WorldWideScience

Sample records for gaseous effluent monitoring

  1. Legal provisions governing gaseous effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.

    1985-01-01

    This contribution explains the main provisions governing radiological monitoring of gaseous effluents from LWR type nuclear power plants. KTA rule 1503.1 defines the measuring methods and tasks to be fulfilled by reactor operators in order to safeguard due monitoring and accounting of radioactive substances in the plants' gaseous effluents. The routine measurements are checked by a supervisory programme by an independent expert. The routine controls include analysis of filter samples, comparative measurement of radioactive noble gases, interlaboratory comparisons, and comparative evaluation of measured values. (DG) [de

  2. Continuous monitoring of gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, A.; Giraut, H.; Prado, M.; Bonino, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The system allows to continuously determine the radioactive materials discharge (iodine, noble gases and aerosols) to the environment. It consists in compelling, by a pump, a known and fixed fraction of the total flow and preserving the aerosols by a filter. The gas -now free from aerosols- traverses an activated carbon filter which keeps the iodine; after being free from aerosols and iodine, the effluent traverses a measurement chambers for noble gases which has a scintillator. (Author) [es

  3. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification using an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.R.; Bennett, C.L.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-10-01

    We are developing an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for chemical effluent monitoring. The system consists of a 2-D infrared imaging array in the focal plane of a Michelson interferometer. Individual images are coordinated with the positioning of a moving mirror in the Michelson interferometer. A three dimensional data cube with two spatial dimensions and one interferogram dimension is then Fourier transformed to produce a hyperspectral data cube with one spectral dimension and two spatial dimensions. The spectral range of the instrument is determined by the choice of optical components and the spectral range of the focal plane array. Measurements in the near UV, visible, near IR, and mid-IR ranges are possible with the existing instrument. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification measurements will be primarily in the ``fingerprint`` region of the spectrum, ({lambda} = 8 to 12 {mu}m). Initial measurements of effluent using this imaging interferometer in the mid-IR will be presented.

  4. Method of removing iodine and compounds thereof from gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keener, R.L.; Kittle, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including an acrylic backbone formed by the suspension polymerization of a mixture of an acrylic and a crosslinking monomer are useful in the removal of iodine and iodine compounds from gaseous effluents. Removal of radioactive iodine contaminants, particularly alkyl iodine compounds or hydrogen iodine, under extreme conditions, namely temperatures up to 180 0 C and humidities up to 100 percent, from effluents resulting from a major nuclear accident could probably be adsorbed by these resins described herein

  5. Removal, storage and disposal of gaseous radionuclides from airborne effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Radioisotopes in the gaseous effluents arising from fuel reprocessing plants are examined and the state of the art to remove, store and dispose of them are discussed. The generation and discharge of krypton-85, iodine-129, tritium and carbon-14 are treated in details. A comparison of the various separation processes is made. Economic aspects of removal of the radionuclides are analysed

  6. Separation of tritium from gaseous and aqueous effluent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobisk, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    Three processes are discussed for separating tritium from gaseous and aqueous effluent systems: separation in the gas phase using Pd-25 wt percent Ag alloy diffusion membranes; electrolytic separation in the aqueous phase using ''bipolar'' electrodes; and the countercurrent exchange of tritium-containing hydrogen gas with water on catalytic surfaces combined with separation by direct electrolysis

  7. A guide for preparing Hanford Site facility effluent monitoring plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    This document provides guidance on the format and content of effluent monitoring plans for facilities at the Hanford Site. The guidance provided in this document is designed to ensure compliance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.3 (DOE 1989a), 5400.4 (DOE 1989b), 5400.5 (DOE 1990a), 5480.1 (DOE 1982), 5480.11 (DOE 1988b), and 5484.1 (DOE 1981). These require environmental monitoring plans for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants of radioactive or hazardous materials. In support of DOE Orders 5400.5 (Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment) and 5400.1 (General Environmental Protection Program), the DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE 1991) should be used to establish elements of a radiological effluent monitoring program in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. Evaluation of facilities for compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Act of 1977 requirements also is included in the airborne emissions section of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Sampling Analysis Plans for Liquid Effluents, as required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), also are included in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans shall include complete documentation of gaseous and liquid effluent sampling and monitoring systems

  8. Separation of tritium from gaseous and aqueous effluent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobisk, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    Removal or reduction of tritium content in a wide variety of effluent streams has been extensively studied in the United States. This paper specifically reviews three processes involving tritium separation in the gaseous phase and the aqueous phase. Diffusion through a selective Pd-25Ag alloy membrane at temperatures up to 600 0 C and at pressures up to 700 kg/cm 2 has resulted in successful separation of hydrogen-deuterium mixtures with an associated separation factor of 1.65 (and gives a calculated separation factor for hydrogen-tritium mixtures of 2.0). Use of a single palladium bipolar membrane in an electrolysis system has been found to yield a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 4 and a hydrogen-tritium factor of 6 to 11 without the production of gaseous hydrogen. Finally, countercurrent catalytic exchange between tritium-containing hydrogen gas and water has yielded a separation factor of 6.3. The specific advantages of each of these systems will be discussed in terms of their potential applications. In all cases, further investigations are necessary to scale the systems to handle large quantities of feed material in a continuous mode and to minimize energy requirements. Such separative systems must necessarily be cascaded to yield gaseous or aqueous product streams suitable for recycling to the tritium producing systems, for storage or for discharge to the environment. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Waste monitoring system for effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, J.M.; Gomez, B.; Trujillo, L.; Malcom, J.E.; Nekimken, H.; Pope, N.; Bibeau, R.

    1995-07-01

    The waste monitoring system in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility, TA-55, is a computer-based system that proves real-time information on industrial effluents. Remote computers monitor discharge events and data moves from one system to another via a local area network. This report describes the history, system design, summary, instrumentation list, displays, trending screens, and layout of the waste monitoring system

  10. Monitoring and removal of gaseous carbon-14 species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    A simple and efficient method was developed for the monitoring of low level carbon-14 in nuclear power station areas and gaseous effluent. Gaseous carbon compounds (hydrocarbons and CO) are catalytically oxidized to CO 2 , which is then absorbed on solid Ca(OH) 2 at elevated temperatures. The 14 C collected is quantitatively liberated by thermal decomposition of CaCO 3 as CO 2 , which is either measured directly by flow-through detectors or absorbed in alkali hydroxide followed by liquid scintillation counting. The method can also be used for the removal of gaseous 14 C. The Ca 14 CO 3 can be immobilized in concrete for long term disposal. Ca(OH) 2 is an inexpensive absorber. It is selective for CO 2 and has high capacity and efficiency for its absorption and retention. A theoretical evaluation of thee optium conditions for CO 2 absorption and liberation is discussed and experimental investigations are described. There is good agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental findings

  11. Legal provisions governing liquid effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, I.; Ruehle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The KTA rule 1504 for radiological monitoring of liquid effluents from nuclear installations is explained. As there are no such rules published to date for establishments handling isotopes, some criteria are discussed which in the future ought to form part of a practical guide for liquid effluents monitoring in isotope handling installations. Monitoring measures described refer to liquid effluents from transfer containers, auxiliary cooling equipment, turbine buildings, main cooling installations, and waste air discharges from closed-circuit cooling systems. (DG) [de

  12. Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.E.; Netzer, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant the ambient atmosphere and all effluent streams are sampled and analyzed regularly for conformance to applicable environmental standards. Although neither the State of Ohio nor the federal government has established standards for fluorides in the ambient atmosphere or in vegetation, these parameters also are monitored because fluoride compounds are used extensively in the gaseous diffusion process. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, food, soil, and sediments; and radiation doses are calculated for the public. All public radiation doses are well within federal standards. Non-radioactive effluent parameters either comply with federal standards, or there are projects planned to allow compliance. A disposal facility to remove chromium from recirculating cooling water blowdown will begin operation in June 1976. Also, pH adjustment facilities for liquid effluents and electrostatic precipitators for a coal-fired steam plant are planned for the near future

  13. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. All discharges for 1982 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. 1 figure

  14. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide

  15. Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1995-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  16. Identification and detection of gaseous effluents from hyperspectral imagery using invariant algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Erin M.; Messinger, David W.; Salvaggio, Carl; Schott, John R.

    2004-08-01

    The ability to detect and identify effluent gases is, and will continue to be, of great importance. This would not only aid in the regulation of pollutants but also in treaty enforcement and monitoring the production of weapons. Considering these applications, finding a way to remotely investigate a gaseous emission is highly desirable. This research utilizes hyperspectral imagery in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum to evaluate an invariant method of detecting and identifying gases within a scene. The image is evaluated on a pixel-by-pixel basis and is studied at the subpixel level. A library of target gas spectra is generated using a simple slab radiance model. This results in a more robust description of gas spectra which are representative of real-world observations. This library is the subspace utilized by the detection and identification algorithms. The subspace will be evaluated for the set of basis vectors that best span the subspace. The Lee algorithm will be used to determine the set of basis vectors, which implements the Maximum Distance Method (MaxD). A Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT) determines whether or not the pixel contains the target. The target can be either a single species or a combination of gases. Synthetically generated scenes will be used for this research. This work evaluates whether the Lee invariant algorithm will be effective in the gas detection and identification problem.

  17. Palisades Nuclear Plant. Radioactive effluents and environmental monitoring sections to second annual operating report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A total of 0.435 Ci of radioactive liquid effluent less tritium was released with 19.63 Ci of tritium. Both liquid and gaseous releases were within permissible limits. There were 8 Ci of solid wastes stored on the site as of 12/31/76. Data clearly shows there was no detectable increase in radioactivity levels in the environmental media that can be attributed to plant effluents. Monitoring reports are presented concerning fish, meteorology, noise, and cooling tower drift

  18. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Camilleri, A.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1995-12-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) during 1994. All low level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.015 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1.5 % of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and 5 % of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. 27 refs., 22 tabs., 6 figs

  19. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1994-03-01

    On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

  20. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.

    1994-03-01

    On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992

  1. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Dugheri, Stefano; Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Mucci, Nicola; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13?mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impre...

  2. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997.

  3. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January-December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997

  4. Characteristics and applications of small, portable gaseous air pollution monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKercher, Grant R; Salmond, Jennifer A; Vanos, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Traditional approaches for measuring air quality based on fixed measurements are inadequate for personal exposure monitoring. To combat this issue, the use of small, portable gas-sensing air pollution monitoring technologies is increasing, with researchers and individuals employing portable and mobile methods to obtain more spatially and temporally representative air pollution data. However, many commercially available options are built for various applications and based on different technologies, assumptions, and limitations. A review of the monitor characteristics of small, gaseous monitors is missing from current scientific literature. A state-of-the-art review of small, portable monitors that measure ambient gaseous outdoor pollutants was developed to address broad trends during the last 5-10 years, and to help future experimenters interested in studying gaseous air pollutants choose monitors appropriate for their application and sampling needs. Trends in small, portable gaseous air pollution monitor uses and technologies were first identified and discussed in a review of literature. Next, searches of online databases were performed for articles containing specific information related to performance, characteristics, and use of such monitors that measure one or more of three criteria gaseous air pollutants: ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide. All data were summarized into reference tables for comparison between applications, physical features, sensing capabilities, and costs of the devices. Recent portable monitoring trends are strongly related to associated applications and audiences. Fundamental research requires monitors with the best individual performance, and thus the highest cost technology. Monitor networking favors real-time capabilities and moderate cost for greater reproduction. Citizen science and crowdsourcing applications allow for lower-cost components; however important strengths and limitations for each application must be addressed

  5. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  6. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugheri, Stefano; Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Mucci, Nicola; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2  μ g/filter), and linearity (2.0-4000  μ g/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  7. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Dugheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fluoride (HF is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC/mass spectrometry (MS. After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90. In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n=10, 4.3%, sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter, and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913 were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  8. Effluent monitoring for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchi, L.

    1976-01-01

    A microprocessor-based instrument operates a continuous surveillance on effluents from a nuclear facility. It receives and evaluates pulses from two NaI detectors and a set of single-channel analyzers. It has self-diagnosing capability so that it takes actions not only when it recognizes excessive radioactivity but also when it ascertains some abnormal behavior. Power failure procedure and automatic restart are provided. Operative constants such as alarm thresholds, times, and number of successive measurements are permanently stored in a read/write battery operated C-MOS memory. The program allows automatic succession of phases in a peculiar way and has a feature for loading an auxiliary program into RAMs

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Dahl, N.R.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  10. Effluent and sanitary sewer monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchi, L.; Vasey, M.R.

    1977-03-01

    Two similar instruments that monitor the liquid wastes from the plutonium facility are described. The operation of the two instruments is completely automatic and performs a continuous surveillance in the frame of Nuclear Safeguards. One instrument controls the liquids from the facility and the other checks the sanitary sewer wastes. Both have self-diagnosing capabilities and take automatic actions in case of abnormal occurrences

  11. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans

  12. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2000 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2000 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2000 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1 % of the 1 milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  13. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2001 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC-controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2001 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2001 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This is well below the ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv per year for off-site doses that ANSTO has set and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv per year (above natural background and medical doses) and the natural background dose in Australia of 1.5 mSv per year (Webb et al; 1999). It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  14. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E. L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the 1 millisievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  15. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the I milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron (authors)

  16. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  18. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate

  19. Methodology of adjustment point in the post treatment of gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizuet G, J.; Molina, G.

    2005-01-01

    The methodology to determine the adjustment points of the monitoring system of gaseous discharges is based on the stipulations of the 10CFR20, which are expressed in terms of limit concentrations for the outstanding radionuclides, and of dose limits for the individuals members of the public. Besides the points of liberation properly said, like they are the chimneys of the reactor buildings and of turbine, the points of adjustment of the monitoring instrumentation that watches in real time the discharge of the Treatment system of output gases, to the HVAC of the waste building; they also undergo to the same methodology, with the approaches previously described. (Author)

  20. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years

  1. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A Evaporator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1**. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  2. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  4. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  5. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the B plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesser, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plant assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated every three years

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  9. Radiation treatment of gaseous and liquid effluents for contaminant removal. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    The Technical Meeting on Radiation Processing of Gaseous and Liquid Effluents conducted in Sofia, Bulgaria, 7-10 September 2004, discussed and evaluated issues related to the status and future trends in radiation application for environmental protection. Five experts from Bulgaria, India, the Republic of Korea, Poland, and the United States of America were invited to provide their experiences in this field. Twenty cost-free participants and observers - from Bulgaria, India, Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine -joined the meeting, and 15 papers in total were presented. Research and development in radiation processing of gaseous and liquid effluents is undertaken in three fields: electron beam flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification and sewage sludge sterilization. Wastewater or sludge treatment and flue gas purification all differ from technological points of view, but they are common services and applications of environmental radiation technology applications, based mostly on electron accelerators. The technical meeting discussed new development in the field of radiation applications in environmental service, especially the status and prospects of radiation processing of gaseous and liquid effluents. Progress in the field of electron accelerators and gamma sources is crucial for routine application of the technology. Cost reduction and improvement of technical reliability are substantial especially for high power of accelerators and high activity of the sources needed for environmental applications. Environmental applications were carefully reviewed in accordance with the existing regulations and state of the art knowledge. The comparison with conventional commercial technologies was addressed as well. In flue gas treatment, applicability of the technology using different fossil fuels (coal, lignite, oil, etc.) was reviewed. The elaborated materials cover the technical and economical evaluation of the technologies. The possible applications of

  10. Study of the adsorption/oxidation coupling for the processing of industrial gaseous effluents; Etude du couplage adsorption / oxydation pour le traitement des effluents gazeux industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monneyron, P.; Manero, M.H.; Foussard, J.N. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), Genie des Procedes Industriels, Lab. d' Ingenierie des Procedes de l' Environnement, 31 - Toulouse (France); Benoit-Marquie, F; Maurette, M.T. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Lab. des Interactions Moleculaires et Reactivite Chimique et Photochimique, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2001-07-01

    This study presents a process for the abatement of the volatile organic compounds of industrial gaseous effluents. This process uses hydrophobous zeolites as adsorbent in order to avoid any risk of ignition during the adsorption of ketones. Adsorption is coupled with oxidation in the same reactor for the regeneration of the adsorbent. Two oxidation processes are evaluated: the regeneration by ozonized air and the UV photo-catalysis. (J.S.)

  11. A fast radiochemical procedure to measure Tc-99 in environmental samples and gaseous and liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxenburger, H.J.; Schuettelkopf, H.; Bohn, B.

    1984-08-01

    Liquid effluent samples are collected in polyethylene bottles. Sampling in the gaseous effluents relies on conventional NaOH scrubbers. No noticeable adsorption on the vessel walls takes place in HNO 3 /H 2 O 2 and NaOH, respectively, in the plastic botteles used. A known amount of Tc-95m is added in order to determine the chemical yield prior to the analysis. The pertechnetate in the samples is first fixed on an anionexchanger. Following elution with perchlorate/sulfite solution TC is coprecipitated with iron(II) hydroxide. Having dissolved the precipitation in H 2 O 2 /H 2 SO 4 one extracts with TBP/alkane. To achieve a better decontamination from other nuclides a re-extraction is performed with NaOH and after acidification with H 2 SO 4 a further extraction using TBP/Alkane. Before the measurement of the sample the alkane is eliminated in a rotation evaporator and the remaining TBP is dissolved directly in the liquid scintillator. Other beta emitters generated as fission products in the course of nuclear fission are satisfactorily separated during the analysis. The decontamination factors for I, Se, Te, Sb, and Ru are > 10 5 . The measurements are carried out with a Beckman LS 7800 instrument. The optimum channel setting is found from the spectra of the two nuclides Tc-95m and Tc-99. The quenching plots are determined accordingly. The measurements are evaluated with a table computer. Chemical yields of 50-90% are achieved. The detection limit for 600 minutes of measuring time is 1 pCi per sample. One person is capable of performing about 15 analyses per week using the method described. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Determination of Kr-85 in environmental samples and gaseous effluents from nuclear industries using the standard method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras Iniquez, M.C.; Perez Garcia, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The determination of the Kr-85 activity in environmental samples and gaseous effluents from Spanish Nuclear Power Stations is described. The method employed has been published elsewhere. The determinations has been carried out in environmental samples token at JEN Laboratories (Madrid) and the Nuclear Power Stations, Jose Cabrera (Zorita), Garona and Vandellos. Also samples of gaseous effluents of the three plants has been analyzed. Values of the Kr-85 environmental background activity in the Almaraz Nuclear Power Stations, has been determined, before the beginning of its nuclear activity. In this paper the sampling equipment used is described and the values found of Kr-85 activity in all the samples in given. (Author) 29 refs

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  15. Purification/deodorization of indoor air and gaseous effluents by TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, P.; Disdier, J.; Hoang-Van, C.; Mas, D.; Goutailler, G.; Gaysse, C. [Laboratoire ' Photocatalyse, Catalyse et Environnement' , CNRS UMR ' IFoS' , Ecole Centrale de Lyon, BP 163, 69131 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2000-12-25

    Our objective was to further assess the capabilities of TiO{sub 2} to purify/deodorize indoor air and industrial gaseous effluents. Using a laboratory photoreactor including a lamp emitting around 365nm and a TiO{sub 2}-coated fiber glass mesh, we first determined that the removal rate of three very different pollutants (CO, n-octane, pyridine) was 5-10{mu}mol per Wh consumed by the lamp for 50-2000ppmv concentrations and 25-50lh{sup -1} flow rates (dry air or O{sub 2}). We inferred that this order of magnitude allows, by use of a reasonable-size apparatus, the abatement of pollutants in constantly renewed indoor air, except CO and CH{sub 4} that are too concentrated. Using a TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis-based individual air purifier prototype, we showed, through distinctive analytical measurements, that the average concentrations of benzene, toluene and xylenes were indeed reduced by a factor of 2-3 in an ordinary non-airtight room. We also showed that O{sub 3} addition in O{sub 2} very markedly increases the mineralization percentage of n-octane, under otherwise identical conditions, in the laboratory photoreactor without photoexcitation of O{sub 3}; this property of O{sub 3} can expand the application field of photocatalytic air purification in industry, at least in some cases.

  16. Analysis of 210Po in the gaseous effluent from the coal-fired boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shutang

    1992-01-01

    The concentrations of 210 Po in crude coal, slag and flue dust from coal-fired boilers, coal-fired power plants and coal-fired boiler for supplying boiling water in nuclear industrial system of China are analysed. The distribution of 210 Po is investigated. The results are as follows: the average concentrations of 210 Po in the crude coal and slag are 27 Bq/kg and 17.6 Bq/kg, respectively. 210 Po is moved toward the stack and released to the atmosphere along with the hot flue gases from the coal-fired boilers. The concentration (C) of 210 Po in flue gases is increases gradually. The distribution of 210 Po is as follows: C before the dust remover 210 Po in crude coal is enriched very much in the gaseous effluent from burnt coal. 210 Po is the most high toxic nuclide and the 210 Po release from the stack will be harmful to the residents. Therefore, in order to remove the black smoke and 210 Po in the stack, the efficiency of a dust remover for coal-fired boiler must be more than 90%

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 100 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, D.E.

    1991-11-01

    The determination for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans arose from evaluations conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 100 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plant determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan, WHC-EP-0438 (WHC 1991). Ten Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 100 Areas were evaluated: N Reactor, KE/KW Reactors, 1706 KE Laboratory, and the Surplus Reactors (B, C, D, DR, F, and H). The N Reactor, KE/KW Reactors, and 1706 KE Laboratory Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared by Columbia Energy and Environmental Services of Richland, Washington. The determination for the Surplus Reactors was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of the 10 facilities evaluated, two will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan: N Reactor and the active spent fuel storage facilities and their contiguous support facilities at 100 KE and 100 KW

  18. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRAZIER, T.P.

    1999-10-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U. S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. To ensure the long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems, an update to this facility effluent monitoring plan is required whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and is updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years

  20. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January - December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1997-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate

  1. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1997-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  2. Order of 21 October 1988 on licensing the release of gaseous radioactive effluents by the Cattenom nuclear production centre (units 1 and 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Order fixes the conditions and limits of authorised releases of gaseous radioactive effluents from Units 1 and 2 of the Cattenom nuclear power plant. The annual limits are 1650 terabecquerels for gas and 55 gigabecquerels for gaseous halogens and aerosols. The Order specifies these are maximum limits, below which the radioactive releases should be as low as possible. (NEA) [fr

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  4. Effluent treatment efficiency and compliance monitoring in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of effluent treatment at the Eleme Petrochemical Industry, Port Harcourt, Nigeria was monitored weekly for six weeks to assess their level of compliance with the Directorate of Petroleum Resources (DPR) guidelines and standards for environmental safety. Effluent samples were taken from the untreated ...

  5. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 effluent monitoring station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This procedure will verify that the 221-B liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the 6-in. chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. TK-900B was installed near stairwell 3 in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system

  6. Statistical evaluation of effluent monitoring data for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    The 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) consists of a pair of infiltration basins that receive wastewater originating from the 200 West and 200 East Areas of the Hanford Site. TEDF has been in operation since 1995 and is regulated by State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 (Ecology 1995) under the authority of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-216. The permit stipulates monitoring requirements for effluent (or end-of-pipe) discharges and groundwater monitoring for TEDF. Groundwater monitoring began in 1992 prior to TEDF construction. Routine effluent monitoring in accordance with the permit requirements began in late April 1995 when the facility began operations. The State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 included a special permit condition (S.6). This condition specified a statistical study of the variability of permitted constituents in the effluent from TEDF during its first year of operation. The study was designed to (1) demonstrate compliance with the waste discharge permit; (2) determine the variability of all constituents in the effluent that have enforcement limits, early warning values, and monitoring requirements (WHC 1995); and (3) determine if concentrations of permitted constituents vary with season. Additional and more frequent sampling was conducted for the effluent variability study. Statistical evaluation results were provided in Chou and Johnson (1996). Parts of the original first year sampling and analysis plan (WHC 1995) were continued with routine monitoring required up to the present time

  7. Method and apparatus for treating gaseous effluents from waste treatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Philip A.; Kujawa, Stephan T.

    2000-01-01

    Effluents from a waste treatment operation are incinerated and oxidized by passing the gases through an inductively coupled plasmas arc torch. The effluents are transformed into plasma within the torch. At extremely high plasma temperatures, the effluents quickly oxidize. The process results in high temperature oxidation of the gases without addition of any mass flow for introduction of energy.

  8. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) System Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The liquid effluent sampling program is part of the effort to minimize adverse environmental impact during the cleanup operation at the Hanford Site. Of the 33 Phase I and Phase II liquid effluents, all streams actively discharged to the soil column will be sampled. The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Construction document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  9. An estimation of exposure from gaseous and volatile radioactive effluents released from EWA reactor between 1971 and 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipiak, B.; Nowicki, K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper gives an estimation of radiation doses for individuals due to gaseous radioactive effluents released from EWA reactor between 1971 and 1975. The doses were estimated for three organs, three groups of people: adults, teenagers and children and for three of the most important exposure paths: the external radiation from a passing cloud, inhalation and from milk ingestion. The results of calculations indicate that the radiation doses received by individuals living in the vicinity of EWA reactor were much below the limit doses or those due to the background radiation. (author)

  10. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre during 1996. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by thr National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. Details of the environmental sample collection and analytical procedures are given in the appendices. (authors)

  11. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y

    1998-11-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) during 1997. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges from HIFAR were estimated utilising the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective dose to the public was estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around the HIFAR research reactor. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 10% of the HIFAR dose constraint of 0.1 mSv/year

  12. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre during 1996. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by thr National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. Details of the environmental sample collection and analytical procedures are given in the appendices. (authors). 29 refs., 26 tabs., 6 figs.

  13. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y

    1998-11-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) during 1997. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges from HIFAR were estimated utilising the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective dose to the public was estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around the HIFAR research reactor. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 10% of the HIFAR dose constraint of 0.1 mSv/year 24 tabs., 7 figs.; Glossary; Appendices

  14. Preliminary evaluation of the gaseous effluent sampling system at the 296-S-18 stack, 242-S evaporator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Schwendiman, L.C.

    1977-04-01

    This evaluation of the 296-S-18 stack sampling system is part of a larger study, sponsored by ARHCO and conducted by Battelle-Northwest, of gaseous effluent sampling systems in ARHCO facilities. It is the fourth and last in a series of evaluations of tank farm stack sampling systems. The objectives of this study are: Evaluate the compliance of the existing effluent particulate sampling system with ARHCO's Interim Criteria for such systems by using sampling theory and radioactivity counting statistics; and make recommendations for corrective action which will lead to a particulate sampling system in compliance with the Interim Criteria. This study is considered preliminary because no experiments have been conducted to verify the sampling system's performance. The following report includes a brief summary, a detailed description and evaluation of the sampling system, conclusions about satisfactory or deficient areas of the sampling system and recommendations for corrective action. The appendices contain a copy of the Interim Criteria and the applicable ARHCO Emergency Procedure for radioactive gaseous discharges.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of the gaseous effluent sampling system at the 296-S-18 stack, 242-S evaporator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Schwendiman, L.C.

    1977-04-01

    This evaluation of the 296-S-18 stack sampling system is part of a larger study, sponsored by ARHCO and conducted by Battelle-Northwest, of gaseous effluent sampling systems in ARHCO facilities. It is the fourth and last in a series of evaluations of tank farm stack sampling systems. The objectives of this study are: Evaluate the compliance of the existing effluent particulate sampling system with ARHCO`s Interim Criteria for such systems by using sampling theory and radioactivity counting statistics; and make recommendations for corrective action which will lead to a particulate sampling system in compliance with the Interim Criteria. This study is considered preliminary because no experiments have been conducted to verify the sampling system`s performance. The following report includes a brief summary, a detailed description and evaluation of the sampling system, conclusions about satisfactory or deficient areas of the sampling system and recommendations for corrective action. The appendices contain a copy of the Interim Criteria and the applicable ARHCO Emergency Procedure for radioactive gaseous discharges.

  16. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  17. Atomics International environmental monitoring and facility effluent annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Environmental and facility effluent radioactivity monitoring at Atomics International (AI) is performend by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Unit of the Health, Safety, and Radiation Services Department. Soil, vegetation, and surface water are routinely sampled to a distance of 10 miles from AI sites. Continuous ambient air sampling and thermoluminescent dosimetry are performed on site for monitoring airborne radioactivity and site ambient radiation levels. Radioactivity in effluents discharged to the atmosphere from AI facilities is continuously sampled and monitored to ensure that levels released to unrestricted areas are within appropriate limits, and to identify processes which may require additional engineering safeguards to minimize radioactivity levels in such effluents. In addition, selected nonradioactive constituents in surface water discharged to unrestricted areas are determined. This report summarizes and discusses monitoring results for 1976. The results of a special soil plutonium survey performed during the year are also summarized

  18. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  19. Radioactive and electron microscope analysis of effluent monitor sample lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Effluent air sampling at nuclear power plant often leads to the question ''How representative is the sample of the effluent stream?'' Samples from radiation monitors are typically obtained at great distances from the sample nozzle because of high background concerns under postulated accidents. Sample line plateout during normal effluent sampling becomes the major concern. A US Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspection raised a concern that monitors were not collecting representative samples per ANSI standard N13.1. A comprehensive 2-yr study at Beaver Valley was performed during normal effluent releases in two phases: 1) weekly charcoal and glass fiber filter samples were analyzed for radioactivity for 6 months, and 2) nuclepore membrane filter samples were analyzed by electron microscope for 4- and 6-h periods. A specially designed test nozzle was directly inserted into an effluent stream for comparison with the radiation monitor samples. Particle behavior characteristics can be determined during effluent releases using a simple test probe. While particle plateout was the major purpose of the study, other particle behavior characteristics were evident and equally as important. Particle travel through long sample lines can also lead to (a) agglomeration or the coagulation of smaller particles to form larger ones, (b) particle splitting or fracturing upon impact with the sample line interior walls, and (c) resuspension of large particles in sample lines

  20. Optimizing Liquid Effluent Monitoring at a Large Nuclear Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Charissa J.; Johnson, V.G.; Barnett, Brent B.; Olson, Phillip M.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring data for a centralized effluent treatment and disposal facility at the Hanford Site, a defense nuclear complex undergoing cleanup and decommissioning in southeast Washington State, was evaluated to optimize liquid effluent monitoring efficiency. Wastewater from several facilities is collected and discharged to the ground at a common disposal site. The discharged water infiltrates through 60 m of soil column to the groundwater, which eventually flows into the Columbia River, the second largest river in the contiguous United States. Protection of this important natural resource is the major objective of both cleanup and groundwater and effluent monitoring activities at the Hanford Site. Four years of effluent data were evaluated for this study. More frequent sampling was conducted during the first year of operation to assess temporal variability in analyte concentrations, to determine operational factors contributing to waste stream variability and to assess the probability of exceeding permit limits. Subsequently, the study was updated which included evaluation of the sampling and analysis regime. It was concluded that the probability of exceeding permit limits was one in a million under normal operating conditions, sampling frequency could be reduced, and several analytes could be eliminated, while indicators could be substituted for more expensive analyses. Findings were used by the state regulatory agency to modify monitoring requirements for a new discharge permit. The primary focus of this paper is on the statistical approaches and rationale that led to the successful permit modification and to a more cost-effective effluent monitoring program

  1. Analysis of Process Gases and Trace Contaminants in Membrane-Aerated Gaseous Effluent Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin Michael; Meyer, Caitlin E.

    2015-01-01

    In membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs), hollow fibers are used to supply oxygen to the biofilms and bulk fluid. A pressure and concentration gradient between the inner volume of the fibers and the reactor reservoir drives oxygen mass transport across the fibers toward the bulk solution, providing the fiber-adhered biofilm with oxygen. Conversely, bacterial metabolic gases from the bulk liquid, as well as from the biofilm, move opposite to the flow of oxygen, entering the hollow fiber and out of the reactor. Metabolic gases are excellent indicators of biofilm vitality, and can aid in microbial identification. Certain gases can be indicative of system perturbations and control anomalies, or potentially unwanted biological processes occurring within the reactor. In confined environments, such as those found during spaceflight, it is important to understand what compounds are being stripped from the reactor and potentially released into the crew cabin to determine the appropriateness or the requirement for additional mitigation factors. Reactor effluent gas analysis focused on samples provided from Kennedy Space Center's sub-scale MABRs, as well as Johnson Space Center's full-scale MABRs, using infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography techniques. Process gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrous oxide, were quantified to monitor reactor operations. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) GC-MS analysis was used to identify trace volatile compounds. Compounds of interest were subsequently quantified. Reactor supply air was examined to establish target compound baseline concentrations. Concentration levels were compared to average ISS concentration values and/or Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) levels where appropriate. Based on a review of to-date results, current trace contaminant control systems (TCCS) currently on board the ISS should be able to handle the added load from bioreactor systems without the need

  2. Nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring program. 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.A.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.; Meachum, T.R.

    1993-08-01

    A monitoring program for nonradioactive parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents was initiated in October 1985 for facilities operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Program design and implementation are discussed in this report. Design and methodologies for sampling, analysis, and data management are also discussed. Monitoring results for 28 liquid effluent streams from (October 1991 through December 1992) are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1992 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

  3. Controlled decomposition and oxidation: A treatment method for gaseous process effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinley, Roger J. B., Sr.

    1990-01-01

    The safe disposal of effluent gases produced by the electronics industry deserves special attention. Due to the hazardous nature of many of the materials used, it is essential to control and treat the reactants and reactant by-products as they are exhausted from the process tool and prior to their release into the manufacturing facility's exhaust system and the atmosphere. Controlled decomposition and oxidation (CDO) is one method of treating effluent gases from thin film deposition processes. CDO equipment applications, field experience, and results of the use of CDO equipment and technological advances gained from the field experiences are discussed.

  4. Order of 4 august 1989 on licensing the release of gaseous radioactive effluents by the Cattenom nuclear production centre (units 3 and 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This Order fixes the conditions and limits of authorised releases of gaseous radioactive effluents from Units 3 and 4 of the Cattenom nuclear power plant. It specifies these are maximum limits, below which the radioactive releases should be as low as possible [fr

  5. Graphic overview system for DOE's effluent and environmental monitoring programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burson, Z.G.; Elle, D.R.

    1980-03-01

    The Graphic Overview System is a compilation of photos, maps, overlays, and summary information of environmental programs and related data for each DOE site. The information consists of liquid and airborne effluent release points, on-site storage locations, monitoring locations, aerial survey results, population distributions, wind roses, and other related information. The relationships of different environmental programs are visualized through the use of colored overlays. Trends in monitoring data, effluent releases, and on-site storage data are also provided as a corollary to the graphic display of monitoring and release points. The results provide a working tool with which DOE management (headquarters and field offices) can place in proper perspective key aspects of all environmental programs and related data, and the resulting public impact of each DOE site

  6. Volatile organic monitor for industrial effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Stuart, A.D.; Loyola, V.M.

    1993-07-01

    1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have created the need for instruments capable of monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in public air space in an unattended and low cost manner. The purpose of the study was to develop and demonstrate the capability to do long term automatic and unattended ambient air monitoring using an inexpensive portable analytic system at a commercial manufacturing plant site. A gas chromatograph system personal computer hardware, meteorology tower ampersand instruments, and custom designed hardware and software were developed. Comparison with an EPA approved method was performed. The system was sited at an aircraft engines manufacturing site and operated in a completely unattended mode for 60 days. Two VOCs were monitored every 30 minutes during the 24hr day. Large variation in the concentration from 800ppb to the limits of detection of about 10ppb were observed. Work to increase the capabilities of the system is ongoing

  7. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 3720 Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the Environmental Science Laboratory (3720 Facility) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs'' This FEMP has been prepared for the 3720 Facility primarily because it has a major (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The 3720 Facility provides office and laboratory space for PNNL scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of materials characterization and testing and waste management. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials to conduct these activities. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, and dispersible particulate. The facility is in the process of being vacated for shutdown, but is considered a Major Emission Point as of the date of this document approval.

  8. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 284-E and 284-W power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Herman, D.R.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  10. Purge Monitoring Technology for Gaseous Helium (GHe) Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jonathan; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center provides rocket engine propulsion testing for the NASA space programs. Since the development of the Space Shuttle, every Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has gone through acceptance testing before going to Kennedy Space Center for integration into the Space Shuttle. The SSME is a large cryogenic rocket engine that used Liquid Oxygen (LO2) and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) as propellants. Due to the extremely cold cryogenic conditions of this environment, an inert gas, helium, is used as a purge for the engine and propellant lines since it can be used without freezing in the cryogenic environment. As NASA moves forward with the development of the new ARES V launch system, the main engines as well as the upper stage engine will use cryogenic propellants and will require gaseous helium during the development testing of each of these engines. The main engine for the ARES V will be similar in size to the SSME.

