. A sample of 43 health care professionals with various professions and length of work experience, who regularly took care of patients subjected to IPV, was selected for focus group discussions. The analysis was performed using qualitative content analysis.The theme "Gendered norms and values defeat the violence legislation in women's health care seeking when women are abused" expressed the health care professionals' experiences of the double-faced situation which women exposed to IPV met in their help seeking process. Positive initiatives to protect women were identified, but the potential for abused women to seek help and support was reduced because of poverty, gender inequality with prevailing strong norms of male superiority, and the tendency to keep abuse as a private family matter.Legislative measures have been instituted to protect women from abuse. Still many Rwandan women do not benefit from these efforts. The role of the health care services needs to be reinforced as an important and available resource for help and support for abused women but further legislative changes are also needed. Initiatives to further improve gender equality, and institutionalised collaboration between different sectors in society would contribute to protecting women from IPV.

  1. Is the gap more than gender? A longitudinal analysis of gender, gender role orientation, and earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Timothy A; Livingston, Beth A

    2008-09-01

    This study investigated the relationships among gender, gender role orientation (i.e., attitudes toward the gendered separation of roles at work and at home), and earnings. A multilevel model was conceptualized in which gender role orientation and earnings were within-individual variables that fluctuate over time (although predictors of between-individual differences in gender role orientation were also considered). Results indicated that whereas traditional gender role orientation was positively related to earnings, gender significantly predicted the slope of this relationship: Traditional gender role orientation was strongly positively associated with earnings for men; it was slightly negatively associated with earnings for women. Occupational segregation partly explained these gender differences. Overall, the results suggest that although gender role attitudes are becoming less traditional for men and for women, traditional gender role orientation continues to exacerbate the gender wage gap.

  2. An Experimental Study of Gender and Cultural Differences in Hue Preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Saud Al-Rasheed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of both gender and culture on colour preference. Inspection of previous studies of colour preference reveals that many of these studies have poor control over the colours that are shown – the chromatic co-ordinates of colours are either not noted or the illuminant that colours are shown under is not controlled. This means that conclusions about colour preference are made using subjective terms for hue with little knowledge about the precise colours that were shown. However, recently, a new quantitative approach to investigating colour preference has been proposed, where there is no need to summarise colour preference using subjective terms for hue (Ling et al., 2007; Hurlbert & Ling, 2007. This approach aims to quantitatively summarise hue preference in terms of weights on the two channels or ‘cardinal axes’ underlying colour vision. Here I further extend Hurlbert and Ling’s (2007 approach to investigating colour preference, by replicating their study but with Arabic and English participants, and to answer several questions: First, are there cultural differences in the shape of the overall preference curve for English and Arabic participants? Second, are there gender differences in the shape of the overall preference curve for English and Arabic participants?. Thirty eight British and 71 Saudi Arabian (Arabic participants were compared. Results revealed that Arabic and English preference curves were found to differ, yet there was greater similarity for Arabic and English males than Arabic and English females. There was also a sex difference that was present for both Arabic and English participants. The male curve is fairly similar for both samples: peak-preference is in the blue-green region, and a preference minimum is in the red-pink/purple region. For Arabic females the preference peak appears to be in the red-pink region, whilst for English females it is shifted towards purple/blue-green.

  3. Empathy differences by gender and specialty preference in medical students: a study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mariana A; Grosseman, Suely; Morelli, Thiago C; Giuliano, Isabela C B; Erdmann, Thomas R

    2016-05-21

    We have conducted this study to assess medical students' empathy and to examine empathy differences by students' socio-demographic characteristics, including gender, and specialty preference. We have conducted a cross-sectional and descriptive research. Among 595 medical students registered at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (Brazil) in 2012, we have selected a sample of 320 enrolled in the first, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, eleventh, and in the last semester of the course. The response rate obtained was 70.6% (n=226). Data was collected by using a self-report questionnaire, and the variables analyzed included course semester, socio-demographic characteristics (such as age, gender, household monthly income and parents level of education), students' specialty preference, and empathy assessed by the Jefferson Scale of Empathy. We have used descriptive statistics, 95% Confidence Interval for percentages, Student's t-test, and Analysis of Variance to analyze the data. Mean empathy among students was (M=119.7, SD=9.9), with no difference by according to semester (F=1.5, p=.2). Empathy means were higher among females (M=118.3, SD=10.6) than among males (M=121.0, SD=9.3, t=-2.1, p=.032). Students who preferred a people-oriented specialty obtained significantly higher mean scores (M=121.5, SD=8.1) in comparison to students who preferred technology-oriented specialties (M=118.0, SD=11.3, t=2.4, p=.02). Our study has found consistently high scores of empathy among medical students enrolled in all levels of training at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, and higher empathy among women and students who intend to pursue a people-oriented specialty. Conclusions on higher empathy among medical students require further study.

