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Sample records for gas activities resulting

  1. Methodology and results of risk assessment of interconnections within the JET active gas handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantyne, P.R.; Bell, A.C.; Konstantellos, A.; Hemmerich, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) is a complex interconnection of numerous subsystems. While individual subsystems were assessed for their risk of operation, an assessment of the effects of inadvertent interconnections was needed. A systematic method to document the assessment was devised to ease the assessment of complex plant and was applied to the AGHS. The methodology, application to AGHS, the four critical issues and required plant modifications as a result of this assessment are briefly discussed in this paper

  2. Coalbed natural gas exploration, drilling activities, and geologic test results, 2007-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur C.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the North Slope Borough, and the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation conducted a four-year study designed to identify, define, and delineate a shallow coalbed natural gas (CBNG) resource with the potential to provide locally produced, affordable power to the community of Wainwright, Alaska. From 2007 through 2010, drilling and testing activities conducted at three sites in or near Wainwright, identified and evaluated an approximately 7.5-ft-thick, laterally continuous coalbed that contained significant quantities of CBNG. This coalbed, subsequently named the Wainwright coalbed, was penetrated at depths ranging from 1,167 ft to 1,300 ft below land surface. Core samples were collected from the Wainwright coalbed at all three drill locations and desorbed-gas measurements were taken from seventeen 1-ft-thick sections of the core. These measurements indicate that the Wainwright coalbed contains enough CBNG to serve as a long-term energy supply for the community. Although attempts to produce viable quantities of CBNG from the Wainwright coalbed proved unsuccessful, it seems likely that with proper well-field design and by utilizing currently available drilling and reservoir stimulation techniques, this CBNG resource could be developed as a long-term economically viable energy source for Wainwright.

  3. Results of gas flux records in the seismically active area of Val d'Agri (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lapenna

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Val d Agri area is well-known for oil exploration. An old 500 m deep exploration well in the northern part of this area has been used for long-term hydrogeochemical investigations. The well is characterized by a discharge of about 500 L/min of thermal water (27.8°C and a simultaneous methane gas emission of about 200 L/min. Gas analyses gave evidence that the methane come from a multiple deep reservoir. Continuous records of gas emission showed some anomalous variations occurred during the past three years. The gas flux anomalies were in a distinctive coincidence with self-potential anomalies of one station close to the hydrogeochemical station. The present paper describes the interpretation of these anomalies in relation to the geodynamic activity in the area.

  4. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  5. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  6. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Dahl, M.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.

    1999-01-01

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples

  7. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  8. Gas Flows in Dual Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller Sanchez, Francisco; Comerford, Julia M.; Davies, Richard; Treister, Ezequiel; Privon, George C.; Nevin, Becky

    2018-06-01

    Dual Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are the Rosetta stone to understand the role of galaxy mergers in triggering nuclear activity and regulating black hole (BH) and galaxy growth. But very little is known about the physical processes required to effectively trigger AGN activity and regulate the growth of the two BHs. The work I will present here characterizes for the first time the properties of the stars, gas (molecular, ionized, and highly-ionized) and dust in all the confirmed dual AGN at z prototypical merger system NGC 6240: vigorous star formation, two AGNs, outflowing winds of ionized gas, rippling dust and gas lanes, and tidal tails. In this galaxy, we observe for the first time a dual outflow of different species of gas: an AGN-driven outflow of highly-ionized gas to the northeast and a starburst-driven outflow of ionized hydrogen to the northwest. This shows that stellar feedback and supermassive black hole feedback can work in tandem to regulate the stellar growth of a galaxy after a merger event. These results open a new door to studies of dual AGN and AGN pairs in general, and enable dual AGN to be used, for the first time, for studies of galaxy evolution.

  9. Discussion of gas trade model (GTM) results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, A.

    1989-01-01

    This is in response to your invitation to comment on the structure of GTM and also upon the differences between its results and those of other models participating in EMF9. First a word upon the structure. GTM was originally designed to provide both regional and sectoral detail within the North American market for natural gas at a single point in time, e.g. the year 2000. It is a spatial equilibrium model in which a solution is obtained by maximizing a nonlinear function, the sum of consumers and producers surplus. Since transport costs are included in producers cost, this formulation automatically ensures that geographical price differentials will not differ by more than transport costs. For purposes of EMF9, GTM was modified to allow for resource development and depletion over time

  10. Butylcellosolve recovery activities results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caponetti, R.; Petrazzuolo, F.

    1988-01-01

    At Casaccia's Energy Research Center (C.R.E.) of the Italien Commission for Nuclear and Alternatives Energy Sources (ENEA) a components cleaning program is under way whose first phase is based on the use of an organic solvent named Butylcellosolve (2-butoxy-ethanol or Ethylene-Glicol-Monobutylether). The main reasons for which this solvent was preferred over others are: - the suitable values of its reaction rate with sodium; - its vapor pressure, equivalent at 20 and 50 0 C to 0.6 and 3.9 torr, respectively. This make it possible, in a comprehensive cleaning process, to carry out vacuum processing without the formation of large quantities of vapor. Butylcellosolve reects with metallic sodium as follows: R-OH + Na → R-ONa + 1/2H 2 . Consequently the organic recirculation becames sodium enriched and the concentration of alcoholic function decreases. Sodium concentration in solution can increase up to 10 + 20 g/it conveniently when we use the butylcellosolve as cleaning medium. On the other hand, when the butylcellosolve is used as rinsing medium, we estimate the most suitable sodium concentration equivalent to ∼ 10 -2 g/lt. The use of butylcellosolve as cleaning medium for activated-contaminated components brings, of course, to the formation of very large amount of liquid wastes having problematic disposal. It should be noted that disposal of these wastes is a very serious problem also in the case of non radioactive liquid. For this reason the definition of suitable methods to restore the butylcellosolve alcoholic function was recently valued very important and the activity reported in this paper was performed

  11. Recent trends in Belgium's gas activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuijpers, Ch.; Woitrin, D.

    2010-01-01

    This article brings various recent trends together to provide a view of the natural gas activities in Belgium. Belgium has a strategic position as an important nodal point in the North-Western European gas grids. This is illustrated by the high interconnection rate with adjacent networks. Gas volumes are attracted for international transit from border point to border point and to supply the national market. Natural gas represents more than a quarter of Belgium's energy mix and is completely dependent on foreign gas supplies. The Belgian gas market and transmission grid are broken down for H-gas (high calorific value, average of 11,630 kWh/m 3 (n)) and for L-gas (low calorific value, average of 9,769 kWh/m 3 (n)). This article is intended to disclose some statistics in order to contribute to the understanding and benchmarking of Belgium's gas flows, gas consumption, supply diversification and import capacity. (authors)

  12. Measurement of activity of radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo Renhong; Lei Jiarong; Wen Dezhi; Cheng Jing; Zheng Hui

    2005-10-01

    A set of standard instrument system with their accessories for the measurement of activity of radioactive gas have been developed. The specifications and performances of the system have been tested and examined. The conventional true values of activity of radioactive gas have been measured and its uncertainty has been assessed. The technique of the dissemination of the measurement of activity of radioactive gas has been researched. The specification and performance of the whole set of apparatus meet the requirements of the relational standard, critra, regulation, it can be regard as a work standard for the measurement of activity of radioactive gas in CAEP. (authors)

  13. Practical Results of Forecasting for the Natural Gas Market

    OpenAIRE

    Potocnik, Primoz; Govekar, Edvard

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas consumption forecasting is required to balance the supply and consumption of natural gas. Companies and natural gas distributors are motivated to forecast their consumption by the economic incentive model that dictates the cash flow rules corresponding to the forecasting accuracy. The rules are quite challenging but enable the company to gain positive cash flow by forecasting accurately their short-term natural gas consumption. In this chapter, some practical forecasting results f...

  14. Active mems microbeam device for gas detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchaala, Adam M.; Jaber, Nizar; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    Sensors and active switches for applications in gas detection and other fields are described. The devices are based on the softening and hardening nonlinear response behaviors of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) clamped-clamped microbeams

  15. Marketing activities of a natural gas company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, D [Thyssengas G.m.b.H., Duisburg (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-01-01

    The last 10 years have produced an extra ordinary upswing in the gas industry. Natural gas could, in part, satisfy the demands in fields previously reserved for heating oil. However, after these successes it seems necessary to analyze the new initial situation for future marketing activities and to find a new strategy. This investigation is concerned with those tasks. Crucial points are dealt with that represent interesting of activities for gas-supply initiatures, and the author tries to show by what means these efforts can be crowned with success. All important sectors of the market are discussed, new technological developments are dealt with briefly, and finally the special case of opening up new areas for natural gas-supply is examined. It is regarded as an absolute necessity that marketing information for new activities should be appreciably improved by market surveys. The whole article describes the activites that have arisen from the co-operation between Thyssen gas and the gas supply undertakings supplied by Thyssen gas.

  16. World oil and gas activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armengol, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    After three years of strong growth, exploration and production activity has marked time in 1998. The refining industry, still facing margins that are chronically low, is undergoing major reorganization in the industrialized countries. At the same time, it has been affected by the Asian economic crisis in the course of the last year

  17. Active mems microbeam device for gas detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchaala, Adam M.

    2017-10-05

    Sensors and active switches for applications in gas detection and other fields are described. The devices are based on the softening and hardening nonlinear response behaviors of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) clamped-clamped microbeams. In that context, embodiments of gas-triggered MEMS microbeam sensors and switches are described. The microbeam devices can be coated with a Metal-Organic Framework to achieve high sensitivity. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm can be used to quantify an amount of gas captured by the devices according to frequency shift. Noise analysis is also conducted according to the embodiments, which shows that the microbeam devices have high stability against thermal noise. The microbeam devices are also suitable for the generation of binary sensing information for alarming, for example.

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions from industrial activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyanjui, L.N.

    1998-01-01

    This study considers greenhouse gas emissions stemming from industrial activities such as cement production; limestone use and lime production. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (1995a) methodology for industrial sector was applied for the three components selected. Limitations hindering the handling of other industrial process are listed as budgetary and time. Data sources and recommendations are listed

  19. French activities on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.

    1996-01-01

    The gas cooled reactor programme in France originally consisted of eight Natural Uranium Graphite Gas Cooled Reactors (UNGG). These eight units, which are now permanently shutdown, represented a combined net electrical power of 2,375 MW and a total operational history of 163 years. Studies related to these reactors concern monitoring and dismantling of decommissioned facilities, including the development of methods for dismantling. France has been monitoring the development of HTRs throughout the world since 1979, when it halted its own HTR R and D programme. France actively participates in three CRPs set up by the IAEA. (author). 1 tab

  20. IAEA high temperature gas-cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA activities on high temperature gas-cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of the Member states, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWG-GCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas-cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (authors)

  1. Modelling combustion reactions for gas flaring and its resulting emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saheed Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flaring of associated petroleum gas is an age long environmental concern which remains unabated. Flaring of gas maybe a very efficient combustion process especially steam/air assisted flare and more economical than utilization in some oil fields. However, it has serious implications for the environment. This study considered different reaction types and operating conditions for gas flaring. Six combustion equations were generated using the mass balance concept with varying air and combustion efficiency. These equations were coded with a computer program using 12 natural gas samples of different chemical composition and origin to predict the pattern of emission species from gas flaring. The effect of key parameters on the emission output is also shown. CO2, CO, NO, NO2 and SO2 are the anticipated non-hydrocarbon emissions of environmental concern. Results show that the quantity and pattern of these chemical species depended on percentage excess/deficiency of stoichiometric air, natural gas type, reaction type, carbon mass content, impurities, combustion efficiency of the flare system etc. These emissions degrade the environment and human life, so knowing the emission types, pattern and flaring conditions that this study predicts is of paramount importance to governments, environmental agencies and the oil and gas industry.

  2. Results of the gas carrier reliquefaction plant trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fatyhov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the gas carrier reliquefaction plant trial are considered. Safe transportation of liquefied gases is explained. The construction of the ship on trial is described. Designed parameters of the reliquefaction plant are presented. Heat gain into cargo tanks is obtained. Volumetric capacity, cooling capacity, volumetric efficiency and power consumption of the compressors are determined. Results of the main engine trial, diesel generator trial, reliquefaction plant trial, and calculations performed after wards are represented in five tables. The results obtained may be used for optimisation calculations of gas carriers’ reliquefaction plants.

  3. Annual survey on the natural gas market: 2008 main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    This document presents and briefly comments the main data of the natural gas market in France in 2008: gas production, gas transit (entry points receiving gas from various origins and export points to Spain and Switzerland), gas storage, gas distribution, gas sales in the different French regions and to different kinds of customers or industries

  4. Healthy Efficient New Gas Homes (HENGH) Pilot Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wanyu R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy L [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hotchi, Toshifumi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Healthy Efficient New Gas Homes (HENGH) is a field study that will collect data on ventilation systems and indoor air quality (IAQ) in new California homes that were built to 2008 Title 24 standards. A pilot test was performed to help inform the most time and cost effective approaches to measuring IAQ in the 100 test homes that will be recruited for this study. Two occupied, single-family detached homes built to 2008 Title 24 participated in the pilot test. One of the test homes uses exhaust-only ventilation provided by a continuous exhaust fan in the laundry room. The other home uses supply air for ventilation. Measurements of IAQ were collected for two weeks. Time-resolved concentrations of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde were measured. Measurements of IAQ also included time-integrated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), volatile aldehydes, and NO2. Three perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) were used to estimate the dilution rate of an indoor emitted air contaminant in the two pilot test homes. Diagnostic tests were performed to measure envelope air leakage, duct leakage, and airflow of range hood, exhaust fans, and clothes dryer vent when accessible. Occupant activities, such as cooking, use of range hood and exhaust fans, were monitored using various data loggers. This document describes results of the pilot test.

  5. Large scale gas injection test (Lasgit): Results from two gas injection tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuss, R. J.; Harrington, J. F.; Noy, D. J.; Wikman, A.; Sellin, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the initial results from a large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) performed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Sweden)). Lasgit is a full-scale field-scale experiment based on the Swedish KBS-3V repository concept, examining the processes controlling gas and water flow in compact buffer bentonite. The first 2 years of the test focused on the artificial hydration of the bentonite buffer. This was followed by a programme of hydraulic and gas injection tests which ran from day 843 to 1110. A further period of artificial hydration occurred from day 1110 to 1385, followed by a more complex programme of gas injection testing which remains on going (day 1385+). After 2 years of hydration, hydraulic conductivity and specific storage values in the lower filter array were found to range from 9 x 10 -14 to 1.6 x 10 -13 m/s and 5.5 x 10 -5 to 4.4 x 10 -4 m -1 respectively, with the injection filter FL903 yielding values of 7.5 x 10 -14 m/s and 2.5 x 10 -5 m -1 . A second set of hydraulic measurements were performed over 1 year and a half later yielding similar values, in the range 7.8 x 10 -14 m/s and 1.3 x 10 -13 m/s. The hydraulic conductivity of FL903 had reduced slightly to 5.3 x 10 -14 m/s while specific storage had increased to 4.0 x 10 -5 m -1 . Both datasets agree with laboratory values performed on small-scale saturated samples. Two sets of gas injection tests were performed over a 3 year period. During the course of testing, gas entry pressure was found to increase from around 650 kPa to approximately 1.3 MPa, indicative of the maturation of the clay. The sequential reduction in volumetric flow rate and lack of correlation between the rate of gas inflow and the gas pressure gradient observed during constant pressure steps prior to major gas entry, is suggestive of a reduction in gas permeability of the buffer and indicates only limited quantities of gas can be injected into the clay without interacting with the continuum stress field. Major gas

  6. Plastic-bag radon gas monitor and survey results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torri, G.

    1990-01-01

    The Plastic-bag radon monitor used in the Italian National Survey is described. The choice of this radon gas sampler has been determined by the peculiarity of the italian environmental monitoring program, which is carried out by several different regional laboratories. Results obtained in the past using this radon monitoring device are also reported. (author). 8 refs, 7 figs

  7. Annual survey of the natural gas market: 2010 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welter-Nicol, Cecile

    2011-12-01

    This document presents and briefly comments the main data of the natural gas market in France in 2010: gas production (only 2 pc of supplies), gas transit evolutions since 2007 (entry points receiving gas from various origins and export points to Spain and Switzerland), outlines the increase of imports from Norway, comments gas storage capacities, the evolution of gas distribution in France, the evolution of gas consumption, and gas sales in the different French regions and to different kinds of customers or industries

  8. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  9. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  10. Natural gas in France: main results in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This document briefly presents and comments the main data about natural gas in France: gas consumption, natural gas-based electricity production, refineries, energetic final consumption of natural gas, non-energetic final consumption of natural gas, gas imports and suppliers (countries), national production, and stocks

  11. Test results for fuel cell operation on anaerobic digester gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, R. J.; Preston, J. L.

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI, embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids. ADG is primarily comprised of methane (57-66%), carbon dioxide (33-39%), nitrogen (1-10%), and a small amount of oxygen (sulfur-bearing compounds (principally hydrogen sulfide) and halogen compounds (chlorides). The project has addressed two major issues: development of a cleanup system to remove fuel cell contaminants from the gas and testing/assessing of a modified ONSI PC25 C fuel cell power plant operating on the cleaned, but dilute, ADG. Results to date demonstrate that the ADG fuel cell power plant can, depending on the energy content of the gas, produce electrical output levels close to full power (200 kW) with measured air emissions comparable to those obtained by a natural gas fuel cell. The cleanup system results show that the hydrogen sulfide levels are reduced to below 10 ppbv and halides to approximately 30 ppbv.

  12. Microbial activities in soil near natural gas leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamse, A D; Hoeks, J; de Bont, J A.M.; van Kessel, J F

    1972-01-01

    From the present experiments it may be concluded that in the surroundings of natural gas leaks, methane, ethane and possibly some other components of the natural gas are oxidized by microbial activities as long as oxygen is available. This is demonstrated by an increased oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production, as well as by increased numbers of different types of bacteria. The resulting deficiency of oxygen, the excess of carbon dioxide, and perhaps the formation of inhibitory amounts of ethylene, are considered to be mainly responsible for the death of trees near natural gas leaks. Also the long period of time needed by the soil to recover, may be due to prolonged microbial activities, as well as to the presence of e.g. ethylene. The present experiments suggest that especially methane-oxidizing bacteria of the Methylosinus trichosporium type were present in predominating numbers and consequently have mainly been responsible for the increased oxygen consumption. However, some fungi oxidizing components of natural gas, including methane and ethane may also have contributed to the increased microbial activities in the soil. The same will be true of a possible secondary microflora on products derived from microorganisms oxidizing natural gas components. 12 references, 9 figures, 7 tables.

  13. Recent results of CHIMERA activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activity of CHIMERA in recent years has been characterized by a steady progress in the detection technique and data analysis. Since 2008 the detector system benefits of new implementations: a new reaction chamber, a new charged particle identification in silicon detector made by an extended pulse shape method and an efficient system for the identification of exotic beams produced by projectile-like fragmentation (In-flight method. These implementations appear to be promising tools in view of further exclusive experiments in the field of isospin physics. The coupling of CHIMERA with other equipments (such as interferometers and highly segmented arrays, magnetic elements, neutron detectors, etc. is also envisaged in order to extend the studies of the reaction mechanism in heavy ion physics.

  14. Aircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Donald L.; Borguet, Sebastien; Leonard, Olivier; Zhang, Xiaodong (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed.

  15. Gas treatment processes for keeping the environment of nuclear plants free from gas-borne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, H.

    1977-01-01

    The separation processes in gas treatment steps for the decontamination of circuit or offgas streams are described and their practicability is evaluated. Examples of the effectiveness of gas separation plants for keeping the environment within and without nuclear plants free from harmful gas-borne activity are presented. (orig.) [de

  16. Integral Transport Analysis Results for Ions Flowing Through Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Gilbert; Santarius, John

    2017-10-01

    Results of a computational model for the flow of energetic ions and neutrals through a background neutral gas will be presented. The method models reactions as creating a new source of ions or neutrals if the energy or charge state of the resulting particle is changed. For a given source boundary condition, the creation and annihilation of the various species is formulated as a 1-D Volterra integral equation that can quickly be solved numerically by finite differences. The present work focuses on multiple-pass, 1-D ion flow through neutral gas and a nearly transparent, concentric anode and cathode pair in spherical, cylindrical, or linear geometry. This has been implemented as a computer code for atomic (3He, 3He +, 3He + +) and molecular (D, D2, D-, D +, D2 +, D3 +) ion and neutral species, and applied to modeling inertial-electrostatic connement (IEC) devices. The code yields detailed energy spectra of the various ions and energetic neutral species. Calculations for several University of Wisconsin IEC and ion implantation devices will be presented. Research supported by US Dept. of Homeland Security Grant 2015-DN-077-ARI095, Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG02-04ER54745, and the Grainger Foundation.

  17. Annual survey on the natural gas market: results for 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadin, Didier; Moreau, Sylvain

    2015-02-01

    Illustrated by graphs and tables, this publication presents and discusses data regarding the French natural gas market in 2013: origin of the consumed gas and share of the national production, evolution of the inlet-outlet ratio for gas-pipe and gas harbour terminals in France, adjustment of resources to demand in terms of jobs, production, imports and storage, evolution of stored quantities, evolution of consumption, evolution of consumption per sector since 2007, regional supplies in 2012 and 2013

  18. Underwater sound and vibrations due to oil & gas activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, P.J.G. van; Binnerts, B.; Nennie, E.D.; Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von

    2014-01-01

    In the oil & gas industry there is a trend towards more subsea activities. To improve gas recovery from existing and new fields at greater depths, the produced gas will be compressed, processed and transported via subsea templates and underwater networks (pipelines, flexible risers, etc.). Besides

  19. Enova results and activities report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    Enova's primary task is to utilise the Norwegian Energy Fund to contribute to environmentally friendly restructuring of energy consumption and generation. Enova's management of the Energy Fund is governed by an agreement between the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and Enova. Restructuring national energy consumption is a comprehensive task, which includes identifying barriers and fine-tuning policy instruments to achieve changes in the market. In 2007, Enova achieved contractual commitments for an energy result of about 2.4 TWh, while 10.1 TWh was contracted in the period 2001-2007. A 28 million euro wind power project received support in 2007, and counting this project, Enova has granted subsidies totalling 100 million euros for 11 different windmill parks located around Norway. A significant commitment was made in the heating area in 2007. An energy result of 751 GWh in renewable heating energy was contracted, distributed among 69 projects with total funding amounting to 40 million euros. Bio fuel processing projects received 0.6 million euros, divided among four projects totalling 163 GWh. From 2008, three new heating programs will replace the existing heating program, and the solid bio fuel production program will be discontinued. In 2007, Enova received 30 applications for the new technology program, of which 21 were connected to the joint effort with the Research Council of Norway and Innovation Norway. A total of ten projects have received pledges of support from Enova in 2007, totalling 10 million euros. The program for energy consumption in buildings achieved a contractual energy result of 365 GWh in 2007. An evaluation was carried out in 2007 that will be used as a basis for tailoring the program activities to the market. The work aimed at energy efficiency and conversion to renewable energy carriers in industry has contributed a total contracted energy result of 814 GWh in 2007. The main program has been confirmed and maintained in 2007. The

  20. Enova results and activities report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    Enova's primary task is to utilise the Norwegian Energy Fund to contribute to environmentally friendly restructuring of energy consumption and generation. Enova's management of the Energy Fund is governed by an agreement between the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and Enova. Restructuring national energy consumption is a comprehensive task, which includes identifying barriers and fine-tuning policy instruments to achieve changes in the market. In 2007, Enova achieved contractual commitments for an energy result of about 2.4 TWh, while 10.1 TWh was contracted in the period 2001-2007. A 28 million euro wind power project received support in 2007, and counting this project, Enova has granted subsidies totalling 100 million euros for 11 different windmill parks located around Norway. A significant commitment was made in the heating area in 2007. An energy result of 751 GWh in renewable heating energy was contracted, distributed among 69 projects with total funding amounting to 40 million euros. Bio fuel processing projects received 0.6 million euros, divided among four projects totalling 163 GWh. From 2008, three new heating programs will replace the existing heating program, and the solid bio fuel production program will be discontinued. In 2007, Enova received 30 applications for the new technology program, of which 21 were connected to the joint effort with the Research Council of Norway and Innovation Norway. A total of ten projects have received pledges of support from Enova in 2007, totalling 10 million euros. The program for energy consumption in buildings achieved a contractual energy result of 365 GWh in 2007. An evaluation was carried out in 2007 that will be used as a basis for tailoring the program activities to the market. The work aimed at energy efficiency and conversion to renewable energy carriers in industry has contributed a total contracted energy result of 814 GWh in 2007. The main program has been confirmed and maintained in 2007. The program

  1. Gas hydrate exploration activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keun-Pil Park, K.P. [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gas Hydrate R and D Organization, Ministry of Knowledge Economy, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Korea's first gas hydrate research project was launched in 1996 to study the gas hydrate potential in the Ulleung Basin of the East Sea. It involved a series of laboratory experiments followed by a preliminary offshore seismic survey and regional reconnaissance geophysical and marine geological surveys. The bottom simulating reflector (BSR) was interpreted to show wide area distribution in the southern part of the Ulleung Basin, and its average burial depth was 187 m below the sea floor in the East Sea. A three-phase 10-year National Gas Hydrate Development Program was launched in 2004 to estimate the potential reserves in the East Sea. It will involve drilling to identify natural gas hydrates and to determine the most optimized production methods. Drilling sites were proposed based on five indicators that imply gas hydrate occurrence, notably BSR, gas vent, enhanced seismic reflection, acoustic blanking and gas seeping structure. The UBGH-X-01 gas hydrate expedition in the East Sea Ulleung Basin involved 5 logging while drilling (LWD) surveys at three high priority sites. One wire line logging was implemented at the site of the UBGH09. A total 334 m of non-pressurized conventional cores and 16 pressure cores were obtained in late 2007. The UBGH-X-01 was successfully completed, recovering many natural samples of gas hydrate from 3 coring sites in the East Sea. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Stability investigations of relaxing molecular gas flows. Results and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, Yurii N.; Ershov, Igor V.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents results of systematic investigations of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The effect can be a new way for control stability and laminar turbulent transition in aerodynamic flows. The consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows is presented. Nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin — Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both classical linear and nonlinear energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of this article is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flow control and laminarization.

  3. A new gas stripper system for BARC-TIFR Pelletron Accelerator facility: installation and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Ninawe, N.G.; Yadav, M.L.; Ekambaram, M.; Ramjilal; Matkar, U.V.; Ansari, Q.N.; Lokare, R.N.; Ramlal; Gupta, A.K.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Pillay, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    The gas-stripper plays a key role in stripping the heavy and molecular ion beams in a tandem accelerator. Efficiency of gas stripper depends on its supporting vacuum pumps. A new recirculating turbo molecular pump-based gas stripper has been installed in the high voltage terminal of Pelletron Accelerator. Re-circulating the stripper gas reduces the flow of gas into the accelerating tubes reducing the transmission losses. Preliminary results obtained using the new gas stripper system are discussed. (author)

  4. Epileptiform activity during inert gas euthanasia of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Thomas C; Detotto, Carlotta; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula

    2018-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the most commonly used euthanasia agents for mice, yet it is highly aversive and nociceptive. Inert gases are a possible alternative, however there are qualitative reports of seizures resulting from exposure. Here we evaluate epileptiform activity caused by inert gases (N2, He, Ar and Xe) and CO2 in mice chronically instrumented for EEG/EMG undergoing single-gas euthanasia. We found that N2, He and Ar caused epileptiform activity in all animals, CO2 in half of animals and no epileptiform activity produced by Xe. Atmospheric O2 concentrations at epileptiform activity onset were significantly higher for CO2 than for all other gases and occurred soon after loss of motion, whereas N2 and Ar epileptiform activity occurred at cessation of neocortical activity. Helium caused the longest epileptiform activity and these commenced significantly before isoelectric EEG. We did not detect any epileptiform activity during active behaviour. Taken together, these results demonstrate that whilst epileptiform activity from inert gases and particularly Ar and N2 are more prevalent than for CO2, their occurrence at the onset of an isoelectric EEG is unlikely to impact on the welfare of the animal. Epileptiform activity from these gases should not preclude them from further investigation as euthanasia agents. The genesis of epileptiform activity from CO2 is unlikely to result from hypoxia as with the inert gases. Helium caused epileptiform activity before cessation of neocortical activity and for a longer duration and is therefore less suitable as an alternative to CO2.

  5. International oil and gas exploration and development activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-29

    This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Indian continental margin gas hydrate prospects : results of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) expedition 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, T [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Riedel, M. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Cochran, J.R. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory; Boswell, R. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Kumar, P. [Pushpendra Kumar Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Mumbai (India). Inst. of Engineering and Ocean Technology; Sathe, A.V. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Uttaranchal (India). KDM Inst. of Petroleum Exploration

    2008-07-01

    The geologic occurrence of gas hydrate deposits along the continental margins of India were investigated in the first expedition of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP). The objective was to determine the regional context and characteristics of the gas hydrate deposits through scientific ocean drilling, logging, and analytical activities. A research drill ship was the platform for the drilling operation. The geological and geophysical studies revealed 2 geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences, notably the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The NGHP Expedition 01 focused on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these 2 diverse settings. The study established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin was discovered to be the one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented, while site 17 in the Andaman Sea had the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known. The existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin was also discovered. Most of the gas hydrate occurrences discovered during this expedition appeared to contain mostly methane which was generated by microbial processes. However, there was also evidence of a thermal origin for a portion of the gas within the hydrates of the Mahanadi Basin and the Andaman offshore area. Gas hydrate in the Krishna-Godavari Basin appeared to be closely associated with large scale structural features, in which the flux of gas through local fracture systems, generated by the regional stress regime, controlled the occurrence of gas hydrate. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  7. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuki; Ishii, Ryohei; Goto, Eiji; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Nureki, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  8. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Kato

    Full Text Available The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING, resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  9. MAPLE activities and applications in gas sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Remsa, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Kubešová, B.; Schůrek, J.; Myslík, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 643-649 ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : MAPLE * gas sensors * biomedicine * thin films Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.630, year: 2011

  10. Improving the natural gas transporting based on the steady state simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoplik, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The work presents an example of practical application of gas flow modeling results in the network, that was obtained for the existing gas network and for real data about network load depending on the time of day and air temperature. The gas network load in network connections was estimated based on real data concerning gas consumption by customers and weather data in 2010, based on two-parametric model based on the number of degree-days of heating. The aim of this study was to elaborate a relationship between pressure and gas stream introduced into the gas network. It was demonstrated that practical application of elaborated relationship in gas reduction station allows for the automatic adjustment of gas pressure in the network to the volume of network load and maintenance of gas pressure in the whole network at possibly the lowest level. It was concluded based on the results obtained that such an approach allows to reduce the amount of gas supplied to the network by 0.4% of the annual network load. - Highlights: • Determination of the hourly nodal demand for gas by the consumers. • Analysis of the results of gas flow simulation in pipeline network. • Elaboration of the relationship between gas pressure and gas stream feeding the network. • Automatic gas pressure steering in the network depending on the network load. • Comparison of input gas pressure in the system without and with pressure steering.

  11. Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document

  12. Self-activation of biochar from furfural residues by recycled pyrolysis gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yulei; Gao, Yuan; Li, Aimin

    2018-04-17

    Biochar samples with controllable specific surface area and mesopore ratio were self-activated from furfural residues by recycled pyrolysis gas. The objective of this study was to develop a new cyclic utilization method for the gas produced by pyrolysis. The influences of preparation parameters on the resulting biochar were studied by varying the pyrolysis-gas flow rate, activation time and temperature. Structural characterization of the produced biochar was performed by analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pyrolysis gas compositions before and after activation were determined by a gas chromatograph. The results indicated that the surface area of the biochar was increased from 167 m 2 /g to 567 m 2 /g, the total pore volume increased from 0.121 cm 3 /g to 0.380 cm 3 /g, and the ratio of the mesopore pore volume to the total pore volume increased 17-39.7%. The CO volume fraction of the pyrolysis gas changed from 34.66 to 62.29% and the CO 2 volume fraction decreased from 48.26% to 12.17% under different conditions of pyrolysis-gas flow rate, activation time and temperature. The calorific values of pyrolysis gas changed from 8.82 J/cm 3 to 14.00 J/cm 3 , which were higher than those of conventional pyrolysis gases. The slower pyrolysis-gas flow rate and higher activation time increased the efficiency of the reaction between carbon and pyrolysis gas. These results demonstrated the feasibility of treatment of the furfural residues to produce microporous and mesoporous biochar. The pyrolysis gas that results from the activation process could be used as fuel. Overall, this new self-activation method meets the development requirements of cyclic economy and cleaner production. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Annual survey on the natural gas market: results 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadin, Didier

    2014-04-01

    While proposing data by tables and graphs, this publication comments the evolution noticed in the natural gas market in 2012. As the French production reaches its end, the share of liquefied natural gas in the national supply and that of purchases have decreased in 2012 after a strong increase in 2011. The natural gas input-output rate decreased for a second year in row. These evolutions are assessed for the different entry points (pipelines or harbours). The evolution of provider countries is also commented: Norway and Russia are the main providers for France. A very close adjustment of resources to demand is highlighted and discussed. The continuous decrease of stocks is also noticed and discussed. After a rather strong increase of natural gas consumption until the middle of the 2000's, this consumption, although it displays some variations, tends to stabilize. The consumption is then analyzed with respect to the sector (energy, agriculture, industry, housing and office building), and to the different French regions

  14. Exact results on the one-dimensional Potts lattice gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, R.; Chaves, C.M.G.F.

    1982-12-01

    An exact calculation of the Potts Lattice Gas in one dimension is presented. Close to T=O 0 K, the uniform susceptibility presents an essencial singularity, when the excharge parameter is positive, and a power law behaviour with critical exponent γ=1, when this parameter is negative. (Author) [pt

  15. Exact results on the one-dimensional Potts lattice gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, R.; Chaves, C.M.G.F.

    1983-01-01

    An exact calculation of the Potts Lattice Gas in one dimension is presented. Close to T=O 0 K, the uniform susceptibility presents an essential singularity, when the exchange parameter is positive, and a power law behaviour with critical exponent γ=1, when this parameter is negative. (Author) [pt

  16. Gas6 downregulation impaired cytoplasmic maturation and pronuclear formation independent to the MPF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeoung-Hwa Kim

    Full Text Available Previously, we found that the growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6 is more highly expressed in germinal vesicle (GV oocytes than in metaphase II (MII oocytes using annealing control primer (ACP-PCR technology. The current study was undertaken to investigate the role of Gas6 in oocyte maturation and fertilization using RNA interference (RNAi. Interestingly, despite the specific and marked decrease in Gas6 mRNA and protein expression in GVs after Gas6 RNAi, nuclear maturation including spindle structures and chromosome segregation was not affected. The only discernible effect induced by Gas6 RNAi was a change in maturation promoting factor (MPF activity. After parthenogenetic activation, Gas6 RNAi-treated oocytes at the MII stage had not developed further and arrested at MII (90.0%. After stimulation with Sr(2+, Gas6-silenced MII oocytes had markedly reduced Ca(2+ oscillation and exhibited no exocytosis of cortical granules. In these oocytes, sperm penetration occurred during fertilization but not pronucleus (PN formation. By roscovitine and colcemid treatment, we found that the Gas6 knockdown affected cytoplasmic maturation directly, independent to the changed MPF activity. These results strongly suggest that 1 the Gas6 signaling itself is important to the cytoplasmic maturation, but not nuclear maturation, and 2 the decreased Gas6 expression and decreased MPF activity separately or mutually influence sperm head decondensation and PN formation.

  17. Flue Gas Desulfurization by Mechanically and Thermally Activated Sodium Bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walawska Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of study on structural parameters (particle size, surface area, pore volume and the sorption ability of mechanically and thermally activated sodium bicarbonate. The sorption ability of the modified sorbent was evaluated by: partial and overall SO2 removal efficiency, conversion rate, normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR. Sodium bicarbonate was mechanically activated by various grinding techniques, using three types of mills: fluid bed opposed jet mill, fine impact mill and electromagnetic mill, differing in grinding technology. Grounded sorbent was thermally activated, what caused a significant development of surface area. During the studies of SO2 sorption, a model gas with a temperature of 300°C, of composition: sulfur dioxide at a concentration of 6292 mg/mn3, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen as a carrier gas, was used. The best development of surface area and the highest SO2 removal efficiency was obtained for the sorbent treated by electromagnetic grinding, with simultaneous high conversion rate.

  18. Evaluation of an active humidification system for inspired gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Nicolás G; Plotnikow, Gustavo A; Villalba, Darío S; Gogniat, Emiliano; Feld, Vivivana; Ribero Vairo, Noelia; Sartore, Marisa; Bosso, Mauro; Scapellato, José L; Intile, Dante; Planells, Fernando; Noval, Diego; Buñirigo, Pablo; Jofré, Ricardo; Díaz Nielsen, Ernesto

    2015-03-01

    The effectiveness of the active humidification systems (AHS) in patients already weaned from mechanical ventilation and with an artificial airway has not been very well described. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of an AHS in chronically tracheostomized and spontaneously breathing patients. Measurements were quantified at three levels of temperature (T°) of the AHS: level I, low; level II, middle; and level III, high and at different flow levels (20 to 60 L/minute). Statistical analysis of repeated measurements was performed using analysis of variance and significance was set at a P<0.05. While the lowest temperature setting (level I) did not condition gas to the minimum recommended values for any of the flows that were used, the medium temperature setting (level II) only conditioned gas with flows of 20 and 30 L/minute. Finally, at the highest temperature setting (level III), every flow reached the minimum absolute humidity (AH) recommended of 30 mg/L. According to our results, to obtain appropiate relative humidity, AH and T° of gas one should have a device that maintains water T° at least at 53℃ for flows between 20 and 30 L/m, or at T° of 61℃ at any flow rate.

  19. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  20. Preparation of activated carbon from waste plastics polyethylene terephthalate as adsorbent in natural gas storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Nasruddin; Sanal, A.; Bernama, A.; Haris, F.; Ramadhan, I. T.

    2017-02-01

    The main problem is the process of natural gas storage and distribution, because in normal conditions of natural gas in the gas phase causes the storage capacity be small and efficient to use. The technology is commonly used Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). The weakness of this technology safety level is low because the requirement for high-pressure CNG (250 bar) and LNG requires a low temperature (-161°C). It takes innovation in the storage of natural gas using the technology ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) with activated carbon as an adsorbent, causing natural gas can be stored in a low pressure of about 34.5. In this research, preparation of activated carbon using waste plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET). PET plastic waste is a good raw material for making activated carbon because of its availability and the price is a lot cheaper. Besides plastic PET has the appropriate characteristics as activated carbon raw material required for the storage of natural gas because the material is hard and has a high carbon content of about 62.5% wt. The process of making activated carbon done is carbonized at a temperature of 400 ° C and physical activation using CO2 gas at a temperature of 975 ° C. The parameters varied in the activation process is the flow rate of carbon dioxide and activation time. The results obtained in the carbonization process yield of 21.47%, while the yield on the activation process by 62%. At the optimum process conditions, the CO2 flow rate of 200 ml/min and the activation time of 240 minutes, the value % burn off amounted to 86.69% and a surface area of 1591.72 m2/g.

  1. The effectiveness of the Brazilian customs activity as a conditioning of the partnership and business results among oil and gas companies; A efetividade da atividade aduaneira brasileira como condicionante dos resultados das aliancas e negocios entre empresas de petroleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Helio Fernando R. [Ministerio da Fazenda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Terceiro Conselho de Contribuintes; Pires, Adilson Rodrigues [Contex - Consultoria em Administracao e Comercio Exterior, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Ronaldo J. [Ronaldo Alves e Associados, Consultores em Exploracao e Producao, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    The thriving of the national oil and gas production depends in major part on the effectiveness of the import operations at non-definitive title made under the customs special regime named Special Customs Regime for Export and Import of Goods for Oil and Natural Gas Exploration and Production Activities - REPETRO. This regime has not totally complied with the targets it has been conceived for, that is, to enable the development of the oil and gas industry at the least import costs in a legal stable environment. This regime is a precarious norm, conceived in a hurry, aiming solely at not unveiling the big threat to the forming of partnerships among companies acting in the commerce of import and/or export of equipment for the exploration and production in the Brazilian territory, that is, the intent of the Federal Fiscal Administration to using the import tax, an extra-fiscal tax by its nature, as a mere collecting instrument. This fact becomes evident from a more detailed analysis of certain aspects of the REPETRO normative structure. (author)

  2. Effects of gas periodic stimulation on key enzyme activity in gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation (GDD-SSF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongzhang; Shao, Meixue; Li, Hongqiang

    2014-03-05

    The heat and mass transfer have been proved to be the important factors in air pressure pulsation for cellulase production. However, as process of enzyme secretion, the cellulase formation has not been studied in the view of microorganism metabolism and metabolic key enzyme activity under air pressure pulsation condition. Two fermentation methods in ATPase activity, cellulase productivity, weight lose rate and membrane permeability were systematically compared. Results indicated that gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation had no obviously effect on cell membrane permeability. However, the relation between ATPase activity and weight loss rate was linearly dependent with r=0.9784. Meanwhile, the results also implied that gas periodic stimulation had apparently strengthened microbial metabolism through increasing ATPase activity during gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation, resulting in motivating the production of cellulase by Trichoderma reesei YG3. Therefore, the increase of ATPase activity would be another crucial factor to strengthen fermentation process for cellulase production under gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. First steps toward maturing the shallow gas play - Results of an integrated exploration workflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, J.H. ten; Verweij, J.M.; Bruin, G. de; Donders, T.

    2014-01-01

    Recent exploration activities in two of the largest deltas in the world, the still active Nile delta and the Cenozoic Southern North Sea (SNS) deltas, proved the potential of shallow gas resources. Although, previously seen as a hazard or an exploration tool for deeper hydrocarbons, the shallow gas

  4. Measurements of pulmonary gas exchange efficiency using expired gas and oximetry: results in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B; Wang, Daniel L; Prisk, G Kim

    2018-04-01

    We are developing a novel, noninvasive method for measuring the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange in patients with lung disease. The patient wears an oximeter, and we measure the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in inspired and expired gas using miniature analyzers. The arterial Po 2 is then calculated from the oximeter reading and the oxygen dissociation curve, using the end-tidal Pco 2 to allow for the Bohr effect. This calculation is only accurate when the oxygen saturation is ideal alveolar Po 2 minus the measured arterial Po 2 . That measurement requires an arterial blood sample. The present study suggests that this noninvasive procedure will be valuable in assessing the degree of impaired gas exchange in patients with lung disease.

  5. Rational gas consumption resulting from technological innovations and improved gas appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, H

    1980-07-01

    Ruhrgas AG has developed several new or improved appliances with a view toward conserving energy. Its household heat center (see also Gas Abstr. 36, 80-1144f) uses a single core unit to supply heat for all the major heat requirements in the house, from cooking and dishwashing to water heating, space heating, and laundry washing/drying. A new burner that can function at both full and partial load with an air ratio of about 1.35 offers economical, yet quiet operation. Ruhrgas is also continuing its laboratory and field research into the application of gas-fired compression-type heat pumps.

  6. Annual report 2011. Results and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-25

    Enova is a state-owned enterprise, owned by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. Over a period of ten years, the enterprise has worked to trigger energy efficiency measures and renewable energy production by supporting proactive players that have paved the way for others. In the period 2002-2011, Enova has contracted an energy result of 16.6 TWh, Enova's Annual Report 2011 shows. This corresponds to the annual energy end-use of more than 35 per cent of Norways 2.2 million private households. Enova has allocated NOK 9 billion in support over ten years. This has resulted in project owners and other financiers investing about Nok 45 billion in capital for environmentally friendly energy projects in Norway, says Nils Kristian Nakstad, CEO of Enova. In 2011, Enova supported projects with an overall energy result of 1.35 TWh using resources from the Energy Fund, equally distributed between energy efficiency and renewable heating. The greatest contributors in 2011 are within energy conversion to renewable heating and energy efficiency measures in buildings.The climate impact of all of the projects where Enova has entered into contracts corresponds to 9.3 million tonnes in reduced CO2 emissions annually. The latter constitutes 17 per cent of domestic greenhouse gas emissions. (au)

  7. Annual report 2011. Results and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Enova is a state-owned enterprise, owned by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. Over a period of ten years, the enterprise has worked to trigger energy efficiency measures and renewable energy production by supporting proactive players that have paved the way for others. In the period 2002-2011, Enova has contracted an energy result of 16.6 TWh, Enova's Annual Report 2011 shows. This corresponds to the annual energy end-use of more than 35 per cent of Norways 2.2 million private households. Enova has allocated NOK 9 billion in support over ten years. This has resulted in project owners and other financiers investing about Nok 45 billion in capital for environmentally friendly energy projects in Norway, says Nils Kristian Nakstad, CEO of Enova. In 2011, Enova supported projects with an overall energy result of 1.35 TWh using resources from the Energy Fund, equally distributed between energy efficiency and renewable heating. The greatest contributors in 2011 are within energy conversion to renewable heating and energy efficiency measures in buildings.The climate impact of all of the projects where Enova has entered into contracts corresponds to 9.3 million tonnes in reduced CO2 emissions annually. The latter constitutes 17 per cent of domestic greenhouse gas emissions. (au)

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Metal Active Gas (MAG) Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model for MAG (metal active gas) arc welding of thin plate has been developed. In MAG arc welding, the electrode wire is melted and supplied into the molten pool intermittently. Accordingly, it is assumed on the modeling that the thermal energy enters the base-plates through two following mechanisms, i.e., direct heating from arc plasma and “indirect” heating from the deposited metal. In the second part of the paper, MAG arc welding process is numerically analyzed by using the model, and the calculated weld bead dimension and surface profile have been compared with the experimental MAG welds on steel plate. As the result, it is made clear that the model is capable of predicting the bead profile of thin-plate MAG arc welding , including weld bead with undercutting.

  9. Environmental risk analysis for offshore oil and gas activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brude, Odd Willy; Aspholm, Ole O.; Rudberg, Anders [Det Norske Veritas (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Offshore oil and gas activities always have a risk for environmental impact due to potential accidental releases of oil and gas. The environmental risk can be calculated as a combination of the frequency of such accidents to occur and their environmental consequences in terms of environmental damage to habitats or populations. A method for conducting environmental risk analysis has been in use in Norwegian offshore waters for a decade, with a continuously refinement of methodology over the past years. This paper outlines the principles in the MIRA method and gives examples and discussions regarding use in different environmental compartments. The risk assessment starts with identification of oil spill scenarios with frequencies of potential release rates and spill durations. The next step is to model the oil drift for each accidental oil spill scenario. Drift and fate of oil is modeled probabilistic. Based on the oil spill scenarios and their probability of oil pollution, the potential environmental damage is quantified for each scenario. The endpoint of environmental damage is reduction of a population and the resulting recovery time (in years) for various species and habitats. Environmental risk levels are then evaluated against the operating companies' environmental acceptance criteria. (author)

  10. A helium gas scintillator active target for photoreaction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Jebali, Ramsey; Annand, John R.M.; Buchanan, Emma; Gardner, Simon; Hamilton, David J.; Livingston, Kenneth; McGeorge, John C.; MacGregor, Ian J.D.; MacRae, Roderick; Reiter, Andreas J.H.; Rosner, Guenther; Sokhan, Daria; Strandberg, Bruno [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Adler, Jan-Olof; Fissum, Kevin; Schroeder, Bent [University of Lund, Department of Physics, Lund (Sweden); Akkurt, Iskender [Sueleyman Demirel University, Fen-Edebiyat Faculty, Isparta (Turkey); Brudvik, Jason; Hansen, Kurt; Isaksson, Lennart; Lundin, Magnus [MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden); Middleton, Duncan G. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Centre for Astro and Particle Physics, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Sjoegren, Johan [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    A multi-cell He gas scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 g/cm{sup 3} at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of N{sub 2} to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has a timing resolution of around 1 ns and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in {sup 4}He, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response. (orig.)

  11. Effect of gas pressure on active screen plasma nitriding response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Akio; Nagatsuka, Kimiaki; Narita, Ryota; Nii, Hiroaki; Akamatsu, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 was active screen plasma nitrided using a 304 steel screen to investigate the effect of the gas pressure on the ASPN response. The sample was treated for 18 ks at 723 K in 25% N2 + 75% H2 gases. The gas pressure was changed to 100, 600 and 1200 Pa. The distance between screen and sample was also changed to 10, 30 and 50 mm. The nitrided samples were characterized by appearance observation, surface roughness, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. After nitriding, polygonal particles with a normal distribution were observed at the center and edges of all the ASPN-treated sample surfaces. Particles on the sample surfaces were finer with an increase in the gas pressure. The nitrided layer with a greater and homogeneous thickness was obtained at a low gas pressure of 100 Pa. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Results from Sales Promotion Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Ban

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An essential element of the sales promotion strategy and not only is the evaluation of the results obtained from the activities performed. Due to their nature and applicability, the evaluation of the sales promotion is much easier to be achieved, but it raises some problems. Using a hypothetical example, we have tried to develop a "classic" evaluation model of the specialty literature.