  11. Design of a PWR gaseous effluent treatment system combining delay-storage vessels, volume-reduction and activated-charcoal beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyt, G.; Glibert, R.; Lahaye, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The usual technique for the treatment of gaseous effluents is to store them in radioactive decay tanks and to carry out a range of operations such as recycling, volume-reduction and discharge. Although presenting undeniable advantages, this technique has a number of weaknesses which have become apparent with experience. This paper describes and analyses a system designed to alleviate these difficulties and to permit greater flexibility in gaseous effluent treatment, especially for power stations in the load-following mode of operation, by means of a combination of storage techniques and retention of short-lived isotopes in activated charcoal beds. The attractiveness of the proposed system is apparent from an analysis of operational, maintenance, safety and cost aspects. (author)

  12. Industrial effluent quality, pollution monitoring and environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S; Hammad, Waleed S

    2008-12-01

    Royal Commission Environmental Control Department (RC-ECD) at Yanbu industrial city in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has established a well-defined monitoring program to control the pollution from industrial effluents. The quality of effluent from each facility is monitored round the clock. Different strategic measures have been taken by the RC-ECD to implement the zero discharge policy of RC. Industries are required to pre-treat the effluent to conform pretreatment standards before discharging to central biological treatment plant. Industries are not allowed to discharge any treated or untreated effluent in open channels. After treatment, reclaimed water must have to comply with direct discharge standards before discharge to the sea. Data of industrial wastewater collected from five major industries and central industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWTP) is summarized in this report. During 5-year period, 3,705 samples were collected and analyzed for 43,436 parameters. There were 1,377 violations from pretreatment standards from all the industries. Overall violation percentage was 3.17%. Maximum violations were recorded from one of the petrochemical plants. The results show no significant pollution due to heavy metals. Almost all heavy metals were within RC pretreatment standards. High COD and TOC indicates that major pollution was due to hydrocarbons. Typical compounds identified by GC-MS were branched alkanes, branched alkenes, aliphatic ketones, substituted thiophenes, substituted phenols, aromatics and aromatic alcohols. Quality of treated water was also in compliance with RC direct discharge standards. In order to achieve the zero discharge goal, further studies and measures are in progress.

  13. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) during 1998. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges from HIFAR were estimated utilising the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective dose to the public was estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around the HIFAR research reactor. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year approved by the Nuclear Safety Bureau. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the LHSTC

  14. Effect of air infiltration in the reactor refrigerant on the radiation measurement systems of gaseous effluents treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorrilla, S.; Padilla, I.

    1991-01-01

    The system of treatment of gassy effluents of the CLV, well-known as the off-gas this gifted one in turn of a mensuration system and registration (monitoring) that consists of diverse established radiation monitors in the discharge point to the atmosphere and in other intermediate points of the process. The purpose of the monitoring system is to maintain continually informed to the operators about the effectiveness of the treatment system, to take registrations of the total quantity of liberated radioactive materials and to give warning by means of an alarm system of any abnormal situation that could end in an approach to the limits marked by the technical specifications. In September 1989 an event happened in the one that the high alarms corresponding to the post-treatment of the off-gas were activated. For this situation the personnel proceeded to diminish the power of the reactor to be able to investigate the causes that gave place to the event. It was observed that the alarms of the monitor were activated by significant infiltrations of air in the primary circuit of the refrigerant, for what it was proceeded to enlarge the scales of the implied monitor or to reduce the sensibility of their readings

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 2724-W Protective Equipment Decontamination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Lavey, G.H.

    1992-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438**. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  16. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  18. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 2724-W Protective Equipment Decontamination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.J.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updates as a minimum every three years

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.J.; Sontage, S.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years

  20. 40 CFR 401.17 - pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true pH Effluent limitations under... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.17 pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring. (a) Where a permittee continuously measures the pH of wastewater pursuant to a...

  1. Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (benthic macroinvertebrates, fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from Jan. 1995 to Dec. 1995, although activities conducted outside this period are included as appropriate

  2. Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1996-04-01

    The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (benthic macroinvertebrates, fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from Jan. 1995 to Dec. 1995, although activities conducted outside this period are included as appropriate.

  3. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2004-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2004 to June 2005. Effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. This estimated maximum potential dose is less than 24% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The levels of tritium detected in groundwater and stormwater at the LHSTC were less than those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne and liquid effluent emissions from the NMC were below both the ARPANSA-approved notification levels and Sydney Water limits for acceptance of trade wastewater to sewer. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of ∼1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  4. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2005-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2005 to June 2006. Estimated effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. The maximum potential dose was 23% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The median tritium concentrations detected in groundwater and surface waters at the LHSTC were typically less than 2% of those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne emissions from the NMC were below the ARPANSA-approved notification levels. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of -1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  5. Liquid effluent retention facility final-status groundwater monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.D.; Chou, C.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    The following sections describe the groundwater-monitoring program for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The LERF is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The LERF is included in the open-quotes Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit WA890008967close quotes, (referred to herein as the Permit) (Ecology 1994) and is subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring (WAC 173-303-645). This document describes a RCRA/WAC groundwater detection-monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the LERF. This plan describes the LERF monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the LERF. This plan will be used to meet the groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the LERF becomes part of the Permit and through the post-closure care period, until certification of final closure

  6. Monitoring and management of tritium from the nuclear power plant effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaoe; Liu, Ting; Yang, Lili; Meng, De; Song, Dahu

    2018-01-01

    It is important to regulate tritium nuclides from the nuclear power plant effluent, the paper briefly analyzes the main source of tritium, and the regulatory requirements associated with tritium in our country and the United States. The monitoring methods of tritium from the nuclear power plant effluent are described, and the purpose to give some advice to our national nuclear power plant about the effluent of tritium monitoring and management.

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 300 Area Fuels Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Brendel, D.F.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP- 0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring system by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The Fuel Fabrication Facility in the Hanford 300 Area supported the production reactors from the 1940's until they were shut down in 1987. Prior to 1987 the Fuel Fabrication Facility released both airborne and liquid radioactive effluents. In January 1987 the emission of airborne radioactive effluents ceased with the shutdown of the fuels facility. The release of liquid radioactive effluents have continued although decreasing significantly from 1987 to 1990

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for K area spent fuel storage basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunacek, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400. 1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in WHC-EP-0438-1, A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the second revision to the original annual report. Long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring system shall be ensured with updates of this report whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  9. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRAZIER, T.P.

    1999-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U. S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. To ensure the long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems, an update to this facility effluent monitoring plan is required whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and is updated, at a minimum, every 3 years

  10. A review of monitoring, sampling and analysis of reactor coolant, reactor containment atmosphere and airborne reactor effluents in post accident concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.P.; White, J.R.; Knox, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    A post-implementation review has been made in NRC Region I of the post-accident sampling systems (PASS), the gaseous effluent monitors, and the provisions for sampling effluent particulates and radioiodines which were required by the NRC subsequent to the TMI-2 accident (NUREG-0737). Prefabricated PASS systems were predominant. Problems included insufficient purge times, inadequate separation of dissolved gases, excessive dilution and the accuracy of analytical techniques in the presence of interferences. Microprocessor-controlled high-range gas monitors with integral provisions for sampling particulates and radioiodines in high concentrations were widely used. Calibration information was generally insufficient for the unambiguous conversion of monitor readings to release rates for a varying postaccident mixture of radiogases. The referenced sampling guidance (ANSI-N 13.1-1969) was inappropriate for the long sampling lines customarily used. Generic research is needed to establish the behavior of particulates and radioiodines in these lines

  11. Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Facility effluent monitoring plan for K Area Spent Fuel. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunacek, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    The scope of this document includes program plans for monitoring and characterizing radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials discharged in the K Area effluents. This FEMP includes complete documentation for both airborne and liquid effluent monitoring systems that monitor radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous pollutants that could be discharged to the environment under routine and/or upset conditions. This documentation is provided for each K Area facility that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials that could impact public and employee safety and the environment. This FEW describes the airborne and liquid effluent paths and the associated sampling and monitoring systems of the K Area facilities. Sufficient information is provided on the effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against requirements may be performed. Adequate details are supplied such that radioactive and hazardous material source terms may be related to specific effluent streams which are, in turn, related to discharge points and finally compared to the effluent monitoring system capability

  13. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes

  14. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

  15. Guidance on air emissions and monitoring requirements during combustion of non-gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    These guidelines, based on technical studies conducted for Alberta Environment on the use of non-gaseous fuels for steam production in the oil sands, help project proponents and regulators with air emissions and monitoring expectations when non-gaseous fuels (i.e. bitumen, petroleum coke, and asphaltenes) are used with boilers or steam generators, and cogeneration equipment. For example, the emission guideline for sulphur dioxide (SO2) ranges from 70 to 116 (grams/gigajoules of energy input) while the oxides of nitrogen (Total NOx) range is between 40 and 50 (grams/gigajoules of energy input), depending on the efficiency of the steam generator. Three steam generator capacity sections are distinguished: less than 105 gigajoules/hour, more than 264 gigajoules/hour, and in-between. Other existing regulations, standards, and policies setting approval limits and monitoring requirements for equipment and fuels must also be respected in the environmental evaluation. For specific applications, professional judgment on necessary requirements will also apply.

  16. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUNACEK, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-EP-0438-1, ''A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans'', and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the third revision to the original annual report. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it is updated as necessary

  17. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) test plans release 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  18. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans release 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  19. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) test plans release 1.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  20. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans releases 2.0 and 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guettler, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  1. Decision no 2009-DC-0157 of the 15. of September 2009 by the Nuclear Safety Authority specifying the limits of releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of the base nuclear installation n. 29 operated by the CIS Bio International on the district of Saclay (Essonne department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document contains references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion) at the root of this specification of limits related to releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of a base nuclear installation. Tables present the limits for radioactive liquid effluents (iodine, rare earths, and other beta and gamma emitters) and the maximum admitted concentrations for gaseous chemical effluents (SO 2 , H 2 S, VOCs)

  2. Method and means of monitoring the effluent from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattin, K.R.; Erickson, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is detected in the effluent cooling gas from a nuclear reactor or nuclear facility by passing the effluent gas through a continuously moving adsorbent filter material which is then purged of noble gases and conveyed continuously to a detector of radioactivity. The purging operation has little or no effect upon the concentration of radioactive iodine which is adsorbed on the filter material. 8 claims, 2 figures

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Input Parameters for the Dose Assessment from Gaseous Effluents due to the Normal Operation of Jordan Research and Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sukhoon; Lee, Seunghee; Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Juyub; Han, Moonhee

    2015-01-01

    In this study, therefore, the sensitivity analysis of input variables for the dose assessment was performed for reviewing the effect of each parameter on the result after determining the type and range of parameters that could affect the exposure dose of the public. (Since JRTR will be operated by the concept of 'no liquid discharge,' the input parameters used for calculation of dose due to liquid effluents are not considered in the sensitivity analysis.) In this paper, the sensitivity analysis of input parameters for the dose assessment in the vicinity of the site boundary due to gaseous effluents was performed for a total of thirty-five (35) cases. And, detailed results for the input variables that have an significant effect are shown in Figures 1 through 7, respectively. For preparing a R-ER for the operating license of the JRTR, these results will be updated by the additional information and could be applied to predicting the variation trend of the exposure dose in the process of updating the input parameters for the dose assessment reflecting the characteristics of the JRTR site

  4. Methodology of adjustment point in the post treatment of gaseous effluents; Metodologia del punto de ajuste en el post tratamiento de efluentes gaseosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizuet G, J.; Molina, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jvg@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The methodology to determine the adjustment points of the monitoring system of gaseous discharges is based on the stipulations of the 10CFR20, which are expressed in terms of limit concentrations for the outstanding radionuclides, and of dose limits for the individuals members of the public. Besides the points of liberation properly said, like they are the chimneys of the reactor buildings and of turbine, the points of adjustment of the monitoring instrumentation that watches in real time the discharge of the Treatment system of output gases, to the HVAC of the waste building; they also undergo to the same methodology, with the approaches previously described. (Author)

  5. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Liger-Belair

    Full Text Available In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2 and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2 and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC, all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2 was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2 visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2 found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2 escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles.

  6. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2) and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2) and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2) was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2) visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2) found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2) escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles.

  7. Désulfuration d'effluents gazeux de raffinerie au moyen de masses régénérables Desulfurization of Gaseous Refinery Effluents by Regenerable Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschamps A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente une nouvelle technique, en cours de développement, de désulfuration d'effluents gazeux en raffinerie. Le procédé proposé utilise une masse désulfurante régénérable à base d'oxyde de magnésium qui fixe les oxydes de soufre sous forme de sulfate de magnésium. Le solide est régénéré par réduction du sulfate au moyen d'hydrogène sulfuré. L'intégration de ce procédé avec une unité Claus permet de transformer en soufre élémentaire les oxydes de soufre récupérés, sans dépense d'énergie ni de réactifs coûteux. This article describes a new technique being developed for desulfurizing gaseous refinery effluents. The new process uses a regenerable desulfurizing mass with a magnesium oxide base, which fixes sulfur oxides in the form of magnesium sulfate. The solid is regenerated by reduction of sulfate by hydrogen sulfide. The integration of this process with a Claus unit can be used to transform the sulfur oxides recovered into elemental sulfur without using any energy or costly reagents.

  8. Monitoring quantity and quality of striped catfish pond effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der P.G.M.; Poelman, M.; Bosma, R.H.; Long, N.; Son, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    The production of striped catfish and other fish species in ponds has several possible impacts on the environment, one of which is caused by the discharge of pond waste water (effluent), which is enriched with nitrogen and phosphorous compounds as result of feeding and fish faeces. To restrict the

  9. Model, parameter and code of environmental dispersion of gaseous effluent under normal operation from nuclear power plant with 600 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Erbang; Gao Zhanrong

    1998-06-01

    The model of environmental dispersion of gaseous effluence under normal operation from a nuclear power plant with 600 MWe is established to give a mathematical expression of annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor under mixing release condition based on quality assessment of radiological environment for 30 years of Chinese nuclear industry. In calculation, the impact from calm and other following factors have been taken into account: mixing layer, dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and buildings. The doses caused from the following exposure pathways are also given by this model: external exposure from immersion cloud and ground deposition, internal exposure due to inhalation and ingestion. The code is named as ROULEA. It contains four modules, i.e. INPUT, ANRTRI, CHIQV and DOSE for calculating 4-dimension joint frequency, annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor and doses

  10. Monitoring of gaseous elemental mercury in central Antarctica at Dome Concordia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommergue A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS, we are monitoring gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0 at the Dome Concordia Station to improve our understanding of atmospheric Hg in the Antarctic atmosphere. This French-Italian facility is located in one of the coldest places on the planet and is situated on the vast Antarctic Plateau at an elevation of 3320 m. Continuous measurements began on December 7, 2011 and are ongoing. The median value calculated over the period (n=24506 is approximately 0.9 ng/m3 and values range from <0.1 ng/m3 up to 2.3 ng/m3. Preliminary results suggest that the Antarctic atmospheric boundary layer is a very reactive place during the periods when sunlight is present. A combination of fast and efficient oxidation processes with snow photochemistry lead to a dynamic record of Hg(0 unlike any other location. Our improved understanding of these processes will help to better constrain the cycle of Hg in the Southern Hemisphere.

  11. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1981 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong, M.; Griggs, K.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report gives methods and results of the 1981 radiation monitoring program at LLL for both radioactive and non-radioactive contamination from gaseous and liquid effluents. Off-site monitoring includes various radionuclides but especially tritium in the ecosystems

  12. Long-term monitoring of atmospheric total gaseous mercury (TGM) at a remote site in Mt. Changbai area, northeastern China

    OpenAIRE

    X. W. Fu; X. Feng; L. H. Shang; S. F. Wang; H. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Total gaseous mercury (TGM) was continuously monitored at a remote site (CBS) in the Mt. Changbai area, northeastern China biennially from 24 October 2008 to 31 October 2010. The overall mean TGM concentration was 1.60 ± 0.51 ng m−3, which is lower than those reported from remote sites in eastern, southwestern and western China, indicating a relatively low regional anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emission intensity in northeastern China. Measurements at a site in ...

  13. Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) calibration and assessment of the ATR SPING-3 stack effluent monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppen, L.D.; Rogers, J.W.; Simpson, O.D.

    1983-12-01

    An evaluation, calibration and assessment of the Eberline SPING-3 ATR stack effluent monitor was conducted. This unit which monitors particulate, iodine and noble gas effluents was producing abnormal results following the initial installation and operational testing. The purposes of this work were to find the causes of the abnormal results and correct them if possible; check the calibrations and adjust them if necessary; and to provide a better in-depth understanding of what the unit is monitoring and how well it performs under this application. Results have shown that there were some problems associated with the unit as initially installed and tested. These problems have been identified and suggested alternatives shown, the monitor was found to be applicable to some extent under the current conditions. The calibrations have been checked and adjustments made. More operation testing and evaluation is needed to assess how well this works under a variety of ATR operating conditions. 2 references, 10 figures, 3 tables

  14. Results of the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility biological monitoring program, July 1987--July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, W.L.

    1992-07-01

    As required by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) under NPDES Permit SCO000175, biological monitoring was conducted in Upper Three Runs Creek to determine if discharges from the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility have adversely impacted the biotic community of the receiving stream. Data included in this summary report encompass July 1987 through July 1991. As originally designed, the F/H ETF was not expected to remove all of the mercury from the wastewater; therefore, SCDHEC specified that studies be conducted to determine if mercury was bioaccumulating in aquatic biota. Subsequent to approval of the biological monitoring program, an ion exchange column was added to the F/H ETF specifically to remove mercury, which eliminated mercury from the F/H ETF effluent. The results of the biological monitoring program indicate that at the present rate of discharge, the F/H ETF effluent has not adversely affected the receiving stream with respect to any of the parameters that were measured. The effluent is not toxic at the in-stream waste concentration and there is no evidence of mercury bioaccumulation

  15. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited monitoring tritiated water in air and water effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.; Tepley, N.W

    1978-01-01

    Current on-line methods of monitoring effluents for tritium (as tritiated water, HTO) measure concentrations in air above 250 nCi/m 3 (approx. 10 kBq/m 3 ) and in water above 1 uCi/kg (approx. 40 kBq/kg). Some of the problems encountered in such monitoring are the presence of fission and activation products in the effluents and, particularly in water monitoring, the often dirty quality of the sample. In a new design of monitor, HTO is collected directly from air by a flow of liquid scintillator (LS). For water monitoring a flow of air continuously samples the water and transports HTO to the LS. The key features of the new design are that the high detection efficiency of LS is realizable, that the rate of use of LS is only approx. 2 mm 3 /s, that the controlled evaporation and metering of air provides the low flow of HTO needed for mixing with LS, and that accurate metering of a dirty effluent is not needed. The sensitivities for detecing tritium on-line are improved by at least an order of magnitude

  16. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports

  17. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  18. 1994 Environmental monitoring drinking water and nonradiological effluent programs annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.D.; Brock, T.A.; Meachum, T.R.

    1995-10-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., initiated monitoring programs for drinking water in 1988 and for nonradiological parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents in 1985. These programs were initiated for the facilities operated by EG ampersand G Idaho for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. On October 1, 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) replaced EG ampersand G Idaho as the prime contractor at the INEL and assumed responsibility for these programs. Section I discusses the general site characteristics, the analytical laboratories, and sampling methodology general to both programs. Section 2, the Drinking Water Program, tracks the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters required by State and Federal regulations. This section describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at 17 LITCO-operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters detected and the regulatory limits exceeded during calendar year 1994. In addition, groundwater quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for LITCO production wells. Section 3 discusses the nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring results for 27 liquid effluent streams. These streams are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1994 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits

  19. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DB Barnett

    2000-05-17

    Seven years of groundwater monitoring at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) have shown that the uppermost aquifer beneath the facility is unaffected by TEDF effluent. Effluent discharges have been well below permitted and expected volumes. Groundwater mounding from TEDF operations predicted by various models has not been observed, and waterlevels in TEDF wells have continued declining with the dissipation of the nearby B Pond System groundwater mound. Analytical results for constituents with enforcement limits indicate that concentrations of all these are below Practical Quantitation Limits, and some have produced no detections. Likewise, other constituents on the permit-required list have produced results that are mostly below sitewide background. Comprehensive geochemical analyses of groundwater from TEDF wells has shown that most constituents are below background levels as calculated by two Hanford Site-wide studies. Additionally, major ion proportions and anomalously low tritium activities suggest that groundwater in the aquifer beneath the TEDF has been sequestered from influences of adjoining portions of the aquifer and any discharge activities. This inference is supported by recent hydrogeologic investigations which indicate an extremely slow rate of groundwater movement beneath the TEDF. Detailed evaluation of TEDF-area hydrogeology and groundwater geochemistry indicate that additional points of compliance for groundwater monitoring would be ineffective for this facility, and would produce ambiguous results. Therefore, the current groundwater monitoring well network is retained for continued monitoring. A quarterly frequency of sampling and analysis is continued for all three TEDF wells. The constituents list is refined to include only those parameters key to discerning subtle changes in groundwater chemistry, those useful in detecting general groundwater quality changes from upgradient sources, or those retained for comparison with end

  20. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DB Barnett

    2000-01-01

    Seven years of groundwater monitoring at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) have shown that the uppermost aquifer beneath the facility is unaffected by TEDF effluent. Effluent discharges have been well below permitted and expected volumes. Groundwater mounding from TEDF operations predicted by various models has not been observed, and waterlevels in TEDF wells have continued declining with the dissipation of the nearby B Pond System groundwater mound. Analytical results for constituents with enforcement limits indicate that concentrations of all these are below Practical Quantitation Limits, and some have produced no detections. Likewise, other constituents on the permit-required list have produced results that are mostly below sitewide background. Comprehensive geochemical analyses of groundwater from TEDF wells has shown that most constituents are below background levels as calculated by two Hanford Site-wide studies. Additionally, major ion proportions and anomalously low tritium activities suggest that groundwater in the aquifer beneath the TEDF has been sequestered from influences of adjoining portions of the aquifer and any discharge activities. This inference is supported by recent hydrogeologic investigations which indicate an extremely slow rate of groundwater movement beneath the TEDF. Detailed evaluation of TEDF-area hydrogeology and groundwater geochemistry indicate that additional points of compliance for groundwater monitoring would be ineffective for this facility, and would produce ambiguous results. Therefore, the current groundwater monitoring well network is retained for continued monitoring. A quarterly frequency of sampling and analysis is continued for all three TEDF wells. The constituents list is refined to include only those parameters key to discerning subtle changes in groundwater chemistry, those useful in detecting general groundwater quality changes from upgradient sources, or those retained for comparison with end

  1. Tritium effluent removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberger, P.H.; Gibbs, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    An air detritiation system has been developed and is in routine use for removing tritium and tritiated compounds from glovebox effluent streams before they are released to the atmosphere. The system is also used, in combination with temporary enclosures, to contain and decontaminate airborne releases resulting from the opening of tritium containment systems during maintenance and repair operations. This detritiation system, which services all the tritium handling areas at Mound Facility, has played an important role in reducing effluents and maintaining them at 2 percent of the level of 8 y ago. The system has a capacity of 1.7 m 3 /min and has operated around the clock for several years. A refrigerated in-line filtration system removes water, mercury, or pump oil and other organics from gaseous waste streams. The filtered waste stream is then heated and passed through two different types of oxidizing beds; the resulting tritiated water is collected on molecular sieve dryer beds. Liquids obtained from regenerating the dryers and from the refrigerated filtration system are collected and transferred to a waste solidification and packaging station. Component redundancy and by-pass capabilities ensure uninterrupted system operation during maintenance. When processing capacity is exceeded, an evacuated storage tank of 45 m 3 is automatically opened to the inlet side of the system. The gaseous effluent from the system is monitored for tritium content and recycled or released directly to the stack. The average release is less than 1 Ci/day. The tritium effluent can be reduced by isotopically swamping the tritium; this is accomplished by adding hydrogen prior to the oxidizer beds, or by adding water to the stream between the two final dryer beds

  2. Evaluation of groundwater monitoring results at the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.

    1998-09-01

    The Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) has operated since June 1995. Groundwater monitoring has been conducted quarterly in the three wells surrounding the facility since 1992, with contributing data from nearby B Pond System wells. Cumulative hydrologic and geochemical information from the TEDF well network and other surrounding wells indicate no discernable effects of TEDF operations on the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the TEDF. The lateral consistency and impermeable nature of the Ringold Formation lower mud unit, and the contrasts in hydraulic conductivity between this unit and the vadose zone sediments of the Hanford formation suggest that TEDF effluent is spreading laterally with negligible mounding or downward movement into the uppermost aquifer. Hydrographs of TEDF wells show that TEDF operations have had no detectable effects on hydraulic heads in the uppermost aquifer, but show a continuing decay of the hydraulic mound generated by past operations at the B Pond System. Comparison of groundwater geochemistry from TEDF wells and other, nearby RCRA wells suggests that groundwater beneath TEDF is unique; different from both effluent entering TEDF and groundwater in the B Pond area. Tritium concentrations, major ionic proportions, and lower-than-background concentrations of other species suggest that groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the TEDF bears characteristics of water in the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report recommends retaining the current groundwater well network at the TEDF, but with a reduction of sampling/analysis frequency and some modifications to the list of constituents sought

  3. A computerised radioactive effluent monitoring system for a medical cyclotron complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the handling and chemical processing in sterile automatic chemistry cells at the Medical Cyclotron of the Radiopharmaceutical Division of ANSTO, a fraction of the radioactive inventory is released into the atmosphere through the main stack of the cyclotron facility. Hence, the installation of a suitable effluent detector for the real-time estimation of the stack discharges during entire radioisotope production and handling processes became mandatory. A smart effluent monitoring system was developed at our health Physics laboratory and installed in July 1993. The system includes a small 94.5 ml flow-through chamber attached to a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector interfaced to a single channel analyser (SCA). The analog voltage output of the SCA, proportional to instantaneous activity concentration of radioactive gas residing in the chamber is sampled by an industrial standard data logger every minute. The data logger is interfaced to a personal computer (PC) based on a 100 MHz central processing unit (CPU) and a 100 MB (Mega Byte) hard disc. The string of raw output data (mV) from the data logger is linearised and converted to equivalent activity concentration [MBqm -3 ] using dedicated calibration polynomials. A spreadsheet macro program was implemented for the data processing. Recently an anemometer, a wind-vane with optoelectronic transducers and a wind temperature indicator have been added to the existing stack monitoring system, thus enabling the datalogger to retrieve the stack release and weather data simultaneously. A Gaussian-Plume type 'Atmospheric-Dispersion-Model' was incorporated in the spreadsheet macro program. By using the atmospheric data such as wind speed, temperature, wind direction and the activity concentration of the stack emission [Mbqm -3 ] the deposited activity concentration in the immediate vicinity of the cyclotron complex are calculated and displayed on a spreadsheet with the corresponding time of the stack release. In this paper

  4. Order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche; Arrete du 10 janvier 2003 autorisant l'Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs a poursuivre les rejets d'effluents gazeux et liquides pour l'exploitation du centre de stockage de dechets radioactifs de la Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This document, took out from the Official Journal, is the law text relative to the order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche. (A.L.B.)

  5. On-line liquid-effluent monitoring of sewage at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Cate, J.L.; Rueppel, D.W.; Huntzinger, C.J.; Gonzalez, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic on line sewage effluent monitoring system has been developed. A representative fraction of the total waste stream leaving the site is monitored for pH, radiation, and metals as it passes through a detection assembly. This assembly consists of an industrial pH probe, NaI radiation detectors, and an x-ray fluorescence metal detector. A microprocessor collects, reduces and analyzes the data to determine if the levels are acceptable by established environmental limits. Currently, if preset levels are exceeded, a sample of the suspect sewage is automatically collected for further analysis, and an alarm is sent to a station where personnel can be alerted to respond on a 24-hour basis. Since at least four hours pass before LLNL effluent reaches the treatment plant, sufficient time is available to alert emergency personnel, evaluate the situation, and if necessary arrange for diversion of the material to emergency holding basins at the treatment plant. Information on the current system is presented, and progress is reported in developing an on-line tritium monitor as an addition to the assembly

  6. A new stack effluent monitoring system at the Risoe Hot Cell plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetter-Jensen, L.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Lauridsen, B.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes a new stack effluent monitoring system that has been installed at the Hot Cell facility. It is an integrating iodine/particulate system consisting of a γ-shielded flow house in which a continous air sample from the ventilation channel ia sucked through coal and glass filter papers. Activity is accumulated on the filter papers and a thin plastic scintillator detects the β-radiation from the trapped iodine or particulate activity. The stack effluent monitoring system has a two-step regulating function as applied to the ventilation system, first switching it to a recirculating mode, and finally to building-seal after given releases of 131 I. The collection efficiency for iodine in form of elementary iodine (I 2 ) and methyliodide (CH 3 I) has been determined experimentally. The unwanted response from a noble gas release has also been determined from experiments. The noble gas response was determined from puff releases of the nuclide 41 Ar in the concrete cells. It is concluded that the iodine/particulate system is extremely sensitive and that it can easily detect iodine or particulate releases as low as a few MBq. A gamma monitor placed in connection with the iodine/particulate system detects Xe/Kr-releases as low as a few tens of MBq per second. (author)

  7. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP

  8. EU-wide monitoring survey on emerging polar organic contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Robert; Carvalho, Raquel; António, Diana C; Comero, Sara; Locoro, Giovanni; Tavazzi, Simona; Paracchini, Bruno; Ghiani, Michela; Lettieri, Teresa; Blaha, Ludek; Jarosova, Barbora; Voorspoels, Stefan; Servaes, Kelly; Haglund, Peter; Fick, Jerker; Lindberg, Richard H; Schwesig, David; Gawlik, Bernd M

    2013-11-01

    In the year 2010, effluents from 90 European wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were analyzed for 156 polar organic chemical contaminants. The analyses were complemented by effect-based monitoring approaches aiming at estrogenicity and dioxin-like toxicity analyzed by in vitro reporter gene bioassays, and yeast and diatom culture acute toxicity optical bioassays. Analyses of organic substances were performed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) or liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) or gas chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Target microcontaminants were pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), veterinary (antibiotic) drugs, perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), organophosphate ester flame retardants, pesticides (and some metabolites), industrial chemicals such as benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), iodinated x-ray contrast agents, and gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging agents; in addition biological endpoints were measured. The obtained results show the presence of 125 substances (80% of the target compounds) in European wastewater effluents, in concentrations ranging from low nanograms to milligrams per liter. These results allow for an estimation to be made of a European median level for the chemicals investigated in WWTP effluents. The most relevant compounds in the effluent waters with the highest median concentration levels were the artificial sweeteners acesulfame and sucralose, benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), several organophosphate ester flame retardants and plasticizers (e.g. tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate; TCPP), pharmaceutical compounds such as carbamazepine, tramadol, telmisartan, venlafaxine, irbesartan, fluconazole, oxazepam, fexofenadine, diclofenac, citalopram, codeine, bisoprolol, eprosartan, the antibiotics trimethoprim, ciprofloxacine, sulfamethoxazole, and clindamycine, the insect repellent N,N'-diethyltoluamide (DEET), the pesticides

  9. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon dioxide...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What continuous emission monitoring...

  11. Order of 30 March 1988 on licensing of gaseous radioactive effluent releases by the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Decree prescribes the documents and information the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre must provide to the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (SCPRI) and lays down the permissible effluent release limits for the Centre [fr

  12. Prioritization methodology for the monitoring of active pharmaceutical ingredients in hospital effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daouk, Silwan; Chèvre, Nathalie; Vernaz, Nathalie; Bonnabry, Pascal; Dayer, Pierre; Daali, Youssef; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine

    2015-09-01

    The important number of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) available on the market along with their potential adverse effects in the aquatic ecosystems, lead to the development of prioritization methods, which allow choosing priority molecules to monitor based on a set of selected criteria. Due to the large volumes of API used in hospitals, an increasing attention has been recently paid to their effluents as a source of environmental pollution. Based on the consumption data of a Swiss university hospital, about hundred of API has been prioritized following an OPBT approach (Occurrence, Persistence, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity). In addition, an Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) allowed prioritizing API based on predicted concentrations and environmental toxicity data found in the literature for 71 compounds. Both prioritization approaches were compared. OPBT prioritization results highlight the high concern of some non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antiviral drugs, whereas antibiotics are revealed by ERA as potentially problematic to the aquatic ecosystems. Nevertheless, according to the predicted risk quotient, only the hospital fraction of ciprofloxacin represents a risk to the aquatic organisms. Some compounds were highlighted as high-priority with both methods: ibuprofen, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, ritonavir, gabapentin, amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, raltegravir, propofol, etc. Analyzing consumption data and building prioritization lists helped choosing about 15 API to be monitored in hospital wastewaters. The API ranking approach adopted in this study can be easily transposed to any other hospitals, which have the will to look at the contamination of their effluents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel mass spectrometric instrument for gaseous and particulate characterization and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    Under contract DE-AC21-92MC29116, SRI International will develop a unique new instrument that will be capable of providing real-time (< l minute), quantitative, chemical characterization of gaseous and particulate pollutants generated from DOE waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be capable of detecting and identifying volatile organic compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and transuranic species released during waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be unique in its ability to detect and quantify in real-time these diverse pollutants in both vapor and particulate form. The instrument to be developed under this program will consist of several major components: (1) an isokinetic sampler capable of operating over a wide range of temperatures (up to 500 K) and flow rates; (2) a high pressure to low pressure transition and sampling region that efficiently separates particles from vapor-phase components for separate, parallel analyses; (3) two small mass spectrometers, one optimized for organic analysis using a unique field ionization source and one optimized for particulate characterization using thermal pyrolysis and electron-impact ionization (EI); and (4) a powerful personal computer for control and data acquisition

  14. Novel mass spectrometric instrument for gaseous and particulate characterization and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    SRI International will develop a unique new instrument that will be capable of providing real-time (<1 minute), quantitative, chemical characterization of gaseous and particulate pollutants generated from DOE waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be capable of detecting and identifying volatile organic compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and transuranic species released during waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be unique in its ability to detect and quantify in real-time these diverse pollutants in both vapor and particulate form. The instrument to be developed under this program will consist of several major components: (1) an isokinetic sampler capable of operating over a wide range of temperatures (up to 500 K) and flow rates; (2) a high pressure to low pressure transition and sampling region that efficiently separates particles from vapor-phase components for separate, parallel analyses; (3) two small mass spectrometers, one optimized for organic analysis using a unique field ionization source and one optimized for particulate characterization using thermal pyrolysis and electron-impact ionization (EI); and (4) a powerful personal computer for control and data acquisition. Initially, the instrument will be developed for targeted use in conjunction with the K-1435 Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory K-25 site. Ultimately, the instrument will be designed to operate in the field at any cleanup site, located close to the stack or process vent, providing the plant operations personnel with real-time information and alarm capabilities. In addition, this instrument will be very broadly applicable for cleanup or sampling, for example, any time contaminated soil is moved or disturbed

  15. Decision no 2010-DC-0188 by the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 7. of July 2010 specifying to Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) the limits of releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents for the operation of Flamanville 1 (IBN n 108), Flamanville 2 (INB n 109) and Flamanville 3 (INB n 167) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document contains references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion) at the root of this specification of limits related to releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents by the three Flamanville nuclear reactors operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA). Tables present the limits for different gaseous and liquid radioactive emissions (carbon 14, hydrogen 3, iodine, radioactive rare earths, and other beta and gamma emitters) from these different installations, but also the maximum admitted concentrations for gaseous chemical effluents (boric acid, hydrazine hydrate, morpholine, phosphates, nitrates, various metals, and so on). The limits for thermal releases are also specified

  16. Monitoring of low-level radioactive liquid effluent in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Koarashi, Jun; Takeishi, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    The Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP), the first reprocessing plant in Japan, has discharged low-level liquid wastes to the Pacific Ocean since the start of its operation in 1977. We have performed liquid effluent monitoring to realize an appropriate radioactive discharge control. Comparing simple and rapid analytical methods with labor-intensive radiochemical analyses demonstrated that the gross-alpha and gross-beta activities agreed well with the total activities of plutonium isotopes ( 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu) and major beta emitters (e.g., 90 Sr and 137 Cs), respectively. The records of the radioactive liquid discharge from the TRP showed that the normalized discharges of all nuclides, except for 3 H, were three or four orders of magnitude lower than those from the Sellafield and La Hague reprocessing plants. This was probably due to the installation of multistage evaporators in the liquid waste treatment process in 1980. The annual public doses for a hypothetical person were estimated to be less than 0.2 μSv y -1 from the aquatic pathway. Plutonium radioactivity ratios ( 238 Pu/ 239+240 Pu) of liquid effluents were determined to be 1.3-3.7, while those of the seabed sediment samples collected around the discharge point were 0.003-0.059, indicating no remarkable accumulation of plutonium in the regional aquatic environment. Thus, we concluded that there were no significant radiological effects on the public and the aquatic environment during the past 30-year operation of the TRP. (author)

  17. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What continuous emission monitoring... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution...

