WorldWideScience

Sample records for gap size effects

  1. Size effects in band gap bowing in nitride semiconducting alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2011-01-01

    Chemical and size contributions to the band gap bowing of nitride semiconducting alloys (InxGa1-xN, InxAl1-xN, and AlxGa1-xN) are analyzed. It is shown that the band gap deformation potentials of the binary constituents determine the gap bowing in the ternary alloys. The particularly large gap bo...... bowing in In-containing nitride alloys can be explained by specific properties of InN, which do not follow trends observed in several other binaries....

  2. [Effects of gap size on seedling natural regeneration in artificial Pinus tabulaeformis plantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen-Juan; Yuan, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Wen-Hui

    2012-11-01

    To clarify the effects of gap size created by thinning on the seedling natural regeneration in artificial Pinus tabulaeformis plantation, a plot investigation was conducted to study the ecological factors and the age structure, height, diameter, length of needles, and dry biomass of roots, stems, and needles of 1-10 year-old seedlings in different habitats, and a path analysis was made on the environmental factors affecting the seedling regeneration. Obvious differences were observed in the ecological factors in different size gaps and slope aspects. There lacked of above 3 year-old seedlings in understory and of above 7 year-old seedlings in small gap, and the seedlings of 5 and 6 year-old were lesser in big gap. The 1-10 year-old seedlings could be divided into 3 development phases, i. e. , 1-3 year-old, 4-7 year-old, and 8-10 year-old seedlings, among which, 1-3 year-old seedlings were critical for the establishment and growth of the population. The growth situation of the seedlings in different habitats was in order of big gap in shady slope > big gap in sunny slope > small gap in sunny slope > small gap in shady slope > understory in sunny slope > understory in shady slope. Path analysis showed light intensity had decisive positive effects on the seedling number of different development phases, shrub coverage had decisive negative effects on the seedling number of 4-7 year-old and 8-10 year-old phases, whereas humus dry mass had negative effects on the seedling number of 4-7 year-old but positive effects on the seedling number of 8-10 year-old. It was suggested that in the management of artificial P. tabulaeformis plantation, relatively high intensity thinning combined with shrub clearing should be adopted to provide favorable conditions for the sustainable development of P. tabulaeformis population.

  3. [Effects of forest gap size and within-gap position on the microclimate in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing; Duan, Wen-Biao; Chen, Li-Xin

    2012-07-01

    HOBO automatic weather stations were installed in the central parts and at the south, north, east, and west edges of large, medium, and small gaps in a Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest in Xiaoxing' anling Mountains to measure the air temperature, relative humidity, and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in these locations and the total radiation and precipitation in the gap centres from June to September 2010, taking the closed forest stand and open field as the controls. The differences in the microclimate between various size forest gaps and between the gap centers and their edges as well as the variations of the microclimatic factors over time were analyzed, and the effects of sunny and overcast days on the diurnal variations of the microclimatic factors within forest gaps were compared, aimed to offer basic data and practice reference for gap regeneration and sustainable management of Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest. The PPFD was decreased in the order of large gap, medium gap, and small gap. For the same gaps, the PPFD in gap centre was greater than that in gap edge. The mean monthly air temperature and total radiation in gap centres were declined in the sequence of July, June, August, and September, and the amplitudes of the two climatic factors were decreased in the order of open field, large gap, medium gap, small gap, and closed forest stand. The mean monthly relative humidity in gap centres dropped in the order of August, July, September, and June, and the amplitude of this climatic factor was decreased in the sequence of closed forest stand, small gap, medium gap, large gap, and open field. The total and monthly precipitations for the three different size gaps and open field during measurement period generally decreased in the order of open field, large gap, medium gap, small gap, and closed forest stand. In sunny days, the variations of PPFD, air temperature, and relative humidity were greater in large gap

  4. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  5. The effects of gap size on some microclimate variables during late summer and autumn in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Blackburn, George Alan

    2010-03-01

    The creation of gaps can strongly influence forest regeneration and habitat diversity within forest ecosystems. However, the precise characteristics of such effects depend, to a large extent, upon the way in which gaps modify microclimate and soil water content. Hence, the aim of this study was to understand the effects of gap creation and variations in gap size on forest microclimate and soil water content. The study site, in North West England, was a mixed temperate broadleaved deciduous forest dominated by mature sessile oak (Quercus petraea), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) with some representatives of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus). Solar radiation (I), air temperature (T(A)), soil temperature (T(S)), relative humidity (h), wind speed (v) and soil water content (Psi) were measured at four natural treefall gaps created after a severe storm in 2006 and adjacent sub-canopy sites. I, T(A), T(S), and Psi increased significantly with gap size; h was consistently lower in gaps than the sub-canopy but did not vary with gap size, while the variability of v could not be explained by the presence or size of gaps. There were systematic diurnal patterns in all microclimate variables in response to gaps, but no such patterns existed for Psi. These results further our understanding of the abiotic and consequent biotic responses to gaps in broadleaved deciduous forests created by natural treefalls, and provide a useful basis for evaluating the implications of forest management practices.

  6. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  7. Gap-based silviculture in a sierran mixed-conifer forest: effects of gap size on early survival and 7-year seedling growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. York; John J. Battles; Robert C. Heald

    2007-01-01

    Experimental canopy gaps ranging in size from 0.1 to 1.0 ha (0.25 to 2.5 acres) were created in a mature mixed conifer forest at Blodgett Forest Research Station, California. Following gap creation, six species were planted in a wagon-wheel design and assessed for survival after two growing seasons. Study trees were measured after seven years to describe the effect of...