  4. GENDER CONSTRUCTION IN DAKWAHTAINMENT: A Case Study of Hati ke Hati Bersama Mamah Dedeh

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    Dicky Sofjan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study examines the phenomenon of dakwahtainment, a concept amalgamating Islamic propagation and entertainment. It focuses on the highly popular daily live programme entitled Hati ke Hati Bersama Mamah Dedeh (literally: Heart to Heart with Mother Dedeh. The programme involves a female penceramah (preacher providing taws}iyyah or nasehat (spiritual advice to the jamaah (congregation, while offering religious verdicts on various aspects of life confronting Indonesian women. One of the main pillars of the programme’s success has been its tightly observed winning formula held dearly by the producer and the creative team, which stipulates 70% tuntunan (spiritual guidance and 30% tontonan (entertainment viewing. Based on an exploratory, single case study design, research findings suggest that the Hati ke Hati Bersama Mamah Dedeh programme is constructed on a gendered understanding that is inconsistent and contradictory, which tend to simultaneously empower and disempower Muslim women viewers.[Tulisan ini merupakan studi kasus mengenai dakwahtainmen yang mempertemukan dakwah pada satu sisi dan hiburan pada sisi lainnya. Diskusi akan difokuskan pada program televisi “Hati ke Hati Bersama Mamah Dedeh.” Program ini melibatkan penceramah yang menyampaikan taws}iyyah dan nasehat yang merespon persoalan-persoalan yang kerap dihadapi perempuan Muslim di Indonesia. Salah satu kunci kesuksesan program ini adalah keberhasilan produser dan tim kreatif yang memadukan 70% tuntunan dan 30% tontonan. Tulisan ini menemukan bahwa program Hati ke Hati Bersama Mamah Dedeh dikonstruk berdasarkan pengertian relasi gender yang rancu dan saling bertentangan. Karena itu, program ini dapat memberdayakan pemirsa perempuan dan sekaligus memperlemah mereka.

  5. Protective effect of riboflavin on cisplatin induced toxicities: a gender-dependent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Imrana; Hassan, Iftekhar; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Chibber, Sandesh

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity exerted by the anticancer drug, cisplatin in vivo is functional to many factors such as dose, duration, gender and age etc. The present study is aimed to investigate if ameliorative potential of riboflavin on cisplatin induced toxicity is gender dependent. Eighty four adult mice from male and female sex were divided into seven groups (n=6) for both sexes. They were treated with riboflavin (2mg/kg), cisplatin (2mg/kg) and their two different combinations (cisplatin at 2mg/kg with 1mg/kg and 2mg/kg of riboflavin) under photoillumination with their respective controls for the combination groups without photoillumination. After treatment, all groups were sacrificed and their kidney, liver and serum were collected for biochemical estimations, comet assay and histopathology. In the present investigation, it was evident from antioxidant and detoxification studies (SOD, CAT, GSH, GST, MDA and carbonyl level) that the female mice exhibited better tolerance towards cisplatin inducted toxicity and the ameliorative effect of riboflavin against cisplatin toxicity was found stronger in their combination groups as compared to the male groups as the activity of all antioxidant enzymes were found better concomitant with lower level of MDA and carbonyl contents in the female combination groups than their male counterparts. Furthermore, single cell gel electrophoresis and histopathological examination confirmed that restoration of normal nuclear and cellular integrity was more prominent in female with respect to the males after treatment in the combination groups in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, this study reveals that cisplatin is more toxic in male mice and the ameliorative effect of riboflavin against cisplatin toxicity is stronger in female mice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Gender and ergonomics: a case study on the 'non-formal' work of women nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Silvana; Livigni, Lucilla; Magrini, Andrea; Talamanca, Irene Figà

    2012-01-01

    Women's work activities are often characterised by 'non-formal actions' (such as giving support). Gender differences in ergonomics may be due to this peculiarity. We applied the method of organisational congruencies (MOC) to ascertain the 'non-formal' work portion of nurses employed in three hospital units (haematology, emergency room and general medicine) during the three work shifts in a major University Hospital in Rome, Italy. We recorded a total of 802 technical actions performed by nine nurses in 72 h of work. Twenty-six percent of the actions in direct patient's care were communicative actions (mainly giving psychological support) while providing physical care. These 'double actions' are often not considered to be a formal part of the job by hospital management. In our case study, the 'non-formal' work of nurses (psychological support) is mainly represented by double actions while taking physical care of the patients. The dual task paradigm in gender oriented research is discussed in terms of its implications in prevention in occupational health. The main purpose of the study was to assess all the formal and non-formal activities of women in the nursing work setting. Offering psychological support to patients is often not considered to be a formal part of the job. Our case study found that nurses receive no explicit guidelines on this activity and no time is assigned to perform it. In measuring the burden of providing psychological support to patients, we found that this is often done while nurses are performing tasks of physical care for the patients (double actions). The article discusses the significance of non-formal psychological work load of women nurses through double actions from the ergonomic point view.