  18. Monitoring of the radioactive liquid effluents discharged from IPEN-CNEN/SP. Optimization of the procedures adopted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The main purpose of a radioactive liquid effluents monitoring of a nuclear installation is to determine the amount of radioactivity discharged to the environment, as well as, to verify if this activity is below the authorized discharge limits established by the competent authority. Although this control has been established on a routine basis since the beginning of operation of the nuclear installations available at IPEN, the growing of such facilities in the last years has implied in an increase in the number of samples to be analyzed. The aim of this work is, therefore, to optimize the procedures adopted in the Environmental Monitoring Division of IPEN-CNEN/SP for the activity measurement of the liquid effluents discharged to the environment. Since these effluents are discharged to Pinheiros river, which presents a high dilution factor, a study is also carried out in order to verify if the activity present can be measured by the equipment available. (author)

  19. Usage Proposal of a common urban decorative tree (Salix alba L.) to monitor the dispersion of gaseous mercury: A case study from Turda (Romania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbrí, J M; Cacovean, H; Higueras, P

    2018-02-01

    Closure of chloralkali plants poses a risk of abandonment of important sources of gaseous mercury. In this work, an assessment has been made of the potential for pollution from one of these plants in the proximity of a densely populated town in central Romania. The work involved a comparison between two major types of monitoring survey: biomonitoring using leaves of a tree common in urban environments; and LUMEX-based gaseous mercury analysis. For biomonitoring, 21 samples from Salix alba L. trees were taken in Turda area. Atmospheric monitoring included two mobile surveys and one at a fixed location. The results from both monitoring systems show similarities in gaseous mercury dispersion patterns, with high mercury contents clearly related to the presence of the chloralkali plant. Particularly high levels were measured in the following situations: (i) in a 'smog' area related with thermal inversion and (ii) during dusk. Direct monitoring suffered from limitations in acquiring information, especially in a medium-long time range, but biomonitoring provided these data and is capable of covering studies on temporary trends or comparative assessments between European cities with contrasting gaseous mercury sources. The thermal speciation of mercury contents indicates that the whole fraction of mercury in leaves corresponds to organic mercury. This finding implies a non-reversible uptake process, which in turn ensures the applicability of this technique to biomonitor long-term exposure. As a conclusion, the assessment of gaseous mercury pollution based on biomonitoring using S. alba has proven to be a useful, reliable and cost-effective methodology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  1. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations

  2. Some considerations on the use of gamma spectrometry for Kr-85 determination at gaseous effluents in the nuclear industry and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras Iniquez, M.C.; Perez Garcia, M.M.; Travesi, A.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities of using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry with GeLi semiconductor detector for measured the 0.514 KeV gamma radiation of Kr-B5 la explored, The detection limit of Kr-85 for a measuring time is 4.10 - 4 μCi with a counting time of 1000 minutes in a GeLi detector with a 20% efficiency relative to the INa (Tl). It is concluded that the use of gamma ray spectrometry for measuring the Kr-85 is not useful for environmental samples, but it can be used for the Kr-85 effluents control in Nuclear Stations. (Author) 26 refs

  3. A study of the annual doses to man from routine gaseous effluent releases of the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 (PNPP-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriel, M.C.J.

    1983-01-01

    Individual and population integrated doses from radioactive gaseous releases of the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant 1 (PNPP-1) were calculated using a modified GASPAR Code. Input data consisted of meteorological and site data gathered from the PNPP-1 Final Analysis Report (FASR) population and agricultural data from the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) and the National Census and Statistics Office (NCSO). Usage factors were calculated based on Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) recommended dietary allowances for Filipinos. Results of population integrated dose calculations were used in identifying the critical nuclides, the critical body organs, and the critical pathway. Results from individual dose calculation were used in determining compliance with the dose limits set forth in Appendix D of Part 7 Code of Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) regulations. (Author). 23 tabs.; 5 figs

  4. Gaseous nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Gaseous nebulae are large, tenuous clouds of ionized gas that are associated with hot stars and that emit visible light because of the energy that they receive from the ultraviolet radiation of the stars. Examples include H II regions, planetary nebulae, and nova/supernova remnants. The emphasis is on the physical processes that occur in gaseous nebulae as opposed to a study of the objects themselves. The introduction discusses thermodynamic vs. steady-state equilibrium and excitation conditions in a dilute radiation field. Subsequent sections take up important atomic processes in gaseous nebulae (particle--particle collision rates, radiative interaction rates, cross sections), the ionization equilibrium (sizes of H II regions, ionization of the heavier elements), kinetic temperature and energy balance (heating of the electrons, cooling of the electrons), and the spectra of gaseous nebulae (line fluxes in nebulae). 7 figures, 5 tables

  5. Using broiler litter and swine manure lagoon effluent in sawdust-based swine mortality composts: Effects on nutrients, bacteria, and gaseous emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, M.R., E-mail: mike.mclaughlin@ars.usda.gov; Brooks, J.P.; Adeli, A.; Miles, D.M.

    2015-11-01

    Disposition of mortalities challenges confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs), especially sow (farrowing) farms, which experience mortalities daily. Regulations and transportation costs may preclude incineration, landfill burial, and rendering; therefore, swine CAFOs in Mississippi in the Mid-South U.S. often compost mortalities. In this study, a farm-standard composting mix of sawdust (S) and water (W) was compared with mixes where N was supplied by broiler litter (L) and water was replaced with swine lagoon effluent (E). The objective was to assess the effects of these manure byproducts: 1) on nutrients and bacteria in composts destined for land application; and 2) on emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases. Three replications of four mixes (SW, SLW, SE, SLE) were compared in microcosms comprising modified plastic recycling bins. The experiment was repeated three times in different seasons in one year. Mixes were compared for differences in temperature, water content, nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn), bacteria (Gram −, Gram +, Clostridium perfringens, Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia coli), and emissions (NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O). Litter addition increased composting temperatures initially and after aerations; increased nutrient concentrations, except C, in start mixes and all except C and N, in finish mixes; increased Gram + bacteria, Salmonella, and E. coli in start mixes, but only Gram+s in finish mixes; and increased emissions. Effluent addition increased early composting temperatures; had no effect on nutrients or bacteria, except increased C. perfringens in start, but not finish mixes; and had no effect on emissions. Nutrients in finish composts did not differ among mixes for N (average 3.3%), but litter composts had more P and K, and lower N:P than composts without litter. Improving mortality composting is of global importance as increasing livestock populations and intensive animal production systems require

  6. Using broiler litter and swine manure lagoon effluent in sawdust-based swine mortality composts: Effects on nutrients, bacteria, and gaseous emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, M.R.; Brooks, J.P.; Adeli, A.; Miles, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Disposition of mortalities challenges confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs), especially sow (farrowing) farms, which experience mortalities daily. Regulations and transportation costs may preclude incineration, landfill burial, and rendering; therefore, swine CAFOs in Mississippi in the Mid-South U.S. often compost mortalities. In this study, a farm-standard composting mix of sawdust (S) and water (W) was compared with mixes where N was supplied by broiler litter (L) and water was replaced with swine lagoon effluent (E). The objective was to assess the effects of these manure byproducts: 1) on nutrients and bacteria in composts destined for land application; and 2) on emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases. Three replications of four mixes (SW, SLW, SE, SLE) were compared in microcosms comprising modified plastic recycling bins. The experiment was repeated three times in different seasons in one year. Mixes were compared for differences in temperature, water content, nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn), bacteria (Gram −, Gram +, Clostridium perfringens, Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia coli), and emissions (NH 3 , CO 2 , CH 4 , N 2 O). Litter addition increased composting temperatures initially and after aerations; increased nutrient concentrations, except C, in start mixes and all except C and N, in finish mixes; increased Gram + bacteria, Salmonella, and E. coli in start mixes, but only Gram+s in finish mixes; and increased emissions. Effluent addition increased early composting temperatures; had no effect on nutrients or bacteria, except increased C. perfringens in start, but not finish mixes; and had no effect on emissions. Nutrients in finish composts did not differ among mixes for N (average 3.3%), but litter composts had more P and K, and lower N:P than composts without litter. Improving mortality composting is of global importance as increasing livestock populations and intensive animal production systems require practical, safe

  7. Long-term monitoring of atmospheric total gaseous mercury (TGM) at a remote site in Mt. Changbai area, northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X. W.; Feng, X.; Shang, L. H.; Wang, S. F.; Zhang, H.

    2012-02-01

    Total gaseous mercury (TGM) was continuously monitored at a remote site (CBS) in the Mt. Changbai area, northeastern China biennially from 24 October 2008 to 31 October 2010. The overall mean TGM concentration was 1.60 ± 0.51 ng m-3, which is lower than those reported from remote sites in eastern, southwestern and western China, indicating a relatively low regional anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emission intensity in northeastern China. Measurements at a site in the vicinity (~1.2 km) of the CBS station during August 2005 and July 2006 showed a significantly higher mean TGM concentration of 3.58 ± 1.78 ng m-3. The divergent result was partially attributed to fluctuations in the regional surface wind system and moreover an effect of local emission sources. The temporal variation of TGM at CBS was obviously influenced by regional sources as well as long-range transported Hg. Regional sources, frequently contributing to episodical high TGM concentrations, were pinpointed as a large iron mining district in northern North Korea and two large power plants and urban areas to the southwest of the sampling site. Source areas in Beijing, Tianjin, southern Liaoning, Hebei, northwestern Shanxi and northwestern Shandong were found to contribute to elevated TGM observations at CBS via long-range transport. The diurnal pattern of TGM at CBS was mainly regulated by regional sources, likely as well as intrusion of air masses from the free troposphere during summer season. There are no discernible seasonal pattern of TGM at CBS, which mainly showed links with the patterns of regional air movements and long-range transport.

  8. Determination of Kr-85 in environmental samples and gaseous effluents from nuclear industries using the standard method; Aplicacion del metodo de concentracion separacion y medida radiactiva por centelleo liquido de Kr-85 en muestras ambientales y en efluentes gaseosos de la industria nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras, M. c.; Perez, M. M.

    1983-07-01

    The determination of the Kr-85 activity in environmental samples and gaseous effluents from Spanish Nuclear Power Stations is described. The method employed has been published elsewhere. The determinations has been carried out in environmental samples token at JEN Laboratories (Madrid) and the Nuclear Power Stations, Jose Cabrera (Zorita), Garona and Vandellos. Also samples of gaseous effluents of the three plants has been analyzed. Values of the Kr-85 environmental background activity in the Almaraz Nuclear Power Stations, has been determined, before the beginning of its nuclear activity. In this paper the sampling equipment used is described and the values found of Kr-85 activity in all the samples in given. (Author) 29 refs.

  9. Evaluation 2000 and regulation and method. Release monitoring and environmental surveillance around Cea centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    This publication counts for the year 2000 for the evaluation of liquid and gaseous radioactive effluents releases and the radioactivity levels measured in the vicinity of Cea centers, through the air, water, vegetation and milk surveillance. An analysis of the results from 1996 to 2000 allows to follow their evolution. A second booklet develops the sampling and measurement methods made on effluents in environment. It present besides the regulation applied to effluents monitoring. (N.C.)

  10. Decision no 2009-DC-0155 of the 15. of September 2009 by the Nuclear Safety Authority specifying the limits of releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of base nuclear installations n. 18, 35, 40, 49, 50, 72, 77 and 101 operated by the Atomic Energy Commissariat (CEA) in its Saclay Centre, located on the districts of Saclay, Saint-Aubin and Villiers-le-Bacle (Essonne department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document contains references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion) at the root of this specification of limits related to releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of base nuclear installations of the Saclay Centre operated by the Atomic Energy Commissariat (CEA). Tables present the limits for different radioactive emissions (carbon 14, hydrogen 3, iodine, radioactive rare earths, and other alpha, beta and gamma emitters) from these different installations, but also the maximum admitted concentrations for gaseous chemical effluents (HCl, HF, NOx, CO, and so on), as well as limits for thermal releases

  11. Decision no 2010-DC-0183 by the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 18. of May 2010 specifying instructions related to modalities of water sampling and consumption, and of release in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents from the base nuclear installations no 46, no 74 and no 100 operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) on the district of Saint-Laurent-Nouan (Loir-et-Cher department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion), this document specifies the instructions related to modalities of water sampling and consumption, and of release in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents from some specific base nuclear installations. These instructions and provisions concern the general means implemented by the operator, records, the control by authorities, the limits of water sampling and consumption, the water sampling process, the sampling works and their maintenance and control, the release of liquid, gaseous and radioactive effluents, their control, and the information of authorities and of population

  12. High‐resolution mass spectrometry of skin mucus for monitoring physiological impacts and contaminant biotransformation products in fathead minnows exposed to wastewater effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    High‐resolution mass spectrometry is advantageous for monitoring physiological impacts and contaminant biotransformation products in fish exposed to complex wastewater effluent. We evaluated this technique using skin mucus from male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales pr...

  13. High-resolution Mass Spectrometry of Skin Mucus for Monitoring Physiological Impacts in Fish Exposed to Wastewater Effluent at a Great Lakes AOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-resolution mass spectrometry is advantageous for monitoring physiological impacts and contaminant biotransformation products in fish exposed to complex wastewater effluent. We evaluated this technique using skin mucus from male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promela...

  14. Dynamic containment of gaseous effluents in the auxiliary buildings and reinjection of liquid effluents from these buildings back into the reactor building for 900 MWe PWRs under accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demoulin, F.; Collinet, J.; Nguyen, C.

    1987-04-01

    Examination of the lessons to be learned from the accident of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant on 20 March 1979 led the French Safety Authorities and EDF (Electricite de France) to adopt a series of measures intended to improve the performance of the containment of French PWRs, especially in the event of accident. Among the measures adopted, two of them contribute to the upgrading of the containment of nuclear island buildings, by reducing radioactivity constraints inside these buildings and by limiting radioactive releases into the environment. These are: (1) dynamic containment of auxiliary buildings likely to be contaminated following an accident, (2) reinjection back into the reactor building of liquid effluents arising in the auxiliary buildings. In this paper we shall discuss, for each measure, the approach to the problem and describe the arrangements made to arrive at a satisfactory solution [fr

  15. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  16. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Environmental Report for 1990, is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  17. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals

  18. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals

  19. Tritium monitoring in groundwater and evaluation of model predictions for the Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R.; Freshley, M.D.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1997-08-01

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) disposal site, also known as the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS), receives treated effluent containing tritium, which is allowed to infiltrate through the soil column to the water table. Tritium was first detected in groundwater monitoring wells around the facility in July 1996. The SALDS groundwater monitoring plan requires revision of a predictive groundwater model and reevaluation of the monitoring well network one year from the first detection of tritium in groundwater. This document is written primarily to satisfy these requirements and to report on analytical results for tritium in the SALDS groundwater monitoring network through April 1997. The document also recommends an approach to continued groundwater monitoring for tritium at the SALDS. Comparison of numerical groundwater models applied over the last several years indicate that earlier predictions, which show tritium from the SALDS approaching the Columbia River, were too simplified or overly robust in source assumptions. The most recent modeling indicates that concentrations of tritium above 500 pCi/L will extend, at most, no further than ∼1.5 km from the facility, using the most reasonable projections of ETF operation. This extent encompasses only the wells in the current SALDS tritium-tracking network

  20. Europe-wide survey of estrogenicity in wastewater treatment plant effluents: the need for the effect-based monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarošová, Barbora; Erseková, Anita; Hilscherová, Klára; Loos, Robert; Gawlik, Bernd M; Giesy, John P; Bláha, Ludek

    2014-09-01

    A pan-European monitoring campaign of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents was conducted to obtain a concise picture on a broad range of pollutants including estrogenic compounds. Snapshot samples from 75 WWTP effluents were collected and analysed for concentrations of 150 polar organic and 20 inorganic compounds as well as estrogenicity using the MVLN reporter gene assay. The effect-based assessment determined estrogenicity in 27 of 75 samples tested with the concentrations ranging from 0.53 to 17.9 ng/L of 17-beta-estradiol equivalents (EEQ). Approximately one third of municipal WWTP effluents contained EEQ greater than 0.5 ng/L EEQ, which confirmed the importance of cities as the major contamination source. Beside municipal WWTPs, some treated industrial wastewaters also exhibited detectable EEQ, indicating the importance to investigate phytoestrogens released from plant processing factories. No steroid estrogens were detected in any of the samples by instrumental methods above their limits of quantification of 10 ng/L, and none of the other analysed classes of chemicals showed correlation with detected EEQs. The study demonstrates the need of effect-based monitoring to assess certain classes of contaminants such as estrogens, which are known to occur at low concentrations being of serious toxicological concern for aquatic biota.

  1. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report. Calendar Year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations

  2. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-12-31

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

  3. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2012-08-28

    Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that

  4. Order of the 15. of September 2010 approving the decision no 2010-DC-0188 by the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 7. of July 2010 specifying to Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) the limits of releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents for the operation of Flamanville 1 (INB n 108), Flamanville 2 (INB n 109) and Flamanville 3 (INB n 167) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This legal publication contains references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion) at the root of this specification of limits related to releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents by the three Flamanville nuclear reactors operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA). Tables present the limits for different gaseous and liquid radioactive emissions (carbon 14, hydrogen 3, iodine, radioactive rare earths, and other beta and gamma emitters) from these different installations, but also the maximum admitted concentrations for gaseous chemical effluents (boric acid, hydrazine hydrate, morpholine, phosphates, nitrates, various metals, and so on). The limits for thermal releases are also specified

  5. Novel mass spectrometric instrument for gaseous and particulate characterization and monitoring. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.

    1994-07-01

    Purpose of the instrument is for real-time (<1 min), ppB analysis of gaseous/particulate pollutants (VOCs, PAHs, heavy metals, transuranics) from DOE waste cleanup. It will consist of an isokinetic sampler, a pressure transition and sampling region for parallel analyses, two small mass spectrometers (one for organic analysis using field ionization, one [ion trap] for particulates using pyrolysis and electron-impact ionization), and a personal computer. A dimethylsilicone membrane will be used for the organic vapors. A forward-backward coincidence method will be used in the laser scattering particle detector. The instrument will be easily transportable to DOE waste sites, such as waste storage tanks

  6. Monitoring release of pharmaceutical compounds: occurrence and environmental risk assessment of two WWTP effluents and their receiving bodies in the Po Valley, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Aukidy, M; Verlicchi, P; Jelic, A; Petrovic, M; Barcelò, D

    2012-11-01

    This study describes an investigation on the occurrence of 27 pharmaceutical compounds, belonging to different classes, in the effluent from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and their receiving water bodies in the sensitive area of the Po Valley (northern Italy). These canals were monitored upstream and downstream of the effluent discharge points in order to evaluate the effluent impact on the quality of surface waters, commonly used for irrigation. An environmental risk assessment was also conducted by calculating the risk quotient, i.e. the ratio between measured concentration and predicted no effect concentration. Collected data show that, although average values of the selected compounds were in general higher in the effluent than in the surface waters, some compounds not detected in the WWTP effluent were detected in the receiving water (upstream as well as downstream), indicating that sources other than treated effluents are present as contaminations during extraction and analysis have to be excluded. The most critical compounds for the environment were found to be the antibiotics sulfamethoxazole, clarithromycin and azithromycin. The study shows that the potential toxicological effects of persistent micropollutants can be mitigated to some extent by a high dilution capacity, i.e. a high average flow rate in the receiving water body with respect to the effluent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In-line monitoring of effluents from HTGR fuel particle preparation processes using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.; Costanzo, D.A.; Stinton, D.P.; Carpenter, J.A.; Rainey, W.T. Jr.; Canada, D.C.; Carter, J.A.

    1976-08-01

    The carbonization, conversion, and coating processes in the manufacture of HTGR fuel particles have been studied with the use of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Non-condensable effluents from these fluidized-bed processes have been monitored continuously from the beginning to the end of the process. The processes which have been monitored are these: uranium-loaded ion exchange resin carbonization, the carbothermic reduction of UO 2 to UC 2 , buffer and low temperature isotropic pyrocarbon coatings of fuel kernels, SiC coating of the kernels, and high-temperature particle annealing. Changes in concentrations of significant molecules with time and temperature have been useful in the interpretation of reaction mechanisms and optimization of process procedures

  8. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaia, P.; Blanco, E.; Girone, M.; Inglese, V.; Pezzetti, M.; Piccinelli, F.; Serio, L.

    2015-07-01

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves—Part 2-1: Flow capacity—sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported.

  9. Prefiltration of gaseous effluents in plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot, G.; Pourprix, M.

    1991-01-01

    The dismantling techniques and mainly the thermal cutting tools can create large amounts of airbone dust, possibly contaminated in the case of the cutting of radioactive materials. Among the secondary solid emissions, the aerosols constitute the most mobile part which can disseminate contamination in the cell where the cutting operation takes place and in the ventilation ducts up to the HEPA filters. An optimised prefiltration coupled with a captation device at the aerosol generating source allows to avoid the dissemination of the contamination, to increase the life of HEPA filters and thus to reduce the amount of solid wastes. The object in this work was to select one or several cleaning devices, selection that can be done from the knowledge of the physico-chemical characteristics of the gas and aerosols to deal with, the available cleaning devices and the implied facility

  10. Microscale diffusion analysis of gaseous radioactive effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Woo; Chang, Kwang Phil; Jeong, Guy Soo; Lee, Kwang Hee; Choi, Yong Seok; An, Jin Young [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The state-of-the art review and relevant data bases have been made in this study. Microscale wind-field model has been made and applied to the site= of a target domestic plant - Younggwang units. Following researches have been made; - Review of modeling status in U.S.A., European countries, and Japan, those theoretical backgrounds, and experimental activities - Graphical display of topographical grid data in the surrounding with the Younggwang N.P.P. and basic investigation of the surrounding geography - Survey of site meteorological data of the Younggwang N.P.P.; precipitation distribution, yearly average wind direction and joint frequency, seasonal wind rose, distribution of seasonal sea and land breeze, joint frequency with respect to the atmospheric stability, mixing height - Presentation of a draft to update the existing Korea real-time dose assessment system, FADAS and to interface to the AWS(Automatic Weather System) of the Korea Meteorology Administration. - Establishment of nested-grid system with micro- and macro- scale cells around the Younggwang nuclear power plant -Consideration of solar radiation effect by using land-use map -Analysis of wind field in the region of 30 x 30 km n the Younggwang site (Author) 67 refs., 20 tabs., 28 figs.

  11. Evaluation 2000 and regulation and method. Release monitoring and environmental surveillance around Cea centers; Bilan 2000 et reglementation et methode. Controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    This publication counts for the year 2000 for the evaluation of liquid and gaseous radioactive effluents releases and the radioactivity levels measured in the vicinity of Cea centers, through the air, water, vegetation and milk surveillance. An analysis of the results from 1996 to 2000 allows to follow their evolution. A second booklet develops the sampling and measurement methods made on effluents in environment. It present besides the regulation applied to effluents monitoring. (N.C.)

  12. Source terms for airborne effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.; Perona, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The origin and nature of fuel cycle wastes are discussed with regard to high-level wastes, cladding, noble gases, iodine, tritium, 14 C, low-level and intermediate-level transuranic wastes, non-transuranic wastes, and ore tailings. The current practice for gaseous effluent treatment is described for light water reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Other topics discussed are projections of nuclear power generation; projected accumulation of gaseous wastes; the impact of nuclear fuel cycle centers; and global buildup of airborne effluents

  13. Radioactivity in gaseous waste discharged from the separations facilities during fourth quarter of 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliger, G. J.

    1980-02-22

    This document is issued quarterly for the purpose of summarizing the radioactive gaseous wastes that are discharged from the facilities of the Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell). Data on alpha and beta emissions during 1979 are presented where relevant to the gaseous effluent. Emission data are not included on gaseous wastes produced within the 200 areas by other Hanford contractors.

  14. Radioactivity in gaseous waste discharged from the separations facilities during 1978. [Rockwell Hanford Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. D.; Poremba, B. E.

    1979-03-30

    This document is issued quarterly for the purpose of summarizing the radioactive gaseous wastes that are discharged from the facilities of the Rockwell Hanford Operations. Data on alpha and beta emissions during 1978 are presented where relevant to the gaseous effluent. Emission data are not included on gaseous wastes produced within the 200 Areas by other Hanford contractors.

  15. Computerized system for the management of radioactive effluent generated by the IPEN-CNEN/SP facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maduar, Marcelo F.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the normal operation of the IPEN CNEN/ SP facilities, liquids, gaseous and airborne effluents are generated. In order to control the effluent discharges to the environment according to radiation protection standards, a radioactive effluents monitoring program was established on a routine basis. This program is carried out by measuring the activity of the radionuclides present in the effluent samples representative of the effluent batch, allowing one to take a decision about the effluent, either to authorize its discharge, or its treatment as a radioactive reject. In order to optimize this process, it was developed a computerized system to implement the various steps of the effluent management. Among others features, this system implements: on line retrieval of analyses results and effluent discharge parameters; a variety of report standards; generation of the facilities source-term. All these features are integrated through a friendly graphical interface. The system database was developed in MS Access. The visual interface was developed in MS-Visual Basic, by using techniques to integrate to it commercial codes for data acquisition and radiometric analyses. (author)

  16. Methods of nuclear power station effluent analysis for application to environmental monitoring and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, J.W.R.; Harvey, B.R.; Mitchell, N.T.

    1978-01-01

    The Fisheries Radiobiological Laboratory, Lowestoft, provides technical support to the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in the control of radioactive waste discharged to the aquatic environment from major nuclear establishments in England and Wales. This involves the quantification of a statutory control system and its subsequent verification, as well as the collection of data on which to base assessments of the environmental impact of future installations. Effluent analysis is an important part of this assessment. Analysis for gamma-emitting radionuclides is achieved by Ge(Li) gamma spectrometry where possible. Those nuclides of interest not amenable to this direct approach are separated by various radiochemical procedures, and assayed as appropriate by liquid scintillation, Cerenkov, or end-window beta counting. Intercomparison exercises with other laboratories form an important part of the work carried out in this field providing confidence between operators and the authorizing organizations, which is difficult to achieve by other means. (author)

  17. Decision no 2009-DC-0156 of the 15. of September 2009 by the Nuclear Safety Authority specifying instructions related to modalities of water sampling and consumption, and of release in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents from the base nuclear installations n. 18, 35, 40, 49, 50, 72, 77 and 101 operated by the Atomic Energy Commissariat (CEA) in its Saclay Centre, located on the districts of Saclay, Saint-Aubin and Villiers-le-Bacle (Essonne department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion), this document specifies the instructions related to modalities of water sampling and consumption, and of release in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents from some specific base nuclear installations. These instructions and provisions concern the general means implemented by the operator, records, the control by authorities, the limits of water sampling and consumption, the water sampling process, the sampling works and their maintenance and control, the release of liquid, gaseous and radioactive effluents, their control and their transfer, the limit values for different compounds and species, the control of environment around the site, the information of authorities and of population

  18. Decision no 2010-DC-0189 by the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 7. of July 2010 specifying to Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) instructions related to modalities of water sampling and consumption, and of release in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents for the operation of the Flamanville 1 (IBN n 108), Flamanville 2 (INB n 109) and Flamanville 3 (INB n 167) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion), this document specifies the instructions related to modalities of water sampling and consumption, and of release in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents from three nuclear reactors. These instructions and provisions concern the general means implemented by the operator, records, the control by authorities, the limits of water sampling and consumption, the water sampling process, the sampling works and their maintenance and control, the release of liquid, gaseous and radioactive effluents, their control, the control of the environment (air, soil, surface and underground water, sampling point implantation), the information of authorities and of population

  19. Order of the 17. of June 2010 approving the decision no 2010-DC-0182 by the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 18. of May 2010 specifying the limits of releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of civil base nuclear installations no 46, 74 and 100 operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) on the district of Saint-Laurent-Nouan (Loir-et-Cher department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This legal publication contains references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion) at the root of this specification of limits related to releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of civil base nuclear installations operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) on the district of Saint-Laurent-Nouan. Tables present the limits for different radioactive emissions (carbon 14, hydrogen 3, iodine, radioactive rare earths, and other alpha, beta and gamma emitters) from these different installations, but also the maximum admitted concentrations for gaseous chemical effluents (boric acid, hydrazine, morpholine, phosphates, nitrates, various metals, and so on). The limits for thermal releases are also specified

  20. Decision no 2010-DC-0182 by the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 18. of May 2010 specifying the limits of releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of civil base nuclear installations no 46, no 74 and no 100 operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) on the district of Saint-Laurent-Nouan (Loir-et-Cher department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document contains references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion) at the root of this specification of limits related to releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of civil base nuclear installations operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) on the district of Saint-Laurent-Nouan. Commented tables in appendix present the limits for different radioactive emissions (carbon 14, hydrogen 3, iodine, radioactive rare earths, and other alpha, beta and gamma emitters) from these different installations, but also the maximum admitted concentrations for gaseous chemical effluents (boric acid, hydrazine, morpholine, phosphates, nitrates, various metals, and so on). The limits for thermal releases are also specified

  1. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations

  2. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  3. Radiological effluent and onsite area monitoring report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1986-December 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1986 through December 1986. It presents results and evaluations of radioactivity measurements in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates. It establishes relevant correlations between the data recorded and DOE concentration guides (CG's). External gamma exposure levels and radioactivity in air and water on the Nevada Test Site were low compared to DOE guidelines. The highest average gross beta concentration in air was 0.005% of the DOE concentration guide (CG). The highest average Pu-239 concentration was 7.7% of the standard. The highest average tritium concentration was 0.39% of the standard. Kr-85 concentrations increased slightly from CY-1985 to CY-1986. Xe-133 remained nondetectable with some exceptions. The highest average gross beta concentration in potable water remained within the applicable standard for drinking water. The highest average Pu-239 concentration from contaminated waters was 0.0005% of the concentration guide. The highest average tritium concentration in noncontaminated water was 6% of the level for drinking water required by the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulation. The amounts of tritium-bearing effluent released to contaminated waste ponds was calculated and reported to DOE Headquarters. Gamma radiation measurements were roughly the same in CY-1986 relative to the previous year. All surveillance results from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) indicate that no detectable releases of radioactive materials occurred in that network in 1986. 29 refs., 14 figs., 23 tabs

  4. Development and validation of spectroscopic methods for monitoring density changes in pressurized gaseous and supercritical fluid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Marc A; Wallen, Scott L

    2002-04-15

    The further development of new processes utilizing liquid or supercritical CO2 as a solvent will benefit from the rational design of new CO2-philes. Understanding solvation structures and mechanisms of these molecules is an important part of this process. In such studies, determining the change in density as a function of the measured thermodynamic conditions (pressure and temperature) provides an excellent means of directly monitoring the solution conditions in the detection volume for a given technique. By integrating spectroscopic peaks, changes in area can be used to determine changes in analyte concentration in the detection volume, and thus, it should be possible to monitor the system density in situ. In the present study, we examine the utility of Raman and NMR spectroscopy as a means of following changes in solution density conditions and validate this approach in pure fluids and gases (N2 and CO2) and supercritical fluid mixtures (acetaldehyde vapor in N2). In addition, we present the design of a simple, inexpensive cell for conducting Raman and NMR measurements under moderate pressure conditions.

  5. 1992 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1992 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1992 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that operation of the Laboratory continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Laboratory operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy

  6. 1993 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1993 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy

  7. 1985 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1985 at the Bettis Laboratory are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensure that all environmental releases during 1985 were in accordance with applicable State and Federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that operation of the Laboratory continued to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Laboratory operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy

  8. Reduction of releases of radioactive effluents from light-water-power-reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Itakura, T.; Kanai, T.

    1977-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Commission established the dose objectives to the population around the light-water-reactors in May, 1975, based on the ''ALAP'' concept. These values are respectively, 5 mrems per year for total body and 15 mrems per year for thyroid of an individual in the critical group in the environs, due to both gaseous and liquid effluents from LWRs in one site. The present paper describes the implications of the dose objective values, control measures which have been adopted to reduce releases of radioactive materials and related technical developments in Japan. The main control measures for reduction of radioactive gaseous effluents are an installation of a charcoal gas holdup system for decay of noble gases and a supply of clean steam for the gland seal of a turbine in BWR, and a storage tank system allowing decay of noble gases in PWR. For liquid effluents are taken measures to re-use them as the primary coolant. Consequently, the amounts of radioactivity released to the environment from any LWR during normal operation have been maintained under the level to meet the above dose objective values. For research reactors, reduction of release of effluents has also been carried out in a similar way to LWRs. In order to establish the techniques applicable for further reduction, studies are being made on the control measures to reduce leakage of radioiodine, an apparatus for removal of krypton, the treatment of laundry waste and measures to remove the crud in the primary coolant. Presentation is also made on the energy-integrated gas monitor for gaseous effluent and systems of measuring γ dose from radioactive cloud descriminating from natural background, which have been developed for effective monitoring thus reduced environmental dose

  9. Proof of concept for a passive sampler for monitoring of gaseous elemental mercury in artisanal gold mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Santos, Elias; Moher, Paleah; Ferlin, Stacy; Fostier, Anne Hélène; Mazali, Italo Odone; Telmer, Kevin; Brolo, Alexandre Guimarães

    2017-11-28

    Mercury emissions from artisanal gold mining operations occurring in roughly 80 developing countries are a major workplace health hazard for millions of people as well as the largest contributor to global mercury pollution. There are no portable, cheap, and rapid methods able to inform workers or health practitioners of mercury exposure on site in remote locations. In this work, a proof of concept for a miniaturized mercury sampler, prepared by the direct reduction of gold into the porous nanostructures of Vycor glass (PVG), is introduced. Mercury retention on the PVG/Au sampler induces significant color changes, due to the formation of Au-Hg amalgam that affects the surface plasmon resonance characteristics of the material. The color change can potentially be quantified by the analysis of pictures obtained with a cell phone camera rapidly and onsite. Laboratory experiments showed the viability of using PVG/Au as passive sampler for monitoring of Hg°. PVG/Au samplers were then deployed in an artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) operations in Burkina Faso and it was able to indicate personal mercury exposures. The amount of mercury quantified in the samplers for all miners was higher than the current personal exposure limit set by the US Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA).

  10. Regulating Effluents From India’s Textile Sector: New Commands and Compliance Monitoring for Zero Liquid Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Grönwall

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2016 large parts of India had experienced failing monsoons for two consecutive years. Textiles production was a natural target in the quest for solutions when re-distribution of water between sectors became imperative, and it seemed likely that the zero liquid discharge (ZLD approach would be mainstreamed nationwide. However, when amended standards for discharge of effluents were enacted it was without strict requirements for reuse of water in-house; the legislator chose to make ZLD applicable only to large units and refrained from making it mandatory. The carrying capacity of the environment in sensitive or otherwise critical areas may henceforth be taken into account by the executive, but the textile sector’s wastewater is not yet regarded the resource that a circular economy calls for. This paper examines the command-side of regulation by shedding light on the applicable law, the reform steps taken in 2014–16 and how judicial interventions influenced these. It also seeks to contribute to the understanding of enforcement control by discussing what role court-established committees are playing in implementation and monitoring of compliance, based on an in-depth case study of Tirupur, India’s ‘knit city’.

  11. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Effluent Charts Details

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Detailed Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data supporting effluent charts for one Clean Water Act discharge permit. Includes effluent parameters, amounts discharged...

  12. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Effluent Charts Downloads

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Detailed Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data supporting effluent charts for one Clean Water Act discharge permit. Includes effluent parameters, amounts discharged...