  13. Experimental results for a novel rotary active magnetic regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Bahl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Active magnetic regenerator (AMR) refrigerators represent an alternative to vapor compression technology and have great potential in realizing cooling devices with high efficiency, which are highly desirable for a broad range of applications. The technology relies on the magnetocaloric effect...... in a solid refrigerant rather than the temperature change that occurs when a gas is compressed/expanded. This paper presents the general considerations for the design and construction of a high frequency rotary AMR device. Experimental results are presented at various cooling powers for a range of operating...

  14. Proximity to natural gas wells and reported health status: results of a household survey in Washington County, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Slizovskiy, Ilya B; Lamers, Vanessa; Trufan, Sally J; Holford, Theodore R; Dziura, James D; Peduzzi, Peter N; Kane, Michael J; Reif, John S; Weiss, Theresa R; Stowe, Meredith H

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the environmental and public health impact of unconventional natural gas extraction activities, including hydraulic fracturing, that occur near residential areas. Our aim was to assess the relationship between household proximity to natural gas wells and reported health symptoms. We conducted a hypothesis-generating health symptom survey of 492 persons in 180 randomly selected households with ground-fed wells in an area of active natural gas drilling. Gas well proximity for each household was compared with the prevalence and frequency of reported dermal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurological symptoms. The number of reported health symptoms per person was higher among residents living 2 km from the nearest gas well (mean ± SD, 1.60 ± 2.14; p = 0.0002). In a model that adjusted for age, sex, household education, smoking, awareness of environmental risk, work type, and animals in house, reported skin conditions were more common in households 2 km from the nearest gas well (odds ratio = 4.1; 95% CI: 1.4, 12.3; p = 0.01). Upper respiratory symptoms were also more frequently reported in persons living in households gas wells (39%) compared with households 1-2 km or > 2 km from the nearest well (31 and 18%, respectively) (p = 0.004). No equivalent correlation was found between well proximity and other reported groups of respiratory, neurological, cardiovascular, or gastrointestinal conditions. Although these results should be viewed as hypothesis generating, and the population studied was limited to households with a ground-fed water supply, proximity of natural gas wells may be associated with the prevalence of health symptoms including dermal and respiratory conditions in residents living near natural gas extraction activities. Further study of these associations, including the role of specific air and water exposures, is warranted.

  15. IAEA activities in gas-cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.; Kupitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the charter to ''foster the exchange of scientific and technical information'', and ''encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world''. This paper describes the Agency's activities in Gas-cooled Reactor (GCR) technology development

  16. Experimental Grey Box Model Identification of an Active Gas Bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane; Pierart Vásquez, Fabián Gonzalo; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2014-01-01

    in a dynamic model of an active gas bearing and subsequent control loop design. A grey box model is determined based on experiments where piezo actuated valves are used to perturb the journal and hence excite the rotor-bearing system. Such modelling from actuator to output is shown to effciently support...

  17. Demand for seasonal gas storage in northwest Europe until 2030. Simulation results with a dynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Joode, J.; Oezdemir, Oe.

    2010-01-01

    The fact that depletion of indigenous gas production increases gas import dependency is widely known and accepted. However, there is considerable less attention for the implications of indigenous resource depletion for the provision of seasonal flexibility. The traditionally largest source of seasonal flexibility in Europe is indigenous gas production, mainly based in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. With the depletion of indigenous sources the market increasingly needs to rely on other sources for seasonal flexibility, such as gas storage facilities. We investigate the future need for gas storage as a source for seasonal flexibility provision using a dynamic gas market model (GASTALE) in which different potential sources for seasonal flexibility - gas production, imports via pipeline, LNG imports and storage facilities - compete with each other in a market-based environment. The inclusion of seasonal flexibility properties in a gas market model allows a more complex analysis of seasonal flexibility issues than previously documented in literature. This is demonstrated in an analysis of the future demand for gas storage in northwestern Europe until 2030. Our results indicate that there is substantial need for additional gas storage facilities and thus supports current project proposals for new investment in gas storage facilities. (author)

  18. Study on the propagation law of shock wave resulting from coal and gas outburst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai; ZHOU Ai-tao; ZHANG Pin; LI Chuan; GUO Yan-wei

    2011-01-01

    According to the formation of shock wave resulting from coal and gas outburst, the gas flow of coal and gas outburst was transformed from an unsteady flow to a steady one based on selected appropriate reference coordinates, and the mathematical expressions were then established by applying mass conservation, momentum conservation equation, and energy conservation equation. On this basis, analyzed gas flow mitigation of variable cross-section area and the outburst intensity, and the relations between cross-section area, velocity, and density; the relations between overpressures and outburst intensity were deduced. Furthermore, shock waves resulting from coal and gas outburst and outburst intensity were measured by experimental setup, the overpressure and outburst intensity of different gas pressures were obtained, and the similar conditions of the experiment were numerically simulated. The averaged overpressure and gas flow velocity of variable cross-section under different gas pressures were numerically derived. The results show that the averaged overpressure and outburst intensity obtained from simulation are in good agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, the gas flow velocity of variable cross-sections approximates to the theoretical analysis.

  19. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. Microbial activities in soil near natural gas leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamse, A D; Hoeks, J; de Bont, J A.M.

    1971-01-01

    Gas leaks cause the death of more than half the trees that perish in the streets since natural gas has been distributed in the Netherlands. Measurements performed in pot experiments, in which a sandy soil was supplied with a constant stream of a mixture of natural gas and air, proved that gas components, such as methane (81.6%), ethane (2.7%), propane (0.37%), were oxidized. Consumption of methane and oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide could be clearly demonstrated. Oxidation of methane started after an extended lag phase during which propane and ethane were found to be consumed. Methane oxidation was demonstrated by a sharp rise of the oxygen-consumption curve, followed by a fall until it became rather constant. After the gas supply had been stopped, a long recovery period was found to be needed for restoring the normal oxygen consumption of the soil. The rate of oxidation was subject to seasonal differences in temperature. Counts of bacteria in soil were carried out using Oxiod membrane filters on Whatman paper discs soaked with a basic salts solutions according to Leadbetter and Foster (1958) or on soil-extract agar plates. Incubation temperature was 30C. The presence of natural gas in soil resulted in an adaptation of the aerobic microflora to this substrate. Moreover, it stimulated the total aerobic microflora as counted on soil-extract agar plates.

  1. Gas nad mud volcanism formation as a result of geodynamic development of the Black sea region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrievsky, A.N.; Karakin, A.V.; Kazmin, V.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text : Fluidodynamic model of moving of gas-mud mixture accompanied by eruptions of mud volcanoes and gas bursts is firstly demonstrated by the example of the Black sea basin. The entire spectrum of gas bursts can be divided into gas and mud-fluid volcanoes. Emanation of hydrocarbon gases during the eruptions accompanied by powerful exploison, bursts of gas, water and fragments of rocks as well as by issue of breccia are typical for the first type of volcanoes. It was suggested that the eastern part of the Black sea forms block or subplate moving to the northeast. This conclusion is important for estimation of seismic and connected geological hazard in the studied region. It was established that deformations and seismicity were mainly confined to the edges of the East Black sea subplate while in its inner part the level of seismic activity is considerably lower.

  2. Flammable gas project expert elicitation results for Hanford Site double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the second phase of parameter quantification by the flammable gas expert panel. This second phase is focused on the analysis of flammable gas accidents in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks. The first phase of parameter quantification, performed in 1997 was focused on the analysis of Hanford single-shell tanks

  3. Results of a Long-Term Demonstration of an Optical Multi-Gas Monitor on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgett, Paul; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Previously at SAMAP we reported on the development of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) based instruments for measuring small gas molecules in real time. TDLS technology has matured rapidly over the last 5 years as a result of advances in low power diode lasers as well as better detection schemes. In collaboration with two small businesses Vista Photonics, Inc. and Nanoracks LLC, NASA developed a 4 gas TDLS based monitor for an experimental demonstration of the technology on the International Space Station (ISS). Vista invented and constructed the core TDLS sensor. Nanoracks designed and built the enclosure, and certified the integrated monitor as a payload. The device, which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, is called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM). MGM measures the 4 gases every few seconds and records a 30 second moving average of the concentrations. The relatively small unit draws only 2.5W. MGM was calibrated at NASA-Johnson Space Center in July 2013 and launched to ISS on a Soyuz vehicle in November 2013. Installation and activation of MGM occurred in February 2014, and the unit has been operating nearly continuously ever since in the Japanese Experiment Module. Data is downlinked from ISS about once per week. Oxygen and carbon dioxide data is compared with that from the central Major Constituents Analyzer. Water vapor data is compared with dew point measurements made by sensors in the Columbus module. The ammonia channel was tested by the crew using a commercial ammonia inhalant. MGM is remarkably stable to date. Results of 18 months of operation are presented and future applications including combustion product monitoring are discussed.

  4. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  5. cGAS drives noncanonical-inflammasome activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerur, Nagaraj; Fukuda, Shinichi; Banerjee, Daipayan; Kim, Younghee; Fu, Dongxu; Apicella, Ivana; Varshney, Akhil; Yasuma, Reo; Fowler, Benjamin J; Baghdasaryan, Elmira; Marion, Kenneth M; Huang, Xiwen; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Hirano, Yoshio; Serbulea, Vlad; Ambati, Meenakshi; Ambati, Vidya L; Kajiwara, Yuji; Ambati, Kameshwari; Hirahara, Shuichiro; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Ogura, Yuichiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kim, Kyung Bo; Hinton, David R; Leitinger, Norbert; Cambier, John C; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Kenney, M Cristina; Jazwinski, S Michal; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hara, Isao; West, A Phillip; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Sadda, SriniVas R; Gelfand, Bradley D; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2018-01-01

    Geographic atrophy is a blinding form of age-related macular degeneration characterized by retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) death; the RPE also exhibits DICER1 deficiency, resultant accumulation of endogenous Alu-retroelement RNA, and NLRP3-inflammasome activation. How the inflammasome is activated in this untreatable disease is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that RPE degeneration in human-cell-culture and mouse models is driven by a noncanonical-inflammasome pathway that activates caspase-4 (caspase-11 in mice) and caspase-1, and requires cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS)-dependent interferon-β production and gasdermin D-dependent interleukin-18 secretion. Decreased DICER1 levels or Alu-RNA accumulation triggers cytosolic escape of mitochondrial DNA, which engages cGAS. Moreover, caspase-4, gasdermin D, interferon-β, and cGAS levels were elevated in the RPE in human eyes with geographic atrophy. Collectively, these data highlight an unexpected role of cGAS in responding to mobile-element transcripts, reveal cGAS-driven interferon signaling as a conduit for mitochondrial-damage-induced inflammasome activation, expand the immune-sensing repertoire of cGAS and caspase-4 to noninfectious human disease, and identify new potential targets for treatment of a major cause of blindness.

  6. Enova results and activities report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    Energy was high on the agenda in 2006. The higher than normal electricity prices, Norway's strong dependence on electricity, and the increased focus on climate change resulted in a lot of interest in environmentally friendly energy solutions. For Enova this meant an exciting and demanding year. At the same time it has been important to take into account the long-term perspective of the activities. Enova is supposed to be a driving force for future oriented energy solutions and to contribute to a lasting change in Norway's generation and use of energy. During the past year better knowledge about what is happening to our world has had a positive effect on Enova's efforts. This increased attention has provided Enova with the opportunity to demonstrate that energy efficiency and renewable energy are the keys to a sustainable energy future. Moreover, the general focus on energy has enabled Enova to more effectively provide business and industry, households and the public authorities with good energy advice. refs., figs., tabs., ills

  7. Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

    The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

  8. 3D analysis of the gas dynamic loads in the KKB containment resulting from combustion of radiolysis gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotchourko, A.; Breitung, W.; Dorofeev, S.; Ohlmeyer, H.

    2003-01-01

    The radiolysis gas explosion in the KKB power plant was recalculated in 3D simulations as followed: The total energy released was limited as far as possible. - Pressure generation and dispersion across the containment was calculated for three different initial energies. - Loads in the near field were simulated assuming the most probable total energy (about 14 MJ) and using three different models of the explosion process. The calculation with direct simulation of detonation inside the tube provided realistic results, according to the authors. - Transient local pressure and temperature loads were recorded in specified local points and evaluated in further damage analyses. The results showed that modern 3D flow and combustion calculations provide valuable information on pressure and temperature loads resulting from radiolysis gas reactions in big complex safety containments. (orig.) [de

  9. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  10. RSG-GAS. Current and strategic plan of future activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R; Tarigan, A [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2012-03-15

    The Multi Purpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy, so-called RSG-GAS, is the third research reactor built in Indonesia and operated by National Nuclear Energy of Indonesia (BATAN). This MTR type reactor achieved its first criticality in July 1987. Since then it has been operated about 77.300 hours. It uses LEU fuel in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al at the beginning, but then converted to silicide fuel, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al by a density of 2.96 g/cm{sup 3} preserving its nominal power of 30 MW and average flux of 2.5x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} sec. In the last two years the reactor is operated more than 3.500 hours per year. Several equipments have been refurbished due to ageing. The reactor is operated mainly for serving radioisotopes production, neutron activation analysis (NAA), neutron beam experiments and general irradiation for research and development activities. The future activities of the RSG-GAS reactor will be prioritized first on increasing the reliability and availability of the reactor operation to assure the fulfillment of the demand of the isotope production, along with the improvement of neutron beam instruments and NAA facilities to increase its utilization. In this context, the collaboration in the utilization of RSG-GAS for many application with the countries in the region is also expected. The human resource development for the new recruited RSG-GAS staff is also a challenge and become a priority. (author)

  11. Shale gas activity and increased rates of sexually transmitted infections in Ohio, 2000–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeau, Zoe; Elliott, Elise G.; Warren, Joshua L.; Niccolai, Linda M.

    2018-01-01

    Background The growing shale gas (“fracking”) industry depends on a mobile workforce, whose influx could have social impacts on host communities. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can increase through sexual mixing patterns associated with labor migration. No prior studies have quantified the relationship between shale gas activity and rates of three reportable STIs: chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Methods We conducted a longitudinal, ecologic study from 2000–2016 in Ohio, situated in a prolific shale gas region in the United States (US). Data on reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis by county and year were obtained from the Ohio Department of Health. All 88 counties were classified as none, low, and high shale gas activity in each year, using data from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Annual rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated from mixed-effects Poisson regression models evaluating the relationship between shale gas activity and reported annual STI rates while adjusting for secular trends and potential confounders obtained from the US Census. Results Compared to counties with no shale gas activity, counties with high activity had 21% (RR = 1.21; 95%CI = 1.08–1.36) increased rates of chlamydia and 19% (RR = 1.27; 95%CI 0.98–1.44) increased rates of gonorrhea, respectively. No association was observed for syphilis. Conclusion This first report of a link between shale gas activity and increased rates of both chlamydia and gonorrhea may inform local policies and community health efforts. PMID:29570712

  12. U.S. Natural Gas Storage Risk-Based Ranking Methodology and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folga, Steve [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Portante, Edgar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shamsuddin, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tompkins, Angeli [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Talaber, Leah [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McLamore, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kavicky, Jim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Conzelmann, Guenter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Levin, Todd [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This report summarizes the methodology and models developed to assess the risk to energy delivery from the potential loss of underground gas storage (UGS) facilities located within the United States. The U.S. has a total of 418 existing storage fields, of which 390 are currently active. The models estimate the impacts of a disruption of each of the active UGS facilities on their owners/operators, including (1) local distribution companies (LDCs), (2) directly connected transporting pipelines and thus on the customers in downstream States, and (3) third-party entities and thus on contracted customers expecting the gas shipment. Impacts are measured across all natural gas customer classes. For the electric sector, impacts are quantified in terms of natural gas-fired electric generation capacity potentially affected from the loss of a UGS facility. For the purpose of calculating the overall supply risk, the overall consequence of the disruption of an UGS facility across all customer classes is expressed in terms of the number of expected equivalent residential customer outages per year, which combines the unit business interruption cost per customer class and the estimated number of affected natural gas customers with estimated probabilities of UGS disruptions. All models and analyses are based on publicly available data. The report presents a set of findings and recommendations in terms of data, further analyses, regulatory requirements and standards, and needs to improve gas/electric industry coordination for electric reliability.

  13. Temperature-modulated direct thermoelectric gas sensors: thermal modeling and results for fast hydrocarbon sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Frank; Moos, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Direct thermoelectric gas sensors are a promising alternative to conductometric gas sensors. For accurate results, a temperature modulation technique in combination with a regression analysis is advantageous. However, the thermal time constant of screen-printed sensors is quite large. As a result, up to now the temperature modulation frequency (20 mHz) has been too low and the corresponding principle-related response time (50 s) has been too high for many applications. With a special design, respecting the physical properties of thermal waves and the use of signal processing similar to a lock-in-amplifier, it is possible to achieve response times of about 1 s. As a result, direct thermoelectric gas sensors with SnO 2 as a gas-sensitive material respond fast and are reproducible to the propane concentration in the ambient atmosphere. Due to the path-independent behavior of the thermovoltage and the temperature, the measured thermopower of two sensors is almost identical

  14. Gas lantern mantle: a low activity alpha particle source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.; Manzoor, S.

    1991-01-01

    Commercially available gas lantern mantles contain a substantial amount of radioactive ThO 2 . Gas lantern mantles purchased from a Sydney camping shop were incinerated, deposited as a thin layer on a aluminium planchette, and the emitted alpha spectrum was measured with a silicon surfacer barrier detector. The specific activity of the samples was estimated by high resolution gamma spectroscopy using a high purity germanium detector as well as CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors. The micro-morphology of the incinerated powder was analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The depth dose and LET distribution of alpha particles in soft tissue were calculated from the energy spectrum. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  15. Nitrogen as the carrier gas for helium emission along an active fault in NW Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Wei-Li; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Walia, Vivek; Lin, Shih-Jung; Fu, Ching-Chou; Chen, Yue-Gau; Sano, Yuji; Chen, Cheng-Hong; Wen, Kuo-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Variations of He gas concentration are widely applied in studies devoted to the location of faults and to monitor seismic activities. Up to now, its migration mechanism in soil is not fully understood. A systematic soil gas survey across an active fault in NW Taiwan provides the opportunity to closely examine the mechanism of He migration in the fault zone. Significant spatial and temporal correlations observed between soil N 2 and He gas support the hypothesis that N 2 is the probable carrier gas for He emission in the studied area. Based on N 2 /Ar ratios and N 2 isotopic results, the excess soil N 2 in this study is considered to be largely derived from ancient atmospheric air which was dissolved in groundwater. Furthermore, observations rule out the possibility of CO 2 being the dominant carrier gas for He in the studied area based on the C and He isotopic compositions and the relationship between concentrations of these gases. At least two soil gas sources, A and B, can be identified in the studied area. Source A is an abiogenic gas source characterized by excess N 2 and He, and very low O 2 and CO 2 content. Source B, on the other hand, is a mixture of biogenic gas and atmospheric air. The development of the fault system is an important factor affecting the degree of mixture between sources A and B. Therefore, variations of soil gas composition, in particular those derived from source A, could be a useful proxy for tracing faults in the area.

  16. Results of vapor space monitoring of flammable gas Watch List tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization Systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, release rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed

  17. Results of Vapor Space Monitoring of Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    2000-09-27

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, released rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  18. Annual report 2009. Results and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    In 2009 Enova entered into agreements which together will provide 3.03 TWh saved and produced renewable energy. So far, Enova has supported energy projects equivalent to 13.8 TWh in the period to 2009. High activity in the industrial energy efficiency and environmentally friendly heat have contributed positively. (eb)

  19. Annual report 2009. Results and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 Enova entered into agreements which together will provide 3.03 TWh saved and produced renewable energy. So far, Enova has supported energy projects equivalent to 13.8 TWh in the period to 2009. High activity in the industrial energy efficiency and environmentally friendly heat have contributed positively. (eb)

  20. Test Plan for Measuring Ventilation Rates and Combustible Gas Levels in TWRS Active Catch Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-10-25

    The purpose of this sampling activity is to obtain data to support an initial evaluation of potential hazards due to the presence of combustible gas in catch tanks that are currently operated by the River Protection Project (RPP). Results of the hazard analysis will be used to support closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. The data collection will be conducted in accordance with the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995). Combustible gas, ammonia, and organic vapor levels in the headspace of the catch tanks will be field-measured using hand-held instruments. If a combustible gas level measurement in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will he collected in SUMMA' canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flowing through the tanks. This test plan identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance, and reporting objectives for this data collection effort. The plan also provides the procedures for field measurement of combustible gas concentrations and ventilation rates.

  1. Production of activated char from Illinois coal for flue gas cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.; Kruse, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Activated chars were produced from Illinois coal and tested in several flue gas cleanup applications. High-activity chars that showed excellent potential for both SO2 and NOx removal were prepared from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal. The SO2 (120 ??C) and NOx (25 ??C) removal performance of one char compared favorably with that of a commercial activated carbon (Calgon Centaur). The NOx removal performance of the same char at 120 ??C exceeded that of the Centaur carbon by more than 1 order of magnitude. Novel char preparation methods were developed including oxidation/thermal desorption and hydrogen treatments, which increased and preserved, respectively, the active sites for SO2 and NOx adsorption. The results of combined SO2/NOx removal tests, however, suggest that SO2 and NOx compete for similar adsorption sites and SO2 seems to be more strongly adsorbed than NO. A low-activity, low-cost char was also developed for cleanup of incinerator flue gas. A three-step method involving coal preoxidation, pyrolysis, and CO2 activation was used to produce the char from Illinois coal. Five hundred pounds of the char was tested on a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial incinerator in Germany. The char was effective in removing >97% of the dioxins and furans present in the flue gas; mercury levels were below detectable limits.

  2. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  3. Politics and economics to shape international oil and gas activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that political and economic events play unusually strong roles in shaping worldwide oil and gas activity levels this year. Developments in the former U.S.S.R. will be critical. As the now-independent republics adopt new economic systems, production and demand patterns will change, as will exports from what has been the world's leading oil producer. Changing conditions in the Middle East among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting countries also will affect the industry in the year following the brief Persian Gulf war. Unless worldwide demand surges unexpectedly, these substantial additions to supply will tend to weaken oil prices in 1992

  4. Model-Based Control Design for Flexible Rotors Supported by Active Gas Bearings - Theory & Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierart Vásquez, Fabián Gonzalo

    , abundant and clean. Nevertheless, this technology has important drawbacks: the low viscosity of the lubricant results in a low load carrying capacity and gas bearings also presents low damping properties, which often lead to a reduced stability range and make dangerous running close to, or across...... theoretical model for active gas bearings, with special attention to the modelling of the injection system. Secondly, experimentally validate the improved mathematical model in terms of static properties (journal equilibrium position and resulting aerodynamic forces) and dynamic properties (natural...

  5. Results of analyzing natural gas during the use of biochemical processes in a petroleum deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yulbarisov, E M

    1972-01-01

    Laboratory and commercial scale experiments with a geobioreagent and the Arlanskii deposit petroleum gave a sharp increase in the content of heavier hydrocarbons, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide in the gas and an increase in the yield of gasoline fraction boiling below 122/sup 0/C. The commercial scale experiments were done in a stratum 1200 m deep during waterflood recovery at 200 kg/cm/sup 2/. A substantial increase in ethane and higher hydrocarbons in the gas and increased petroleum yield were observed, especially after each waterflood. The effect of water was explained by higher activity of the bacteria at a lower concentration of rock salts.

  6. Removal of calcium and magnesium ions from shale gas flowback water by chemically activated zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Haiqing; Liu, Teng; He, Qiping; Li, Duo; Crittenden, John; Liu, Baicang

    2017-07-01

    Shale gas has become a new sweet spot of global oil and gas exploration, and the large amount of flowback water produced during shale gas extraction is attracting increased attention. Internal recycling of flowback water for future hydraulic fracturing is currently the most effective, and it is necessary to decrease the content of divalent cations for eliminating scaling and maintaining effectiveness of friction reducer. Zeolite has been widely used as a sorbent to remove cations from wastewater. This work was carried out to investigate the effects of zeolite type, zeolite form, activation chemical, activation condition, and sorption condition on removal of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ from shale gas flowback water. Results showed that low removal of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ was found for raw zeolite 4A and zeolite 13X, and the efficiency of the mixture of both zeolites was slightly higher. Compared with the raw zeolites, the zeolites after activation using NaOH and NaCl greatly improved the sorption performance, and there was no significant difference between dynamic activation and static activation. Dynamic sorption outperformed static sorption, the difference exceeding 40% and 7-70% for removal of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ , respectively. Moreover, powdered zeolites outperformed granulated zeolites in divalent cation removal.

  7. Annual report 2010. Results and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    In 2010, 926 G Wh of renewable heating was contracted. This is nearly on par with the record-breaking year of 2009, when Enova had extra funds to distribute through the Governments Stimulus Package in response to the financial crisis. District heating has been developed, or is in the process of being developed, in most major cities.We also expect new developments in smaller communities and extensions of existing facilities in cities. We expect this to result in an increased number of applications for smaller projects. (au)

  8. Annual report 2010. Results and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, 926 G Wh of renewable heating was contracted. This is nearly on par with the record-breaking year of 2009, when Enova had extra funds to distribute through the Governments Stimulus Package in response to the financial crisis. District heating has been developed, or is in the process of being developed, in most major cities.We also expect new developments in smaller communities and extensions of existing facilities in cities. We expect this to result in an increased number of applications for smaller projects. (au)

  9. Lessons from wet gas flow metering systems using differential measurements devices: Testing and flow modelling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazin, J.; Couput, J.P.; Dudezert, C. et al

    2005-07-01

    A significant number of wet gas meters used for high GVF and very high GVF are based on differential pressure measurements. Recent high pressure tests performed on a variety of different DP devices on different flow loops are presented. Application of existing correlations is discussed for several DP devices including Venturi meters. For Venturi meters, deviations vary from 9% when using the Murdock correlation to less than 3 % with physical based models. The use of DP system in a large domain of conditions (Water Liquid Ratio) especially for liquid estimation will require information on the WLR This obviously raises the question of the gas and liquid flow metering accuracy in wet gas meters and highlight needs to understand AP systems behaviour in wet gas flows (annular / mist / annular mist). As an example, experimental results obtained on the influence of liquid film characteristics on a Venturi meter are presented. Visualizations of the film upstream and inside the Venturi meter are shown. They are completed by film characterization. The AP measurements indicate that for a same Lockhart Martinelli parameter, the characteristics of the two phase flow have a major influence on the correlation coefficient. A 1D model is defined and the results are compared with the experiments. These results indicate that the flow regime influences the AP measurements and that a better modelling of the flow phenomena is needed even for allocation purposes. Based on that, lessons and way forward in wet gas metering systems improvement for allocation and well metering are discussed and proposed. (author) (tk)

  10. The N terminus of cGAS de-oligomerizes the cGAS:DNA complex and lifts the DNA size restriction of core-cGAS activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Arum; Park, Eun-Byeol; Lee, Janghyun; Choi, Byong-Seok; Kang, Suk-Jo

    2017-03-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a DNA-sensing enzyme in the innate immune system. Recent studies using core-cGAS lacking the N terminus investigated the mechanism for binding of double-stranded (ds) DNA and synthesis of 2',3'-cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), a secondary messenger that ultimately induces type I interferons. However, the function of the N terminus of cGAS remains largely unknown. Here, we found that the N terminus enhanced the activity of core-cGAS in vivo. Importantly, the catalytic activity of core-cGAS decreased as the length of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) increased, but the diminished activity was restored by addition of the N terminus. Furthermore, the N terminus de-oligomerized the 2 : 2 complex of core-cGAS and dsDNA into a 1 : 1 complex, suggesting that the N terminus enhanced the activity of core-cGAS by facilitating formation of a monomeric complex of cGAS and DNA. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Seismo-Geochemical Variations in SW Taiwan: Multi-Parameter Automatic Gas Monitoring Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. F.; Fu, C.-C.; Walia, V.; Chen, C.-H.; Chyi, L. L.; Liu, T.-K.; Song, S.-R.; Lee, M.; Lin, C.-W.; Lin, C.-C.

    2006-04-01

    Gas variations of many mud volcanoes and hot springs distributed along the tectonic sutures in southwestern Taiwan are considered to be sensitive to the earthquake activity. Therefore, a multi-parameter automatic gas station was built on the bank of one of the largest mud-pools at an active fault zone of southwestern Taiwan, for continuous monitoring of CO2, CH4, N2 and H2O, the major constituents of its bubbling gases. During the year round monitoring from October 2001 to October 2002, the gas composition, especially, CH4 and CO2, of the mud pool showed significant variations. Taking the CO2/CH4 ratio as the main indicator, anomalous variations can be recognized from a few days to a few weeks before earthquakes and correlated well with those with a local magnitude >4.0 and local intensities >2. It is concluded that the gas composition in the area is sensitive to the local crustal stress/strain and is worthy to conduct real-time monitoring for the seismo-geochemical precursors.

  12. NOx results from two combustors tested on medium BTU coal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, T. P.; Carl, D. E.; Vermes, G.; Schwab, J.; Notardonato, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of tests of two combustor configurations using coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are reported. The trials were run with a ceramic-lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannular swirl burner (MASB) using a range of temperatures and pressures representative of industrial turbine inlet conditions. A lean mixture was examined at 104, 197, and 254 Btu/Scf, yielding NO(x) emissions of 5, 20, and 70 ppmv, respectively. The MASB was employed only with a gas rated at 220-270 Btu/Scf, producing 80 ppmv NO(x) at rated engine conditions. The results are concluded to be transferrable to current machines. Further tests on the effects of gas composition, the scaling of combustors to utility size, and the development of improved wall cooling techniques and variable geometry are indicated.

  13. Soil gas and radon entry into a simple test structure: Comparison of experimental and modelling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Søgaard-Hansen, J.; Majborn, B.

    1994-01-01

    A radon test structure has been established at a field site at Riso National Laboratory. Measurements have been made of soil gas entry rates, pressure couplings and radon depletion. The experimental results have been compared with results obtained from measured soil parameters and a two......-dimensional steady-state numerical model of Darcy flow and combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. For most probe locations, the calculated values of the pressure couplings and the radon depletion agree well with the measured values, thus verifying important elements of the Darcy flow approximation......, and the ability of the model to treat combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. However, the model gives an underestimation of the soil gas entry rate. Even if it is assumed that the soil has a permeability equal to the highest of the measured values, the model underestimates the soil gas entry rate...

  14. Diversification of Oil and Gas Companies’ Activities in the Condition of Oil Prices Reduction and Economic Sanctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V. Sheveleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the influence of the economic sanctions imposed from the USA and the EU and oil prices reduction on the oil and gas companies and the directions of diversification of their activity as a method of management of price risks are considered. In the modern dynamic and quickly developing world, in the conditions of globalization and market economy, the oil and gas companies are affected by various risks which can exert negative impact on production and financial results. Risks can arise in absolutely various spheres, beginning from natural and technological hazards, and finishing with price risks. Sharp reduction of oil prices and decrease in demand for energy resources in the world markets, first of all in the European countries, input of financial or technological sanctions from the USA and Europe against Russia in 2014 has caused necessity of search a new more effective methods of price risks management of the oil and gas company. The methods of price risk management include the creation of commodity reserves, the establishment of a reserve fund, long-term contracts, subsidies from the state and the diversification of activities. The most effective it is possible to offer diversification of oil and gas companies' activity. It is expedient to carry out diversification of oil and gas companies' activity in such directions as geographical diversification of the oil, oil products and gas realization directions, geographical diversification of oil and gas companies' purchasing activity, diversification of oil, oil products and gas transportation ways, diversification of oil and gas companies' business. This approach allows to expand the activities of the oil and gas companies and create additional ways to generate revenue and enhance efficiency of oil and gas companies.

  15. [Impact of introduction of O2 on the welding arc of gas pool coupled activating TIG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Guo

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper, Boltzmann plot method was applied to analyze the temperature distributions of the are plasma when the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding was at different coupling degrees with the outer gas being O2. Based on this study of temperature distributions, the changing regularities of are voltage and are appearance were studied. The result shows that compared with traditional TIG welding, the introduction of O2 makes the welding arc constricted slightly, the temperature of the are center build up, and the are voltage increase. When argon being the inner gas, oxygen serving as the outer gas instead of argon makes the are constricted more obviously. When the coupling degree increases from 0 to 2, the temperature of the are center and the are voltage both increase slightly. In the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding the are is constricted not obviously, and the reason why the weld penetration is improved dramatically in the welding of stainless steel is not are constriction.

  16. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  17. 77 FR 22387 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2012-0024] Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems Annual Report, Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems Incident Report...

  18. 77 FR 58616 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2012-0024] Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems Annual Report, Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems Incident Report...

  19. Scientific results of the Second Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition in the Ulleung Basin (UBGH2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, Michael; Kim, Gil-Young; Chun, Jong-Hwa; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2013-01-01

    As a part of Korean National Gas Hydrate Program, the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) was conducted from 9 July to 30 September, 2010 in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea using the D/V Fugro Synergy. The UBGH2 was performed to understand the distribution of gas hydrates as required for a resource assessment and to find potential candidate sites suitable for a future offshore production test, especially targeting gas hydrate-bearing sand bodies in the basin. The UBGH2 sites were distributed across most of the basin and were selected to target mainly sand-rich turbidite deposits. The 84-day long expedition consisted of two phases. The first phase included logging-while-drilling/measurements-while-drilling (LWD/MWD) operations at 13 sites. During the second phase, sediment cores were collected from 18 holes at 10 of the 13 LWD/MWD sites. Wireline logging (WL) and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were also acquired after coring operations at two of these 10 sites. In addition, seafloor visual observation, methane sensing, as well as push-coring and sampling using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) were conducted during both phases of the expedition. Recovered gas hydrates occurred either as pore-filling medium associated with discrete turbidite sand layers, or as fracture-filling veins and nodules in muddy sediments. Gas analyses indicated that the methane within the sampled gas hydrates is primarily of biogenic origin. This paper provides a summary of the operational and scientific results of the UBGH2 expedition as described in 24 papers that make up this special issue of the Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology.

  20. Implementing the EMF 9 gas trade scenarios and interpreting the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowse, J.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed description of the model employed appears in Rowse (1986) and the Appendix of Rowse (1987). Only the salient features are discussed here, along with the modifications carried out for the EMF scenarios and certain specific data and assumptions important for understanding the empirical results. The nonlinear programming model has seven Canadian regions, pipeline links to three US regions, twenty-five three-year time periods representing 1986-2060, and perfect foresight in allocating gas to domestic and export regions. It determines equilibrium Canadian consumption levels, Canadian supplies and exports to the US over this time frame by solving for equilibrium prices. Figure 1 indicates the regional breakdown employed, with the principal supply regions lying in Western Canada. Ontario is the principal consuming region in Canada. Prospective supplies and their locations are also indicated in Figure 1. All producing provinces of Western Canada have existing and prospective conventional supplies of gas, while prospective nonconventional supplies are confied to Alberta. Nonconventional or Deep Basin supplies are assumed available only by the mid-1990's at the earliest because they have not previously been commercially produced. Prospective supplies are also assumed available from the Mackenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea area - henceforth simply Delta - but only by the mid-1990's as well due to the lead time necessary for pipeline construction and for industry confidence in the financial viability of megaprojects to recover. Delta gas is shown as a prospective Alberta source because, if developed, it will likely be pipelined south to connect with the existing transportation network in Alberta. Both nonconventional gas and Delta gas are more costly than future conventional gas supplies but the latter can only be introduced gradually over time because of constraints on gas finding rates and expansion of the domestic drilling rig fleet

  1. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  2. Development of AN Active 238UF6 Gas Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, C.; Enders, J.; Freudenberger, M.; Göök, A.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    2014-09-01

    Detailed studies of the fission process, e.g., the search for parity nonconservation (PNC) effects, the energy dependence of fission modes or the population of fission isomers, depend on high quality data, therefore requiring high luminosities. An active gas target containing uranium may overcome the deterioration of energy and angular resolution caused by large solid target thicknesses. A single Frisch-grid ionization chamber has been built to test a mixture of standard counting gases (e.g., argon) with depleted uranium hexafluoride (238UF6), utilizing a triple alpha source to evaluate signal quality and drift velocity. For mass fractions of up to 4 percent of 238U the drift velocity increases with rising UF6 content, while a good signal quality and energy resolution is preserved.

  3. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  4. Tank 241-BX-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  5. Tank 241-U-203 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  6. Tank 241-C-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  7. Tank 241-S-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  8. Tank 241-U-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  9. Tank 241-SX-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  10. Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  11. Tank 241-C-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  12. Tank 241-BY-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  13. Tank 241-T-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in January 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  14. Tank 241-SX-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  15. Tank 241-TY-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  16. Tank 241-C-110 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  17. Tank 241-C-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  18. Tank 241-C-107 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  19. Tank 241-C-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  20. FIRST OPERATING RESULTS OF A DYNAMIC GAS BEARING TURBINE IN AN INDUSTRIAL HYDROGEN LIQUEFIER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  1. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Test results from the GA Technologies engineering-scale off-gas treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, D.D.; Olguin, L.J.; Wilbourn, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Test results are available from the GA Technologies (GA) off-gas treatment facilities using gas streams from both the graphite fuel element burner system and from the spent fuel dissolver. The off-gas system is part of a pilot plant for development of processes for treating spent fuel from high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). One method for reducing the volume of HTGR fuel prior to reprocessing or spent fuel storage is to crush and burn the graphite fuel elements. The burner off-gas (BOG) contains radioactive components, principally H-3, C-14, Kr-85, I-129, and Rn-220, as well as chemical forms such as CO 2 , CO, O 2 , and SO 2 . The BOG system employs components designed to remove these constituents. Test results are reported for the iodine and SO 2 adsorbers and the CO/HT oxidizer. Integrated testing of major BOG system components confirmed the performance of units evaluated in individual tests. Design decontamination and conversion factors were maintained for up to 72 h. In a reprocessing flowsheet, the solid product from the burners is dissolved in nitric or Thorex acid. The dissolver off-gas (DOG) contains radioactive components H-3, Kr-85, I-129, Rn-220 plus chemical forms such as nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/). In the pilot-scale system iodine is removed from the DOG by adsorption. Tests of iodine removal have been conducted using either silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) or AgNO 3 -impregnated silica gel (AC-6120). Although each sorbent performed well in the presence of NO/sub x/, the silica gel adsorbent proved more efficient in silver utilization and, thus, more cost effective

  3. SO{sub 2} removal from flue gas by activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilgun Karatepe; Ilkun Orbak; Reha Yavuz; Ayse Ozyuguran [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey). Institute of Energy

    2007-07-01

    Adsorption of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) onto activated carbons prepared from Tuncbilek lignite with different methods was investigated. Experimental results showed that the adsorption temperature, initial SO{sub 2} concentration, particle size of the activated carbon and H{sub 2}O content in the flue gas had significantly effect on the amounts of SO{sub 2} adsorbed. Textural (BET surface area, micropore surface area, total pore volume, micropore volume and average pore size) characteristics of activated carbons also played an important role on adsorption of SO{sub 2}. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Improved of Natural Gas Storage with Adsorbed Natural Gas (ANG) Technology Using Activated Carbon from Plastic Waste Polyethylene Terepthalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Nasruddin; Sanal, A.; Bernama, A.; Haris, F.; Hardhi, M.

    2017-07-01

    Indonesia imports high amount of Fuel Oil. Although Indonesia has abundant amount of natural gas reserve, the obstacle lies within the process of natural gas storage itself. In order to create a safe repository, the ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) technology is planned. ANG technology in itself has been researched much to manufacture PET-based activated carbon for natural gas storage, but ANG still has several drawbacks. This study begins with making preparations for the equipment and materials that will be used, by characterizing the natural gas, measuring the empty volume, and degassing. The next step will be to examine the adsorption process. The maximum storage capacity obtained in this study for a temperature of 27°C and pressure of 35 bar is 0.0586 kg/kg, while for the desorption process, a maximum value for desorption efficiency was obtained on 35°C temperature with a value of 73.39%.

  5. Determining greenhouse gas balances of biomass fuel cycles. Results to date from task 15 of IEA bio-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlamadinger, B.; Spitzer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Selected activities of IEA Bio-energy Task 15 are described. Task 15 of IEA Bio-energy, entitled 'Greenhouse Gas Balances of Bio-energy Systems', aims at investigating processes involved in the use of bio-energy systems on a full fuel-cycle basis to establish overall greenhouse gas balances. The work of Task 15 includes, among other things, a compilation of existing data on greenhouse gas emissions from various biomass production and conversion processes, a standard methodology for greenhouse gas balances of bio-energy systems, a bibliography, and recommendations for selection of appropriate national strategies for greenhouse gas mitigation. (K.A.)

  6. The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge 1992: Exhaust emissions testing and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimkus, W. A.; Larsen, R. P.; Zammit, M. G.; Davies, J. G.; Salmon, G. S.; Bruetsch, R. I.

    The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge '92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the U.S. Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

  7. Terahertz Active Photonic Crystals for Condensed Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Unterrainer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The terahertz (THz spectral region, covering frequencies from 1 to 10 THz, is highly interesting for chemical sensing. The energy of rotational and vibrational transitions of molecules lies within this frequency range. Therefore, chemical fingerprints can be derived, allowing for a simple detection scheme. Here, we present an optical sensor based on active photonic crystals (PhCs, i.e., the pillars are fabricated directly from an active THz quantum-cascade laser medium. The individual pillars are pumped electrically leading to laser emission at cryogenic temperatures. There is no need to couple light into the resonant structure because the PhC itself is used as the light source. An injected gas changes the resonance condition of the PhC and thereby the laser emission frequency. We achieve an experimental frequency shift of 10−3 times the center lasing frequency. The minimum detectable refractive index change is 1.6 × 10−5 RIU.

  8. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: Results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, P.; Lall, M.; Mazumdar, A.; Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Riedel, M.; Sain, K.; Sathe, A.V.; Vishwanath, K.; NGHP Expedition 01 Scientific Party

    in Japan (Tsujii et al., 2009) and in the Gulf of Mexico (Boswell et al., 2012a) and the pace of gas-hydrate energy-assessment projects continues to accelerate. Beyond a future energy resource, gas hydrates may in some cases represent a significant...

  9. The JET gas baking plant for DT operation and analysis of tritium permeation and baking gas activation in DTE1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, R.J.H.; Andrew, P.; Bryan, S.; Hemmrich, J.L. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    The JET gas baking plant allows the vacuum vessel to be heated for conditioning and plasma operations. The vessel was maintained at 320 deg. C for the JET DT experiments (DTE 1). The design of the plant is outlined with particular reference to the features to provide compatibility with tritium operations. The experience of baking gas activation and tritium permeation into the plant are given, Developmentsto reduce the tritium permeation out of the vessel are considered. (authors)

  10. Preliminary results of soil radon gas survey of the Lake Bosomtwi impact crater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preko, S.; Danuor, S.K.; Menyeh, A.

    2004-01-01

    Soil radon gas survey was carried out in the Lake Bosomtwi impact crater area on eight profiles, which ran rapidly toward the end of the crater. One thousand soil samples, each weighing about 100g were acquired at a depth of 20 cm and at regular intervals of 10 m. The radon gas decay rate of the soil samples was then determined in the laboratory using the RDA-200 Radon detector and RDU-200 Degassing unit. It was found that generally areas south and east of the crater, which are severally sheared, faulted and fractured recorded high radon gas decay rates of the order of 800 counts/min whilst relatively undisturbed zones west of the crater recorded lower rates of the order of 20 counts/min. the cause of fracturing, shearing and faulting have been attributed to the effect of the meteorite impact in the Bosomtwi area, and therefore the results indicate that the soil radon gas survey could serve as a useful tool in mapping the impact-related structural characteristics of the crater. (author)

  11. Experimental Results from a Laser-Triggered, Gas-Insulated, Spark-Gap Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, J. F.; Ruden, E. L.; Domonkos, M. T.

    2017-10-01

    We are performing experiments on a laser-triggered spark-gap switch with the goal of studying the transition from photoionization to current conduction. The discharge of current through the switch is triggered by a focused 532-nm wavelength beam from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of about 10 ns. The trigger pulse is delivered along the longitudinal axis of the switch, and the focal spot can be placed anywhere along the axis of the 5-mm, gas-insulated gap between the switch electrodes. The switch test bed is designed to support a variety of working gases (e.g., Ar, N2) over a range of pressures. Electrical and optical diagnostics are used to measure switch performance as a function of parameters such as charge voltage, trigger pulse energy, insulating gas pressure, and gas species. A Mach-Zehnder imaging interferometer system operating at 532 nm is being used to obtain interferograms of the discharge plasma in the switch. We are also developing a 1064-nm interferometry diagnostic in an attempt to measure plasma free electron and neutral gas density profiles simultaneously within the switch gap. Results from our most recent experiments will be presented.

  12. Flue Gas Desulfurization by Mechanically and Thermally Activated Sodium Bicarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Walawska Barbara; Szymanek Arkadiusz; Pajdak Anna; Nowak Marzena

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of study on structural parameters (particle size, surface area, pore volume) and the sorption ability of mechanically and thermally activated sodium bicarbonate. The sorption ability of the modified sorbent was evaluated by: partial and overall SO2 removal efficiency, conversion rate, normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR). Sodium bicarbonate was mechanically activated by various grinding techniques, using three types of mills: fluid bed opposed jet mill, fine i...

  13. Solid electrolyte gas sensors based on cyclic voltammetry with one active electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, G; Jasinski, P, E-mail: gregor@biomed.eti.pg.gda.pl [Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Informatics, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-10-29

    Solid state gas sensors are cost effective, small, rugged and reliable. Typically electrochemical solid state sensors operate in either potentiometric or amperometric mode. However, a lack of selectivity is sometimes a shortcoming of such sensors. It seems that improvements of selectivity can be obtained in case of the electrocatalytic sensors, which operate in cyclic voltammetry mode. Their working principle is based on acquisition of an electric current, while voltage ramp is applied to the sensor. The current-voltage response depends in a unique way on the type and concentration of ambient gas. Most electrocatalytic sensors have symmetrical structure. They are in a form of pellets with two electrodes placed on their opposite sides. Electrochemical reactions occur simultaneously on both electrodes. In this paper results for sensors with only one active electrode exposed to ambient gas are presented. The other electrode was isolated from ambient gas with dielectric sealing. This sensor construction allows application of advanced measuring procedures, which permit sensor regeneration acceleration. Experiments were conducted on Nasicon sensors. Properties of two sensors, one with one active electrode and second with symmetrical structure, used for the detection of mixtures of NO{sub 2} and synthetic air are compared.

  14. The adaptive internet application for interpretation of the transformer oil gas chromatographic analysis results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polužanski Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an adaptive Internet application for the interpretation of the transformer oil gas chromatographic analysis results. The first version of the application is developed by following an evolutionary software development concept. The most important software development risks and the appropriate solutions are described. An open-source web framework named Bootstrap is used for an application implementation. The application is developed by using ASP.NET and MS SQL server.

  15. Stimulation technologies for Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoirs in the Sichuan Basin and their application results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yongqiang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Longwangmiao Fm group gas reservoirs in the Moxi structure in central Sichuan Basin feature high temperature, high pressure and high H2S content. The thickness of such high permeable reservoirs with great homogeneity is a geologic basis for a high-productivity gas well, and good match of natural fractures and vugs is the key factor to high well productivity. Overbalance drilling is likely to cause the opening-up of natural fractures, which will lead to the leakage of drilling fluid and severe damage to the reservoir. Experimental evaluation results show that the damage rate of the drilling fluid to the rock sample is between 82.2% and 89.2%, which severely restricts the productivity of gas wells. Therefore, it is necessary to deepen the experimental evaluation technologies and methods to promote the design pertinence of technical parameters. The study shows: first, the optimized gelling acid and steering acid are effective in slowing down speed and removing blockage, forming acidizing wormholes and effectively eliminating the blockage effect caused by drilling liquid pollution; second, the self-developed fiber steering agent and soluble temporary blocking ball can divert the acid, increasing the processing pressure at the well bottom by 5–15 MPa, realizing the even stimulation of heterogeneous reservoirs; third, based on experimental evaluation such as the acid penetration and acid rock reaction, it is recommended that the pumping rate be 3.0–3.5 m3/min in acidizing treatment and the acid intensity for blockage removal be 3.0–5.0 m3/m; fourth, the established blockage removal and steering acidizing technology have been applied in more than 20 wells with a remarkable productivity-increase effect, which gives full play to the natural productivity of gas wells and decreases the acid application scale. All these technologies and measures effectively enhance the development quality and profit of the gas reservoir.