  7. Gender Implications of UK Welfare Reform and Government Equality Duties: Evidence from Qualitative Studies

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    Fran Bennett

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The UK coalition government is bound by equality duties to have regard to the impact of its policies on various groups, including women. This article investigates how far this legislative commitment is influencing debates about current welfare reforms, especially plans for ‘universal credit’ (a new means-tested benefit. The authors draw on findings from recent studies of within-household distribution from a gender perspective, including their own qualitative research. A major aim of this research was to facilitate more nuanced analysis of the effects of welfare reforms in terms of gender roles and relationships within the household. This article therefore examines how far findings from qualitative studies, in conjunction with the key principles they develop for assessing the gender impact of welfare reforms, can be used to examine ‘universal credit’; and to what extent these influenced the UK government’s proposals and analysis in the light of its commitment to equality duties. Los derechos de igualdad obligan al gobierno de coalición del Reino Unido a tener en cuenta el impacto de sus políticas sobre varios grupos, incluidas las mujeres. En este artículo se investiga hasta qué punto este compromiso legislativo está influyendo en los debates sobre las reformas de bienestar actuales, especialmente los planes de “crédito universal” (un nuevo beneficio de ingreso. Los autores se basan en los resultados de estudios recientes sobre la distribución dentro de los hogares desde una perspectiva de género, incluida su propia investigación cualitativa. Un objetivo principal de esta investigación era el de facilitar un análisis más matizado de los efectos de las reformas de bienestar en términos de roles y relaciones de género dentro del hogar. Por tanto, este artículo examina hasta qué punto los resultados de estudios cualitativos, en relación con los principios fundamentales que se desarrollan para evaluar el impacto de g

  8. Transmasculine individuals' experiences with lactation, chestfeeding, and gender identity: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Trevor; Noel-Weiss, Joy; West, Diana; Walks, Michelle; Biener, MaryLynne; Kibbe, Alanna; Myler, Elizabeth

    2016-05-16

    Transmasculine individuals are people who were assigned as female at birth, but identify on the male side of the gender spectrum. They might choose to use and engage their bodies to be pregnant, birth a baby, and chestfeed. This study asked an open research question, "What are the experiences of transmasculine individuals with pregnancy, birthing, and feeding their newborns?" Participants who self-identified as transmasculine and had experienced or were experiencing pregnancy, birth, and infant feeding were recruited through the internet and interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim. We used interpretive description methodology to analyze the data. Our analysis was guided by our awareness of concepts and history important to the transgender community. Out of 22 participants, 16 chose to chestfeed for some period of time, four participants did not attempt chestfeeding, and two had not reached the point of infant feeding (i.e., were still pregnant or had a miscarriage). Nine of the 22 study participants had chest masculinization surgery before conceiving their babies. Six participants had the surgery after their children were born, five desired the surgery in the future, and two did not want it at all. Chest care, lactation, and chestfeeding in the context of being a transgender person are reported in this paper. The participants' experiences of gender dysphoria, chest masculinization surgery before pregnancy or after weaning, accessing lactation care as a transmasculine person, and the question of restarting testosterone emerged as data. We present the participants' experiences in a chronological pattern with the categories of before pregnancy, pregnancy, postpartum (6 weeks post birth), and later stage (beyond 6 weeks). The majority of participants chose to chestfeed while some did not due to physical or mental health reasons. Care providers should communicate an understanding of gender dysphoria and transgender identities in order to build patient trust

  9. Gendered Language in Interactive Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Karen A.; Katz, Albert N.; Leith, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Over two studies, we examined the nature of gendered language in interactive discourse. In the first study, we analyzed gendered language from a chat corpus to see whether tokens of gendered language proposed in the gender-as-culture hypothesis (Maltz and Borker in "Language and social identity." Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp…

  10. Investigating the Relationship among Test Anxiety, Gender, Academic Achievement and Years of Study: A Case of Iranian EFL University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Mohsen; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    The construct of anxiety plays a major role in one's life. One of these anxieties is test anxiety or apprehension over academic evaluation. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between gender, academic achievement, years of study and levels of test anxiety. This investigation is a descriptive analytic study and was done…

  11. An Exploration of Shift Work, Fatigue, and Gender Among Police Officers: The BCOPS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violanti, John M; Owens, Sherry L; Fekedulegn, Desta; Ma, Claudia C; Charles, Luenda E; Andrew, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    The present study examined the association between shift work and fatigue among male ( n = 230) and female ( n = 78) police officers. A 15-year work history database was used to define dominant shifts as day, afternoon, or night. A 10-item questionnaire created from the Standard Shiftwork Index (SSI) assessed fatigue. Gender-stratified analyses of variance and covariance and Poisson regression were used to compare means and prevalence of individual items across shifts. No significant differences in total fatigue scores were observed across shifts. However, the prevalence of the fatigue item "feelings of tiredness" was 89% higher among male officers working the afternoon shift compared with officers working the day shift (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.12, 3.23], p = .020), after adjustment for covariates. Women reported a lower prevalence of tiredness than men on the afternoon shift. Organizations with afternoon shift workers should consider reducing fatigue at work through education and other methods.

  12. Gender differences of cannabis smoking on serum leptin levels: population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda P. Moreira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the serum leptin levels in cannabis smokers. Methods: This was a cross-sectional population-based study of participants between the ages of 18 and 35 years. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire covering sociodemographic data and the use of psychoactive substances. Leptin levels were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Results: Of the 911 participants, 6.7% were identified as cannabis smokers and had significantly lower leptin levels (p = 0.008. When stratified by gender, there was a significant decrease in leptin levels among male smokers (p = 0.039. Conclusion: Cannabis smoking was linked to leptin levels in men, suggesting that the response to biological signals may be different between men and women.