  13. Performance evaluation of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for online monitoring of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Jayan, M.P.; Pawar, V.J.; Sureshkumar, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and reactors have to monitor the presence of activity in various process cooling water streams in order to ensure that no containment failure occurred resulting in mixing of radioactivity into the cooling water. Similarly, in a radiochemical plant using steam for inter-tank transfer or process solution heating, potential exists for radioactivity release into the steam lines, which manifest as contamination in the resultant steam condensates. Nuclear facilities usually use online methods to get real-time detection of activity contents in process cooling water lines and steam condensate lines. In order to avoid flow interruptions and contamination of detectors, the detector is usually kept close to the external surface of the process/sampling line. This experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of NaI(TI) scintillator detector for online monitoring as an external probe. The results presented here with a single radionuclide and detector configuration is extendable to mixture containing multiple gamma emitters or other detector configuration, by conducting suitable experiments

  14. Ground-water monitor-well installation at twelve hazardous-waste storage or handling facilities at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Phase 2, Detection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlmeier, P.D.; Motley, C.A.

    1987-06-01

    This report provides construction information for 41 ground-water monitor wells and a narrative describing a drilling, geophysical logging, and hydraulic permeability testing programs to detect and identify chemical compounds that may have entered the uppermost aquifer and any interconnecting aquifers. This investigation is the second phase of well installations at the storage and handling facilities. The initial phase characterized the hydrogeology at each facility. A third phase will delineate the extent of any detected contamination. The sites that were investigated require monitoring. The activities conducted during this investigation included installation of unconsolidated zone wells, installation of bedrock zone wells, geophysical logging and hydraulic testing of selected wells, and re-development of Phase I monitor wells. 5 refs., 97 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Graphic displays on PCs of gaseous diffusion models of radionuclide releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo Ortega, E. del

    1993-01-01

    The well-known MESOI program has been modified and improved to adapt it to a PC/AT with VGA colour monitor. Far from losing any of its powerful characteristics to calculate the transport, diffusion, deposition and decay of gaseous radioactive effluents discharged to the atmosphere, it has been enhanced to allow graphic viewing of concentrations, wind speed and direction and puff locations in colour, all on a background map of the site. The background covers a 75 x 75 km square and has a graphic grid density of 421 x 421 pixels. This means that effluent concentration is represented approximately every 170 metres in the 'clouded-area'. Among the modifications and enhancements made, the following are of particular interest: 1. A new subroutine called NUBE has been added, which calculates the distribution of effluent concentration of activity in a grid of 421 x 421 pixels. 2. Several subroutines have been added to obtain graphic displays and printouts of the cloud, wind field and puff locations. 3. Graphic display of the geographic plane of the area surrounding the effluent release point. 4. Off-line preparation of meteorological and topographical data files necessary for program execution. (author)

  16. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  17. Generation of gaseous tritium standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    The determination of aqueous and non-aqueous tritium in gaseous samples is one type of determination often requested of radioanalytical laboratories. This determination can be made by introducing the sample as a gas into a sampling train containing two silica gel beds separated by.a catalytic oxidizer bed. The first bed traps tritiated water. The sample then passes into and through the oxidizer bed where non-aqueous tritium containing species are oxidized to water and other products of combustion. The second silica gel bed then traps the newly formed tritiated water. Subsequently, silica gel is removed to plastic bottles, deionized water is added, and the mixture is permitted to equilibrate. The tritium content of the equilibrium mixture is then determined by conventional liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For many years, the moisture content of inert, gaseous samples has been determined using monitors which quantitatively electrolyze the moisture present after that moisture has been absorbed by phosphorous pentoxide or other absorbents. The electrochemical reaction is quantitative and definitive, and the energy consumed during electrolysis forms the basis of the continuous display of the moisture present. This report discusses the experimental evaluation of such a monitor as the basis for a technique for conversion of small quantities of SRMs of tritiated water ( 3 HOH) into gaseous tritium standards ( 3 HH)

  18. Development of gaseous photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sugiyama, H.; Okada, T.

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing gaseous photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with alkali photocathode combined with micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs). The potential advantage of the gaseous PMT is that it can achieve a very large effective area with adequate position and timing resolutions. In addition, it will be easily operated under a very high magnetic field, compared with the conventional vacuum-based PMT. To evaluate the gaseous PMTs filled with Ne and Ar based gas mixture, we have developed gaseous PMTs with an alkali photocathode combined with MPGDs such as a glass capillary plate, GEM, and Micromegas detector. We describe the recent development of the gaseous PMTs, particularly the production of the photocathode, gas gain, ion and photon feedbacks, quantum efficiency, and the characteristics in the magnetic field environment. (author)

  19. Liquid effluent discharges to Rivacre Brook, Capenhurst: an evaluation and radiological assessment of some monitoring data on environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, P.; Thorne, M.C.; Dickson, D.M.J.

    1993-01-01

    An assessment of the radiological impact of past and current discharges of liquid radioactive effluents to the Rivacre Brook demonstrated that critical group doses are less than 0.001 mSv/a, with contributions from isotopes of uranium, Tc-99 and Np-237. (Author)

  20. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  1. Order of the 17. of June 2010 approving the decision no 2010-DC-0182 by the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 18. of May 2010 specifying the limits of releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of civil base nuclear installations no 46, 74 and 100 operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) on the district of Saint-Laurent-Nouan (Loir-et-Cher department); Arrete du 17 juin 2010 portant homologation de la decision no 2010-DC-0182 de l'Autorite de surete nucleaire du 18 mai 2010 fixant les limites de rejets dans l'environnement des effluents liquides et gazeux des installations nucleaires de base no 46, no 74 et no 100 exploitees par Electricite de France-Societe anonyme (EDF-SA) sur la commune de Saint-Laurent-Nouan (departement de Loir-et-Cher)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This legal publication contains references to the different legal and official documents (codes, orders, minister's opinion, public surveys, administrative authorizations, local community opinion) at the root of this specification of limits related to releases in the environment of liquid and gaseous effluents of civil base nuclear installations operated by Electricite de France-Societe Anonyme (EDF-SA) on the district of Saint-Laurent-Nouan. Tables present the limits for different radioactive emissions (carbon 14, hydrogen 3, iodine, radioactive rare earths, and other alpha, beta and gamma emitters) from these different installations, but also the maximum admitted concentrations for gaseous chemical effluents (boric acid, hydrazine, morpholine, phosphates, nitrates, various metals, and so on). The limits for thermal releases are also specified

  2. Progress in the domain of emissions tracking and environment radioactivity monitoring - Proceedings of the technical days organised by the SFRP Environment Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, Dominique; Calvez, Marianne; Rivasseau, Corinne Cea; Monfort, Marguerite; Manificat, Guillaume; Pierrard, Olivier; Couvez, Celine; Masson, Olivier; Bruno, Valerie; Renaud, Philippe; Genova, Zhana; Reynal, Nathalie; Le Coz, Eric; Tchilian, Nathalie; Diana, Jean-Jacques; Beguinel, Philippe; Cortes, Pierre; Puydarrieux, Stephane; Brun, Thierry; Devin, Patrick; Clavel, Benoit; Hemidy, Pierre-Yves; Gontier, Gilles; Delloye, Thierry; Mailliat, Alain; Ferreri, Giovanni; LECLERC, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    The Environment Section of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) organized a technical meeting on the progress made in the domain of emissions tracking and environment radioactivity monitoring. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Environment monitoring at the global, national and local scale: historical overview (Dominique CALMET, CEA); 2 - Evolution of radioactivity monitoring in the environment from 1960 to the present day (Guillaume MANIFICAT, IRSN); 3 - Euratom's legal framework (Zhana GENOVA, CTE); 4 - Main regulatory changes during the last decade (Nathalie REYNAL, ASN); 5 - Progress of standardization works on radioactive effluent emissions control and environment monitoring (Philippe BEGUINEL, BNEN); 6 - From operators' self-monitoring to ASN's inspections: a many components control system (Eric LE COZ, ASN); 7 - Control of effluents and emissions management at CEA Centres (Marianne CALVEZ, CEA); 8 - Liquid and gaseous effluents of ITER experimental facility: description and impacts (Pierre CORTES, IO); 9 - Effluents and emissions management strategy at AREVA NC La Hague facility (Stephane PUYDARRIEUX, AREVA); 10 - Radioactive effluents from nuclear facilities ongoing deconstruction: from dimensioning to real effluents (Benoit CLAVEL, EDF); 11 - Radionuclides decontamination process for liquid effluents using micro-algae at the laboratory scale (Corinne RIVASSEAU, CEA); 12 - Radioactive effluents from nuclear medicine services: management, monitoring and impact measurement methods (Nathalie TCHILIAN, ASN); 13 - Evolution history of effluents management and environment monitoring at the Solvay La Rochelle site (Thierry DELLOYE, SOLVAY); 14 - Different international approaches in effluents management and monitoring: example of French and German gaseous effluents - regulation, analyses, accounting rules (Jean-Jacques DIANA, ASN); 15 - Environment

  3. A real-time positron monitor for the estimation of stack effluent releases from PET medical cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar.

    2002-01-01

    Large activities of short-lived positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals are routinely manufactured by modern Medical Cyclotron facilities for positron emission tomography (PET) applications. During radiochemical processing, a substantial fraction of the volatile positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals are released into the atmosphere. An inexpensive, fast response positron detector using a simple positron-annihilation chamber has been developed for real-time assessment of the stack release of positron emitting effluents at the Australian National Medical Cyclotron. The positron detector was calibrated by using a 3.0 ml (1.50 MBq) aliquot of 18 FDG and interfaced to an industrial standard datalogger for the real-time acquisition of stack release data

  4. Uptake calibration of polymer-based passive samplers for monitoring priority and emerging organic non-polar pollutants in WWTP effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Ureta, Oscar; Olivares, Maitane; Zatón, Leire; Delgado, Alejandra; Prieto, Ailette; Vallejo, Asier; Paschke, Albrecht; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-05-01

    The uptake calibration of more than 12 non-polar organic contaminants by 3 polymeric materials is shown: bare polydimetilsiloxane (PDMS, stir-bars), polyethersulfone tubes and membranes (PES) and polyoxymethylene membranes (POM), both in their free form and membrane-enclosed sorptive coating (MESCO). The calibration process was carried out exposing the samplers to a continuous flow of contaminated water at 100 ng mL(-1) for up to 28 days, and, consequently, the sampling rates (Rs, mL day(-1)) of several organic microcontaminants were provided for the first time. In situ Rs values were also determined disposing the samplers in the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. Finally, these passive samplers were applied to monitor the effluents of two wastewater treatment plants. This application lead to the confirmation of the presence of galaxolide, tonalide and 4-tert-octylphenol at high ng mL(-1) levels, as well as the identification of compounds like some phthalates and alkylphenols at levels below the detection limits for active sampling methods.

  5. Degradation and monitoring of acetamiprid, thiabendazole and their transformation products in an agro-food industry effluent during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a raceway pond reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Irene; Sirtori, Carla; Ponce-Robles, Laura; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio; Malato, Sixto; Agüera, Ana

    2015-07-01

    In this study, pesticides acetamiprid and thiabendazole and their transformation products (TPs), seven from each pesticide, were successfully monitored during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a real secondary effluent from an agro-food industry spiked with 100μgL(-1) of each pesticide. To this end, a highly sensitive procedure was developed, based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (QqLIT-MS). In addition, finding low-cost and operational technology for the application of AOPs would then facilitate their use on a commercial level. Simple and extensive photoreactors such as raceway pond reactors (RPRs) are therefore proposed as an alternative for the application of solar photo-Fenton. Results showed that high degradation could be achieved in a complex water matrix (>99% TBZ and 91% ACTM in 240min) using a 120-L RPR pilot plant as novel technology. The analyses indicated that after the treatment only three TPs from ACTM were still present in the effluent, while the others had been removed. The study showed that the goal of either just removing the parent compounds, or going one step further and removing all the TPs, can significantly change the treatment time, which would affect process costs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Position Sensitive Gaseous Photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Martinengo, P; Peskov, V

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the technologies associated with position sensitive gaseous detectors especially featuring CsI as reflective photoconverters will be reviewed. These photodetectors represent the most effective solution for what concerns cost and performance in the case of large area Cherenkov imaging applications in relatively low rate (or low occupancy) high energy physics and astrophysics experiments. Moreover, they are the only choice when the Cherenkov detector is embedded in a magnetic field. Recently proposed single photon MPGDs (Micropattern Gaseous Detectors) will be also discussed in view of the successful efforts so far made to extend their sensitivity to visible light. With some modifications, photosensitive gaseous detectors can also be used in the imaging of X-rays and particles.

  7. Position sensitive gaseous photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Biteman, V; Peskov, Vladimir; Sakuraï, H; Silin, E; Sokolova, T; Radionov, I

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a simple design of a gaseous photomultiplier, sensitive up to visible light, is described. It consists of a parallel plate chamber combined with a solid photocathode through a capillary plate, which works in a transmission mode and serves to suppress photon feedback. Ion feedback was minimized through the optimization of the gas mixture. A gain >10 sup 3 was achieved.

  8. Technical review of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant non-radiological effluent and environmental monitoring program. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    Based on information reviewed in July 1985, Y-12 has some very strong areas such as chain-of-custody forms and compliance work on the new NPDES permit. The recommendations are divided into eighteen categories. Each recommendation is also divided into major or minor categories as an indication of the resources estimated to complete this recommendation. The areas needing the most improvement are air monitoring, QA/QC, field procedures, documentation, groundwater sampling, spill prevention control and countermeasures plan and biological monitoring. Recommendations are tabulated by category and by priority.

  9. Gaseous diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, G.A.; Shacter, J.

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous diffusion system is described comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of the diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof

  10. Synthesis of INERIS works in 2006-2008 on the issue: gaseous phase geochemical monitoring at the surface and in the intermediate roofing of storage sites. CO2 capture and storage 2005 ANR program - Geo-carbon Monitoring Convention ANR-05-CO2-008-05. Investigation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokryszka, Zbigniew; Charmoille, Arnaud; Bentivegna, Gaetan

    2008-01-01

    Within the frame of the project of CO 2 capture and storage as a way to struggle against the greenhouse effect, this report proposes a synthesis of works performed by the INERIS in the field of gaseous phase geochemical monitoring, and more particularly on some parts of a larger programme, i.e. leakage detection in storage roofing and aquifers, leakage detection at the surface and at its vicinity (development of means of detection and direct measurement of CO 2 flows at the soil/atmosphere interface, assessment of leakages at the surface on the basis of point measurements), and testing of methods of direct measurement of CO 2 flows on sites

  11. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999

  12. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000

  13. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

  14. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

  15. Examination of vegetation around a nuclear plant emitting gaseous fluorides in order to detect fluorine pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teulon, Francoise; Bonnaventure, J. P.

    1971-08-01

    Fluorine pollution (chronic or occasional) around a plant rejecting gaseous fluoride effluents can be detected from vegetation samples by chemical analysis. Systematic monitoring allows the effects and gravity of the pollution to be estimated. The analytical method used consists of a double distillation (in phosphoric acid and perchloric acid) followed by a spectro-colorimetric analysis (alizarine-complexon-lanthane). This method of control allows both the efficiency of the trapping installations and also the appearance of effluents at unexpected places to be checked, In the event of an accident it is possible to determine the advisability of prohibiting the consumption of locally grown produce by humans or fodder by cattle. Research conducted in order to determine the relation between visible, damage to certain vegetables (tomatoes, haricot beans and sorghum) and their fluorine contents demonstrated that such a relation appears above all at the level of the leaves; chemical analysis may thus be used to confirm or reject information obtained on the basis of visual evidence [fr

  16. Bacterial community shift for monitoring the co-composting of oil palm empty fruit bunch and palm oil mill effluent anaerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, Mohd Huzairi Mohd; Ramli, Norhayati; Hassan, Mohd Ali; Shirai, Yoshihito; Tashiro, Kosuke; Sakai, Kenji; Tashiro, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    A recently developed rapid co-composting of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) and palm oil mill effluent (POME) anaerobic sludge is beginning to attract attention from the palm oil industry in managing the disposal of these wastes. However, a deeper understanding of microbial diversity is required for the sustainable practice of the co-compositing process. In this study, an in-depth assessment of bacterial community succession at different stages of the pilot scale co-composting of OPEFB-POME anaerobic sludge was performed using 454-pyrosequencing, which was then correlated with the changes of physicochemical properties including temperature, oxygen level and moisture content. Approximately 58,122 of 16S rRNA gene amplicons with more than 500 operational taxonomy units (OTUs) were obtained. Alpha diversity and principal component analysis (PCoA) indicated that bacterial diversity and distributions were most influenced by the physicochemical properties of the co-composting stages, which showed remarkable shifts of dominant species throughout the process. Species related to Devosia yakushimensis and Desemzia incerta are shown to emerge as dominant bacteria in the thermophilic stage, while Planococcus rifietoensis correlated best with the later stage of co-composting. This study proved the bacterial community shifts in the co-composting stages corresponded with the changes of the physicochemical properties, and may, therefore, be useful in monitoring the progress of co-composting and compost maturity.

  17. Importance of benthonic marine flora monitoring in the liquid effluent discharge form Angra-1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloise, G.C.; Araujo Costa, D. de

    1994-01-01

    Angra-1 Nuclear Power Plant use sea water to condenser the steam of the secondary circuit. This water capted from Itaorna bay is chlorined and discharged more heater in Piraquara de Fora small bay. The temperature, chlorinade concentration, marine flora and fauna are monitored frequently with the intend of value the impact caused by this discharge to marine environment. The macroscopic marines algae is very sensible to environment temperature variations, constitutes on of the main rink in the food chain and stay every time attach at the bottom. Because of this facts they are considered an important bio indicators. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  18. POLLUTION EFFECT OF FOOD AND BEVERAGES EFFLUENTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT. The main course of water pollution in the Alaro river is the direct discharge of food and beverages processing effluents. The impact of such effluents on the water quality was studied in detail by monitoring selected physicochemical parameters monthly between January 2003 and December 2007. The combined ...

  19. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The principal function at KAPL sites (Knolls, Kesselring, and Windsor) is research and development in the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. The Kesselring Site is also used for the training of personnel in the operation of these plants. The Naval nuclear propulsion plant at the Windsor Site is currently being dismantled. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations

  20. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The principal function at KAPL sites (Knolls, Kesselring, and Windsor) is research and development in the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. The Kesselring Site is also used for the training of personnel in the operation of these plants. The Naval nuclear propulsion plant at the Windsor Site is currently being dismantled. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  1. Radiological environmental monitoring program for Angra I: basis and methodology proposed for executing the requirements of the regulatory member and to assure the population safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, E.; Dezordi, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented, applyed to Angra-1, a methodology for implanting the monitoring program of the vicinity level radiation exposure to the installation. The method considers two kinds of radioactive effluents in the environment: gaseous (in the atmosphere) and liquid (in the marine aquatic environment). It is based on the generation and ordering of the important relation: radiation exposure pathway/radionuclide group. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    An extremely compact two-terminal gaseous discharge device is described that is capable of producing neutrons in copious quantities, relatively high energy ions, intense x rays, and the like. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a crossed electric-magnetic field region in the discharge envelope that traps electrons and accelerates them to very high energies to provide an intense ionizing medium adjacent the anode of the device for ionizing gas therein with extremely high efficiency. In addition, the crossed-field trapping region holds the electrons close to the anode whereby the acceleration of ions to the cathode is not materially effected by the electron sheath and the ions assume substantially the full energy of the anodecathode potential drop. (auth)

  3. Ethylene Oxide Gaseous Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Robert R.; Shull, James J.

    1962-01-01

    The duration of the equilibration period between admission of water vapor and subsequent introduction of gaseous ethylene oxide to an evacuated sterilizer chamber was studied with respect to its effect on the inactivation of spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger under simulated practical conditions. Introduction of a water-adsorbing cotton barrier between the spores and an incoming gas mixture of water vapor and ethylene oxide caused a marked increase in the observed thermochemical death time of the spore populations. This effect was negated by admission of water vapor one or more minutes prior to introduction of ethylene oxide gas. Increases in temperature and relative humidity of the system promoted passage of water vapor through the cotton barriers and diminished their effect. PMID:13890660

  4. Effluent release limits, sources and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindell, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives of radiation protection in relation to releases. Environmental transfer models for radionuclides. Relationship between releases, environmental levels and doses to persons. Establishment of release limits: Limits based on critical population group concept critical pathway analysis and identification of critical group. Limits based on optimization of radiation protection individual dose limits, collective doses and dose commitments 1) differential cost benefit analysis 2) authorized and operational limits taking account of future exposures. Monitoring of releases to the environment: Objectives of effluent monitoring. Typical sources and composition of effluents; design and operation of monitoring programmes; recording and reporting of monitoring results; complementary environmental monitoring. (orig.) [de

  5. PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

    2002-02-24

    Engineered covers have been placed on top of buried/subsurface wastes to minimize water infiltration and therefore, release of hazardous contaminants. In order for the cover to protect the environment it must remain free of holes and breaches throughout its service life. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program 2006 Accelerated Cleanup Plan is pushing for rapid closure of many of the DOE facilities. This will require a great number of new cover systems. Some of these new covers are expected to maintain their performance for periods of up to 1000 years. Long-term stewardship will require monitoring/verification of cover performance over the course of the designed lifetime. In addition, many existing covers are approaching the end of their design life and will need validation of current performance (if continued use is desired) or replacement (if degraded). The need for a reliable method of verification and long-term monitoring is readily apparent. Currently, failure is detected through monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. This is too late as the contaminants have already left the disposal area. The proposed approach is the use of gaseous Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) to verify and monitor cover performance. It is believed that PFTs will provide a technology that can verify a cover meets all performance objectives upon installation, be capable of predicting changes in cover performance and failure (defined as contaminants leaving the site) before it happens, and be cost-effective in supporting stewardship needs. The PFTs are injected beneath the cover and air samples taken above (either air samples or soil gas samples) at the top of the cover. The location, concentrations, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) provide a direct measure of cover performance. PFT technology can

  6. Dosimeter for measuring gaseous contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kring, E.V.; Lautenberger, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    A personal dosimeter for measuring the time-average concentration of a gaseous contaminant in the atmosphere in a manner substantially independent of atmospheric motion relative to the dosimeter is provided. The dosimeter comprises a detector substance capable of chemically or physically combining with the gaseous contaminant disposed tightly between two substantially flat members, at least one of which has a plurality of throughand-through channels. The members have corresponding, meshing shapes such that the channels provide the only communication between the atmosphere and the detector substance, allowing the gaseous contaminant to diffuse through the channels

  7. Alpha contaminated liquid effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparo, M.; Mattia, B.; Bianchini, E.; Frazzoli, F.V.

    1987-01-01

    The present report takes into consideration the possibility to carry out an in-line control of activity in liquid streams of fuel cycle nuclear plants, epecially for waste streams. The instrument developed for this purpose, has been characterized by means of static and dinamic measurements with Pu and Am bearing solutions. The results so far obtained show that the minimum detectable Pu amount is about .01mg/l and that it is possible to apply such a technique as alarm system able to detect the overcoming of a present threshold of actinides concentrations. The report also presents an approach to the spectra deconvolution in order to determine the amount of single isotopes

  8. Cool gaseous nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Shaver, P A; Pottasch, S R

    1979-01-01

    The electron temperatures of diffuse gaseous nebulae have long been thought to be close to 10/sup 4/K. Much lower temperatures were derived from some of the early radio continuum and recombination line work, but these were generally considered to be wrong for a variety of reasons. While there is little doubt that the bright nebulae do indeed have temperatures of approximately 8000-9000K, there are strong indications that some nebulae of lower densities have much lower temperatures,

  9. Gaseous radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To prevent explosion of hydrogen gas within gaseous radioactive waste by removing the hydrogen gas by means of a hydrogen absorber. Structure: A coolant extracted from a reactor cooling system is sprayed by nozzle into a gaseous phase (hydrogen) portion within a tank, thus causing slipping of radioactive rare gas. The gaseous radioactive waste rich in hydrogen, which is purged in the tank, is forced by a waste gas compressor into a hydrogen occlusion device. The hydrogen occlusion device is filled with hydrogen occluding agents such as Mg, Mg-Ni alloy, V-Nb alloy, La-Ni alloy and so forth, and hydrogen in the waste gas is removed through reaction to produce hydrogen metal. The gaseous radioactive waste, which is deprived of hydrogen and reduced in volume, is stored in an attenuation tank. The hydrogen stored in the hydrogen absorber is released and used again as purge gas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Need to monitoring the particulate components and gaseous components of the I-131 in air, on Radiological monitoring networks. impact of the accident of Fukushima Dai-chi in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza Espasa, A.; Caballero Andrada, M.; Corbacho Merino, J. A.; Ontalba Salamanca, M. A.; Rodriguez Perulero, A.; Valencia Corrales, D.; Vasco Vargas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Following a nuclear accident with significant overseas evacuations, it should be accurately determined concentration radio iodines into the atmosphere, given its important contribution to the radiological impact produced. Automatic networks radiation monitoring aim to provide as quickly as possible, reliable information on these radiological changes, to take necessary countermeasures. (Author)

  11. Overview of the Tritium-in-Air Monitoring System of Cernavoda NPP U1 Romania - modernization and improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murgoci, S.; Popescu, I.; Ibadula, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Tritium-in-Air Monitoring System used in Cernavoda NPP U1 is a Scintrex Model 292 and is a multi-room monitoring station for measuring tritium activity in air, particularly tritiated water vapor, ideal for installations in: nuclear power stations, tritium extraction plants, fusion facilities, other industrial tritium applications. The Tritium-in-Air Monitoring System (Scintrex Model 292) has two major limitations: the presetted setpoint is not for the tritium level of activity, is for a global activity including noble gas contribution; the presetted setpoint should be changed for each particular room, which means a major delay in the location of D 2 O leak sources. Both limitations can be solved by using a Tritium Monitoring Network consisting of a number of tritium monitors stationed in individual rooms and the readings are transmitted to a central computer. The data can be logged to a database (MS Access compatible) and will offer historical trends and necessary reports. This paper presents the main equipment's of the Tritium-in-Air Monitoring system, the description of this modernization project and the results of 3 H emissions monitoring program (Liquid and Gaseous Effluent Program Monitoring program at Cernavoda NPP). 1 INTRODUCTION During routine operation of a CANDU reactor, various gaseous, liquid, and solid radioactive wastes are generated. The design of its systems ensures that these are minimized, but small quantities of gaseous and liquid wastes are continuously discharged at very low concentrations.(author)

  12. Regulatory review of releases from HIFAR of radioactive airborne effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westall, D.J.; Macnab, D.I.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) was set up by legislation in 1992 as an independent Commonwealth corporate body reporting to the Minister for Health and Family Services. Its functions include monitoring and reviewing the safety of nuclear plant owned or operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The NSB sets requirements for authorisation of the operation of the HIFAR research reactor, and may impose restrictions and conditions on its operation. The authorisation for the operation of HIFAR includes a requirement for arrangements for the treatment, safe storage and disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes from the reactor. The objective is to establish conditions which would ensure that radiation exposure to plant personnel and the public from radioactive wastes are within acceptable limits and that releases are maintained as low as reasonably achievable. The NSB has developed expectations based on international best practice, against which to review HIFAR's arrangements for satisfying the requirement and achieving the objective. Arrangements for the release of airborne radioactive effluent from HIFAR were reviewed by the NSB as part of an overall review of the upgrade of safety documentation for HIFAR. The NSB's expectations for the review were drawn from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Basic Safety Standards (Safety Series No 115-I) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Recommendations for Limiting Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (1995). These expectations included a hierarchy of primary dose limits, stack discharge limits and reference levels for HIFAR aimed at ensuring that radiation doses to the public due to airborne effluent are less than the national dose limits and ANSTO's dose constraints, and are as low as reasonably achievable. An approach favoured by the operator is to work directly to a primary dose limit using an airborne dispersion computer program to

  13. Temporal Variation in the Estrogenicity of a Sewage Treatment Plant Effluent and its Biological Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes variations in the estrogenic potency of effluent from a "model" wastewater treatment plant in Duluth, MN, and explores the significance of these variations relative to sampling approaches for monitoring effluents and their toxicity to fish.

  14. Gaseous emissions from coal stockpiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Stockpiled coal undergoes atmospheric oxidation and desorption processes during open air storage. These processes release gases to the environment which may effect health and safety by their toxicity and flammability. In extreme cases, this could lead to a fire. This report discusses gaseous emissions from coal stockpiles. It covers gas emission mechanisms, and gas sampling and testing methods, before examining in more detail the principal gases that have been emitted. It concludes that there is limited research in this area and more data are needed to evaluate the risks of gaseous emissions. Some methods used to prevent coal self-heating and spontaneous combustion can be applied to reduce emissions from coal stockpiles.

  15. Treatment of Radioactive Gaseous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Radioactive waste, with widely varying characteristics, is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. The waste needs to be treated and conditioned as necessary to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Although radioactive gaseous radioactive waste does not constitute the main waste flow stream at nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste processing facilities, it represents a major source for potential direct environmental impact. Effective control and management of gaseous waste in both normal and accidental conditions is therefore one of the main issues of nuclear fuel cycle and waste processing facility design and operation. One of the duties of an operator is to take measures to avoid or to optimize the generation and management of radioactive waste to minimize the overall environmental impact. This includes ensuring that gaseous and liquid radioactive releases to the environment are within authorized limits, and that doses to the public and the effects on the environment are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Responsibilities of the regulatory body include the removal of radioactive materials within authorized practices from any further regulatory control — known as clearance — and the control of discharges — releases of gaseous radioactive material that originate from regulated nuclear facilities during normal operation to the environment within authorized limits. These issues, and others, are addressed in IAEA Safety Standards Series Nos RS-G-1.7, WS-G-2.3 and NS-G-3.2. Special systems should be designed and constructed to ensure proper isolation of areas within nuclear facilities that contain gaseous radioactive substances. Such systems consist of two basic subsystems. The first subsystem is for the supply of clean air to the facility, and the second subsystem is for the collection, cleanup and

  16. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System's pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System

  17. Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, W.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances

  18. Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances

  19. Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

  20. Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

  1. Effluents and releases of tritium from Novo-Voronezh-5 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, A.G.; Mekhedov, B.N.; Podporinova, L.E.; Popov, S.V.; Shalin, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Results of systematic measurements of tritium concentration within technological systems of reactor of Novo-Voronezh NPP conducted to evaluate tritium effluents and releases and radiation doses to population from these effluents and releases are given. It is shown that 68% concerning tritium total amount were disposed into sewerage while 17% - through vent tube and 15% - with water and steam from secondary circuit systems. Standartized tritium effluents from WWER-1000 reactor for 5 year run constitute 15±1.9 GBq/MWxyear and it corresponds to mean value of effluents for foreign NPPs. Tritium concentration in the atmosphere constituted according to calculations (4.1-20)x10 -5 Bq/l. Conclusion is made about insignificant dose to population from tritium gaseous effluents. Detail study is necessary for dose connected with tritium contained in water effluents

  2. Monitoring the fate and behavior of TiO2nanoparticles: Simulated in a WWTP with industrial dye-stuff effluent according to OECD 303A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlalela, Lwazi C; Ngila, Jane C; Dlamini, Langelihle N

    2017-07-03

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in several consumer products has led to them finding their way into wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Some of these NPs have photocatalytic properties, thus providing a possible solution to textile industries to photodegrade dyes from their wastewater. Thus, the interaction of NPs with industrial dye effluents is inevitable. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD) guideline for testing of chemical 303A was employed to study the fate and behaviour of TiO 2 NPs in industrial dye-stuff effluent. This was due to the unavailability of NPs' fate and behaviour test protocols. The effect of TiO 2 NPs on the treatment process was ascertained by measuring chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5). Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to study the fate and behavior of TiO 2 NPs. Acclimatization of bacteria to target pollutants was a crucial factor for the treatment efficiency of activated sludge in a simulated wastewater treatment plant (SWTP). The acclimatization of the activated sludge to the synthetic industrial dye-stuff effluent was successfully achieved. Effect of TiO 2 NPs on the treatment process efficiency was then investigated. Addition of TiO 2 NPs had no effect on the treatment process as chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal remained >80%. Measured total plate count (TPC) affirmed that the addition of TiO 2 NPs had no effect on the treatment process. The removal of total nitrogen (TN) was not efficient as the treatment system was required to have an oxic and anoxic stage for efficient TN removal. Results from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) confirmed that the anatase phase of the added TiO 2 NPs remained unchanged even after exposure to the treatment plant. Removal of the NPs from the influent was facilitated by biosorption of the NPs on the activated sludge. Nanoparticles received by wastewater treatment plants will therefore reach the

  3. Potentialities of dark fermentation effluent as substrates for microalgae growth: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Turon, Violette; Fouilland, Eric; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, coupling bacterial dark fermentation (DF) and heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae (HCM) has been pointed out as a promising sustainable approach for producing both gaseous and liquid biofuels. Complex organic waste and effluents that are not susceptible to be directly degraded by microalgae are first converted into volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and hydrogen by DF. In this work, the feasibility of using DF effluents to sustain has been thoroughly reviewed and evaluated. Prom...

  4. Waste analysis plan for the 200 area effluent treatment facility and liquid effluent retention facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantyne, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for startup of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) and operation of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF), which are located on the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to obtain and analyze representative samples of dangerous waste managed in these units, and of the nondangerous treated effluent that is discharged to the State-Approved Land Disposal System (SALDS). Groundwater Monitoring at the SALDS will be addressed in a separate plan

  5. Public doses estimation based on effluents data and direct measurements of Tritium in environmental samples at Cernavoda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobric, E.; Popescu, I.; Simionov, V.

    2002-01-01

    The release of any potential radioactive pollutant to the environment during routine operation of a Nuclear Power Plant should be the subject of appropriate controls and assessments. The layout of the Candu reactor and the design of its systems ensure that the radioactive waste quantities are minimized, but small amounts of radioisotopes are continuously discharged at very low concentrations through gaseous and liquid effluents. Radioprotection of the public is based on the principles recommended by ICRP, the protection being mainly achieved by control of the sources of exposure. Source monitoring provide a means of assessing the radiation exposure of population groups, critical groups and individual members of the public. The assessed doses are used to demonstrate the compliance with authorized dose limits - 1 mSv / year in our case - but can also be used for optimization purposes

  6. Radioactive gases monitor system: tritium, radon, noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egey, J.Z.; Matatagui, E.

    2015-01-01

    A system for monitoring the radioactive gases tritium, radon and noble gases is described. We present the description of the sensor and the associated electronics that have been developed to monitor the presence of radioactive gases in air or other gaseous effluents. The system has a high sensitivity and a wide range of operation. The sensor is an ionization chamber, featuring the internal circulation of the gas to monitor and the associated electronics has a resolution better than 10 E-15A (fA). It allows the detection of the individual pulses that are produced during the alpha decay of radon and its daughter elements. The measurement system is made up of a commercial data acquisition system connected to a computer. The acquired data is presented on a graphical display and it is stored for later processing and analysis. We have a system that is of simple construction and versatile. Here we present the experimental results. (authors) [es

  7. The Use of Kitchen Effluent as Alternative Nutrient Source for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recovery of oil based drilling muds was monitored for a period of 12 weeks upon inoculation with kitchen effluent. Oil based drilling muds inoculated with varying volumes (200ml, 250ml and 300ml) of kitchen effluent constituted the experimental set-ups, while the control set-ups were made up of oil based drilling muds ...

  8. Environmental monitoring during the ten years of operation of the Almirante Alvaro Alberto nuclear power plant in Angra dos Reis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoli, I.G.; Vetere, M.I.; Guimaraes, J.R.; Nouailhetas, Y.; Godoy, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The operational environmental monitoring program of the Almirante Alvaro Alberto nuclear power station is part of the national nuclear energy commission (CNEN). The program was established in 1982, at the same time as the power station became operational and approximately four years after the application of the pre-operational environmental monitoring. The program/Angra-1 was elaborated based on the gaseous and liquid effluents compositions and on identification of the principal potential radiation exposition of man. For liquids effluents ocean water, fish and man were identified as the critical targets for the radionuclide cesium-137. Another route was the deposition of radionuclides from ocean waters onto the region's beach sand, cobalt-60 and cobalt-58 were the critical radionuclides. For the gaseous effluents the main targets from radioactivity transport were air, soil, grass and milk, through which the iodine-131 would reach the man. Besides, in the program/Angra 1 were included the physical radiation characteristics and the direct exposition. the paper presents an overview of both PMAPO and PMAO programmes. (B.C.A.). 11 refs, 07 figs

  9. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  10. Radiation imaging with gaseous detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauli, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    Modern position-sensitive fast gaseous detectors, developed primarily to satisfy the needs of particle physics experiments, have been tailored by many research groups for the use in other applied fields, owing to their main performances: high rate capability, sub-mm position resolution, large covered areas at moderate costs. Implemented with electronic or optical detection systems, the devices are successfully used to image various radiation fields: X-rays, low energy electrons, neutrons.