  16. Laser Spectroscopy Multi-Gas Monitor: Results of Technology Demonstration on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) is an up and coming trace and major gas monitoring technology with unmatched selectivity, range and stability. The technology demonstration of the 4 gas Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM), reported at the 2014 ICES conference, operated continuously on the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly a year. The MGM is designed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor in ambient cabin air in a low power, relatively compact device. While on board, the MGM experienced a number of challenges, unplanned and planned, including a test of the ammonia channel using a commercial medical ammonia inhalant. Data from the unit was downlinked once per week and compared with other analytical resources on board, notably the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA), a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. MGM spent the majority of the time installed in the Nanoracks Frame 2 payload facility in front breathing mode (sampling the ambient environment of the Japanese Experiment Module), but was also used to analyze recirculated rack air. The capability of the MGM to be operated in portable mode (via internal rechargeable lithium ion polymer batteries or by plugging into any Express Rack 28VDC connector) was a part of the usability demonstration. Results to date show unprecedented stability and accuracy of the MGM vs. the MCA for oxygen and carbon dioxide. The ammonia challenge (approx. 75 ppm) was successful as well, showing very rapid response time in both directions. Work on an expansion of capability in a next generation MGM has just begun. Combustion products and hydrazine are being added to the measurable target analytes. An 8 to 10 gas monitor (aka Gas Tricorder 1.0) is envisioned for use on ISS, Orion and Exploration missions.

  17. Mechanical properties of steel for construction of gas transfer pipelines and their modification resulting from expanding of gas pipelines during hydraulic pressure testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopczynski, A.

    1997-01-01

    There are discussed the mechanical properties of the new generation of steel as per European Standard EN 10208.2: 1996. on the basis of the mechanical parameters of steel the normalized graphs of steel tensioning are presented. Analysis of influence of expanding gas pipelines on changes of steel tensioning graphs were performed. Advantages, resulting from expanding of gas pipelines, were shown. (author)

  18. Natural gas adsorption on biomass derived activated carbons: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Usman D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon materials are good candidates for natural gas storage due excellent textural properties that are easy to enhance and modify. Natural gas is much cleaner fuel than coal and other petroleum derivatives. Storage of natural gas on porous sorbents at lower pressure is safer and cheaper compared to compressed and liquefied natural gas. This article reviews some works conducted on natural gas storage on biomass based activated carbon materials. Methane storage capacities and deliveries of the various sorbents were given. The effect of factors such as surface area, pore characteristic, heat of adsorption, packing density on the natural gas storage capacity on the activated carbons are discussed. Challenges, improvements and future directions of natural gas storage on porous carbonaceous materials are highlighted.

  19. Maintenance of the JET active gas handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, P.D.; Bell, A.C.; Brown, K.; Cole, C.; Cooper, B.; Gibbons, C.; Harris, M.; Jones, G.; Knipe, S.; Lewis, J.; Manning, C.; Miller, A.; Perevezentsev, A.; Skinner, N.; Stagg, R.; Stead, M.; Thomas, R.; Yorkshades, J.

    2003-01-01

    The JET active gas handling system (AGHS) has been in operation in conjunction with the JET machine since Spring 1997. The tritium levels within the vessel have remained sufficiently high, 6.2 g at the end of the DTE1 experiment and currently 1.5 g, such that the AGHS has been required to operate continuously to detritiate gases liberated during D-D operations and to maintain discharges to the environment to ALARP. Maintaining the system to ensure continued operation has been a key factor in guaranteeing the continued availability of the essential sub-systems. The operational history of the JET AGHS has been previously documented in a number of papers [R. Laesser, et al. Proc. of the 19th SOFT Conf. 1 (1996) 227; R. Laesser, et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 46 (1999) 307; P.D. Brennan, et al., 18th Symp. on Fusion Eng., 1999]. Operational downtime is minimised through well-engineered sub-systems that use high integrity components. Outage, contamination and operator dosage are minimised through pre-planned and prepared maintenance operations. The reliability of sub-system critical condition fault detection is demonstrated through routine testing of hard-wired alarms and interlocks

  20. Feasibility of mercury removal from simulated flue gas by activated chars made from poultry manures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasson, K Thomas; Lima, Isabel M; Boihem, Larry L; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2010-12-01

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plants has resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents for mercury removal. At the same time, the quantity of poultry manure generated each year is large and technologies that take advantage of the material should be explored. The purpose of the work was to obtain preliminary data to investigate if activated chars made from different poultry manures could adsorb mercury from simulated flue gas. In laboratory experiments, activated chars made from chicken cake and litter removed mercury from the gas as well as a commercial alternative. It was also found that acid-washing these chars after activation may improve pore structure but does not influence the mercury removal efficiency. Activated chars were also made from turkey cake and litter. These raw materials produced activated chars with similar pore structure as those made from chicken manure, but they did not adsorb mercury as well. Acid-washing the turkey manure-based chars improved their performance, but this step would add to the cost of production. Preliminary evaluations suggest that unwashed activated chars may cost as little as $0.95/kg to produce. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  2. A study of the thermal activation of synthetic zeolites (molecular sieve) for gas-solid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.A.J.

    1978-10-01

    The thermal activation of synthetic zeolites from two sources has been investigated with reference to the adsorption chromatography of inorganic gases. It was found that the heats of adsorption for oxygen and carbon monoxide increased with activation temperatures. Limits of detection for oxygen in argon and conversely argon in oxygen were determined as well as the chromatographic stability of the activated zeolite. The practical implications and importance of the results are discussed and the application to the analysis of fast reactor blanket gas is mentioned. An explanation is proposed for the adsorption behaviour of these activated materials, based on an electrostatic mechanism, and this has suggested a reason for the separation characteristics of oxygen and argon on polar zeolites. Further work is identified including the investigation of energy states of the oxygen molecule adsorbed on activated zeolite by means of ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. (author)

  3. A study of the thermal activation of synthetic zeolites (molecular sieve) for gas-solid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.A.J.

    1978-10-01

    The thermal activation of synthetic zeolites from two sources has been investigated with reference to the adsorption chromatography of inorganic gases. It was found that the heats of adsorption for oxygen and carbon monoxide increased with activation temperature. Limits of detection for oxygen in argon and conversely argon in oxygen were determined as well as the chromatographic stability of the activated zeolite. The practical implications and importance of the results are discussed and the application to the analysis of fast reactor blanket gas is mentioned. An explanation is proposed for the adsorption behaviour of these activated materials, based on an electrostatic mechanism, and this has suggested a reason for the separation characteristics of oxygen and argon on polar zeolites. Further work is identified including the investigation of energy states of the oxygen molecule adsorbed on activated zeolite by means of ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. (author)

  4. Improvement of Performance Range of Centrifugal Compressors Gas by Surge Line Modification Using Active Controller Based on Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezhman Mohammadi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, surge of prevention is a critical problem in oil and gas industries, particularly when return gas flow or gas flow reduces in transportation of gas pipelines. This paper is illustrated new results about surge control of centrifugal compressors .surge phenomenon is flow unsteady state in compressors which causes damages seriously in compressor construction. Furthermore, it also demonstrates in comparison with anti surge control ،active surge control expands stability range.Active surge control which based on fuzzy logic،is the main idea that used in this investigation. Using fuzzy controller causes an improvement in compressor's condition and increase performance range of the compressor, in addition to prevention of any instability in compressor. The simulation results is also satisfactory.

  5. First experimental results and simulation for gas optimisation of the MART-LIME detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzano, A.; Brunetti, M.T.; Cocchi, M.; Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Natalucci, L.; Ortuno-Prados, F.; Ubertini, P.

    1996-01-01

    A large area high pressure multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC), with both spatial and spectroscopic capabilities, is being jointly developed by the Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale (IAS), CNR, Frascati, Italy and the Daresbury Laboratory (DL), Warrington, UK as part of the MART-LIME telescope. Recent test results (October-December 1995) carried out at the DL facilities are presented. A brief study, by means of a simulation program, on the possible gas mixtures to be employed in the MART-LIME detector is also reported. The results of the simulation are compared with the experimental data obtained from the tests. (orig.)

  6. The Lower Jurassic Posidonia Shale in southern Germany: results of a shale gas analogue study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Steffen; Schulz, Hans-Martin; Horsfield, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The shale gas potential of Germany was recently assessed by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (2012 NiKo-Project) and is - in respect of the general natural gas occurrence in Germany - regarded as a good alternative hydrocarbon source. The Posidonia Shale in northern and southern Germany is one of the evaluated rock formation and easily accessible in outcrops in the Swabian Alps (southern Germany). The area of interest in this work is located in such an outcrop that is actively used for open pit mining next to the town of Dotternhausen, 70 km southwest of Stuttgart. 31 samples from the quarry of Dotternhausen were analyzed in order to characterize the immature Posidonia Shale (Lower Toarcian, Lias ɛ) of southern Germany as a gas shale precursor. Methods included are Rock Eval, Open Pyrolysis GC, SEM, Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry, XRD, and other. The samples of Dotternhausen contain exclusively type II kerogen. The majority of the organic matter is structureless and occurs in the argillaceous-calcareous matrix. Structured organic matter appears predominantly as alginite, in particular the algae "tasmanite" is noticeable. The TOC content ranges up to 16 wt% with a high bitumen content. The mineral content characterizes the Posidonia Shale as a marlstone or mudstone with varying clay-calcite ratios. The quartz and pyrite content reaches up to 20 wt% and 9 wt%, respectively. The rock fabric is characterized by a fine grained and laminated matrix. The mean porosity lies between 4 and 12 %. Fractures other than those introduced by sample preparation were not observed. The Posidonia Shale is predicted to have an excellent source rock potential and will generate intermediate, P-N-A low wax oil when exposed to higher P-T-conditions ("oil kitchen"). Contact surfaces between the kerogen and matrix will be vulnerable to pressure induced fracturing caused by hydrocarbon formation. Additional porosity will be formed during maturation due to the

  7. Activation of cGAS-dependent antiviral responses by DNA intercalating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépin, Geneviève; Nejad, Charlotte; Thomas, Belinda J; Ferrand, Jonathan; McArthur, Kate; Bardin, Philip G; Williams, Bryan R G; Gantier, Michael P

    2017-01-09

    Acridine dyes, including proflavine and acriflavine, were commonly used as antiseptics before the advent of penicillins in the mid-1940s. While their mode of action on pathogens was originally attributed to their DNA intercalating activity, work in the early 1970s suggested involvement of the host immune responses, characterized by induction of interferon (IFN)-like activities through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate here that sub-toxic concentrations of a mixture of acriflavine and proflavine instigate a cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS)-dependent type-I IFN antiviral response. This pertains to the capacity of these compounds to induce low level DNA damage and cytoplasmic DNA leakage, resulting in cGAS-dependent cGAMP-like activity. Critically, acriflavine:proflavine pre-treatment of human primary bronchial epithelial cells significantly reduced rhinovirus infection. Collectively, our findings constitute the first evidence that non-toxic DNA binding agents have the capacity to act as indirect agonists of cGAS, to exert potent antiviral effects in mammalian cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Novel bacterial gas sensor proteins with transition metal-containing prosthetic groups as active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Shigetoshi

    2012-04-01

    Gas molecules function as signaling molecules in many biological regulatory systems responsible for transcription, chemotaxis, and other complex physiological processes. Gas sensor proteins play a crucial role in regulating such biological systems in response to gas molecules. New sensor proteins that sense oxygen or nitric oxide have recently been found, and they have been characterized by X-ray crystallographic and/or spectroscopic analysis. It has become clear that the interaction between a prosthetic group and gas molecules triggers dynamic structural changes in the protein backbone when a gas sensor protein senses gas molecules. Gas sensor proteins employ novel mechanisms to trigger conformational changes in the presence of a gas. In gas sensor proteins that have iron-sulfur clusters as active sites, the iron-sulfur clusters undergo structural changes, which trigger a conformational change. Heme-based gas sensor proteins reconstruct hydrogen-bonding networks around the heme and heme-bound ligand. Gas sensor proteins have two functional states, on and off, which are active and inactive, respectively, for subsequent signal transduction in response to their physiological effector molecules. To fully understand the structure-function relationships of gas sensor proteins, it is vital to perform X-ray crystal structure analyses of full-length proteins in both the on and off states.

  9. Gas purity analytics, calibration studies, and background predictions towards the first results of XENON1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasterok, Constanze

    2017-10-25

    The XENON1T experiment aims at the direct detection of the well motivated dark matter candidate of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) scattering off xenon nuclei. The first science run of 34.2 live days has already achieved the most stringent upper limit on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-sections above masses of 10 GeV with a minimum of 7.7.10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} at a mass of 35 GeV. Crucial for this unprecedented sensitivity are a high xenon gas purity and a good understanding of the background. In this work, a procedure is described that was developed to measure the purity of the experiment's xenon inventory of more than three tons during its initial transfer to the detector gas system. The technique of gas chromatography has been employed to analyze the noble gas for impurities with the focus on oxygen and krypton contaminations. Furthermore, studies on the calibration of the experiment's dominating background induced by natural gamma and beta radiation were performed. Hereby, the novel sources of radioactive isotopes that can be dissolved in the xenon were employed, namely {sup 220}Rn and tritium. The sources were analyzed in terms of a potential impact on the outcome of a dark matter search. As a result of the promising findings for {sup 220}Rn, the source was successfully deployed in the first science run of XENON1T. The first WIMP search of XENON1T is outlined in this thesis, in which a background component from interactions taking place in close proximity to the detector wall is identified, investigated and modeled. A background prediction was derived that was incorporated into the background model of the WIMP search which was found to be in good agreement with the observation.

  10. Test results in the treatment of HTR reprocessing off-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert-Wiemer, H.; Bendick, B.; Juergens, B.; Nafissi, A.; Vygen, H.; Krill, W.

    1983-01-01

    The AKUT II-facility (throughput 10 m 3 /h, STP) for the clean up of the burner off-gas has been tested with synthetic off-gas and with off-gas from cold burner tests. The results are reported. During dissolution of the burner ash in nitric acid an off-gas is formed whose main component is air and which, besides the gaseous fission products, contains NO/sub x/. Before the separation of the gaseous fission products NO/sub x/ and/or O 2 are removed by reaction with H 2 or NH 3 . For these reactions catalysts were used. Because of the known disadvantages of catalytic systems, like reduction in efficiency by poisoning or thermal influence, the alternative method of thermal, flameless reduction was tested. The reactions were carried out in a stainless steel and a quartz reactor. Throughput, reaction temperature, O 2 -, NO/sub x/-, H 2 -, and NH 3 -concentrations respectively were varied. The goal of these tests was to remove O 2 and NO/sub x/ to below 1 ppM behind the reactor and NH 3 to below the detection limit of 50 ppM. It was found that at a reaction temperature of 750 0 C in the stainless steel reactor these goals can be reached for both H 2 and NH 3 as reducing agents. In the quartz reactor only the O 2 -H 2 -reaction takes place. Obviously stainless steel acts as a catalyst for all other reactions

  11. HgCl{sub 2} sorption on lignite activated carbon: Analysis of fixed-bed results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mibeck, Blaise A.F.; Olson, Edwin S.; Miller, Stanley J. [University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center, 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Factors that influence kinetic reactivity and equilibrium between elemental mercury, carbon, and flue gas components have been the focus of numerous studies. This study pertains to recent bench-scale fixed-bed tests in which activated carbon was exposed to HgCl{sub 2} in a flue gas composition typical of an unscrubbed eastern bituminous coal. Results are discussed in light of a refined binding site model based on the zigzag carbene structures recently proposed for electronic states at the edges of the carbon graphene layers. (author)

  12. Characterisation and activation of catalysts for recombination of radiolysis gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolz, Michael; Koehler, Jan; Schorle, Rolf; Helf, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Radiolysis gas is produced by radiolysis of cooling water during the operation of boiling water reactors. Small amounts of radiolysis gas can accumulate at dead ends of pipes in the water-steam circuit. Under certain conditions, it can accumulate even to higher concentrations. To avoid these accumulations, small catalysts are built in. As part of a diploma thesis, the catalysts were analysed and characterised. (orig.)

  13. The local content approach in activities of exploration and production of oil and gas; Conteudo local nas atividades de exploracao e producao de petroleo e gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederice, Jose Carlos [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenadoria de Conteudo Local; Macedo, Marcelo Mafra Borges de [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Regulacao de Petroleo e Derivados

    2008-07-01

    Breaking the monopoly of PETROBRAS for the activities of exploration and production of oil and natural gas has occurred in Brazil in 1995 by the Constitutional Amendment No 9 followed by the promulgation of the Law 9.478 of 1997, the 'Law of Oil' and the creation of the Agencia Nacional do Petroleo - ANP, with powers to regulate, recruit and monitor the oil and natural gas industry. The new regulatory framework has established the award granted by the State, through bids organized by the ANP, of the oil and gas exploration and production activities. This new model has established that the offers to purchase blocks must be composed by the Signature Bonus, Minimum Exploration Program and percentages of Local Content for the stages of exploration and development of production. As a result of market opening and the completion of bids over these 10 years, there has been a significant expansion of investment in the industry, revealing that the demands of Local Content rightly acted as a strong mechanism inducing the participation of local industry supplier of goods and services. In practical terms, in 1997 the participation of the sector of oil and gas in the Brazilian GDP was approximately 2.5% and now comes to 10.5%, or each R$ 100.00 generated in the country, R$ 10.50 come from the sector of oil and gas. (author)

  14. Greenhouse gas measurements from a UK network of tall towers: technical description and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kieran M.; Grant, Aoife; O'Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Manning, Alistair J.; Stavert, Ann R.; Spain, T. Gerard; Salameh, Peter K.; Harth, Christina M.; Simmonds, Peter G.; Sturges, William T.; Oram, David E.; Derwent, Richard G.

    2018-03-01

    A network of three tall tower measurement stations was set up in 2012 across the United Kingdom to expand measurements made at the long-term background northern hemispheric site, Mace Head, Ireland. Reliable and precise in situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analysis systems were developed and deployed at three sites in the UK with automated instrumentation measuring a suite of GHGs. The UK Deriving Emissions linked to Climate Change (UK DECC) network uses tall (165-230 m) open-lattice telecommunications towers, which provide a convenient platform for boundary layer trace gas sampling. In this paper we describe the automated measurement system and first results from the UK DECC network for CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO and H2. CO2 and CH4 are measured at all of the UK DECC sites by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) with multiple inlet heights at two of the three tall tower sites to assess for boundary layer stratification. The short-term precisions (1σ on 1 min means) of CRDS measurements at background mole fractions for January 2012 to September 2015 is sampling temperatures. Automated alerts are generated and emailed to site operators when instrumental parameters are not within defined set ranges. Automated instrument shutdowns occur for critical errors such as carrier gas flow rate deviations. Results from the network give good spatial and temporal coverage of atmospheric mixing ratios within the UK since early 2012. Results also show that all measured GHGs are increasing in mole fraction over the selected reporting period and, except for SF6, exhibit a seasonal trend. CO2 and CH4 also show strong diurnal cycles, with night-time maxima and daytime minima in mole fractions.

  15. Results of SSTC NRS Scientific and Technical Activities for 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Valyigun, N.P.; Vorobej, I.I.; Kornijevska, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes results of SSTC NRS scientific activities for 2014 in basic areas of activities. In particular, it addresses the development of nuclear regulatory control system, reviews, scientific and technical support to the SNRIU oversight function, research ampersand development and analytical efforts as well as scientific information and international activity. First-priority areas for SSTC NRS for the nearest years are identified

  16. Resolve. Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    RESOLVE. Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations

  17. Test results from a helium gas-cooled porous metal heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, M.T.; Rosenfeld, J.H.; Youchison, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A helium-cooled porous metal heat exchanger was built and tested, which successfully absorbed heat fluxes exceeding all previously tested gas-cooled designs. Helium-cooled plasma-facing components are being evaluated for fusion applications. Helium is a favorable coolant for fusion devices because it is not a plasma contaminant, it is not easily activated, and it is easily removed from the device in the event of a leak. The main drawback of gas coolants is their relatively poor thermal transport properties. This limitation can be removed through use of a highly efficient heat exchanger design. A low flow resistance porous metal heat exchanger design was developed, based on the requirements for the Faraday shield for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) device. High heat flux tests were conducted on two representative test articles at the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) at Sandia National Laboratories. Absorbed heat fluxes as high as 40 MW/m 2 were successfully removed during these tests without failure of the devices. Commercial applications for electronics cooling and other high heat flux applications are being identified

  18. Increase in gas output by active modification of the water pressure regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakirov, S N; Gordon, V Y; Kondrat, R M; Kravtsov, N A; Somov, B Y

    1981-01-01

    Based on gas-hydrodynamic calculations made on a planar model formation, two variants of formation working are examined. In the first variant, the modern ideology of working gas fields with a water pressure regime are simulated. In the second variant, working of the formation is modeled according to the suggested ideology of active modification of the water-pressure regime by operating the flooded gas wells. The calculations made indicate the efficiency of active modification of the water pressure regime from the viewpoint of controlling the fund of E wells, and most important, maximizing the final coefficient of gas bed output.

  19. Formation of activation mechanism for investment maintenance management of gas industry enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вікторія Валеріївна Чорній

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The problematic aspects of the existing management mechanism of investment management of gas industry enterprises are analyzed in the article. The ways of their elimination are suggested in accordance with the Energy Strategy of Ukraine – 2035 at different levels of its operation. The ways of improving the investment management mechanism of the enterprises in this industry on three levels are proved. Activation mechanism for investment maintenance management of gas industry enterprises is developed as result of research. Its implementation will allow enterprises of the industry to increase its investment attractiveness and effectively carry out the procedure for enterprises’ entry to the market of initial public offering to raise the required amount of investment resources for the modernization of investigated industry.

  20. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  1. Correlation between active layer thickness and ambient gas stability in IGZO thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xu; Mao, Bao-Hua; Wang, Sui-Dong; Lin, Meng-Fang; Shimizu, Maki; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Ou-Yang, Wei; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Nabatame, Toshihide; Liu, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the active layer thickness has been recently reported as an alternative way to achieve fully depleted oxide thin-film transistors for the realization of low-voltage operations. However, the correlation between the active layer thickness and device resistivity to environmental changes is still unclear, which is important for the optimized design of oxide thin-film transistors. In this work, the ambient gas stability of IGZO thin-film transistors is found to be strongly correlated to the IGZO thickness. The TFT with the thinnest IGZO layer shows the highest intrinsic electron mobility in a vacuum, which is greatly reduced after exposure to O 2 /air. The device with a thick IGZO layer shows similar electron mobility in O 2 /air, whereas the mobility variation measured in the vacuum is absent. The thickness dependent ambient gas stability is attributed to a high-mobility region in the IGZO surface vicinity with less sputtering-induced damage, which will become electron depleted in O 2 /air due to the electron transfer to adsorbed gas molecules. The O 2 adsorption and deduced IGZO surface band bending is demonstrated by the ambient-pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy results. (paper)

  2. Environmental Accounts of the Netherlands. Greenhouse gas emissions by Dutch economic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Climate change is one of the major global challenges of our time. There is abundant scientific evidence that the emission of greenhouse gases caused by economic activities contributes to climate change. Accelerating emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases since the beginning of the 20th century have increased the average global temperature by about 0.8C and altered global precipitation patterns. Combustion of fossil fuels, deforestation, but also specific agricultural activities and industrial processes are the main drivers of the increased emission of greenhouse gasses. Enhanced concentrations of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere will increase global temperatures by radiative forcing. Likewise, climate change has a direct impact on all kinds of economic processes. These impacts may be positive or negative, but it is expected that the overall impact will be primarily negative. In order to design effective mitigation policies, one must have a good conception of the economic driving forces of climate change. The air emission accounts can be used to analyse the environmental implications in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, of production and consumption patterns. Because of their compatibility with the national accounts, greenhouse gas data can be directly linked to the economic drivers of global warming. There are several frameworks for estimating the greenhouse gas emissions for a country, yielding different results. Well-known are the emissions reported to the UNFCCC (United National Framework Convention on Climate Change) in particular under the Kyoto Protocol, but also environment statistics as well as the air emission accounts provide independent greenhouse gas estimates. The differences are not the result of disputes about the accuracy of the estimates themselves, but arise from different interpretations of what has to be counted. The inclusion or exclusion of certain elements depends on the concepts and definitions that underlie

  3. Composition, preparation, and gas generation results from simulated wastes of Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-08-01

    This document reviews the preparation and composition of simulants that have been developed to mimic the wastes temporarily stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at Hanford. The kinetics and stoichiometry of gases that are generated using these simulants are also compared, considering the roles of hydroxide, chloride, and transition metal ions; the identities of organic constituents; and the effects of dilution, radiation, and temperature. Work described in this report was conducted for the Flammable Gas Safety Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (a) whose purpose is to develop information that is necessary to mitigate potential safety hazards associated with waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The goal of this research and of related efforts at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is to determine the thermal and thermal/radiolytic mechanisms by which flammable and other gases are produced in Hanford wastes, emphasizing those stored in Tank 241-SY-101. A variety of Tank 241-SY-101 simulants have been developed to date. The use of simulants in laboratory testing activities provides a number of advantages, including elimination of radiological risks to researchers, lower costs associated with experimentation, and the ability to systematically alter simulant compositions to study the chemical mechanisms of reactions responsible for gas generation. The earliest simulants contained the principal inorganic components of the actual waste and generally a single complexant such as N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (EDTA). Both homogeneous and heterogeneous compositional forms were developed. Aggressive core sampling and analysis activities conducted during Windows C and E provided information that was used to design new simulants that more accurately reflected major and minor inorganic components

  4. Species at risk setback distances : the effects of shallow gas activity on the distribution of grassland birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnen, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of shallow gas activity on the distribution of grassland birds was discussed in this presentation. The overall purpose of the study was to examine the effects of minimal disturbance gas wells and associated activity on species richness; effects on species abundance; and effects on the occurrence of species. The presentation provided several hypotheses, including that species richness would increase with increasing distance from gas wells and trails; that abundance and occurrence of sensitive species would increase with distance from gas wells and trails; and that abundance and occurrence of brood parasites and predators would decrease with increasing distance from gas wells and trails. The presentation illustrated the study area and study design. Several graphs representing the study results were also presented. Bird species that were examined included the abundance and occurrence of western meadowlark; horned lark; chestnut-collared longspur; clay-coloured sparrow; vesper sparrow; sprague pipit; savannah sparrow; grasshopper sparrow; baird sparrow; and brown-headed cowbird. A summary slide was also presented that concluded that species richness did not vary with distance from gas development and that brown-headed cowbirds tended to favour areas with gas development and interior habitats. tabs., figs

  5. Gas cleaning and hydrogen sulfide removal for COREX coal gas by sorption enhanced catalytic oxidation over recyclable activated carbon desulfurizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tonghua; Shen, Yafei; Jia, Jinping

    2014-02-18

    This paper proposes a novel self-developed JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 alkaline adsorbent for H2S removal and gas cleaning of the COREX coal gas in small-scale and commercial desulfurizing devices. JTS-01 desulfurizer was loaded with metal oxide (i.e., ferric oxides) catalysts on the surface of activated carbons (AC), and the catalyst capacity was improved dramatically by means of ultrasonically assisted impregnation. Consequently, the sulfur saturation capacity and sulfur capacity breakthrough increased by 30.3% and 27.9%, respectively. The whole desulfurizing process combined selective adsorption with catalytic oxidation. Moreover, JZC-80 adsorbent can effectively remove impurities such as HCl, HF, HCN, and ash in the COREX coal gas, stabilizing the system pressure drop. The JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 adsorbent have been successfully applied for the COREX coal gas cleaning in the commercial plant at Baosteel, Shanghai. The sulfur capacity of JTS-01 desulfurizer can reach more than 50% in industrial applications. Compared with the conventional dry desulfurization process, the modified AC desulfurizers have more merit, especially in terms of the JTS-01 desulfurizer with higher sulfur capacity and low pressure drop. Thus, this sorption enhanced catalytic desulfurization has promising prospects for H2S removal and other gas cleaning.

  6. Monitoring of Thermal and Gas Activities in Mining Dump Hedvika, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovka, D.; Pertile, E.; Dombek, V.; Vastyl, M.; Leher, V.

    2017-10-01

    The negative consequences of mining of the black coal is occurrence of extractive waste storage locations - mining dumps. The mining activities carried out within the area of Ostrava are responsible for at least six mine dumps of loose materials arising as wastes from mining of mineral resources, many of which show presence of thermal processes. The thermal activity in dumps is responsible for many hazardous substances that pollute the environment and harm human health in the surroundings. This paper deals with the results of the first phase of project CZ.11.4.120/0.0/0.0/15_006/0000074 TERDUMP, on exploration of thermally active mining dumps are published in the article. As a first studied thermally active dump was a Hedvika dump. To localize of hot spots with hot gas emission was used a thermovision scanning by drone. The place with high temperature (49.8 °C) identified natural gas emission through natural cracks. Analysing the occurring pollutants in Hedvika Dump using the GC-MS or HPLC, respectively and the inert gases (CO2, CO and SO2) were determined by ion chromatography. The pollutants were determined in five sampling points during two measurements executed from July to August 2017.

  7. Offshore oil and gas activities in the PERD program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billette, N. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Office of Energy Research and Development

    2001-07-01

    Natural Resources Canada manages the Program of Energy Research and Development (PERD), which covers all but a few of non-nuclear energy areas. The aim of the Program is to focus on research and technology developments that support a dynamic and diversified energy supply, while encouraging industries to consume the energy efficiently. Twelve federal departments and agencies are stakeholders in energy research and development and the 57 million dollar annual budget is allocated amongst the stakeholders according to the priorities established. Each year, one-quarter of the program is evaluated externally and potential reallocation examined, a recent initiative implemented as part of a results-based management (RBM) system. Five federal departments and one agency carry out offshore research and development activities, touching the fields of basin assessment and geotechnics in the Canadian North and offshore East Coast, winds-wave-current modelling, the management of sea ice, iceberg and ice-structure interactions, ship design and navigation issues. In this last category, activities related to offshore safety, management of offshore drilling and production wastes, oil spills remediation, and assessment of cumulative effects of wastes and produced waters are included. These activities are detailed in the presentation, and the author discussed the future shifts likely to occur in PERD so that the needs of the regulatory agencies in terms of science and technology are met. There is also the aspect of the protection of the interests of the Canadian public to consider. 1 tab.

  8. Results at Mallik highlight progress in gas hydrate energy resource research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    The recent studies that project the role of gas hydrates in the future energy resource management are reviewed. Researchers have long speculated that gas hydrates could eventually be a commercial resource for the future. A Joint Industry Project led by ChevronTexaco and the US Department of Energy is designed to characterize gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. Countries including Japan, canada, and India have established large gas hydrate research and development projects, while China, Korea and Mexico are investigating the viability of forming government-sponsored gas hydrate research projects.

  9. Preliminary results and power analysis of the UAH SEDS G503 GAS can

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Lyle B.; Mustaikis, Steven, II; Nerren, Philip

    1995-01-01

    The G-503 Get Away Special (GAS) Canister contained four experiments. A stainless steel corrosion experiment, and experiment to mix and cure concrete, a plant root growth chamber, and a group of 8 chambers to characterize diatom growth cycles in microgravity. As would be expected for this selection of experiments a significant amount of power was required to carry out these investigations over several days in a GAS environment. This was accomplished through the use of low power experiment control circuitry, heaters, and an estimate 3.6 kWh battery pack. The battery was designed around 120 standard Duracell Alkaline F cells. This pack weighed 29.5 kg (65 lbs) including a DC/DC converter and the power distribution bus for all of the experiments. Although not rechargeable, this configurations was a fraction of the cost of rechargeable systems and did not require venting to the outside of the can. Combining this with the long term storage performance, 85% of initial capacity after four years at 20 C (70 F), this guarantees sufficient power even with unexpected launch delays. This paper describes the experiments, there operation and initial results. Also, the performance of the power system during the STS-68 SRL2 mission will be addressed.

  10. Deliberation of arc plasma characteristics according to experimental results in a typical gas circuit-breaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghei, M.

    2005-01-01

    One of the industrial plasma applications is in the gas circuit breakers (GCB) and switching processes. During GCB operation and opening of its two contacts, current flows through of the inter-electrode medium (generally SF 6 or its mixture) and electric arc forms from the plasma that has been created between the contacts. The electric arc is a self-sustained discharge having low voltage drop and able to support great amplitudes of current. The technical basis of circuit breaker is: initiating arc plasma, flowing a large current, cooling it effectively to avoid re-ignition, and finally the transition from a well-conducting medium into insulating gas space in a very short time interval. In other words, for a successful interruption we need to know about power brought to the arc and that of removed. In this paper an attempt has been made to study, characterize and understand some arc behaviors such as arc conductance and its changes according to recorded current and voltage traces experimentally. From physical point of view, there are different phenomena that affect on arc behavior. According to methodology used here, we tried to understand some of arc behavior from experimental results and finally we extract some arc parameters. (author)

  11. Active gas adsorption-promoted evaporation of tungsten and niobium in strong electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksenofontov, V.A.; Kul'ko, V.B.; Mikhajlovskij, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    Field-ion methods and pulsed mass-spectrometeric analysis are used to study field evaporation of tungsten and niobium affected by nitrogen and hydrogen. Active gas-promoted evaporation is found to take place at field intensities high enough for the field ionization of active gases. The evaporating field intensity is established to increase from 1.45x10 8 to 5.5x10 8 V/cm while passing from continuous to pulsed conditions of evaporation, this testifies to the change of the mechanism of the promoted evaporation. Under the effect of active gases, the evaporation rate essentially depends on the surface state. It is shown that in the microcrystals irradiated with 1-3 kV helium ions, the dependence of the evaporation rate of Nb in hydrogen on the field intensity gets monotonous. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the recombination model of a promoted evaporation [ru

  12. Shale gas activity and increased rates of sexually transmitted infections in Ohio, 2000-2016.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C Deziel

    Full Text Available The growing shale gas ("fracking" industry depends on a mobile workforce, whose influx could have social impacts on host communities. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs can increase through sexual mixing patterns associated with labor migration. No prior studies have quantified the relationship between shale gas activity and rates of three reportable STIs: chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis.We conducted a longitudinal, ecologic study from 2000-2016 in Ohio, situated in a prolific shale gas region in the United States (US. Data on reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis by county and year were obtained from the Ohio Department of Health. All 88 counties were classified as none, low, and high shale gas activity in each year, using data from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Annual rate ratios (RR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were calculated from mixed-effects Poisson regression models evaluating the relationship between shale gas activity and reported annual STI rates while adjusting for secular trends and potential confounders obtained from the US Census.Compared to counties with no shale gas activity, counties with high activity had 21% (RR = 1.21; 95%CI = 1.08-1.36 increased rates of chlamydia and 19% (RR = 1.27; 95%CI 0.98-1.44 increased rates of gonorrhea, respectively. No association was observed for syphilis.This first report of a link between shale gas activity and increased rates of both chlamydia and gonorrhea may inform local policies and community health efforts.

  13. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  14. Activities report - IBP - Instituto Brasileiro do Petroleo e Gas - 2006; Relatorio de atividades - IBP - Instituto Brasileiro do Petroleo e Gas - 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This report presents the activities of IBP- Instituto Brasileiro de Petroleo e Gas (Brazilian Institute of Oil and Gas) in the year of 2005 as follows: economic and energy policy; supply, natural gas, support and services, certification, standardization, courses, events and normalization managing.

  15. Activities report - IBP - Instituto Brasileiro do Petroleo e Gas - 2007; Relatorio de atividades - IBP - Instituto Brasileiro do Petroleo e Gas - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of IBP- Instituto Brasileiro de Petroleo e Gas (Brazilian Institute of Oil and Gas) in the year of 2005 as follows: economic and energy policy; supply, natural gas, petroleum, biofuels, support and services, environment, licensing, certification, standardization, courses, information system, events and normalization managing.

  16. Activities report - IBP - Instituto Brasileiro do Petroleo e Gas - 2005; Relatorio de atividades - IBP - Instituto Brasileiro do Petroleo e Gas - 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This report presents the activities of IBP - Instituto Brasileiro de Petroleo e Gas (Brazilian Institute of Oil and Gas) in the year of 2005 as follows: economic and energy policy, supply, natural gas, support and services, certification, courses, events and normalization managing.

  17. Adsorption of mercury by activated carbon prepared from dried sewage sludge in simulated flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongmin; Lee, Sang-Sup

    2018-04-25

    Conversion of sewage sludge to activated carbon is attractive as an alternative method to ocean dumping for the disposal of sewage sludge. Injection of activated carbon upstream of particulate matter control devices has been suggested as a method to remove elemental mercury from flue gas. Activated carbon was prepared using various activation temperatures and times and was tested for their mercury adsorption efficiency using lab-scale systems. To understand the effect of the physical property of the activated carbon, its mercury adsorption efficiency was investigated as a function of their Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area. Two simulated flue gas conditions: (1) without hydrogen chloride (HCl) and (2) with 20 ppm HCl, were used to investigate the effect of flue gas composition on the mercury adsorption capacity of activated carbon. Despite very low BET surface area of the prepared sewage sludge activated carbons, their mercury adsorption efficiencies were comparable under both simulated flue gas conditions to those of pinewood and coal activated carbons. After injecting HCl into the simulated flue gas, all sewage sludge activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption efficiencies, i.e., more than 87%, regardless of their BET surface area. IMPLICATIONS We tested activated carbons prepared from dried sewage sludge to investigate the effect of their physical properties on their mercury adsorption efficiency. Using two simulated flue gas conditions, we conducted mercury speciation for the outlet gas. We found that the sewage sludge activated carbon had comparable mercury adsorption efficiency to pinewood and coal activated carbons, and the presence of HCl minimized the effect of physical property of the activated carbon on its mercury adsorption efficiency.

  18. Plutonium recycle test reactor characterization activities and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    Report contains results of PRTR core and associated structures characterization performed in January and February of 1997. Radiation survey data are presented, along with recommendations for stabilization activities before transitioning to a decontamination and decommissioning function. Recommendations are also made about handling the waste generated by the stabilization activities, and actions suggested by the Decontamination and Decommissioning organization

  19. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO

  20. ICARUS T600: physics results and future activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zani Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This contribution will report the present physics results obtained by the ICARUS Collaboration, as well as describe the overhauling activities and the physics program for the detector in its future deployment at Fermilab.

  1. Hanford Low-Activity Waste Processing: Demonstration of the Off-Gas Recycle Flowsheet - 13443

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, William G.; Esparza, Brian P. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99532 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Vitrification of Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW) is nominally the thermal conversion and incorporation of sodium salts and radionuclides into borosilicate glass. One key radionuclide present in LAW is technetium-99. Technetium-99 is a low energy, long-lived beta emitting radionuclide present in the waste feed in concentrations on the order of 1-10 ppm. The long half-life combined with a high solubility in groundwater results in technetium-99 having considerable impact on performance modeling (as potential release to the environment) of both the waste glass and associated secondary waste products. The current Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flowsheet calls for the recycle of vitrification process off-gas condensates to maximize the portion of technetium ultimately immobilized in the waste glass. This is required as technetium acts as a semi-volatile specie, i.e. considerable loss of the radionuclide to the process off-gas stream can occur during the vitrification process. To test the process flowsheet assumptions, a prototypic off-gas system with recycle capability was added to a laboratory melter (on the order of 1/200 scale) and testing performed. Key test goals included determination of the process mass balance for technetium, a non-radioactive surrogate (rhenium), and other soluble species (sulfate, halides, etc.) which are concentrated by recycling off-gas condensates. The studies performed are the initial demonstrations of process recycle for this type of liquid-fed melter system. This paper describes the process recycle system, the waste feeds processed, and experimental results. Comparisons between data gathered using process recycle and previous single pass melter testing as well as mathematical modeling simulations are also provided. (authors)

  2. Determination of the Boltzmann constant with cylindrical acoustic gas thermometry: new and previous results combined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.; Lin, H.; Gillis, K. A.; Mehl, J. B.; Moldover, M. R.; Zhang, K.; Duan, Y. N.

    2017-10-01

    We report a new determination of the Boltzmann constant k B using a cylindrical acoustic gas thermometer. We determined the length of the copper cavity from measurements of its microwave resonance frequencies. This contrasts with our previous work (Zhang et al 2011 Int. J. Thermophys. 32 1297, Lin et al 2013 Metrologia 50 417, Feng et al 2015 Metrologia 52 S343) that determined the length of a different cavity using two-color optical interferometry. In this new study, the half-widths of the acoustic resonances are closer to their theoretical values than in our previous work. Despite significant changes in resonator design and the way in which the cylinder length is determined, the value of k B is substantially unchanged. We combined this result with our four previous results to calculate a global weighted mean of our k B determinations. The calculation follows CODATA’s method (Mohr and Taylor 2000 Rev. Mod. Phys. 72 351) for obtaining the weighted mean value of k B that accounts for the correlations among the measured quantities in this work and in our four previous determinations of k B. The weighted mean {{\\boldsymbol{\\hat{k}}}{B}} is 1.380 6484(28)  ×  10-23 J K-1 with the relative standard uncertainty of 2.0  ×  10-6. The corresponding value of the universal gas constant is 8.314 459(17) J K-1 mol-1 with the relative standard uncertainty of 2.0  ×  10-6.

  3. Marine energy consumption, national economic activity, and greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ching-Chih

    2012-01-01

    The causal relationships among marine energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping, and economic growth for Kyoto Protocol Annex I countries for the period of 1990 to 2006 are discussed. The real gross domestic product is used as a proxy for economic activity. The United States is also discussed because it was the main global polluter before 2006. The co-integration methodology and an error-correction model are used to examine the causal relationships. The empirical results show that marine energy consumption and GDP are the main factors of increased GHG emissions in the short-run, and that economic activity significantly increased emissions in the long-run. Emissions from shipping are more closely related to marine energy consumption than to economic activity. Hence, policies for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from marine shipping need to focus on greater energy efficiency in the design of ship engines and hulls. - Highlights: ► Energy consumption and GDP are the main causes to increased GHG emissions in the shipping industry. ► Emissions from shipping are more closely related to energy consumption than to GDP. ► Policies to mitigate GHG emissions from shipping industry should focus on the engine and hull design.

  4. Beyond low-level activity: On a 'non-radioactive' gas mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poljanc, Karin [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Steinhauser, Georg [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: georg.steinhauser@ati.ac.at; Sterba, Johannes H. [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Buchtela, Karl [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Bichler, Max [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-03-01

    Gas mantles for camping gas lanterns sometimes contain thorium compounds. During the last years, the use of thorium-free gas mantles has become more and more popular due to the avoidance of a radioactive heavy metal. We investigated a gas mantle type that is declared to be 'non-radioactive' and that can be bought in Austria at the moment. Methods used were Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), {gamma}-spectroscopy, and Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC). We found massive thorium contents of up to 259 mg per gas mantle. Leaching experiments showed that only 0.4% of the Th but approximately 90% of the decay products of {sup 232}Th can be leached under conditions simulating sucking and chewing with human saliva. In this paper, the investigation of these gas mantles including the consideration of the environmental hazard caused by disposed mantles and the health hazard for unsuspecting consumers is presented and legal consequences are discussed for this fraud.

  5. Beyond low-level activity: On a 'non-radioactive' gas mantle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poljanc, Karin; Steinhauser, Georg; Sterba, Johannes H.; Buchtela, Karl; Bichler, Max

    2007-01-01

    Gas mantles for camping gas lanterns sometimes contain thorium compounds. During the last years, the use of thorium-free gas mantles has become more and more popular due to the avoidance of a radioactive heavy metal. We investigated a gas mantle type that is declared to be 'non-radioactive' and that can be bought in Austria at the moment. Methods used were Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), γ-spectroscopy, and Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC). We found massive thorium contents of up to 259 mg per gas mantle. Leaching experiments showed that only 0.4% of the Th but approximately 90% of the decay products of 232 Th can be leached under conditions simulating sucking and chewing with human saliva. In this paper, the investigation of these gas mantles including the consideration of the environmental hazard caused by disposed mantles and the health hazard for unsuspecting consumers is presented and legal consequences are discussed for this fraud

  6. 78 FR 34703 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2013-0004] Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice and request...

  7. Small molecule inhibitors block Gas6-inducible TAM activation and tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Stanley G; Kumar, Sushil; Bansal, Nitu; Singh, Kamalendra; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Comollo, Thomas; Peng, Youyi; Kotenko, Sergei V; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Bertino, Joseph R; Welsh, William J; Birge, Raymond B

    2017-03-08

    TAM receptors (Tyro-3, Axl, and Mertk) are a family of three homologous type I receptor tyrosine kinases that are implicated in several human malignancies. Overexpression of TAMs and their major ligand Growth arrest-specific factor 6 (Gas6) is associated with more aggressive staging of cancers, poorer predicted patient survival, acquired drug resistance and metastasis. Here we describe small molecule inhibitors (RU-301 and RU-302) that target the extracellular domain of Axl at the interface of the Ig-1 ectodomain of Axl and the Lg-1 of Gas6. These inhibitors effectively block Gas6-inducible Axl receptor activation with low micromolar IC 50s in cell-based reporter assays, inhibit Gas6-inducible motility in Axl-expressing cell lines, and suppress H1299 lung cancer tumor growth in a mouse xenograft NOD-SCIDγ model. Furthermore, using homology models and biochemical verifications, we show that RU301 and 302 also inhibit Gas6 inducible activation of Mertk and Tyro3 suggesting they can act as pan-TAM inhibitors that block the interface between the TAM Ig1 ectodomain and the Gas6 Lg domain. Together, these observations establish that small molecules that bind to the interface between TAM Ig1 domain and Gas6 Lg1 domain can inhibit TAM activation, and support the further development of small molecule Gas6-TAM interaction inhibitors as a novel class of cancer therapeutics.

  8. The mid-infrared properties and gas content of active galaxies over large lookback times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, S. J.; Duchesne, S. W.

    2018-05-01

    Upon an expansion of all of the searches for redshifted H I 21-cm absorption (0.002 1 ≤ z ≤ 5.19), we update recent results regarding the detection of 21-cm in the non-local Universe. Specifically, we confirm that photo-ionization of the gas is the mostly likely cause of the low detection rate at high redshift, in addition to finding that at z ≲ 0.1 there may also be a decrease in the detection rate, which we suggest is due to the dilution of the absorption strength by 21-cm emission. By assuming that associated and intervening absorbers have similar cosmological mass densities, we find evidence that the spin temperature of the gas evolves with redshift, consistent with heating by ultraviolet photons. From the near-infrared (λ = 3.4, 4.6 and 12 μm) colours, we see that radio galaxies become more quasar-like in their activity with increasing redshift. We also find that the non-detection of 21-cm absorption at high redshift is not likely to be due to the selection of gas-poor ellipticals, in addition to a strong correlation between the ionizing photon rate and the [3.4] - [4.6] colour, indicating that the UV photons arise from AGN activity. Like previous studies, we find a correlation between the detection of 21-cm absorption and the [4.6] - [12] colour, which is a tracer of star-forming activity. However, this only applies at the lowest redshifts (z ≲ 0.1), the range considered by the other studies.

  9. Measurement of atmospheric pollutants associated with oil and natural gas exploration and production activity in Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekney, Natalie J; Veloski, Garret; Reeder, Matthew; Tamilia, Joseph; Rupp, Erik; Wetzel, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) activities generate emissions from diesel engines, compressor stations, condensate tanks, leaks and venting of natural gas, construction of well pads, and well access roads that can negatively impact air quality on both local and regional scales. A mobile, autonomous air quality monitoring laboratory was constructed to collect measurements of ambient concentrations of pollutants associated with oil and natural gas E&P activities. This air-monitoring laboratory was deployed to the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) in northwestern Pennsylvania for a campaign that resulted in the collection of approximately 7 months of data split between three monitoring locations between July 2010 and June 2011. The three monitoring locations were the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF) area in Elk County, which is downwind of the Sackett oilfield; the Bradford Ranger Station (BRS) in McKean County, which is downwind of a large area of historic oil and gas productivity; and the U.S. Forest Service Hearts Content campground (HC) in Warren County, which is in an area relatively unimpacted by oil and gas development and which therefore yielded background pollutant concentrations in the ANF. Concentrations of criteria pollutants ozone and NO2 did not vary significantly from site to site; averages were below National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas (ethane, propane, butane, pentane) were highly correlated. Applying the conditional probability function (CPF) to the ethane data yielded most probable directions of the sources that were coincident with known location of existing wells and activity. Differences between the two impacted and one background site were difficult to discern, suggesting the that the monitoring laboratory was a great enough distance downwind of active areas to allow for sufficient dispersion with background air such that the localized

  10. Test results from the GA technologies engineering-scale off-gas treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, D.D.; Olguin, L.J.; Wilbourn, R.G.