  13. Women in advertising production. Study of the Galician advertising sector from a gender perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora García-González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the advertising sector has been strongly criticised due to its sexist representation of gender. The messages in advertisements are the result of a careful manufacturing process, which reflects the values and attitudes of the professionals involved in their creation. The main research hypothesis of this article is that the persistence of sexist stereotypes in advertising is related to the absence of women in the creative departments of advertising agencies. In this sense, the objective of this work is to examine the situation of women within the Galician advertising sector, and particularly women’s participation in ads production. This study, which has been carried out from the production perspective, also compares the situation of women in the Galician advertising agencies with the general situation of women in the national advertising sector.

  14. Gender incongruence: a comparative study using ICD-10 and DSM-5 diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Bianca M; Robles-García, Rebeca; Brandelli-Costa, Angelo; Mori, Daniel; Mueller, Andressa; Vaitses-Fontanari, Anna M; Cardoso-da-Silva, Dhiordan; Schwarz, Karine; Abel-Schneider, Maiko; Saadeh, Alexandre; Lobato, Maria-Inês-Rodrigues

    2018-01-01

    To compare the presence of criteria listed in the DSM-5 and ICD-10 diagnostic manuals in a Brazilian sample of transgender persons seeking health services specifically for physical transition. This multicenter cross-sectional study included a sample of 103 subjects who sought services for gender identity disorder in two main reference centers in Brazil. The method involved a structured interview encompassing the diagnostic criteria in the two manuals. The results revealed that despite theoretical disagreement about the criteria, the manuals overlap regarding diagnosis confirmation; the DSM-5 was more inclusive (97.1%) than the ICD-10 (93.2%) in this population. Although there is no consensus on diagnostic criteria on transgenderism in the diversity of social and cultural contexts, more comprehensive diagnostic criteria are evolving due to society's increasing inclusivity.

  15. Gender and stereotypes in motivation to study computer programming for careers in multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubé, Wendy; Lang, Catherine

    2012-03-01

    A multimedia university programme with relatively equal numbers of male and female students in elective programming subjects provided a rare opportunity to investigate female motivation to study and pursue computer programming in a career. The MSLQ was used to survey 85 participants. In common with research into deterrence of females from STEM domains, females displayed significantly lower self-efficacy and expectancy for success. In contrast to research into deterrence of females from STEM domains, both genders placed similar high values on computer programming and shared high extrinsic and intrinsic goal orientation. The authors propose that the stereotype associated with a creative multimedia career could attract female participation in computer programming whereas the stereotype associated with computer science could be a deterrent.

  16. Identifying gender differences in reported occupational information from three US population-based case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Sarah J; Colt, Joanne S; Stewart, Patricia A; Armenti, Karla R; Baris, Dalsu; Blair, Aaron; Cerhan, James R; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Faith; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Hartge, Patricia; Karagas, Margaret R; Johnson, Alison; Purdue, Mark P; Rothman, Nathaniel; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Severson, Richard; Silverman, Debra T; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that gender-blind assessment of exposure may introduce exposure misclassification, but few studies have characterised gender differences across occupations and industries. We pooled control responses to job-specific, industry-specific and exposure-specific questionnaires (modules) that asked detailed questions about work activities from three US population-based case-control studies to examine gender differences in work tasks and their frequencies. We calculated the ratio of female-to-male controls that completed each module. For four job modules (assembly worker, machinist, health professional, janitor/cleaner) and for subgroups of jobs that completed those modules, we evaluated gender differences in task prevalence and frequency using χ(2) and Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. The 1360 female and 2245 male controls reported 6033 and 12 083 jobs, respectively. Gender differences in female:male module completion ratios were observed for 39 of 45 modules completed by ≥20 controls. Gender differences in task prevalence varied in direction and magnitude. For example, female janitors were significantly more likely to polish furniture (79% vs 44%), while male janitors were more likely to strip floors (73% vs 50%). Women usually reported more time spent on tasks than men. For example, the median hours per week spent degreasing for production workers in product manufacturing industries was 6.3 for women and 3.0 for men. Observed gender differences may reflect actual differences in tasks performed or differences in recall, reporting or perception, all of which contribute to exposure misclassification and impact relative risk estimates. Our findings reinforce the need to capture subject-specific information on work tasks. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Gender, population and environment in the context of deforestation: a Malaysian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyzer, N

    1995-01-01

    This article is a case study of the impact of environmental changes on livelihood strategies among the Penan hunter and gatherer communities in the Limbang District of Sarawak, Malaysia. Environmental changes include government timber concessions to companies logging in the tropical rainforest and government policy shifts on land tenure and shifting cultivation. Increased logging has led to deforestation and water quality degradation, which led to declining fish stocks. Logging occurred with a lack of implementation of protective forest policy and regulations. The government blamed shifting cultivation for deforestation. The government continues to pressure nomadic indigenous and largely illiterate people to settle, maintain herds, and cultivate cash crops. Shifting cultivation was outlawed. Livelihood systems in the study area varied in their vulnerability, and people varied in their social adjustment to change. Perceptions of change varied among the upstream and downstream communities and by gender. The Penan communities continue to depend upon increasingly scarce or degraded resources. Poor health and malnutrition are the outcome of a decline in their traditional systems of livelihood. Both men and women have been equally affected by the environmental changes. In upstream communities men have adapted by collecting and selling forest rattan. Women generate income by making baskets that are sold by men in the market. The demand for children has changed. Women desire more children as social insurance that some will adopt the indigenous life style rather than the modern one. The government cut off mobile family planning services due to the Penan protests against loggers. The mid-stream communities were less vulnerable to the environmental changes. For all communities, gender relations were an important factor in understanding community responses to a declining resource base.