  11. Gaseous diffusion -- the enrichment workhorse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, J.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Construction of the first large-scale gaseous diffusion facility was started as part of the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in 1943. This facility, code named ''K-25,'' began operation in January 1945 and was fully on stream by September 1945. Four additional process buildings were later added in Oak Ridge as the demand for enriched uranium escalated. New gaseous diffusion plants were constructed at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, during this period. The three gaseous diffusion plants were the ''workhorses'' which provided the entire enriched uranium demand for the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. As the demand for enriched uranium for military purposes decreased during the early 1960s, power to the diffusion plants was curtailed to reduce production. During the 1960s, as plans for the nuclear power industry were formulated, the role of the diffusion plants gradually changed from providing highly-enriched uranium for the military to providing low-enriched uranium for power reactors

  12. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Yuka.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive gaseous wastes are introduced to a cooling tower and cooled by cooling water discharged from a cooling water discharging nozzle. Cooled radioactive gaseous wastes are cleaned by cleaning water in the cleaning tower and introduced accompanied with water to a condenser. Water in the gases is condensed in a condenser and gathered in a condensated water receiving tank. Water-removed gases are removed with fine particles by way of filters and then released out of the system by using a blower. Further, water used for cleaning the radioactive gaseous wastes in the cleaning tower is gathered to the liquid wastes receiving tank and sent to a radioactive liquid wastes processing device. On the other hand, condensates collected to the condensates receiving tank are returned to a cooling water discharging nozzle by a pump and re-utilized as cooling water. This can reduce the amount of radioactive liquid wastes, to reduce the processing amount of the radioactive liquid waste processing devices. (I.N.)

  13. Some considerations on the use of gamma spectrometry for Kr-85 determination at gaseous effluents in the nuclear industry and environmental samples; Estudio sobre la aplicacin de la espectrometria gamma en la medida del Kr-8 5 ambiental y en efluentes gaseosos de la industria nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras, M. C.; Perez, M. M.; Travesi, A.

    1983-07-01

    The possibilities of using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry with GeLi semiconductor detector for measured the 0.514 KeV gamma radiation of Kr-B5 la explored, The detection limit of Kr-85 for a measuring time is 4.10{sup -}4 {mu}Ci with a counting time of 1000 minutes in a GeLi detector with a 20% efficiency relative to the INa (Tl). It is concluded that the use of gamma ray spectrometry for measuring the Kr-85 is not useful for environmental samples, but it can be used for the Kr-85 effluents control in Nuclear Stations. (Author) 26 refs.

  14. The effects of brewery effluent discharge on the water quality and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effluent discharge into the river significantly altered the water quality. Monitoring of effluent discharge into the aquatic environment and strict adherence to regulatory limits will halt further degradation of the environment. Key words: Water, sediment physico-chemistry, distribution coefficient, effluent discharge, tropical river ...

  15. Pollution effect of food and beverages effluents on the Alaro river in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main course of water pollution in the Alaro river is the direct discharge of food and beverages processing effluents. The impact of such effluents on the water quality was studied in detail by monitoring selected physicochemical parameters monthly between January 2003 and December 2007. The combined effluent was ...

  16. Dose apportionment using statistical modeling of the effluent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are always operated under the guidelines stipulated by the regulatory body. These guidelines basically contain the technical specifications of the specific power plant and provide the knowledge of the discharge limit of the radioactive effluent into the environment through atmospheric and aquatic route. However, operational constraints sometimes may violate the technical specification due to which there may be a failure to satisfy the stipulated dose apportioned to that plant. In a site having multi facilities sum total of the dose apportioned to all the facilities should be constrained to 1 mSv/year to the members of the public. Dose apportionment scheme basically stipulates the limit of the gaseous and liquid effluent released into the environment. Existing methodology of dose apportionment is subjective in nature that may result the discharge limit of the effluent in atmospheric and aquatic route in an adhoc manner. Appropriate scientific basis for dose apportionment is always preferable rather than judicial basis from the point of harmonization of establishing the dose apportionment. This paper presents an attempt of establishing the discharge limit of the gaseous and liquid effluent first on the basis of the existing value of the release of the same. Existing release data for a few years (for example 10 years) for any nuclear power station have taken into consideration. Bootstrap, a resampling technique, has been adopted on this data sets to generate the population which subsequently provide the corresponding population distribution of the effluent release. Cumulative distribution of the population distribution obtained is constructed and using this cumulative distribution, 95th percentile (upper bound) of the discharge limit of the radioactive effluents is computed. Dose apportioned for a facility is evaluated using this estimated upper bound of the release limit. Paper describes the detail of the bootstrap method in evaluating the

  17. Release monitoring and environmental surveillance of Cea centers. Assessment and regulation and method 1999; Controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA. Bilan et reglementation et methode 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The quality of the natural environment around the centers of the Commissariat a l Energie Atomique is an important point of its safety policy. The environmental protection is based on the control of risks coming from research and development activities of its installations. It aims to reduce as low as possible, the impact of its activities on man and his environment. This publication develops the sampling and measurement methods that are made on effluents and in environment, according to the radionuclides characteristics, that are present. It gives also the regulation that applied to the effluents monitoring. The results of radioactive effluents releases (liquid and gaseous) and the surveillance of environment around cea centers is given in the 'Bilan 1999' publication. An analysis of these results on the 1995-1999 period allows to follow their evolution. (N.C.)

  18. Decentralised wastewater treatment effluent fertigation: preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-02

    Apr 2, 2018 ... monitoring is required when using anaerobic filter effluent from a DEWATS for irrigating banana and taro. Keywords: banana, intercrop, nitrogen, ... and anaerobic filter (AF) of the DEWATS degrade blackwater and greywater to produce biogas and ...... Passive Approaches. Intech Open Science Online ...

  19. Simulation of ammoniacal nitrogen effluent using feedforward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammoniacal nitrogen in domestic wastewater treatment plants has recently been added as the monitoring parameter by the Department of Environment, Malaysia. It is necessary to obtain a suitable model for the simulation of ammonical nitrogen in the effluent stream of sewage treatment plant in order to meet the new ...

  20. EFFECTS OF REFINERY EFFLUENT ON THE PHYSICO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing oil and gas industrial environment requires constant monitoring of the effluent discharges from such industries. ... The samples were analysed for physico-chemical parameters such as pH, TDS, TSS, COD, Oil and Grease, Temperature, Cations (Pb2+, Fe (total), Cu2+ , Cr6+, Ca2+, and Mg2+) and Anions (PO3-4, ...

  1. Effluent and water treatment at AERE Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The treatment of liquid wastes at Harwell is based on two main principles: separation of surface water, domestic sewage, trade wastes and radioactive effluents at source, and a system of holding tanks which are sampled so that the appropriate treatment can be given to any batch. All discharges are subject to independent monitoring by the authorising departments and the Thames Water Inspectors. (author)

  2. Gamma irradiation treatment of secondary sewage effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajdic, A.H.

    The operation and monitoring of a pilot scale Co-60 gamma irradiation unit treating secondary sewage effluent is described. The disinfecting efficiency of the unit is compared to that of an experimental 'ideal' chlorination unit and to the plant chlorination process. A cost estimate for disinfection by gamma irradiation on a full plant scale is included. (author)

  3. Offsite dose calculation manual guidance: Standard radiological effluent controls for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinke, W.W.; Essig, T.H.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains guidance which may be voluntarily used by licensees who choose to implement the provision of Generic Letter 89-- 01, which allows Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) to be removed from the main body of the Technical Specifications and placed in the Offsite Dose Calculation Manual (ODCM). Guidance is provided for Standard Effluent Controls definitions, Controls for effluent monitoring instrumentation, Controls for effluent releases, Controls for radiological environmental monitoring, and the basis for Controls. Guidance on the formulation of RETS has been available in draft form for a number of years; the current effort simply recasts those RETS into Standard Radiological Effluent Controls for application to the ODCM. 11 tabs

  4. The management plan of liquid effluent in Korean advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lim, H. S.; Jeong, D. W.; Jeong, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Non-radioactive liquid effluent in Korean Advanced Light Water Reactor is transferred and treated in centralized waste treatment facility after the radioactivity in effluent is checked within power block. The liquid effluent from centralized waste treatment facility will be discharged by way of discharge canal in order to be in the sufficient condition. As a result of investigating the radiation monitoring design in accordance with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring design satisfies the regulatory guideline. In relation to sampling and analyses, most systems satisfy the regulatory guideline except for some effluents from turbine building. And, though sampling and analyses are performed after radioactivity is monitored at each system in turbine building, these exceptions in turbine building effluents are expected to cause no significant problems because radioactivity is monitored by direct or indirect methods prior to release from turbine building. Integrated monitoring on liquid effluent from the centralized waste water treatment facility is not necessary because radiation monitoring, sampling and analyses on each system within power block are performed, and operational effectiveness compared with cost according to adding the radiation monitoring equipment is too low. So, whether the radiation monitoring in this effluent is reflected on design or not is planned to be determined through discussion with regulatory authority

  5. modelling effluent assimila modelling effluent assimilat modelling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    have applied the theory to water quality management studies and several modifications as well had been proposed ... other factors in a water body which affect the DO-BOD relationship. According to them these factors are: ... large breweries which also channel their effluent discharge into it. Also, along the river bank of this.

  6. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  7. A holistic monitoring of terrigenous effluents and their impacts on shaping the biological diversity of Chilika lagoon, Mahanadi River basin with benthic foraminifera as a biotic proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Bhadury, P.

    2016-12-01

    Mahanadi river basin situated in the eastern coast of India is characterized in having Asia's largest lagoon, Chilika, as one of the major reservoirs of its outflow during monsoon. The present study investigated sedimentological and hydrological parameters along with benthic foraminiferal abundance for a period of twelve months to understand the effect of terrigenous effluents on the lagoon. Salinity and pH at the sediment-water interface, to some extent co-varied with the amount of precipitation, while dissolved oxygen concentrations displayed a gradual increase irrespective of monsoon. Dissolved nutrient concentrations displayed source specific responses as terrigeneous silicate concentration was found to increase with increased freshwater inflow, while other dissolved nutrients displayed limited variability. Concentrations of rare earth elements in the water column were found to be extremely low with four elements (Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn) displaying seasonal variation. The sediment composition of the lagoon bottom was found to be relatively conserved across temporal scale with certain stations having higher content of fine-sized particles. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content of the sediment across the lagoon was found to be low during monsoon months. Determination of the source of TOC in the sediment was performed by analyzing the ratio of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C‰) and carbon content was revealed to be mostly originating from surface water primary producers with certain stations having terrestrial carbon influx. The benthic foraminiferal assemblage studied as a proxy of the biota, was dominated by the stress tolerant taxa, Ammonia spp. which displayed little to no variation. The study thus revealed the estuarine lagoon to be devoid of pollution with respect to the presence of rare earth elements, however the biota reflected a stressed water quality which may stem from high surface primary production shaped my monsoonal effluence of nutrients.

  8. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  9. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  10. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  11. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials

  12. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  13. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.W.; Gallegos, G.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Tate, P.J.; Balke, B.K.; Biermann, A.H.; Hoppes, W.G.; Fields, B.C.; Gouveia, F.J.; Berger, R.L.; Miller, F.S.; Rueppel, D.W.; Sims, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    The primary tasks of the environmental monitoring section (EMS) Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are: effluent monitoring of air, sewer, and NPDES water. Surveillance monitoring of soil, vegetation and foodstuff, water, air particulate, and air tritium. Radiation monitoring, dose assessment, emergency response, quality assurance, and reporting. This report describes LLNL and the monitoring plan

  14. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  15. Evaluation of paint industry effluents for irrigation purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, Y.N.; Islam, A.; Quraishi, S.B.; Mustafa, A.I.

    2006-01-01

    Effluent samples collected from a paints factory for a period of seven months were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), soluble cations and anions, nitrogen, phosphorus, and trace elements (Cd, B, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb). Compared with the natural groundwater used for washing paint wastes, the paint industry effluents were found to contain elevated concentrations of cations with the exception of Ca and moderately high concentrations of trace elements. Evaluation of the effluents was made, based on the integration of EC and both the sodium absorption ratio (SAR) and soluble sodium percent (SSP), BOD and COD values, and maximum permissible limits of heavy metals in the irrigation water. From the overall assessment, the effluents were considered suitable for use as supplement irrigation water. However, it is essential that the heavy metals in the effluents, as well as their accumulation in plants and soils, are monitored regularly. (author)

  16. Monitoring of low level environmental gamma exposure by the centralized radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Obata, Kazuichi; Kokubu, Morinobu; Itoh, Naoji

    1981-07-01

    In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), a centralized automatic radiation monitoring system developed 20 years ago has recently been improved to monitor low level gamma radiation more accurately in normal operation of the nuclear facilities and to detect abnormal radioactive releases more effectively. The present state of the system is described. This system puts together environmental monitoring data such as gamma exposure rate (20 points), radioactive concentration in the air (4 points) and in water (2 drains), and meteorological items (14 including wind directions, wind speeds, solar radiation and air temperatures at a observation tower of 40 m height). Environmental monitoring around the JAERI site is carried out effectively using the system. Data processing system consists of a central processing unit, a magnetic disk, a magnetic tape, a line printer and a console typewriter. The data at respective monitoring points are transmitted to the central monitoring room by wireless or telephone line. All data are printed out and field in magnetic disk and magnetic tape every 10 minutes. When the emergency levels are exceeded, however, the data are automatically output on a line printer every 2 minute. This system can distinguish very low gamma exposure due to gaseous effluents, about 1 mR/y, from the background. Even in monthly exposures, calculated values based on the data of release amount and meteorology are in good agreement with the measured ones. (author)

  17. Physiochemical study of NSSC effluents and assessment of principal pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Waste effluents collected from different processing units of a pulp-mill were analyzed for various physiochemical parameters i.e. appearance, pH, conductance, total dissolved and suspended solids (TDS and TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5- days biochemical oxygen demand (BOD/sub 5/). Various ions with reference to pulping process were investigated in these effluents which include Cr, SO/sub 4/sup 2-/, SO/sub 3/sup 2-/, CO/sub 3/sup 2-/HCO/sub 3/sup 1-/, Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Mg/sup +2/ and Ca/sup +2/. Heavy metals like Hg, Pb, Fe, Cr, Cu and Zn was also determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results were compared with National Environmental Quality Standards for industrial effluents. Most of the parameters were found outside the permissible limits except the temperature, pH and few cations. Effluents from NSSC process exhibited highest values of TDS, TSS, COD and BODs (these are 103174, 31866, 23340, 6864 mg/l respectively). Chief polluting characteristics of these effluents were found to be the dissolved chemicals and suspended organic matter, which are responsible for very high COD and BODs values. This study was: an effort to monitor the concentration of various pollutants in the waste effluents of pulp and paper industry with special emphasis on NSSC effluents and their contribution in environmental pollution. The hazardous effects of these effluents and different treatment methodologies have also been discussed. (author)

  18. Guide for effluent radiological measurements at DOE installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, J.P.; Corbit, C.D.

    1983-07-01

    Effluent monitoring and reporting programs are maintained at all US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities that may: (1) discharge significant concentrations of radioactivity in relation to applicable standards, or (2) discharge quantities of radioactivity that have potential health and safety or other environmental significance. This Guide is intended to provide supplemental guidance to DOE Orders on methods, procedures, and performance criteria to bring more comparable rationale to DOE facility effluent measurement programs and promote compliance with applicable standards and provide the DOE Office of Operational Safety (OOS) and Operations Offices with an additional tool for evaluating effluent measurement programs at DOE facilities

  19. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    In a radioactive gaseous waste processing device, a dehumidifier in which a lot of hollow thread membranes are bundled and assembled is disposed instead of a dehumidifying cooling device and a dehumidifying tower. The dehumidifier comprises a main body, a great number of hollow thread membranes incorporated in the main body, a pair of fixing members for bundling and fixing both ends of the hollow thread membranes, a pair of caps for allowing the fixing members to pass through and fixing them on both ends of the main body, an off gas flowing pipe connected to one of the caps, a gas exhaustion pipe connected to the other end of the cap and a moisture removing pipeline connected to the main body. A flowrate control valve is connected to the moisture removing pipeline, and the other end of the moisture removing pipeline is connected between a main condensator and an air extraction device. Then, cooling and freezing devices using freon are no more necessary, and since the device uses the vacuum of the main condensator as a driving source and does not use dynamic equipments, labors for the maintenance is greatly reduced to improve economical property. The facilities are reduced in the size thereby enabling to use space effectively. (N.H.)

  20. Exposure Reduction to Human Bio-effluents Using Seat-integrated Localized Ventilation in Quiescent Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Rezgals, Lauris; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2016-01-01

    gaseous pollutants (i.e. bio-effluents) emitted from the body of a sedentary person and exhaust them before they entrained in the person’s breathing zone or mix with the surrounding air. Full-scale experiments were performed in a climate chamber. The chamber was ventilated by an upward piston flow through...

  1. Quantification of effluents in the production of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Mayara C.C.B.; Riella, Humberto G.; Carvalho, Elita F.U. de

    2017-01-01

    At the Instituto de Pesquisa Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), the Centro de Combustível Nuclear (CCN), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, is responsible for manufacturing fuels for the IEA-R1 reactor and, possibly, the multipurpose reactor fuels. In order to meet the demand for both reactors, the CCN developed a new plant. The production process of the fuel generates several types of effluents - containing uranium or not - being solid, liquid and gaseous with varied physical and chemical characteristics. The objective of this work is to follow the nuclear fuel production process and to identify, quantify and characterize the effluents, especially the liquid ones, to later elaborate a plan of management of these and eventually dispose in a responsible way in the environment. (author)

  2. IRSN's expertise about nuclear medicine hospital effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This brief note aims at presenting the radioactivity follow up of hospital effluents performed by the French Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). This follow up concerns the radioactive compounds and radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine, and principally technetium 99 and iodine 131. The IRSN has developed a network of remote measurement systems for the monitoring of sewers and waste water cleaning facilities. Data are compiled in a data base for analysis and subsequent expertise. (J.S.)

  3. HECO annually conducts and reports results of a biological monitoring program for waters receiving effluent from the Kahe Generating Station, O'ahu, Hawai'i from 1992 to 1997 (NODC Accession 9900021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Since January 1, 1986, HECO has used adjusted intake water temperatures as the reference against which temperature elevations of the thermal effluent are measured....

  4. In situ and laboratory bioassays to evaluate the impact of effluent discharges on receiving aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolders, R. [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)]. E-mail: roel.smolders@ua.ac.be; Bervoets, L. [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, R. [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2004-11-01

    Effluents are a main source of direct and often continuous input of pollutants into aquatic ecosystems with long-term implications on ecosystem functioning. Therefore, the study of the effects of effluent exposure on organisms, populations or communities within the framework of impact assessment has a high ecological relevance. The aim of this study was to assess the toxicological impact of two effluents, one household wastewater treatment effluent (Effluent 1) and one industrial effluent (Effluent 2), on the receiving aquatic ecosystem using two test species under both in situ and laboratory conditions. Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed under laboratory conditions in an online monitoring flow-through system (receiving different concentrations of Effluent 2) and under in situ conditions along the pollution gradient established by these two effluent discharges. Bioassays focussed on growth and condition related endpoints (i.e. condition, growth, lipid budget), since these are key functional processes within organisms and populations. Under laboratory conditions, increasing concentrations of the industrial effluent (Effluent 2) had a negative effect on both zebra mussel and carp energy reserves and condition. Under in situ conditions, the same negative impact of Effluent 2 was observed for zebra mussels, while Effluent 1 had no apparent effect on exposed zebra mussels. Carp growth and condition, on the other hand, were significantly increased at the discharge sites of both effluents when compared to the reference site, probably due to differences in food availability. The results indicate that a combination of in situ and laboratory exposures can illustrate how ecological processes influence bioassay studies. The incorporation of indirect, ecological effects, like changes in food availability, provides considerable benefit in understanding and predicting effects of effluents on selected species under realistic exposure

  5. In situ and laboratory bioassays to evaluate the impact of effluent discharges on receiving aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolders, R.; Bervoets, L.; Blust, R.

    2004-01-01

    Effluents are a main source of direct and often continuous input of pollutants into aquatic ecosystems with long-term implications on ecosystem functioning. Therefore, the study of the effects of effluent exposure on organisms, populations or communities within the framework of impact assessment has a high ecological relevance. The aim of this study was to assess the toxicological impact of two effluents, one household wastewater treatment effluent (Effluent 1) and one industrial effluent (Effluent 2), on the receiving aquatic ecosystem using two test species under both in situ and laboratory conditions. Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed under laboratory conditions in an online monitoring flow-through system (receiving different concentrations of Effluent 2) and under in situ conditions along the pollution gradient established by these two effluent discharges. Bioassays focussed on growth and condition related endpoints (i.e. condition, growth, lipid budget), since these are key functional processes within organisms and populations. Under laboratory conditions, increasing concentrations of the industrial effluent (Effluent 2) had a negative effect on both zebra mussel and carp energy reserves and condition. Under in situ conditions, the same negative impact of Effluent 2 was observed for zebra mussels, while Effluent 1 had no apparent effect on exposed zebra mussels. Carp growth and condition, on the other hand, were significantly increased at the discharge sites of both effluents when compared to the reference site, probably due to differences in food availability. The results indicate that a combination of in situ and laboratory exposures can illustrate how ecological processes influence bioassay studies. The incorporation of indirect, ecological effects, like changes in food availability, provides considerable benefit in understanding and predicting effects of effluents on selected species under realistic exposure

  6. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

  7. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program

  8. 7th International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    James, David

    1994-01-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, U. S. A. , on April 24-28, 1994. The symposium continued the interdisciplinary character and comprehensive approach of the preceding six symposia. Gaseous DielecIries VII is a detailed record of the symposium proceedings. It covers recent advances and developments in a wide range of basic, applied and industrial areas of gaseous dielectrics. It is hoped that Gaseous DielecIries VII will aid future research and development in, and encourage wider industrial use of, gaseous dielectrics. The Organizing Committee of the Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics consisted of G. Addis (U. S. A. ), L. G. Christophorou (U. S. A. ), F. Y. Chu (Canada), A. H. Cookson (U. S. A. ), O. Farish (U. K. ), I. Gallimberti (Italy) , A. Garscadden (U. S. A. ), D. R. James (U. S. A. ), E. Marode (France), T. Nitta (Japan), W. Pfeiffer (Germany), Y. Qiu (China), I. Sauers (U. S. A. ), R. J. Van Brunt (U. S. A. ), and W. Zaengl...

  9. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques

  10. Detoxification of textile effluent by fungal treatment and its performance in agronomic usages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Abul Hossain; Khan, Haider Iqbal

    2018-02-03

    Globally, scarcity of contaminant free water usages is increasing gradually; it might be solved after generation of any sustainable technology to detoxify contaminated waters. An attempt was undertaken to detoxify textile effluent with fungal strains Trichoderma harzianum and Mucor hiemalis. Fungal detoxified effluent and its performance on three crops (wheat, mungbean, and mustard) seed germination in petri dishes and seedlings establishment of mustard in polythene bag were evaluated. Fungal strains significantly detoxified textile effluent by removal of 76% total solids, 91.35% COD, 77.34% absorbance against optical density, and increased 87.31% DO. Studied heavy metals were reduced significantly (P ≤ 0.05) in treated effluent by both fungal strains but superior performance was achieved by Mucor hiemalis. Maximum 92.5, 88.7, 83, and 100% removal of Mn, Zn, Cu, and Fe were monitored in fungal-treated effluent, respectively. Seeds germination and seedling growth by fungal treated effluents were similar and insignificant with the results achieved in tap water but which was significant over raw textile effluent. Eighty and above percent seed germination in petri dishes was recorded at 48 h by Mucor hiemalis-treated textile effluent but conversely at the same period it was below 10% in raw effluent. Significant achievement of seedling establishment was noticed in poly bag with fungal-treated effluent. The applied technique might be a prospective way to detoxify and recycle the industrial effluents for beneficial purpose in the future.

  11. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Buffleben, George M.; Johnson, Terry A.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  12. Techniques to limit gaseous releases in case of reactor accident. Choice criteria - present solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, Francois; Lavie, Jean-Marie

    1964-10-01

    Within the frame of the study of radiological risks associated with a reactor accident in order to define the required responses, this study comprises, on the one hand, an analysis of the different accident types in order to select typical accidents, and on the other hand, a site-based analysis to define the maximum admissible radioactivity release for a given site. The determination of minimum required coefficient of risk reduction results from a compromise between the choice of reactor configuration type and the efficiency of purification devices, while taking into account minimum characteristics of the enclosure mechanical strength, local release conditions, and nature of gaseous effluents to be processed. After a review of available containment techniques, the author applies this analysis method to the different French reactor types. He gives a brief description of adopted solutions for the most typical French reactors in terms of characteristics of venting and filtration devices. As data quality is a crucial requirement, the author outlines the need for further studies regarding fission product emission and transfer, the purification of gaseous effluents and their diffusion in the atmosphere [fr

  13. Zero effluent; Efluente zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Silvio Rogerio; Santos, Angelo Francisco dos [Liquigas Distribuidora S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A scenery of water shortage and the search for profitability improvement obligate the companies to exercise their creativity and to adopt alternative methods to the conventional ones to preserve the environmental resources. The 'Effluent Zero' project comes from a paradigms changing that the environmental preservation is a necessary cost. It brings a new analysis approach of this problem with the purpose to adapt the investments and operational costs with the effluents treatment to the demands of the productive processes. In Liquigas, the project brought significant results; made a potential reduction of nearly 90% in the investments of the effluents treatment systems. That means nearly 13% in reduction in the total investments in modernization and upgrade of the existents companies installations and of 1,6% in the total operational costs of the Company. Further more, it has contributed for a reduction of until 43% of the water consumption in the bottling process of the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). This way, the project resulted in effective actions of environmental protection with relevant economic benefits. (author)

  14. Management of radioactive effluents from research Reactors and PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodke, S.B.; Surender Kumar; Sinha, P.K.; Budhwar, R.K.; Raj, Kanwar

    2006-01-01

    Indian nuclear power programme is mainly based on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). In addition we have research reactors namely Apsara, CIRUS, Dhruva at Trombay. The operation and maintenance activities of these reactors generate radioactive liquid waste. These wastes require effective management so that the release of radioactivity to the environment is well within the authorized limits. India is self reliant in the design, erection, commissioning and operation of effluent management system for nuclear reactors. Segregation at source based on nature of effluents and radioactivity content is the first and foremost step in the over all management of liquid effluents. The effluents from the power reactors contain mainly activation products like 3 H. It also contains fission products like 137 Cs. Containment of these radionuclide along with 60 Co, 90 Sr, 131 I plays an important part in liquid waste management. Treatment processes for decontamination of these radionuclide include chemical treatment, ion exchange, evaporation etc. Effluents after treatment are monitored and discharged to the nearby water body after filtration and dilution. The concentrates from the processes are conditioned in cement matrix and disposed in Near Surface Disposal Facilities (NSDFs) co-located at each site. Some times large quantity of effluents with higher radioactivity concentration may get generated from the abnormal operation such as failure of heat exchangers. These effluents are handled on a campaign basis for which adequate storage capacity is provided. The treatment is given taking into consideration the required decontamination factor (DF), capacities of available treatment process, discharge limits and the availability of the dilution water. Similarly large quantities of effluents may get generated during fuel clad failure incident in reactors. In such situation, as in CIRUS large volume of effluent containing higher radioactivity are generated and are managed by delay

  15. Automated biomonitoring: living sensors as environmental monitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gruber, D; Diamond, J

    1988-01-01

    Water quality continues to present problems of global concern and has resulted in greatly increased use of automated biological systems in monitoring drinking water, industrial effluents and wastewater...

  16. Preliminary study of PCBs in raccoons living on or near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbrook, Richard S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Zoology. Cooperative Wildlife Research Lab. Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and Environment

    2016-01-15

    The “Ecological Monitoring at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Historical Evaluation and Guidelines for Future Monitoring” report (Halbrook, et al. 2007) recommended the raccoon as a species for study at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This species was selected to fill data gaps in ecological resources and provide resource managers with knowledge that will be valuable in making decisions and implementing specific actions to safeguard ecological resources and reduce human exposure. The current paper reports results of a preliminary evaluation to establish protocols for collection of tissues and initial screening of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in raccoons collected near the PGDP. These data are useful in developing future more comprehensive studies.

  17. Monitoreo de emisiones de material particulado de chimeneas de generadores de vapor de la industria azucarera en Tucumán, R. Argentina Monitoring of effluent particulate matter emitted by sugarcane factory stacks in Tucumán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Golato

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Durante las moliendas en los años 2008, 2009, 2010 y 2011, se realizaron mediciones de las concentraciones de material particulado total (MPT en las emisiones de chimeneas de calderas de la industria azucarera, en Tucumán, R. Argentina. El objetivo de este trabajo fue monitorear la evolución de la concentración y emisión de MPT y observar la influencia de los sistemas de filtrado instalados en las chimeneas de las mencionadas unidades. Se ilustran los datos de las emisiones de MPT obtenidas en los años indicados, con valores promedio por caldera de 58,5 kg/h, 33,6 kg/h, 47,6 kg/h y 33,9 kg/h, respectivamente. Asimismo, este estudio muestra un seguimiento minucioso de un grupo de calderas bagaceras, para determinar la evolución de las emisiones en función de las variables de operación características de esas calderas. Los resultados demostraron la influencia del mantenimiento y de la correcta operación de los equipos de filtrado en la calidad de los gases que fluyen por las chimeneas. Se estudió la influencia de los índices característicos de diseño de los lavadores de gases en la concentración de partículas. Se observó que se ha logrado un menor impacto ambiental a lo largo del tiempo analizado.Total particulate matter (TPM concentrations were measured in stack fumes from sugar factory steam generating boilers in Tucumán in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011. The objective of this work was to monitor the evolution of TPM concentrations and emissions and observe the efficiency of filtration systems used in sugarcane factory stacks. Average values of 58.5 kg/h, 33.6 kg/h, 47.6 kg/h and 33.9 kg/h were obtained in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011, respectively. Bagasse boilers were also meticulously surveyed to obtain data of the evolution of emissions in relation to specific operation variables of the boilers. Data concerning the quality of effluent gasses from the stacks demonstrated the influence of maintaining and correctly using filtration

  18. Dynamical instability of a charged gaseous cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Mumtaz, Saadia

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss dynamical instability of a charged dissipative cylinder under radial oscillations. For this purpose, we follow the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches to evaluate linearized perturbed equation of motion. We formulate perturbed pressure in terms of adiabatic index by applying the conservation of baryon numbers. A variational principle is established to determine characteristic frequencies of oscillation which define stability criteria for a gaseous cylinder. We compute the ranges of radii as well as adiabatic index for both charged and uncharged cases in Newtonian and post-Newtonian limits. We conclude that dynamical instability occurs in the presence of charge if the gaseous cylinder contracts to the radius R*.

  19. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  20. Treated effluent disposal system process control computer software requirements and specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The software requirements for the monitor and control system that will be associated with the effluent collection pipeline system known as the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal System is covered. The control logic for the two pump stations and specific requirements for the graphic displays are detailed

  1. Treated effluent disposal system process control computer software requirements and specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1994-06-03

    The software requirements for the monitor and control system that will be associated with the effluent collection pipeline system known as the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal System is covered. The control logic for the two pump stations and specific requirements for the graphic displays are detailed.

  2. Radiation treatment of sewage effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Teruko; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Sawai, Takeshi

    1990-01-01

    The water demand of the past several years increased rapidly. Recycling of municipal wastewater is the effective means of coping with water shortage in Tokyo. We studied the radiation treatment method of further purification of the effluent from sewage treatment plant. By gamma irradiation the refractory organic substances in effluent were decomposed. The COD values decreased and the light brown color faded with increasing dose. The high molecular weight components in effluent were degraded to lower molecular weight substances and were decomposed finally to carbon dioxide. Recent attention has been given to the disadvantages of using chlorine as a disinfectant of municipal wastewater effluents. It has been shown that the chlorination of organic substances in water may produce chlorinated hydrocarbons with carcinogenic properties. So a development of the effective sterilization method for the effluent has been needed instead of chlorine. The radiation sterilization of coliforms and total bacteria in primary effluent, secondary effluent and rapid sand filtered effluent were studied. Coliforms were very sensitive to radiation treatment in comparison with total bacteria. Especially, coliforms in secondary and rapid sand filtered effluents were disinfected to 10 % of initial at 0.1 kGy. (author)

  3. Methods and systems for deacidizing gaseous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang

    2010-05-18

    An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

  4. Sevoflurane improves gaseous exchange and exerts protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Sevoflurane improves gaseous exchange and exerts protective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in mice models .... field microscope [20]. Statistical analysis. All data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM). One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test were used ...

  5. Attachment of gaseous fission products to aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, G.

    1985-01-01

    Accidents may occur in which the integrity of fuel cladding is breached and volatile fission products are released to the containment atmosphere. In order to assess the magnitude of the subsequent radiological hazard it is necessary to know the transport behaviour of such fission products. It is frequently assumed that the fission products remain in the gaseous phase. There is a possibility, however, that they may attach themselves to particles and hence substantially modify their transport properties. This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the conditions under which gaseous fission products may be attached to aerosol particles. Specific topics discussed are: the mass transfer of a gaseous fission product to an isolated aerosol particle in an infinite medium; the rate at which the concentration of fission products in the gas phase diminishes within a container as a result of deposition on a population of particles; and the distribution of deposited fission product between different particle sizes in a log-normal distribution. It is shown that, for a given mass, small particles are more efficient for fission product attachment, and that only small concentrations of such particles may be necessary to achieve rapid attachment. Conditions under which gaseous fission products are not attached to particles are also considered, viz, the competing processes of deposition onto the containment walls and onto aerosol particles, and the possibility of the removal of aerosols from the containment by various deposition processes, or agglomeration, before attachment takes place. (author)

  6. Gaseous pollutants from brick kiln industry decreased the growth, photosynthesis, and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrees, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Shah, Aamir Mehmood; Abbas, Farhat; Saleem, Farhan; Rizwan, Muhammad; Hina, Saadia; Jabeen, Fariha; Ali, Shafaqat

    2016-05-01

    Gaseous pollutant emissions from brick kiln industries deteriorate the current state of ambient air quality in Pakistan and worldwide. These gaseous pollutants affect the health of plants and may decrease plant growth and yield. A field experiment that was conducted to monitor the concentration of gaseous pollutants emitted mainly from brick kilns in the ambient air and associated impacts on the growth and physiological attributes of the two wheat (Triticum spp.) cultivars. Plants were grown at three sites, including control (Ayub Agriculture Research Institute, AARI), low pollution (LP) site (Small Estate Industry), and high pollution (HP) site (Sidar Bypass), of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Monitoring of ambient air pollution at experimental sites was carried out using the state-of-art ambient air analyzers. Plants were harvested after 120 days of germination and were analyzed for different growth attributes. Results showed that the hourly average concentration of gaseous air pollutants CO, NO2, SO2, and PM10 at HP site were significantly higher than the LP and control sites. Similarly, gaseous pollutants decreased plant height, straw and grain yield, photosynthesis and increased physical injury, and metal concentrations in the grains. However, wheat response toward gaseous pollutants did not differ between cultivars (Galaxy and 8173) studied. Overall, the results indicated that brick kiln emissions could reduce the performance of wheat grown in the soils around kilns and confirm the adverse impacts of pollutants on the growth, yield, and quality of the wheat.

  7. Environmental monitoring handbook for coal conversion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salk, M.S.; DeCicco, S.G. (eds.)

    1978-05-01

    The primary objectives of the Department of Energy's (DOE) coal conversion program are to demonstrate the environmental acceptability, technical feasibility, and economic viability of various technologies for gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels from coal. The Environmental Monitoring Handbook for Coal Conversion Facilities will help accomplish the objective of environmental acceptability by guiding the planning and execution of socioeconomic and environmental monitoring programs for demonstration facilities. These programs will provide information adequate to (1) predict, insofar as is possible, the potential impacts of construction and operation of a coal conversion plant, (2) verify the occurrence of these or any other impacts during construction and operation, (3) determine the adequacy of mitigating measures to protect the environment, (4) develop effluent source terms for process discharges, and (5) determine the effectiveness of pollution control equipment. Although useful in a variety of areas, the handbook is intended primarily for contractors who, as industrial partners with DOE, are building coal conversion plants. For the contractor it is a practical guide on (1) the methodology for developing site- and process-specific environmental monitoring programs, (2) state-of-the-art sampling and analytical techniques, and (3) impact analyses.To correspond to the phases of project activity, the subject matter is divided into four stages of monitoring: (1) a reconnaissance or synoptic survey, (2) preconstruction or baseline, (3) construction, and (4) operation, including process monitoring (prepared by Radian Corp., McLean, Va.). For each stage of monitoring, guidelines are given on socioeconomics, aquatic and terrestrial ecology, air quality and meteorology, surface and groundwater quality, geohydrology and soil survey, and surface water hydrology.