  8. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  9. School Size, Achievement, and Achievement Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. McMillen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the relationship between school size and achievement, a study was conducted using longitudinal achievement data from North Carolina for three separate cohorts of public school students (one elementary, one middle and one high school. Results revealed several interactions between size and student characteristics, all of which indicated that the achievement gaps typically existing between certain subgroups (i.e., more versus less-advantaged, lower versus higher-achieving were larger in larger schools. Results varied across the grade level cohorts and across subjects, but in general effects were more common in mathematics than in reading, and were more pronounced at the high school level. Study results are discussed in the context of educational equity and cost-effectiveness.

  10. Effects of mesh size and escape gaps on discarding in an Australian giant mud crab (Scylla serrata trap fishery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt K Broadhurst

    Full Text Available In response to concerns over excessive discarding from Australian recreational round traps (with four funnel entrances used to target giant mud crabs, Scylla serrata, an experiment was done to assess the independent and cumulative utility of paired, bottom-located horizontal escape gaps (46×120 mm and increasing mesh size (from 51 to 101 mm. Compared to conventional traps comprising 51-mm mesh throughout, those with the same mesh size and escape gaps caught significantly fewer (by 95% undersize (<85 mm carapace length--CL crabs while maintaining legal catches. Traps made from 101-mm mesh (but with the same funnel entrances as conventional designs and with and without escape gaps similarly retained fewer undersize crabs and also yellowfin bream Acanthopagrus australis (the key bycatch species by up to 94%, but there were concomitant reductions in fishing power for legal sizes of S. serrata. Although there were no immediate mortalities among any discarded crabs, there was a greater bias towards wounding among post molts than late inter-molts and less damage to individuals in the 101-mm conventional than 51-mm conventional traps (without escape gaps. The results support retrospectively fitting escape gaps in conventional S. serrata traps as a means for reducing discarding, but additional work is required to determine appropriate mesh sizes/configurations that maximize species and size selectivity.

  11. [Effects of forest gap size and uprooted microsite on the microclimate in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wen-biao; Du, Shan; Chen, Li-xin; Wang, Li-xia; Wei, Quan-shuai; Zhao, Jian-hui

    2013-08-01

    Three representative forest gaps with pit-mound microsites formed by uprooted trees were selected within the 2.55 hm2 plot in a Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest in Xiao Xing'an Mountains of Northeast China. The cleared land and closed stand were set up as the controls, and the PAR, air temperature and relative humidity in the centers of different size gaps and in mound top as well as the total radiation and precipitation in the gap centers were measured between July and September, 2011 by using multichannel automatic meteorological stations. The differences of the microclimate between the gap centers and mound top in different months were compared, and the monthly and diurnal variations of the microclimatic factors in the gap centers and in the mound top under typical weather conditions were analyzed. The results showed that the mean monthly PAR and air temperature in the three gaps of different sizes were in the order of large gap > medium gap > small gap, and the mean monthly relative humidity was in the order of small gap > medium gap > large gap. For the same size gap, the mean monthly PAR and air temperature were higher in the mound top than in the gap center, whereas the mean monthly relative humidity was higher in the gap center than in the mound top. Both the mean monthly total radiation and the mean monthly air temperature in the forest gaps and in the controls were in the order of July > August > September and of cleared land > large gap > medium gap > small gap > closed stand, while the mean monthly relative humidity was in the order of closed stand > small gap > medium gap > large gap > cleared land. The differences in the mean monthly relative humidity between closed stand and various gaps and between closed stand and cleared land reached significant level. The monthly precipitation from July to September decreased in the order of cleared land > large gap > medium gap > small gap > closed stand. Whether in sunny days or in overcast

  12. Experimental study on the effects of channel gap size on mixed convection heat transfer characteristics in vertical rectangular channels heated from both sides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.; Kaminaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of channel gap size on mixed forced and free convective heat transfer characteristics were experimentally investigated for water flowing near atmospheric pressure in a 750 mm long and 50 mm wide channel heated from both sides. The channel gap sizes investigated were 2.5, 6, 18 and 50 mm. Experiments were carried out for both aiding and opposing forced convective flows with a Reynolds number Re x of 4x10 to 6x10 6 and a Grashof number Gr x of 2x10 4 to 6x10 11 , where the distance x from the inlet of the channel is adopted as the characteristic length in Re x and Gr x . As for the results, the following were revealed for the parameters ranges investigated in this study. (1) When the dimensionless parameter, Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is less than 10 -4 , the flow shows the nature of forced convective heat transfer for a channel with any channel gap size in both aiding and opposing flows. (2) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is larger than 10 -2 , the flow shows the nature of free convective heat transfer for a channel with any channel gap size in both aiding and opposing flows. (3) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is between 10 -4 and 10 -2 for the channel with a channel gap size equal to or larger than 6 mm, the heat transfer coefficients in both aiding and opposing flows become, on the average, higher than those predicted by the previous correlations for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the pure free convection, and can be expressed in simple forms with a combination of Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 and the previous correlation for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the free convection along a flat plate. (4) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is between 10 -4 and 10 -2 for the channel with a channel gap size of 2.5 mm, the heat transfer coefficients in both aiding and opposing flows also become, on the average, higher than those predicted by the previous correlations for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the pure free convection. (orig./GL)