  18. A quantitative study on gender differences in disclosing child sexual abuse and reasons for nondisclosure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okur, Pinar; van der Knaap, Leontien; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the available literature on disclosure of child sexual abuse (CSA), little is known about how gender affects disclosure. This article aims to quantitatively examine whether gender differences exist in formal (to legal or child protection authorities) and informal (to a family member or

  19. Studying Gender Bias in Physics Grading: The Role of Teaching Experience and Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Sarah I.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gender-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) stereotypes has been repeatedly documented. This article examines physics teachers' gender bias in grading and the influence of teaching experience in Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. In a 2?×?2 between-subjects design, with years of teaching experience included as…

  20. Preparing Teachers to Deliver Gender-Focused Sexuality/HIV Education: A Case Study from Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan Y.; Rogow, Deborah; Stines, Frederica

    2015-01-01

    Evidence shows that a focus on gender and power in sexuality/HIV education increases the likelihood of achieving positive sexual health outcomes, and international agencies have called for a shift to a gender-focused approach. However, questions remain about the implementation of such programmes, including how best to prepare teachers to deliver…

  1. Successfully Sustaining Sex and Gender Issues in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Francisca; Fluit, Cornelia; Albers, Mieke; Laan, Roland; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Although several projects have addressed the importance of gender health issues in medical education, the sustainability of change efforts in medical education has rarely been addressed. Understanding the possible facilitators or barriers to sustainability may help to develop future interventions that are effective in maintaining gender health…

  2. Gender determinants of smoking practice in Indigenous communities: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, V E; Gilligan, G; Maksimovic, L; Shen, D; Murphy, M

    2016-03-01

    Despite the need to urgently reduce smoking rates among Indigenous Australians, in order to close-the-gap in life expectancy, little is known regarding how this can be achieved. This study aimed to explore whether a focus on gender specific determinants of smoking among Indigenous Australians could be identified, thus providing a potentially novel approach to underpin future efforts at intervention. A qualitative research design was employed. Eighty-two participants, comprised of 43 Indigenous women (mean age 32.15, SD, 12.47) and 39 Indigenous men (mean age 34.91, SD, 11.26), participated in one of 12 focus groups held in metropolitan, regional and rural locations in South Australia. Facilitators prompted discussion in response to the question: 'What is it like being a smoker these days?' Two experienced coders assessed data for themes using Attride-Stirling's (2002) method of analysis. Two global themes emerged for men and women. The first theme, 'It's Harder to Smoke Nowadays', encompassed sub-themes capturing changed smoking practices in response to tobacco control strategies implemented in Australia. Sub-themes of 'smoking in secrecy' coupled with an 'awareness of the effects of passive smoking' were identified among women. Among men, sub-themes that depicted tension between 'a desire to be a role model' and 'guilt about smoking' emerged. The second theme, 'Push and Pull Factors', identified a range of gender specific determinants of smoking. While similar reasons for smoking ('pull factors') were identified in men and women (e.g. addiction, boredom, stress, pleasure, mood stabiliser), different 'push factors' (reasons for not wanting to smoke) emerged. For men, sport, fitness and children were identified as reasons for not wanting to smoke, whereas women identified factors such as respect for non-smokers, and body image concerns. The current findings suggest that there may be fundamental differences in the determinants of smoking (pull factors) as well as

  3. Attitudes toward and experiences of gender issues among physician teachers: A survey study conducted at a university teaching hospital in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westman Göran

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender issues are important to address during medical education, however research about the implementation of gender in medical curricula reports that there are obstacles. The aim of this study was to explore physician teachers' attitudes to gender issues. Methods As part of a questionnaire, physician teachers at Umeå University in Sweden were given open-ended questions about explanations for and asked to write examples why they found gender important or not. The 1 469 comments from the 243 respondents (78 women, 165 men were analyzed by way of content analysis. The proportion of comments made by men and women in each category was compared. Results We found three themes in our analysis: Understandings of gender, problems connected with gender and approaches to gender. Gender was associated with differences between women and men regarding behaviour and disease, as well as with inequality of life conditions. Problems connected with gender included: delicate situations involving investigations of intimate body parts or sexual attraction, different expectations on male and female physicians and students, and difficulty fully understanding the experience of people of the opposite sex. The three approaches to gender that appeared in the comments were: 1 avoidance, implying that the importance of gender in professional relationships was recognized but minimized by comparing gender with aspects, such as personality and neutrality; 2 simplification, implying that gender related problems were easy to address, or already solved; and 3 awareness, implying that the respondent was interested in gender issues or had some insights in research about gender. Only a few individuals described gender as an area of competence and knowledge. There were comments from men and women in all categories, but there were differences in the relative weight for some categories. For example, recognizing gender inequities was more pronounced in the comments

  4. Puberty suppression in adolescents with gender identity disorder: a prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Annelou L C; Steensma, Thomas D; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2011-08-01