    1984-06-01

    One method for reducing the volume of HTGR fuel prior to reprocessing or spent fuel storage is to crush and burn the graphite fuel elements. The burner off-gas (BOG) contains radioactive components, principally H-3, C-14, Kr-85, I-129, and Rn-220, as well as chemical forms such as CO 2 , CO, O 2 , and SO 2 . The BOG system employs components designed to remove these constitutents. Test results are reported for the iodine and SO 2 adsorbers and the CO/HT oxidizer. Silver-based iodine adsorbents were found to catalyze the premature conversion of CO to CO 2 . Subsequent tests showed that iodine removal could not be performed downstream of the CO/HT oxidizer since iodine in the BOG system rapidly deactivated the Pt-coated alumina CO catalyst. Lead-exchanged zeolite (PbX) was found to be an acceptable alternative for removing iodine from BOG without CO conversion. Intermittent and steady-state tests of the pilot-plant SO 2 removal unit containing sodium-exchanged zeolite (NaX) demonstrated that decontamination factors greater than or equal to 100 could be maintained for up to 50 h. In a reprocessing flowsheet, the solid product from the burners is dissolved in nitric or Thorex acid. The dissolver off-gas (DOG) contains radioactive components H-3, Kr-85, I-129, Rn-220 plus chemical forms such as nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/). In the pilot-scale system at GA, iodine is removed from the DOG by adsorption. Tests of iodine removal have been conducted using either silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) or AgNO 3 -impregnated silica gel (AC-6120). Although each sorbent performed well in the presence of NO/sub x/, the silica gel adsorbent proved more efficient in silver utilization and, thus, more cost effective

  11. Industrial activity, gas emissions and environmental urban management. Operative condition's diagnostic of smelting activities in Tandil, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soledad Sosa, Beatriz; Guerrero, Elsa Marcela; Banda Noriega, Roxana

    2013-01-01

    Amongst urban environmental problems, those associated to industry are of particular interest in environmental management. Tandil, a city in Argentina, owes its economic and urban growth to metalworking activity, especially to smelting. Despite the crisis in the sector, activity continues to be the axis of local economic and urban growth. The present research characterizes, in production, operative and environmental terms, local smelting industries and assesses operative conditions of gas emissions management during 2010. There were analyzed 25 industries over 30. The sample was representative of five productive processes: aluminum (Al), aluminum/iron (Al Fe), aluminum/bronze (Al Cu+Sn), aluminum/iron/bronze (Al Fe Cu+Sn), and iron (Fe). The variables analyzed were: primary fusion mater, oven used and industry size. To obtain production data we applied structured interviews, and for industry sizes we used surveys. It was possible to describe the productive prospect of the sector at a local level: for most industries the destination of their production is automotive sector. Taking into account the relation between the size and the type of industry, the aluminum smelting companies are small. Regarding iron industries, all three company sizes are present in the sample and exists a medium size industry that occupies between 51 and 230 employees. The operative conditions and their compliance with current legislation regarding control of gas emissions require to identify monitoring indicators for the melting stage that allow knowing precisely the resulting contaminants and their environmental effects.

  12. Prospective activity levels in the regions of the UKCS under different oil and gas prices: an application of the Monte Carlo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, A.G.; Stephen, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of a study using the Monte Carlo simulation to examine activity levels in the regions of the UK continental shelf under different oil and gas prices. Details of the methodology, data, and assumptions used are given, and the production of oil and gas, new field investment, aggregate operating expenditures, and gross revenues under different price scenarios are addressed. The total potential oil and gas production under the different price scenarios for 2000-2013 are plotted. (UK)

  13. Foreign activities of German producers of petroleum and natural gas; Auslandsaktivitaeten deutscher Erdoel-ErdgasProduzenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-04-15

    The contribution under consideration is engaged in the foreign activities of German producers of natural gas and oil: Wintershall Holding AG (Kassel), RWE DEA AG (Hamburg), Petro Canada Germany GmbH (Essen), E.ON Ruhrgas AG (Essen), VNG Norge AG (Leipzig), Bavaria gas GmbH (Munich) and EWE AG (Oldenburg). Data according to the petroleum of petroleum and natural gas abroad are published for the period between 2007 and 2009. Besides this, the activities of these companies in individual countries are specified exactly.

  14. Hyperspectral indices for detecting changes in canopy reflectance as a result of underground natural gas leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noomen, M.F.; Smith, K.L.; Colls, J.J.; Steven, M.D.; Skidmore, A.K.; Meer, van der F.D.

    2008-01-01

    Natural gas leakage from underground pipelines is known to affect vegetation adversely, probably by displacement of the soil oxygen needed for respiration. This causes changes in plant and canopy reflectance, which may serve as indicators of gas leakage. In this study, a covariance analysis was

  15. Comprehensive Interpretation of the Laboratory Experiments Results to Construct Model of the Polish Shale Gas Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Jadwiga A.; Krakowska, Paulina I.; Puskarczyk, Edyta; Wawrzyniak-Guz, Kamila; Zych, Marcin

    2018-03-01

    More than 70 rock samples from so-called sweet spots, i.e. the Ordovician Sa Formation and Silurian Ja Member of Pa Formation from the Baltic Basin (North Poland) were examined in the laboratory to determine bulk and grain density, total and effective/dynamic porosity, absolute permeability, pore diameters size, total surface area, and natural radioactivity. Results of the pyrolysis, i.e., TOC (Total Organic Carbon) together with S1 and S2 - parameters used to determine the hydrocarbon generation potential of rocks, were also considered. Elemental composition from chemical analyses and mineral composition from XRD measurements were also included. SCAL analysis, NMR experiments, Pressure Decay Permeability measurements together with water immersion porosimetry and adsorption/ desorption of nitrogen vapors method were carried out along with the comprehensive interpretation of the outcomes. Simple and multiple linear statistical regressions were used to recognize mutual relationships between parameters. Observed correlations and in some cases big dispersion of data and discrepancies in the property values obtained from different methods were the basis for building shale gas rock model for well logging interpretation. The model was verified by the result of the Monte Carlo modelling of spectral neutron-gamma log response in comparison with GEM log results.

  16. Comparison of GAMMA results with experimental data in the naturally circulating gas loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.I.; No, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Natural circulation steady-state data with carbon dioxide and nitrogen are compared to numerical predictions by GAMMA code, which is being developed by KAIST and KAERI. The GAMMA code is a computational tool for predicting various transients those can potentially occur in a high temperature gas cooled reactor. The code has a capability of analyzing multi-dimensional multi-component mixture and includes models for friction, heat transfer, chemical reaction and multi-component molecular diffusion. Natural circulation data with nitrogen and carbon dioxide gases show that the loop operates in a Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime which exhibits substantially reduced heat transfer coefficients. The GAMMA code with original heat transfer package predicted conservative results in terms of peak wall temperature. Also, the estimated peak location did not successfully match with the data. Even though GAMMA's original heat transfer package included mixed-convection regime, which is part of DTHT regime, still the results showed that the original heat transfer package performs with insufficient accuracy. After implementing a recently developed correlation and corresponding heat transfer regime map into GAMMA to cover the whole range of deteriorated heat transfer, a better agreement with data was obtained. In addition, RELAP5-MOD3 results are discussed in parallel. (author)

  17. Active lubrication applied to radial gas journal bearings. Part 1: Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morosi, Stefano; Santos, Ilmar

    2011-01-01

    Active bearings represent a mechatronic answer to the growing industrial need to high performance turbomachinery. The present contribution aims at demonstrate the feasibility of applying active lubrication to gas journal bearings. The principle of operation is to generate active forces by regulat...

  18. Measurement of the 232Th-series activity in gas sockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutarman, I.

    1995-01-01

    The activity of 232 Th and its daughters in Th-based gas sockets is required for health risk assessment. By absolute measurement of the 228 Ac-and 212 Pb/ 208 Tl-activities, the total activity of the sockets can be assessed. It is governed by 228 Ra and 228 Th and the product age. (author) 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  19. Future evolution of the liberalised European gas market: Simulation results with a dynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lise, Wietze; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    Strategic behaviour by gas producers is likely to affect future gas prices and investments in the European Union (EU). To analyse this issue, a computational game theoretic model is presented that is based on a recursive-dynamic formulation. This model addresses interactions among demand, supply, pipeline and liquefied natural gas (LNG) transport, storage and investments in the natural gas market over the period 2005-2030. Three market scenarios are formulated to study the impact of producer market power. In addition, tradeoffs among investments in pipelines, LNG liquefaction and regasification facilities, and storage are explored. The model runs indicate that LNG can effectively compete with pipelines in the near future. Further, significant decreases in Cournot prices between 2005 and 2010 indicate that near-term investments in EU gas transport capacity are likely to diminish market power by making markets more accessible. (author)

  20. Gas enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the cerebrum using carbon dioxide and oxygen - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Ohlhues, Anders

    Purpose/introduction Standard imaging of the cerebral arteries is performed using intravenous contrast in CT angiography and x-ray angiography. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the cerebral arteries using intravenous contrast media does not perform well. Contrast in the venous bed...... and Methods Two healthy volunteers were scanned during inhalation of three different gas mixtures: Gas I (air), Gas II (5% CO2, 21 % O2, 74 % N2), Gas III (5% CO2, 95% O2). For each gas mixture a time of flight (TOF) series on the cerebral arteries was performed. Following each TOF series an ECG-gated phase...... contrast sequence was performed to calculate volume flow in the common carotid arteries. MRA data was acquired with a 1.5 T Siemens VISION MR-system (SIEMENS Medical Systems, Germany) using a standard circularly polarized head coil. Reconstructed images of TOF series and volume flow measurements were...

  1. Future evolution of the liberalised European gas market: Simulation results with a dynamic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lise, Wietze [IBS Research and Consultancy, Aga Han, Agahamami Cadessi 1/6, Cihangir, 34433 Beyoglu, Istanbul (Turkey); Energy Markets and International Environmental Policy group, ECN Policy Studies, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hobbs, Benjamin F. [Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Ames Hall 313, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Strategic behaviour by gas producers is likely to affect future gas prices and investments in the European Union (EU). To analyse this issue, a computational game theoretic model is presented that is based on a recursive-dynamic formulation. This model addresses interactions among demand, supply, pipeline and liquefied natural gas (LNG) transport, storage and investments in the natural gas market over the period 2005-2030. Three market scenarios are formulated to study the impact of producer market power. In addition, tradeoffs among investments in pipelines, LNG liquefaction and regasification facilities, and storage are explored. The model runs indicate that LNG can effectively compete with pipelines in the near future. Further, significant decreases in Cournot prices between 2005 and 2010 indicate that near-term investments in EU gas transport capacity are likely to diminish market power by making markets more accessible. (author)

  2. Advanced Gas Sensors Using SERS-Activated Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Robert; McWhorter, Scott; Murph, Simona Hunyadi

    2010-08-01

    This contribution describes progress towards the development and testing of a functionalized capillary that will provide detection of low-concentration gas-phase analytes through SERS. Measurement inside a waveguide allows interrogation of a large surface area, potentially overcoming the short distance dependence of the SERS effect. The possible use of Raman spectroscopy for gas detection is attractive for IR-inactive molecules or scenarios where infrared technology is inconvenient. However, the weakness of Raman scattering limits the use of the technique to situations where low detection limits are not required or large gas pressures are present. With surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), signal enhancements of 106 are often claimed, and higher values are seen in specific instances. However, most of the examples of SERS analysis are on liquid-phase samples, where the molecular density is high, usually combined with some sort of sample concentration at the surface. Neither of these factors is present in gas-phase samples. Because the laser is focused to a small point in the typical experimental setup, and the spatial extent of the effect above the surface is small (microns), the excitation volume is miniscule. Thus, exceptionally large enhancements are required to generate a signal comparable to that obtained by conventional Raman measurements. A reflective waveguide offers a way to increase the interaction volume of the laser with a SERS-modified surface. The use of a waveguide to enhance classical Raman measurements was recently demonstrated by S.M. Angel and coworkers, who obtained 12- to 30-fold sensitivity improvements for nonabsorbing gases (CO2, CH4) with a silvered capillary (no SERS enhancement). Shi et al.. demonstrated 10-to 100-fold enhancement of aqueous Rhodamine 6G in a capillary coated with silver nanoparticles. They observed enhancements of 10- to 100-fold compared to direct sampling, but this relied on a "double substrate", which required

  3. Four-Wave Optical Parametric Amplification in a Raman-Active Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave optical parametric amplification (FWOPA in a Raman-active medium is experimentally investigated by use of an air-filled hollow fiber. A femtosecond pump pulse shorter than the period of molecular motion excites the coherent molecular motion of the Raman-active molecules during the parametric amplification of a signal pulse. The excited coherent motion modulates the frequency of the signal pulse during the parametric amplification, and shifts it to lower frequencies. The magnitude of the frequency redshift depends on the pump intensity, resulting in intensity-dependent spectral characteristics that are different from those in the FWOPA induced in a noble-gas-filled hollow fiber.

  4. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Debra K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI. It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control. Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control, which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity.

  5. Measurement of activity coefficients of mixtures by head-space gas chromatography: general procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Patricia; Wouters, Christine; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Sandler, Stanley I

    2013-08-09

    Head-space gas chromatography (HS-GC) is an applicable method to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements and determine activity coefficients. However, the reproducibility of the data may be conditioned by the experimental procedure concerning to the automated pressure-balanced system. The study developed in this work shows that a minimum volume of liquid in the vial is necessary to ensure the reliability of the activity coefficients since it may become a parameter that influences the magnitude of the peak areas: the helium introduced during the pressurization step may produce significant variations of the results when too small volume of liquid is selected. The minimum volume required should thus be evaluated prior to obtain experimentally the concentration in the vapor phase and the activity coefficients. In this work, the mixture acetonitrile-toluene is taken as example, requiring a sample volume of more than 5mL (about more than 25% of the vial volume). The vapor-liquid equilibrium and activity coefficients of mixtures at different concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 molar fraction) and four temperatures (35, 45, 55 and 70°C) have been determined. Relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 5% have been obtained, indicating the good reproducibility of the method when a sample volume larger than 5mL is used. Finally, a general procedure to measure activity coefficients by means of pressure-balanced head-space gas chromatography is proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Resulting From Tourism Travel in an Alpine Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Unger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism—with its social, economic, and ecological dimensions—can be an important driver of sustainable development of alpine communities. Tourism is essential for local people's incomes and livelihoods, but it can also have a major impact on the local environment, landscape aesthetics, and (mainly through tourist transport global climate change. A project currently underway is developing the Austrian mountain municipality of Alpbach into a role model for competitive and sustainable year-round alpine tourism using an integrated and spatially explicit approach that considers energy demand and supply related to housing, infrastructure, and traffic in the settlement and the skiing area. As the first outcome of the project, this article focuses on the development of the Model of Alpine Tourism and Transportation, a geographic information system–based tool for calculating, in detail, energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions resulting from travel to a single alpine holiday destination. Analysis results show that it is crucial to incorporate both direct and indirect energy use and emissions as each contributes significantly to the climate impact of travel. The study fills a research gap in carbon impact appraisal studies of tourism transport in the context of alpine tourism at the destination level. Our findings will serve as a baseline for the development of comprehensive policies and agendas promoting the transformation toward sustainable alpine tourism.

  7. Oil and gas activities in the program energy research and development (PERD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billette, N.; Marshall, S.-L.

    2002-01-01

    A broad range of non-nuclear energy research and development activities are covered under the umbrella of the Program of Energy Research and Development (PERD) managed by Natural Resources Canada. The research and development budget amounts to 52.5 million dollars annually, and is distributed across twelve federal departments and agencies. Horizontal coordinated research activities are taking place. Of this total budget, approximately 14 million dollars annually are spent to carry out oil and gas research and development activities by five federal departments and one agency. A results-based management for PERD was recently implemented by the Office of Energy Research and Development in an effort to improve the strategic management. Some of the efforts are directed toward research in the following general classification: upstream activities, offshore and frontier activities, and cross-cutting activities. Upgrading technologies and advanced separation technologies with the focus on oil sands bitumen represent the main issues addressed under the heading upstream activities. The major issues studied in the offshore and frontier activities are: basin assessment and geotechnics, wind-wave-current modelling, managing sea ice, ice-structure interactions, transportation safety, marine operations and ship design, management of offshore drilling and production waste, oil spills remediation and environmental impact assessment of offshore wastes and produced waters. Flaring, pipelines and soil and groundwater remediation are topics classified under the heading cross-cutting activities. The authors provided an overview of the activities and identified the future trends in PERD to meet the requirements of the various stakeholders and the Canadian population. 1 tab

  8. Oil and gas activities in the program energy research and development (PERD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billette, N.; Marshall, S.-L. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2002-06-01

    A broad range of non-nuclear energy research and development activities are covered under the umbrella of the Program of Energy Research and Development (PERD) managed by Natural Resources Canada. The research and development budget amounts to 52.5 million dollars annually, and is distributed across twelve federal departments and agencies. Horizontal coordinated research activities are taking place. Of this total budget, approximately 14 million dollars annually are spent to carry out oil and gas research and development activities by five federal departments and one agency. A results-based management for PERD was recently implemented by the Office of Energy Research and Development in an effort to improve the strategic management. Some of the efforts are directed toward research in the following general classification: upstream activities, offshore and frontier activities, and cross-cutting activities. Upgrading technologies and advanced separation technologies with the focus on oil sands bitumen represent the main issues addressed under the heading upstream activities. The major issues studied in the offshore and frontier activities are: basin assessment and geotechnics, wind-wave-current modelling, managing sea ice, ice-structure interactions, transportation safety, marine operations and ship design, management of offshore drilling and production waste, oil spills remediation and environmental impact assessment of offshore wastes and produced waters. Flaring, pipelines and soil and groundwater remediation are topics classified under the heading cross-cutting activities. The authors provided an overview of the activities and identified the future trends in PERD to meet the requirements of the various stakeholders and the Canadian population. 1 tab.

  9. Suppressive oligodeoxynucleotides containing TTAGGG motifs inhibit cGAS activation in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, Folkert; Zillinger, Thomas; Peukert, Konrad; Fox, Mario; Thudium, Marcus; Barchet, Winfried; Putensen, Christian; Klinman, Dennis; Latz, Eicke; Bode, Christian

    2018-04-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is a critical mediator of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome (AGS). The recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) induces the production of type I IFN in response to cytosolic DNA and is potentially linked to SLE and AGS. Suppressive oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing repetitive TTAGGG motifs present in mammalian telomeres have proven useful in the treatment of autoimmune diseases including SLE. In this study, we demonstrate that the suppressive ODN A151 effectively inhibits activation of cGAS in response to cytosolic DNA, thereby inhibiting type I IFN production by human monocytes. In addition, A151 abrogated cGAS activation in response to endogenous accumulation of DNA using TREX1-deficient monocytes. We demonstrate that A151 prevents cGAS activation in a manner that is competitive with DNA. This suppressive activity of A151 was dependent on both telomeric sequence and phosphorothioate backbone. To our knowledge this report presents the first cGAS inhibitor capable of blocking self-DNA. Collectively, these findings might lead to the development of new therapeutics against IFN-driven pathologies due to cGAS activation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Applications of UT results to confirm defects findings by utilization of relevant metallurgical investigations techniques on gas/condensate pipeline working in wet sour gas environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Azhari, O. A.; Gajam, S. Y.

    2015-03-01

    The gas/condensate pipe line under investigation is a 12 inch diameter, 48 km ASTM, A106 steel pipeline, carrying hydrocarbons containing wet CO2 and H2S.The pipe line had exploded in a region 100m distance from its terminal; after 24 years of service. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sour gas corrosion were expected due to the presence of wet H2S in the gas analysis. In other areas of pipe line ultrasonic testing was performed to determine whether the pipeline can be re-operated. The results have shown presence of internal planner defects, this was attributed to the existence of either laminations, type II inclusions or some service defects such as HIC and step wise cracking (SWC).Metallurgical investigations were conducted on fractured samples as per NACE standard (TM-0284-84). The obtained results had shown macroscopic cracks in the form of SWC, microstructure of steel had MnS inclusions. Crack sensitivity analyses were calculated and the microhardness testing was conducted. These results had confirmed that the line material was suffering from sour gas deteriorations. This paper correlates the field UT inspection findings with those methods investigated in the laboratory. Based on the results obtained a new HIC resistance material pipeline needs to be selected.

  11. Oil and gas activities of the world bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein, R.

    1993-01-01

    The oil crisis of the 1970s profoundly challenged the economies of most developing countries. The crisis hit the the oil-importing countries severely, and many suffered deteriorating balances of payments and increasingly unmanageable import bills. It was in this context, in July 1977, that the World Bank's Executive Directors approved an expanded program of lending to assist the Bank's client countries in developing their own energy resources. In 1978, the Bonn Summit and the Secretary General of the United Nations endorsed the initiation of new approaches in the energy sector by the World Bank, particularly in financing oil exploration in countries that were significant oil importers. The new initiative led to a rapid expansion of the World Bank's lending for oil and gas projects, which reached about $1 billion in 1983

  12. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly Basin Activities Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, C H

    1979-01-31

    This report is a summation of 3 months' drilling and testing activities in the four primary WGSP study areas: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. The monitoring of basin activities is part of resource assessment. (DLC)

  13. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  14. Rn, He and CO{sub 2} soil gas geochemistry for the study of active and inactive faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, S. [Earth Science Department - University ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Voltattorni, N., E-mail: nunzia.voltattorni@ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Rome (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Two Italian areas, characterized by different seismological histories, were investigated to enhance the basic knowledge of gas migration mechanisms during earthquakes. Sharp variations occur in the movement and concentration of some gaseous species due to the evolution of the local stress regime. The first area (Colpasquale) is located in the central Italian region of Marche and provided a good location to study gas migration in a seismically active region. The area was devastated by a sequence of shallow earthquakes over a 3 month-long period (September-December, 1997). The occurrence of this catastrophic event, as well as the long duration of the 'seismic sequence', presented a unique opportunity to study gas migration in a zone undergoing active displacement. Soil gas surveys were performed 1 day, 1 week, 1 year and 2 years after the main shock (Ms 5.6) in the Colpasquale area. In particular, results highlight a change in the Rn distribution during the three monitoring years indicating a variation of gas migration that may be linked to the evolution of the stress regime. The second study area is located in the Campidano Graben (southern part of Sardinia Island). This area is characterized by seismic quiescence, displaying an almost complete lack of historical earthquakes and instrumentally recorded seismicity. The consistently low values observed for all analyzed gases suggest that the studied area is likely characterized by sealed, non-active faults that prevent significant gas migration. The comparison of data from both studied areas indicate that soil gas geochemistry is useful to locate tectonic discontinuities even when they intersect non-cohesive clastic rocks near the surface and thus are not visible (i.e., 'blind faults').

  15. ESSENCE AND VALUE OF FINANCIAL RESULTS OF COMMERCIAL BANK ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushnarova Anna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Financial results of the banking institution activity are one of the most important indicators of its functioning. They characterize the stability and reliability of a commercial bank, which is necessary to create reserve funds, to encourage staff and offer guidance to develop and improve operations on the market, reduce costs and improve the quality of services provided. Purpose. The purpose of the study is to determine the composition and significance of financial results for the functioning of the banking institution in the existing competitive environment. Results. The article considers the concept of financial results of a commercial bank as an important element of its activity for achieving competitive advantages in the banking services market. The composition and structure of financial results, factors of possible impact on them are determined. The source of the mapping and recording of the results of the activity is indicated. Attention is paid to the significance of profit as a positive financial result of a commercial bank activity and the priority directions of its distribution are formed. The importance of the relative indicator of the effective activity of a commercial bank as one of the elements of the formation of financial results is substantiated. Conclusions. Thus, in today’s market conditions, one can talk about the expediency of determining the composition of financial results and their significance to ensure the main directions of the functioning of a commercial bank. First of all, in order to increase the level of profitability it is necessary to carry out a comprehensive analysis of income and expenditure, to identify the factors of influence on them, to increase the reserves of activity. Receiving a positive or negative value of financial performance depends primarily on the effectiveness of the interaction of each component of the organization of a modern commercial bank. The ability to correctly identify

  16. Micronozzles: 3D numerical structural and gas dynamics modeling, fabrication, and preliminary experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Pyatishev, Evgenij N.; Lurie, Mihail S.; Korshunov, Andrey V.; Akulshin, Y. D.; Dolganov, A. G.; Sabadash, V. O.

    2001-02-01

    The tiny engines, founded on the principle of reactive thrust, are one of most perspective actuators developed by modern micromechanics. These engines can be applied for such apparent problems, as orientation and stabilization of small space objects, but also as local or distributed reactive thrust of new phylum of aerospace objects, for control of boundary layer of flying objects and in series of converting power devices of different purposes. Distinctive features of jet tiny engines are profitability (very large thrust-to-weight ratio) and high (milliseconds) response, which makes them to irreplaceable elements in control systems and, specially, in distributed power generations. These features are provided the minimum sizes, high pressure in working chambers and hypersonic velocity of propulsive jet. Topologically micronozzles are designed as the flat batch devices (3 layers as minimum). The lower and upper layers make flat walls of the nozzle and mainly influence on strength properties of the device. The mean layer reshapes geometry and determines gas dynamic characteristic of the nozzle. A special problem is the opening-up of the combustion-mixture, which is not esteemed in this work. It is necessary to allow for effect of considerable local stresses arising at the expense of static and dynamic loading at design of the jet tiny engines. Thermal gas dynamic processes in the chamber and nozzle determine the values and nature of these stresses, which are hardly studied for the microdevices. The priority is mathematical and experimental simulation of these processes. The most suitable object for initial phase of experimental simulation is the 'cold' engine. The demanded chamber static pressure is formed by external compressed air. In Laboratory of Microtechnology and MicroElectroMechanical Systems a number of such tiny engines with different shapes of the chamber's and the nozzles' surfaces were designed, made and tested. The engines were produced from photosensing

  17. Experiences of small-scale consumers in the market for natural gas. Visible results of liberalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeleman, J.

    2005-01-01

    The gas market, as the electricity market, has been fully liberalized for all consumers in the Netherlands since 1 July 2004. Was the market ready for this? What main changes have taken place? Health care institutions in the province of Zeeland have now had their first experiences with the liberalized gas market and the outcome has been a saving of 17%. A study of the tendering process for 86 care institutions reveals that not all the gas supply companies were ready to sign contracts with a combination of smaller and larger consuming organizations. Another conclusion is that these consumers expended some effort learning about the gas market, which appears to be nontransparent to outsiders. The latter is a striking observation because costs are the most important criterion for institutional consumers [nl

  18. Influence of altered precipitation pattern on greenhouse gas emissions and soil enzyme activities in Pannonian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Stefan Johannes; Michel, Kerstin; Berthold, Helene; Baumgarten, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kitzler, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    water only once in two weeks (D=dry). Both groups received same water totals for each soil. At the end of each two week drying period, greenhouse gas fluxes were measured via an open-chamber-system (CO2, NO) and a closed-chamber-approach (CH4, N2O, CO2). Additional cylinders were harvested destructively to quantify inorganic N forms, microbial biomass C, N and extracellular enzyme activity (Cellulase, Xylanase, Protease, Phenoloxidase, Peroxidase). We hypothesize that after rewetting (1) rates of greenhouse gas fluxes will generally increase, as well as (2) extracellular enzyme activity indicating enhanced microbial activity. However, response may be different for gases and enzymes involved in the C and N cycle, respectively, as drying/rewetting stress may uncouple microbial mediated biogeochemical cycles. Results will be presented at the EGU General Assembly. Reference: Schimel, J., Balser, T.C., and Wallenstein, M. (2007). Microbial stress-response physiology and its implications for ecosystem function. Ecology 88, 1386-1394.

  19. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. All rights reserved ISABE-2011-1129 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS SHOWING THE INTERNAL THREE-COMPONENT VELOCITY FIELD AND OUTLET TEMPERATURE CONTOURS FOR A MODEL GAS TURBINE COMBUSTOR BC Meyers*, GC... identifier c Position identifier F Fuel i Index L (Combustor) Liner OP Orifice plate Introduction There are often inconsistencies when comparing experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for gas turbine combustors [1...

  20. Protocol for the quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    ' document. The quantification of GHG emissions from waste management activities is a complex exercise. This Protocol is a living document which is going to evolve together with the improvement of calculation and measurement techniques. This Protocol is a tool for quantifying and reporting a greenhouse gas inventory from waste activities over a given time frame, typically a year. In this regard, the landfill methane emissions reported are only those estimated to be emitted in the given reporting year. The reported value does not include the future emissions resulting from the degradation of waste landfilled in and prior to the reporting year. Therefore, the reported landfill methane values based on this Protocol should not be used in the context of a comparison of greenhouse gas footprint of various waste technologies

  1. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  2. RISK DECREASE PROBLEM WITH MAKING ERRORS IN ACTIVITY OF OPERATORS DEALING WITH AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS OF GAS-DISTRIBUTION STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Egorov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis of specific features pertaining to the activity of operators dealing with automatic control systems of gas-distribution stations. The professional operator’s activity is presented in the form of the developed data model. Possible conceptual approaches to the research are analyzed in the paper. The paper describes an author’s approach to studying a risk decrease problem in the activity of operators on the basis of the analytical research results. Technology for obtaining  research results is cited in the paper. 

  3. Active aging promotion: results from the vital aging program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Mariagiovanna; Molina, María Ángeles; Schettini, Rocío; Santacreu, Marta; Orosa, Teresa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rojas, Macarena; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative) are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants' satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished.

  4. Active Aging Promotion: Results from the Vital Aging Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagiovanna Caprara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants’ satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished.

  5. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure.

  6. Predicting mixed-gas adsorption equilibria on activated carbon for precombustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, S; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F; Pevida, C

    2013-05-21

    We present experimentally measured adsorption isotherms of CO2, H2, and N2 on a phenol-formaldehyde resin-based activated carbon, which had been previously synthesized for the separation of CO2 in a precombustion capture process. The single component adsorption isotherms were measured in a magnetic suspension balance at three different temperatures (298, 318, and 338 K) and over a large range of pressures (from 0 to 3000-4000 kPa). These values cover the temperature and pressure conditions likely to be found in a precombustion capture scenario, where CO2 needs to be separated from a CO2/H2/N2 gas stream at high pressure (~1000-1500 kPa) and with a high CO2 concentration (~20-40 vol %). Data on the pure component isotherms were correlated using the Langmuir, Sips, and dual-site Langmuir (DSL) models, i.e., a two-, three-, and four-parameter model, respectively. By using the pure component isotherm fitting parameters, adsorption equilibrium was then predicted for multicomponent gas mixtures by the extended models. The DSL model was formulated considering the energetic site-matching concept, recently addressed in the literature. Experimental gas-mixture adsorption equilibrium data were calculated from breakthrough experiments conducted in a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor and compared with the predictions from the models. Breakthrough experiments were carried out at a temperature of 318 K and five different pressures (300, 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 kPa) where two different CO2/H2/N2 gas mixtures were used as the feed gas in the adsorption step. The DSL model was found to be the one that most accurately predicted the CO2 adsorption equilibrium in the multicomponent mixture. The results presented in this work highlight the importance of performing experimental measurements of mixture adsorption equilibria, as they are of utmost importance to discriminate between models and to correctly select the one that most closely reflects the actual process.

  7. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassotis, Christopher D., E-mail: christopher.kassotis@duke.edu [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Iwanowicz, Luke R. [U.S. Geological Survey, Leetown Science Center, Fish Health Branch, 11649 Leetown Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430 (United States); Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Mumford, Adam C. [U.S. Geological Survey, National Research Program, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS 430, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Orem, William H. [U.S. Geological Survey, Eastern Energy Resources Science Center, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS 956, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Nagel, Susan C., E-mail: nagels@health.missouri.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Currently, > 95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby. - Highlights: • Oil and gas wastewater disposal may increase endocrine disrupting activity in water. • Tested EDC activity in surface water near oil and gas wastewater injection site. • Water downstream had significantly

  8. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Mumford, Adam C.; Orem, William H.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, > 95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby. - Highlights: • Oil and gas wastewater disposal may increase endocrine disrupting activity in water. • Tested EDC activity in surface water near oil and gas wastewater injection site. • Water downstream had significantly

  9. Improving bondability to RTV silicone elastomer using rf-activated gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, J.L.

    1979-05-01

    The effects of an rf-activated gas (plasma) on the bondability to RTV silicone elastomer were studied. Processing guidelines were developed, and a method was sought to satisfactorily bond RTV to the walls of a machined aluminum casting and to provide a surface on the RTV which would best accept bonding to an epoxy encapsulant. Processing parameters, such as gas type and flow rate, reaction chamber pressure, and rf power level, were developed

  10. On gas sweeping from central regions of galaxies with active nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silich, S.A.; Fomin, P.I.

    1980-01-01

    A mechanism of gas sweeping by shock waves from central regions of plane galaxies with active nuclei which is connected with the angular moment transfer from a stellar-cloud component to a gas one is considered. It is shown that shock waves are capable to form the observable density profile with the maximum at a distance of some kpc from galaxy centre for the time of the order of 10 9 years

  11. The influence of adsorption capacity on enhanced gas absorption in activated carbon slurries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstvoogd, R.D.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1990-01-01

    The enhanced absorption of gases in aqueous activated carbbon slurries of fine particles is studied with a non-steady-state absorption model, taking into account the finite adsorption capacity of the carbon particles. It has been found that, for the different gas/activated carbon slurry systems

  12. Soil Gas Dynamics and Microbial Activity in the Unsaturated Zone of a Regulated River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, H.; Ferencz, S. B.; Cardenas, M. B.; Neilson, B. T.; Bennett, P. C.

    2017-12-01

    Over 60% of the world's rivers are dammed, and are therefore regulated. In some river systems, river regulation is the dominant factor governing fluid exchange and soil gas dynamics in the hyporheic region and overlying unsaturated zone of the river banks. Where this is the case, it is important to understand the effects that an artificially-induced change in river stage can have on the chemical, plant, and microbial components of the unsaturated zone. Daily releases from an upstream dam cause rapid stage fluctuations in the Lower Colorado River east of Austin, Texas. For this study, we utilized an array of water and gas wells along a transect perpendicular to the river to investigate the biogeochemical process occurring in this mixing zone. The gas wells were installed at several depths up to 1.5 meters, and facilitated the continuous monitoring of soil gases as the pulse percolated through the river bank. Water samples collected from the screened wells penetrated to depths below the water table and were analyzed for nutrients, carbon, and major ions. Additionally, two soil cores were taken at different distances from the river and analyzed for soil moisture and grain size. These cores were also analyzed for microbial activity using the total heterotroph count method and the acetylene inhibition technique, a sensitive method of measuring denitrifying activity. The results provide a detailed picture of soil gas flux and biogeochemical processes in the bank environment in a regulated river. Findings indicate that a river pulse that causes a meter-scale change in river stage causes small, centimeter-scale pulses in the water table. We propose that these conditions create an area of elevated microbial respiration at the base of the unsaturated zone that appears to be decoupled from normal diurnal fluctuations. Along the transect, CO2 concentrations increased with increasing depth down to the water table. CO2 concentrations were highest in the time following a pulse

  13. Pneumococcal Induced T-activation with Resultant Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic microangiopathies are disorders resulting from platelet thromboses forming in the microvasculature with resultant schistocyte forms. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia often complicated by acute renal failure in children. HUS is typically caused by bacterial infection, most commonly enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Neuraminidase-producing organisms, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae have also been reported as potential etiologies. The pathogenesis in these cases involves cleavage of sialic acid residues from the surfaces of erythrocytes, platelets, and glomerular capillary endothelial cells, exposing the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, a process known as T-activation. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis ultimately resulting in a thrombotic microangiopathy with acute renal failure, most consistent with HUS. The patient's direct antiglobulin test was positive. Polyagglutination was observed with human adult serum, but not with umbilical cord serum. Her red blood cells (RBCs were reactive against peanut and soybean lectins, but not Salvia sclarea or Salvia horminum lectins. These findings are consistent with T-activation. Clinicians should be cognizant of the possibility of T-activation with resultant HUS in patients infected with neuraminidase-producing bacteria. Such patients may be difficult to identify using monoclonal typing antisera, as these typically do not have anti-T antibodies. Whether such patients are at risk for transfusion-associated hemolysis is debatable.

  14. Lower electricity prices and greenhouse gas emissions due to rooftop solar: empirical results for Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Robert K.; Vaid, Devina

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and hourly correlations among photovoltaic (PV) capacity utilization, electricity prices, electricity consumption, and the thermal efficiency of power plants in Massachusetts reduce electricity prices and carbon emissions beyond average calculations. PV utilization rates are highest when the thermal efficiencies of natural gas fired power plants are lowest, which reduces emissions of CO 2 and CH 4 by 0.3% relative to the annual average emission rate. There is a positive correlation between PV utilization rates and electricity prices, which raises the implied price of PV electricity by up to 10% relative to the annual average price, such that the average MWh reduces electricity prices by $0.26–$1.86 per MWh. These price reductions save Massachusetts rate-payers $184 million between 2010 and 2012. The current and net present values of these savings are greater than the cost of solar renewable energy credits which is the policy instrument that is used to accelerate the installation of PV capacity. Together, these results suggest that rooftop PV is an economically viable source of power in Massachusetts even though it has not reached socket parity. - Highlights: •Implied price of PV up to 10% greater than the annual average price. •PV saves Massachusetts rate-payers $184 million in 2010–2012. •Annual savings are greater than the cost of solar renewable energy credits. •Savings rise longer lifetime of PV systems and pay period for SREC's shortened. •PV reduces emissions of CO 2 and CH 4 by 0.3% relative to the annual average.

  15. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  16. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days

  17. Design and operation results of nitrogen gas baking system for KSTAR plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Tae [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Jin, E-mail: k43689@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Joung, Nam-Yong; Im, Dong-Seok; Kim, Kang-Pyo; Kim, Kyung-Min; Bang, Eun-Nam; Kim, Yaung-Soo [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seong-Yeon [Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Vacuum pressure in a vacuum vessel arrived at 7.24 × 10{sup −8} mbar. • PFC temperature was reached maximum 250 °C by gas temperature at 300 °C. • PFC inlet gas temperature was changed 5 °C per hour during rising and falling. • PFC gas balancing was made temperature difference among them below 8.3 °C. • System has a pre-cooler and a three-way valve to save operation energy. -- Abstract: A baking system for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma facing components (PFCs) is designed and operated to achieve vacuum pressure below 5 × 10{sup −7} mbar in vacuum vessel with removing impurities. The purpose of this research is to prevent the fracture of PFC because of thermal stress during baking the PFC, and to accomplish stable operation of the baking system with the minimum life cycle cost. The uniformity of PFC temperature in each sector was investigated, when the supply gas temperature was varied by 5 °C per hour using a heater and the three-way valve at the outlet of a compressor. The alternative of the pipe expansion owing to hot gas and the cage configuration of the three-way valve were also studied. During the fourth campaign of the KSTAR in 2011, nitrogen gas temperature rose up to 300 °C, PFC temperature reached at 250 °C, the temperature difference among PFCs was maintained at below 8.3 °C, and vacuum pressure of up to 7.24 × 10{sup −8} mbar was achieved inside the vacuum vessel.

  18. Natural gas assessment in France in 2015: final results - February 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mombel, David

    2017-02-01

    Illustrated by tables and graphs, this publication presents and comments data related to primary consumption of natural gas in France (increase in 2015), national production (still marginal), the evolution of imports and re-exports (a decrease of imports more than balanced by the strong decrease of re-exports), the origin of supplies (a rather diversified supply still dominated by Norway and still attractive short-term contracts), stocks, the evolution of consumption in relationship with climate and use of gas-fired plants (evolution of consumption since 1970, supplies to the different sectors), and the evolution of supplies to the different regions

  19. Continuous gas monitoring in the West Bohemian earthquake area, Czech Republic: First results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faber, E.; Horálek, Josef; Boušková, Alena; Teschner, M.; Koch, U.; Poggenburg, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2009), s. 315-328 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1780 Grant - others:German Ministry of Economics and Labour(DE) BMWi VI A 2-27/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : West Bohemian earthquake area * earthquake swarms * gas monitoring * soil gas * carbon dioxide * radon * mofette * time series Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  20. Enova results and activities report 2008; Resultat- og aktivitetsrapport 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Enova's results in 2008 was 2,15 TWh in saved and produces renewable energy. Totally Enova has contributed by activate environmental friendly energy projects equivalent 11,6 TWh up to 2009. This is a good step towards Enova's long-term goal and corresponding to an amount of approximately 10 % of Norway's united consumption of energy throughout a year. (AG). refs., figs., tabs., ills

  1. Measurement Testing of Radon Gas for Fault Activity Detection in Rahtawu Muria, Pati

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntoko, Hadi; Hamzah, Imam

    2004-01-01

    The radon surface can be used to investigates not only for environment but also to be develop in an earth application. The investigation is carried out at the Rahtawu fault, that includes, to the Pati regency which is located 40 km South of ULA. The objective of study to measure the radon released from the fracture zone activities. RDA equipment is being used to measure the radon gas released. The result shown that the high value of radon is 311 cpm with the background of 18 cpm, whereas the low value falls at 0 cpm. The tattoo value are influenced by the soil condition, tattoo time, hardness, weather, soil/stone porosity and fault possession. (author)

  2. A Photocatalytic Active Adsorbent for Gas Cleaning in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pucher

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient photocatalysis for gas cleaning purposes requires a large accessible, illuminated active surface in a simple and compact reactor. Conventional concepts use powdered catalysts, which are nontransparent. Hence a uniform distribution of light is difficult to be attained. Our approach is based on a coarse granular, UV-A light transparent, and highly porous adsorbent that can be used in a simple fixed bed reactor. A novel sol-gel process with rapid micro mixing is used to coat a porous silica substrate with TiO2-based nanoparticles. The resulting material posses a high adsorption capacity and a photocatalytic activity under UV-A illumination (PCAA = photocatalytic active adsorbent. Its photocatalytic performance was studied on the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE in a fixed bed reactor setup in continuous and discontinuous operation modes. Continuous operation resulted in a higher conversion rate due to less slip while discontinuous operation is superior for a total oxidation to CO2 due to a user-defined longer residence time.

  3. Use of proportional gas scintillator in absolute measurements of alpha-gamma emitter activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a U 3 O 8 sample was measured utilizing a sum-coincidence circuit which selects only the alpha particles which are simultaneous with the 143 KeV and 186 KeV gamma radiations from the Th-231 (product nucleus). The alpha particles were detected by means of a new type of a gas scintillating chamber, in which the light emitted by excitation of the gas atoms, due to the passage of a charged incoming particle, has its intensity increased by the action of an applied electric field. The gamma radiations were detected by means of a NaI(Tl) 1'' x 1 1/2'' scintillation detector. The value obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with the data available from various observers which used different experimental techniques. It is shown tht the results, are in excellent agreement with the best international data available on the subject and that, therefore, the sum-coincidence technique constitutes an important method for such measurements. (Author) [pt

  4. CONGESTION AS A RESULT OF SCHOOL AND SHOPPING CENTER ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Kumaat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of land use in public facilities such as shopping center and school gives an impact on transportation problem in Manado City, North Sulawesi.  To determine factors which have causal relationship with congestion  as a result of school and shopping center activity then it need to be assessed and studied.  Descriptive study with observational survey was used in this study. The study ran Structural Equation Modelling (SEM by using AMOS program. Estimated method was used to calculate sample size then found 300 repondents, comprised : visitors and mall managers, school visitors, parents, school managers, Public Works department, and urban planning department .The study yielded a statistically significant correlation between  school and shopping center activity with congestion s. The result  indicated that school activity was positively related to congestion with p value  at p=0,000 (p ≤ 0,05. Shopping center activity was positively related to congestion with p value  at p=0,000 (p ≤ 0,05. The closer proximity from school to shooping center will causes severe traffic congestion. The relationship between school facility with proximity was found in p value at  p=0,000 (p ≤ 0,05 . The relationship between shopping center facility with proximity was found in p value at  p= 0,020 (p ≤ 0,05. While, the relationship between proximity with congestion was p= 0,008 (p ≤ 0,05. Monastery school and Mega Mall activity were affecting congestion because a closer proximity of two facilities. This indicates that the occurence of traffic congestion in Monastery School  may be dependent on existence of  Piere Tendean road link

  5. Human Ebola virus infection results in substantial immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Anita K; Akondy, Rama S; Davis, Carl W; Ellebedy, Ali H; Mehta, Aneesh K; Kraft, Colleen S; Lyon, G Marshall; Ribner, Bruce S; Varkey, Jay; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, Shelley; Ströher, Ute; Damon, Inger; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-04-14

    Four Ebola patients received care at Emory University Hospital, presenting a unique opportunity to examine the cellular immune responses during acute Ebola virus infection. We found striking activation of both B and T cells in all four patients. Plasmablast frequencies were 10-50% of B cells, compared with less than 1% in healthy individuals. Many of these proliferating plasmablasts were IgG-positive, and this finding coincided with the presence of Ebola virus-specific IgG in the serum. Activated CD4 T cells ranged from 5 to 30%, compared with 1-2% in healthy controls. The most pronounced responses were seen in CD8 T cells, with over 50% of the CD8 T cells expressing markers of activation and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that all four patients developed robust immune responses during the acute phase of Ebola virus infection, a finding that would not have been predicted based on our current assumptions about the highly immunosuppressive nature of Ebola virus. Also, quite surprisingly, we found sustained immune activation after the virus was cleared from the plasma, observed most strikingly in the persistence of activated CD8 T cells, even 1 mo after the patients' discharge from the hospital. These results suggest continued antigen stimulation after resolution of the disease. From these convalescent time points, we identified CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to several Ebola virus proteins, most notably the viral nucleoprotein. Knowledge of the viral proteins targeted by T cells during natural infection should be useful in designing vaccines against Ebola virus.

  6. Influence of surface mechanical activation of the X40Cr13 steel on roughness after ion and gas nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinski, J.; Wojtal, A.; Jeziorski, L.; Radecki, A.; Ucieklak, S.

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the problem of the thermal and mechanical activation of the surface of the X40Cr13 steel on the state of the ion and gas nitriding. in order to determine the nitriding influence and make the analysis of results, the steel was subjected to: soft annealing, hardening with subsequent tempering at T = 550 o C and also mechanical activation of the surface consisting in peripheral grinding with abrasive papers of the grain size 60, 360, 1000 and mechanical polishing. The main aim of this work was to establish the influence of different surface geometrical structure, depending on X40Cr13 steel structure, on the roughness profile after ion and gas nitriding. With regard to the above, the examinations of basic roughness parameters prior to and after thermochemical processes and the analysis of utilitarian usefulness of activations applied were carried out. (author)

  7. Study on removal of elemental mercury from simulated flue gas over activated coke treated by acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jinfeng [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Caiting, E-mail: ctli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Lingkui; Zhang, Jie; Song, Jingke; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Xunan; Xie, Yine [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • HClO{sub 4} treated AC was developed for effective Hg{sup 0} removal from simulated flue gas. • The exceptional effect of SO{sub 2} on Hg{sup 0} removal by AC{sub 4.5} was discussed. • Possible reaction mechanism of Hg{sup 0} removal over AC{sub 4.5} was put forward. - Abstract: This work addressed the investigation of activated coke (AC) treated by acids. Effects of AC samples, modified by ether different acids (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4}) or HClO{sub 4} of varied concentrations, on Hg{sup 0} removal were studied under simulated flue gas conditions. In addition, effects of reaction temperature and individual flue gas components including O{sub 2}, NO, SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O were discussed. In the experiments, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied to explore the surface properties of sorbents and possible mechanism of Hg{sup 0} oxidation. Results showed that AC sample treated by HClO{sub 4} of 4.5 mol/L exhibited maximum promotion of efficiency on Hg{sup 0} removal at 160 °C. NO was proved to be positive in the removal of Hg{sup 0}. And SO{sub 2} displayed varied impact in capturing Hg{sup 0} due to the integrated reactions between SO{sub 2} and modified AC. The addition of O{sub 2} could improve the advancement further to some extent. Besides, the Hg{sup 0} removal capacity had a slight declination when H{sub 2}O was added in gas flow. Based on the analysis of XPS and FTIR, the selected sample absorbed Hg{sup 0} mostly in chemical way. The reaction mechanism, deduced from results of characterization and performance of AC samples, indicated that Hg{sup 0} could firstly be absorbed on sorbent and then react with oxygen-containing (C−O) or chlorine-containing groups (C−Cl) on the surface of sorbent. And the products were mainly in forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) and mercuric oxide (HgO)

  8. Functionalized Ga2O3 nanowires as active material in room temperature capacitance-based gas sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeina, Lena; Perkins, F Keith; Bermudez, Victor M; Arnold, Stephen P; Prokes, S M

    2010-08-17

    We report the first evidence for functionalization of Ga(2)O(3) nanowires (NWs), which have been incorporated as the active material in room temperature capacitance gas-sensing devices. An adsorbed layer of pyruvic acid (PA) was successfully formed on Ga(2)O(3) NWs by simple room temperature vapor transport, which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The effect of the adsorbed PA on the surface properties was demonstrated by the change in the response of the NW gas-sensing devices. Results indicate that the adsorption of PA reduced the sensitivity of the Ga(2)O(3) NW device to common hydrocarbons such as nitromethane and acetone while improving the response to triethylamine by an order of magnitude. Taking into account the simplicity of this functionalization together with the ease of producing these capacitance-based gas-sensing devices, this approach represents a viable technique for sensor development.