  8. Treatment of gaseous effluents by using surface discharge plasma in continuous reactors: Process modelling and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Assadi , Aymen ,; Bouzaza , Abdelkrim; Wolbert , Dominique

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In the present work, the oxidation of isovaleraldehyde, a typical pollutant of indoor air, is investigated by using two different plasma DBD reactors: cylindrical and planar reactor. The study of the influence of the specific energy shows that its increment is accompanied by an increase of the removal efficiency. In fact, when specific energy extends three times, the removal efficiency is increased from 5 to 40%. Moreover an increase of the specific energy induces a hi...

  9. Measurement of radioactive gaseous effluents from voloxidation and dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, J.A.; Johnson, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory-scale tests gave data on the release of tritium, /sup 14/C, /sup 85/Kr, and /sup 129/I as radioactive gases from spent nuclear fuels during voloxidation and dissolution. Voloxidation, a proposed reprocessing step, is intended to remove tritium from fuel by oxidation of UO/sub 2/ to U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ prior to dissolution of the fuel with nitric acid. /sup 14/C, /sup 85/Kr, and /sup 129/I may be evolved in both steps. Quantitative data from the tests may be used in designing off-gas treatment processes and equipment. The tests were performed in a shielded cell with a combination voloxidizer-dissolver. With a recirculating off-gas system, tritium and /sup 14/C were trapped on molecular sieves; /sup 129/I was trapped on silver-exchanged zeolite. /sup 85/Kr was measured by online gamma-ray counting. Zircaloy-clad UO/sub 2/ fuels from H. B. Robinson-2, Oconee-1, and Saxton reactors, with burnups from approximately 100 to approximately 28,000 MWD/MTHM, were tested. The results confirm that voloxidation released most of the tritium but only small fractions of the /sup 14/C, /sup 85/Kr, and /sup 129/I; the remainder of these radioactive gases evolved when the voloxidized fuels were dissolved. Voloxidation off-gases typically contained >99.8% of the tritium, 17 to 22% of the /sup 14/C, 7 to 17% of the /sup 85/Kr, and <8% of the /sup 129/I. Tritium evolved as HTO, with <0.1% as HT.

  10. Study and analysis of two semi-humid flue acid gas industrial treatment processes and study of an adsorption process of gaseous mercury on active carbon; Etude et analyse de deux dispositifs industriels de traitement d'effluents gazeux acide par voie semi-humide et etude d'un procede d'elimination du mercure gazeux par adsorption sur charbon actif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anki, F.

    1998-07-01

    During the process of waste incineration, gaseous pollutants contained in fumes such as hydrochloric acid or mercury have to be removed before being discharged in air. A study has then been conducted on incineration plant fumes (municipal and industrial wastes). Four alkaline reagents have been tested in two semi-humid fume treatment processes for neutralizing hydrochloric acid. The reagents are: hydrated lime, sodium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate. The alkaline solutions, pulverized in thin droplets, absorb and neutralize thus HCl and lead to the formation of a solid residue. On the other hand, a study of the adsorption of gaseous mercury on a coconut-based activated carbon has been conducted with a pilot fixed bed reactor. The taken incineration fume (flow rate: 2000 L/H) is introduced in the reactor at temperatures between 150 and 200 degrees Celsius. Different exposure times are tested to determine the saturation of the activated carbon by mercury. An evaporation model and an absorption model are applied; they represent the experimental evolution of the HCl absorption rates in terms of the liquid flow or of the stoichiometric factor. A model of mercury adsorption by the activated carbon is applied for determining the total transfer coefficient and the adsorption equilibrium constant. (O.M.)

  11. Environmental monitoring at major U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration contractor sites: calendar year 1975. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring conducted during 1975 in the vicinity of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The environmental monitoring program consists of onsite sampling of water, gaseous, and air effluents, as well as offsite monitoring of water, air, soil, and radiation levels in the vicinity of the site. The report discusses releases of small quantities of radioactivity to the Ohio River from the Shippingport Atomic Power Station during 1975. The Beaver Valley Power Station was under construction during the report year, and therefore, made no radioactive releases. Additional analyses of the effluent from the reactor portion of Shippingport were performed to ensure that the water quality standards specified by Energy Research and Development Administration Manual Chapter 0510 and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania have been met. The results of environmental monitoring described by this report show that Shippingport operations and the pre-operational phase of the Beaver Valley Power Station have not adversely affected the surrounding environment

  12. Monitoring Gaseous and Particulate Air Pollutants near Major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High traffic volume and traffic congestion on Nigerian roads have led to increase in the concentration of pollutants in the air t posing health risks for human population. This study investigates air quality due to vehicular emissions in some busy roads in Abeokuta metropolis, Nigeria. Air pollutants such as CO, CO2, NO, NO2, ...

  13. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1992 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: narrative, summaries, and conclusions (Part 1) and data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are to: (1) report 1992 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, (2) provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, (3) provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, (4) provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and (5) provide general information on plant quality assurance

  14. Quality Testing of Gaseous Helium Pressure Vessels by Acoustic Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco-Luque, M; Hervé, C; Margaroli, C; Sergo, V

    1998-01-01

    The resistance of pressure equipment is currently tested, before commissioning or at periodic maintenance, by means of normal pressure tests. Defects occurring inside materials during the execution of these tests or not seen by usual non-destructive techniques can remain as undetected potential sources of failure . The acoustic emission (AE) technique can detect and monitor the evolution of such failures. Industrial-size helium cryogenic systems employ cryogens often stored in gaseous form under pressure at ambient temperature. Standard initial and periodic pressure testing imposes operational constraints which other complementary testing methods, such as AE, could significantly alleviate. Recent reception testing of 250 m3 GHe storage vessels with a design pressure of 2.2 MPa for the LEP and LHC cryogenic systems has implemented AE with the above-mentioned aims.

  15. Measurement of carbon 14 radioactivity in its gaseous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Michel

    1967-01-01

    This report presents an apparatus aimed at following in a destructive way the distribution of the specific activity of a C 14 -marked graphite sample by measuring the gaseous C 14 activity. This apparatus is based on the following principle: the sample is oxidised in dry air at 900 C in a thermo-balance which allows the graphite wear to be monitored. The variation of the formed active gas activity is measured by means of a scintillation counter. The knowledge of these both parameters (wear and activity variation in function of time) allows the distribution of the specific activity in the graphite sample to be known. The development and adjustment of the scintillation detector are notably addressed [fr

  16. Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Y; Boudry, V

    2014-01-01

    A sampling calorimeter using gaseous sensor layers with digital readout [1] is near perfect for ``Particle Flow Algorithm'' [2,3] approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. Monte-Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 [4] simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate ``digitization'' process. We develop a general method for simulating the pad response using the spatial information from a simulation done at high granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas, and validated on test beam data. Experimental observable such as pad multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

  17. Basic processes and trends in gaseous detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Almost a century after the invention of the proportional counter, a large research effort is still devoted to better understand the basic properties of gaseous detectors, and to improve their performances and reliability, particularly in view of use at the high radiation levels expected at LHC. In the first part of the lectures, after a brief introduction on underlying physical phenomena, I will review modern sophisticated computational tools, as well as some classic "back of the envelope" analytical methods, available today for estimating the general performances of gaseous detectors. In the second part, I will analyze in more detail problems specific to the use of detectors at high rates (space charge, discharges, aging), and describe the recent development of powerful and perhaps more reliable devices, particularly in the field of position-sensitive micro-pattern detectors.

  18. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  19. Secondary incinerator for radioactive gaseous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tadashi; Masuda, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    A vessel incorporated with packings, in which at least either of the packings and the vessel is put to induction-heating by high frequency induction coils, is disposed in a flow channel of radioactive gaseous wastes exhausted from a radioactive waste incinerator. The packings include metals such as stainless pipes and electroconductive ceramics such as C-SiC ceramics. Since only electricity is used as an energy source, in the secondary incinerator for the radioactive gaseous wastes, it can be installed in a cell safely. In addition, if ceramics are used, there is no worry of deterioration of the incinerator due to organic materials, and essential functions are not lowered. (T.M.)

  20. Trends and new developments in gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069485

    2004-01-01

    Almost one century ago the method of particle detection with gaseous detectors was invented. Since then they have been exploited successfully in many experiments using a wide variety of different applications. The development is still going on today. The underlying working principles are today well understood and with the help of modern simulation techniques, new configurations can be easily examined and optimized before a first experimental test. Traditional wire chamber ensembles demonstrate that they are still up to date and are well prepared to meet also the challenges of LHC. Applications will be discussed using TPCs in high multiplicity environments with standard Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) as readout as well as drift tubes in a muon spectrometer for a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. Triggered by the evolving printed circuit technology, a new generation of gaseous detectors with very high position resolution and rate capability has emerged. Two representatives (MICROMEGAS, GEM) have p...

  1. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Mound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) is to define and document the requirements for environmental monitoring programs at Mound as required by DOE 5400 Series Orders and the Environmental Regulatory Guide of Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. This plan sets forth the requirements for the routine environmental monitoring programs established by Mound to: (1)measure and monitor effluents from US Department of Energy (DOE) operations, (2) maintain surveillance through measurement and monitoring, and, (3) calculate the effects of those operations on the environment and public health

  2. Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-09-01

    This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  3. National Gas Survey. Synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The supply-Technical Advisory Task Force-Synthesized Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuels considered coal, hydrocarbon liquids, oil shales, tar sands, and bioconvertible materials as potential feedstocks for gaseous fuels. Current status of process technology for each feedstock was reviewed, economic evaluations including sensitivity analysis were made, and constraints for establishment of a synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels industry considered. Process technology is presently available to manufacture gaseous hydrocarbon fuels from each of the feedstocks. In 1975 there were eleven liquid feedstock SNG plants in the United States having a capacity of 1.1 billion SCFD. There can be no contribution of SNG before 1982 from plants using feedstocks other than liquids because there are no plants in operation or under construction as of 1977. Costs for SNG are higher than current regulated prices for U.S. natural gas. Because of large reserves, coal is a prime feedstock candidate although there are major constraints in the area of coal leases, mining and water permits, and others. Commercial technology is available and several new gasification processes are under development. Oil shale is also a feedstock in large supply and commercial process technology is available. There are siting and permit constraints, and water availability may limit the ultimate size of an oil shale processing industry. Under projected conditions, bioconvertible materials are not expected to support the production of large quantities of pipeline quality gas during the next decade. Production of low or medium Btu gas from municipal solid wastes can be expected to be developed in urban areas in conjunction with savings in disposal costs. In the economic evaluations presented, the most significant factor for liquid feedstock plants is the anticipated cost of feedstock and fuel. The economic viability of plants using other feedstocks is primarily dependent upon capital requirements.

  4. EURODIF: the uranium enrichment by gaseous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    During the seventies the nuclear power programme had an extremely rapid growth rate which entailed to increase the world uranium enrichment capacity. EURODIF is the largest undertaking in this field. This multinational joint venture built and now operates and enrichment plant using the gaseous diffusion process at Tricastin (France). This plant is delivering low enriched uranium since two years and has contracted about 110 million SWU's till 1990. Description, current activity and prospects are given in the paper. (Author) [pt

  5. 2 π gaseous flux proportional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, E.A.; Costello, E.D.; Di Carlo, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    A counting system has been developed in order to measure carbon-14 samples obtained in the course of a study of a plasmapheresis treatment for diabetic children. The system is based on the use of a 2π gaseous flux proportional detector especially designed for the stated purpose. The detector is described and experiment results are given, determining the characteristic parameters which set up the working conditions. (Author) [es

  6. A Population Study of Gaseous Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiaras, A.; Waldmann, I. P.; Zingales, T.; Rocchetto, M.; Morello, G.; Damiano, M.; Karpouzas, K.; Tinetti, G.; McKemmish, L. K.; Tennyson, J.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2018-04-01

    We present here the analysis of 30 gaseous extrasolar planets, with temperatures between 600 and 2400 K and radii between 0.35 and 1.9 R Jup. The quality of the HST/WFC3 spatially scanned data combined with our specialized analysis tools allow us to study the largest and most self-consistent sample of exoplanetary transmission spectra to date and examine the collective behavior of warm and hot gaseous planets rather than isolated case studies. We define a new metric, the Atmospheric Detectability Index (ADI) to evaluate the statistical significance of an atmospheric detection and find statistically significant atmospheres in around 16 planets out of the 30 analyzed. For most of the Jupiters in our sample, we find the detectability of their atmospheres to be dependent on the planetary radius but not on the planetary mass. This indicates that planetary gravity plays a secondary role in the state of gaseous planetary atmospheres. We detect the presence of water vapour in all of the statistically detectable atmospheres, and we cannot rule out its presence in the atmospheres of the others. In addition, TiO and/or VO signatures are detected with 4σ confidence in WASP-76 b, and they are most likely present in WASP-121 b. We find no correlation between expected signal-to-noise and atmospheric detectability for most targets. This has important implications for future large-scale surveys.

  7. 291-B-1 stack monitoring and sampling system annual system assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridge, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    The B Plant 291-B-1 main stack exhausts gaseous effluents to the atmosphere from the 221-B Building canyon and cells, the No. 1 Vessel Ventilation System (VVS1), the 212-B Cask Station cell ventilation system, and, to a limited capacity, the 224-B Building. VVS1 collects offgases from various process tanks in 221-B Building, while the 224-B system maintains a negative pressure in out-of-service, sealed process tanks. B Plant Administration Manual, WHC-CM-7-5, Section 5.30 requires an annual system assessment to evaluate and report the present condition of the sampling and monitoring system associated with Stack 291-B-1 (System Number B977A) at B Plant. The system is functional and performing satisfactorily

  8. Limitation of radioactive discharges from NPP based on radionuclide specific monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucina, I.; Malatova, I.; Vidlakova, J.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous and liquid discharges from nuclear power plants based on particulate-iodine-gas measurements and gross beta or gamma plus tritium measurements is being improved by performing radionuclide specific measurements using semiconductor gamma and beta spectrometers and radiochemical methods. A new concept of regulatory effluent limits is being developed. The activities of all the relevant radionuclides discharged during a years, multiplied by the appropriate Sv/Bq conversion coefficient based on a standard multi-pathway model, are summed up, and the effective dose is compared with the new limit. Such limits should be laid down as the per capita collective commitment effective dose in the plant surroundings for atmospheric discharges, and as the committed effective dose to a critical group member for the hydrospheric releases

  9. Role of livestock effluent suspended particulate in sealing effluent ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J McL; Warren, B R

    2015-05-01

    Intensive livestock feed-lots have become more prevalent in recent years to help in meeting the predicted food production targets based on expected population growth. Effluent from these is stored in ponds, representing a potential concern for seepage and contamination of groundwater. Whilst previous literature suggests that effluent particulate can limit seepage adequately in combination with a clay liner, this research addresses potential concerns for sealing of ponds with low concentration fine and then evaluates this against proposed filter-cake based methodologies to describe and predict hydraulic reduction. Short soil cores were compacted to 98% of the maximum dry density and subject to ponded head percolation with unfiltered-sediment-reduced effluent, effluent filtered to soil surface. Management considerations based on the results are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility/Effluent Treatment Facility Hazards Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simiele, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and Effluent Treatment Facility the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated

  11. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

  12. Offsite dose calculation manual guidance: Standard radiological effluent controls for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinke, W.W.; Essig, T.H.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains guidance which may be voluntarily used by licensees who choose to implement the provision of Generic Letter 89-01, which allows Radiological Effect Technical Specifications (RETS) to be removed from the main body of the Technical Specifications and placed in the Offsite Dose Calculation Manual (ODCM). Guidance is provided for Standard Effluent Controls definitions, Controls for effluent monitoring instrumentation, Controls for effluent releases, Controls for radiological environmental monitoring, and the basis for Controls. Guidance on the formulation of RETS has been available in draft from (NUREG-0471 and -0473) for a number of years; the current effort simply recasts those RETS into Standard Radiological Effluent Controls for application to the ODCM. Also included for completeness are: (1) radiological environmental monitoring program guidance previously which had been available as a Branch Technical Position (Rev. 1, November 1979); (2) existing ODCM guidance; and (3) a reproduction of generic Letter 89-01

  13. Tannery Effluent Treatment by Yeast Species Isolates from Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Irobekhian Reuben Okoduwa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The quest for an effective alternative means for effluent treatment is a major concern of the modern-day scientist. Fungi have been attracting a growing interest for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater. In this study, Saccharomycescerevisiae and Torulasporadelbrueckii were isolated from spoiled watermelon and inoculated into different concentrations of effluent. The inoculants were incubated for 21-days to monitor the performance of the isolates by measurement of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, nitrates, conductivity, phosphates, sulphates and turbidity. The results showed that Saccharomycescerevisiae had the highest percentage decrease of 98.1%, 83.0%, 60.7%, 60.5%, and 54.2% for turbidity, sulphates, BOD, phosphates and COD, respectively, of the tannery effluent. Torulasporadelbrueckii showed the highest percentage decrease of 92.9%, 90.6%, and 61.9% for sulphates, COD, and phosphates, respectively, while the syndicate showed the highest percentage reduction of 87.4% and 70.2% for nitrate and total dissolve solid (TDS, respectively. The least percentage decrease was displayed by syndicate organisms at 51.2%, 48.1% and 40.3% for BOD, COD and conductivity, respectively. The study revealed that Saccharomycescerevisiae and Torulasporadelbrueckii could be used in the biological treatment of tannery-effluent. Hence, it was concluded that the use of these organisms could contribute to minimizing the adverse environmental risks and health-hazards associated with the disposal of untreated tannery-effluents.

  14. Lung Cancer Mortality among Uranium Gaseous Diffusion Plant Workers: A Cohort Study 1952–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LW Figgs

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: 9%–15% of all lung cancers are attributable to occupational exposures. Reports are disparate regarding elevated lung cancer mortality risk among workers employed at uranium gaseous diffusion plants. Objective: To investigate whether external radiation exposure is associated with lung cancer mortality risk among uranium gaseous diffusion workers. Methods: A cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003 at the Paducah uranium gaseous diffusion plant (PGDP was assembled. A job-specific exposure matrix (JEM was used to determine likely toxic metal exposure categories. In addition, radiation film badge dosimeters were used to monitor cumulative external ionizing radiation exposure. International Classification for Disease (ICD codes 9 and 10 were used to identify 147 lung cancer deaths. Logistic and proportional hazards regression were used to estimate lung cancer mortality risk. Results: Lung cancer mortality risk was elevated among workers who experienced external radiation >3.5 mrem and employment duration >12 years. Conclusion: Employees of uranium gaseous diffusion plants carry a higher risk of lung cancer mortality; the mortality is associated with increased radiation exposure and duration of employment.

  15. Detection of Gaseous Methane on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leslie; Tokunaga, Alan; Elliot, J.; deBergh, Catherine; Owen, Tobias; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We obtained Pluto's spectrum using the CSHELL echelle spectrograph at NASA's IRTF on Mauna Kea, on 25-26 May 1992, with a spectral resolution of 13,300. The spectral range (5998 - 6018 per centimeter, or 1661.8 - 1666.9 nm) includes the R(0) and the Q(1) - Q(9) lines of the 2v3 band of methane. The resulting spectrum shows the first detection of gaseous methane on Pluto, with a column height of 1.20 (sup +3.15) (sub -0.87) cm-A (3.22 (sup +8.46) (sub -2.34) x 10(exp 19) molecule per square centimeter)).

  16. Treatment of gaseous and airborne radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichsenring, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    Gaseous and airborne radionuclides in the fuel cycle are retained in vessel off-gas filter systems and in the dissolver off-gas cleaning system. Those systems have to meet the regulatory requirements for both normal and accident conditions. From the solutions liquid aerosols are formed during liquid transfer (air lifts, steam jets) or by air sparging or by evaporation processes. During dissolution the volatile radionuclides i.e. 85 Kr, 129 I and 14 C are liberated and enter into the dissolver off-gas cleaning system. Flow sheets of different cleaning systems and their stage of development are described. (orig./RW)

  17. Environmental aspects of the production process of ceramic tiles (wet process), with emphasis in liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Katia Regina

    2000-01-01

    Present study developed a simplified methodology to evaluate the environmental impacts of the wet process of production of ceramic tiles. In order to subsidize the development of the model of environmental evaluation and to achieve a better understanding of the productive process, there were elaborated matrices in which was correlated the stages of the productive system with the respective types and volumes of residues generated. To these matrices there were related the technical norms of the Brazilian Association of Norms and Techniques (ABNT), which determines the sampling methodologies, characterizations, monitoring and treatment of the solid residues and liquid and gaseous effluents; and the pertinent Federal and State Legislations which dispose on the control of the environmental pollution. The evaluation of the environmental impact model here proposed was developed fram the Interaction Matrix of Leopold and from the Risk Matrix proposed by Moura, in which identified the pollutant effects (critical, significant, reduced, marginal) of the stages of this productive process. The validation of these results was obtained through the accomplishment of analytic assays in the used raw materials and in the residues generated in the productive process. The results of the chemical analyses reinforce that the positive toxicity in the liquid effluent is related with the chemical composition of the synthetic raw material used in the decoration. It was concluded that the solid residues that more damage cause to the environment are those coming from the enamel and dying preparation and application sections. Concomitantly, it was performed a study of characterization of the natural raw materials and of the product, using different techniques as fluorescence X ray, differential thermal analysis with thermogravimetry, scanning electron microscopy and X ray diffraction, in order to understand the interactions of the components of the mass of the ceramic body, during the stage of

  18. Waste Treatment Plant Liquid Effluent Treatability Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) provided a forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be generated by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of 25 distinct batches of tank waste through the WTP. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) evaluated the treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERFIETF. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERFIETF treatability envelope, which provides information on the items that determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERFIETF. The WTP liquid effluent forecast is outside the current LERFlETF treatability envelope. There are several concerns that must be addressed before the WTP liquid effluents can be accepted at the LERFIETF

  19. Dispersion of effluents in the atmosphere; Dispersion des effluents dans l`atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `convection` section of the French association of thermal engineers with the support of the environment and energy mastery agency (ADEME). This book of proceedings contains 10 papers entitled: `physical modeling of atmospheric dispersion in wind tunnels. Some industrial examples`; `modeling of the noxious effects of a fire on the environment of an industrial site: importance of thermal engineering related hypotheses`; `atmospheric diffusion of a noxious cloud: fast evaluation method of safety areas around refrigerating installations that use ammonia`; `modeling of atmospheric flows in urban areas in order to study the dispersion of pollutants`; `use of a dispersion parameter to characterize the evolution of a diffusion process downstream of a linear source of passive contaminant placed inside a turbulent boundary layer`; `elements of reflexion around the development of an analytical methodology applied to the elaboration of measurement strategies of air quality in ambient and outdoor atmospheres around industrial sites`; `state-of-the-art about treatment techniques for VOC-rich gaseous effluents`; `characteristics of the time variation of the atmospheric pollution in the Paris region and visualization of its space distribution`; `mass-spectrometry for the measurement of atmospheric pollutants`; `volume variations in natural convection turbulence`. (J.S.)

  20. 40 CFR 426.113 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Television Picture... applicable to the abrasive polishing and acid polishing waste water streams. Effluent characteristic Effluent...

  1. 40 CFR 426.112 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Television... stream): Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1 day Average of daily values for...

  2. Determination of gaseous compounds using online mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praun, S.

    1999-08-01

    The work is divided in three major parts and describes various measurements of gaseous compounds. The first part tasks the problem of transit traffic along the motorway from Kufstein, Northern Tyrol/Austria until Ala, Trentino/Italy. During three periods measurements of the immissions of many compounds were carried out simultaneously in Northern Tyrol, Southern Tyrol and Trentino. The influence of the ban of heavy lorry traffic during the weekend and during the night on the reduction of NO 2 could be demonstrated. Furthermore certain compounds (e.g. Benzene) were monitored online for the first time along the motorway at lowest concentrations using the mass spectrometer 'Airsense 500'. In the second part online measurements of exhaled human breath after the oral application of a medicine against bronchitis was performed. In that way beside clinical and pharmacological studies the effectiveness of this pharmacon could be proved. The last part of the present work shows adsorption- and desorption measurements on four different adsorbents. During this procedure seven different gases with an increasing number of carbon atoms were monitored online by the hyphenation of these adsorbents with the mass spectrometer 'Airsense 500'. Thereby, the various properties of the adsorbents in the interaction with the gases could be demonstrated. (author)

  3. Need to monitoring the particulate components and gaseous components of the I-131 in air, on Radiological monitoring networks. impact of the accident of Fukushima Dai-chi in Spain; Necesidad de monitorizar las componentes particulada y gaseosa del {sup 1}31I en aire, en redes de vigilancia radiologica. Impacto en Espana del accidente de Fukushima DAI-ICHI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza Espasa, A.; Caballero Andrada, M.; Corbacho Merino, J. A.; Ontalba Salamanca, M. A.; Rodriguez Perulero, A.; Valencia Corrales, D.; Vasco Vargas, J.

    2013-07-01

    Following a nuclear accident with significant overseas evacuations, it should be accurately determined concentration radio iodines into the atmosphere, given its important contribution to the radiological impact produced. Automatic networks radiation monitoring aim to provide as quickly as possible, reliable information on these radiological changes, to take necessary countermeasures. (Author)

  4. Utilization of molasses based distillery effluent for fertigation of sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P C; Singh, R K; Srivastava, P; Shrivastava, Manoj

    2012-11-01

    A field study was carried out to monitor the effect of application of molasses based distillery effluent on yields of sugarcane and soil properties. The treatments consisted of main plots: control (I0), first pre-sowing irrigation with undiluted effluent (I1), one irrigation with effluent: tube-well water (1:3) at tillering stage (I2), two irrigations with effluent: tube-well water (1:4) at tillering and 30 d after tillering stage (I3). The subplots either received no fertilizer application (F0) or had 50 % of recommended dose (50 kg N, 60 kg P(2)O(5) and 40 kg K(2)O ha(-1) as basal dose (F1) with top dressing of 50 kg N ha(-1) at tillering and in June before the onset of monsoon. Nitrogen to the ratoon crops was applied in three equal splits. Application of 50 % recommended fertilizer dose increased the cumulative cane yields under different effluent treatments. Use of distillery effluent irrespective of the method of application significantly increased the cumulative yields of sugarcane over no application of effluent significantly at p ≤ 0.05. After the harvest of second ratoon crop, no significant effect of different treatments was noted on soil pH, electrical conductance and exchangeable Na. Significantly higher build-up of organic C in surface soil was noted under I2 treatment in comparison to I0 treatment at p ≤ 0.05. With no fertilizer application, both I1 and I2 significantly increased accumulation of alkaline KMnO(4) hydrolysable N in 30-45 cm layer in comparison to I0F0 at p ≤ 0.05. In comparison to I0, use of I2 increased the content of Olsen's P significantly (p ≤ 0.05) in 30-45 and 45-60 cm layers while I3 increased it significantly at p ≤ 0.05 in 0-15 and 45-60 cm layers. Use of distillery effluent as pre-sowing or standing crop irrigation increased ammonium acetate extractable K in surface and sub-surface layers significantly in comparison to I0 at p ≤ 0.05. Thus, use of distillery effluent in sugarcane crop as pre-sown or standing crop

  5. Position-sensitive gaseous photomultipliers research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Francke, Tom; Peskov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Gaseous photomultipliers are defined as gas-filled devices capable of recording single ultraviolet (UV) and visible photons with high position resolution. Used in a variety of research areas, these detectors can be paired with computers to treat and store imaging information of UV-light. Position-Sensitive Gaseous Photomultipliers: Research and Applications explores the advancement of gaseous detectors as applied for single photon detection. Emphasizing emerging perspectives and new ways to apply gaseous detectors across research fields, this research-based publication is an essential reference source for engineers, physicists, graduate-level students, and researchers.

  6. Gaseous radiocarbon measurements of small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, M.; Szidat, S.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Wacker, L.

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a well-established method for samples containing carbon in the milligram range. However, the measurement of small samples containing less than 50 μg carbon often fails. It is difficult to graphitise these samples and the preparation is prone to contamination. To avoid graphitisation, a solution can be the direct measurement of carbon dioxide. The MICADAS, the smallest accelerator for radiocarbon dating in Zurich, is equipped with a hybrid Cs sputter ion source. It allows the measurement of both, graphite targets and gaseous CO 2 samples, without any rebuilding. This work presents experiences dealing with small samples containing 1-40 μg carbon. 500 unknown samples of different environmental research fields have been measured yet. Most of the samples were measured with the gas ion source. These data are compared with earlier measurements of small graphite samples. The performance of the two different techniques is discussed and main contributions to the blank determined. An analysis of blank and standard data measured within years allowed a quantification of the contamination, which was found to be of the order of 55 ng and 750 ng carbon (50 pMC) for the gaseous and the graphite samples, respectively. For quality control, a number of certified standards were measured using the gas ion source to demonstrate reliability of the data.

  7. TBP production plant effluent treatment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriniwas, C.; Sugilal, G.; Wattal, P.K.

    2004-06-01

    TBP production facility at Heavy Water Plant, Talcher generates about 2000 litres of effluent per 200 kg batch. The effluent is basically an aqueous solution containing dissolved and dispersed organics such as dibutyl phosphate, butanol etc. The effluent has high salinity, chemical oxygen demand (30-80 g/L) and pungent odour. It requires treatment before discharge. A chemical precipitation process using ferric chloride was developed for quantitative separation of organics from the aqueous part of the effluent. This process facilitates the discharge of the aqueous effluent. Results of the laboratory and bench scale experiments on actual effluent samples are presented in this report. (author)

  8. Development of Methods for Gaseous Phase Geochemical Monitoring on the Surface and in the Intermediate Overburden Strata of Geological CO2 Storage Sites Développement de méthodes de suivi géochimique en phase gazeuse à la surface et dans la couverture intermédiaire des sites de stockage géologique du CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokryszka Z.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The developments and results presented in this paper are taken from the work carried out as part of the GeoCarbon-Monitoring project, which was partly funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR. An important part of this project covers methods for gas monitoring on the surface as well as within the cap rock of geological CO2 storage sites. The work undertaken by INERIS was targeted at two specific approaches which are often recommended as essential for the monitoring of future storage sites: early detection (pre-alert, based on the sampling and analysis of gas at the bottom of the dedicated boreholes which are drilled from the surface into the intermediate cap rock strata; the detection and quantification of the gaseous flux of CO2 released from the ground into the atmosphere. These two approaches were developed in the laboratory successively and then applied and tested in-situ, under conditions that are as close as possible to those of the future storage sites. They offer the advantage of ensuring a direct measurement as well as providing real-time information on the presence or, on the contrary, the absence of CO2 leaks. The tests undertaken on a 200 meter deep borehole have shown that the detection of CO2 leaks passing through the intermediate overburden strata was possible thanks to the continuous sampling and analysis of the composition of the gas which accumulated at the bottom of the borehole. In particular, the detection of small releases of gas emanating from the surrounding rock gave rise to a number of good results. These releases may be a precursor to a larger leak. Likewise, it has been possible to take a sample and ensure the transit of gas over long distances, up to 1000 meters from the sampling point. This was done without causing any significant deformation or dilution of the initial gaseous signal, even for low amplitude leaks. These results allow us to envisage the implementation of a relatively simple system for

  9. Control verification radioactive effluent discharges to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, D.E.; Czerniczyniec, M.A.; Amado, V.A.; Curti, A.R.; Lee Gonzáles, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The National Law of Nuclear Activity No. 24,804 establishes that the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) will be responsible for the function of regulation and control of nuclear activity, grant, suspend and revoke licenses, permits or authorizations and to issue regulatory standards on radiation and nuclear safety. According to the latter the ARN has issued a set of rules that make up the regulatory framework for nuclear activity. This includes the standards that determine the radiological criteria for controlling the release of radioactive effluents which were established to protect members of the public. In the process of licensing a facility, the ARN determines the authorized discharge of gaseous and liquid effluents which must comply with the installation values. These annual values are understood as an operating restriction (OR) and arise from the activity of each relevant radionuclide present in the discharge. For this is taken as a reference the level of optimized discharge considering an appropriate margin of flexibility to ensure public protection without interfering with the operation of the installation. This paper presents the results of the review of the above criteria and methodology for calculating the RO adopted by the RNA present. [es

  10. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE REUSE OF A FOOD INDUSTRY EFFLUENT DEGRADED VIA PHOTOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Eliane Marchini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The effluent reuse in industrial processes is an interesting alternative, especially nowadays, because of the serious environmental problems faced by the population every day. This practice reduces wastewater generation and saves money for the companies. This study aimed to evaluate the possible reuse of a food industry effluent through the use of a photochemical process, with direct UV radiation incidence. The samples of the raw and treated effluent were tested to measure pH, conductivity, total organic carbon (TOC, spectrophotometry, turbidity, total solids, fixed and volatile solids and toxicity. The photochemical treatment caused complete removal of the effluent color, a 92% reduction of the total organic carbon, and a reduction of the levels of acute toxicity, what indicates the efficiency of the photodegradation in removing contaminating agents in industrial effluents. The inorganic carbon value was high, indicating a high concentration of carbonate and bicarbonate dissolved in the effluent. To classify this treated effluent, according to current legislation, it is necessary to monitor other parameters in details. According to the tests performed for this work, it is possible to conclude that a company can make use of an effluent generated on the production line and, in a not very distant future, direct on the production line.

  11. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents; Methanisation des effluents industriels liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic, S.; Lugardon, A. [Societe Naskeo Environnement, 92 - Levallois-Perret (France)

    2007-09-15

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  12. Potential risks of effluent from acid mine drainage treatment plants at abandoned coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jaehwan; Kang, Sung-Wook; Ji, Wonhyun; Jo, Hun-Je; Jung, Jinho

    2012-06-01

    The lethal and sublethal toxicity of effluent from three acid mine drainage treatment plants were monitored from August 2009 to April 2010 using Daphnia magna (reference species) and Moina macrocopa (indigenous species). Acute lethal toxicity was observed in Samma effluent due to incomplete neutralization of acid mine drainages by the successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS). Additionally, there was no significant difference in toxicity values (TU) between D. magna and M. macrocopa (p water bodies.

  13. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederic, S.; Lugardon, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  14. Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinzman, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate

  15. Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

  16. A system for destroying mixed and hazardous wastes with no gas or liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.W.; Upadhye, R.S.

    1992-04-01

    We developed a conceptual design for a processing system in which the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste would be destroyed, while discharging virtually no gaseous or liquid effluents. Only solid products would be produced. For mixed waste feeds these could then be transported and disposed as low level waste. This system would oxidize the organics using any one of several destruction processes adapted to replace air with a mixture of O 2 and recycled CO 2 . Net production Of CO 2 , HC1, and H 2 O in the dosed recycle system would be scrubbed or reacted to solid products such as CaCO 3 , NaCl, and concrete. This no-effluent design may improve community acceptance of a waste destruction system

  17. Test Beam Measurements on Picosec Gaseous Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Sohl, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    In the Picosec project micro pattern gaseous detectors with a time resolution of some ten picoseconds are developed. The detectors are based on Micromegas detectors. With a cherenkov window and a photocathode the time jitter from different position of the primary ionization clusters can be substituted. This reports describes the beam setup and measurements of different Picosec prototypes. A time resolution of under 30 ps has been measured during the test beam. This report gives an overview of my work as a Summer Student. I set up and operated a triple-GEM tracker and a trigger system for the beam. During the beam I measured different prototypes of Picosec detectors and analysed the data.

  18. Simulating Isotope Enrichment by Gaseous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cameron

    2015-04-01

    A desktop-computer simulation of isotope enrichment by gaseous diffusion has been developed. The simulation incorporates two non-interacting point-mass species whose members pass through a cascade of cells containing porous membranes and retain constant speeds as they reflect off the walls of the cells and the spaces between holes in the membranes. A particular feature is periodic forward recycling of enriched material to cells further along the cascade along with simultaneous return of depleted material to preceding cells. The number of particles, the mass ratio, the initial fractional abundance of the lighter species, and the time between recycling operations can be chosen by the user. The simulation is simple enough to be understood on the basis of two-dimensional kinematics, and demonstrates that the fractional abundance of the lighter-isotope species increases along the cascade. The logic of the simulation will be described and results of some typical runs will be presented and discussed.