  13. Influence of size effect and electron correlation to the energy band gap of CuFeO2 and AgFeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Khuong; Bai, Kewu; Blaha, Peter; Wu, Ping

    2007-03-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure of delafossite type oxides CuFeO2 and AgFeO2 using the Full Potential Linearlized Augmented Plane Wave (FP-LAPW) method within Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof Generalized-Gradient Approximation (PBE-GGA). A metallic state instead of true insulating state is obtained for CuFeO2 and AgFeO2. The insulating state is reproduced when electron correlations have been taken into account. An effective Hubbard parameter for Fe, Ueff=7.86eV, has been derived based on an ab initio constraint calculation. This value is an over estimation for the optical band gaps of CuFeO2 and most probably for AgFeO2 as well. One reasonable Ueff has been derived by comparing between computational and experimental X-Ray emission spectra. The energy band gap of CuFeO2 and AgFeO2 within the PBE-GGA+U is found as charge transfer gap. Theoretical optical band gaps δ0=1.30eV, δ1=2.06eV, and δ2=3.20eV for CuFeO2 are quite compatible with experimental data. For AgFeO2 an optical band gap δ0=1.90eV has been predicted. The size effect is considered as the origin of the increase in optical and energy band gaps of AgFeO2 in comparison with CuFeO2.

  14. Experimental method to reveal the effect of rotor magnet size and air gap on artificial heart driving motor torque and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, K X; Yuan, H Y; Ru, W M; Zeng, P

    2002-01-01

    To investigate experimentally the effect of rotor magnet design on artificial heart driving motor performance, seven rotors with different magnet lengths or thicknesses, as well as different peripheral angles, were manufactured and tested in the same motor stator with different rotating speeds. The input power (voltage and current) and output torque were measured and the motor efficiency was computed. The results demonstrated that the reduction of rotor magnet size and the enlargement of the air gap between the rotor magnets and the stator coil core have no significant effect on motor efficiency, but will reduce the torque value on which the motor achieves the highest efficiency; it could be remedied however by increasing the rotating speed, because the torque at the high efficiency point will increase along with the rotating speed. These results may provide a basis for developing small rotor magnets, large air gap and high efficiency motors for driving an artificial heart pump.

  15. Spatial distribution and size of small canopy gaps created by Japanese black bears: estimating gap size using dropped branch measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Kaori

    2013-06-10

    Japanese black bears, a large-bodied omnivore, frequently create small gaps in the tree crown during fruit foraging. However, there are no previous reports of black bear-created canopy gaps. To characterize physical canopy disturbance by black bears, we examined a number of parameters, including the species of trees in which canopy gaps were created, gap size, the horizontal and vertical distribution of gaps, and the size of branches broken to create gaps. The size of black bear-created canopy gaps was estimated using data from branches that had been broken and dropped on the ground. The disturbance regime was characterized by a highly biased distribution of small canopy gaps on ridges, a large total overall gap area, a wide range in gap height relative to canopy height, and diversity in gap size. Surprisingly, the annual rate of bear-created canopy gap formation reached 141.3 m2 ha-1 yr-1 on ridges, which were hot spots in terms of black bear activity. This rate was approximately 6.6 times that of tree-fall gap formation on ridges at this study site. Furthermore, this rate was approximately two to three times that of common tree-fall gap formation in Japanese forests, as reported in other studies. Our findings suggest that the ecological interaction between black bears and fruit-bearing trees may create a unique light regime, distinct from that created by tree falls, which increases the availability of light resources to plants below the canopy.

  16. Brazilian Soybean Yields and Yield Gaps Vary with Farm Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, G. R.; Cohn, A.; Griffin, T. S.; Bragança, A.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the farm size-specific characteristics of crop yields and yield gaps may help to improve yields by enabling better targeting of technical assistance and agricultural development programs. Linking remote sensing-based yield estimates with property boundaries provides a novel view of the relationship between farm size and yield structure (yield magnitude, gaps, and stability over time). A growing literature documents variations in yield gaps, but largely ignores the role of farm size as a factor shaping yield structure. Research on the inverse farm size-productivity relationship (IR) theory - that small farms are more productive than large ones all else equal - has documented that yield magnitude may vary by farm size, but has not considered other yield structure characteristics. We examined farm size - yield structure relationships for soybeans in Brazil for years 2001-2015. Using out-of-sample soybean yield predictions from a statistical model, we documented 1) gaps between the 95th percentile of attained yields and mean yields within counties and individual fields, and 2) yield stability defined as the standard deviation of time-detrended yields at given locations. We found a direct relationship between soy yields and farm size at the national level, while the strength and the sign of the relationship varied by region. Soybean yield gaps were found to be inversely related to farm size metrics, even when yields were only compared to farms of similar size. The relationship between farm size and yield stability was nonlinear, with mid-sized farms having the most stable yields. The work suggests that farm size is an important factor in understanding yield structure and that opportunities for improving soy yields in Brazil are greatest among smaller farms.

  17. Gap-size distribution functions of a random sequential adsorption model of segments on a line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, N. A. M.; Cadilhe, A.