  9. Test beam results of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a secondary-electron emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, S.; Anderson, D.F.; Zimmerman, J.; Sbarra, C.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We present recent results, from a beam test, on the angular dependence of the efficiency and the distribution of the signals on the anode strips of a low-pressure microstrip gas chamber with a thick CsI layer as a secondary-electron emitter. New results of CVD diamond films as secondary-electron emitters are discussed

  10. Impact of closed Brayton cycle test results on gas cooled reactor operation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, St.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the measurements and model predictions for a series of tests supported by the U.S. Department of Energy that were performed using the recently constructed Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL-30). From the test results we have developed steady-state power operating curves, controls methodologies, and transient data for normal and off-normal behavior, such as loss of load events, and for decay heat removal conditions after shutdown. These tests and models show that because the turbomachinery operates off of the temperature difference (between the heat source and the heat sink), that the turbomachinery can continue to operate (off of sensible heat) for long periods of time without auxiliary power. For our test hardware, operations up to one hour have been observed. This effect can provide significant operations and safety benefits for nuclear reactors that are coupled to a Brayton cycles because the operating turbomachinery continues to provide cooling to the reactor. These capabilities mean that the decay-heat removal can be accommodated by properly managing the electrical power produced by the generator/alternator. In some conditions, it may even be possible to produce sufficient power to continue operating auxiliary systems including the waste heat circulatory system. In addition, the Brayton plant impacts the consequences of off-normal and accident events including loss of load and loss of on-site power. We have observed that for a loss of load or a loss of on-site power event, with a reactor scram, the transient consists initially of a turbomachinery speed increase to a new stable operating point. Because the turbomachinery is still spinning, the reactor is still being cooled provided the ultimate heat sink remains available. These highly desirable operational characteristics were observed in the Sandia Brayton loop. This type of behavior is also predicted by our models. Ultimately, these results provide the designers the opportunity to design gas

  11. Results using flue gas desulfurization gypsum in soilless substrates for greenhouse crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent availability of Flue Gas Desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has led to interested in its possible use in horticulture greenhouse production. Three studies were conducted to determine the effects of increasing rates of FGDG on six greenhouse crops. In the first study, substrates (6:1 pine bark:san...

  12. Hybrid recoil mass analyzer at IUAC – First results using gas-filled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    kinematics (to access heavy nuclei around 200 amu mass and beyond) and both ... totype each of RFQ and DTL are undergoing detailed tests for field ... magnet MD1 in gas-filled mode and is especially attractive in reactions induced by ... calculated using GIOS [11] ion-optical program to get the maximum count rate on.

  13. Biogas and sewage gas in Stirling engines and micro gas turbines. Results of a field study; Bio- und Klaergas in Stirlingmotoren und Mikrogasturbinen. Ergebnisse einer Feldstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Bernd; Wyndorps, Agnes [Hochschule Reutlingen (Germany); Bekker, Marina; Oechsner, Hans [Hohenheim Univ., Landesanstalt fuer Agrartechnik und Bioenergie, Stuttgart (Germany); Kelm, Tobias [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In decentral heat and power generation from biogas, sewage gas, landfill gas and methane in systems with a capacity below 100 kWe, Stirling engines and micro gas turbines may have advantages over gas engines, gasoline engines, and diesel engines. This was proved in a research project in which the operation of a Stirling engine with sewage gas and a micro gas turbine with biogas were investigated. (orig.)

  14. Environmental approach and gas industry activities: the actions of two AFG members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The members of the French gas association (AFG) are fully aware of the responsibility they have in the domain of sustainable development. For us, it is a global commitment which consists in improving the impact of their activities in their different social, society, economical and environmental aspects. The environmental aspect is of primary importance with the Kyoto protocol and the obligation for France to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. In order to better understand the implications of an environmental approach in the gas industry sector, this paper presents the actions and projects developed by Gaz de France and Total companies for the rational use of energy, the development of renewable energy sources (geothermal, wind and solar energies, hydrogen and fuel cells) and the abatement of the impacts of their activities on the environment: development of high efficiency equipments and appliances, improvement of existing fuels, development of natural gas for vehicles, LPG fuels and bio-fuels, investment in projects of greenhouse effect abatement (carbon prototype stock), reduction of works impact on the environment, geologic sequestration of CO 2 , recycling of coal mine gas, optimum processing of industrial effluents and wastes (development of gas-fueled processes) etc.. (J.S.)

  15. Active gas discharge cleaning for superconducting lead-plated resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malev, M.D.; Weisser, D.C.

    1985-06-01

    Lead-plating for superconducting RF resonators historically has been directed toward reducing grain size and eliminating spikes on the surface. Investigations were made of degassing lead-plated surfaces under RF resonant electron discharge or multipacting. The mass-spectra of the residual atmosphere showed that decomposition of hydrocarbons on the surface took place. Discolouration of the lead surface, due to the formation of a carbon layer, was easily observed. A method of cleaning surfaces by ion bombardment employing chemically active gases, was proposed and tested. An RF discharge, initiated by multipacting at pressure 10 -2 - 10 -1 torr was used. The first step, discharge treatment in a CO 2 atmosphere, assures oxidation of carbon and hydrocarbons into gaseous compounds which are removed by pumping. During the second step, discharge treatment in a hydrogen atmosphere, lead oxides are reduced to metal

  16. Lateral vibration control of a flexible overcritical rotor via an active gas bearing – Theoretical and experimental comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierart Vásquez, Fabián Gonzalo; Santos, Ilmar

    2016-01-01

    The lack of damping of radial gas bearings leads to high vibration levels of a rotor supported by this type of bearing when crossing resonant areas. This is even more relevant for flexible rotors, as studied in this work. In order to reduce these high vibration levels, an active gas bearing...... is proposed. The control action of this active bearing is selected based on two different strategies: a simple proportional integral derivative controller and an optimal controller. Both controllers are designed based on a theoretical model previously presented. The dynamics of the flexible rotor are modelled......-based controllers are compared against experimental results, showing good agreement. Theoretical and experimental results show a significant increase in the damping ratio of the system, enabling the flexible rotor to run safely across the critical speeds and up to 12,000rev/min, i.e. 50 percent over the second...

  17. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchaala, Adam M.

    2016-05-25

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming.

  18. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchaala, Adam M.; Jaber, Nizar; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Chernikova, Valeriya; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming.

  19. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Bouchaala

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF, namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming.

  20. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaala, Adam; Jaber, Nizar; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Chernikova, Valeriya; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming. PMID:27231914

  1. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaala, Adam; Jaber, Nizar; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Chernikova, Valeriya; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Younis, Mohammad I

    2016-05-25

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming.

  2. Statistical evaluation of the impact of shale gas activities on ozone pollution in North Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; John, Kuruvilla

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, substantial growth in shale gas exploration and production across the US has changed the country's energy outlook. Beyond its economic benefits, the negative impacts of shale gas development on air and water are less well known. In this study the relationship between shale gas activities and ground-level ozone pollution was statistically evaluated. The Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) area in north-central Texas was selected as the study region. The Barnett Shale, which is one the most productive and fastest growing shale gas fields in the US, is located in the western half of DFW. Hourly meteorological and ozone data were acquired for fourteen years from monitoring stations established and operated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The area was divided into two regions, the shale gas region (SGR) and the non-shale gas (NSGR) region, according to the number of gas wells in close proximity to each monitoring site. The study period was also divided into 2000-2006 and 2007-2013 because the western half of DFW has experienced significant growth in shale gas activities since 2007. An evaluation of the raw ozone data showed that, while the overall trend in the ozone concentration was down over the entire region, the monitoring sites in the NSGR showed an additional reduction of 4% in the annual number of ozone exceedance days than those in the SGR. Directional analysis of ozone showed that the winds blowing from areas with high shale gas activities contributed to higher ozone downwind. KZ-filtering method and linear regression techniques were used to remove the effects of meteorological variations on ozone and to construct long-term and short-term meteorologically adjusted (M.A.) ozone time series. The mean value of all M.A. ozone components was 8% higher in the sites located within the SGR than in the NSGR. These findings may be useful for understanding the overall impact of shale gas activities on the local and regional ozone

  3. Glutamylation of the DNA sensor cGAS regulates its binding and synthase activity in antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pengyan; Ye, Buqing; Wang, Shuo; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Du, Ying; Xiong, Zhen; Tian, Yong; Fan, Zusen

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA during viral infection and catalyzes synthesis of the dinucleotide cGAMP, which activates the adaptor STING to initiate antiviral responses. Here we found that deficiency in the carboxypeptidase CCP5 or CCP6 led to susceptibility to DNA viruses. CCP5 and CCP6 were required for activation of the transcription factor IRF3 and interferons. Polyglutamylation of cGAS by the enzyme TTLL6 impeded its DNA-binding ability, whereas TTLL4-mediated monoglutamylation of cGAS blocked its synthase activity. Conversely, CCP6 removed the polyglutamylation of cGAS, whereas CCP5 hydrolyzed the monoglutamylation of cGAS, which together led to the activation of cGAS. Therefore, glutamylation and deglutamylation of cGAS tightly modulate immune responses to infection with DNA viruses.

  4. Results from active spacecraft potential control on the Geotail spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Arends, H.; Pedersen, A.

    1995-01-01

    A low and actively controlled electrostatic potential on the outer surfaces of a scientific spacecraft is very important for accurate measurements of cold plasma electrons and ions and the DC to low-frequency electric field. The Japanese/NASA Geotail spacecraft carriers as part of its scientific payload a novel ion emitter for active control of the electrostatic potential on the surface of the spacecraft. The aim of the ion emitter is to reduce the positive surface potential which is normally encountered in the outer magnetosphere when the spacecraft is sunlit. Ion emission clamps the surface potential to near the ambient plasma potential. Without emission control, Geotail has encountered plasma conditions in the lobes of the magnetotail which resulted in surface potentials of up to about +70 V. The ion emitter proves to be able to discharge the outer surfaces of the spacecraft and is capable of keeping the surface potential stable at about +2 V. This potential is measured with respect to one of the electric field probes which are current biased and thus kept at a potential slightly above the ambient plasma potential. The instrument uses the liquid metal field ion emission principle to emit indium ions. The ion beam energy is about 6 keV and the typical total emission current amounts to about 15 μA. Neither variations in the ambient plasma conditions nor operation of two electron emitters on Geotail produce significant variations of the controlled surface potential as long as the resulting electron emission currents remain much smaller than the ion emission current. Typical results of the active potential control are shown, demonstrating the surface potential reduction and its stability over time. 25 refs., 5 figs

  5. The cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS forms an oligomeric complex with DNA and undergoes switch-like conformational changes in the activation loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Xu, Hui; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhe; Brautigam, Chad A; Zhang, Xuewu; Chen, Zhijian J

    2014-02-13

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm is a danger signal that triggers immune and inflammatory responses. Cytosolic DNA binds to and activates cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which produces the second messenger cGAMP. cGAMP binds to the adaptor protein STING and activates a signaling cascade that leads to the production of type I interferons and other cytokines. Here, we report the crystal structures of human cGAS in its apo form, representing its autoinhibited conformation as well as in its cGAMP- and sulfate-bound forms. These structures reveal switch-like conformational changes of an activation loop that result in the rearrangement of the catalytic site. The structure of DNA-bound cGAS reveals a complex composed of dimeric cGAS bound to two molecules of DNA. Functional analyses of cGAS mutants demonstrate that both the protein-protein interface and the two DNA binding surfaces are critical for cGAS activation. These results provide insights into the mechanism of DNA sensing by cGAS. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Cytosolic DNA Sensor cGAS Forms an Oligomeric Complex with DNA and Undergoes Switch-like Conformational Changes in the Activation Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm is a danger signal that triggers immune and inflammatory responses. Cytosolic DNA binds to and activates cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP synthase (cGAS, which produces the second messenger cGAMP. cGAMP binds to the adaptor protein STING and activates a signaling cascade that leads to the production of type I interferons and other cytokines. Here, we report the crystal structures of human cGAS in its apo form, representing its autoinhibited conformation as well as in its cGAMP- and sulfate-bound forms. These structures reveal switch-like conformational changes of an activation loop that result in the rearrangement of the catalytic site. The structure of DNA-bound cGAS reveals a complex composed of dimeric cGAS bound to two molecules of DNA. Functional analyses of cGAS mutants demonstrate that both the protein-protein interface and the two DNA binding surfaces are critical for cGAS activation. These results provide insights into the mechanism of DNA sensing by cGAS.

  7. Wind Speed and Sea State Dependencies of Air-Sea Gas Transfer: Results From the High Wind Speed Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, B. W.; Brumer, S. E.; Fairall, C. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Zappa, C. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Yang, M.; Bariteau, L.; Prytherch, J.; Hare, J. E.; Czerski, H.; Matei, A.; Pascal, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    A variety of physical mechanisms are jointly responsible for facilitating air-sea gas transfer through turbulent processes at the atmosphere-ocean interface. The nature and relative importance of these mechanisms evolves with increasing wind speed. Theoretical and modeling approaches are advancing, but the limited quantity of observational data at high wind speeds hinders the assessment of these efforts. The HiWinGS project successfully measured gas transfer coefficients (k660) with coincident wave statistics under conditions with hourly mean wind speeds up to 24 m s-1 and significant wave heights to 8 m. Measurements of k660 for carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) show an increasing trend with respect to 10 m neutral wind speed (U10N), following a power law relationship of the form: k660 CO2˜U10N1.68 and k660 dms˜U10N1.33. Among seven high wind speed events, CO2 transfer responded to the intensity of wave breaking, which depended on both wind speed and sea state in a complex manner, with k660 CO2 increasing as the wind sea approaches full development. A similar response is not observed for DMS. These results confirm the importance of breaking waves and bubble injection mechanisms in facilitating CO2 transfer. A modified version of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment Gas transfer algorithm (COAREG ver. 3.5), incorporating a sea state-dependent calculation of bubble-mediated transfer, successfully reproduces the mean trend in observed k660 with wind speed for both gases. Significant suppression of gas transfer by large waves was not observed during HiWinGS, in contrast to results from two prior field programs.

  8. Hydrofluoric acid burn resulting from ignition of gas from a compressed air duster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Jones, LouAnn; Caruso, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    A young female suffered burns to her hand after the ignition of gas from a compressed air duster. After debridement and dressing, the patient continued to have pain out of proportion to injury that was refractory to intravenous morphine. The material safety data sheet revealed that the chemical used was 1,1-difluoroethane. High temperatures can cause decompensation to form hydrofluoric acid. Calcium gluconate gel was applied topically to the patient's burns, which caused prompt and complete relief of her pain. A review of different compressed air duster products revealed that the main ingredient in each was a halogenated hydrocarbon. Although not considered flammable, all products have warnings regarding the possibility of ignition under various circumstances. Ignition of the gas in compressed air cleaners not only can cause flame burns, it can also cause chemical damage from exposure to hydrogen and fluoride ions. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary to prevent severe injury.

  9. The Dense Molecular Gas and Nuclear Activity in the ULIRG IRAS 13120–5453

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privon, G. C.; Treister, E. [Instituto de Astrofśica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Aalto, S.; Falstad, N.; Muller, S.; Costagliola, F. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 94 Onsala (Sweden); González-Alfonso, E. [Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Sliwa, K. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Garcia-Burillo, S. [Observatorio de Madrid, OAN-IGN, Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014-Madrid (Spain); Izumi, T. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Sakamoto, K. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, 10617, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Werf, P. van der [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Chu, J. K. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Band 7 (∼340 GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO{sup +}, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120–5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4–3) emission, relative to HCO{sup +} (4–3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of ∼1.2 yr{sup −1}, the high HCN/HCO{sup +} ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high Σ{sub IR} of 4.7 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ⊙} kpc{sup −2}, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the Galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H{sub 2}O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of ∼40 K. IRAS 13120–5453 has a lower dust temperature and Σ{sub IR} than is inferred for the systems termed “compact obscured nuclei (CONs)” (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120–5453 has undergone a CON phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/active galactic nucleus core.

  10. Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor sample results - August 1993 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Tank 241-C-111 is on the ferrocyanide Watch List. Gas and vapor samples were collected to assure safe conditions before planned intrusive work was performed. Sample analyses showed that hydrogen is about ten times higher in the tank headspace than in ambient air. Nitrous oxide is about sixty times higher than ambient levels. The hydrogen cyanide concentration was below 0.04 ppbv, and the average NO x concentration was 8.6 ppmv

  11. Results of gas exposure experiments for determination of HF concentrations injurious to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guderian, R

    1971-01-01

    Gas exposure experiments were performed under greenhouse conditions to determine the effects of hydrogen fluoride on the growth capacity, yield and quality of plants. Damage to plants was assessed after HF concentrations of 0.85-25 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. The effects of definite HF quantities on plants are described and relative sensitivities of 17 deciduous trees, 9 evergreens, 24 agricultural garden plants and 17 ornamental plants are presented. 2 references, 7 tables.

  12. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas : numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Alastuey , Angel; Ballenegger , Vincent

    2010-01-01

    8 pages; International audience; We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first five leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation ...

  13. Interaction between gas cooking and GSTM1 null genotype in bronchial responsiveness: results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, André F S; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Minelli, Cosetta; Accordini, Simone; Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Pin, Isabelle; Kogevinas, Manolis; Jõgi, Rain; Balding, David J; Norbäck, Dan; Verlato, Giuseppe; Olivieri, Mario; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Janson, Christer; Zock, Jan-Paul; Heinrich, Joachim; Jarvis, Deborah L

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased bronchial responsiveness is characteristic of asthma. Gas cooking, which is a major indoor source of the highly oxidant nitrogen dioxide, has been associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function. However, little is known about the effect of gas cooking on bronchial responsiveness and on how this relationship may be modified by variants in the genes GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1, which influence antioxidant defences. Methods The study was performed in subjects with forced expiratory volume in one second at least 70% of predicted who took part in the multicentre European Community Respiratory Health Survey, had bronchial responsiveness assessed by methacholine challenge and had been genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1-rs1695. Information on the use of gas for cooking was obtained from interviewer-led questionnaires. Effect modification by genotype on the association between the use of gas for cooking and bronchial responsiveness was assessed within each participating country, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. Results Overall, gas cooking, as compared with cooking with electricity, was not associated with bronchial responsiveness (β=−0.08, 95% CI −0.40 to 0.25, p=0.648). However, GSTM1 significantly modified this effect (β for interaction=−0.75, 95% CI −1.16 to −0.33, p=4×10−4), with GSTM1 null subjects showing more responsiveness if they cooked with gas. No effect modification by GSTT1 or GSTP1-rs1695 genotypes was observed. Conclusions Increased bronchial responsiveness was associated with gas cooking among subjects with the GSTM1 null genotype. This may reflect the oxidant effects on the bronchi of exposure to nitrogen dioxide. PMID:24613990

  14. Correlation between indoor radon and soil gas availability: Results of field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothari, B.K.; Kunz, C.; Lilley, W.

    1990-01-01

    To correlate indoor radon concentrations with soil gas, the authors have carried out a field survey of surficial material in selected regions of New York State. The survey consisted of measurements of gamma radiation, Ra-226, Rn-222 and the permeability for gas flow in surficial material. Based on the data, three areas with a potential for above average indoor radon concentrations have been identified: (1) a black shale region in Onondaga County; (2) a granitic region in Orange County; and (3) a black shale region in Erie County. For an area with potential for below-average indoor radon concentrations, sandy deposits on Long Island with an average concentration of 0.7 pCi Ra-226/g and 160 pCi Rn-222/L at 2-feet depth, have been selected. Fifteen homes from each of these four areas are under test for indoor radon. Measurements of air infiltration rates and soil gas availability parameters are planned for all 60 homes

  15. Digital pulse-shape discrimination applied to an ultra-low-background gas-proportional counting system. First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalseth, C.E.; Day, A.R.; Fuller, E.S.; Hoppe, E.W.; Keillor, M.E.; Mace, E.K.; Myers, A.W.; Overman, C.T.; Panisko, M.E.; Seifert, A.

    2013-01-01

    A new ultra-low-background proportional counter design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (∼30 m water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a 'self-calibrating' template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed. (author)

  16. High accuracy laboratory spectroscopy to support active greenhouse gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, D. A.; Bielska, K.; Cygan, A.; Havey, D. K.; Okumura, M.; Miller, C. E.; Lisak, D.; Hodges, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Recent carbon dioxide (CO2) remote sensing missions have set precision targets as demanding as 0.25% (1 ppm) in order to elucidate carbon sources and sinks [1]. These ambitious measurement targets will require the most precise body of spectroscopic reference data ever assembled. Active sensing missions will be especially susceptible to subtle line shape effects as the narrow bandwidth of these measurements will greatly limit the number of spectral transitions which are employed in retrievals. In order to assist these remote sensing missions we have employed frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS) [2], a high-resolution, ultrasensitive laboratory technique, to measure precise line shape parameters for transitions of O2, CO2, and other atmospherically-relevant species within the near-infrared. These measurements have led to new HITRAN-style line lists for both 16O2 [3] and rare isotopologue [4] transitions in the A-band. In addition, we have performed detailed line shape studies of CO2 transitions near 1.6 μm under a variety of broadening conditions [5]. We will address recent measurements in these bands as well as highlight recent instrumental improvements to the FS-CRDS spectrometer. These improvements include the use of the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, a high bandwidth servo which enables measurements to be made at rates greater than 10 kHz [6]. In addition, an optical frequency comb will be utilized as a frequency reference, which should allow for transition frequencies to be measured with uncertainties below 10 kHz (3×10-7 cm-1). [1] C. E. Miller, D. Crisp, P. L. DeCola, S. C. Olsen, et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos. 112, D10314 (2007). [2] J. T. Hodges, H. P. Layer, W. W. Miller, G. E. Scace, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 849-863 (2004). [3] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, M. Okumura, C. E. Miller, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 111, 2021-2036 (2010). [4] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, S. S. Yu, M. Okumura, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc

  17. Conical Magnetic Bearings Developed for Active Stall Control in Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Kascak, Albert F.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Buccieri, Carl J.

    2004-01-01

    Active stall control is a current research area at the NASA Glenn Research Center that offers a great benefit in specific fuel consumption by allowing the gas turbine to operate beyond the onset of stall. Magnetic bearings are being investigated as a new method to perform active stall control. This enabling global aviation safety technology would result in improved fuel efficiency and decreased carbon dioxide emissions, as well as improve safety and reliability by eliminating oil-related delays and failures of engine components, which account for 40 percent of the commercial aircraft departure delays. Active stall control works by perturbing the flow in front of the compressor stage such that it cancels the pressure wave, which causes the compressor to go into stall. Radial magnetic bearings are able to whirl the shaft so that variations in blade tip leakage would flow upstream causing a perturbation wave that could cancel the rotating stall cell. Axial or thrust magnetic bearings cannot be used to cancel the surge mode in the compressor because they have a very low bandwidth and thus cannot modulate at a high enough frequency. Frequency response is limited because the thrust runner cannot be laminated. To improve the bandwidth of magnetic thrust bearings, researchers must use laminations to suppress the eddy currents. A conical magnetic bearing can be laminated, resulting in increased bandwidth in the axial direction. In addition, this design can produce both radial and thrust force in a single bearing, simplifying the installation. The proposed solution combines the radial and thrust bearing into one design that can be laminated--a conical magnetic bearing. The new conical magnetic bearing test rig, funded by a Glenn fiscal year 2002 Director's Discretionary Fund, was needed because none of the existing rigs has an axial degree of freedom. The rotor bearing configuration will simulate that of the main shaft on a gas turbine engine. One conical magnetic bearing

  18. Soil gas 222Rn and volcanic activity at El Hierro (Canary Islands) before and after the 2011 submarine eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, G.; Hernández, P. A.; Padrón, E.; Barrancos, J.; Melián, G.; Dionis, S.; Rodríguez, F.; Nolasco, D.; Calvo, D.; Hernández, I.; Pereza, M. D.; Pérez, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    El Hierro (278 km2) is the southwesternmost island of the Canarian archipelago. From June 19, 2011 to January 2012, more than 11,950 seismic events have been detected by the seismic network of IGN. On 10 October 2011 the earthquake swarm changed its behaviour and produced a harmonic tremor due to magma movement, indicating that a submarine eruption located at 2 km south of La Restinga had started which is still in progress. Since 2003, the ITER Environmental Research Division now integrated in the Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias, INVOLCAN, has regularly performed soil gas surveys at El Hierro as a geochemical tool for volcanic surveillance. Among the investigated gases, soil gas radon (222Rn) and thoron (220Rn) have played a special attention. Both gases are characterized to ascend towards the surface mainly through cracks or faults via diffusion or advection, mechanisms dependent of both soil porosity and permeability, which in turn vary as a function of the stress/strain changes at depth. Years before the starts of the volcanic-seismic crisis on July 17, 2011, a volcanic multidisciplinary surveillance program was implemented at El Hierro including discrete and continuous measurements of 222Rn and 220Rn. Two soil gas 222Rn surveys had been carried out at El Hierro in 2003 and 2011, and four continuous geochemical monitoring stations for 222Rn and 220Rn measurements had been installed (HIE02, HIE03, HIE04 and HIE08). Soil gas 222Rn surveys were carried out at the surface environment of El Hierro after selecting 600 sampling observation sites (about 40 cm depth). Geochemical stations measure 222Rn and 220Rn activities by pumping the gas from a PVC pipe inserted 1m in the ground and thermally isolated. The results of the 2003 and 2011 soil gas 222Rn surveys show clearly a relatively higher observed 222Rn activities in the surface environment on 2011 than those observed on 2003 when no anomalous seismicity were taking place beneath El Hierro. The observed

  19. 77 FR 40354 - Permitting Guidance for Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing Activities Using Diesel Fuels-Draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... through the UIC Class II Program, the well class for oil and gas activities. Geothermal activities are not... inject diesel fuels during hydraulic fracturing related to oil, gas, or geothermal operations must obtain... geothermal activities, the draft guidance only covers hydraulic fracturing using diesel fuels related to oil...

  20. 77 FR 27451 - Permitting Guidance for Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing Activities Using Diesel Fuels-Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... (other than diesel fuels) pursuant to hydraulic fracturing operations related to oil, gas, or geothermal... during HF related to oil, gas, or geothermal operations must obtain a UIC permit before injection begins... diesel fuels are available through the UIC Class II Program, the well class for oil and gas activities.\\1...

  1. Risk assessment in gas activities according to legislative decree No. 626/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Gaudio, P.; Andreani, A.; Brindani, A.; Capizzi, F.; Cervi, G.; Gandausio, C.; Savio, S.; Rossi, G.P.; Viola, M.

    1998-01-01

    Among the latest measures on health and safety (H and S) at work, Legislative Decree 626/94 is the most important step ever taken until now. Following the implementation of a long series of European Directives, the Decree gives the guidelines to be followed in order to safeguard the workers' H and S. Since gas distribution companies are deeply involved in these activities, the Italian Technical Gas Association (ATIG) has issued a paper on D and S focused on the activities of construction, maintenance and management of gas distribution networks. In a series of tables, the article summarizes a long list of the possible actions to be taken during various interventions, detects the sources of potential risks and suggests the main operational precautions. Besides, criteria for risk assessment, a scale of occurrence probabilities and a scale for damage evaluation are given [it

  2. Study of the characteristics of duplex stainless steel activated tungsten inert gas welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, Tsann-Shyi; Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Tsai, Hsien-Lung

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the specific fluxes used in the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process on surface appearance, weld morphology, angular distortion, mechanical properties, and microstructures when welding 6 mm thick duplex stainless steel. This study applies a novel variant of the autogenous TIG welding, using oxide powders (TiO 2 , MnO 2 , SiO 2 , MoO 3 , and Cr 2 O 3 ), to grade 2205 stainless steel through a thin layer of the flux to produce a bead-on-plate joint. Experimental results indicate that using SiO 2 , MoO 3 , and Cr 2 O 3 fluxes leads to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. The activated TIG process can increase the joint penetration and the weld depth-to-width ratio, and tends to reduce the angular distortion of grade 2205 stainless steel weldment. The welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. These results suggest that the plasma column and the anode root are a mechanism for determining the morphology of activated TIG welds.

  3. Tank 241-TY-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994 and April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  4. Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994 and December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  5. Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in July 1993 and August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  6. Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994 and October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  7. Tank 241-BY-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in April 1994 and June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  8. Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and July 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  9. Tank 241-C-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in June 1994 and August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  10. Tank 241-BY-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  11. Tank 241-C-109 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  12. Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1993 and September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  13. Tank 241-BY-108 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994 and October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  14. Tank 241-BY-110 Headspace Gas and Vapor Characterization Results for Samples Collected in November 1994. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  15. Tank 241-C-105 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1994. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  16. Tank 241-BY-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  17. Tank 241-TY-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994 and April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  18. What oil and gas activities infringe on Aboriginal interests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, J.

    1998-01-01

    Some of the experiences that First Nations communities in British Columbia have had in dealing with the petroleum industry and government are reviewed, emphasizing the past lack of consultation with First Nations whose treaty and Aboriginal rights were being infringed. The focus is primarily on Treaty 8, one of the series of numbered treaties negotiated during the 1800s, but which is still very much in effect. Changes expected as a result of the recent Delgamuukw decision which obligates regulatory authorities to consult with First Nations prior to issuing any permits for exploration or extraction of natural resources where such proposed projects might infringe on treaty and Aboriginal rights, are reviewed. Recent examples of settlements that confirm governments' and the industry's readiness to deal with aboriginal title claims as intended by the courts are cited. Other examples, showing reluctance by both governments and industry to accept the concept of mutually acceptable and meaningful consultation despite court rulings, and in the face of increasing levels of conflict, are also discussed.2 figs

  19. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Muhammad, S.; Saviano, G.; Auwegem, P. Van; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Ferrini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO 2 and CF 3 I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  20. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M.

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO2 and CF3I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  1. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbons made from Illinois coals and scrap tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.; Lehmann, C.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Activated carbons for natural gas storage were produced from Illinois bituminous coals (IBC-102 and IBC-106) and scrap tires by physical activation with steam or CO2 and by chemical activation with KOH, H3PO4, or ZnCl2. The products were characterized for N2-BET area, micropore volume, bulk density, pore size distribution, and volumetric methane storage capacity (Vm/Vs). Vm/Vs values for Illinois coal-derived carbons ranged from 54 to 83 cm3/cm3, which are 35-55% of a target value of 150 cm3/cm3. Both granular and pelletized carbons made with preoxidized Illinois coal gave higher micropore volumes and larger Vm/Vs values than those made without preoxidation. This confirmed that preoxidation is a desirable step in the production of carbons from caking materials. Pelletization of preoxidized IBC-106 coal, followed by steam activation, resulted in the highest Vm/Vs value. With roughly the same micropore volume, pelletization alone increased Vm/Vs of coal carbon by 10%. Tire-derived carbons had Vm/Vs values ranging from 44 to 53 cm3/cm3, lower than those of coal carbons due to their lower bulk densities. Pelletization of the tire carbons increased bulk density up to 160%. However, this increase was offset by a decrease in micropore volume of the pelletized materials, presumably due to the pellet binder. As a result, Vm/Vs values were about the same for granular and pelletized tire carbons. Compared with coal carbons, tire carbons had a higher percentage of mesopores and macropores.

  2. The innate immune DNA sensor cGAS produces a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide that activates human STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Elie J; Burdette, Dara L; Wilson, Stephen C; Monroe, Kathryn M; Kellenberger, Colleen A; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hammond, Ming C; Vance, Russell E

    2013-05-30

    The presence of foreign DNA in the cytosol of mammalian cells elicits a potent antiviral interferon response. Recently, cytosolic DNA was proposed to induce the synthesis of cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) upon binding to an enzyme called cGAMP synthase (cGAS). cGAMP activates an interferon response by binding to a downstream receptor called STING. Here, we identify natural variants of human STING (hSTING) that are poorly responsive to cGAMP yet, unexpectedly, are normally responsive to DNA and cGAS signaling. We explain this paradox by demonstrating that the cGAS product is actually a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, cyclic [G(2'-5')pA(3'-5')p], which contains a single 2'-5' phosphodiester bond. Cyclic [G(2'-5')pA(3'-5')p] potently activates diverse hSTING receptors and, therefore, may be a useful adjuvant or immunotherapeutic. Our results indicate that hSTING variants have evolved to distinguish conventional (3'-5') cyclic dinucleotides, known to be produced mainly by bacteria, from the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide produced by mammalian cGAS. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Innate Immune DNA Sensor cGAS Produces a Noncanonical Cyclic Dinucleotide that Activates Human STING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie J. Diner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of foreign DNA in the cytosol of mammalian cells elicits a potent antiviral interferon response. Recently, cytosolic DNA was proposed to induce the synthesis of cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP upon binding to an enzyme called cGAMP synthase (cGAS. cGAMP activates an interferon response by binding to a downstream receptor called STING. Here, we identify natural variants of human STING (hSTING that are poorly responsive to cGAMP yet, unexpectedly, are normally responsive to DNA and cGAS signaling. We explain this paradox by demonstrating that the cGAS product is actually a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, cyclic [G(2′-5′pA(3′-5′p], which contains a single 2′-5′ phosphodiester bond. Cyclic [G(2′-5′pA(3′-5′p] potently activates diverse hSTING receptors and, therefore, may be a useful adjuvant or immunotherapeutic. Our results indicate that hSTING variants have evolved to distinguish conventional (3′-5′ cyclic dinucleotides, known to be produced mainly by bacteria, from the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide produced by mammalian cGAS.

  4. Using robust statistics to improve neutron activation analysis results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.; Ticianelli, Regina B.; Figueiredo, Ana Maria G.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is an analytical technique where an unknown sample is submitted to a neutron flux in a nuclear reactor, and its elemental composition is calculated by measuring the induced activity produced. By using the relative NAA method, one or more well-characterized samples (usually certified reference materials - CRMs) are irradiated together with the unknown ones, and the concentration of each element is then calculated by comparing the areas of the gamma ray peaks related to that element. When two or more CRMs are used as reference, the concentration of each element can be determined by several different ways, either using more than one gamma ray peak for that element (when available), or using the results obtained in the comparison with each CRM. Therefore, determining the best estimate for the concentration of each element in the sample can be a delicate issue. In this work, samples from three CRMs were irradiated together and the elemental concentration in one of them was calculated using the other two as reference. Two sets of peaks were analyzed for each element: a smaller set containing only the literature-recommended gamma-ray peaks and a larger one containing all peaks related to that element that could be quantified in the gamma-ray spectra; the most recommended transition was also used as a benchmark. The resulting data for each element was then reduced using up to five different statistical approaches: the usual (and not robust) unweighted and weighted means, together with three robust means: the Limitation of Relative Statistical Weight, Normalized Residuals and Rajeval. The resulting concentration values were then compared to the certified value for each element, allowing for discussion on both the performance of each statistical tool and on the best choice of peaks for each element. (author)

  5. Systematic Expansion of Active Spaces beyond the CASSCF Limit: A GASSCF/SplitGAS Benchmark Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Li Manni, Giovanni; Stoneburner, Samuel J; Ma, Dongxia; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-07-14

    The applicability and accuracy of the generalized active space self-consistent field, (GASSCF), and (SplitGAS) methods are presented. The GASSCF method enables the exploration of larger active spaces than with the conventional complete active space SCF, (CASSCF), by fragmentation of a large space into subspaces and by controlling the interspace excitations. In the SplitGAS method, the GAS configuration interaction, CI, expansion is further partitioned in two parts: the principal, which includes the most important configuration state functions, and an extended, containing less relevant but not negligible ones. An effective Hamiltonian is then generated, with the extended part acting as a perturbation to the principal space. Excitation energies of ozone, furan, pyrrole, nickel dioxide, and copper tetrachloride dianion are reported. Various partitioning schemes of the GASSCF and SplitGAS CI expansions are considered and compared with the complete active space followed by second-order perturbation theory, (CASPT2), and multireference CI method, (MRCI), or available experimental data. General guidelines for the optimum applicability of these methods are discussed together with their current limitations.

  6. Radiological impact of oil and Gas Activities in selected oil fields in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... A study of the radiological impact of oil and gas exploration activities in the production land area of Delta ... the public and non-nuclear industrial environment, while the levels for the fields at Otorogu, Ughelli West, ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  7. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. 78 FR 33051 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas, Subzone 9F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... May 22, 2013. The subzone currently has authority to produce synthetic natural gas, carbon dioxide... FTZ procedures could exempt Hawai'i Gas from customs duty payments on the foreign status components... during customs entry procedures that apply to synthetic natural gas, carbon dioxide, hydrogen...

  9. Safety basis for selected activities in single-shell tanks with flammable gas concerns. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    This is full revision to Revision 0 of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of analyses done to support activities performed for single-shell tanks. These activities are encompassed by the flammable gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). The basic controls required to perform these activities involve the identification, elimination and/or control of ignition sources and monitoring for flammable gases. Controls are implemented through the Interim Safety Basis (ISB), IOSRs, and OSDs. Since this report only provides a historical compendium of issues and activities, it is not to be used as a basis to perform USQ screenings and evaluations. Furthermore, these analyses and others in process will be used as the basis for developing the Flammable Gas Topical Report for the ISB Upgrade

  10. Dimethyl ether reviewed: New results on using this gas in a high-precision drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basile, M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; D'Ali, G.; Del Papa, C.; Maccarrone, G.; Massam, T.; Motta, F.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Rinaldi, G.; Sartorelli, G.; Spinetti, M.; Susinno, G.; Villa, F.; Voltano, L.; Zichichi, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two years ago, dimethyl ether (DME) was presented, for the first time, as a suitable gas for high-precision drift chambers. In fact our tests show that resolutions can be obtained which are better by at least a factor of 2 compared to what one can get with conventional gases. Moreover, DME is very well quenched. The feared formation of whiskers on the wires has not occurred, at least after months of use with a 10 μCi 106 Ru source. (orig.)

  11. California: the shutting down of San Onofre results in an increase of greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrin, Anne-Perrine; Zweibaum, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    As the Californian San Onofre nuclear power station has been announced to be definitively shut down (after having being stopped since January 2012), due to corrosion and wear problems on steam generators, California will loose one of its two nuclear plants. The authors indicate the three different strategies proposed by the NRC to dismantle this plant: decontamination, safe storage, entombment. The operator has chosen the safe storage strategy for San Onofre. Funding issues are evoked. The authors finally comment the consequences of this shutting down: increase of greenhouse gas emissions and of electricity bill

  12. The 1996 CFM results. Record natural gas sales figure in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The French Methane Company (CFM) provides about 20% of the French natural gas market with its pipes network. Its sales wined a new record in 1996 with 86 billions of kWh which corresponds to a 20% increase in two years. This growth reached 12% in the domestic sector with respect to 1995 and is explained by colder climatic conditions and to the efficient promotional policy of Gaz de France. In the industrial sector, a 10% growth is recorded due to the start up a new cogeneration installations in which CFM is considerably involved (short note). (J.S.)

  13. First in situ plasma and neutral gas measurements at comet Halley: initial VEGA results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gringauz, K.I.; Remizov, A.P.; Gombosi, T.I.

    1986-04-01

    The first in situ observations and a description of the large scale behaviour of comet Halley's plasma environment are presented. The scientific objectives of the PLASMAG-1 experiment were as follows: to study the change of plasma parameters and distributions as a function of cometocentric distance; to investigate the existence and structure of the cometary bow shock; to determine the change in chemical composition of the heavily mass loaded plasma as the spacecraft approached the comet; and to measure the neutral gas distribution along the spacecraft trajectory. (author)

  14. Quantum quenches to the attractive one-dimensional Bose gas: exact results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Piroli, Pasquale Calabrese, Fabian H. L. Essler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study quantum quenches to the one-dimensional Bose gas with attractive interactions in the case when the initial state is an ideal one-dimensional Bose condensate. We focus on properties of the stationary state reached at late times after the quench. This displays a finite density of multi-particle bound states, whose rapidity distribution is determined exactly by means of the quench action method. We discuss the relevance of the multi-particle bound states for the physical properties of the system, computing in particular the stationary value of the local pair correlation function $g_2$.

  15. Klipperaas study site. Scope of activities and main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Andersson, J.E.; Andersson, Peter; Ittner, T.; Tiren, S.; Ljunggren, C.

    1992-09-01

    During the period from 1977 - 1986 SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) performed surface and borehole investigations of 14 study sites for the purpose of assessing their suitability for a repository of spent nuclear fuel. The next phase in the SKB site selection rpogramme will be to perform detailed characterisation, including characterization from shafts and/or tunnels, of two or three sites. The detailed investigations will continue over several years to provide all the data needed for a licensing application to build a repository. Such an application is foreseen to be given to the authorities around the year 2003. It is presently not clear if any of the study sites will be selected as a site for detailed characterization. Other sites with geological and/or socio-economical characteristics judged more favorable may very well be the ones selected. However, as a part of the background documentation needed for the site selection studies to come, summary reports will be prepared for most study sites. These reports will include scope of activities, main results, uncertainties and need of complementary investigations. This report concern the Klipperaas study site. The main topics are the scope of activities, geologic model, geohydrological model, groundwater chemistry, assessment of solute transport, and rock mechanics

  16. Recent Surgical Results for Active Endocarditis Complicated With Perivalvular Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Daisuke; Toda, Koichi; Yokoyama, Jun-Ya; Matsuura, Ryohei; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Takahashi, Toshiki; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Fukuda, Hirotsugu; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-10-25

    Surgical treatment for endocarditis patients with a perivalvular abscess is still challenging.Methods and Results:From 2009 to 2016, 470 patients underwent surgery for active endocarditis at 11 hospitals. Of these, 226 patients underwent aortic valve surgery. We compared the clinical results of 162 patients without a perivalvular abscess, 37 patients who required patch reconstruction of the aortic annulus (PR group) and 27 who underwent aortic root replacement (ARR group). Patients with a perivalvular abscess had a greater number ofStaphylococcusspecies and prosthetic valve endocarditis, a greater level of inflammation at diagnosis and symptomatic heart failure before surgery, especially in the ARR group. Nevertheless, the duration between diagnosis and surgery was similar, because of a high prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage in the ARR group. Hospital death occurred in 13 (9%) patients without a perivalvular abscess, in 4 (12%) in the PR and in 7 (32%) in the ARR group. Postoperative inflammation and end-organ function were similar between the groups. Overall survival of patients without a perivalvular abscess and that of the PR group was similar, but was significantly worse in the ARR group (P=0.050, 0.026). Freedom from endocarditis recurrence was similar among all patients. Patients treated with patch reconstruction showed favorable clinical results. Early surgical intervention is necessary when a refractory invasive infection is suspected.

  17. The feed gas composition determines the degree of physical plasma-induced platelet activation for blood coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeschus, Sander; Brüggemeier, Janik; Hackbarth, Christine; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Partecke, Lars-Ivo; van der Linde, Julia

    2018-03-01

    Cold atmospheric (physical) plasma has long been suggested to be a useful tool for blood coagulation. However, the clinical applicability of this approach has not been addressed sufficiently. We have previously demonstrated the ability of a clinically accepted atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet (kINPen® MED) to coagulate liver incisions in mice with similar performance compared to the gold standard electrocauterization. We could show that plasma-mediated blood coagulation was dependent on platelet activation. In the present work, we extended on this by investigating kINPen®-mediated platelet activation in anticoagulated human donor blood ex vivo. With focus on establishing high-throughput, multi-parametric platelet activation assays and performing argon feed gas parameter studies we achieved the following results: (i) plasma activated platelets in heparinized but not in EDTA-anticoagulated blood; (ii) plasma decreased total platelet counts but increased numbers of microparticles; (iii) plasma elevated the expression of several surface activation markers on platelets (CD62P, CD63, CD69, and CD41/61); (iv) in platelet activation, wet and dry argon plasma outperformed feed gas admixtures with oxygen and/or nitrogen; (v) plasma-mediated platelet activation was accompanied by platelet aggregation. Platelet aggregation is a necessary requirement for blood clot formation. These findings are important to further elucidate molecular details and clinical feasibility of cold physical plasma-mediated blood coagulation.

  18. Theoretical and experimental results of a mesoscale electric power generation system from pressurized gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krähenbühl, D; Kolar, J W; Zwyssig, C; Weser, H

    2009-01-01

    In many process applications where throttling is used to reduce pressure, the potential to obtain net work output is sacrificed to the throttling process. Examples are throttling valves of gas pipelines and conventional throttles in automotive applications or turbo expanders as used in cryogenic plants. With a new pressure reduction system that produces electricity while expanding the gas, the lost potential to obtain work output can be recovered. To achieve a high power density, this energy generation system requires an increased operating speed of the electrical machine and the turbomachinery. This paper presents a miniature compressed-air-to-electric-power system, based on a radial turbine with a rated rotational speed of 490 000 rpm and a rated electric power output of 150 W. A comprehensive description including turbine, diffuser and permanent magnet (PM) generator is given. Finally, measurements of the compressed-air-to-electric-power system with a maximum rotational speed of over 600 000 rpm, a maximum electric output power of 170 W, a maximum torque of 5.2 mN m and a turbine efficiency of 52% are presented

  19. First Results from the $Herschel$ and ALMA Spectroscopic Surveys of the SMC: The Relationship Between [CII]-bright Gas and CO-bright Gas at Low Metallicity

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, Katherine E.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wolfire, Mark; Warren, Steven R.; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Croxall, Kevin; Pellegrini, Eric; Smith, John-David; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Frank P.; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Muller, Erik

    2018-01-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides the only laboratory to study the structure of molecular gas at high resolution and low metallicity. We present results from the Herschel Spectroscopic Survey of the SMC (HS$^{3}$), which mapped the key far-IR cooling lines [CII], [OI], [NII], and [OIII] in five star-forming regions, and new ALMA 7m-array maps of $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO $(2-1)$ with coverage overlapping four of the five HS$^{3}$ regions. We detect [CII] and [OI] throughout all of the r...

  20. Refueling Stop Activity Detection and Gas Station Extraction Using Crowdsourcing Vehicle Trajectory Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In view of the deficiencies of current surveying methods of gas station, an approach is proposed to extract gas station from vehicle traces. Firstly, the spatial-temporal characteristics of individual and collective refueling behavior of trajectory is analyzed from aspects of movement features and geometric patterns. Secondly, based on Stop/Move model, the velocity sequence linear clustering algorithm is proposed to extract refueling stop tracks. Finally, using the methods including Delaunay triangulation, Fourier shape recognition and semantic constraints to identify and extract gas station. An experiment using 7 days taxi GPS traces in Beijing verified the novel method. The experimental results of 482 gas stations are extracted and the correct rate achieves to 93.1%.

  1. Oil and gas impacts on air quality in federal lands in the Bakken region: an overview of the Bakken Air Quality Study and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Prenni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bakken formation contains billions of barrels of oil and gas trapped in rock and shale. Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing methods have allowed for extraction of these resources, leading to exponential growth of oil production in the region over the past decade. Along with this development has come an increase in associated emissions to the atmosphere. Concern about potential impacts of these emissions on federal lands in the region prompted the National Park Service to sponsor the Bakken Air Quality Study over two winters in 2013–2014. Here we provide an overview of the study and present some initial results aimed at better understanding the impact of local oil and gas emissions on regional air quality. Data from the study, along with long-term monitoring data, suggest that while power plants are still an important emissions source in the region, emissions from oil and gas activities are impacting ambient concentrations of nitrogen oxides and black carbon and may dominate recent observed trends in pollutant concentrations at some of the study sites. Measurements of volatile organic compounds also definitively show that oil and gas emissions were present in almost every air mass sampled over a period of more than 4 months.

  2. Study of the mobility activation in ZnSe thin films deposited using inert gas condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeewan Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ZnSe thin films were synthesized on glass substrates using the inert gas condensation technique at substrate temperature ranging from 25 °C to 100 °C. The hexagonal structure and average crystallite size (6.1–8.4 nm were determined from X-ray diffraction data. The transient photoconductivity was investigated using white light of intensity 8450 lx to deduce the effective density of states (Neff in the order of 1.02 × 1010–13.90 × 1010 cm−3, the frequency factor (S in the range 2.5 × 105–24.6 × 105 s−1 and the trap depth (E ranging between 0.37–0.64 eV of these films. The trap depth study revealed three different types of levels with quasi-continuous distribution below the conduction band. An increase in the photoconductivity was observed as a result of the formation of potential barriers (Vb and of the increase of carrier mobility at the crystallite boundaries. The study of the dependence of various mobility activation parameters on the deposition temperature and the crystallite size has provided better understanding of the mobility activation mechanism.

  3. Determination of extractable organohalogens in apple by neutron activation analysis and gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Chai, Z.F.; Sun, H.B.; Zhang, J.L.; Sun, J.Q.