    Puberty suppression by means of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) is used for young transsexuals between 12 and 16 years of age. The purpose of this intervention is to relieve the suffering caused by the development of secondary sex characteristics and to provide time to make a balanced decision regarding actual gender reassignment. To compare psychological functioning and gender dysphoria before and after puberty suppression in gender dysphoric adolescents. Of the first 70 eligible candidates who received puberty suppression between 2000 and 2008, psychological functioning and gender dysphoria were assessed twice: at T0, when attending the gender identity clinic, before the start of GnRHa; and at T1, shortly before the start of cross-sex hormone treatment. Behavioral and emotional problems (Child Behavior Checklist and the Youth-Self Report), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety and anger (the Spielberger Trait Anxiety and Anger Scales), general functioning (the clinician's rated Children's Global Assessment Scale), gender dysphoria (the Utrecht Gender Dysphoria Scale), and body satisfaction (the Body Image Scale) were assessed. Behavioral and emotional problems and depressive symptoms decreased, while general functioning improved significantly during puberty suppression. Feelings of anxiety and anger did not change between T0 and T1. While changes over time were equal for both sexes, compared with natal males, natal females were older when they started puberty suppression and showed more problem behavior at both T0 and T1. Gender dysphoria and body satisfaction did not change between T0 and T1. No adolescent withdrew from puberty suppression, and all started cross-sex hormone treatment, the first step of actual gender reassignment. Puberty suppression may be considered a valuable contribution in the clinical management of gender dysphoria in adolescents. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Social constructions of gender roles, gender-based violence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The links between gender roles, gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS risk are complex and culturally specific. In this qualitative study we investigated how women and men in two black communities in the Western Cape, South Africa, constructed their gender identities and roles, how they understood gender-based violence ...

  6. Gender Attribution and Gender Agreement in French Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boloh, Yves; Ibernon, Laure; Royer, Stephanie; Escudier, Frederique; Danillon, Aurelia

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies on grammatical gender in French individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have led to conflicting findings and interpretations regarding keys abilities--gender attribution and gender agreement. New production data from a larger SW sample (N = 24) showed that gender attribution scores in SW participants exactly mirrored those of…

  7. Afraid of being "witchy with a 'b'": a qualitative study of how gender influences residents' experiences leading cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Christine; Brennan, Meghan; Filut, Amarette; Isaac, Carol; Carnes, Molly

    2014-09-01

    Ineffective leadership during cardiopulmonary resuscitation ("code") can negatively affect a patient's likelihood of survival. In most teaching hospitals, internal medicine residents lead codes. In this study, the authors explored internal medicine residents' experiences leading codes, with a particular focus on how gender influences the code leadership experience. The authors conducted individual, semistructured telephone or in-person interviews with 25 residents (May 2012 to February 2013) from 9 U.S. internal medicine residency programs. They audio recorded and transcribed the interviews and then thematically analyzed the transcribed text. Participants viewed a successful code as one with effective leadership. They agreed that the ideal code leader was an authoritative presence; spoke with a deep, loud voice; used clear, direct communication; and appeared calm. Although equally able to lead codes as their male colleagues, female participants described feeling stress from having to violate gender behavioral norms in the role of code leader. In response, some female participants adopted rituals to signal the suspension of gender norms while leading a code. Others apologized afterwards for their counternormative behavior. Ideal code leadership embodies highly agentic, stereotypical male behaviors. Female residents employed strategies to better integrate the competing identities of code leader and female gender. In the future, residency training should acknowledge how female gender stereotypes may conflict with the behaviors required to enact code leadership and offer some strategies, such as those used by the female residents in this study, to help women integrate these dual identities.

  8. Communication skills of medical students during the OSCE: Gender-specific differences in a longitudinal trend study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Joachim; Smolka, Robert; Simoes, Elisabeth; Zipfel, Stephan; Junne, Florian; Holderried, Friederike; Wosnik, Annette; Doherty, Anne M; Menzel, Karina; Herrmann-Werner, Anne

    2017-05-02

    Communication skills are essential in a patient-centred health service and therefore in medical teaching. Although significant differences in communication behaviour of male and female students are known, gender differences in the performance of students are still under-reported. The aim of this study was to analyse gender differences in communication skills of medical students in the context of an OSCE exam (OSCE = Objective Structured Clinical Examination). In a longitudinal trend study based on seven semester-cohorts, it was analysed if there are gender differences in medical students' communication skills. The students (self-perception) and standardized patients (SP) (external perception) were asked to rate the communication skills using uniform questionnaires. Statistical analysis was performed by using frequency analyses and t-tests in SPSS 21. Across all ratings in the self- and the external perception, there was a significant gender difference in favour of female students performing better in the dimensions of empathy, structure, verbal expression and non-verbal expression. The results of male students deteriorated across all dimensions in the external perception between 2011 and 2014. It is important to consider if gender-specific teaching should be developed, considering the reported differences between female and male students.