    2006-05-01

    We performed extensive simulations accompanied by a detailed study of a two-segment size random sequential model on the line. We followed the kinetics towards the jamming state, but we paid particular attention to the characterization of the jamming state structure. In particular, we studied the effect of the size ratio on the mean-gap size, the gap-size dispersion, gap-size skewness, and gap-size kurtosis at the jamming state. We also analyzed the above quantities for the four possible segment-to-segment gap types. We ranged the values of the size ratio from one to twenty. In the limit of a size ratio of one, one recovers the classical car-parking problem. We observed that at low size ratios the jamming state is constituted by short streaks of small and large segments, while at high values of the size ratio the jamming state structure is formed by long streaks of small segments separated by a single large segment. This view of the jamming state structure as a function of the size ratio is supported by the various measured quantities. The present work can help provide insight, for example, on how to minimize the interparticle distance or minimize fluctuations around the mean particle-to-particle distance.

  18. Diversifying the composition and structure of managed late-successional forests with harvest gaps: What is the optimal gap size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christel C. Kern; Anthony W. D’Amato; Terry F. Strong

    2013-01-01

    Managing forests for resilience is crucial in the face of uncertain future environmental conditions. Because harvest gap size alters the species diversity and vertical and horizontal structural heterogeneity, there may be an optimum range of gap sizes for conferring resilience to environmental uncertainty. We examined the impacts of different harvest gap sizes on...

  19. Fuel temperature prediction using a variable bypass gap size in the prismatic VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Nam, E-mail: snlee@kaeri.re.kr; Tak, Nam-il; Kim, Min Hwan

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The bypass flow of the prismatic very high temperature reactor is analyzed. • The bypass gap sizes are calculated considering the effect of the neutron fluences and thermal expansion. • The fuel hot spot temperature and temperature profiles are calculated using the variable gap size. • The BOC, MOC and EOC condition at the cycle 07 and 14 are applied. - Abstract: The temperature gradient and hot spot temperatures were calculated in the prismatic very high temperature reactor as a function of the variable bypass gap size. Many previous studies have predicted the temperature of the reactor core based on a fixed bypass gap size. The graphite matrix of the assemblies in the reactor core undergoes a dimensional change during the operation due to thermal expansion and neutron fluence. The expansion and shrinkage of the bypass gaps change the coolant flow fractions into the coolant channels, the control rod holes, and the bypass gaps. Therefore, the temperature of the assemblies may differ compared to those for the fixed bypass gap case. The temperature gradient and the hot spot temperatures are important for the design of reactor structures to ensure their safety and efficiency. In the present study, the temperature variation of the PMR200 is studied at the beginning (BOC), middle (MOC), and end (EOC) of cycles 07 and 14. CORONA code which has been developed in KAERI is applied to solve the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core of the PMR200. CORONA solves a fluid region using a one-dimensional formulation and a solid region using a three-dimensional formulation to enhance the computational speed and still obtain a reasonable accuracy. The maximum temperatures in the fuel assemblies using the variable bypass gaps did not differ much from the corresponding temperatures using the fixed bypass gaps. However, the maximum temperatures in the reflector assemblies using the variable bypass gaps differ significantly from the corresponding temperatures

  20. Fuel temperature prediction using a variable bypass gap size in the prismatic VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Nam; Tak, Nam-il; Kim, Min Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The bypass flow of the prismatic very high temperature reactor is analyzed. • The bypass gap sizes are calculated considering the effect of the neutron fluences and thermal expansion. • The fuel hot spot temperature and temperature profiles are calculated using the variable gap size. • The BOC, MOC and EOC condition at the cycle 07 and 14 are applied. - Abstract: The temperature gradient and hot spot temperatures were calculated in the prismatic very high temperature reactor as a function of the variable bypass gap size. Many previous studies have predicted the temperature of the reactor core based on a fixed bypass gap size. The graphite matrix of the assemblies in the reactor core undergoes a dimensional change during the operation due to thermal expansion and neutron fluence. The expansion and shrinkage of the bypass gaps change the coolant flow fractions into the coolant channels, the control rod holes, and the bypass gaps. Therefore, the temperature of the assemblies may differ compared to those for the fixed bypass gap case. The temperature gradient and the hot spot temperatures are important for the design of reactor structures to ensure their safety and efficiency. In the present study, the temperature variation of the PMR200 is studied at the beginning (BOC), middle (MOC), and end (EOC) of cycles 07 and 14. CORONA code which has been developed in KAERI is applied to solve the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core of the PMR200. CORONA solves a fluid region using a one-dimensional formulation and a solid region using a three-dimensional formulation to enhance the computational speed and still obtain a reasonable accuracy. The maximum temperatures in the fuel assemblies using the variable bypass gaps did not differ much from the corresponding temperatures using the fixed bypass gaps. However, the maximum temperatures in the reflector assemblies using the variable bypass gaps differ significantly from the corresponding temperatures

  1. Effect of gap size on seedling establishment, growth and survival at three years in mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell.) forest in Victoria, Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.; Dignan, P.; Saveneh, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Establishment, growth and survival of Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. seedlings was studied at two sites over three years under a range of small gaps (up to 30mx30m) and large gaps (50mx50m up to clearfells) in a gap cutting experiment in mountain ash forest at Tanjil Bren, Victoria, Australia. In both

  2. On Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  3. Effects of SF$_{6}$ on the avalanche mode operation of a real-sized double-gap resistive plate chamber for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn Sung Hwan; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Ito, M; Kim, B I; Kim, J H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Park, S; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S; Kang, T I

    2005-01-01

    We present the design and the test, results for a real-sized prototype resistive plate chamber by using cosmic-ray muons for the forward region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In particular, we investigate the effects of adding SF/sub 6/ to the gas mixture for the avalanche mode operation of a resistive plate chamber. A small fraction of SF/sub 6/ is very effective in suppressing streamer signals in a resistive plate chamber. The shapes of the muon detection efficiency and the muon cluster size remain similar, but are shifted to higher operating voltage by SF/sub 6/. The noise cluster rate and size are not influenced by SF/sub 6/.