    2005-01-01

    In addition to compounds such as dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethanes (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which originate from by now well-known anthropogenic sources, there is increasing awareness of other halogenated compounds coming from a number of different processes, and probably also from natural source. To provide the reliable results and data for evaluation of hazard of extractable persistent organohalogen (EPOX) to food safety and to further characterize halogenated compounds in fruits, the concentrations of extractable organohalogen (EOX), EPOX, and identified organochlorine compounds including DDTs, hexachlorinated cyclohexanes (HCHs), chlordanes and PCBs in apple samples from Chinese homegrown and imports were determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA) and gas chromatography. The results indicated that the levels of EPOX in apples was in the order of EPOCl >> EPOBr > EPOI, which showed that EPOCl was the major fraction of the EPOX pollutions. Also, most chlorinated compounds in apple samples existed as inorganic species and water-soluble polar compounds, and about 1/10-4/5 of EOX was sulfuric acid-resistant EPOX contaminants. Meanwhile, about more than 94 % of EPOCl in detected specimens cannot be accounted for by DDTs, HCHs, chlordanes and PCBs. Furthermore, the T-test result indicated that the EPOCl levels in apple were significantly higher than those in peeled apple , which stated that people consuming peeled apple will get lesser intakes of EPOCl pollutants than they consume unpeeled apple.

  4. Modified Active Videogame Play Results in Moderate-Intensity Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monedero, Javier; McDonnell, Adam C; Keoghan, Melissa; O'Gorman, Donal J

    2014-08-01

    Large proportions of the population do not meet current American College of Sports Medicine physical activity recommendations, and innovative approaches are required. Most active videogames do not require a significant amount of energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was to determine if modifying an active videogame increased exercise intensity to meet current physical activity recommendations. After completing a maximal oxygen uptake test, participants did a familiarization session on a separate day. Thirteen healthy participants 24.2±3.4 years of age played (1) a sedentary videogame, (2) an active videogame, and (3) a modified active videogame designed to increase physical activity for 46 minutes in a randomized order on separate days. Oxygen uptake, heart rate, heart rate reserve, percentage of maximal heart rate, metabolic equivalents of task, and energy expenditure were significantly higher during the modified active videogame trial than during the active videogame or sedentary videogame trials and also between the active videogame and sedentary videogame. A simple modification to an existing active videogame was sufficient to reach moderate exercise intensity. Active videogames could provide an important option for increasing daily physical activity and reducing sedentary time.

  5. Governance of Arctic Offshore Oil & Gas Activities: Multilevel Governance & Legal Pluralism at Stake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelaudeix, Cecile

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the governance process of offshore oil and gas activities in the Arctic with the concept of multilevelgovernance and legal pluralism to address both issues of management of the environment and public participation. The analysis goes beyond the single issue of fragmentation p...... and from regional government, indigenous shareholders and corporation perspectives, could be helpful in providing relevant actors with arguments to weigh the decision on seismic and drilling activities in relation to risk acceptance.......This article analyses the governance process of offshore oil and gas activities in the Arctic with the concept of multilevelgovernance and legal pluralism to address both issues of management of the environment and public participation. The analysis goes beyond the single issue of fragmentation...... pertaining to the international and supranational levels, to encompass national and regional levels and evaluate how the interactions between those levels structure the policy process and impact the efficiency of environmental management and public participation. Four paths of reflection arise from...

  6. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    of the sulfite converter is short and typically within 2min. Dynamic mercury adsorption and oxidation tests on commercial activated carbons Darco Hg and HOK standard were performed at 150°C using simulated cement kiln gas and a fixed bed reactor system. It is shown that the converter and analyzer system...... are still under development and are investigated in this work. A commercial red brass converter was tested at 180°C and it was found that the red brass chips work in nitrogen atmosphere only, but do not work properly under simulated cement kiln flue gas conditions. Test of the red brass converter using only...... elemental mercury shows that when HCl is present with either SO2 or NOx the mercury measurement after the converter is unstable and lower than the elemental mercury inlet level. The conclusion is that red brass chips cannot fully reduce oxidized mercury to elemental mercury when simulated cement kiln gas...

  7. Anthropogenic activities impact on atmospheric environmental quality in a gas-flaring community: application of fuzzy logic modelling concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintola, Olayiwola Akin; Sangodoyin, Abimbola Yisau; Agunbiade, Foluso Oyedotun

    2018-05-24

    We present a modelling concept for evaluating the impacts of anthropogenic activities suspected to be from gas flaring on the quality of the atmosphere using domestic roof-harvested rainwater (DRHRW) as indicator. We analysed seven metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Fe, Ca, and Mg) and six water quality parameters (acidity, PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , Cl - , and pH). These were used as input parameters in 12 sampling points from gas-flaring environments (Port Harcourt, Nigeria) using Ibadan as reference. We formulated the results of these input parameters into membership function fuzzy matrices based on four degrees of impact: extremely high, high, medium, and low, using regulatory limits as criteria. We generated indices that classified the degree of anthropogenic activity impact on the sites from the product membership function matrices and weight matrices, with investigated (gas-flaring) environment as between medium and high impact compared to those from reference (residential) environment that was classified as between low and medium impact. Major contaminants of concern found in the harvested rainwater were Pb and Cd. There is also the urgent need to stop gas-flaring activities in Port Harcourt area in particular and Niger Delta region of Nigeria in general, so as to minimise the untold health hazard that people living in the area are currently faced with. The fuzzy methodology presented has also indicated that the water cannot safely support potable uses and should not be consumed without purification due to the impact of anthropogenic activities in the area but may be useful for other domestic purposes.

  8. Diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite used as granular sorbents for the removal of sodium chloride vapor from hot flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.; Johnson, I.

    1980-01-01

    Diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite were tested as granular sorbents for use as filter media in granular-bed filters for the removal of gaseous alkali metal compounds from the hot (800/sup 0/C) flue gas of PFBC. Tests were performed at atmospheric pressure, using NaCl vapor transported in relatively dry simulated flue gas of PFBC. Either a fixed-bed combustor or a high-temperature sorption test rig was used. The effects of sorbent bed temperature, superficial gas velocity, gas hourly space velocity, and NaCl-vapor concentration in flue gas on the sorption behavior of these two sorbents and their ultimate sorption capacities were determined. Both diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite were found to be very effective in removing NaCl vapor from flue gas. Preliminary cost evaluations showed that they are economically attractive as granular sorbents for cleaning alkali vapor from simulated flue gas.

  9. Radcalc for windows benchmark study: A comparison of software results with Rocky Flats hydrogen gas generation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCFADDEN, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Radcalc for Windows Version 2.01 is a user-friendly software program developed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations for the U.S. Department of Energy (McFadden et al. 1998). It is used for transportation and packaging applications in the shipment of radioactive waste materials. Among its applications are the classification of waste per the US. Department of Transportation regulations, the calculation of decay heat and daughter products, and the calculation of the radiolytic production of hydrogen gas. The Radcalc program has been extensively tested and validated (Green et al. 1995, McFadden et al. 1998) by comparison of each Radcalc algorithm to hand calculations. An opportunity to benchmark Radcalc hydrogen gas generation calculations to experimental data arose when the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) Residue Stabilization Program collected hydrogen gas generation data to determine compliance with requirements for shipment of waste in the TRUPACT-II (Schierloh 1998). The residue/waste drums tested at RFETS contain contaminated, solid, inorganic materials in polyethylene bags. The contamination is predominantly due to plutonium and americium isotopes. The information provided by Schierloh (1 998) of RFETS includes decay heat, hydrogen gas generation rates, calculated G eff values, and waste material type, making the experimental data ideal for benchmarking Radcalc. The following sections discuss the RFETS data and the Radcalc cases modeled with the data. Results are tabulated and also provided graphically

  10. 77 FR 2513 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA934 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean AGENCY: National Marine... Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean.'' Based on...

  11. Gideaa study site. Scope of activities and main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Andersson, J.E.; Nordqvist, R.; Ljunggren, C.; Tiren, S.; Voss, C.

    1991-10-01

    During the period from 1977-1986 SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co) performed surface and borehole investigations of 14 study sites for the purpose of assessing their suitability for a repository of spent nuclear fuel. The next phase in the SKB site selection programme will be to perform detailed characterization, including characterization from shafts and/or tunnels, of two or three sites. The detailed investigations will continue over several years to provide all the data needed for a licensing application to build a repository. Such an application is foreseen to be given to the authorities around the year 2003. It is presently not clear if anyone of the study sites will be selected as a site for detailed characterization. Other site with geological and/or socio-economical characteristics judged more favourable may very well be the ones selected. However, as a part of the background documentation needed for the site selection studies to come, summary reports will be prepared for most study sites. These reports will include scope of activities, main results, uncertainties and need of complementary investigations. This report concerns the Gideaa study site. (au)

  12. Kamlunge study site. Scope of activities and main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Andersson, J.E.; Andersson, P.; Ittner, T.; Tiren, S.; Ljunggren, C.

    1992-05-01

    During the period from 1977-1986 SKB (Swedish nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) performed surface and borehole investigations of 14 study sites for the purpose of assessing their suitability for a repository of spent nuclear fuel. The next phase in the SKB site selection programme will be to perform detailed characterization, including characterization from shafts and/or tunnels, of two or three sites. The detailed investigations will continue over several years to provide all the data needed for a licensing application to build a repository. Such an application is foreseen to be given to the authorities around the year 2003. It is presently not clear if anyone of the study sites will be selected as a site for detailed characterization. Other sites with geological and/or socio-economical characteristics judged more favourable may very well be selected. However, as a part of the background documentation needed for the site selection studies to come, summary reports will be prepared for most study sites. These reports will include scope of activities, main results, uncertainties and need of complementary investigations. This report concerns the Kamlunge study site. (79 refs.) (au)

  13. Sternoe study site. Scope of activities and main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Andersson, J.E.; Nordqvist, R.; Tiren, S.; Ljunggren, C.; Voss, C.

    1992-01-01

    During the period from 1977-1986 SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co) performed surface and borehole investigations of 14 study sites for the purpose of assessing their suitability for a repository of spent nuclear fuel. The next phase in the SKB site selection programme will be to perform detailed characterization, including characterization from shafts and/or tunnels, of two or three sites. The detailed investigations will continue over several years to provide all the data needed for a licensing application to build a repository. Such an application is foreseen to be given to the authorities around the year 2003. It is presently not clear if anyone of the previously investigated study sites will be selected as a site for detailed characterization. Other sites with geological and/or socio-economical characteristics judged more favourable may very well be the ones selected. However, as a part of the background documentation needed for the site selection studies to come, summary reports will be prepared for most study sites. These reports will include scope of activities, main results, uncertainties and need of complementary investigations. This report concerns the Sternoe study site. This site was one of the first sites to be investigated by SKB . The studies at Sternoe were made under severe time-constraints and with prototype borehole instrumentations. These limitations should be kept in mind when reading the report. (41 refs., 16 figs., 12 tabs.) (au)

  14. Statistical Results of Activities Categorization in Czech Agricultural Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svobodová J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In today’s competitive environment, to identify and correctly adjust the individual components of the business model is an important strategic device for every entrepreneur. This paper (preliminary study deals with different types of business models applied to the sector of small and medium-size farms in the Czech Republic. The main objective was to identify and categorize activities undertaken by Czech farmers into homogeneous clusters and offer recommendations on possible business model modification. The research was based on data from the Farm Accountancy Data Network (hereafter FADN. The principal component analysis and cluster analysis were carried out as part of the assessment, under which farms are categorized into homogeneous groups. The results showed that the farms surveyed can be categorized according to similar economic characteristics, production plans, and implementation processes into three basic clusters. The first business model is elaborated for the classic field production and various kinds of vegetable or livestock production, the second model for the special crop and livestock production, and the third one for the animal production. The use of FADN data and the fact that most Czech agricultural companies are of small- and medium-size should be taken into account as limiting factors of the study.

  15. Fjaellveden study site. Scope of activities and main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Andersson, J.E.; Nordqvist, R.; Ljunggren, C.; Tiren, S.; Voss, C.

    1991-10-01

    During the period from 1977-1986 SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management CO) performed surface and borehole investigations of 14 study sites for the purpose of assessing their suitability for a repository of spent nuclear fuel. The next phase in the SKB site selection programme will be to perform detailed characterization, including characterization from shafts and/or tunnels, of two or three sites. The detailed investigations will continue over several years to provide all the data needed for a licensing application to build repository. Such an application is foreseen to be given to the authorities around the year 2003. It is presently not clear if anyone of the study sites will be selected as a site for detailed characterization. Other sites with geological and/or socio-economical characteristics judged more favourable may very well be the ones selected. However, as a part of the background documentation needed for the site selection studies to come, summary reports will be prepared for most study sites. These reports will include scope of activities, main results, uncertainties and need for complementary investigations. This report concerns the Fjaellveden study site. (au)

  16. Neutron activation analysis (NAA), radioisotope production via neutron activation (PNA) and fission product gas-jet (GJA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeggeler, H W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Three different non-diffractive applications of neutrons are outlined, neutron activation analysis, production of radionuclides, mostly for medical applications, and production of short-lived fission nuclides with a so-called gas-jet. It is shown that all three devices may be incorporated into one single insert at SINQ due to their different requests with respect to thermal neutron flux. Some applications of these three facilities are summarized. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs.

  17. Neutron activation analysis (NAA), radioisotope production via neutron activation (PNA) and fission product gas-jet (GJA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeggeler, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    Three different non-diffractive applications of neutrons are outlined, neutron activation analysis, production of radionuclides, mostly for medical applications, and production of short-lived fission nuclides with a so-called gas-jet. It is shown that all three devices may be incorporated into one single insert at SINQ due to their different requests with respect to thermal neutron flux. Some applications of these three facilities are summarized. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  18. Active Aging Promotion: Results from the Vital Aging Program

    OpenAIRE

    Caprara, Mariagiovanna; Molina, María Ángeles; Schettini, Rocío; Santacreu, Marta; Orosa, Teresa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rojas, Macarena; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, where by aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual activ...

  19. Comprehensive assessment of energy systems: approach and current results of the Swiss activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschberg, S.; Dones, R.; Kypreos, S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the approaches used and results obtained to this date within the Swiss Project GaBE on ''Comprehensive Assessment of Energy Systems''. Based on the ''cradle to grave'' approach detailed environmental inventories for major fuel cycles have been generated. In comparison to earlier studies a very broad spectrum of resources and air and water pollutants has been covered. Also non-energetic resources such as land depreciation have been considered. Numerous examples of evaluations are provided in the paper, including comparisons of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, radiation and wastes, and illustrating the impact of consideration of full energy chains. In the part concerning severe accidents some evaluations based on the database established as the Paul Scherrer Institute are presented as well as the estimated contribution of hypothetical severe accidents to the external costs associated with a specific Swiss nuclear power plant. Results of applications of the large scale energy-economy model MARKAL to the Swiss energy system and greenhouse gas scenarios are described. This includes cost-optimal contributions of different technologies to reduce CO 2 emissions, and trade-offs on the national and international level. Finally, the content of other GaBE activities either being in progress or planned is provided. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of Satellite Capabilities to Detect Impacts of Oil and Natural Gas Activity by Analysis of SONGNEX 2015 Aircraft Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, M. P.; Keutsch, F. N.; Wolfe, G.; St Clair, J. M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Aikin, K. C.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W.; Eilerman, S. J.; Gilman, J.; De Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Thompson, C. R.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Wild, R. J.; Womack, C.; Yuan, B.; Zarzana, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    In the last decade, the rate of domestic energy production from oil and natural gas has grown dramatically, resulting in increased concurrent emissions of methane and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Products of VOC oxidation and radical cycling, such as tropospheric ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA), have detrimental impacts on human health and climate. The ability to monitor these emissions and their impact on atmospheric composition from remote-sensing platforms will benefit public health by improving air quality forecasts and identifying localized drivers of tropospheric pollution. New satellite-based instruments, such as TROPOMI (October 2017 launch) and TEMPO (2019-2021 projected launch), will be capable of measuring chemical species related to energy drilling and production on unprecedented spatial and temporal scales, however there is need for improved assessments of their capabilities with respect to specific applications. We use chemical and physical parameters measured via aircraft in the boundary layer and free troposphere during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX 2015) field campaign to view chemical enhancements over tight oil and shale gas basins from a satellite perspective. Our in-situ data are used to calculate the planetary boundary layer contributions to the column densities for formaldehyde, glyoxal, O3, and NO2. We assess the spatial resolution and chemical precisions necessary to resolve various chemical features, and compare these limits to TEMPO and TROPOMI capabilities to show the degree to which their retrievals will be able to discern the signatures of oil and natural gas activity.

  1. Syringe test screening of microbial gas production activity: Cases denitrification and biogas formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østgaard, Kjetill; Kowarz, Viktoria; Shuai, Wang; Henry, Ingrid A; Sposob, Michal; Haugen, Hildegunn Hegna; Bakke, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Mass produced plastic syringes may be applied as vessels for cheap, simple and large scale batch culture testing. As illustrated for the cases of denitrification and of biogas formation, metabolic activity was monitored by direct reading of the piston movement due to the gas volume formed. Pressure buildup due to friction was shown to be moderate. A piston pull and slide back routine can be applied before recording gas volume to minimize experimental errors due to friction. Inoculum handling and activity may be conveniently standardized as illustrated by applying biofilm carriers. A robust set of positive as well as negative controls ("blanks") should be included to ensure quality of the actual testing. The denitrification test showed saturation response at increasing amounts of inoculum in the form of adapted moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers, with well correlated nitrate consumption vs. gas volume formed. As shown, the denitrification test efficiently screened different inocula at standardized substrates. Also, different substrates were successfully screened and compared at standardized inocula. The biogas potential test showed efficient screening of different substrates with effects of relative amounts of carbohydrate, protein, fat. A second case with CO 2 capture reclaimer waste as substrate demonstrated successful use of co-feeding to support waste treatment and how temperature effects on kinetics and stoichiometry can be observed. In total, syringe test screening of microbial gas production seems highly efficient at a low cost when properly applied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  3. Unintended possible consequences of fuel input taxes for individual investments in greenhouse gas mitigation technologies and the resulting emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz E. Klingelhöfer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa is planning to introduce a carbon tax as a Pigouvian measure for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, one of the tax bases designed as a fuel input tax. In this form, it is supposed to incentivise users to reduce and/or substitute fossil fuels, leading to a reduction of CO2 emissions. Aim: This article examines how such a carbon tax regime may affect the individual willingness to invest in greenhouse gas mitigation technologies. Setting: Mathematical derivation, using methods of linear programming, duality theory and sensitivity analysis. Methods: By employing a two-step evaluation approach, it allows to identify the factors determining the maximum price an individual investor would pay for such an investment, given the conditions of imperfect markets. Results: This price ceiling depends on the (corrected net present values of the payments and on the interdependencies arising from changes in the optimal investment and production programmes. Although the well-established results of environmental economics usually can be confirmed for a single investment, increasing carbon taxes may entail sometimes contradictory and unexpected consequences for individual investments in greenhouse gas mitigation technologies and the resulting emissions. Under certain circumstances, they may discourage such investments and, when still undertaken, even lead to higher emissions. However, these results can be interpreted in an economically comprehensible manner. Conclusion: Under the usually given conditions of imperfect markets, the impact of a carbon tax regime on individual investment decisions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions is not as straight forward as under the usually assumed, but unrealistically simplifying perfect market conditions. To avoid undesired and discouraging effects, policy makers cannot make solitary decisions, but have to take interdependencies on the addressee´s side into account. The individual investor

  4. Catalytic activity of Cu4-cluster to adsorb H2S gas: h-BN nanosheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the electronic properties, adsorptions strength and charge transfer using first principles calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate shows metallic behavior, which helps to enhance the absorption process. The adsorption of three different orientations (S, D and T) of the H2S gas molecules to analyze the maximum adsorption strength from them onto a copper cluster (Cu4) based on h-BN nanosheet. The maximum adsorption energy of the H2S gas molecule is -1.50 eV for the S orientation and for D and U, it is -0.71 eV and -0.78 eV, respectively. The results show that Cu4 cluster helps to capture H2S gas from the environment and results are useful for the cleaning environment from the toxic gases.

  5. Active bypass flow control for a seal in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Todd A.; Kimmel, Keith D.

    2017-01-10

    An active bypass flow control system for controlling bypass compressed air based upon leakage flow of compressed air flowing past an outer balance seal between a stator and rotor of a first stage of a gas turbine in a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The active bypass flow control system is an adjustable system in which one or more metering devices may be used to control the flow of bypass compressed air as the flow of compressed air past the outer balance seal changes over time as the outer balance seal between the rim cavity and the cooling cavity wears. In at least one embodiment, the metering device may include a valve formed from one or more pins movable between open and closed positions in which the one pin at least partially bisects the bypass channel to regulate flow.

  6. The line-emitting gas in active galaxies - A probe of the nuclear engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic questions regarding the structure of the engine powering active galactic nuclei (AGN), the nature of the interaction between the AGN and the host galaxy, and the origin and evolution of AGN. The study of the dynamics and physical characteristics of the line-emitting gas in these objects has proven fruitful in addressing many of these issues. Recent advances in optical and infrared detector technology combined with the development of superior ground-based instruments have produced efficient new tools for the study of the line-emitting gas on nuclear and Galactic scales. Programs which take advantage of two of these new techniques, Fabry-Perot imaging spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy, are described in this paper. The origin of nuclear activity in galaxies is also addressed in a third project which aims at determining the nature of luminous infrared galaxies.

  7. Active bypass flow control for a seal in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Todd A.; Kimmel, Keith D.

    2017-03-14

    An active bypass flow control system for controlling bypass compressed air based upon leakage flow of compressed air flowing past an outer balance seal between a stator and rotor of a first stage of a gas turbine in a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The active bypass flow control system is an adjustable system in which one or more metering devices may be used to control the flow of bypass compressed air as the flow of compressed air past the outer balance seal changes over time as the outer balance seal between the rim cavity and the cooling cavity wears In at least one embodiment, the metering device may include an annular ring having at least one metering orifice extending therethrough, whereby alignment of the metering orifice with the outlet may be adjustable to change a cross-sectional area of an opening of aligned portions of the outlet and the metering orifice.

  8. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas: numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alastuey, A. [Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS, Lyon (France); Ballenegger, V. [Institut UTINAM, Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first.ve leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation of state have been derived[A. Alastuey, V. Ballenegger et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)]. Those corrections account for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations up to order exp(E{sub H} /kT) included, where E{sub H} {approx_equal} -13.6 eV is the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom. Among the.ve leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve suitably truncated internal partition functions of H{sub 2} molecules and H{sup -} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions, for which no analytical formulae are available in closed form. We estimate those partitions functions at.nite temperature via a simple phenomenology based on known values of rotational and vibrational energies. This allows us to compute numerically the leading deviations to the Saha pressure along several isotherms and isochores. Our values are compared with those of the OPAL tables (for pure hydrogen) calculated within the ACTEX method (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Analysis of the test results for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensible gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S. K.; Chung, C. H.; Park, H. S.; Min, K. H.; Choi, N. H.; Kim, C. H.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, H. C.; Chang, M. H.

    2002-07-01

    The two-phase critical flow test was performed for simulating the pipe break accident of SMART reactor. The requirements of the critical flow test are 7∼20mm pipe break dia., 7∼12MPa stagnation pressure, 0∼60 .deg. C subcooling degree and 0∼0.5kg/s N 2 gas flow rate. The test section is sharp edged pipe type which has the dimension of I.D.=20, L=300mm and I.D.=10.9, L=1000mm. The test conditions are 4, 7, 10 MPa at stagnation pressure, 0, 20, 50 .deg. C of subcooling degree and 0.028∼0.39 kg/s of N 2 injection gas flowrate. The measured data at test section and other components in terms of pressure, temperature and flowrate were collected in DAS computer with maintaining the steady state conditions at least 60 seconds. From the test results, the critical characteristics of the break pipe were analysed and verified the capacity of the test facility. For the verification of the Modified Henry-Fauske model which can predict the two-phase critical flow with non-condensible gas, the code simulation using MARS which contains the option of the Modified Henry -Fauske model was performed. The simulation results of steady-state two-phase critical flow experiments show that they agree with the measured critical flow rates within 6% root-mean-square error

  10. Hot gas metallicity and the history of supernova activity in elliptical galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Mathews, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    Calculations of the dynamical evolution of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) in a massive elliptical galaxy are described, with a variety of past variations of the SN rate being assumed. The investigation focuses on iron enrichment in the ISM. The equivalent widths of the 6.7-keV iron line are calculated as a function of redshift and of galactic projected radius. The present-day interstellar gas in elliptical galaxies contains a fossil record of past SN activity that can be determined from measurements of iron line equivalent widths at several projected radii in the galaxy. It is proposed that the ISM iron abundance is likely to be quite inhomogeneous. The hydrogen-free ejecta of type Ia SN also result in pronounced ISM abundance inhomogeneities that probably eventually cool and move in pressure equilibrium with the local ISM flow velocity. The 6.7-keV iron line emission is greater if the iron is confined to ionized regions of pure iron. 25 refs

  11. Removal and recovery of gas-phase element mercury by metal oxide-loaded activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Zhijian; Shen Zhemin; Zhao Qingjie; Wang Wenhua; Zhang Yejian

    2008-01-01

    The reusability of Co 3 O 4 (AC-Co), MnO 2 (AC-Mn) and CuCoO 4 (AC-CC) loaded activated carbon (AC) and their element mercury removal efficiency had been studied using a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor under simulated flue gas conditions. Tests showed that spent AC-Co could be regenerated through heating at 673 K under N 2 atmosphere and the enrichment regenerated Hg 0 could be collected to eliminate the secondary pollution. Regenerated AC-Mn and AC-CC's Hg 0 removal efficiency decreased greatly due to AC's decomposition and MnO 2 's crystal structure variation. Compared with AC and metal oxides, metal oxide-loaded AC had higher Hg 0 capture ability and capacity due to AC huge surface areas and lots of function groups. TGA analysis results showed that AC-Co and AC-Mn's HgO adsorptive capacity at 523 K reached 19.8 mg g -1 and 5.21 mg g -1 , respectively. High loading values and adsorption temperatures were beneficial to AC-Co's Hg 0 removal efficiency. However, CuCoO 4 and MnO 2 's AC decomposition ability had negative effect on AC-CC and AC-Mn's performance, respectively, especially at high adsorption temperatures and loading values. SO 2 tests showed that AC-CC had higher anti SO 2 -poisoning ability than AC-Co and AC-Mn

  12. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, Marcello; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Cauwenbergh, Simon Marc D; Ferrini, Mauro; Muhammad, Saleh; Passamontic, L; Pierluigi, Daniele; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Russo, Alessandro; Savianoc, G; Tytgat, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard cms electronic setup are under test. In this talk preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze and with CO2 based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  13. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  14. cGAS produces a 2'-5'-linked cyclic dinucleotide second messenger that activates STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablasser, Andrea; Goldeck, Marion; Cavlar, Taner; Deimling, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Röhl, Ingo; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Ludwig, Janos; Hornung, Veit

    2013-06-20

    Detection of cytoplasmic DNA represents one of the most fundamental mechanisms of the innate immune system to sense the presence of microbial pathogens. Moreover, erroneous detection of endogenous DNA by the same sensing mechanisms has an important pathophysiological role in certain sterile inflammatory conditions. The endoplasmic-reticulum-resident protein STING is critically required for the initiation of type I interferon signalling upon detection of cytosolic DNA of both exogenous and endogenous origin. Next to its pivotal role in DNA sensing, STING also serves as a direct receptor for the detection of cyclic dinucleotides, which function as second messenger molecules in bacteria. DNA recognition, however, is triggered in an indirect fashion that depends on a recently characterized cytoplasmic nucleotidyl transferase, termed cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which upon interaction with DNA synthesizes a dinucleotide molecule that in turn binds to and activates STING. We here show in vivo and in vitro that the cGAS-catalysed reaction product is distinct from previously characterized cyclic dinucleotides. Using a combinatorial approach based on mass spectrometry, enzymatic digestion, NMR analysis and chemical synthesis we demonstrate that cGAS produces a cyclic GMP-AMP dinucleotide, which comprises a 2'-5' and a 3'-5' phosphodiester linkage >Gp(2'-5')Ap(3'-5')>. We found that the presence of this 2'-5' linkage was required to exert potent activation of human STING. Moreover, we show that cGAS first catalyses the synthesis of a linear 2'-5'-linked dinucleotide, which is then subject to cGAS-dependent cyclization in a second step through a 3'-5' phosphodiester linkage. This 13-membered ring structure defines a novel class of second messenger molecules, extending the family of 2'-5'-linked antiviral biomolecules.

  15. The gas-filled counting tube of the PTB - a device for the activity determination of radioactive gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, E.W.

    1993-08-01

    A measuring device for the activity determination of gaseous radioactive materials (H-3, Kr-85, C-14 O 2 ) has been set up as a PTB primary standard. Samples measured in it or their initial substances are the basis for activity standards. The gaseous samples are introduced directly into the vacuum device. The amount of gas filled can be determined by measuring pressure, volume and temperature. After the gas has been mixed with a counting gas (methane, argon/methane or propane), the count-rates are measured and the activity of the gas calculated. The activity of solid or liquid radioactive substances can also be determined with the device described, if they can be converted into a suitable gas. For this purpose there are additional devices (e.g. for producing hydrogen from water or C-14 O 2 from carbonate). The first models of these devices have been developed and are described. (orig.) [de

  16. Adsorption of iodine from COIL waste gas on soaked coal-based activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junbo; Hao, Shan; Gao, Liping

    2014-04-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) has wide application prospects in military, industrial and medical treatment fields as a second generation gas chemical laser to follow the first HF/DF chemical laser. However, a COIL releases large amounts of gas, such as helium, oxygen, chlorine and iodine. Chlorides have a serious corrosive effect on the system, especially iodine vapor crystallization, which seriously endangers the normal use of vacuum systems, and radioactive methyl iodide, which is hazardous to operators and pollutes the environment. The use of soaked coal-based activated carbon as an adsorbent for removing methyl iodine is proposed, while it is proposed that coal-based activated carbon is an effective adsorbent for removing stable iodine. The research conducted in this work shows that iodine residues are less than 0.5 μg ml-1 after the adsorption treatment and the decontamination factor of the coal-based activated carbon for removing stable iodine is more than 1000. Using this method can achieve the purpose of removing harmful iodine, satisfy the requirements for engineering applications, and also be applied to other nuclear power plant flue gas treatments.

  17. Pd/activated carbon sorbents for mid-temperature capture of mercury from coal-derived fuel gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dekui; Han, Jieru; Han, Lina; Wang, Jiancheng; Chang, Liping

    2014-07-01

    Higher concentrations of Hg can be emitted from coal pyrolysis or gasification than from coal combustion, especially elemental Hg. Highly efficient Hg removal technology from coal-derived fuel gas is thus of great importance. Based on the very excellent Hg removal ability of Pd and the high adsorption abilities of activated carbon (AC) for H₂S and Hg, a series of Pd/AC sorbents was prepared by using pore volume impregnation, and their performance in capturing Hg and H₂S from coal-derived fuel gas was investigated using a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. The effects of loading amount, reaction temperature and reaction atmosphere on Hg removal from coal-derived fuel gas were studied. The sorbents were characterized by N₂ adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that the efficiency of Hg removal increased with the increasing of Pd loading amount, but the effective utilization rate of the active component Pd decreased significantly at the same time. High temperature had a negative influence on the Hg removal. The efficiency of Hg removal in the N₂-H₂S-H₂-CO-Hg atmosphere (simulated coal gas) was higher than that in N₂-H₂S-Hg and N₂-Hg atmospheres, which showed that H₂ and CO, with their reducing capacity, could benefit promote the removal of Hg. The XPS results suggested that there were two different ways of capturing Hg over sorbents in N₂-H₂S-Hg and N₂-Hg atmospheres. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Benchmarking Evaluation Results for Prototype Extravehicular Activity Gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Lindsay; McFarland, Shane

    2012-01-01

    The Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Development Team at NASA Johnson Space Center has invested heavily in the advancement of rear-entry planetary exploration suit design but largely deferred development of extravehicular activity (EVA) glove designs, and accepted the risk of using the current flight gloves, Phase VI, for unique mission scenarios outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) Program realm of experience. However, as design reference missions mature, the risks of using heritage hardware have highlighted the need for developing robust new glove technologies. To address the technology gap, the NASA Game-Changing Technology group provided start-up funding for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Project in the spring of 2012. The overarching goal of the HPEG Project is to develop a robust glove design that increases human performance during EVA and creates pathway for future implementation of emergent technologies, with specific aims of increasing pressurized mobility to 60% of barehanded capability, increasing the durability by 100%, and decreasing the potential of gloves to cause injury during use. The HPEG Project focused initial efforts on identifying potential new technologies and benchmarking the performance of current state of the art gloves to identify trends in design and fit leading to establish standards and metrics against which emerging technologies can be assessed at both the component and assembly levels. The first of the benchmarking tests evaluated the quantitative mobility performance and subjective fit of four prototype gloves developed by Flagsuit LLC, Final Frontier Designs, LLC Dover, and David Clark Company as compared to the Phase VI. All of the companies were asked to design and fabricate gloves to the same set of NASA provided hand measurements (which corresponded to a single size of Phase Vi glove) and focus their efforts on improving mobility in the metacarpal phalangeal and carpometacarpal joints. Four test

  19. The new french legislative framework in the gas sector resulting from the law of the 3 january 2003 ''gas: the turning of the liberalization opens up new horizons''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the law project adopted by the Parliament the 19 december 2002 concerning the gas market liberalization, the author (D. Maillard) explains the law project objectives and general context, the stakes and the content of the new french legislative framework, the access freedom to the gas market, the new regulator of the market and the new obligations of the gas utilities. (A.L.B.)

  20. Design activity of IHI on the experimental multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    With conspicuous interest and attention paid by iron and steel manufacturing industries, the development of the multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor, namely the process heat reactor has been energetically discussed in Japan. The experimental multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor, planned by JAERI (the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), is now at the end of the adjustment design stage and about to enter the system synthesizing design stage. The design of the JAERI reactor as a pilot plant for process heat reactors that make possible the direct use of the heat, produced in the reactor, for other industrial uses was started in 1969, and has undergone several revisions up to now. The criticality of the JAERI reactor is expected to be realized before 1985 according to the presently published program. IHI has engaged in the developing work of HTGR (high temperature gas-cooled reactor) including VHTR (very high temperature gas-cooled reactor) for over seven years, producing several achievements. IHI has also participated in the JAERI project since 1973 with some other companies concerned in this field. The design activity of IHI in the development of the JAERI reactor is briefly presented in this paper. (auth.)

  1. Assessment of respiratory disorders in relation to solution gas flaring activities in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    A study was conducted by Alberta Health to address the issue of whether or not flaring of solution gas has a negative impact on human health. The Flaring Working Group of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance initiated this study which focused on the assessment of the relationship between human health disorders (such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia and upper respiratory infections) and solution gas flaring activities in rural, urban and aboriginal populations. The personal exposure to flaring emissions was estimated by physical proximity to the source of emissions. A small area was studied in which geographical variations in human health disorders were compared to geographical variations of socioeconomic and environmental factors. Data was gathered from 1989 to 1996 to evaluate long term average conditions and changes over the time period investigated. Notwithstanding physicians' claims for increased rates of respiratory infections and hospitalization attributed to solution gas flaring, the study found no evidence linking respiratory infections and solution gas flaring. This was the conclusion regardless of the measure of health outcomes, the rural-urban status, ethnicity, or age. Nevertheless, the study recommended identification of bio-markers of exposure and effect reflective of the compounds of interest, and the development of a responsive and comprehensive geographic information database that would allow data linkage at all geographic levels for different periods of time. refs., 10 tabs., 15 figs., 1 appendix

  2. Effects of offshore oil and gas development activities in southern California on larval settlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, P.T.; Barnett, A.; Krause, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    A series of in situ field experiments were conducted to determine effects of oil and gas drilling activities on the settlement of marine larvae in the deep ocean (180 m). The study sites were a series of three drilling rigs and three reference sites between Pt. Arguello and Pt. Conception in California. Experiments were carried out in both pre-drilling and drilling phases to test the effects of drilling activities (e.g. drilling, drilling mud release, and produced water discharges) on the ability of red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) larvae to settle using an in situ experiment. Their in situ experiment involved reciprocal transplants of settling plates that were ''filmed'' with bacteria from each site. After filming in the field at each of two heights, plates were mounted into chambers, covered with mesh and placed onto recoverable larval arrays for deployment in the field. Before deployment the authors injected approximately 300 competent red abalone larvae into each chamber. One larval array was deployed at each site for three days and each array contained plates filmed at all sites. In addition sterile plates (no surface filming) were included at each site. Upon recovery the number of settled abalone larvae were counted. Therefore, the experiment tested location-related (drilling sites versus reference), waterborne, and height effects on settlement in both the pre-drilling and drilling phases. Their results show that red abalone served as a sensitive indicator for in situ studies of larval settlement. The authors found significantly higher numbers of abalone settling onto plates that were filmed versus those that were not. The authors also found significantly lower settlement rates between the pre-drilling and drilling periods

  3. Active lubrication applied to radial gas journal bearings. Part 2: Modelling improvement and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierart, Fabián G.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-01-01

    Actively-controlled lubrication techniques are applied to radial gas bearings aiming at enhancing one of their most critical drawbacks, their lack of damping. A model-based control design approach is presented using simple feedback control laws, i.e. proportional controllers. The design approach...... by finite element method and the global model is used as control design tool. Active lubrication allows for significant increase in damping factor of the rotor-bearing system. Very good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, supporting the multi-physic design tool developed....

  4. Alteration of natural "3"7Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    High "3"7Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of "3"7Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict "3"7Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating "3"7Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for "3"7Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural "3"7Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of "3"7Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on "3"7Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while "3"7Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. - Highlights: • "3"7Ar in the subsurface as a key evidence to detect underground nuclear explosions. • Numerical modeling of "3"7Ar production and transport in variably saturated soil. • Large uncertainty on predicting "3"7Ar activity concentration in soil gas. • Control of subsurface "3"7Ar temporal variability by water infiltration events. • Limited influence of soil water content on "3"7Ar production.

  5. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  6. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  7. Instrumental support in the physical activity community - premilinary results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elloumi, Lamia; Zhang, Qiwen; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Currently, we witness the growth of ICT-mediated solutions for chronic diseases management, especially to assist and support patients in lifestyle changes in order to improve their health condition. Being physically active is one the recommended lifestyle changes for patients with chronic diseases.

  8. HIPPARCOS satellite: Aeritalia involvement and system test activities and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strim, B.; Cugno, W.; Morsillo, G.

    In 1989 the European Space Agency is scheduled to launch HIPPARCOS on a 2.5-year mission that will revolutionize the state of astronomy. This is the first satellite to be dedicated to astrometry, a branch of astronomy that deals with the position of celestial objects and their motion in space. With an accuracy impossible to achieve from Earth, HIPPARCOS will make position, trigonometric parallax and proper motion measurements of some 100.000 pre-selected stars. The data will be used to calculate each star's distance and motion, providing astronomers with an unprecedented map of the heavens. In the end, the HIPPARCOS mission is expected to reveal surprisingly new insight into theories of stellar evolution, as well as into the nature of our galaxy and the universe. The program has been awarded to the MESH industrial consortium for definition, development and production. The French firm MATRA (prime contractor) and the AERITALIA SPACE SYSTEMS GROUP (major co-contractor) share program responsibility. AERITALIA is in charge of the spacecraft or "service module". This is the structural platform for the telescope payload and provides all subsystem services including thermal control, data handling, telecommunications, electrical power distribution, power generation, attitude and orbit control, and apogee kick motor. AERITALIA is responsible for the procurement of all spacecraft subsystems for which it directs the activities of a multinational team of subcontractors. In addition, it is in charge of the satellite's final assembly, integration and testing, as well as for the procurement of all ground support equipment for satellite testing. HIPPARCOS stands for HIgh Precision PARallax COllecting Satellite. Its name is also intended to honor the Greek astronomer Hipparchus (190-120 BC) who compiled the first star catalog and who first used trigonometric parallax to calculate the distance to the moon. (Parallax is the apparent shift in a celestial body's position in the sky

  9. Study on the associated removal of pollutants from coal-firing flue gas using biomass activated carbon pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cuiping; Yuan, Wanli [Qingdao Univ., Shandong (China). Electrical and Mechanical Engineering College; Qi, Haiying [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A pilot-scale multi-layer system was developed for the adsorption of SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}/Hg from flue gas (real flue gases of an heating boiler house) at various operating conditions, including operating temperature and activated carbon materials. Excellent SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}/Hg removal efficiency was achieved with the multi-layer design with carbons pellets. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency achieved with the first layer adsorption bed clearly decreased as the operating temperature was increased due to the decrease of physisorption performance. The NO{sub x} removal efficiency measured at the second layer adsorption bed was very higher when the particle carbon impregnated with NH{sub 3}. The higher amounts of Hg absorbed by cotton-seed-skin activated carbon (CSAC) were mainly contributed by chlorinated congeners content. The simultaneously removal of SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}/Hg was optimization characterized with different carbon layer functions. Overall, The alkali function group and chloride content in CSAC impelled not only the outstanding physisorption but also better chemisorptions. The system for simultaneously removal of multi-pollutant-gas with biomass activated carbon pellets in multi-layer reactor was achieved and the removal results indicated was strongly depended on the activated carbon material and operating temperature.

  10. Blood gas sample spiking with total parenteral nutrition, lipid emulsion, and concentrated dextrose solutions as a model for predicting sample contamination based on glucose result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Aguirre, Jose C; Smeets, Steven W; Wockenfus, Amy M; Karon, Brad S

    2018-05-01

    Evaluate the effects of blood gas sample contamination with total parenteral nutrition (TPN)/lipid emulsion and dextrose 50% (D50) solutions on blood gas and electrolyte measurement; and determine whether glucose concentration can predict blood gas sample contamination with TPN/lipid emulsion or D50. Residual lithium heparin arterial blood gas samples were spiked with TPN/lipid emulsion (0 to 15%) and D50 solutions (0 to 2.5%). Blood gas (pH, pCO2, pO2), electrolytes (Na+, K+ ionized calcium) and hemoglobin were measured with a Radiometer ABL90. Glucose concentration was measured in separated plasma by Roche Cobas c501. Chart review of neonatal blood gas results with glucose >300 mg/dL (>16.65 mmol/L) over a seven month period was performed to determine whether repeat (within 4 h) blood gas results suggested pre-analytical errors in blood gas results. Results were used to determine whether a glucose threshold could predict contamination resulting in blood gas and electrolyte results with greater than laboratory-defined allowable error. Samples spiked with 5% or more TPN/lipid emulsion solution or 1% D50 showed glucose concentration >500 mg/dL (>27.75 mmol/L) and produced blood gas (pH, pO 2 , pCO 2 ) results with greater than laboratory-defined allowable error. TPN/lipid emulsion, but not D50, produced greater than allowable error in electrolyte (Na + ,K + ,Ca ++ ,Hb) results at these concentrations. Based on chart review of 144 neonatal blood gas results with glucose >250 mg/dL received over seven months, four of ten neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients with glucose results >500 mg/dL and repeat blood gas results within 4 h had results highly suggestive of pre-analytical error. Only 3 of 36 NICU patients with glucose results 300-500 mg/dL and repeat blood gas results within 4 h had clear pre-analytical errors in blood gas results. Glucose concentration can be used as an indicator of significant blood sample contamination with either TPN

  11. Secondary Aerosol Formation over the ESCOMPTE Area: Results from airborne Aerosol and Trace Gas Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dingenen, R.; Martins-Dos Santos, S.; Putaud, J. P.; Allet, C.; Bretton, E.; Perros, P.

    2003-04-01

    From June 10th to July 14th 2001, the ESCOMPTE campaign took place in the Marseille-Berre area in Southern France. The goal of the campaign was to produce a high quality 3-D data base from emissions, transport and air composition measurements during urban photochemical pollution episodes at the meso-scale. The CAATER AEROPLUM project was embedded within this international field campaign. AEROPLUM aimed at mapping size distributions of aerosols and photo-oxidants in the mixed layer over the ESCOMPTE domain, using the ARAT Fokker 27 as measurement platform. Aircraft sub-micrometer aerosol measurements are validated during overpasses against ground-based measurements, carried out with similar instrumentation. We will present and discuss data during periods of seabreeze, transporting coastal industrial and urban pollution land-inwards. This leads to intense photochemical activity, evidenced by elevated O_3 concentrations and aerosol levels.

  12. Intricate but tight coupling of spiracular activity and abdominal ventilation during locust discontinuous gas exchange cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talal, Stav; Gefen, Eran; Ayali, Amir

    2018-03-15

    Discontinuous gas exchange (DGE) is the best studied among insect gas exchange patterns. DGE cycles comprise three phases, which are defined by their spiracular state: closed, flutter and open. However, spiracle status has rarely been monitored directly; rather, it is often assumed based on CO 2 emission traces. In this study, we directly recorded electromyogram (EMG) signals from the closer muscle of the second thoracic spiracle and from abdominal ventilation muscles in a fully intact locust during DGE. Muscular activity was monitored simultaneously with CO 2 emission, under normoxia and under various experimental oxic conditions. Our findings indicate that locust DGE does not correspond well with the commonly described three-phase cycle. We describe unique DGE-related ventilation motor patterns, coupled to spiracular activity. During the open phase, when CO 2 emission rate is highest, the thoracic spiracles do not remain open; rather, they open and close rapidly. This fast spiracle activity coincides with in-phase abdominal ventilation, while alternating with the abdominal spiracle and thus facilitating a unidirectional air flow along the main trachea. A change in the frequency of rhythmic ventilation during the open phase suggests modulation by intra-tracheal CO 2 levels. A second, slow ventilatory movement pattern probably serves to facilitate gas diffusion during spiracle closure. Two flutter-like patterns are described in association with the different types of ventilatory activity. We offer a modified mechanistic model for DGE in actively ventilating insects, incorporating ventilatory behavior and changes in spiracle state. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Determination of boiling point of petrochemicals by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate regression analysis of structural activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakayode, Sayo O; Mitchell, Breanna S; Pollard, David A

    2014-08-01

    Accurate understanding of analyte boiling points (BP) is of critical importance in gas chromatographic (GC) separation and crude oil refinery operation in petrochemical industries. This study reported the first combined use of GC separation and partial-least-square (PLS1) multivariate regression analysis of petrochemical structural activity relationship (SAR) for accurate BP determination of two commercially available (D3710 and MA VHP) calibration gas mix samples. The results of the BP determination using PLS1 multivariate regression were further compared with the results of traditional simulated distillation method of BP determination. The developed PLS1 regression was able to correctly predict analytes BP in D3710 and MA VHP calibration gas mix samples, with a root-mean-square-%-relative-error (RMS%RE) of 6.4%, and 10.8% respectively. In contrast, the overall RMS%RE of 32.9% and 40.4%, respectively obtained for BP determination in D3710 and MA VHP using a traditional simulated distillation method were approximately four times larger than the corresponding RMS%RE of BP prediction using MRA, demonstrating the better predictive ability of MRA. The reported method is rapid, robust, and promising, and can be potentially used routinely for fast analysis, pattern recognition, and analyte BP determination in petrochemical industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. ERINDA Scientific Results: Transnational Access Activities and Scientific Visits

    CERN Document Server

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the Transnational Access Activities and Scientific visits within the FP7 project ERINDA (European Research Infrastructures for Nuclear Data). It highlights the fact that nearly 3200 data - taking hours for external users were made available in the partner installations and 104 man weeks for scientific visits to par tner institutes. This is much more than the 2500 beam hours and 80 weeks promised in the Description of Work of the project.

  15. On-farm euthanasia of broiler chickens: effects of different gas mixtures on behavior and brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritzen, M A; Lambooij, B; Reimert, H; Stegeman, A; Spruijt, B

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of gas mixtures for euthanasia of groups of broilers in their housing by increasing the percentage of CO2. The suitability was assessed by the level of discomfort before loss of consciousness, and the killing rate. The gas mixtures injected into the housing were 1) 100% CO2, 2) 50% N2 + 50% CO2, and 3) 30% O2 + 40% CO2 + 30% N2, followed by 100% CO2. At 2 and 6 wk of age, groups of 20 broiler chickens per trial were exposed to increasing CO2 percentages due to the injection of these gas mixtures. Behavior and killing rate were examined. At the same time, 2 broilers per trial equipped with brain electrodes were observed for behavior and brain activity. Ten percent of the 2-wk-old broilers survived the increasing CO2 percentage due to the injection of 30% O2 + 40% CO2 + 30% N2 mixture, therefore this mixture was excluded for further testing at 6 wk of age. At 6 wk of age, 30% of the broilers survived in the 50% N2 + 50% CO2 group. The highest level of CO2 in the breathing air (42%) was reached by the injection of the 100% CO2 mixture, vs. 25% for the other 2 mixtures. In all 3 gas mixtures, head shaking, gasping, and convulsions were observed before loss of posture. Loss of posture and suppression of electrical activity of the brain (n = 7) occurred almost simultaneously. The results of this experiment indicate that euthanasia of groups of 2- and 6-wk-old broilers by gradually increasing the percentage of CO2 in the breathing air up to 40% is possible.