  19. Gaseous radiation detectors fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Widely used in high-energy and particle physics, gaseous radiation detectors are undergoing continuous development. The first part of this book provides a solid background for understanding the basic processes leading to the detection and tracking of charged particles, photons, and neutrons. Continuing then with the development of the multi-wire proportional chamber, the book describes the design and operation of successive generations of gas-based radiation detectors, as well as their use in experimental physics and other fields. Examples are provided of applications for complex events tracking, particle identification, and neutral radiation imaging. Limitations of the devices are discussed in detail. Including an extensive collection of data and references, this book is ideal for researchers and experimentalists in nuclear and particle physics.

  20. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France ali.dastgheibi-fard@lsm.in2p3.fr (France); Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (France); Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François [CEA Saclay - IRFU/SEDI - 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Savvidis, Ilias [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-08-17

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal {sup 210}Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  1. 2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Anderson

    2011-03-04

    The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

  2. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, H. H.; Schwenk, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is participating in a NASA-sponsored program to demonstrate the feasibility of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor. The work is aimed at acquiring experimental and theoretical information for the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test heat removal by optical radiation. The basic goal of this work is for space applications, however, other NASA-sponsored work suggests several attractive applications to help meet earth-bound energy needs. Such potential benefits are: small critical mass, on-site fuel processing, high fuel burnup, low fission fragment inventory in reactor core, high temperature for process heat, optical radiation for photochemistry and space power transmission, and high temperature for advanced propulsion systems.

  3. Air pollution with gaseous emissions and methods for their removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, Venceslav; Boycheva, Sylvia; Fidancevska, Emilija

    2009-01-01

    Information concerning gaseous pollutants generated in the atmosphere, as a result of fuel incineration processes in thermal power and industrial plants, was summarized. The main methods and technologies for flue gases purification from the most ecologically hazardous pollutants are comparatively discussed. Keywords: gaseous pollutants, aerosols, flue gas purification systems and technologies, air ecology control

  4. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... VEHICLES § 538.8 Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels. The gallon equivalent of gaseous fuels, for purposes... Natural Gas 0.823 Liquefied Natural Gas 0.823 Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Grade HD-5)* 0.726 Hydrogen 0.259...

  5. Flux and polarization signals of spatially inhomogeneous gaseous exoplanets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karalidi, T.; Stam, D.M.; Guirado, D.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We present numerically calculated, disk-integrated, spectropolarimetric signals of starlight that is reflected by vertically and horizontally inhomogeneous gaseous exoplanets. We include various spatial features that are present on Solar System’s gaseous planets: belts and zones, cyclonic

  6. On the physics and technology of gaseous particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fonte, P; Peskov, V; 10.1088/0963-0252/19/3/034021

    2010-01-01

    Despite an already long and fruitful history, gaseous elementary-particle detectors remain today an important mainstay of high-energy and nuclear physics experiments and of radiation detection in general. In here we briefly describe some of the gaseous detector's main applications, along with some less known gas-discharge physics aspects of practical relevance.

  7. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The US Department of Energy's liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility is a research and demonstration facility available on a user-fee basis to private and public sector test and training sponsors concerned with safety aspects of hazardous chemicals. Though initially designed to accommodate large liquefied natural gas releases, the Spill Test Facility (STF) can also accommodate hazardous materials training and safety-related testing of most chemicals in commercial use. The STF is located at DOE's Nevada Test Site near Mercury, Nevada, USA. Utilization of the Spill Test Facility provides a unique opportunity for industry and other users to conduct hazardous materials testing and training. The Spill Test Facility is the only facility of its kind for either large- or small-scale testing of hazardous and toxic fluids including wind tunnel testing under controlled conditions. It is ideally suited for test sponsors to develop verified data on prevention, mitigation, clean-up, and environmental effects of toxic and hazardous gaseous liquids. The facility site also supports structured training for hazardous spills, mitigation, and clean-up. Since 1986, the Spill Test Facility has been utilized for releases to evaluate the patterns of dispersion, mitigation techniques, and combustion characteristics of select materials. Use of the facility can also aid users in developing emergency planning under US P.L 99-499, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and other regulations. The Spill Test Facility Program is managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy (FE) with the support and assistance of other divisions of US DOE and the US Government. DOE/FE serves as facilitator and business manager for the Spill Test Facility and site. This brief document is designed to acquaint a potential user of the Spill Test Facility with an outline of the procedures and policies associated with the use of the facility

  8. Characterisation of potential aquaculture pond effluents, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conventional treatment of effluents from these small-scale, low-volume operations, which discharge relatively dilute effluents infrequently, might not be cost-effective. Keywords: aquaculture–environment interaction, earthen ponds, effluent characterisation, K-means clustering, t ilapia, water quality. African Journal of Aquatic ...

  9. Methods for reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons using electrical discharge

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Methods for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons are provided. The methods can include forming a bubble containing the gaseous hydrocarbon in a liquid. The bubble can be generated to pass in a gap between a pair of electrodes, whereby an electrical discharge is generated in the bubble at the gap between the electrodes. The electrodes can be a metal or metal alloy with a high melting point so they can sustain high voltages of up to about 200 kilovolts. The gaseous hydrocarbon can be combined with an additive gas such as molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce mixtures containing one or more of H2, CO, H2O, CO2, and a lower hydrocarbon such as ethane or ethylene. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce low amounts of CO2 and H2O, e.g. about 15 mol-% or less.

  10. Exhaust Gas Scrubber Washwater Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    oceans . However, this effect is minor compared to ocean acidification due to Exhaust Gas Scrubber Washwater Effluent...Section 6 -Assessment of Pollutants Discharged in Scrubber Washwater and Protectiveness of IMO Guidelines 29 increased carbon dioxide ...June 11, 2010 (http://www.motorship.com/news101/breakthrough-order-for-krystallon-scrubbers). Orr, J.C. et al. 2005. Anthropogenic ocean acidification

  11. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M.; Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N.; Cherry, R.C.; Whiting, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF 6 . This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date

  12. Indigenous design, development and calibration of an online 131I monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajoy, K.C.; Dhanasekaran, A.; Santhanam, R.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Achuthan

    2014-01-01

    Reprocessing of spent fuels result in release of radioactive gases, vapours and volatile fission products. Monitoring of the gaseous effluents in the stack is mandatory to ensure compliance with the discharge limits specified by the regulatory agency. Though the fuel that is being reprocessed at COmpact Reprocessing of Advanced Lead cells (CORAL) at Kalpakkam are sufficiently cooled resulting in significant decay of all the iodine 129 I, any other major event could result in release of 131 I. In CORAL, as a matter of abundant caution and due to the possibility of processing highburn up, short cooled fuels, discharge limits are specified for Iodine also. Previously, monitoring of iodine was done offline using charcoal cartridges but present paper highlights the indigenous design, development and calibration of an online 131 I monitor for stack. The estimated activity in one litre bottle was 4.396 nCi/ml. Assuming the same activity is dispensed in the sampling head, the efficiency for the sampling head was estimated to be 0.029 counts/Bq. Integrity of the sampling head was established by analysing the data obtained from repeated counting of the sampling head at fixed intervals. The online iodine monitor is presently installed in the existing stack sampling system with data logging facility and is connected to the Radiation Data Acquisition System at CORAL

  13. Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-09

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

  15. [Influence of the substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lin; Li, Tian; Gu, Jun-Qing

    2014-11-01

    By monitoring the effluent quality from different green roof assemblies during several artificial rain events, the main pollutant characteristics and the influence of substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality were studied. Results showed that the main pollutants in the effluent were N, P and COD; with the increase of cumulative rain, the concentrations of pollutants in the effluent decreased, which had obvious leaching effect; The average concentrations of heavy metals in the early effluent from all assemblies reached drinking water standard, including the assemblies using crushed bricks; When garden soil and compost were used as organic matter, the assemblies had serious leaching of nutrient substance. After the accumulated rainfall reached 150 mm, the TN, TP and COD concentrations of effluent were 2.93, 0.73 and 78 mg x L(-1), respectively, which exceeded the Surface water V class limit. By means of application of the Water Treatment Residual, the leaching of TP from green planting soil was decreased by about 60%. The inorganic compound soil had better effluent quality, however we also need to judge whether the substrate could be applied in extensive green roof or not, by analyzing its ability of water quantity reduction and the plant growth situation.

  16. Bromide as chemical tracer to measure the liquid effluent flow at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Douglas B.; Faustino, Mainara G.; Monteiro, Lucilena R.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Aparecida F.

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent changes in CONAMA Resolution 357, which occurred through the publication of Resolution 430, on May 13, 2011 that now set standards about the effluent release, IPEN-CNEN/SP initiated several actions to improve the Environmental Monitoring Program (PMA-Q) of stable chemical compounds. Besides various parameters (physical and chemical) established by CONAMA, the submission of an annual pollution inventory report became necessary. The liquid effluent flow measurement is required to implement this inventory. Thereby, this paper describes a study that uses bromide as a chemical tracer. This paper presents the results of 6 tracer releases in IPEN wastewater collection network between 2011 and 2012. Two tracer releases designs were performed: single pulse and continuous releases performed with 1 to 6 hours duration, done by using one single piston pump manufactured by DIONEX. After the release, one fraction of the effluent was collected every 15 minutes at IPEN effluent monitoring station. The tracer concentration in the effluent was analyzed by ion chromatography and flow was calculated considering the dilution in the system and pump flow set up for the release. The flow values were measured in 6 events were determined and evaluated as per Brazilian regulation requirements. Experimental designs to be implemented during 2013 monitoring were also discussed in this paper, contributing to legal compliance and to improve IPEN's Environmental Monitoring Program for stable chemical compounds (PMA-Q). (author)

  17. EVALUATION OF GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM THE RĂDĂUŢI MUNICIPAL LANDFILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela PETRESCU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Our study presents the evaluation of gaseous emissions generated by a non-compliant municipal landfill after its closure (municipal landfill Rădăuţi. To this end we measured and interpreted the characteristics of gaseous emissions captured in two monitoring boreholes made on the deposit surface (F1 and F2. The main components of landfill gas are CH4 and CO2, and in lower proportions O2, N2 and nitrogen oxides, and also traces of H2S and CO. Their concentrations were measured using a portable gas analyzer GA type 2000Plus, which recorded simultaneously temperature and pressure data of the landfill gas. The high concentration of about 60% CH4 and approximately 39% CO2 in the landfill gas captured in two different areas (F1 and F2 shows the polluting character of those emissions with a direct impact on the environmental component "air", due to the greenhouse effect produced by those two components. Moreover, the characteristics of the measured gaseous emissions (a CH4 content above 50%, a 2-3 l / h flow rate indicates they have significant energy potential and represent a possible source of renewable energy.

  18. Rapid Evolution of the Gaseous Exoplanetary Debris around the White Dwarf Star HE 1349–2305

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennihy, E.; Clemens, J. C.; Dunlap, B. H.; Fanale, S. M.; Fuchs, J. T.; Hermes, J. J.

    2018-02-01

    Observations of heavy metal pollution in white dwarf stars indicate that metal-rich planetesimals are frequently scattered into star-grazing orbits, tidally disrupted, and accreted onto the white dwarf surface, offering direct insight into the dynamical evolution of post-main-sequence exoplanetary systems. Emission lines from the gaseous debris in the accretion disks of some of these systems show variations on timescales of decades, and have been interpreted as the general relativistic precession of a recently formed, elliptical disk. Here we present a comprehensive spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the calcium infrared triplet emission in one system, HE 1349–2305, which shows morphological emission profile variations suggestive of a precessing, asymmetric intensity pattern. The emission profiles are shown to vary on a timescale of one to two years, which is an order of magnitude shorter than what has been observed in other similar systems. We demonstrate that this timescale is likely incompatible with general relativistic precession, and consider alternative explanations for the rapid evolution, including the propagation of density waves within the gaseous debris. We conclude with recommendations for follow-up observations, and discuss how the rapid evolution of the gaseous debris in HE 1349–2305 could be leveraged to test theories of exoplanetary debris disk evolution around white dwarf stars.

  19. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  20. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The response of various austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades to low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising was investigated. Gaseous nitriding was performed in ammonia/hydrogen mixtures at temperatures ,723 K; gaseous carburising was carried out in carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures...... for temperatures (783 K. The case developed by thermochemical treatment was examined using reflected light microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and microhardness testing. Both nitriding and carburising led to the development of expanded austenite in the surface adjacent zone, irrespective of the phase...... constitution of the substrate. A two step process, consisting of carburising followed by nitriding, provides great flexibility with regard to adjusting the hardness–depth profile....

  1. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Hartmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.) [de

  2. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  3. The behavior of gaseous iodine in sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kanji

    1974-01-01

    Radioactive iodine gas was passed through 10 different sands collected at rivers and hills. The relation between the amount of the loaded gas and the amount of adsorbed gas was determined at room temperature, 50 -- 60 0 C, and 90 -- 100 0 C under humidity of 2 sand. This amount was about 1 -- 3 times as much as that of monomolecular membrane adsorption, 0.2 -- 0.3 μg/cm 2 . The decrease of adsorption amount that accompanies the increase of humidity is attributable to the decrease of effective surface area of sand due to the presence of water. The transport of iodine in sand was studied by passing gaseous iodine through a glass tubing packed with sand. The distribution in the flow direction of iodine indicated that the ease of desorption depends upon the situation of adsorption. Easily desorbed case was named Henry type adsorption. Hardly desorbed case was named absorption type. Discussion is made on experimental results. (Fukutomi, T.)

  4. Automated sampling and control of gaseous simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ruoguan

    2013-05-04

    In this work, we describe a method that automates the sampling and control of gaseous fluid simulations. Several recent approaches have provided techniques for artists to generate high-resolution simulations based on a low-resolution simulation. However, often in applications the overall flow in the low-resolution simulation that an animator observes and intends to preserve is composed of even lower frequencies than the low resolution itself. In such cases, attempting to match the low-resolution simulation precisely is unnecessarily restrictive. We propose a new sampling technique to efficiently capture the overall flow of a fluid simulation, at the scale of user\\'s choice, in such a way that the sampled information is sufficient to represent what is virtually perceived and no more. Thus, by applying control based on the sampled data, we ensure that in the resulting high-resolution simulation, the overall flow is matched to the low-resolution simulation and the fine details on the high resolution are preserved. The samples we obtain have both spatial and temporal continuity that allows smooth keyframe matching and direct manipulation of visible elements such as smoke density through temporal blending of samples. We demonstrate that a user can easily configure a simulation with our system to achieve desired results. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. GEM - A novel gaseous particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Meinschad, T

    2005-01-01

    The work carried out within the framework of this Ph.D. deals with the construction of gaseous prototype detectors using Gas Electron Multiplier electrodes for the amplification of charges released by ionizing particles. The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is a thin metal-clad polymer foil, etched with a high density of narrow holes, typically 50-100mm-2. On the application of a potential difference between the conductive top and bottom sides each hole acts as independent proportional counter. This new fast device permits to reach large amplification factors at high rates with a strong photon and ion-mediated feedback suppression due to the avalanche confinement in the GEM-holes. Here, in particular studies have been performed, which should prove, that the GEM-technology is applicable for an efficient measurement of single Cherenkov photons. These UV-photons can be detected in different ways. An elegant solution to develop large area RICH-detectors is to evaporate a pad-segmented readout-cathode of a multi-wire...

  6. Toxicity Evaluation of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents Using Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Movahedian, B Bina, GH Asghari

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxicity evaluation is an important parameter in wastewater quality monitoring as it provides the complete response of test organisms to all compounds in wastewater. The water flea Daphnia magna straus is the most commonly used zooplankton in toxicological tests. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of effluents from different units of Isfahan Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP. The samples were taken from four different physical and biological units. The acute toxicity tests were determined using Daphnia magna. The immobility of Daphnia was determined after 48h. Toxicity results showed that 48h-LC50 and ATU values for raw wastewater were 30% (v/v and 3.33, respectively. It was also found that LC50 values after 48 h for preliminary, primary, and secondary effluents were 32%, 52% and 85% (v/v, respectively. The ATU values for these effluents were 3.1, 1.9, and 1.8, correspondingly. The efficiency levels of preliminary, primary, and secondary units for removal of toxicity were found as 6%, 38.9% and 8%, in that order. Overall, the present investigation indicated that toxicity removal by up to 50% might be achieved in IWPT. Based on the obtained results and regarding the improvement of water quality standards, coupled with public expectations in Iran, it is necessary to consider more stringent water quality policies for regular monitoring and toxicity assessment.

  7. Ecofriendly degradation, decolorization and detoxification of textile effluent by a developed bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phugare, Swapnil S; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Surwase, Shripad N; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2011-07-01

    Present study illustrates the effectual decolorization and degradation of the textile effluent using a developed bacterial consortium SDS, consisted of bacterial species Providencia sp. SDS and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa strain BCH, originally isolated from dye contaminated soil. The intensive metabolic activity of the consortium SDS led to complete decolorization of textile effluent within 20 h at pH 7 and temperature 30°C. Significant induction in the activities of veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, azoreductase and DCIP reductase were observed during decolorization, which indicates their involvement in decolorization and degradation process. The decolorization and biodegradation was monitored using UV-vis spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, HPLC and HPTLC analysis. Toxicological analysis of effluent before and after treatment was performed using classical Allium cepa test. Investigations of various toxicological parameters viz, oxidative stress response, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and phytotoxicity, collectively concludes that, the toxicity of effluent reduces significantly after treatment with consortium SDS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gaseous mercury fluxes from forest soils in response to forest harvesting intensity: A field manipulation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, M. [University of Toronto Scarborough, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Mitchell, C.P.J., E-mail: carl.mitchell@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto Scarborough, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Eckley, C.S. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferein Street, Toronto, ON M3H 5T4 (Canada); Eggert, S.L.; Kolka, R.K.; Sebestyen, S.D. [Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 1831 Hwy 169 E, Grand Rapids, MN 55744 (United States); Swain, E.B. [Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Paul, MN 55155 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Forest harvesting leads to changes in soil moisture, temperature and incident solar radiation, all strong environmental drivers of soil–air mercury (Hg) fluxes. Whether different forest harvesting practices significantly alter Hg fluxes from forest soils is unknown. We conducted a field-scale experiment in a northern Minnesota deciduous forest wherein gaseous Hg emissions from the forest floor were monitored after two forest harvesting prescriptions, a traditional clear-cut and a clearcut followed by biomass harvest, and compared to an un-harvested reference plot. Gaseous Hg emissions were measured in quadruplicate at four different times between March and November 2012 using Teflon dynamic flux chambers. We also applied enriched Hg isotope tracers and separately monitored their emission in triplicate at the same times as ambient measurements. Clearcut followed by biomass harvesting increased ambient Hg emissions the most. While significant intra-site spatial variability was observed, Hg emissions from the biomass harvested plot (180 ± 170 ng m{sup −2} d{sup −1}) were significantly greater than both the traditional clearcut plot (− 40 ± 60 ng m{sup −2} d{sup −1}) and the un-harvested reference plot (− 180 ± 115 ng m{sup −2} d{sup −1}) during July. This difference was likely a result of enhanced Hg{sup 2+} photoreduction due to canopy removal and less shading from downed woody debris in the biomass harvested plot. Gaseous Hg emissions from more recently deposited Hg, as presumably representative of isotope tracer measurements, were not significantly influenced by harvesting. Most of the Hg tracer applied to the forest floor became sequestered within the ground vegetation and debris, leaf litter, and soil. We observed a dramatic lessening of tracer Hg emissions to near detection levels within 6 months. As post-clearcutting residues are increasingly used as a fuel or fiber resource, our observations suggest that gaseous Hg emissions from forest

  9. DOSEFU: Computer application for dose calculation and effluent management in normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Garcia, J. E.; Gonzalvo Manovel, A.; Revuelta Garcia, L.

    2002-01-01

    DOSEFU is a computer application on Windows that develops the methodology of nuclear power plant Exterior Dose Calculation Manuals (Manuals de Calculo de Dosis al Exterior-MACADE) for calculating doses in normal operation caused by radioactive liquid and gaseous effluents, for the purpose of enforcing the new Spanish Regulation on Health Protection against Ionizing Radiations, Royal Decree 783/2001 resulting from transposition of Directive 96/29/Euratom whereby the basic rules regarding health protection of workers and the population against risks resulting from ionizing radiations are established. In addition to making dose calculations, DOSEFU generates, on a magnetic support, the information regarding radioactive liquid and gaseous effluents that plants must periodically send to the CSN (ELGA format). The computer application has been developed for the specific case of Jose Cabrera NPP, which is called DOEZOR. This application can be easily implemented in any other nuclear or radioactive facility. The application is user-friendly, as the end user inputs data and executes the different modules through keys and dialogue boxes that are enabled by clicking on the mouse (see figures 2, 3, 4 and 5 ), The application runs under Windows 95. Digital Visual Fortran has been used as the development program, as this does not require additional libraries (DLLs), it can be installed in any computer without affecting other programs that are already installed. (Author)

  10. Liquid Effluents Program mission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    Systems engineering is being used to identify work to cleanup the Hanford Site. The systems engineering process transforms an identified mission need into a set of performance parameters and a preferred system configuration. Mission analysis is the first step in the process. Mission analysis supports early decision-making by clearly defining the program objectives, and evaluating the feasibility and risks associated with achieving those objectives. The results of the mission analysis provide a consistent basis for subsequent systems engineering work. A mission analysis was performed earlier for the overall Hanford Site. This work was continued by a ''capstone'' team which developed a top-level functional analysis. Continuing in a top-down manner, systems engineering is now being applied at the program and project levels. A mission analysis was conducted for the Liquid Effluents Program. The results are described herein. This report identifies the initial conditions and acceptable final conditions, defines the programmatic and physical interfaces and sources of constraints, estimates the resources to carry out the mission, and establishes measures of success. The mission analysis reflects current program planning for the Liquid Effluents Program as described in Liquid Effluents FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan

  11. Sampling and identification of gaseous and particle bounded air pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettrup, A.

    1993-01-01

    Air pollutants are gaseous, components of aerosols or particle bounded. Sampling, sample preparation, identification and quantification of compounds depend from kind and chemical composition of the air pollutants. Quality assurance of analytical data must be guaranted. (orig.) [de

  12. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  13. The nonlinear stage of gravitational instability in flat gaseous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyachenko, V.L.; Churilov, S.M.; Shukhman, I.G.

    1980-05-01

    The evolution of finite-amplitude waves in a flat, gaseous, gravitating system is considered. Constraints are placed on the physical state of the gas such that density perturbations can undergo strong growth.

  14. Gaseous Helium Reclamation at Rocket Test Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to restore large amounts of vented gaseous helium (GHe) at rocket test sites preserves the GHe and reduces operating cost. The used GHe is vented into...

  15. The effect of selected gaseous air pollutants on woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baciak Michał

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses gaseous air pollutants that have the greatest impact on forest ecosystems. This group of pollutants ncludes sulfur dioxide (SO2, nitric oxides (NO and NO2 and ozone (O3.

  16. Heterogeneous Reaction gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride was investigated over a temperature range of 220 - 300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  17. Total Gaseous Mercury Concentration Measurements at Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Parsons

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations are described from total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations measured at the Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA Fort McMurray—Patricia McInnes air quality monitoring station—from 21 October 2010 through 31 May 2013, inclusively. Fort McMurray is approximately 380 km north-northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, and approximately 30 km south of major Canadian oil sands developments. The average TGM concentration over the period of this study was 1.45 ± 0.18 ng∙m−3. Principal component analysis suggests that observed TGM concentrations are correlated with meteorological conditions including temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation, and also ozone concentration. There is no significant correlation between ambient concentrations of TGM and anthropogenic pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOX and sulphur dioxide (SO2. Principal component analysis also shows that the highest TGM concentrations observed are a result of forest fire smoke near the monitoring station. Back trajectory analysis highlights the importance of long-range transport, indicating that unseasonably high TGM concentrations are generally associated with air from the southeast and west, while unseasonably low TGM concentrations are a result of arctic air moving over the monitoring station. In general, TGM concentration appears to be driven by diel and seasonal trends superimposed over a combination of long-range transport and regional surface-air flux of gaseous mercury.

  18. Environmental monitoring report, Sandia Laboratories 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.L.; Simmons, T.N.

    1976-04-01

    Water and vegetation are monitored to determine Sandia Laboratories impact on the surrounding environment. Nonradioactive pollutants released are reported. Radioactive effluents are also reported and their person-rem contribution to the population is calculated

  19. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease

  20. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

    1996-10-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-01-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities

  3. Astrophysics of gaseous nebulae and active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterbrock, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A graduate-level text and reference book on gaseous nebulae and the emission regions in Seyfert galaxies, quasars, and other types of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is presented. The topics discussed include: photoionization equilibrium, thermal equilibrium, calculation of emitted spectrum, comparison of theory with observations, internal dynamics of gaseous nebulae, interstellar dust, regions in the galactic context, planetary nebulae, nova and supernova remnants, diagnostics and physics of AGN, observational results on AGN

  4. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Freezer-sublimer for gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reti, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for freezing and subliming uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) as part of a gaseous diffusion plant from which a quantity of the UF 6 inventory is intermittently withdrawn and frozen to solidify it. A plurality of upright heat pipes holds a coolant and is arranged in a two compartment vessel, the lower compartment is exposed to UF 6 , the higher one serves for condensing the evaporated coolant by means of cooling water. In one embodiment, each pipe has a quantity of coolant such as freon, hermetically sealded therein. In the other embodiment, each pipe is sealed only at the lower end while the upper end communicates with a common vapor or cooling chamber which contains a water cooled condenser. The cooling water has a sufficiently low temperature to condense the evaporated coolant. The liquid coolant flows gravitationally downward to the lower end portion of the pipe. UF 6 gas is flowed into the tank where it contacts the finned outside surface of the heat pipes. Heat from the gas evaporates the coolant and the gas in turn is solidified on the exterior of the heat pipe sections in the tank. To recover UF 6 gas from the tank, the solidified UF 6 is sublimed by passing compressed UF 6 gas over the frozen UF 6 gas on the pipes or by externally heating the lower ends of the pipes sufficiently to evaporate the coolant therein above the subliming temperature of the UF 6 . The subliming UF 6 gas then condenses the coolant in the vertical heat pipes, so that it can gravitationally flow back to the lower end portions

  6. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  7. Effluent treatment for nuclear thermal propulsion ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipers, Larry R.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives are to define treatment functions, review concept options, discuss PIPET effluent treatment system (ETS), and outline future activities. The topics covered include the following: reactor exhaust; effluent treatment functions; effluent treatment categories; effluent treatment options; concept evaluation; PIPETS ETS envelope; PIPET effluent treatment concept; and future activities.

  8. Environmental monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs

  9. Environmental monitoring plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Two years of measurements of atmospheric total gaseous mercury (TGM) at a remote site in Mt. Changbai area, Northeastern China

    OpenAIRE

    X. W. Fu; X. Feng; L. H. Shang; S. F. Wang; H. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Total gaseous mercury (TGM) was continuously monitored at a remote site (CBS) in Mt. Changbai area, Northeastern China from 24 October 2008 to 31 October 2010. The overall mean TGM concentration was 1.60±0.51 ng m−3, which is lower than those reported from remote sites in Eastern, Southwestern, and Western China, indicating a relatively lower regional anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emission intensity in Northeastern China. Measurements at a site in the vicinity (...

  11. Radiation treatment of sewage effluent, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Teruko; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Sawai, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Toshinari; Tanabe, Hiroko

    1991-01-01

    The water demand of the past several years has increased rapidly. Recycling of municipal waste water is an effective mean of coping with the water shortage in Tokyo. We studied the radiation treatment method of further purification of the effluent from sewage treatment plants. By gamma irradiation the refractory organic substances in the effluent were decomposed and the COD values decreased with increasing dose. The high molecular weight components in the effluent were degraded to lower molecular weight substances and were decomposed finally to carbon dioxide. In this paper we studied on the fading color and the reducing of order of sewage effluent. (author)

  12. Determination of non-gaseous and gaseous mercury fractions in unused fluorescent lamps: a study of different lamp types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figi, Renato; Nagel, Oliver; Schreiner, Claudia; Hagendorfer, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Since incandescent light bulbs have been phased out in the European Union from 2009, the use of fluorescent lamps has drastically increased as a reliable, more energy-efficient and cost-effective alternative. State-of-the-art fluorescent lamps are dependent on mercury/mercury alloys, posing a risk for the consumer and the environment, and appropriate waste management is challenging. Consequently analytical methods to determine possible mercury species (non-gaseous/gaseous) in these lamps are of need. Here, a straightforward and wet-chemistry-based analytical strategy for the determination of gaseous and non-gaseous mercury in commercially available fluorescent lamps is presented. It can be adapted in any analytical laboratory, without or with only minimum modifications of already installed equipment. The analytical figures of merit, as well as application of the method to a series of commercially available fluorescent lamps, are presented. Out of 14 analysed and commercially available lamp types, results from this study indicate that only one contains a slightly higher amount of mercury than set by the legislative force. In all new lamps the amount of gaseous mercury is negligible compared with the non-gaseous fraction (88%-99% of total mercury). © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Evaluation of leafy vegetables as bioindicators of gaseous mercury pollution in sewage-irrigated areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shun-An; Wu, Zeying; Chen, Chun; Liang, Junfeng; Huang, Hongkun; Zheng, Xiangqun

    2018-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) can evaporate and enter the plants through the stomata of plant leaves, which will cause a serious threat to local food safety and human health. For the risk assessment, this study aimed to investigate the concentration and accumulation of total gaseous mercury (TGM) in five typical leafy vegetables (Chinese chives (Allium tuberosum Rottler), amaranth (Amaranthus mangostanus L.), rape (Brassica campestris L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.)) grown on sewage-irrigated areas in Tianjin, China. The following three sites were chosen to biomonitor Hg pollution: a paddy field receiving sewage irrigation (industrial and urban sewage effluents) for the last 30 years, a vegetable field receiving sewage irrigation for 15 years, and a grass field which did not receive sewage irrigation in history. Results showed that the total Hg levels in the paddy (0.65 mg kg -1 ) and vegetation fields (0.42 mg kg -1 ) were significantly higher than the local background level (0.073 mg kg -1 ) and the China national soil environment quality standard for Hg in grade I (0.30 mg kg -1 ). The TGM levels in ambient air were significantly higher in the paddy (71.3 ng m -3 ) and vegetable fields (39.2 ng m -3 ) relative to the control (9.4 ng m -3 ) and previously reported levels (1.45 ng m -3 ), indicating severe Hg pollution in the atmospheric environment of the sewage-irrigated areas. Furthermore, gaseous mercury was the dominant form of Hg uptake in the leaves or irreversibly bound to leaves. The comparison of Hg uptake levels among the five vegetables showed that the gradient of Hg accumulation followed the order spinach > red amaranth > Chinese chives > rape > lettuce. These results suggest that gaseous Hg exposure in the sewage-irrigated areas is a dominant Hg uptake route in leafy vegetables and may pose a potential threat to agricultural food safety and human health.

  14. Experimental study and phenomenological modeling of the hydrolysis of tritiated sodium: influence of experimental conditions on the tritium distribution in the effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassery, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of the decommissioning of fast reactors, several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them rests on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction (SWR), in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium containing impurities such as sodium hydrides, sodium oxides and tritiated sodium hydrides. Such a hydrolysis releases some amount of energy and produces a liquid effluent, composed of a solution of soda, and a gaseous effluent, composed of hydrogen, steam and an inert gas. The tritium, originally into the sodium as a soluble (T - ) or precipitate form (NaT), will be distributed between the liquid and gaseous effluent, and according to two chemical forms, the tritium hydride HT and the tritiated water HTO. HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the distribution of tritium is necessary in order to estimate the exhaust gas releases and design the process needed to treat the off-gas before its release into the environment. An experimental study has been carried out in order to determine precisely the phenomena involved in the hydrolysis. The influence of the experimental conditions on the tritium distribution has been tested. The results of this study leaded to a phenomenological description of the tritiated sodium hydrolysis that will help to predict the composition of the effluents, regarding tritium. (author) [fr

  15. Environmental gamma radiation monitoring around Tarapur Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.G.; Swarnakar, M.; Takale, R.A; Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station (T.A.P.S.) is located on the Arabian Sea coast and uses enriched uranium as fuel and seawater as condenser coolant. It is India's first nuclear power plant. It was initially constructed with two boiling water reactor (BWR) units of 210 MWe each. The capacity of units 1 and 2 was reduced to 160 MWe later on due to technical difficulties. Units 1 and 2 were brought online for commercial operation on October 28, 1969. Two Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) (units 3 and 4) of 540 MW each was brought online for commercial operation on August 18, 2006 and September 12, 2005 respectively. The Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (PREFRE), which was commissioned in 1976, is located about 1.3 Km East of TAPS. Presently, Tarapur is a multifacility site. In addition to TAPS and PREFRE, Waste Immobilization Plant (WIP), Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (A3F), Away from Reactor (APR) fuel storage facility and Tarapur Radwaste treatment plant (TRAP) are operating at the site. At TAPS, gaseous effluents are discharged through 110 m stack to atmosphere. The results of environmental gamma monitoring programme carried out at the taps sites in terms of annual average dose to public is given in this paper

  16. Bioassessment of the Effluents Discharged from Two Export Oriented Industrial Zones Located in Kelani River Basin, Sri Lanka Using Erythrocytic Responses of the Fish, Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachandra, C K; Pathiratne, A

    2017-10-01

    Complex effluents originating from diverse industrial processes in industrial zones could pose cytotoxic/genotoxic hazards to biota in the receiving ecosystems which cannot be revealed by conventional monitoring methods. This study assessed potential cytotoxicity/genotoxicity of treated effluents of two industrial zones which are discharged into Kelani river, Sri Lanka combining erythrocytic abnormality tests and comet assay of the tropical model fish, Nile tilapia. Exposure of fish to the effluents induced erythrocytic DNA damage and deformed erythrocytes with serrated membranes, vacuolations, nuclear buds and micronuclei showing cytotoxic/genotoxic hazards in all cases. Occasional exceedance of industrial effluent discharge regulatory limits was noted for color and lead which may have contributed to the observed cytotoxicity/genotoxicity of effluents. The results demonstrate that fish erythrocytic responses could be used as effective bioanalytical tools for cytotoxic/genotoxic hazard assessments of complex effluents of industrial zones for optimization of the waste treatment process in order to reduce biological impacts.

  17. Assessment of the impact of textile effluents on microbial diversity in Tirupur district, Tamil Nadu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Shashi; Gogoi, Anindita; Mazumder, Payal; Ramanathan, AL.; Kumar, Manish

    2017-09-01

    The expedited advent of urbanization and industrialization for economic growth has adversely affected the biological diversity, which is one of the major concerns of the developing countries. Microbes play a crucial role in decontaminating polluted sites and degrades pollution load of textile effluent. The present study was based on identification of microbial diversity along the Noyaal river of Tirupur area. River water samples from industrial and non-industrial sites and effluent samples of before and after treatment were tested and it was found that microbial diversity was higher in the river water at the industrial site (Kasipalayam) as compared to the non-industrial site (Perur). Similarly, the microbial populations were found to be high in the untreated effluent as compared to the treated one by conventional treatment systems. Similar trends were observed for MBR treatment systems as well. Pseudomonas sp ., Achromobacter sp. (bacterial species) and Aspergillus fumigates (fungal species), found exclusively at the industrial site have been reported to possess decolorization potential of dye effluent, thus can be used for treatment of dye effluent. The comparison of different microbial communities from different dye wastewater sources and textile effluents was done, which showed that the microbes degrade dyestuffs, reduce toxicity of wastewaters, etc. From the study, it can be concluded that the microbial community helps to check on the pollutants and minimize their affect. Therefore, there is a need to understand the systematic variation in microbial diversity with the accumulation of pollution load through monitoring.