  4. Phylogenetic effective sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2016-10-21

    In this paper I address the question-how large is a phylogenetic sample? I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes-the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find that the AICc is robust if one corrects for the number of species or effective number of species. Lastly I discuss how the concept of the phylogenetic effective sample size can be useful for biodiversity quantification, identification of interesting clades and deciding on the importance of phylogenetic correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Beam-Size-Invariant Spectropolarimeters Using Gap-Plasmon Metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Fei; Pors, Anders Lambertus; Chen, Yiting

    2017-01-01

    Metasurfaces enable exceptional control over the light with surface-confined planar components, offering the fascinating possibility of very dense integration and miniaturization in photonics. Here, we design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate chip-size plasmonic spectropolarimeters, cons......-size-invariant functionality. The proposed spectropolarimeters are compact, cost-effective, and robust and promise high-performance real-time polarization and spectral measurements....... the expected polarization selectivity and high angular dispersion (0.0133°/nm for the |x» channel). Moreover, we show that, due to the circular-sector design, polarization analysis can be conducted for optical beams of different diameters without prior calibration, demonstrating thereby the beam...

  6. Optimization of gap sizes for the high performance of annular nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Soon Bum; Cho, Hui Jeong; Kim, Seong Su [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-type nuclear fuels have been used for nuclear reactors for a long time. Many countries are currently developing annular fuels to improve the efficiency of nuclear fuels. The thermoelastic-plastic-creep analyses of solid- and annular-type rods were conducted under the same conditions. The temperature and stress of the solid- and annular-type rods were compared on the basis of gap size. In this study, we examined the advantages and disadvantages of annular-type fuel regarding the temperature and stress of the pellet and cladding. The inner and outer gaps between the pellet and cladding play important roles in the temperature and stress distributions of fuel systems. Therefore, the optimization of gaps in fuel systems was conducted for a low temperature under certain stress conditions. hermoelasticplastic-creep analyses were conducted by using an in-house thermoelastic-plastic-creep finite element analysis program in Visual FORTRAN with the effective stress function algorithm. Nonlinear iterative stress analyses were conducted by nonlinear iterative temperature analyses; that is, a quasi-fully coupled algorithm was applied to this procedure. In this study, the thermoelastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized water reactor annular fuels was conducted to determine the contacting tendency of the inner-outer gaps between the annular fuel pellets and cladding, as well as to optimize the gap sizes by using the commercial package PIAnO for efficient heat transfer at certain stress levels. Most analyses were conducted until the gaps disappeared. However, certain analyses lasted for 1582 days, after which the fuels were replaced.

  7. Gap Size Uncertainty Quantification in Advanced Gas Reactor TRISO Fuel Irradiation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh T.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Lybeck, Nancy J.; Petti, David A.

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-3/4 experiment is the combination of the third and fourth tests conducted within the tristructural isotropic fuel development and qualification research program. The AGR-3/4 test consists of twelve independent capsules containing a fuel stack in the center surrounded by three graphite cylinders and shrouded by a stainless steel shell. This capsule design enables temperature control of both the fuel and the graphite rings by varying the neon/helium gas mixture flowing through the four resulting gaps. Knowledge of fuel and graphite temperatures is crucial for establishing the functional relationship between fission product release and irradiation thermal conditions. These temperatures are predicted for each capsule using the commercial finite-element heat transfer code ABAQUS. Uncertainty quantification reveals that the gap size uncertainties are among the dominant factors contributing to predicted temperature uncertainty due to high input sensitivity and uncertainty. Gap size uncertainty originates from the fact that all gap sizes vary with time due to dimensional changes of the fuel compacts and three graphite rings caused by extended exposure to high temperatures and fast neutron irradiation. Gap sizes are estimated using as-fabricated dimensional measurements at the start of irradiation and post irradiation examination dimensional measurements at the end of irradiation. Uncertainties in these measurements provide a basis for quantifying gap size uncertainty. However, lack of gap size measurements during irradiation and lack of knowledge about the dimension change rates lead to gap size modeling assumptions, which could increase gap size uncertainty. In addition, the dimensional measurements are performed at room temperature, and must be corrected to account for thermal expansion of the materials at high irradiation temperatures. Uncertainty in the thermal expansion coefficients for the graphite materials used in the AGR-3/4 capsules

  8. Universal size dependence of auger constants in direct- and indirect-gap semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robel, Istvan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gresback, Ryan [U OF MINNESOTA; Kortshagen, Uwe [U OF MINNESOTA

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) spatial confinement of electronic wave functions in semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) results in a significant enhancement of multi-electron phenomena including non radiative Auger recombination. In this process, a conduction-band electron recombines with a valence-band hole by transferring the recombination energy to a third carrier. Significant interest in Auger recombination in NCs has been stimulated by recent studies ofNC lasing, and generation-III photovoltaics enabled by carrier multiplication because in both of these prospective applications Auger recombination represents a dominant carrier-loss mechanism. Here, we perform a side-by-side comparison of Auger recombination rates in NCs of several different compositions including Ge, PbSe, InAs, and CdSe. We observe that the only factor, which has a significant effect on the measured recombination rates, is the size of the NCs but not the details of the material's electronic structure. Most surprisingly, comparable rates are measured for nanocrystals of directand indirect-gap semiconductor NCs despite a dramatic four-to-five orders of magnitude difference in respective bulk-semiconductor Auger constants. This unusual observation can be explained by confinement-induced relaxation of momentum conservation, which smears out the difference between direct- and indirect-gap materials.