  16. Results of Investigative Tests of Gas Turbine Engine Compressor Blades Obtained by Electrochemical Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhina, T. D.; Kurochkin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper highlights results of the investigative tests of GTE compressor Ti-alloy blades obtained by the method of electrochemical machining with oscillating tool-electrodes, carried out in order to define the optimal parameters of the ECM process providing attainment of specified blade quality parameters given in the design documentation, while providing maximal performance. The new technological methods suggested based on the results of the tests; in particular application of vibrating tool-electrodes and employment of locating elements made of high-strength materials, significantly extend the capabilities of this method.

  17. IFI16 and cGAS cooperate in the activation of STING during DNA sensing in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almine, Jessica F; O'Hare, Craig A J; Dunphy, Gillian; Haga, Ismar R; Naik, Rangeetha J; Atrih, Abdelmadjid; Connolly, Dympna J; Taylor, Jordan; Kelsall, Ian R; Bowie, Andrew G; Beard, Philippa M; Unterholzner, Leonie

    2017-02-13

    Many human cells can sense the presence of exogenous DNA during infection though the cytosolic DNA receptor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces the second messenger cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP). Other putative DNA receptors have been described, but whether their functions are redundant, tissue-specific or integrated in the cGAS-cGAMP pathway is unclear. Here we show that interferon-γ inducible protein 16 (IFI16) cooperates with cGAS during DNA sensing in human keratinocytes, as both cGAS and IFI16 are required for the full activation of an innate immune response to exogenous DNA and DNA viruses. IFI16 is also required for the cGAMP-induced activation of STING, and interacts with STING to promote STING phosphorylation and translocation. We propose that the two DNA sensors IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to prevent the spurious activation of the type I interferon response.

  18. FUZZY INFERENCE SYSTEM MODELING FOR BED ACTIVE CARBON RE-GENERATION PROCESS (CO2 GAS FACTORY CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Febriana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed active carbon is one of the most important materials that had great impact in determining level of impurities in production of CO2 gas. In this particular factory case, there is unavailability of standard duration time of heating and cooling and steam flow rate for the re-generation process of bed active carbon. The paper discusses the fuzzy inference system for modeling of re-generation process of bed active carbon to find the optimum setting parameter. The fuzzy inference system was build using real historical daily processing data. After validation process, surface plot analysis was performed to find the optimum setting. The result of re-generation parameter setting is 9-10 hours of heating process, 4.66-5.32 hours of cooling process, and 1500-2500 kg/hr of steam flow rate.

  19. Influence of FGR complexity modelling on the practical results in gas pressure calculation of selected fuel elements from Dukovany NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahodova, M.

    2001-01-01

    A modernization fuel system and advanced fuel for operation up to the high burnup are used in present time in Dukovany NPP. Reloading of the cores are evaluated using computer codes for thermomechanical behavior of the most loaded fuel rods. The paper presents results of parametric calculations performed by the NRI Rez integral code PIN, version 2000 (PIN2k) to assess influence of fission gas release modelling complexity on achieved results. The representative Dukovany NPP fuel rod irradiation history data are used and two cases of fuel parameter variables (soft and hard) are chosen for the comparison. Involved FGR models where the GASREL diffusion model developed in the NRI Rez plc and standard Weisman model that is recommended in the previous version of the PIN integral code. FGR calculation by PIN2k with GASREL model represents more realistic results than standard Weisman's model. Results for linear power, fuel centre temperature, FGR and gas pressure versus burnup are given for two fuel rods

  20. Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions resulting from decreased losses in the conductors of an electrical installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobão, J.A.; Devezas, T.; Catalão, J.P.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new software application is provided in this paper. • The efficient investment in street lighting and industrial and domestic electrical equipment is analyzed. • The reduction of losses in the conductors of electrical installations is properly accounted for. • The reduction of CO 2 emitted into the atmosphere is also determined. - Abstract: The activities of the electricity sector in production and consumption have implications in almost all environmental problems of today. The main environmental impacts occur during the production of electricity, mainly due to the emission of air pollutants, which is directly linked to climate change that has been observed over time. Ambitious climate change mitigation requires significant changes in many economic sectors, in particular in the production and consumption of energy. Considering that the primary energy consumption has increased, doubling since the 1970s, and in particular the consumption of electricity has had a sharper increase, nearly quadrupling in the same period, all measures that can mitigate environmental impacts on both the supply and demand sides of electricity are of interest. This paper introduces a new software application that analyses efficient investment in street lighting and industrial and domestic electrical equipment, accounting for the reduction of losses in the conductors of electrical installations, which is usually neglected. It also determines the reduction of CO 2 emitted into the atmosphere, which contributes to the reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases from a country or particular product

  1. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-09-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement.

  2. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement. ((orig.))

  3. Support effects and catalytic trends for water gas shift activity of transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Astrid; Janssens, T.V.W.; Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii

    2010-01-01

    Water gas shift activity measurements for 12 transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Ir, Pt, Au) supported on inert MgAl2O4 and Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 are presented, to elucidate the influence of the active metal and the support. The activity is related to the adsorption energy of molecular...... activity on the MgAl2O4 support and are both characterized by weak CO adsorption. For the MgAl2O4-supported catalysts a volcano-type relation between the activity and the adsorption energy of atomic oxygen on the metal is obtained. The maximum activity is found for metals with a binding energy of oxygen...... around −2.5 eV. No clear correlation exists with the adsorption energy of CO. In contrast, the activity for the Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 support increases with increasing adsorption strength for CO, and based on a relatively low activity of Cu the activity does not seem to depend on the adsorption energy of oxygen...

  4. Last results of MADRAS, a space active optics demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hourtoule, Claire; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Devilliers, Christophe; Liotard, Arnaud; Lopez, Céline; Chazallet, Frédéric

    2017-11-01

    The goal of the MADRAS project (Mirror Active, Deformable and Regulated for Applications in Space) is to highlight the interest of Active Optics for the next generation of space telescope and instrumentation. Wave-front errors in future space telescopes will mainly come from thermal dilatation and zero gravity, inducing large lightweight primary mirrors deformation. To compensate for these effects, a 24 actuators, 100 mm diameter deformable mirror has been designed to be inserted in a pupil relay. Within the project, such a system has been optimized, integrated and experimentally characterized. The system is designed considering wave-front errors expected in 3m-class primary mirrors, and taking into account space constraints such as compactness, low weight, low power consumption and mechanical strength. Finite Element Analysis allowed an optimization of the system in order to reach a precision of correction better than 10 nm rms. A dedicated test-bed has been designed to fully characterize the integrated mirror performance in representative conditions. The test set up is made of three main parts: a telescope aberrations generator, a correction loop with the MADRAS mirror and a Shack-Hartman wave-front sensor, and PSF imaging. In addition, Fizeau interferometry monitors the optical surface shape. We have developed and characterized an active optics system with a limited number of actuators and a design fitting space requirements. All the conducted tests tend to demonstrate the efficiency of such a system for a real-time, in situ wave-front. It would allow a significant improvement for future space telescopes optical performance while relaxing the specifications on the others components.

  5. Identification of Aroma-active Compounds in Essential Oil from Uncaria Hook by Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Megumi; Nakaya, Satoshi; Maki, Yusuke; Marumoto, Shinsuke; Usami, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil extracted from Uncaria Hook ("Chotoko" in Japanese), the branch with curved hook of the herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla has been investigated by GC and GC-MS analyses. Eighty-four compounds, representing 90.8% of the total content was identified in oil obtained from Uncaria Hook. The main components i were (E)-cinnamaldehyde (13.4%), α-copaene (8.0%), methyl eugenol (6.8%), δ-cadinene (5.3%), and curcumene (3.6%). The important key aroma-active compounds in the oil were detected by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), using the flavor dilution (FD) factor to express the odor potency of each compounds. Furthermore, the odor activity value (OAV) has been used as a measure of the relative contribution of each compound to the aroma of the Uncaria Hook oil. The GC-O and AEDA results showed that α-copaene (FD = 4, OAV = 4376), (E)-linalool oxide (FD = 64, OAV = 9.1), and methyl eugenol (FD = 64, OAV = 29) contributed to the woody and spicy odor of Uncaria Hook oil, whereas furfural (FD = 8, OAV = 4808) contributed to its sweet odor. These results warrant further investigations of the application of essential oil from Uncaria Hook in the phytochemical and medicinal fields.

  6. Regional and Detailed Survey for Radon Activities in Soil-Gas and Groundwater in the Okchon Zone, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, H.-K.; Chon, H.-T.

    2012-04-01

    The Okchon zone in Korea provides a typical example of natural geological materials enriched in potentially toxic elements including uranium which is parent nuclide for radon gas. For the purpose of radon radioactivity risk assessment, making the map of radon risk grade from Okchon zone, regional and detailed field surveys were carried out during 3 years. The study area is located in the central part of Korea, called the Okchon zone (about 5,100 km2), which occur in a 80km wide, northeast-trending belt that extends across the Korean Peninsula. The Okchon zone is underlain by metasedimentary rocks of unknown age that are composed mainly of black slate, phyllite, shale, and limestone. The three research areas (defined as Boeun, Chungju, and Nonsan) for detailed survey were selected from the results of regional survey. Results of detailed radon survey indicated a wide range of radon activities for soil-gases (148-1,843 pCi/L) and ground waters (23-5,540 pCi/L). About 15 percent of soil-gas samples exceeded 1,000 pCi/L and 84 percent of ground water samples exceeded the MCL (maximum contaminant level) of drinking water, 300 pCi/L, which proposed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1999. For detailed survey, radon activities of soil-gas and ground water were classified as bedrock geology, based on 1/50,000 geological map and field research. For soil-gas measurements, mean values of radon activity from black slate-shale (789 pCi/L) were highest among the other base rocks. And for groundwater measurements, mean value of radon activities were decreased in the order of granite (1,345 pCi/L) > black shale-slate (915 pCi/L) > metasediments (617 pCi/L). Result of indoor radon measurement from detailed survey areas showed that about 50% of houses exceeded the indoor guideline, 4 pCi/L. For the radon risk assessment in indoor environment showed that probability of lung cancer risk from the houses located on the granite base rock (3.0×10-2) was highest among the other

  7. The use of NPAR results in plant inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is a hardware oriented research program which has produced a large data base of equipment and system operating, maintenance, and testing information. Equipment and systems which have a propensity for age related degradation are identified, and methods for detecting and mitigating aging effects have been evaluated. As plants age, it becomes increasingly important that NRC inspectors be cognizant of plant aging phenomena. This paper describes the NPAR information which can enhance inspection activities, and provides a mechanism for making pertinent research available to the inspectors

  8. Design and preliminary results of a fuel flexible industrial gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The design characteristics are presented of a fuel tolerant variable geometry staged air combustor using regenerative/convective cooling. The rich/quench/lean variable geometry combustor is designed to achieve low NO(x) emission from fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The physical size of the combustor was calculated for a can-annular combustion system with associated operating conditions for the Allison 570-K engine. Preliminary test results indicate that the concept has the potential to meet emission requirements at maximum continuous power operation. However, airflow sealing and improved fuel/air mixing are necessary to meet Department of Energy program goals.

  9. Results of cost estimates for the exploitation of the Natuna gas field in Indonesia using the HTR: A new momentum for commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, H.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a simplified method for cost estimations are presented. The main result is: There exists a potential of economical competitiveness for the exploitation of the gas of the Natuna Gas Field in Indonesia. The potential consists in the production of Energy Alcohol from the gas of the Natuna Gas Field, making use of nuclear energy in the form of high temperature heat and electricity from the High Temperature reactor, HTR. The reason is that Energy Alcohol is a readily marketable product as a substitute for gasoline and diesel, with their relatively high market values. This is not so for methane, because of its lower market value, being used mainly in the heat market only. In the conversion process some - or a little more - of the carbondioxide CO 2 , the main constituent of the gas of the Natuna Gas Field, is used; the competitiveness of the product decreases with the increasing consumption of CO 2

  10. Hellenic Amateur Astronomy Association's activities: Preliminary results on Perseids 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravelias, G.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary results on the Perseids 2010 are presented. Visual and video observations were obtained by the author and a first reduction of the visual data shows that a maximum of ZHR ~120 was reached during the night 12-13 of August 2010. Moreover, a video setup was tested (DMK camera and UFO Capture v2) and the results show that, under some limitations, valuable data can be obtained.

  11. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow

  12. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in

  13. Summarizing evaluation of the results of in-pile experiments for the transient fission gas release under accidental conditions of fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.A.; Vaeth, L.

    1989-04-01

    The transient fission gas behaviour and the fission gas induced fuel motion were studied in in-pile experiments in different countries, under conditions typical for hypothetical accidents. This report summarizes first the different experiment series and the main results. Then, a comparative evaluation is given, which provides a basis for the choice of the fission gas parameters in the accident code SAS3D

  14. Recent results of seismic isolation study in CRIEPI: Numerical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiojiri, Hiroo; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Yabana, Shurichi; Hirata, Kazuta

    1992-01-01

    Development of detailed numerical models of a bearing and the related isolation system Is necessary for establishing the rational design of the bearing and the system. The developed numerical models should be validated regarding the physical parameters and the basic assumption by comparing the experimental results with the numerical ones. The numerical work being conducted in CRIEPI consists of the following items: (1) Simple modeling of the behavior of the bearings capable of approximating the tests on bearings, and the validation of the model for the bearing by comparing the numerical results adopting the models with the shaking table tests results; (2) Detailed three-dimensional modeling of single bearings with finite-element codes, and the experimental validation of the model; (3)Simple and detailed three-dimensional modeling of isolation buildings and experimental validation

  15. SENP7 Potentiates cGAS Activation by Relieving SUMO-Mediated Inhibition of Cytosolic DNA Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP synthase (cGAS, a.k.a. MB21D1, a cytosolic DNA sensor, catalyzes formation of the second messenger 2'3'-cGAMP that activates the stimulator of interferon genes (STING signaling. How the cGAS activity is modulated remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 7 (SENP7 interacted with and potentiated cGAS activation. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO was conjugated onto the lysine residues 335, 372 and 382 of cGAS, which suppressed its DNA-binding, oligomerization and nucleotidyl-transferase activities. SENP7 reversed this inhibition via catalyzing the cGAS de-SUMOylation. Consistently, silencing of SENP7 markedly impaired the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by cGAS-STING axis. SENP7-knockdown mice were more susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection. SENP7 was significantly up-regulated in patients with SLE. Our study highlights the temporal modulation of the cGAS activity via dynamic SUMOylation, uncovering a novel mechanism for fine-tuning the STING signaling in innate immunity.

  16. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Smith, A. Peyton; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-12-01

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is uncertain but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e., directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from 30 cores, subjected to two temperatures and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Daily CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen. They also had a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Daily CH4 emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over 6 orders of magnitude higher than that from CH4; cumulative CO2 was correlated with incubation temperature and moisture treatment, with drought cores producing 52-73 % lower C. Cumulative CH4 production was unaffected by any treatment. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be sensitive to changes in soil moisture under aerobic conditions, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost thaws in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have been shown to be

  17. Critical Nuclei Size, Rate, and Activation Energy of H2 Gas Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Sean R; Edwards, Martin A; Ren, Hang; White, Henry S

    2018-03-21

    Electrochemical measurements of the nucleation rate of individual H 2 bubbles at the surface of Pt nanoelectrodes (radius = 7-41 nm) are used to determine the critical size and geometry of H 2 nuclei leading to stable bubbles. Precise knowledge of the H 2 concentration at the electrode surface, C H 2 surf , is obtained by controlled current reduction of H + in a H 2 SO 4 solution. Induction times of single-bubble nucleation events are measured by stepping the current, to control C H 2 surf , while monitoring the voltage. We find that gas nucleation follows a first-order rate process; a bubble spontaneously nucleates after a stochastic time delay, as indicated by a sudden voltage spike that results from impeded transport of H + to the electrode. Hundreds of individual induction times, at different applied currents and using different Pt nanoelectrodes, are used to characterize the kinetics of phase nucleation. The rate of bubble nucleation increases by four orders of magnitude (0.3-2000 s -1 ) over a very small relative change in C H 2 surf (0.21-0.26 M, corresponding to a ∼0.025 V increase in driving force). Classical nucleation theory yields thermodynamic radii of curvature for critical nuclei of 4.4 to 5.3 nm, corresponding to internal pressures of 330 to 270 atm, and activation energies for nuclei formation of 14 to 26 kT, respectively. The dependence of nucleation rate on H 2 concentration indicates that nucleation occurs by a heterogeneous mechanism, where the nuclei have a contact angle of ∼150° with the electrode surface and contain between 35 and 55 H 2 molecules.

  18. Removal and recovery of gas-phase element mercury by metal oxide-loaded activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei Zhijian [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shen Zhemin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: pnyql520@hotmail.com; Zhao Qingjie [Shanghai Academy of Environmental Science, 508 Qin-Zhou Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Wang Wenhua; Zhang Yejian [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2008-04-01

    The reusability of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} (AC-Co), MnO{sub 2} (AC-Mn) and CuCoO{sub 4} (AC-CC) loaded activated carbon (AC) and their element mercury removal efficiency had been studied using a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor under simulated flue gas conditions. Tests showed that spent AC-Co could be regenerated through heating at 673 K under N{sub 2} atmosphere and the enrichment regenerated Hg{sup 0} could be collected to eliminate the secondary pollution. Regenerated AC-Mn and AC-CC's Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency decreased greatly due to AC's decomposition and MnO{sub 2}'s crystal structure variation. Compared with AC and metal oxides, metal oxide-loaded AC had higher Hg{sup 0} capture ability and capacity due to AC huge surface areas and lots of function groups. TGA analysis results showed that AC-Co and AC-Mn's HgO adsorptive capacity at 523 K reached 19.8 mg g{sup -1} and 5.21 mg g{sup -1}, respectively. High loading values and adsorption temperatures were beneficial to AC-Co's Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency. However, CuCoO{sub 4} and MnO{sub 2}'s AC decomposition ability had negative effect on AC-CC and AC-Mn's performance, respectively, especially at high adsorption temperatures and loading values. SO{sub 2} tests showed that AC-CC had higher anti SO{sub 2}-poisoning ability than AC-Co and AC-Mn.

  19. Improved PFB operations: 400-hour turbine test results. [coal combustion products and hot corrosion in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Benford, S. M.; Zellars, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) coal-burning reactor was used to provide hot effluent gases for operation of a small gas turbine. Preliminary tests determined the optimum operating conditions that would result in minimum bed particle carryover in the combustion gases. Solids were removed from the gases before they could be transported into the test turbine by use of a modified two stage cyclone separator. Design changes and refined operation procedures resulted in a significant decrease in particle carryover, from 2800 to 93 ppm (1.5 to 0.05 grains/std cu ft), with minimal drop in gas temperature and pressure. The achievement of stable burn conditions and low solids loadings made possible a 400 hr test of small superalloy rotor, 15 cm (6 in.) in diameter, operating in the effluent. Blades removed and examined metallographically after 200 hr exhibited accelerated oxidation over most of the blade surface, with subsurface alumina penetration to 20 micron m. After 400 hours, average erosion loss was about 25 micron m (1 mil). Sulfide particles, indicating hot corrosion, were present in depletion zones, and their presence corresponded in general to the areas of adherent solids deposit. Sulfidation appears to be a materials problem equal in importance to erosion.

  20. Effect of sulphurous gas and γ-radiation upon nitricreductase activity in the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, I.A.; Nifontova, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    A study was made on damaging effect of sulphurous gas and γ-radiation on nitric-reductase activity in the lichen lobaria pulmonaria, sensitive to contamination. The lowest gas concentration (2.0 mg/l) increased the enzyme activity by 32.5%; concentration growth up to 20.3 and 40.6 mg/l caused the enzyme inhibition. Gamma-irradiation dose of 50000 Gy reduced practically twice the activity of nitric reductase, if dry thalli were irradiated. Irradiation of wet lichen by 500 Gy dose activated the enzyme, by 5000 Gy dose - decreased it's activity; nitrate reduction was almost terminated under irradiation by 40000 Gy dose

  1. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic signatures of gas hydrate-forming fluids offshore NE Sakhalin (the sea of Okhotsk): Results from the CHAOS-2003 cruises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurenko, Leonid; Matveeva, Tatiana; Soloviev, Valery; Prasolov, Eduard; Logvina, Elizaveta; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hirotsugi; Sakagami, Hirotoshi

    2005-01-01

    During the CHAOS-2003 cruises of R/V Akademik Lavrentyev three new gas hydrate accumulations named the Chaos, the Hieroglyph and the Kitami were discovered offshore NE Sakhalin (the Sea of Okhotsk) in association with fluid venting. The main goal of this paper is to clarify the origin and the composition of gas and water involving the accumulation of vent-related gas hydrates and to reveal their mechanism of formation. Discharging of deeper sourced water is not observed based on data of the major ion distribution. Observed isotope anomalies of hydrogen (up to 2.52%) and oxygen (up to 0.36%) are higher than fractionation coefficient under gas hydrate formation (1.8% and 0.3%, respectively). These features could be explained by two processes: a) an influence of residual water during gas hydrates formation or b) involving to the process of gas hydrate formation of deep-sourced water. The latter process is most probably influence on the isotopic composition of the pore water. Studied pore water samples consist from three end members: Gas hydrate water, seawater (or in situ pore water of the basin) and deep-sourced water. Results of isotopic studies of water testify that discharged fluid is characterized by light (delta)D (up to approx. 0.11% ) and (delta) 18 O (up to approx. 0.12%). Two mechanisms of gas hydrate accumulation are distinguished: Precipitation from infiltrating gas-saturated water and segregation of pore water by diffusing gas. (Author)

  2. The application of release models to the interpretation of rare gas coolant activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-01-01

    Much research is carried out into the release of fission products from UO 2 fuel and from failed pins. A significant application of this data is to define models of release which can be used to interpret measured coolant activities of rare gas isotopes. Such interpretation is necessary to extract operationally relevant parameters, such as the number and size of failures in the core and the 131 I that might be released during depressurization faults. The latter figure forms part of the safety case for all operating CAGRs. This paper describes and justifies the models which are used in the ANAGRAM program to interpret CAGR coolant activities, highlighting any remaining uncertainties. The various methods by which the program can extract relevant information from the measurements are outlined, and examples are given of the analysis of coolant data. These analyses point to a generally well understood picture of fission gas release from low temperature failures. Areas of higher temperature release are identified where further research would be beneficial to coolant activity analysis. (author)

  3. The gas sector in Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, G.

    2000-05-01

    Natural gas in Canada represents 29% of the primary energy and 42% of the energy used in the industrial sector. The biggest users are the manufacturing industries for which the low cost of natural gas and the quality of products resulting from its use represent a serious advantage in a more and more competitive market. This document takes stock of the situation of natural gas and gas-related technologies in Quebec. The first part recalls the historical evolution of the gas distribution network in Quebec and its present day situation. Then, some technical-economical data about the consumption of natural gas in Quebec are presented according to the sectors of use. The third part treats of the R and D activities linked with the gas sector, in particular the activities of the two main research organizations: the technical centre of natural gas and the research group in gas technologies of the Polytechnique school of Montreal. (J.S.)

  4. Integral test on activation cross section of tag gas nuclides using fast neutron spectrum fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    Activation cross sections of tag gas nuclides, which will be used for the failed fuel detection and location in FBR plants, were evaluated by the irradiation tests in the fast neutron spectrum fields in JOYO and YAYOI. The comparison of their measured radioactivities and the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 cross section set showed that the C/E values ranged from 0.8 to 2.8 for the calibration tests in YAYOI and that the present accuracies of these cross sections were confirmed. (author)

  5. Improvement of organic compounds labelling method with the use of thermally activated tritium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejman, L.A.; Smolyakov, V.S.; Antropova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Use of a support (various types of papers) is recommended for organic compounds labelling by tritium gas activated at a hot tungsten filament. This improvement increases chemical and radiochemical yields and makes the experiment simpler and faster. Generally labelled triethyloxonium tetra-fluoroborate, ethyl-p-aminobenzoate, p-aminobenzoic acid (Na-salt), A-factor (a natural regulator of streptomycin biosynthesis), decapeptide angiotensin I, phospholipid 1, 2 - dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3--phosphocholine and E. coli tRNAs have been prepared by this method. Molar radioactivity of the labelled compounds is in the range of 1-200 GBg/mmole [ru

  6. METHODOLOGY OF AN ASSESSMENT OF RESULTS OF INTELLECTUAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa I. Egorova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodological bases of an assessment of the results of research, development and technological works and intangible assets are given in the article. A special attention is paid to the problems of formation of fair value of such assets for clients of financial accounting. The authors compare the methods of cost measurement of accounting entities regulated by Russian Accounting Standards (RAS and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS. Peculiarities of detection and acknowledgement of impairment of intangible assets (loss of value are considered.

  7. The results of pre-design studies on the development of a new design of gas turbine compressor package of GPA-C-16 type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Chobenko, V. M.; Shcherbakov, O. M.; Ushakov, S. M.; Parafiynyk, V. P.; Sereda, R. M.

    2017-08-01

    The article summarizes the results of analysis of data concerning the operation of turbocompressor packages at compressor stations for the natural gas transmission system of Ukraine. The basic requirements for gas turbine compressor packages used for modernization and reconstruction of compressor stations are considered. Using a 16 MW gas turbine package GPA-C-16S/76-1,44M1 as an example, the results of pre-design studies and some technical solutions that improve the energy efficiency of gas turbine compressor packages and their reliability, as well as its environmental performance are given. In particular, the article deals with the matching of performance characteristics of a centrifugal compressor (hereinafter compressor) and gas turbine drive to reduce fuel gas consumption; as well as application of energy efficient technologies, in particular, exhaust gas heat recovery units and gas-oil heat exchangers in turbocompressor packages oil system; as well as reducing emissions of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere using a catalytic exhaust system. Described technical solutions can be used for development of other types of gas turbine compressor packages.

  8. Finnsjoen study site. Scope of activities and main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Andersson, J.E.; Andersson, Peter; Ittner, T.; Tiren, S.; Ljunggren, C.

    1992-12-01

    The Finnsjoen study site was selected in 1977 to provide input to the KBS-1 and KBS-2 performance assessments. The site was later used as a test site for testing new instruments and new site characterization methods, as well as a research site for studying mainly groundwater flow and groundwater transport. All together, the Finnsjoen studies have involved 11 cored boreholes, down to max 700 m depth, and extensive borehole geophysical, geochemical and geohydraulic measurements, as well as rock stress measurements and tracer tests. This report presents the scope of the Finnsjoen studies together with main results. Conceptual uncertainties in assumptions and models are discussed with emphasis on the models used for the performance assessment SKB91. Of special interest for the Finnsjoen study site is the strong influence caused by a subhorizontal fracture zone on groundwater flow, transport and chemistry

  9. Programs of environmental administration of GASBOL and its results; Programas de gestao ambiental do GasBol e seus resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Helio Joaquim dos; Figliuolo, Marilu [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil, S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    One of the largest South America's enterprises of energy integration of the Bolivia/Brazil gas pipeline in Brazilian side, owned and operated by TBG, has interacted with 05 states, 137 districts and 06 environment governmental entities (Environmental and States department) of environment multilateral financial institutions and group of ten of other governmental and not governmental organizations. As a result of the Environmental Impact Studies and Environmental Impact Reports (EIA/RIMA) required for the project implementation, was developed an Environmental Management Plan - EMP, which addressed the following compensation plans: Socio - Economic Compensation Plan, Indigenous Peoples Development Plan - PDI and Ecological Compensation Plan. This report presents a summary of the compensation plans, the criteria utilized for the projects determination and the evaluation of the results, after 6 years, according to the established targets. (author)

  10. Programs of environmental administration of GASBOL and its results; Programas de gestao ambiental do GasBol e seus resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Helio Joaquim dos; Figliuolo, Marilu [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil, S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    One of the largest South America's enterprises of energy integration of the Bolivia/Brazil gas pipeline in Brazilian side, owned and operated by TBG, has interacted with 05 states, 137 districts and 06 environment governmental entities (Environmental and States department) of environment multilateral financial institutions and group of ten of other governmental and not governmental organizations. As a result of the Environmental Impact Studies and Environmental Impact Reports (EIA/RIMA) required for the project implementation, was developed an Environmental Management Plan - EMP, which addressed the following compensation plans: Socio - Economic Compensation Plan, Indigenous Peoples Development Plan - PDI and Ecological Compensation Plan. This report presents a summary of the compensation plans, the criteria utilized for the projects determination and the evaluation of the results, after 6 years, according to the established targets. (author)

  11. Natural gas corridors among the EU and its main suppliers. Simulation results with the dynamic GASTALE model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lise, W.; Van Oostvoorn, F.; Hobbs, B.F.

    2006-06-01

    European demand for natural gas has grown and is expected to expand considerably in the next decades. This growth is partly induced by the environmental policy targets, e.g., the Kyoto protocol, and the European energy market liberalisation. However, this development also poses a challenge for the energy consumers in the EU and other gas importing countries with respect to the increasing dependency on gas imports and consequently also the security of gas supplies. First, briefly the business-as-usual (BAU) scenario with a focus on the required gas infrastructure is presented. The analysis focuses on interactions among demand, supply and gas transport infrastructure, pipeline and LNG transport, storage, and necessary investments in the natural gas market over the period 2005-2030. For dealing with the great uncertainties that are part of our long term future, a number of policy scenarios in addition to the BAU case are formulated to study the impact of demand uncertainty and delaying investment behaviour on the gas transport infrastructure (pipeline transport, LNG facilities and storage capacity) required in the long run in Europe. In addition, some of the key tradeoffs among investments in pipelines, LNG liquifaction and regasification facilities, and storage capacity are investigated. The analyses in this paper indicate that substantial investments in gas transport corridors are needed to provide for security of supply. Especially the pipeline connections running from East to West need to be prioritised. The future gas price largely depends upon the sufficient availability of gas from Russia, Iran, and Central Asian countries

  12. The results interpretation of thermogasdynamic studies of vertical gas wells incomplete in terms of the reservoir penetration degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Shamsiev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed for interpreting thermogasdynamic studies of vertical gas wells that are incomplete in terms of the reservoir penetration degree on the basis of inverse tasks theory. The inverse task has the aim to determine the reservoir parameters for nonisothermal filtration of a real gas to a vertical well in an anisotropic reservoir. In this case, the values ​​of the pressure and temperature at the well bottom, recorded by deep instruments, are assumed to be known. The solution of the inverse task is to minimize the functional. The iterative sequence for minimizing the functional is based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method. The convergence and stability of the iterative process for various input information have been studied on specific examples. The effect of reservoir anisotropy on the pressure and temperature changes at the bottom of the well is studied. It is shown that if the reservoir is not completely penetrated by the results of pressure and temperature measurements at the bottom of the well, anisotropy of the reservoir can be estimated after its launch. It should be noted that when studying thermodynamic processes in the vicinity of a well, which penetrates thick layers, it is necessary to take into account not only the heat exchange of the reservoir with the surrounding rocks, but also the geothermal temperature gradient.

  13. Power Deals. Mergers and acquisitions activity within the global electricity and gas market. 2006 Annual Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    2006 was another recordbreaking year in the electricity and gas utilities sector. Total deal values shot through the record level set in 2005 to reach a dizzying USD 298.8bn. This is nearly seven times the USD 43bn level of transactions recorded in the sector only three years earlier in 2003. The rise is all the more astonishing as it comes in a year when deal activity from corporate US utility players plummeted. The sharp downturn in North America came as companies took stock of aggressive regulatory stances from some state regulators during a US midterm election year that coincided with the ending of rate freezes and reaction to the repeal of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act. North American electricity deal values by bidder fell 64% to USD 20.7bn, not far above the USD 16.7bn level of 2003. The picture in Europe and the Asia Pacific region was very different. Both regions recorded record levels of power deal activities as utility companies continued to strive for super regional'' scale. Deal activity in Europe was given extra momentum by the countdown to the July 2007 implementation of full retail market liberalisation. This report examines the rationale behind the overall trends and the key individual deals. We also highlight, in a series of deal dialogues throughout the report, some of the critical issues for companies engaging in deal activity within the sector drawing on our global experience as an adviser to players in major deals throughout the sector in all key power and gas markets. Looking to the future, the regulatory environment will play a key role in determining the course of deal activity. Companies entering into big deals need to be ready more than ever for the long haul. However, the underpinning momentum in the sector remains strong and this is likely to create continued buoyancy in the period ahead

  14. Power Deals. Mergers and acquisitions activity within the global electricity and gas market. 2006 Annual Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-01-15

    2006 was another recordbreaking year in the electricity and gas utilities sector. Total deal values shot through the record level set in 2005 to reach a dizzying USD 298.8bn. This is nearly seven times the USD 43bn level of transactions recorded in the sector only three years earlier in 2003. The rise is all the more astonishing as it comes in a year when deal activity from corporate US utility players plummeted. The sharp downturn in North America came as companies took stock of aggressive regulatory stances from some state regulators during a US midterm election year that coincided with the ending of rate freezes and reaction to the repeal of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act. North American electricity deal values by bidder fell 64% to USD 20.7bn, not far above the USD 16.7bn level of 2003. The picture in Europe and the Asia Pacific region was very different. Both regions recorded record levels of power deal activities as utility companies continued to strive for super regional'' scale. Deal activity in Europe was given extra momentum by the countdown to the July 2007 implementation of full retail market liberalisation. This report examines the rationale behind the overall trends and the key individual deals. We also highlight, in a series of deal dialogues throughout the report, some of the critical issues for companies engaging in deal activity within the sector drawing on our global experience as an adviser to players in major deals throughout the sector in all key power and gas markets. Looking to the future, the regulatory environment will play a key role in determining the course of deal activity. Companies entering into big deals need to be ready more than ever for the long haul. However, the underpinning momentum in the sector remains strong and this is likely to create continued buoyancy in the period ahead.

  15. Potential impacts of OCS oil and gas activities on fisheries. Volume 2. Annotated bibliography for OCS oil and gas impact studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tear, L.M.

    1989-10-01

    The volume is the second of two volumes to the final report, Potential Impacts of OCS Oil and Gas Activities on Fisheries. The volume presents an annotated bibliography of published and grey literature related to OCS oil and gas activity impacts of finfish and shellfish in marine and estuaring waters. The studies presented in the bibliography include those related to the following pollutants or impact-causing activities: Rig/reef effects, Drilling discharges (muds or cuttings), Oil (petroleum hydrocarbons), Trace metals, Produced water, Habitat alteration, Debris, Rig placement (avoidance), Pipelines, and Socioeconomic effects. The studies are listed alphabetically by the primary author's last name. An index is provided to help the reader identify studies related to a specific impact

  16. Optimal Sizing and Placement of Power-to-Gas Systems in Future Active Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz de Cerio Mendaza, Iker; Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Kouzelis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Power-to-Gas is recently attracting lots of interest as a new alternative for the regulation of renewable based power system. In cases, where the re-powering of old wind turbines threatens the normal operation of the local distribution network, this becomes especially relevant. However, the design...... -investment cost- and the technical losses in the system under study. The results obtained from the assessed test system show how such non-linear methods could help distribution system operators to obtain a fast and precise perception of what is the best way to integrate the Power-to-Gas facilities...... of medium voltage distribution networks does not normally follow a common pattern, finding a singular and very particular layouts in each case. This fact, makes the placement and dimensioning of such flexible loads a complicated task for the distribution system operator in the future. This paper describes...

  17. Modern Processes of Hydrocarbon Migration and Re-Formation of Oil and Gas Fields (Based on the Results of Monitoring and Geochemical Studies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, Irina; Salakhidinova, Gulmira; Nosova, Fidania; Pronin, Nikita; Ostroukhov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    important fundamental task of exceptional practical importance. The reservoir water monitoring has been conducted in five wells that have penetrated the water-saturated, loosely aggregated zones of the South Tatarstan Arch's basement. The long-term testing resulted in the production of reservoir water from the basement. The sedimentary cover in these wells is blocked by the column, which prevents water cross-flowing from the sedimentary cover. The observations have shown that the levels, gas saturation, mineralisation, density, and composition of reservoir waters from the loosely aggregated zones of the basement change with time. The varying characteristics of the water include its component composition, redox potential, and amount of chlorine and some other components and trace elements. Compositional changes in gases of the loosely aggregated zones of the basement, variations in the gas saturation of reservoir waters and of their composition, the decreasing density of oil in the sedimentary cover, - all result from one cause. This cause is the movement of fluids (solutions and gases dissolved in them) through the loosely aggregated zones and faults of the Earth's crust and the sedimentary cover. The fluids mainly move vertically in an upward direction, although their migration through subhorizontal, loosely aggregated zones of the crystalline basement is also possible. Fluid migration still takes place in the Earth's crust of ancient platforms. This phenomenon indicates that some portions of the platforms - primarily, their margins - periodically resume tectonic activities. The fluid dynamic activity of the crust define the processes in the sedimentary cover. It affects the development of the sedimentary basin during the sedimentation period, and the formation of mineral deposits. The monitoring of the present-day movement of fluid systems in the loosely aggregated zones of the basement will permit the more detailed study of the present-day fluid regime in the upper

  18. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  19. Glutamate decarboxylase and. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transaminase activity in brain structures during action of high concentrated sulfide gas on a background of hypo- and hypercalcemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyrov, G.K.; Aliyev, A.M.

    Activity of the following enzymes was studied on the background of hypo- and hypercalcemia and exposure to high concentration of sulfide gas: glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T). These enzymes regulate metabolism of GABA. The results showed that a 3.5 hr exposure to sulfide gas at a concentration of 0.3 mg/1 led to significantly increased activity of GDC in cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and in brain stem. Activity of GABA-T dropped correspondingly. On the background of hypercalcemia induced by im. injection of 10% calcium gluconate (0.6 m1/200 g body weight of experimental rats) the negative effect caused by the exposure to sulfide gas was diminished. Under conditions of hypocalcemia (im. injection of 10 mg/200 g body weight of sodium oxalate), exposure to sulfide gas led to a significantly decreased activity of GDC and GABA-T in the hemispheres and in the brain stem, but in the cerebellum the activity of GDC increased sharply while that of GABA-T decreased correspondingly. 8 refs.

  20. Differing opinions about natural gas drilling in two adjacent counties with different levels of drilling activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriesky, J.; Goldstein, B.D.; Zell, K.; Beach, S.

    2013-01-01

    The pace of development of shale gas plays varies greatly among US states and globally. Through analysis of telephone survey responses, we explore support for natural gas drilling in residents of Washington County (WC), PA (n=502) vs. residents of Allegheny County (AC), PA (n=799). WC has had intense Marcellus Shale (MS) drilling activity, in comparison to adjacent AC, which has had little drilling activity. WC residents are marginally more supportive of MS drilling than are AC residents (p=0.0768). Residents of WC are more likely to perceive MS as an economic opportunity than are AC residents (p=0.0015); to be in a family that has signed a MS lease (p<0.0001); to follow the MS issue closely (p=0.0003); to get MS information from neighbors, friends, and relatives (p<0.0001); and are marginally less likely to perceive MS as an environmental threat (p=0.1090). WC leaseholders are significantly more supportive of MS drilling than WC non-leaseholders and AC non-leaseholders (p=0.0024). Mediation analyses show that county-based differences in support of MS drilling are due to WC residents seeing more of an economic opportunity in the MS and their greater likelihood of having a family-held lease. - Highlights: • Telephone survey analysis of sources of support for Marcellus Shale drilling. • Perceived positive economic impact of drilling drives support among respondents. • Mineral rights leaseholders are significantly more supportive than non-leaseholders

  1. Gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoir systems in the offshore of India: Results of the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Collett, Timothy S.; Vishwanath, K.; Shukla, K.M.; Nagalingam, J.; Lall, M.V.; Yamada, Y; Schultheiss, P.; Holland, M.

    2016-01-01

    The India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 02 (NGHP-02) was conducted from 3-March-2015 to 28-July-2015 off the eastern coast of India using the deepwater drilling vessel Chikyu. The primary goal of this expedition was to explore for highly saturated gas hydrate occurrences in sand reservoirs that would become targets for future production tests. The first two months of the expedition were dedicated to logging-whiledrilling (LWD) operations, with a total of 25 holes drilled and logged. The next three months were dedicated to coring operations at 10 of the most promising sites. With a total of five months of continuous field operations, the expedition was the most comprehensive dedicated gas hydrate investigation ever undertaken.

  2. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets: Effect of gas flow, active species, and snake-like bullet propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Tan, X.; Lu, X. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Ostrikov, K. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets have recently attracted enormous interest owing to numerous applications in plasma biology, health care, medicine, and nanotechnology. A dedicated study of the interaction between the upstream and downstream plasma plumes revealed that the active species (electrons, ions, excited OH, metastable Ar, and nitrogen-related species) generated by the upstream plasma plume enhance the propagation of the downstream plasma plume. At gas flows exceeding 2 l/min, the downstream plasma plume is longer than the upstream plasma plume. Detailed plasma diagnostics and discharge species analysis suggest that this effect is due to the electrons and ions that are generated by the upstream plasma and flow into the downstream plume. This in turn leads to the relatively higher electron density in the downstream plasma. Moreover, high-speed photography reveals a highly unusual behavior of the plasma bullets, which propagate in snake-like motions, very differently from the previous reports. This behavior is related to the hydrodynamic instability of the gas flow, which results in non-uniform distributions of long-lifetime active species in the discharge tube and of surface charges on the inner surface of the tube.

  3. Preliminary Monitoring of Soil gas Radon in Potentially Active Faults, San Sai District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondthai, P.; Udphuay, S.

    2013-05-01

    The magnitude of 5.1 Mw earthquake occurred in San Sai District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand in December 2006 was considered an uncommon event due to the fact that there was no statistical record of such significant earthquake in the area. Therefore the earthquake might have been associated with a potentially active fault zone within the area. The objective of this study is to measure soil gas radon across this unknown fault zone within the Chiang Mai Basin, northern Thailand. Two profiles traversing the expected fault zone of soil gas radon measurements have been monitored, using TASTRAK solid state track nuclear detectors (SSNTDs). Radon signals from three periods of measurement show a distinctive consistent spatial distribution pattern. Anomalous radon areas along the profiles are connected to fault locations previously interpreted from other geophysical survey results. The increased radon signal changes from the radon background level with the signal-to-background ratio above 3 are considered anomalous. Such pattern of radon anomaly supports the existence of the faults. The radon measurement, therefore is a powerful technique in mapping active fault zone.

  4. Active control of combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, B.T.; Neumeier, Y. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This 3-year research program was initiated in September, 1995, to investigate active control of detrimental combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines (LNGT), which burn natural gas in a lean premixed mode to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. The program will investigate the mechanisms that drive these instabilities. Furthermore, it will study active control systems (ACS) that can effectively prevent the onset of such instabilities and/or reduce their amplitudes to acceptable levels. An understanding of the driving mechanisms will not only guide the development of effective ACS for LNGT but may also lead to combustor design changes (i.e., passive control) that will fully or partially resolve the problem. Initial attempts to stabilize combustors (i.e., chemical rockets) by ACS were reported more than 40 years ago, but were unsuccessful due to lack of adequate sensors, electronics, and actuators for performing the needed control actions. Progress made in recent years in sensor and actuator technology, electronics, and control theory has rekindled interest in developing ACS for unstable combustors. While initial efforts in this area, which focused on active control of instabilities in air breathing combustors, have demonstrated the considerable potential of active control, they have also indicated that more effective observers, controllers, and actuators are needed for practical applications. Considerable progress has been made in the observer and actuator areas by the principal investigators of this program during the past 2 years under an AFOSR program. The developed observer is based upon wavelets theory, and can identify the amplitudes, frequencies, and phases of the five most dominant combustor modes in (virtually) real time. The developed actuator is a fuel injector that uses a novel magneto-strictive material to modulate the fuel flow rate into the combustor.

  5. The effects of hypotension on differences between the results of simultaneous venous and arterial blood gas analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shirani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Analysis of venous blood gas (VBG can represent arterial blood gas (ABG analysis in patients with various diseases. The effects of hypotension on differences between the results of simultaneous venous and arterial blood gas analyses were reviewed. Methods: This observational, cross-sectional study was conducted from March to October 2010 in emergency depart-ments of two university hospitals in Tehran (Iran on consecutive adult patients for whom ABG had been indicated for diagnosis/treatment. Arterial and peripheral venous bloods were simultaneously sampled with blood pressure measure-ment. The VBG-ABG amount of difference regarding pH, HCO 3 , PCO 2 , PO 2 , SO 2 , and Base Excess (BE was com-pared between those with and without hypotension. Results: During the study, 192 patients (51.6 ± 23.6 years, 67.7% males were entered into the hypotension (n = 78 and normotensive groups (n = 114. The average VBG-ABG amount of difference (95% limits of agreement in the hypotension versus normotensive group were -0.030 (-0.09 to 0.03 vs. -0.016 (-0.1 to 0.068 for pH (p = 0.01, 1.79 (-1.91 to 5.49 vs. 1.32 (-1.94 to 4.58 mEq/L for HCO 3 (p = 0.032, 2.69 (-20.43 to 25.81 vs. 2.03 (-7.75 to 11.81 mmHg for PCO 2 (p = 0.295, -35.97 (-130.17 to 58.23 vs. -32.65 (-104.79 to 39.49 mmHg for PO 2 (p = 0.293, -18.58 (-14.66 to 51.82 vs. -9.06 (-31.28 to 13.16 percent (p < 0.001 for SO 2 , and 0.25 (-3.73 to 4.23 vs. 0.79 (-2.51 to 4.09 for BE (p = 0.036. Conclusions: Hypotensive status is associated with an increase in the amount of difference between VBG and ABG analysis regarding pH, HCO 3 , and BE, though the amount of increase does not seem to be clinically important. Studying the precise effects of replacing ABG with VBG on the clinical decision-making and the following outcomes is worth-while.

  6. THERMAL AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF GAS ACCRETING ONTO A SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mościbrodzka, M.; Proga, D.

    2013-01-01

    We study stability of gas accretion in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our grid-based simulations cover a radial range from 0.1 to 200 pc, which may enable linking the galactic/cosmological simulations with small-scale black hole (BH) accretion models within a few hundreds of Schwarzschild radii. Here, as in previous studies by our group, we include gas radiative cooling as well as heating by a sub-Eddington X-ray source near the central supermassive BH of 10 8 M ☉ . Our theoretical estimates and simulations show that for the X-ray luminosity, L X ∼ 0.008 L Edd , the gas is thermally and convectively unstable within the computational domain. In the simulations, we observe that very tiny fluctuations in an initially smooth, spherically symmetric, accretion flow, grow first linearly and then nonlinearly. Consequently, an initially one-phase flow relatively quickly transitions into a two-phase/cold-hot accretion flow. For L X = 0.015 L Edd or higher, the cold clouds continue to accrete but in some regions of the hot phase, the gas starts to move outward. For L X Edd , the cold phase contribution to the total mass accretion rate only moderately dominates over the hot phase contribution. This result might have some consequences for cosmological simulations of the so-called AGN feedback problem. Our simulations confirm the previous results of Barai et al. who used smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations to tackle the same problem. Here, however, because we use a grid-based code to solve equations in one dimension and two dimensions, we are able to follow the gas dynamics at much higher spacial resolution and for longer time compared with the three-dimensional SPH simulations. One of the new features revealed by our simulations is that the cold condensations in the accretion flow initially form long filaments, but at the later times, those filaments may break into smaller clouds advected outward within the hot outflow. Therefore, these simulations may serve as

  7. Multivariate statistical assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and comparison with results from general circulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenwiese, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    Based on univariate correction and coherence analyses, including techniques moving in time, and taking account of the physical basis of the relationships, a simple multivariate concept is presented which correlates observational climatic time series simultaneously with solar, volcanic, ENSO (El Nino/Souther Oscillation) and anthropogenic greenhouse-gas forcing. The climatic elements considered are air temperature (near the ground and stratosphere), sea surface temperature, sea level and precipitation, and cover at least the period 1881-1980 (stratospheric temperature only since 1960). The climate signal assessments which may be hypothetically attributed to the observed CO 2 or equivalent CO 2 (implying additional greenhouse gases) increase are compared with those resulting from GCM experiments. In case of the Northern hemisphere air temperature these comparisons are performed not only in respect to hemispheric and global means, but also in respect to the regional and seasonal patterns. Autocorrelations and phase shifts of the climate response to natural and anthropogenic forcing complicate the statistical assessments

  8. Improving quantitative gas chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry results using a modified ion source: demonstration for a pharmaceutical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Autry, Ward; Wolfs, Kris; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2011-07-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a well established analytical technique. However, mass spectrometers with electron ionization sources may suffer from signal drifts, hereby negatively influencing quantitative performance. To demonstrate this phenomenon for a real application, a static headspace-gas chromatography method in combination with electron ionization-quadrupole mass spectrometry was optimized for the determination of residual dichloromethane in coronary stent coatings. Validating the method, the quantitative performance of an original stainless steel ion source was compared to that of a modified ion source. Ion source modification included the application of a gold coating on the repeller and exit plate. Several validation aspects such as limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity and precision were evaluated using both ion sources. It was found that, as expected, the stainless steel ion source suffered from signal drift. As a consequence, non-linearity and high RSD values for repeated analyses were obtained. An additional experiment was performed to check whether an internal standard compound would lead to better results. It was found that the signal drift patterns of the analyte and internal standard were different, consequently leading to high RSD values for the response factor. With the modified ion source however, a more stable signal was observed resulting in acceptable linearity and precision. Moreover, it was also found that sensitivity improved compared to the stainless steel ion source. Finally, the optimized method with the modified ion source was applied to determine residual dichloromethane in the coating of coronary stents. The solvent was detected but found to be below the limit of quantification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gas/aerosol Partitioning Parameterisation For Global Modelling: A Physical Interpretation of The Relationship Between Activity Coefficients and Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, S.; Dentener, F. J.; Lelieveld, J.; Pandis, S. N.