  9. Gender disparity in late-life cognitive functioning in India: findings from the longitudinal aging study in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinkook; Shih, Regina; Feeney, Kevin; Langa, Kenneth M

    2014-07-01

    To examine gender disparities in cognitive functioning in India and the extent to which education explains this disparity in later life. This study uses baseline interviews of a prospective cohort study of 1,451 community-residing adults 45 years of age or older in four geographically diverse states of India (Karnataka, Kerala, Punjab, Rajasthan). Data collected during home visits includes cognitive performance tests, and rich sociodemographic, health, and psychosocial variables. The cognitive performance tests include episodic memory, numeracy, and a modified version of the Mini-Mental State Examination. We find gender disparity in cognitive function in India, and this disparity is greater in the north than the south. We also find that gender disparities in educational attainment, health, and social and economic activity explain the female cognitive disadvantage in later life. We report significant gender disparities in cognitive functioning among older Indian adults, which differ from gender disparities in cognition encountered in developed countries. Our models controlling for education, health status, and social and economic activity explain the disparity in southern India but not the region-specific disparity in the northern India. North Indian women may face additional sources of stress associated with discrimination against women that contribute to persistent disadvantages in cognitive functioning at older ages. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Gendered sexual uses of alcohol and associated risks: a qualitative study of Nigerian University students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka W. Dumbili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol misuse among young people is a global phenomenon. In many countries, young people engage in heavy drinking and this exacerbates risky sexual behaviour. In Nigeria, alcohol held multiple roles in the traditional era but was mainly consumed by adult males for pleasure. Adult females and young people were culturally constrained from drinking in most communities. In contemporary Nigeria, young people’s drinking is increasing, and many engage in sexual intercourse under the influence of alcohol. Methods This study draws on the traditional gender and social sexual scripts to explore the factors that motivate young people to use alcohol for sexual purposes. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 to 23-year old male and female undergraduate students from a Nigerian university. Thematic analysis was conducted with the aid of NVivo 10 software. Results Men drink to become confident to initiate sexual relationships, stimulate sexual urges, prolong erection, increase sexual satisfaction and become more aggressive during sexual intercourse. Women also drink to be bold in initiating sexual relationships, for sexual arousal and to increase satisfaction. Relatedly, not every brand of alcohol is used for sexual purposes. For example, while men use ‘herbal’ alcoholic beverages and a mixture of locally-produced gin and marijuana, women use champagne and other flavoured alcoholic beverages. The results also revealed that young people use alcohol or salt in a bid to prevent conception after sexual intercourse. Conclusions Adherence to the traditional gender (masculinity and social sexual scripts amongst men and the enactment of what appears to be a new form of femininity script amongst women contribute to a culturally specific understanding of the motivations to use alcohol for sexual purposes. Evidence-based strategies should be employed to distribute information about the consequences of sexual intercourse under the influence

  11. Sex and the money--How gender stereotypes modulate economic decision-making: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Eve F; Causse, Mickael; Pesciarelli, Francesca; Cacciari, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    In the present event-related potential study, we investigated whether and how participants playing the ultimatum game as responders modulate their decisions according to the proposers' stereotypical identity. The proposers' identity was manipulated using occupational role nouns stereotypically marked with gender (e.g., Teacher; Engineer), paired with either feminine or masculine proper names (e.g., Anna; David). Greater FRN amplitudes reflected the early processing of the conflict between the strategic rule (i.e., earning as much money as possible) and ready-to-go responses (i.e., refusing unequal offers and discriminating proposers according to their stereotype). Responders were found to rely on a dual-process system (i.e., automatic and heuristic-based system 1 vs. cognitively costly and deliberative system 2), the P300 amplitude reflecting the switch from a decision making system to another. Greater P300 amplitudes were found in response to both fair and unfair offers and male-stereotyped proposers' offers reflecting an automatic decision making based on heuristics, while lower P300 amplitudes were found in response to 3€ offers and the female-stereotyped proposers' offers reflecting a more deliberative reasoning. Overall, the results indicate that participants were more motivated to engage in a costly deliberative reasoning associated with an increase in acceptation rate when playing with female-stereotyped proposers, who may have induced more positive and emphatic feelings in the participants than did male-stereotyped proposers. Then, we assume that people with an occupation stereotypically marked with female gender and engaged in an economic negotiation may benefit from their occupation at least in the case their counterparts lose their money if the negotiation fails. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gender expression associated with BMI in a prospective cohort study of US adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryn Austin, S; Ziyadeh, Najat J; Calzo, Jerel P; Sonneville, Kendrin R; Kennedy, Grace A; Roberts, Andrea L; Haines, Jess; Scherer, Emily A

    2016-02-01

    To examine the relationship between gender expression (GE) and BMI in adolescence. Repeated measures of weight-related behaviors and BMI were collected from 1996 to 2011 via annual/biennial self-report surveys from youth aged 10 to 23 years (6,693 females, 2,978 males) in the longitudinal Growing Up Today Study. GE (very conforming [referent], mostly conforming, nonconforming) was assessed in 2010/11. Sex-stratified, multivariable linear models estimated GE group differences in BMI and the contribution of sexual orientation and weight-related exposures to group differences. Models for males included interaction terms for GE with age. In females, mostly conforming youth had 0.53 kg m(-2) and nonconforming had 1.23 kg m(-2) higher BMI; when adding adjustment for sexual orientation and weight-related exposures, GE group estimates were attenuated up to 8% and remained statistically significant. In males, mostly conforming youth had -0.67 kg m(-2) and nonconforming had -1.99 kg m(-2) lower BMI (age [in years]) interactions were between -0.09 and -0.14 kg m(-2) ; when adding adjustment for sexual orientation and weight-related exposures, GE group estimates were attenuated up to 11% and remained statistically significant. GE is a strong independent predictor of BMI in adolescence. Obesity prevention and treatment interventions with youth must address ways that gender norms may reinforce or undermine healthful behaviors. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  13. Age and gender effects on normal regional cerebral blood flow studied using two different voxel-based statistical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirson, A.S.; George, J.; Krug, B.; Vander Borght, T.; Van Laere, K.; Jamart, J.; D'Asseler, Y.; Minoshima, S.