  9. Period effects, cohort effects, and the narrowing gender wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colin; Pearlman, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    Despite the abundance of sociological research on the gender wage gap, questions remain. In particular, the role of cohorts is under investigated. Using data from the Current Population Survey, we use age-period-cohort analysis to uniquely estimate age, period, and cohort effects on the gender wage gap. The narrowing of the gender wage gap that occurred between 1975 and 2009 is largely due to cohort effects. Since the mid-1990s, the gender wage gap has continued to close absent of period effects. While gains in female wages contributed to declines in the gender wage gap for cohorts born before 1950, for later cohorts the narrowing of the gender wage gap is primarily a result of declines in male wages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Period Effects, Cohort Effects, and the Narrowing Gender Wage Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Colin; Pearlman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Despite the abundance of sociological research on the gender wage gap, questions remain. In particular, the role of cohorts is under investigated. Using data from the Current Population Survey, we use Age-Period-Cohort analysis to uniquely estimate age, period, and cohort effects on the gender wage gap. The narrowing of the gender wage gap that occurred between 1975 and 2009 is largely due to cohort effects. Since the mid-1990s, the gender wage gap has continued to close absent of period effe...

  11. Size and Causes of the Occupational Gender Wage-gap in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Judith M. P. de; Doorne-Huiskes, Anneke van; Schippers, Joop J.

    2003-01-01

    Research from the United States consistently shows that female-dominated occupations generally yield lower wages than male-dominated occupations. Using detailed occupational data, this study analyses the size andcauses of this occupational genderwage-gap in the Dutch labourmarket using

  12. Effect sizes in memory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Peter E; Fritz, Catherine O

    2013-01-01

    Effect sizes are omitted from many research articles and are rarely discussed. To help researchers evaluate effect sizes we collected values for the more commonly reported effect size measures (partial eta squared and d) from papers reporting memory research published in 2010. Cohen's small, medium, and large generic guideline values for d mapped neatly onto the observed distributions, but his values for partial eta squared were considerably lower than those observed in current memory research. We recommend interpreting effect sizes in the context of either domain-specific guideline values agreed for an area of research or the distribution of effect size estimates from published research in the domain. We provide cumulative frequency tables for both partial eta squared and d enabling authors to report and consider not only the absolute size of observed effects but also the percentage of reported effects that are larger or smaller than those observed.

  13. Modulation of Asymmetric Flux in Heterotypic Gap Junctions by Pore Shape, Particle Size and Charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhijit; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction channels play a vital role in intercellular communication by connecting cytoplasm of adjoined cells through arrays of channel-pores formed at the common membrane junction. Their structure and properties vary depending on the connexin isoform(s) involved in forming the full gap junction channel. Lack of information on the molecular structure of gap junction channels has limited the development of computational tools for single channel studies. Currently, we rely on cumbersome experimental techniques that have limited capabilities. We have earlier reported a simplified Brownian dynamics gap junction pore model and demonstrated that variations in pore shape at the single channel level can explain some of the differences in permeability of heterotypic channels observed in in vitro experiments. Based on this computational model, we designed simulations to study the influence of pore shape, particle size and charge in homotypic and heterotypic pores. We simulated dye diffusion under whole cell voltage clamping. Our simulation studies with pore shape variations revealed a pore shape with maximal flux asymmetry in a heterotypic pore. We identified pore shape profiles that match the in silico flux asymmetry results to the in vitro results of homotypic and heterotypic gap junction formed out of Cx43 and Cx45. Our simulation results indicate that the channel's pore-shape established flux asymmetry and that flux asymmetry is primarily regulated by the sizes of the conical and/or cylindrical mouths at each end of the pore. Within the set range of particle size and charge, flux asymmetry was found to be independent of particle size and directly proportional to charge magnitude. While particle charge was vital to creating flux asymmetry, charge magnitude only scaled the observed flux asymmetry. Our studies identified the key factors that help predict asymmetry. Finally, we suggest the role of such flux asymmetry in creating concentration imbalances of messenger

  14. Half Size Reduction of DC Output Filter Inductors With the Saturation-Gap Magnetic Bias Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguilar, Andres Revilla; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Filter inductors are probably one of the heaviest and more voluminous components found in power supplies of most electronic devices. A known technique to reduce the inductor size in dc applications is the use of permanent magnet inductors (PMIs). One of the latest developed biasing topologies......, termed the saturation-gap, uses two standard UU cores simultaneously biased by PMs. This paper presents a size reduction design strategy, implemented on a 10-A, 5-mH output filter inductor pair of a dc–dc converter, using the saturation-gap topology. Two different PMI designs are presented. The standard...... filter and the two versions using PMIs were physically implemented and tested in the power electronics lab. The two different implemented PMIs filters present 50% core volume reduction and 25% and 50% copper volume reduction, respectively. The measurements on the three filters are compared...

  15. Size and Causes of the Occupational Gender Wage-gap in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Ruijter, Judith M. P. de; Doorne-Huiskes, Anneke van; Schippers, Joop J.