    A computationally efficient model (EQSAM) to calculate gas/aerosol partitioning ofsemi-volatile inorganic aerosol components has been developed for use in global- atmospheric chemistry and climate models; presented at the EGS 2001.We introduce and discuss here the physics behind the parameterisation, upon whichthe EQuilib- rium Simplified Aerosol Model EQSAM is based. The parameterisation,which ap- proximates the activity coefficient calculation sufficiently accurately forglobal mod- elling, is based on a method that directly relates aerosol activitycoefficients to the ambient relative humidity, assuming chemical equilibrium.It therefore provides an interesting alternative for the computationally expensiveiterative activity coefficient calculation methods presently used in thermodynamicgas/aerosol equilibrium mod- els (EQMs). The parameterisation can be used,however, also in dynamical models that calculate mass transfer between theliquid/solid aerosol phases and the gas/phase explicitly; dynamical models oftenincorporate an EQM to calculate the aerosol com- position. The gain of theparameterisation is that the entire system of the gas/aerosol equilibrium partitioningcan be solved non-iteratively, a substantial advantage in global modelling.Since we have already demonstrated at the EGS 2001 that EQSAM yields similarresults as current state-of-the-art equilibrium models, we focus here on a dis- cussionof our physical interpretation of the parameterisation; the identification of theparameters needed is crucial. Given the lag of reliable data, the best way tothor- oughly validate the parameterisation for global modelling applications is theimple- mentation in current state-of-the-art gas/aerosol partitioning routines, whichare embe- ded in e.g. a global atmospheric chemistry transport model, by comparingthe results of the parameterisation against the ones based on the widely used activitycoefficient calculation methods (i.e. Bromley, Kussik-Meissner or Pitzer). Then

  10. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  11. Screening of marine seaweeds for bioactive compound against fish pathogenic bacteria and active fraction analysed by gas chromatography– mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekar Thirunavukkarasu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate bioactive molecules from marine seaweeds and check the antimicrobial activity against the fish pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Fresh marine seaweeds Gracilaria edulis, Kappaphycus spicifera, Sargassum wightii (S. wightii were collected. Each seaweed was extracted with different solvents. In the study, test pathogens were collected from microbial type culture collection. Antibacterial activity was carried out by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibition concentration (MIC was calculated. Best seaweed was analysed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cured extract was separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC. Fraction was collected from TLC to check the antimicrobial activity. Best fraction was analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCMS. Results: Based on the disc diffusion method, S. wightii showed a better antimicrobial activity than other seaweed extracts. Based on the MIC, methanol extract of S. wightii showed lower MIC than other solvents. S. wightii were separated by TLC. In this TLC, plate showed a two fraction. These two fractions were separated in preparative TLC and checked for their antimicrobial activity. Fraction 2 showed best MIC value against the tested pathogen. Fraction 2 was analysed by GCMS. Based on the GCMS, fraction 2 contains n-hexadecanoic acid (59.44%. Conclusions: From this present study, it can be concluded that S. wightii was potential sources of bioactive compounds.

  12. Oil and gas activities in northern Norway. Summary; KonKraft rapport 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    KonKraft report 6 deals with oil and gas operations on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS) from Nordland county and northwards. It aims to contribute to a broad factual base for decision processes related to opening new exploration areas in these waters. The Norwegian petroleum sector employs about 250 000 people directly and indirectly. It accounts for a third of government revenues, and 90 per cent of its profits accrue to the state. NOK 119 billion of the central government budget in 2009 comes directly from oil and gas revenues. These funds finance roads, nursery schools, hospitals and the Norwegian welfare state. In addition, they safeguard future pensions. This industry is at a crossroads today. Oil production has dropped by 30 per cent since 2000. Recent forecasts from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate show that it may be reduced by 50 per cent from its peak by 2013. Overall oil and gas output is expected to begin falling from the middle of the next decade. To slow this decline in output and revenues, the oil companies need access to new and attractive exploration acreage. Half the production expected by the government in 2030 relates to resources which have yet to be proven. Opening further areas of the NCS to petroleum activities would contribute to maintaining substantial investment and revenues for the community, and to continuing the development of industry in the northernmost parts of the country. The report reviews unopened areas along the Norwegian coast from the Helgeland region and north-eastwards to the Russian border. Nordland VI and VII plus Troms II are regarded by the petroleum industry as the most promising regions for big discoveries which could slow the production decline. The KonKraft 2 report concerning production development on the NCS estimates remaining resources in these three areas at 3.4 billion barrels of oil equivalent (boe). (Author)

  13. Overview of the performance of the JET active gas handling system during and after DTE1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laesser, R.; Atkins, G.; Bell, A.

    1999-02-01

    The JET Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) was designed, built and commissioned to handle safely radioactive tritium gas mixtures, to supply tritium (T 2 ) and deuterium (D 2 ) to the JET torus, to process the exhaust gases with the main purpose to enrich and re-use T 2 and D 2 , to detritiate tritiated impurities and to keep discharges far below the approved daily release limits. In addition, the AGHS had to supply the necessary ventilation air streams during maintenance or repair inside or outside of the AGHS building. During the first Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE1) at JET in 1997 the AGHS fulfilled all these tasks in an excellent manner. No unauthorised or unplanned tritium releases occurred and no operational delays were caused by the AGHS. In fact, this was the first true demonstration that quantities of tritium in the tens of grams range can be processed and recycled safely and efficiently in a large fusion device. At the start of DTE1 20 g of tritium were available on the JET site. About 100 g of tritium were supplied from the AGHS to the users which necessitated the recycling of tritium at least five times. Approximately 220 tritium plasma shots were performed during DTE1. Large amounts of tritium were temporarily trapped in the torus. This overview presents the performance of the whole AGHS during DTE1 as well as general aspects such as the preparation for DTE1; the quantities of gases supplied from the AGHS to the users and pumped back to the AGHS; tritium accountancy; interlock systems; failure of equipment; and gives detailed information of the gas processing in each subsystem of the AGHS. As a consequence of the performance of the AGHS during DTE1 we can state confidently that the AGHS is ready for further Deuterium-Tritium Experiments. (author)

  14. A decade of changes in nitrogen oxides over regions of oil and natural gas activity in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Majid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO are a highly regulated species that play a major role in the formation of photochemical smog. While NOx emissions are generally decreasing over the U.S. as a result of more stringent environmental policies and improved emissions control technologies, the shale oil and natural gas industry is reversing this rate of changes in certain regions. We present here a quantitative analysis of NOx levels over the seven main U.S. shale plays (Bakken, Eagle Ford, Permian, Niobrara-Codell, Marcellus-Utica, Haynesville, and Barnett between 2005 and 2015 using measurements of tropospheric NO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the NASA EOS-Aura aircraft. We develop and apply a methodology that seeks to maximise pollutant signals from oil and gas activities. For reference, we also examine the national trend averaged over the lower 48 states. Consistent with previous studies, we find NOx across the U.S. is generally declining. During the low-production phase of oil and natural gas production (2005–2009, we find declining trends in tropospheric NOx that are similar to the national trend (–4.6% yr–1 in 6 of the 7 study regions (–8 to –2% yr–1. In the high-production phase (2010–15, we find an increasing NOx trend in 5 of the 7 study basins (0.4 to 4.5% yr–1 while the national trend continued to decline (–0.3% yr–1. Over the most intensive oil-producing shale plays (Bakken, Eagle Ford, Permian and Niobrara-Codell, we observe a rapid growth (1–4.5% yr–1, which correlates well (r2 = 0.6–0.9 with their annual oil production rates and/or drilling rigs. In contrast, trends across the mainly gas-producing regions (Haynesville, Barnett, and Marcellus-Utica show decreases (–0.4 to –1.7% yr–1 similar to the national trend, with the exception of the Marcellus-Utica where a slight increase (0.4 ± 0.2% yr–1 may be an indication of a small regional increase. Our study shows the important decadal

  15. Drilling in troubled waters. For an international regulation on offshore gas and oil activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochette, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Due to an increased energy demand, offshore activities are being extended to deep and ultra-deep waters: nearly one third of consumed oil and one quarter of consumed gas come from offshore drilling. This development threatens the environment and natural resources, and may have an impact on human activities which depend on the concerned ecosystems. As some accident had cross-border consequences, the relevance of the international regulatory framework is put into question again. This article first outlines the incomplete character of the legal framework for the safety of offshore activities: uncoordinated national systems, lack of an international convention, fragmented regional initiatives (some agreements exist for some specific regions: Arctic Sea, Baltic Sea, Mediterranean Sea, North-Eastern Atlantic, Persic Gulf and Oman Sea, Africa, western Indian Ocean). The author outlines that there is no international rules regarding responsibility and compensations. While highlighting the risks of a status-quo on these different issues, the author proposes and discusses a set of recommendations aimed at strengthening the regulation of offshore drilling activities

  16. Influence of new environmental state policy on gas industry activities in countries of economy in transition. Case of Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steczko, K.; Rachwalski, J.; Fronski, A.

    1997-01-01

    Political and economical changes in Poland are accompanied by substantial transition of ecological policy of the state. A first sign of that policy is new law defining responsibilities of companies in minimising the environmental impacts of new investments and duties concerning waste management and disposal as well as pollutant emission reduction. These more stringent environmental rules influence force the Polish gas industry to fulfill new ecological requirements and, because of high ecological value of gas, they give it promising prospects of development. Since environmental condition improvement in Poland can not be achieved without the change in primary energy consumption structure the Gas Development Programme has been established. It assumes more than double increase in gas consumption up to 2010. Gas industry duties connected with environmental requirements have been presented and activities taken in order to meet ecological law rules have been specified for all stages of gas fuel chain from exploration to gas usage. Some measures taken to prevent environment damages have been discussed like ecological evaluation of drilling materials and wastes, elaborated strategy for water protection and Environmental Impact Assessment procedure. The problem of methane emissions from Polish gas system has also been discussed. (au)

  17. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  18. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Omran, Hesham; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Salama, Khaled N.

    2015-01-01

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  19. The influence of shale gas mining activities on the natural environment in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyssa, Justyna

    2017-10-01

    In the paper the main threats to the environment arising from works related to the exploration of gas from unconventional sources have been discussed. The influence of exploration works on the atmosphere (the emission of gases to the atmosphere as a result of fuel combustion, the emission of noise by drilling equipment) has been explained. Threats to the hydrological balance associated with the intake of water for performing the process of fracturing have been discussed. Legal regulations connected with waste management, water resource management and protected areas (Nature 2000) have been presented.

  20. Quantification of Greenhouse Gas Emission Rates from strong Point Sources by Airborne IPDA-Lidar Measurements: Methodology and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Wirth, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a new method and on the first demonstration to quantify emission rates from strong greenhouse gas (GHG) point sources using airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Lidar measurements. In order to build trust in the self-reported emission rates by countries, verification against independent monitoring systems is a prerequisite to check the reported budget. A significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emission of CO2 and CH4 originates from localized strong point sources of large energy production sites or landfills. Both are not monitored with sufficiently accuracy by the current observation system. There is a debate whether airborne remote sensing could fill in the gap to infer those emission rates from budgeting or from Gaussian plume inversion approaches, whereby measurements of the GHG column abundance beneath the aircraft can be used to constrain inverse models. In contrast to passive sensors, the use of an active instrument like CHARM-F for such emission verification measurements is new. CHARM-F is a new airborne IPDA-Lidar devised for the German research aircraft HALO for the simultaneous measurement of the column-integrated dry-air mixing ratio of CO2 and CH4 commonly denoted as XCO2 und XCH4, respectively. It has successfully been tested in a serious of flights over Central Europe to assess its performance under various reflectivity conditions and in a strongly varying topography like the Alps. The analysis of a methane plume measured in crosswind direction of a coal mine ventilation shaft revealed an instantaneous emission rate of 9.9 ± 1.7 kt CH4 yr-1. We discuss the methodology of our point source estimation approach and give an outlook on the CoMet field experiment scheduled in 2017 for the measurement of anthropogenic and natural GHG emissions by a combination of active and passive remote sensing instruments on research aircraft.

  1. Interaction between gas cooking and GSTM1 null genotype in bronchial responsiveness: results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, A.F.S.; Ramasamy, A.; Castro-Giner, F.; Minelli, C.; Accordini, S.; Sorheim, I.C.; Pin, I.; Kogevinas, M.; Jögi, R.; Balding, D.J.; Norbäck, D.; Verlato, G.; Olivieri, M.; Probst-Hensch, N.; Janson, C.; Zock, J.P.; Heinrich, J.; Jarvis, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increased bronchial responsiveness is characteristic of asthma. Gas cooking, which is a major indoor source of the highly oxidant nitrogen dioxide, has been associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function. However, little is known about the effect of gas cooking on

  2. Environmental law issues: Offshore oil and gas activities and tanker transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The environmental law issues that arise from offshore oil/gas activities and petroleum transport are reviewed, focusing on marine oil pollution and especially on the issues surrounding accidental spills. Some observations are offered on the context of these issues, namely on the risks of oil spills, the difficulty of spill response in the ocean and on shorelines, and the possible environmental damage. Environmental control of petroleum operations is discussed with reference to Canadian regulation, the primary source of which is the Oil and Gas Production and Conservation Act. These regulations require developmental approval for offshore operations, formulation of plans for foreseeable spill emergencies, and compensation to those affected by spills, notably those in the fishing industry. Ship-source oil pollution and spill compensation is discussed with reference to international agreements and the Canada Shipping Act. Some problems and trends with oil spill compensation and recovery for environmental damage are noted in such areas as tanker ship standards, cleanup capabilities, and inadequacy of spill penalties and compensation. 18 refs., 1 fig

  3. [Effects of nitrogen application rate on nitrate reductase activity, nitric oxide content and gas exchange in winter wheat leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Zhou-Ping

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of different nitrogen application rates on the nitrate reductase (NR) activity, nitric oxide (NO) content and gas exchange parameters in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves from tillering stage to heading stage and on grain yield were studied. The results showed that the photosynthetic rate (P(n)), transpiration rate (T(r)) and instantaneous water use efficiency (IWUE) of leaves as well as the grain yield were increased with increasing nitrogen application rate first but decreased then, with the values of all these parameters reached the highest in treatment N180. The NR activity increased with increasing nitrogen application rate, and there was a significant linear correlation between NR activity and NO content at tillering and jointing stages (R2 > or = 0.68, n = 15). NO content had a quadratic positive correlation with stomatal conductance (G(s)) (R2 > or = 0.43, n = 15). The lower NO content produced by lower NR activity under lower nitrogen application rate promoted the stoma opened, while the higher NO content produced by higher NR activity under higher nitrogen application rate induced the stoma closed. Although the leaf NO content had a quadratic positive correlation with stomatal conductance (R2 > or = 0.36, n = 15), no remarkable correlation was observed between NR activity and NO content at heading stage, suggesting that nitrogen fertilization could not affect leaf NO content through promoting NR activity, and further more, regulate the stomatal action. Under appropriate nitrogen application the leaf NR activity and NO content were lower, G(s), T(r) and IWUE were higher, and thus, the crop had a better drought-resistant ability, higher P(n), and higher grain yield.

  4. Diagnosis of solid waste of oil and natural gas exploration and production activities in Brazil offshore sedimentary basins; Diagnostico dos residuos solidos das atividades de exploracao e producao de petroleo e gas natural em bacias sedimentares maritimas no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Pedro Henrique Wisniewski; Mendonca; Gilberto Moraes de

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the generation and disposal of solid waste from the exploration and production activities of oil and natural gas in Brazilian waters. We used data from the implementation reports of pollution control project of the activities licensed by IBAMA. During 2009 the activities related to exploration and production of offshore oil and gas produced a total of 44,437 tons of solid waste, with the main waste generated corresponding to: oily waste (16,002 t); Metal uncontaminated (11,085 t); contaminated waste (5630 t), non recycling waste (4935 t); Wood uncontaminated (1,861 t), chemicals (1,146 t). Considering the total waste generated by activities during the period analyzed, it was observed that 54.3% are made up of waste Class I (hazardous waste), 27.9% of Class II wastes (waste non-hazardous non-inert); and 17.8% of waste Class IIB (non-hazardous and inert waste). The results obtained in this work enabled the scenario of waste generation by the E and P offshore activities. As a result, the survey serves as a starting point for monitoring the progress in implementing the projects sought Pollution Control of licensed projects, as well as support the monitoring of reflexes arising from the intensification of activities in certain regions. (author)

  5. FY 1999 report on the results of the R and D of the substituting gas system and the substituting process of the etching gas used in the electronic device production process; 1999 nendo denshi device seizo process de shiyosuru etching gas no daitai gas system oyobi daitai process no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    As to the dry etching process and the wiring process where PFC gas and electric power are required most in the electronic device production process, an investigational study was conducted with the aim of PFC saving and energy saving, and the FY 1999 results were summed up. In the study, high efficiency etching process analysis equipment was developed, and three kinds of PFC gas quantitative analysis method were comparatively studied. Relating to the substitution of global environmental warming gas, it was found that C{sub x}F{sub y} type gas was effective which includes no oxygen, has a lot of carbon element numbers, and has double unsaturated bond. Further, in the study of the technology of PFC decomposition by plasma, it was indicated that PFC of 98.7% at maximum in exhaust gas could be removed on ideal conditions. In the dry etching technology by non-PFC gas of the organic insulating film, it was found out that NH{sub 3} base gas is more excellent in both shape and speed of etching than the existing O{sub 2} base one. As to the future wiring technology, new concepts of the optical wiring inside chip, etc. were proposed. (NEDO)

  6. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  7. Novel sensors to enable closed-loop active clearance control in gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan; Holst, Tom

    2014-06-01

    Active clearance control within the turbine section of gas turbine engines presents and opportunity within aerospace and industrial applications to improve operating efficiencies and the life of downstream components. Open loop clearance control is currently employed during the development of all new large core aerospace engines; however, the ability to measure the gap between the blades and the case and close down the clearance further presents as opportunity to gain even greater efficiencies. The turbine area is one of the harshest environments for long term placement of a sensor in addition to the extreme accuracy requirements required to enable closed loop clearance control. This paper gives an overview of the challenges of clearance measurements within the turbine as well as discusses the latest developments of a microwave sensor designed for this application.

  8. Effect of electronegative additives on physical properties and chemical activity of gas discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, D. L.; Filatov, I. E.; Uvarin, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    Effect of electronegative additives (oxygen O2, sulfur dioxide SO2, carbon disulfide CS2, and carbon tetrachloride CCl4) on physical properties and chemical activity of plasma formed by pulsed corona discharge and by non-self-sustained discharge supported by pulsed electron beam in atmospheric pressure gas mixtures was investigated. It is shown that a decrease in discharge current depends on a sort of the additive and on its concentration. The reason is the difference in rate constants of electron attachment processes for the above molecules. In experiments on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conversion in air by streamer corona it is obtained that an addition of CCl4 both decreases the discharge current amplitude and increases the VOCs conversion degree. An installation for investigation of electron attachment processes and for study of toxic impurities conversion in plasma formed by non-self-sustained discharge initiated by pulsed nanosecond electron beam is created.

  9. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Kimberly A; Miniat, Chelcy F; Vose, James M

    2016-03-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion-tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a 'demand limitation' driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) 'hydraulic limitation' of water movement from the roots to the leaves; and (3) 'non-stomatal' limitations imposed by declining leaf water status within the leaf. Model results suggest that species-specific 'economics' of stomatal behaviour may play an important role in differentiating species along the continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviour; specifically, we show that non-stomatal and demand limitations may reduce stomatal conductance and increase leaf water potential, promoting wide safety margins characteristic of isohydric species. We used model results to develop a diagnostic framework to identify the most likely limiting mechanism to stomatal functioning during drought and showed that many of those features were commonly observed in field observations of tree water use dynamics. Direct comparisons of modelled and measured stomatal conductance further indicated that non-stomatal and demand limitations reproduced observed patterns of tree water use well for an isohydric species but that a hydraulic limitation likely applies in the case of an anisohydric species. Published 2015. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Experimental results and thermodynamic analysis of a natural gas small scale cogeneration plant for power and refrigeration purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzo, Edson; Nacif de Carvalho, Alvaro; Matelli, José Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    In this work, experimental results are reported for a small scale cogeneration plant for power and refrigeration purposes. The plant includes a natural gas microturbine and an ammonia/water absorption chiller fired by steam. The system was tested under different turbine loads, steam pressures and chiller outlet temperatures. An evaluation based on the 1st and 2nd Laws of Thermodynamics was also performed. For the ambient temperature around 24 °C and microturbine at full load, the plant is able to provide 19 kW of saturated steam at 5.3 bar (161 °C), corresponding to 9.2 kW of refrigeration at −5 °C (COP = 0.44). From a 2nd law point-of-view, it was found that there is an optimal chiller outlet temperature that maximizes the chiller exergetic efficiency. As expected, the microturbine presented the highest irreversibilities, followed by the absorption chiller and the HRSG. In order to reduce the plant exergy destruction, it is recommended a new design for the HRSG and a new insulation for the exhaust pipe. -- Highlights: • A small scale cogeneration plant for power and refrigeration is proposed and analyzed. • The plant is based on a microturbine and a modified absorption chiller. • The plant is analysed based on 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. • Experimental results are found for different power and refrigeration conditions. • The plant proved to be technically feasible

  11. Natural gas corridors between the EU and its main suppliers: Simulation results with the dynamic GASTALE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lise, Wietze [Energy Markets and International Environmental Policy Group, ECN Policy Studies, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Amsterdam (Netherlands); IBS Research and Consultancy, Agahamami Cadessi 1/6, Cihangir 34433, Beyoglu, Istanbul (Turkey); Hobbs, Benjamin F. [Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Oostvoorn, Frits [Energy Markets and International Environmental Policy Group, ECN Policy Studies, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    Growth in gas demand poses a challenge for European energy consumers and other gas-importing countries in terms of an increasing dependency on gas imports and consequently also supply security. This paper focuses on interactions among demand, supply, and investments in natural gas corridors, namely pipeline transport, LNG, and storage facilities, affecting the European natural gas market over the period 2005-2030. A number of policy scenarios, including a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, are formulated to study the impact of demand uncertainty and delays in investment on the gas transport infrastructure required in the long run in Europe. The analyses indicate that substantial investments in gas transport corridors are needed to accommodate imports and seasonal demand variations. Analysis of scenarios of supply interruption, in the form of suddenly reduced import capacity for particular pipeline routes, indicates that portions of Europe could experience price increases of up to 100% in the case of a year-long interruption. To accommodate import needs and to mitigate possible disruptions, pipeline connections running from East to West need to be given special priority. (author)

  12. Natural gas corridors between the EU and its main suppliers: Simulation results with the dynamic GASTALE model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lise, Wietze; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Van Oostvoorn, Frits

    2008-01-01

    Growth in gas demand poses a challenge for European energy consumers and other gas-importing countries in terms of an increasing dependency on gas imports and consequently also supply security. This paper focuses on interactions among demand, supply, and investments in natural gas corridors, namely pipeline transport, LNG, and storage facilities, affecting the European natural gas market over the period 2005-2030. A number of policy scenarios, including a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, are formulated to study the impact of demand uncertainty and delays in investment on the gas transport infrastructure required in the long run in Europe. The analyses indicate that substantial investments in gas transport corridors are needed to accommodate imports and seasonal demand variations. Analysis of scenarios of supply interruption, in the form of suddenly reduced import capacity for particular pipeline routes, indicates that portions of Europe could experience price increases of up to 100% in the case of a year-long interruption. To accommodate import needs and to mitigate possible disruptions, pipeline connections running from East to West need to be given special priority. (author)

  13. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated l-Alanine Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2017-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of l-alanine peptides ( l-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala n ) and homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the l-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+( l-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of d-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+( d-Trp). l-Ala peptides recognize d-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+( d-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas l-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of l-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  14. Activity and selectivity regulation of synthesis gas reaction over supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K; Nobusawa, T; Fukushima, T; Tominaga, H

    1985-01-01

    The catalytic activities of supported ruthenium for synthesis-gas conversion to hydrocarbons was found to be in the following order: TiOS > Nb2O3 > ZrO2 > SiO2 > Ta2O5 > Al2O3 > V2O5 > MoO3 > WO3 > MnO2 > ZnO. Turnover frequencies of the supported ruthenium increased with decrease in dispersion of the metal particles for every carrier material. Even the activities per unit weight of metals were higher for low-dispersion ruthenium of Al2O3, TiO2, and ZrO2. The chain-growth probability of a hydrocarbon product, which is characterized by the Schulz-Flory distribution, increased markedly with decrease in the metal dispersion irrespective of the carrier material. The catalytic activity of ruthenium particles with a dispersed ruthenium increased almost linearly with an increase in reaction pressure (up to at least 2.0 MPa). 23 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  15. The influence of surface-active agents in gas mixture on the intensity of jet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezhov, YV; Okhotin, VS

    2017-11-01

    The report presents: the methodology of calculation of contact condensation of steam from the steam-gas mixture into the stream of water, taking into account: the mass flow of steam through the boundary phase, particularly the change in turbulent transport properties near the interface and their connection to the interface perturbations due to the surface tension of the mixture; the method of calculation of the surface tension at the interface water - a mixture of fluorocarbon vapor and water, based on the previously established analytical methods we calculate the surface tension for simple one - component liquid-vapor systems. The obtained analytical relation to calculate the surface tension of the mixture is a function of temperature and volume concentration of the fluorocarbon gas in the mixture and is true for all sizes of gas molecules. On the newly created experimental stand is made verification of experimental studies to determine the surface tension of pure substances: water, steam, C3F8 pair C3F8, produced the first experimental data on surface tension at the water - a mixture of water vapor and fluorocarbon C3F8. The obtained experimental data allow us to refine the values of the two constants used in the calculated model of the surface tension of the mixture. Experimental study of jet condensation was carried out with the flow in the zone of condensation of different gases. The condensation process was monitored by measurement of consumption of water flowing from the nozzle, and the formed condensate. When submitting C3F8, there was a noticeable, intensification condensation process compared with the condensation of pure water vapor. The calculation results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data on surface tension of the mixture and steam condensation from steam-gas mixture. Analysis of calculation results shows that the presence of surfactants in the condensation zone affects the partial vapor pressure on the interfacial surface, and

  16. Evolved Gas Analyses of the Murray Formation in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Thompson, L. M.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 13 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM-evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g., H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HCl) [1- 6]. The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize recent evolved SO2, CO2, O2, and NO gas traces of the Murray formation mudstone, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results relative to understanding the geological history of Gale Crater.

  17. Evolved Gas Analyses of Sedimentary Materials in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument from Yellowknife Bay to the Stimson Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 10 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g, H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HC1). The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize the evolved H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2 gas traces of sediments analyzed by SAM through sol 1178, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results releative to understanding the geochemical history of Gale Crater.

  18. Pt/ZnO nanoarray nanogenerator as self-powered active gas sensor with linear ethanol sensing at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yayu; Lai, Xuan; Deng, Ping; Nie, Yuxin; Zhang, Yan; Xing, Lili; Xue, Xinyu

    2014-03-21

    A self-powered gas sensor that can actively detect ethanol at room temperature has been realized from a Pt/ZnO nanoarray nanogenerator. Pt nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the whole surface of ZnO nanowires. The piezoelectric output of Pt/ZnO nanoarrays can act not only as a power source, but also as a response signal to ethanol at room temperature. Upon exposure to dry air and 1500 ppm ethanol at room temperature, the piezoelectric output of the device under the same compressive strain is 0.672 and 0.419 V, respectively. Moreover, a linear dependence of the sensitivity on the ethanol concentration is observed. Such a linear ethanol sensing at room temperature can be attributed to the atmosphere-dependent variety of the screen effect on the piezoelectric output of ZnO nanowires, the catalytic properties of Pt nanoparticles, and the Schottky barriers at Pt/ZnO interfaces. The present results can stimulate research in the direction of designing new material systems for self-powered room-temperature gas sensing.

  19. Critic to the science and technology activities in the CTPETRO, Brazil, natural gas sector (National Plan of Science end Technology of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Sector); Critica as atividades de C and T na area de gas natural do CTPETRO (Plano Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Setor de Petroleo e Gas Natural)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Edmilson Moutinho dos; Faga, Murilo Tadeu Wenerck [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia. Grupo de Energia]. E-mails: edsantos@iee.usp.br; Poulallion, Paul; Correa Neto, Vicente [SINDE - Sinergia e Desenvolvimento S/C Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    This paper performs an evaluation of the science and technology activities for the natural gas area at the CTPETRO - National Plan of Science and Technology for the Petroleum and Natural Gas Sector. The paper discuss the insufficiency of the present technological efforts in Brazil, aiming the increasing of the natural gas participation in the brazilian energy matrix. The work shows the great distance among those efforts and the national policy for the natural gas. Last, the paper discusses the necessity of a review in the science and technology activities in the gas sector, and makes some considerations on the great potential in the gas industry for employment generation, for new business and the increasing in the national competitiveness.

  20. Cyclotron production of radioactive gas from gaseous targets: inhomogeneity of the target activity - optimum flow rate of the carrier gas - cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.-M.; Fiore, G. del; Quaglia, L.; Depresseux, J.-C.; Bartsch, P.

    1979-01-01

    When short-lived radioactive gases are produced by cyclotron-irradiated gaseous targets, the yield of activity, at the site of delivery, depends on the flow rate in the gas-carrying line. The authors improve a preliminarily published previous single model by the introduction of a supplementary hypothesis which takes into account the inhomogeneity of the activity in the gaseous target. By substituting the NTP volume of the gas in the irradiation cell Vsub(c) by a visible volume Vsub(a) depending on the flow rate and expressed by Vsub(a) = Vsub(infinity) +(V 0 - Vsub(infinity))exp(-kDsub(p)), they derive the following general expression for the optimum flow rate D which gives a maximum yield of production. D 2 -bD-bc-D 2 akexp(-kD)-abexp(-kD) = 0, a=lambda(V 0 -Vsub(infinity)), b = lambdaVsub(r), c = lambdaVsub(infinity), lambda = the decay constant of the radionuclide produced,Vsub(r) the inner volume of the gas-carrying line. The unknown parameters Vsub(r), Vsub(a), V 0 , Vsub(infinity), and k can be determined experimentally. The authors also suggest a new method for the determination of experimental cross sections with their gaseous target. (Auth.)

  1. An Overview of Mode of Action and Analytical Methods for Evaluation of Gas Phase Activities of Flame Retardants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifah A. Salmeia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The latest techniques used to prove, describe and analyze the gas phase activity of a fire retardant used in polymeric materials are briefly reviewed. Classical techniques, such as thermogravimetric analysis or microscale combustion calorimetry, as well as complex and advanced analytical techniques, such as modified microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC, molecular beam mass spectroscopy and vacuum ultra violet (VUV photoionization spectroscopy coupled with time of flight MS (TOF-MS, are described in this review. The recent advances in analytical techniques help not only in determining the gas phase activity of the flame-retardants but also identify possible reactive species responsible for gas phase flame inhibition. The complete understanding of the decomposition pathways and the flame retardant activity of a flame retardant system is essential for the development of new eco-friendly-tailored flame retardant molecules with high flame retardant efficiency.

  2. Preparation of 3-7 MeV neutron source and preliminary results of activation cross section measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, T.; Masuda, T.; Tsurita, Y.; Hashimoto, A.; Miyajima, N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sakane, H.; Shibata, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawade, K.

    1999-03-01

    A d-D gas target producing monoenergetic neutrons has been constructed for measurement of activation cross sections in the energy region of 3 to 7 MeV at Van de Graaff accelerator of Nagoya University. Neutron spectra and neutron fluxes were measured as a function of the incident deuteron energy. Preliminary results of activation cross sections were obtained for reactions {sup 27}Al(n, p){sup 27}Mg, {sup 27}Al(n, {alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 47}Ti(n, p){sup 47}Sc, {sup 56}Fe(n, p){sup 56}Mn, {sup 58}Ni(n, p){sup 58}Co and {sup 64}Zn(n, p){sup 64}Cu. The results are compared with the evaluated values of JENDL-3.2. A well-type HPGe detector was used for highly efficient detection. (author)

  3. Preliminary results of the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as real-time beam monitor in hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aza, E., E-mail: eleni.aza@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); AUTH, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Ciocca, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Murtas, F. [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); LNF-INFN, Via Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Puddu, S. [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); AEC-LHEP, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Pullia, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Silari, M. [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-01-01

    The use of proton and carbon ion beams in cancer therapy (also known as hadron therapy) is progressively growing worldwide due to their improved dose distributions, sparing of healthy tissues and (for carbon ions) increased radiobiological effectiveness especially for radio-resistant tumours. Strict Quality Assurance (QA) protocols need to be followed for guaranteeing the clinical beam specifications. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a gaseous detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology for measuring the beam spot dimensions and the homogeneity of the scanned irradiation field, which are daily QA tasks commonly performed using radiochromic films. Measurements performed at the National Centre for Oncological Hadron Therapy (CNAO) in Pavia (Italy) showed that the detector is able to monitor the 2D beam image on-line with a pad granularity of 2 mm and a response proportional to the number of delivered particles. The dose homogeneity was measured with low deviation from the results obtained with radiochromic films.

  4. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  5. Phase transitions and steady-state microstructures in a two-temperature lattice-gas model with mobile active impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Sabra, Mads Christian; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2000-01-01

    The nonequilibrium, steady-state phase transitions and the structure of the different phases of a two-dimensional system with two thermodynamic temperatures are studied via a simple lattice-gas model with mobile active impurities ("hot/cold spots'') whose activity is controlled by an external drive...... on the temperatures, microstructured phases of both lamellar and droplet symmetry arise, described by a length scale that is determined by the characteristic temperature controlling the diffusive motion of the active impurities....

  6. The Integration Aspects of Activities of the Companies in the Oil and Gas Industry Sector in the Context of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panevnyk Tetiana M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article considers both the dynamics and the structure of oil and gas production in Ukraine, situation of the oil and gas companies at the current stage of globalization of the world economy have been covered. The main problems impacting the functioning of the domestic industry sector have been identified, including the lack of effectiveness of the existing integration processes. The world trends and patterns of integration processes have been considered. It has been determined that the oil and gas industry sector leaders are the multinational companies that actively use integration in their practices. The current trends in creating integration linkages in different parts of the process chain in the oil and gas industry have been identified. Influence by large corporations of the innovative type on the creation of a favorable investment climate has been confirmed, as well as conducting their own policies of expansion in the overseas markets. On the basis of studying the foreign experience, expediency of development of the oil and gas sector enterprises by activating integration processes has been substantiated. Priorities and possibilities for further functioning of enterprises in the the oil and gas industry sector have been identified

  7. Analysis the potential gas production of old municipal solid waste landfill as an alternative energy source: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, A. P.; Emalya, N.; Munawar, E.; Schwarzböck, T.; Lederer, J.; Fellner, J.

    2018-03-01

    The MSW landfill produces gas which is represent the energy resource that lost and polluted the ambient air. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential gas production of old landfill as an alternative energy source. The study was conducted by using 10 years old waste in landfill simulator reactor (LSR). Four Landfills Simulator Reactors (LSR) were constructed for evaluate the gas production of old MSW landfilled. The LSR was made of high density poly ethylene (HDPE) has 50 cm outside diameter and 150 cm of high. The 10 years old waste was excavated from closed landfill and subsequently separated from inorganic fraction and sieved to maximum 50 mm size particle prior emplaced into the LSR. Although quite small compare to the LSR containing fresh waste has been reported, the LRS containing 10 years old waste still produce much landfill gas. The landfill gas produced of LSR operated with and without leachate recirculation were about 29 and 21 litter. The composition of landfill gas produced was dominated by CO2 with the composition of CH4 and O2 were around 12.5% and 0.2 %, respectively.

  8. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  9. Radon occurrence in soil-gas and groundwater around an active landslide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramola, R.C. [Department of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal -249 199 (India)], E-mail: rcramola@gmail.com; Choubey, V.M. [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun 248 001 (India); Negi, M.S.; Prasad, Yogesh; Prasad, Ganesh [Department of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal -249 199 (India)

    2008-01-15

    This paper presents the results of investigation of radon levels in the soil-gas and groundwater of Uttarkashi, India within the distance of 5 km in vertical and horizontal directions from the landslide of Varunawat hill. Radon release from the soil and groundwater was found higher than the normal values. Radon concentration in groundwater over and around the landslide was found to vary from 0.51 to 86kBqm{sup -3}. The soil-gas radon concentration was found to vary from 219 to 3kBqm{sup -3} along the slope of landslide. Radon exhalation rate in collected soil samples was found to vary from 2.28x10{sup -5} to 9.01x10{sup -5}Bqkg{sup -1}h{sup -1}. Radon values were not found correlated with major and trace element contents in the upper soil of the area, which indicate that the migration of radon from deeper part of the earth along with landslide contribute to the surface radon concentration. Recorded values show a close association with local geology and Varunawat eruptions.

  10. Radon occurrence in soil-gas and groundwater around an active landslide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramola, R.C.; Choubey, V.M.; Negi, M.S.; Prasad, Yogesh; Prasad, Ganesh

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigation of radon levels in the soil-gas and groundwater of Uttarkashi, India within the distance of 5 km in vertical and horizontal directions from the landslide of Varunawat hill. Radon release from the soil and groundwater was found higher than the normal values. Radon concentration in groundwater over and around the landslide was found to vary from 0.51 to 86kBqm -3 . The soil-gas radon concentration was found to vary from 219 to 3kBqm -3 along the slope of landslide. Radon exhalation rate in collected soil samples was found to vary from 2.28x10 -5 to 9.01x10 -5 Bqkg -1 h -1 . Radon values were not found correlated with major and trace element contents in the upper soil of the area, which indicate that the migration of radon from deeper part of the earth along with landslide contribute to the surface radon concentration. Recorded values show a close association with local geology and Varunawat eruptions

  11. Power Deals. Mergers and acquisitions activity within the global electricity and gas market. 2008 Annual Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    2008 was the year in which power deal values came down from their record-breaking highs of the two preceding years as the financial crisis and a number of market uncertainties had a negative impact on deal activity. Nonetheless, total deal numbers leapt by 24% as companies concentrated on smaller deals and took advantage of new opportunities that arose in the changed market conditions. Europe was least affected by the downturn in deal values and accounted for over half of all bidder and target power deal value. In contrast, power deals in Australia, which had previously been a main motor of growing M and A activity in the Asia Pacific region, virtually stalled as uncertainty over new carbon emission policies combined with the financial crisis to deter deal flow. In North America, like Europe, big deals were fewer but underlying deal activity was comparable with previous years. This report examines the rationale behind the overall trends and the key individual deals. We also highlight, in a series of deal dialogues throughout the report, some of the critical issues for companies engaging in deal activity within the sector, drawing on our global experience as an adviser to players in major deals throughout the sector in all key electricity and gas utilities markets. Looking to the future, the easing of the financial crisis will be key to deal flow but the near-term outlook looks less robust than the recent past, especially as debt markets will be further constrained by calls from the public financing required to support government bail-out programmes. Set against this, the underlying imperatives of consolidation, supply security and capitalisation remain in place and will create increasing pent-up deal demand. A lower energy price environment will change the metrics for more expensive cleaner power assets, placing an even higher importance on the outcome of global climate talks and the run-up to the December 2009 UN Climate Summit in Copenhagen

  12. Power Deals. Mergers and acquisitions activity within the global electricity and gas market. 2008 Annual Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-01-15

    2008 was the year in which power deal values came down from their record-breaking highs of the two preceding years as the financial crisis and a number of market uncertainties had a negative impact on deal activity. Nonetheless, total deal numbers leapt by 24% as companies concentrated on smaller deals and took advantage of new opportunities that arose in the changed market conditions. Europe was least affected by the downturn in deal values and accounted for over half of all bidder and target power deal value. In contrast, power deals in Australia, which had previously been a main motor of growing M and A activity in the Asia Pacific region, virtually stalled as uncertainty over new carbon emission policies combined with the financial crisis to deter deal flow. In North America, like Europe, big deals were fewer but underlying deal activity was comparable with previous years. This report examines the rationale behind the overall trends and the key individual deals. We also highlight, in a series of deal dialogues throughout the report, some of the critical issues for companies engaging in deal activity within the sector, drawing on our global experience as an adviser to players in major deals throughout the sector in all key electricity and gas utilities markets. Looking to the future, the easing of the financial crisis will be key to deal flow but the near-term outlook looks less robust than the recent past, especially as debt markets will be further constrained by calls from the public financing required to support government bail-out programmes. Set against this, the underlying imperatives of consolidation, supply security and capitalisation remain in place and will create increasing pent-up deal demand. A lower energy price environment will change the metrics for more expensive cleaner power assets, placing an even higher importance on the outcome of global climate talks and the run-up to the December 2009 UN Climate Summit in Copenhagen.

  13. A Comparison of Producer Gas, Biochar, and Activated Carbon from Two Distributed Scale Thermochemical Conversion Systems Used to Process Forest Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Anderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermochemical biomass conversion systems have the potential to produce heat, power, fuels and other products from forest biomass at distributed scales that meet the needs of some forest industry facilities. However, many of these systems have not been deployed in this sector and the products they produce from forest biomass have not been adequately described or characterized with regards to chemical properties, possible uses, and markets. This paper characterizes the producer gas, biochar, and activated carbon of a 700 kg h−1 prototype gasification system and a 225 kg h−1 pyrolysis system used to process coniferous sawmill and forest residues. Producer gas from sawmill residues processed with the gasifier had higher energy content than gas from forest residues, with averages of 12.4 MJ m−3 and 9.8 MJ m−3, respectively. Gases from the pyrolysis system averaged 1.3 MJ m−3 for mill residues and 2.5 MJ m−3 for forest residues. Biochars produced have similar particle size distributions and bulk density, but vary in pH and carbon content. Biochars from both systems were successfully activated using steam activation, with resulting BET surface area in the range of commercial activated carbon. Results are discussed in the context of co-locating these systems with forest industry operations.

  14. Gas exchange and antioxidant activity in seedlings of C opaifera langsdorffii Desf. under different water conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Derek B C J; Scalon, Silvana P Q; Cremon, Thais; Ceccon, Felipe; Dresch, Daiane M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate gas exchange, efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus, and antioxidant activity in Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. The seedlings were cultivated under different conditions of water availability, in order to improve the utilization efficiency of available water resources. The seedlings were cultivated in four different water retention capacities (WRC- 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%), and evaluated at four different time (T- 30, 60, 90, and 120 days). During the experimental period, seedlings presented the highest values for carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco (A/Ci), intrinsic water use efficiency (IWUE = A/gs), chlorophyll index, and stomatal opening, when grown in the substrate with 75% WRC, but the stomatal index (SI) was less the 25% WRC. The efficiency of photosystem II was not significantly altered by the treatments. Comparison between the extreme treatments in terms of water availability, represented by 25% and 100% WRC, represent stress conditions for the species. Water availability causes a high activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase) in the plant.

  15. Gas exchange and antioxidant activity in seedlings of C opaifera langsdorffii Desf. under different water conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEREK B.C.J. ROSA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate gas exchange, efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus, and antioxidant activity in Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. The seedlings were cultivated under different conditions of water availability, in order to improve the utilization efficiency of available water resources. The seedlings were cultivated in four different water retention capacities (WRC- 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%, and evaluated at four different time (T- 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. During the experimental period, seedlings presented the highest values for carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco (A/Ci, intrinsic water use efficiency (IWUE = A/gs, chlorophyll index, and stomatal opening, when grown in the substrate with 75% WRC, but the stomatal index (SI was less the 25% WRC. The efficiency of photosystem II was not significantly altered by the treatments. Comparison between the extreme treatments in terms of water availability, represented by 25% and 100% WRC, represent stress conditions for the species. Water availability causes a high activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase in the plant.

  16. Origin and Distribution of Thiophenes and Furans in Gas Discharges from Active Volcanoes and Geothermal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tassi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C2–C20 species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C4H8O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection.

  17. Origin and distribution of thiophenes and furans in gas discharges from active volcanoes and geothermal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-03-31

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C(2)-C(20) species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C(4)H(8)O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection.

  18. Low accessibility and chemical activity of PAHs restrict bioremediation and risk of exposure in a manufactured gas plant soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichenberg, Fredrik; Karlson, Ulrich Gosewinkel; Gustafsson, Orjan; Long, Sara M.; Pritchard, Parmely H.; Mayer, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Composting of manufactured gas plant soil by a commercial enterprise had removed most of its polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but concentrations remained above regulatory threshold levels. Several amendments and treatments were first tested to restart the PAH degradation, albeit with little success. The working hypothesis was then that PAHs were 'stuck' due to strong sorption to black carbon. Accessibility was measured with cyclodextrin extractions and on average only 4% of the PAHs were accessible. Chemical activity of the PAHs was measured by equilibrium sampling, which confirmed a low exposure level. These results are consistent with strong sorption to black carbon (BC), which constituted 59% of the total organic carbon. Composting failed to remove the PAHs, but it succeeded to minimize PAH accessibility and chemical activity. This adds to accumulating evidence that current regulatory thresholds based on bulk concentrations are questionable and alternative approaches probing actual risk should be considered. - Bioremediation of MGP soil failed to eliminate PAHs but it succeeded to limit their accessibility, chemical activity and the remaining risk of biological exposure.

  19. Nanosensors: towards morphological control of gas sensing activity. SnO2, In2O3, ZnO and WO3 case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurlo, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropy is a basic property of single crystals. Dissimilar facets/surfaces have different geometric and electronic structure that results in dissimilar functional properties. Several case studies unambiguously demonstrated that the gas sensing activity of metal oxides is determined by the nature of surfaces exposed to ambient gas. Accordingly, a control over crystal morphology, i.e. over the angular relationships, size and shape of faces in a crystal, is required for the development of better sensors with increased selectivity and sensitivity in the chemical determination of gases. The first step toward this nanomorphological control of the gas sensing properties is the design and synthesis of well-defined nanocrystals which are uniform in size, shape and surface structure. These materials possess the planes of the symmetrical set {hkl} and must therefore behave identically in chemical reactions and adsorption processes. Because of these characteristics, the form-controlled nanocrystals are ideal candidates for fundamental studies of mechanisms of gas sensing which should involve (i) gas sensing measurements on specific surfaces, (ii) their atomistic/quantum chemical modelling and (ii) spectroscopic information obtained on same surfaces under operation conditions of sensors.

  20. Use of catalytic reforming to aid natural gas HCCI combustion in engines: experimental and modelling results of open-loop fuel reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peucheret, S.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Lehrle, R.S. [Future Power Systems Group, Mechanical Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Golunski, S. [Johnson Matthey, Technology Centre, Blount' s Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); Xu, H. [Jaguar Land Rover Research, Jaguar Land Rover W/2/021, Abbey Road, Coventry CV3 4LF (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    The potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process to deliver drastically reduced emissions of NO{sub x} and improved fuel economy from internal combustion engines is well known. The process is, however, difficult to initiate and control, especially when methane or natural gas are used as fuel. To aid the HCCI combustion of natural gas, hydrogen addition has been successfully used in this study. This hydrogen can be obtained from on-line reforming of natural gas. Methane reforming is achieved here by reaction with engine exhaust gas and air in a small scale monolith catalytic reactor. The benchmark quantity of H{sub 2} required to enhance the feasibility and engine load range of HCCI combustion is 10%. For low temperature engine exhaust gas, typical for HCCI engine operating conditions, experiments show that additional air is needed to produce this quantity. Experimental results from an open-loop fuel exhaust gas reforming system are compared with two different models of basic thermodynamic equilibria calculations. At the low reactor inlet temperatures needed for the HCCI application (approx. 400 deg C) the simplified three-reaction thermodynamic equilibrium model is in broad agreement with experimental results, while for medium (550-650 deg C) inlet temperature reforming with extra air added, the high hydrogen yields predicted from the multi-component equilibrium model are difficult to achieve in a practical reformer. (author)