  18. Preparation of gaseous CRMs from the primary system for 222Rn activity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.J.; Kim, B.C.; Lee, K.B.; Lee, J.M.; Park, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    For disseminating the gaseous radon standard traceable to the KRISS primary system based on the defined solid angle counting method, two kinds of radon CRM (a glass ampule type and a stainless steel cylinder type) were developed. The activity of the CRM was certified by subtracting a residual activity from the measured activity by the primary system. After certification, the ampule CRM was used to calibrate a radon-monitoring instrument and the cylinder CRM to calibrate an HPGe system. We also improved the measurement procedure of the radon primary system. In a typical radon energy spectrum, the radon peak overlaps with the polonium peak. For more reliable and accurate measurement of radon activity, a fitting method was adopted for the evaluation of radon area in the alpha energy spectrum. The result of radon activity evaluated by using the fitting method is in good agreement with that by the previous integration method. - Highlights: • Preparation of gaseous Rn-222 CRMs from primary measurement system. • Convolution of 3 left-handed exponentials with a Gaussian function to count radon. • Calibration of continuous radon monitor using glass ampoule CRM. • Calibration of HPGe system as secondary standard for stainless steel cylinder CRM.

  19. Characterisation of the ecotoxicity of hospital effluents: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orias, Frédéric; Perrodin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The multiple activities that take place in hospitals (surgery, drug treatments, radiology, cleaning of premises and linen, chemical and biological analysis laboratories, etc.), are a major source of pollutant emissions into the environment (disinfectants, detergents, drug residues, etc.). Most of these pollutants can be found in hospital effluents (HWW), then in urban sewer networks and WWTP (weakly adapted for their treatment) and finally in aquatic environments. In view to evaluating the impact of these pollutants on aquatic ecosystems, it is necessary to characterise their ecotoxicity. Several reviews have focused on the quantitative and qualitative characterisation of pollutants present in HWW. However, none have focused specifically on the characterisation of their experimental ecotoxicity. We have evaluated this according to two complementary approaches: (i) a “substance” approach based on the identification of the experimental data in the literature for different substances found in hospital effluents, and on the calculation of their PNEC (Predicted Non Effect Concentration), (ii) a “matrix” approach for which we have synthesised ecotoxicity data obtained from the hospital effluents directly. This work first highlights the diversity of the substances present within hospital effluents, and the very high ecotoxicity of some of them (minimum PNEC observed close to 0,01 pg/L). We also observed that the consumption of drugs in hospitals was a predominant factor chosen by authors to prioritise the compounds to be sought. Other criteria such as biodegradability, excretion rate and the bioaccumulability of pollutants are considered, though more rarely. Studies of the ecotoxicity of the particulate phase of effluents must also be taken into account. It is also necessary to monitor the effluents of each of the specialised departments of the hospital studied. These steps is necessary to define realistic environmental management policies for hospitals

  20. Characterisation of the ecotoxicity of hospital effluents: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orias, Frédéric; Perrodin, Yves

    2013-06-01

    The multiple activities that take place in hospitals (surgery, drug treatments, radiology, cleaning of premises and linen, chemical and biological analysis laboratories, etc.), are a major source of pollutant emissions into the environment (disinfectants, detergents, drug residues, etc.). Most of these pollutants can be found in hospital effluents (HWW), then in urban sewer networks and WWTP (weakly adapted for their treatment) and finally in aquatic environments. In view to evaluating the impact of these pollutants on aquatic ecosystems, it is necessary to characterise their ecotoxicity. Several reviews have focused on the quantitative and qualitative characterisation of pollutants present in HWW. However, none have focused specifically on the characterisation of their experimental ecotoxicity. We have evaluated this according to two complementary approaches: (i) a “substance” approach based on the identification of the experimental data in the literature for different substances found in hospital effluents, and on the calculation of their PNEC (Predicted Non Effect Concentration), (ii) a “matrix” approach for which we have synthesised ecotoxicity data obtained from the hospital effluents directly. This work first highlights the diversity of the substances present within hospital effluents, and the very high ecotoxicity of some of them (minimum PNEC observed close to 0,01 pg/L). We also observed that the consumption of drugs in hospitals was a predominant factor chosen by authors to prioritise the compounds to be sought. Other criteria such as biodegradability, excretion rate and the bioaccumulability of pollutants are considered, though more rarely. Studies of the ecotoxicity of the particulate phase of effluents must also be taken into account. It is also necessary to monitor the effluents of each of the specialised departments of the hospital studied. These steps is necessary to define realistic environmental management policies for hospitals

  1. Elimination of effluents and wastes contaminated by radionuclides produced in installations authorized on the account of the Public Health Code - ASN guide nr 18 - Release of the 26/01/2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document aims at specifying the modalities of application of a decision taken by the ASN in January 2008 regarding the technical rules which the elimination of effluents and wastes contaminated by radionuclides must comply with. First, it describes the objective of the 'waste zoning' concept. Then, it addresses the management of contaminated wastes: general rules, wastes contaminated by radionuclides of very short period (less than 100 days) and of period longer than 100 days, and the management of wastes with 'hybrid risks'. It addresses the management of contaminated effluents: radioactive liquid effluent with a period either shorter or longer than 100 days, radioactive gaseous effluents. It addresses the warehousing conditions (premise design, exploitation rules). The other parts deal with the convention between several establishments within a same site (notably in the case of nuclear medicine departments), with the management plan, and with the agenda for the implementation of the ASN decision

  2. 40 CFR 421.123 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of Film Stripping Solutions Wet Air Pollution Control. BAT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or... and Filtration of Photographic Solutions Wet Air Pollution Control. BAT Effluent Limitations Pollutant... and Precipitation of Nonphotographic Solutions Wet Air Pollution Control. BAT Effluent Limitations...

  3. 40 CFR 421.122 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Filtration of Film Stripping Solutions Wet Air Pollution Control. BPT Effluent Limitations... Filtration of Photographic Solutions Wet Air Pollution Control. BPT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or... Precipitation of Nonphotographic Solutions Wet Air Pollution Control. BPT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or...

  4. 324 and 327 Facilities Environmental Effluent Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    These effluent specifications address requirements for the 324/321 Facilities, which are undergoing stabilization activities. Effluent specifications are imposed to protect personnel, the environment and the public, by ensuring adequate implementation and compliance with federal and state regulatory requirements and Hanford programs

  5. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that toxicity based effluent assessments and subsequent discharge controls became globally important, when it was recognized that physical and chemical measurements alone did not protect the environment from potential impacts. Consequently, various strategies using different toxicity tests, whole effluent assessment techniques (incorporating bioaccumulation potential and persistence) plus supporting analytical tools have been developed over 30 years of practice. Numerous workshops and meetings have focused on effluent risk assessment through ASTM, SETAC, OSPAR, UK competent authorities, and EU specific country rules. Concurrent with this drive to improve effluent quality using toxicity tests, interest in reducing animal use has risen. The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) organized and facilitated an international workshop in March 2016 to evaluate strategies for concepts, tools, and effluent assessments and update the toolbox of for effluent testing methods. The workshop objectives were to identify opportunities to use a suite of strategies for effluents, and to identify opportunities to reduce the reliance on animal tests and to determine barriers to implementation of new methodologie

  6. Bioremediation of petroleum refinery effluent by Planococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present investigation, Planococcus halophilus was screened for hydrocarbon degradation and bioremediation of refinery effluent. The test organism, P. halophilus, showed the capability to utilize kerosene as carbon source in minimal medium. Biological treatment of the refinery effluent with P. halophilus reduced the ...

  7. Derived release limits for airborne effluents at TRIGA - INR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, A.; Dulama, C.; Hirica, O.; Mihai, S.; Oprea, I.

    2008-01-01

    Beginning from fulfilling the purposes of dose limitation system recommended by ICRP, and now accepted in radiation protection, this paper presents an environmental transfer model to calculate derived release limits for airborne and gaseous radioactive effluents at TRIGA-INR, 14 MW Steady State Reactor, in function on INR-Pitesti site. The methodology consists in determination of the principal exposure pathways for different groups of population and dose calculations for each radionuclide. The characterization of radionuclides transfer to environment was made using the compartmental model. The parameter transfer concept was used to describe the distribution of radionuclides between the different compartments. Atmospheric dispersion was very carefully treated, because it is the primary mechanism of the transfer of radionuclides in the environment and it determines all exposure pathways. Calculation of the atmospheric dispersion was made using ORION-II computer code based on the Gaussian plume model which takes account of site's specific climate and relief conditions. Default values recommended by literature were used to calculate some of the parameters when specific site values were not available. After identification of all transfer parameters which characterize the most important exposure pathways, the release rate corresponding to the individual dose rate limit was calculated. This maximum release rate is the derived release limit for each radionuclide and source. In the paper, the derived release limits are calculated for noble gases, radioiodine and other airborne particulate radionuclides, which can be released on the TRIGA-INR reactor stack, and are important to radiation protection. (authors)

  8. Mound Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, L.R.; Tullis, M.S.; Paulick, R.P.; Roush, L.L.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) is to describe the environmental monitoring and surveillance programs in place at Mound. The Plan is required by DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE, 1990). The programs described in the EMP are required by the DOE 5400 Order series and by the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environment Surveillance (DOE 1991a), referred to as the Regulatory Guide throughout this Plan

  9. The aquatic toxicity and chemical forms of coke plant effluent cyanide -- Implications for discharge limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibay, R.; Rupnow, M.; Godwin-Saad, E.; Hall, S.

    1995-01-01

    Cyanide is present in treated cokemaking process waters at concentrations as high as 8.0 mg/L. In assessing options for managing the discharge of a treated effluent, the development and implementation of discharge limits for cyanide became a critical issue. A study was initiated to evaluate possible alternatives to cyanide permit limits at the US Steel Gary Works Facility. The objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluation the forms of cyanide present in coke plant effluent; (2) determine whether these forms of cyanide are toxic to selected aquatic organisms; (3) compare the aquatic toxicity of various chemical forms of cyanide; (4) identify if the receiving water modifies cyanide bioavailability; and (5) confirm, with respect to water quality-based effluent limits, an appropriate analytical method for monitoring cyanide in a coke plant effluent. The results of aquatic toxicity tests and corresponding analytical data are presented. Toxicity tests were conducted with various pure chemical forms of cyanide as well as whole coke plant effluent (generated from a pilot-scale treatment system). Test species included the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) and Daphnia magna (D. magna). Analytical measurements for cyanide included total, weak acid dissociable, diffusible cyanide and selected metal species of cyanide. The findings presented by the paper are relevant with respect to the application of cyanide water quality criteria for a coke plant effluent discharge, the translation of these water quality-based effluent limits to permit limits, and methods for compliance monitoring for cyanide

  10. Derived release limits for radionuclides in airborne and liquid effluents for the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment and errata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemire, A.E.

    1989-08-01

    Radionuclides released to the environment may cause external and internal radiation exposure to man via a number of potential pathways. The resulting radiation dose due to such releases from any operating facility must be kept below dose limits specified in the regulations issued by the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada. At the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE), there is one primary source of liquid effluent to the Winnipeg River via the process water outfall. There are five sources of gaseous effluents: the WR-1 stack; the incinerator stack in the waste management area; the active laboratories building (including the hot cells); the Active-Liquid Waste Treatment Centre; and the compactor-baler in the Waste Management Area. This report presents the methodology and models used to calculate the maximum permissible release rates of radionuclides for each of these sources

  11. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed

  12. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  13. Femtosecond Time-Resolved Resonance-Enhanced CARS of Gaseous Iodine at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Fan, Rong-Wei; Xia, Yuan-Qin; Yu, Xin; Yao, Yong; Chen, De-Ying

    2011-04-01

    Time-resolved resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is applied to investigate molecular dynamics in gaseous iodine. 40 fs laser pulses are applied to create and monitor the high vibrational states of iodine at room temperature (corresponding to a vapor pressure as low as about 35 Pa) by femtosecond time-resolved CARS. Depending on the time delay between the probe pulse and the pump/Stokes pulse pairs, the high vibrational states both on the electronically ground states and the excited states can be detected as oscillations in the CARS transient signal. It is proved that the femtosecond time-resolved CARS technique is a promising candidate for investigating the molecular dynamics of a low concentration system and can be applied to environmental and atmospheric monitoring measurements.

  14. the impact of effluent produced from ntak inyang and iba oku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The characteristics of effluent produced in Uyo Capital city slaughterhouses located at Ntak Inyang and. Iba Oku were monitored by water and wastewater parameters. The wastewater from the slaughterhouses generally shows a high pollutant strength. The BOD value of 7.25mg/l, DO value of. 0.21mg/l, nutrient values of ...

  15. The Impact of Effluent Produced from Ntak Inyang and Iba Oku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characteristics of effluent produced in Uyo Capital city slaughterhouses located at Ntak Inyang and Iba Oku were monitored by water and wastewater parameters. The wastewater from the slaughterhouses generally shows a high pollutant strength. The BOD value of 7.25mg/l, DO value of 0.21mg/l, nutrient values of ...

  16. Handling and treatment of low-level radioactive wastes from gaseous diffusion plants in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, J.F.; Behrend, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Gaseous diffusion plants in the United States of America currently generate very small quantities of low-level radioactive wastes. These wastes consist primarily of airborne effluent solid trapping media and liquid scrubber solutions, liquid effluent treatment sludges, waste oils and solvents, scrap metals and conventional combustible wastes such as floor sweepings, cleaning rags and shoe covers. In addition to waste emanating from current operations, large quantities of scrap metal generated during the Cascade Improvement Program are stored above ground at each of the diffusion plants. The radionuclides of primary concern are uranium and 99 Tc. Current radioactive waste treatment consists of uranium dissolution in weak acids followed by chemical precipitation and/or solvent extraction for uranium recovery. Current disposal operations consist of above ground storage of scrap metals, shallow land burial of inorganic solids and incineration of combustible wastes. With increased emphasis on reducing the potential for off-site radiological dose, several new treatment and disposal options are being studied and new projects are being planned. One project of particular interest involves the installation of a high temperature incinerator to thermally degrade hazardous organic wastes contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes. Other technologies being studied include fixation of uranium-bearing sludges in concrete before burial, decontamination of scrap metals by smelting and use of specially engineered centralized burial grounds. (author)

  17. 40 CFR 469.19 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Semiconductor... conventional pollution control technology (BCT): Subpart A—Semiconductor BCT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or...

  18. 40 CFR 469.15 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Semiconductor... best available technology economically achievable (BAT): Subpart A—Semiconductor BAT Effluent...

  19. 40 CFR 440.22 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Ore... pollutants discharged in mine drainage from mines producing bauxite ores shall not exceed: Effluent...

  20. 40 CFR 440.23 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Ore Subcategory... discharged in mine drainage from mines producing bauxite ores shall not exceed: Effluent characteristic...

  1. 40 CFR 415.342 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORY Chrome Pigments Production Subcategory § 415.342 Effluent limitations guidelines... available (BPT): Subpart AH—Chrome Pigments Pollutant or pollutant property BPT effluent limitations Maximum...

  2. 40 CFR 415.647 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Cadmium Pigments and Salts Production Subcategory § 415.647 Effluent limitations guidelines... subject to this subpart and producing cadmium pigments must achieve the following effluent limitations...

  3. 40 CFR 415.643 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Cadmium Pigments and Salts Production Subcategory § 415.643 Effluent limitations guidelines... subject to this subpart and producing cadmium pigments must achieve the following effluent limitations...

  4. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gaseous detectors for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Silva, A. L. M.

    2018-01-01

    The energy resolution capability of gaseous detectors is being used in the last years to perform studies on the detection of characteristic X-ray lines emitted by elements when excited by external radiation sources. One of the most successful techniques is the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis. Recent developments in the new generation of micropatterned gaseous detectors (MPGDs), triggered the possibility not only of recording the photon energy, but also of providing position information, extending their application to EDXRF imaging. The relevant features and strategies to be applied in gaseous detectors in order to better fit the requirements for EDXRF imaging will be reviewed and discussed, and some application examples will be presented.

  6. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  7. Extruder system and method for treatment of a gaseous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvi, Norberto; Perry, Robert James; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Balch, Gary Stephen; Westendorf, Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard

    2016-04-05

    A system for treatment of a gaseous medium, comprises an extruder having a barrel. The extruder further comprises a first inlet port, a second inlet port, and a plurality of outlet ports coupled to the barrel. The first inlet port is configured for feeding a lean sorbent, the second inlet port is configured for feeding a gaseous medium, and the plurality of outlet ports are configured for releasing a plurality of components removed from the gaseous medium. Further, the extruder comprises a plurality of helical elements coupled to a plurality of kneading elements, mounted on a shaft, and disposed within the barrel. The barrel and the plurality of helical and kneading elements together form an absorption unit and a desorption unit. The first and second inlet ports are formed in the absorption unit and the plurality of outlet ports are formed in the absorption and desorption units.

  8. An automation model of Effluent Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Oliveira Lima Roque

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Population growth and intensification of industrial activities have increased the deterioration of natural resources. Industrial, hospital and residential wastes are dumped directly into landfills without processing, polluting soils. This action will have consequences later, because the liquid substance resulting from the putrefaction of organic material plows into the soil to reach water bodies. Cities arise without planning, industrial and household wastes are discharged into rivers, lakes and oceans without proper treatment, affecting water resources. It is well known that in the next century there will be fierce competition for fresh water on the planet, probably due to the scarcity of it. Demographic expansion has occurred without proper health planning, degrading oceans, lakes and rivers. Thus, a large percentage of world population suffers from diseases related to water pollution. Accordingly, it can be concluded that sewage treatment is essential to human survival, to preserve rivers, lakes and oceans. An Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP treats wastewater to reduce its pollution to acceptable levels before sending them to the oceans or rivers. To automate the operation of an ETP, motors, sensors and logic blocks, timers and counters are needed. These functions are achieved with programmable logic controllers (PLC and Supervisory Systems. The Ladder language is used to program controllers and is a pillar of the Automation and Control Engineering. The supervisory systems allow process information to be monitored, while the PLC are responsible for control and data acquisition. In the age we live in, process automation is used in an increasing scale in order to provide higher quality, raise productivity and improve the proposed activities. Therefore, an automatic ETP will improve performance and efficiency to handle large volumes of sewage. Considering the growing importance of environmental awareness with special emphasis

  9. Impacts and Policy Implications of Metals Effluent Discharge into Rivers within Industrial Zones: A Sub-Saharan Perspective from Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinabu, E.; Kelderman, P.; van der Kwast, J.; Irvine, K.

    2018-04-01

    Kombolcha, a city in Ethiopia, exemplifies the challenges and problems of the sub-Saharan countries where industrialization is growing fast but monitoring resources are poor and information on pollution unknown. This study monitored metals Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb concentrations in five factories' effluents, and in the effluent mixing zones of two rivers receiving discharges during the rainy seasons of 2013 and 2014. The results indicate that median concentrations of Cr in the tannery effluents and Zn in the steel processing effluents were as high as 26,600 and 155,750 µg/L, respectively, much exceeding both the USEPA and Ethiopian emission guidelines. Cu concentrations were low in all effluents. Pb concentrations were high in the tannery effluent, but did not exceed emission guidelines. As expected, no metal emission guidelines were exceeded for the brewery, textile and meat processing effluents. Median Cr and Zn concentrations in the Leyole river in the effluent mixing zones downstream of the tannery and steel processing plant increased by factors of 52 (2660 compared with 51 µg Cr/L) and 5 (520 compared with 110 µg Zn/L), respectively, compared with stations further upstream. This poses substantial ecological risks downstream. Comparison with emission guidelines indicates poor environmental management by industries and regulating institutions. Despite appropriate legislation, no clear measures have yet been taken to control industrial discharges, with apparent mismatch between environmental enforcement and investment policies. Effluent management, treatment technologies and operational capacity of environmental institutions were identified as key improvement areas to adopt progressive sustainable development.

  10. Impacts and Policy Implications of Metals Effluent Discharge into Rivers within Industrial Zones: A Sub-Saharan Perspective from Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinabu, E; Kelderman, P; van der Kwast, J; Irvine, K

    2017-12-09

    Kombolcha, a city in Ethiopia, exemplifies the challenges and problems of the sub-Saharan countries where industrialization is growing fast but monitoring resources are poor and information on pollution unknown. This study monitored metals Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb concentrations in five factories' effluents, and in the effluent mixing zones of two rivers receiving discharges during the rainy seasons of 2013 and 2014. The results indicate that median concentrations of Cr in the tannery effluents and Zn in the steel processing effluents were as high as 26,600 and 155,750 µg/L, respectively, much exceeding both the USEPA and Ethiopian emission guidelines. Cu concentrations were low in all effluents. Pb concentrations were high in the tannery effluent, but did not exceed emission guidelines. As expected, no metal emission guidelines were exceeded for the brewery, textile and meat processing effluents. Median Cr and Zn concentrations in the Leyole river in the effluent mixing zones downstream of the tannery and steel processing plant increased by factors of 52 (2660 compared with 51 µg Cr/L) and 5 (520 compared with 110 µg Zn/L), respectively, compared with stations further upstream. This poses substantial ecological risks downstream. Comparison with emission guidelines indicates poor environmental management by industries and regulating institutions. Despite appropriate legislation, no clear measures have yet been taken to control industrial discharges, with apparent mismatch between environmental enforcement and investment policies. Effluent management, treatment technologies and operational capacity of environmental institutions were identified as key improvement areas to adopt progressive sustainable development.

  11. The effect of gaseous ammonia on cobalt perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, L.P.; Men'shikov, O.D.; Borisov, V.V.; Sorokin, S.I.; Krutovertsev, S.A.; Kharkevich, S.I.; Ivanova, O.M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of humid air ammonia mixture on crystal pentahydrate of cobalt(2) perrhenate has been studied by the methods of PES, IR spectroscopy thermal analysis and electrophysical measurements. It is shown that with an increase in ammonia content in gaseous phase cobalt perrhenate successively transforms into diaquodiammine-, tetrammine- and μ-dioxo-bis-(tetrammine) derivatives of cobalt. Reversibility of dioxocomplex formation and a correlation between the change in electrophysical properties of crystal sample and change in ammonia content in gaseous phase are pointed out. 16 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  12. Electron impact phenomena and the properties of gaseous ions

    CERN Document Server

    Field, F H; Massey, H S W; Brueckner, Keith A

    1970-01-01

    Electron Impact Phenomena and the Properties of Gaseous Ions, Revised Edition deals with data pertaining to electron impact and to molecular gaseous ionic phenomena. This book discusses electron impact phenomena in gases at low pressure that involve low-energy electrons, which result in ion formation. The text also describes the use of mass spectrometers in electron impact studies and the degree of accuracy obtained when measuring electron impact energies. This book also reviews relatively low speed electrons and the transitions that result in the ionization of the atomic system. This text the

  13. Rare earths in iron and steelmaking and gaseous desulphurisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, D.A.R.; Subramanian, S.V.; Meng, V.; Kumar, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) additions, either as mischmetal or rare earth silicide, are used in many ladle treatment processes in modern ferrous metallurgy. In ironmaking they provide the basis for the control of graphite morphology in cast irons and in steelmaking additions are made to aluminum-killed steels for desulphurisation and the control of inclusion composition and morphology. Rare earth oxides may also be used in the desulphurisation of medium calorific value gaseous fuels and stack gases. In this paper, Ce-S-O and La-S-O phase stability diagrams are used to determine the role of the rare earths in the external processing of iron and steel, and gaseous desulphurisation

  14. Discussion on monitoring items of radionuclides in influents from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanxia; Li Jin; Liu Jiacheng; Han Shanbiao; Yu Zhengwei

    2014-01-01

    For the radionuclide monitoring items of effluents from nuclear power plant, this paper makes some comparisons and analysis from three aspects of the international atomic energy general requirements, the routine radionuclide measurement items of China's nuclear power plant and effluents low level radionuclide experimental research results. Finally, it summarizes the necessary items and recommended items of the radionuclide monitoring of effluents from nuclear power plant, which can provide references for the radioactivity monitoring activities of nuclear power plant effluent and the supervisions of regulatory departments. (authors)

  15. Generation of gaseous methanol reference standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geib, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Methanol has been proposed as an automotive fuel component. Reliable, accurate methanol standards are essential to support widespread monitoring programs. The monitoring programs may include quantification of methanol from tailpipe emissions, evaporative emissions, plus ambient air methanol measurements. This paper will present approaches and results in the author's investigation to develop high accuracy methanol standards. The variables upon which the authors will report results are as follows: (1) stability of methanol gas standards, the studies will focus on preparation requirements and stability results from 10 to 1,000 ppmv; (2) cylinder to instrument delivery system components and purge technique, these studies have dealt with materials in contact with the sample stream plus static versus flow injection; (3) optimization of gas chromatographic analytical system will be discussed; (4) gas chromatography and process analyzer results and utility for methanol analysis will be presented; (5) the accuracy of the methanol standards will be qualified using data from multiple studies including: (a) gravimetric preparation; (b) linearity studies; (c) independent standards sources such as low pressure containers and diffusion tubes. The accuracy will be provided as a propagation of error from multiple sources. The methanol target concentrations will be 10 to 500 ppmv

  16. Production of gaseous radiotracers CH3I and I2 through Na123I salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candeiro, R.E.M.; Pereira, W.P.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop, separately, methodology for production of two gaseous tracers through the sodium iodide NaI marked with 123 I. Found in the nature in form different, the iodine has been used in diverse works in the area of the industry and health. These two forms of the gaseous iodine, the methyl iodide, CH 3 I, and molecular iodine, I 2 , are very unstable and volatile in the ambient temperature and presents different problems in clean-up and monitoring systems. The syntheses were processed with sodium iodide (NaI) 1M aqueous solution marked with 1 23I . The production of gas I 2 was realized with in chlorine acid (HCl) and sodium iodate salt (NaIO 3 ) and the CH 3 I was used, the salt of NaI and the reagent (CH 3 ) 2 SO 4 . The production of gases was initially realized through in unit in glass with an inert material and the purpose was to study the kinetic of reaction and to determine the efficiency of production. The two synthesis occurs in the reaction bottle and after of produced, the gas is stored in the collect bottle that contains a starch solution for fixed the I 2 , and in syntheses of CH 3 I contains a silver nitrate solution for your fixation. To determine the efficiency of production of gases, analytic tests were realized, where the consumption of iodide ions of the bottle of reaction are measured. The optimization of production of the each gaseous tracer was studied varying parameter as: concentration of iodide, concentration of acid and temperature. After, the syntheses of the radiotracers were realized in the compact unit, having been used as main reagent the salt radiated of sodium iodide, Na 123 I. The transportation of elementary iodine and methyl iodine was studied by a scintillation detector NaI (2 x 2)' positioned in the reaction bottle. (author)

  17. Suspended solids in liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    An international literature review and telephone mail survey was conducted with respect to technical and regulatory aspects of suspended solids in radioactive liquid wastes from nuclear power stations. Results of the survey are summarized and show that suspended solids are an important component of some waste streams. The data available, while limited, show these solids to be associated largely with corrosion products. The solids are highly variable in quantity, size and composition. Filtration is commonly applied for their removal from liquid effluents and is effective. Complex interactions with receiving waters can result in physical/chemical changes of released radionuclides and these phenomena have been seen as reason for not applying regulatory controls based on suspended solids content. 340 refs

  18. Studies on Lyari river effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Hashmi, I.; Rashid, A.; Niaz, G.R.; Khan, F.

    1999-01-01

    The study was aimed to determining the physical (TS, TSS, TDS, TVS) and chemical (Cl, SO/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/, BOD/sub 5/ COD, DO) characteristics as well as heavy present in the Lyari river effluents so as to identify the extent of pollution. The average results of each parameter of twelve different sites were compared with that of National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS), BOD/sub 5/ and COD levels were above the NEQS while the NH/sub 3/-N concentration was low. Concentrations of Cd and Zn were within the range while that of Pb, Cr, Ni and Cu were higher than the NEQS at times. This indicates that heavy pollution load is entering into the Arabian Sea creating tremendous harm especially to marine life. (author)

  19. Liquid effluent processing group. Activity details 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-08-01

    This report first gives a quantitative overview of volumes of effluents of high activity, medium activity and low activity which passed through the department for effluent processing. It also makes the distinction between the shape or type of container of these effluents. A table indicates their origin and another indicates their destination. The β and α decontamination rates are determined, and the assessment of stored aqueous and organic effluents on the 31 December 1963 is given. The next part proposes an assessment of laboratory activities: control operations (input controls, control of processed effluent before discarding), controls related to processing (processing types, radiochemical and chemical dosing performed on effluent mixes before processing). Tables indicate the characteristics of medium activity effluents collected in 1963, the results of high activity liquid analysis, and Beryllium dosing results. A summary of ALEA processing, a table of the characteristics of stored oils and solvents are given. The third part reports data related to transport activities, and various works performed in the Saclay plant to improve exploitation conditions and results

  20. Absorption column working study for iodine formed in spent fuel reprocessing plant gaseous effluents: hydrodynamic and mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignau, B.

    1986-09-01

    The hydrodynamic and matter transfer parameters has been studied on absorption columns destined to trap iodine issued of spent fuel reprocessing plants. These columns have different packing - Raschig rings (glass, ceramic, PVC, steel) - Berl saddles (ceramic) - Weaved metallic thread (steel). The effect of dimension and of packing structure on gas pressure drop and on liquid holdup has been evaluated. The partial transfer coefficients of I 2 -Air-NaOH system has been the object of an experimental study. This system can be simulated by CO 2 -Air-NaOH system [fr

  1. Improving the performances of hydrophobic catalysts used for tritium recovery and enrichment processes In liquid and gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Irina; Ionita, Gheorghe; Varlam, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Based on the long experience of the authors in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts and based also on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts in tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: (1) how to improve the characteristics and performance of platinum hydrophobic catalysts; (2) to assess and find a new procedure for the preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. From reviewed references it results that platinum appears to be the most active and efficient catalytic metal while polytetrafluoroethylene is the best wetproofing agent. A new improved hydrophobic Pt-catalyst has been obtained and tests are now underway. The main steps and experimental conditions of preparation are largely discussed. A new wetproofing agent and new binding agents (titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide, zirconium dioxide) with a catalytic role are proposed and tested. The physico-structural parameters of the improved catalyst have been determined and are discussed in detail. The new proposal is a promising for improving the performance of conventional hydrophobic Pt-catalysts. (authors)

  2. Method for radioactivity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbarger, C. John; Cowder, Leo R.

    1976-10-26

    The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

  3. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  4. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes

  5. Direct readout of gaseous detectors with tiled CMOS circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visschers, J.L.; Blanco Carballo, V.; Chefdeville, M.; Colas, P.; Graaf, H. van der; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Timmermans, J.

    2007-01-01

    A coordinated design effort is underway, exploring the three-dimensional direct readout of gaseous detectors by an anode plate equipped with a tiled array of many CMOS pixel readout ASICs, having amplification grids integrated on their topsides and being contacted on their backside

  6. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    arrays of several thousand m2 of active detector surface to cover a large rapidity interval. The challenge is the construction of ... performance on aging of gaseous detectors. 2. ATLAS muon system. The ATLAS muon system ... drift gas is used to avoid high occupancy and aging respectively. The MDTs have been thoroughly ...

  7. Gaseous fuel production by anaerobic fungal degradation of banana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic biodegradation of banana leaves by cellulolytic fungus (yeast) was carried out at optimum operational conditions of temperature (330C), PH (7.3) and slurry concentration (4g/25cm3). The organic component of the gaseous fuel generated was analysed using flame ionization detector (FID). The analysis revealed ...

  8. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters

  9. Transference system of gaseous fluoride compounds for infrared spectrofotometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, L.

    1988-07-01

    A vacuum line design for transference of gaseous fluoride compounds involved in the uranium hexafluoride infrared analysis is presented. The text include specific comments about the characteristics of each component and about the possibilities of its acquisition in the national market. (author) [pt

  10. gaseous fuel production by anaerobic fungal degradation of banana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JANICO

    wood, peat, lignite, anthracite, coke, e.t.c; liquid fuels include: petrol, diesel oil, kerosene e.t.c; and gaseous fuels include: natural gas, coal gas, water gas, producer gas ..... publishing company Ltd., New Delhi – India. Pp 2 - 50. Murray, P.R.S. (1977). Principles of organic chemistry: A modern comprehensive text for schools.

  11. Microstructural and compositional Evolution of Compound Layers during Gaseous Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Hong; Somers, Marcel A.J.; Ågren, John

    2000-01-01

    Compound layers developed at 848 K during gaseous nitrocarburizing of iron and iron-carbon specimens were investigated for several combinations of N and C activities imposed at the specimen surface by gas mixtures of NH3, N2, CO2 and CO. The microstructural evolution of the compound layer was stu...

  12. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Gaseous detectors have been pushed to the limits when required to operate in the ferocious and aggressive rate environment of the new generation of HEP experiments. A great effort has resulted in the optimization and construction of large systems of gas detectors, some operational and some due for installation.

  13. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanite “layers” on stainless steel are addressed....

  14. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present contribtion gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanded austenite "layers" on stainless steel are addressed....

  15. Charge amplitude distribution of the Gossip gaseous pixel detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco Carballo, V.M.; Chefdeville, M.A.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, Y.; van der Graaf, H.; Gromov, V.; Hartjes, F.; Kluit, R.; Koffeman, E.; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Smits, Sander M.; Timmermans, J.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Gossip gaseous pixel detector is being developed for the detection of charged particles in extreme high radiation environments as foreseen close to the interaction point of the proposed super LHC. The detecting medium is a thin layer of gas. Because of the low density of this medium, only a few

  16. Separation of gaseous air pollutants using membrane contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverak, T.; Bulejko, P.; Ostrezi, J.; Kristof, O.; Kalivoda, J.; Kejik, P.; Mayerova, K.; Adamcik, M.

    2017-10-01

    This work deals with the separation of CO2 gaseous pollutant from gas mixtures to a water solution using the laboratory contactor. The laboratory set process parameters showed the rate of carbon dioxide transition through the interface in a so promising level the contactor separators can be considered as a very promising pathway to reduce the content of this greenhouse gas from the air.

  17. Engineering design of the Aries-IV gaseous divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S.

    1994-01-01

    ARIES-IV is a conceptual, D-T burning, steady-state tokamak fusion reactor producing 1000 MWe net. It operates in the second plasma stability regime. The structural material is SiC composite and the primary coolant is helium at 10MPa base pressure. ARIES-IV uses double-null divertors for particle control. Total thermal power recovered from the divertors is 425MW, which is 16% of the total reactor thermal power. Among the desirable goals of divertor design were to avoid the use of tungsten and to use the same structural material and primary coolant as in the blanket design. In order to reduce peak heat flux, the innovative gaseous divertor has been used in ARIES-IV. A gaseous divertor reduces peak heat flux by increasing the surface area and by distributing particle and radiation energy more uniformly. Another benefit of gaseous divertor is the reduction of plasma temperature in the divertor chamber, so that material erosion due to sputtering, can be diminished. This makes the use of low-Z material possible in a gaseous divertor

  18. 29 CFR 1910.162 - Fixed extinguishing systems, gaseous agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employee alarm capable of being perceived above ambient light or noise levels when agent design... application. Carbon dioxide obtained by dry ice conversion to liquid is not acceptable unless it is processed... designed concentration of gaseous agents is maintained until the fire has been extinguished or is under...

  19. Inhalation gases or gaseous mediators as neuroprotectants for cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Harrison, Joanne C; Nair, Shiva M; Sammut, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be administered to produce thrombolysis and restore blood flow to the ischaemic brain, therapeutic benefit is only achieved in a fraction of the subset of patients eligible for fibrinolytic intervention. Neuroprotective therapies attempting to restrict the extent of brain injury following cerebral ischaemia have not been successfully translated into the clinic despite overwhelming pre-clinical evidence of neuroprotection. Therefore, an adequate treatment for the majority of acute ischaemic stroke patients remains elusive. In the stroke literature, the use of therapeutic gases has received relatively little attention. Gases such as hyperbaric and normobaric oxygen, xenon, hydrogen, helium and argon all possess biological effects that have shown to be neuroprotective in pre-clinical models of ischaemic stroke. There are significant advantages to using gases including their relative abundance, low cost and feasibility for administration, all of which make them ideal candidates for a translational therapy for stroke. In addition, modulating cellular gaseous mediators including nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulphide may be an attractive option for ischaemic stroke therapy. Inhalation of these gaseous mediators can also produce neuroprotection, but this strategy remains to be confirmed as a viable therapy for ischaemic stroke. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of therapeutic gas therapy and modulation of gaseous mediators for ischaemic stroke. The therapeutic advantages of gaseous therapy offer new promising directions in breaking the translational barrier for ischaemic stroke.

  20. On the Jeans Criterion of a Stratified Heat Conducting Gaseous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 33; Issue 4. On the Jeans Criterion of a Stratified Heat Conducting Gaseous Medium in the Presence of Non-Uniform Rotation and Magnetic Field. Joginder S. Dhiman Rekha Dadwal. Volume 33 Issue 4 December 2012 pp 363-373 ...