    2003-01-01

    Research from the United States consistently shows that female-dominated occupations generally yield lower wages than male-dominated occupations. Using detailed occupational data, this study analyses the size andcauses of this occupational genderwage-gap in the Dutch labourmarket using multi-levelmodelling techniques.The analyses showthat bothmen andwomen earn lowerwages if they are employed in female-dominated occupations. This especially indicates the signi¢cance of gender inWestern labour ...

  16. The gap year for geographers:effects and paradoxes

    OpenAIRE

    Blackburn, Alan; Clark, Gordon; Pilgrim, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines why the growing gap-year phenomenon is important for university geography departments in the context of education and employment. The research examines the scale and types of gap years, and their effects on students. The study uses a multi-actor approach comprising information from national statistical sources, university departments, students who have taken gap years and commercial gap-year providers. The paper draws some lessons for geography departments such as the need...

  17. Size effects in crystal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    Numerical analyses of plasticity size effects have been carried out for different problems using a developed strain gradient crystal plasticiy theory. The theory employs higher order stresses as work conjugates to slip gradients and uses higher order boundary conditions. Problems on localization...... of plastic flow in a single crystal, grain boundary effects in a bicrystal, and grain size effects in a polycrystal are studied. Single crystals containing micro-scale voids have also been analyzed at different loading conditions with focus on the stress and deformation fields around the voids, on void...

  18. Silicon-based photocells of enhanced spectral sensitivity with nano-sized graded band gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhadyrkhanov, M.K.; Isamov, S.B.; Iliev, K.M. et al.

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of monocrystalline silicon with multiply charged nanoclusters are studied that generate 'silicon clusters', i.e., nano-sized graded band gap structures. Multiply charged nanoclusters of manganese atoms strongly influence the photoelectric properties of monocrystalline silicon and expand the range of spectral sensitivity up to 8 μm; the photoelectric sensitivity reaches ∼10 9 . Conditions occur for the emergence of photo-emf in such a material in the infrared region when hν< E g . The obtained experimental data expand the functional capabilities for the application of silicon with multiply charged impurity atoms. (authors)

  19. Effect of hygroscopic expansion of resin filling on interfacial gap and sealing: a confocal microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Leal, Juan I; Castillo-Salmerón, Ramón Del; Molino-Serrano, María A; González-Moreira, Humberto; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A

    2013-10-01

    To measure dimensional changes due to hygroscopic expansion and their effect on interface gaps and sealing in four light-cured restorative materials using an original confocal microscopic methodology. The materials tested were an ormocer (Admira [Voco]), a compomer (Dyract AP [Dentsply]), a hybrid composite (Spectrum [Dentsply]), and a nanohybrid composite (Esthet·X [Dentsply]). Water sorption was evaluated by weighing material disks after immersion. Hygroscopic expansion was measured from volumetric variations of material fillings in cylindrical cavities in dentin slices; the interfacial gap size was obtained from the same cavities using a novel confocal microscopic method. Microleakage was evaluated in cavities prepared in extracted third molars. Measurements followed water immersion for 24 h, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. A factorial ANOVA, the Student Newman Keuls test for post-hoc comparisons, the Student's t-test, and the Pearson test were used for the statistical analysis (p hygroscopic expansion, and sealing. Hygroscopic expansion reduced post-polymerization interfacial gaps and improved cavity sealing. Dyract AP and Admira showed the highest water sorption, hygroscopic expansion, and gap size reduction. 1. The proposed methodology is valid to measure hygroscopic expansion and interfacial gap. 2. Water sorption and hygroscopic expansion are positively correlated, and hygroscopic expansion, gap size, and sealing are also positively correlated. 3. The adhesive influences the interfacial gap size and its variation after hygroscopic expansion. 4. Hygroscopic expansion reduces the interfacial gaps generated by polymerization shrinkage and improves cavity sealing.

  20. Does Class-Size Reduction Close the Achievement Gap? Evidence from TIMSS 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    Policies about reducing class size have been implemented in the US and Europe in the past decades. Only a few studies have discussed the effects of class size at different levels of student achievement, and their findings have been mixed. We employ quantile regression analysis, coupled with instrumental variables, to examine the causal effects of…

  1. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyewale, S [Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma, Lawton, OK (United States); Pokharel [21st Century Oncology, Estero, FL (United States); Singh, H [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Islam, M [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Rana, S [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  2. A Primer on Basic Effect Size Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Patricia B.; Rotou, Ourania

    The increased interest in reporting effect sizes means that it is necessary to consider what should be included in a primer on effect sizes. A review of papers on effect sizes and commonly repeated statistical analyses suggests that it is important to discuss effect sizes relative to bivariate correlation, t-tests, analysis of variance/covariance,…

  3. A Palm Size Micron-gap ThermoPhoto Voltaic (MTPV) Energy Converter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiMatteo, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to demonstrate that enhanced photovoltaic cell output can be achieved as a function of the physical gap between emitter and receiver in a Micron-gap ThermoPhotoVoltaic (MTPV) system...

  4. Biofuel manufacturing from woody biomass: effects of sieve size used in biomass size reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T W; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes.

  5. Grain size dependent optical band gap of CdI2 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    direct band gap in conformity with band structure calcula- tions. However, a smaller indirect band gap can also be determined from part of absorption data near the band edge for the purpose of comparison with earlier analyses of absorption data as well as the band structure calcula- tions. The decreasing band gap with film ...