    2009-01-01

    Fully automated analysis programs have been applied more and more to aid for the reading of regional cerebral blood flow SPECT study. They are increasingly based on the comparison of the patient study with a normal database. In this study, we evaluate the ability of Three-Dimensional Stereotactic Surface Projection (3 D-S.S.P.) to isolate effects of age and gender in a previously studied normal population. The results were also compared with those obtained using Statistical Parametric Mapping (S.P.M.99). Methods Eighty-nine 99m Tc-E.C.D.-SPECT studies performed in carefully screened healthy volunteers (46 females, 43 males; age 20 - 81 years) were analysed using 3 D-S.S.P.. A multivariate analysis based on the general linear model was performed with regions as intra-subject factor, gender as inter-subject factor and age as co-variate. Results Both age and gender had a significant interaction effect with regional tracer uptake. An age-related decline (p < 0.001) was found in the anterior cingulate gyrus, left frontal association cortex and left insula. Bilateral occipital association and left primary visual cortical uptake showed a significant relative increase with age (p < 0.001). Concerning the gender effect, women showed higher uptake (p < 0.01) in the parietal and right sensorimotor cortices. An age by gender interaction (p < 0.01) was only found in the left medial frontal cortex. The results were consistent with those obtained with S.P.M.99. Conclusion 3 D-S.S.P. analysis of normal r.C.B.F. variability is consistent with the literature and other automated voxel-based techniques, which highlight the effects of both age and gender. (authors)

  14. Gender Differences During Toddlerhood in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Community-Based Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Lauren P; Joshi, Rucha; Barbaro, Josephine; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2018-03-01

    Relatively few studies have examined gender differences in infants and toddlers, and most focus on clinically referred samples or high-risk infant cohorts. The current study aimed to examine gender differences in early autism manifestations and cognitive development in a community-ascertained sample. In total, 46 males and 21 females with ASD were seen at approximately 24 and 48 months of age. No significant gender differences were observed on overall cognitive ability, verbal skills, non-verbal skills, overall autism severity, or restricted repetitive behaviours. However, females were found to exhibit more social communication impairments than males. These findings may indicate that female toddlers with less severe or different, social communication impairments may be more likely to be missed during routine surveillance during toddlerhood.

  15. A Longitudinal Study of Impression Management Strategies and Leadership Emergence: The Moderating Roles of Gender and Virtualness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yong-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    This study used a longitudinal study spanning a twelve-week time period and involving 165 undergraduate students to examine the combined impact of gender and impression management strategies on leader emergence by members relying on low versus high virtualness. The subjects were formed into 44 self-managed work groups and charged with completing…

  16. Gender Gap in the National College Entrance Exam Performance in China: A Case Study of a Typical Chinese Municipality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Tsang, Mun

    2015-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to investigate gender achievement gap in the National College Entrance Exam in a typical municipality in China, which is the crucial examination for the transition from high school to higher education in that country. Using ordinary least square model and quantile regression model, the study consistently finds that…

  17. A Comparative Study of International Student Engagement and Success Based on Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and Institutional Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gareth Carlington

    2013-01-01

    The study examined international students' engagement and success using NSSE 2007 data. The sample consisted of 1996 first years and 2,158 seniors. These students were compared by race/ethnicity, gender, and institutional type. The study found that students' engagement differed by race/ethnicity as well as type of institution. The null hypotheses…

  18. Adolescents' cortisol responses to awakening and social stress; Effects of gender, menstrual phase and oral contraceptives. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Esther M. C.; Riese, Harriette; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    Studies on the influence of sex hormones on cortisol responses to awakening and stress have mainly been conducted in adults, while reports on adolescents are scarce. We studied the effects of gender, menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive (OC) use on cortisol responses in a large sample of

  19. Gender Differences in Memory for Objects and Their Locations: A Study on Automatic versus Controlled Encoding and Retrieval Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Goede, Maartje; Postma, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Object-location memory is the only spatial task where female subjects have been shown to outperform males. This result is not consistent across all studies, and may be due to the combination of the multi-component structure of object location memory with the conditions under which different studies were done. Possible gender differences in object…

  20. Gender-Related Quality of Parent-Child Interactions and Early Adolescent Problem Behaviors: Exploratory Study with Midwestern Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoth, Richard; Neppl, Tricia; Goldberg-Lillehoj, Catherine; Jung, Tony; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini

    2006-01-01

    This article reports two exploratory studies testing a model guided by a social interactional perspective, positing an inverse relation between the quality of parent-child interactions and adolescent problem behaviors. It addresses mixed findings in the literature related to gender differences. Study 1 uses cross-sectional survey data from…