  6. Effects of annular air gaps surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister in deep geologic storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, W.E.; Davis, B.W.; Cheung, H.

    1980-06-05

    Annular air spaces surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister in deep geologic storage will have significant effects on the long-term performance of the waste form. Addressed specifically in this analysis is the influence of a gap on the thermal response of the waste package. Three dimensional numerical modeling predicts temperature effects for a series of parameter variations, including the influence of gap size, surface emissivities, initial thermal power generation of the canister, and the presence/absence of a sleeve. Particular emphasis is placed on determining the effects these variables have on the canister surface temperature. We have identified critical gap sizes at which the peak transient temperature occurs when gap widths are varied for a range of power levels. It is also shown that high emissivities for the heat exchanging surfaces are desirable, while that of the canister surface has the greatest influence. Gap effects are more pronounced, and therefore more effort should be devoted to optimal design, in situations where the absolute temperature of the near field medium is high. This occurs for higher power level emplacements and in geomedia with low thermal conductivities. Finally, loosely inserting a sleeve in the borehole effectively creates two gaps and drastically raises the canister peak temperature. It is possible to use these results in the design of an optimum package configuration which will maintain the canister at acceptable temperature levels. A discussion is provided which relates these findings to NRC regulatory considerations.

  7. Bridging the energy gap through small and medium sized nuclear reactors in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.

    1987-01-01

    India is the only country in the world which is employing small sized nuclear reactors for its nuclear power programme. It has now embarked on a programme of augmenting the contribution of the nuclear power by way of employing both medium and small sized nuclear reactors in the next 15 years. This paper discusses the Indian experience and its efforts for industrial mobilisation for rapidly constructing 235/500 MWe nuclear reactor units in a period of about 8 to 9 years. The current energy situation in India and this context the near term role of nuclear power for supplementing the existing sources of commercial energy have been evaluated. Nuclear power has reached such a stage of maturity whereby it has now become a commercially viable source of electricity and it could be utilised on large scale to bridge the energy gap. At present six reactor units of 210/235 MWe capacity are in operation and eight more are in different stages of construction. While we are continuing with the construction of 235 MWe units, a programme of being pursued to construct 550 MWe capacity reactor units from midnineties onwards. This has become possible with the strengthening of regional electricity grids and simultaneous efforts undertaken for augmentation of fuel supply, heavy water production and industrial infrastructure. For a developing country like India, implementation of a sizable nuclear power programme has posed certain special challenges as major inputs are required to be made available with indigeneous efforts. This paper discusses such challenges and presents the ways and means adopted to surmount them. Other developing countries with conditions comparable to those in India could benefit from Indian experience in this regard. This paper also proposes India's willingness to cooperate with other countries for exchange of information and assistance in terms of technical knowhow. (author)

  8. Correlation of vestibular aqueduct size with air-bone gap in enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Joon; Kim, Jinna; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) often demonstrate an air-bone gap (ABG) at low frequencies on audiometric testing. The mechanism for this has not been well elucidated. We investigated vestibular aqueduct (VA) size and ABG in patients with EVA, and assessed the relationship between VA diameter and ABG. Retrospective review. We assessed 98 ears from 49 individuals diagnosed with Pendred syndrome. The VA diameters of ears in groups with (n = 60) and without (n = 38) ABG were measured using axial computed tomography images. Three different parameters of VA diameter (fundus, midpoint, and porous width) were correlated with the results of pure tone analysis. We found that patients with ABG have larger diameters of the VA than patients without ABG (fundus width = 1.13 vs. 0.71 mm, respectively; midpoint width = 3.23 vs. 2.77 mm, respectively; porous width = 2.73 vs. 2.29 mm, respectively; P 0.865 mm. Our findings suggest that the axial parameters of the VA yield information about ABG in patients with EVA. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that an EVA introduces a third mobile window into the inner ear, resulting in an ABG at low frequencies. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1633-1638, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Tying it all together: telomeres, sexual size dimorphism and the gender gap in life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stindl, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    The classic explanation that women outlive men solely due to hormonal and lifestyle differences, does not withstand a critical analysis. In developed countries, the average gap in life expectancy between the sexes is 7 years. It has widened over the last decades, despite the trend of women copying the 'unhealthy' lifestyle of men. Estrogen levels in postmenopausal women are virtually identical to estrogen levels in males and can hardly explain the discrepancy. Furthermore, testosterone got its bad reputation from one study on mentally retarded men, which has to be interpreted with caution. However, sexual size dimorphism with men being the larger sex in conjunction with the limited replication potential of human somatic cells might account for higher mortality rates in males, especially at old age. The hypothesis, as presented here, is based on the well-known concept of a cellular mitotic clock, which was discovered by Leonard Hayflick almost half a century ago. The underlying counting mechanism, namely the gradual erosion of chromosome ends (telomeres) due to the end replication problem of linear DNA molecules, was first described by Alexey Olovnikov in 1971 and with minor modifications has become a widely accepted paradigm. In a recent Lancet study, an inverse correlation between mean telomere length and mortality in people has been found. In this and two other studies, it was confirmed that males do have shorter telomeres than females at the same age. This is almost certainly a consequence of men being usually taller than women, although nobody has done an investigation yet. Clearly, a larger body requires more cell doublings, especially due to the ongoing regeneration of tissues over a lifetime. Accordingly, the replicative history of male cells might be longer than that of female cells, resulting in the exhaustion of the regeneration potential and the early onset of age-associated diseases predominantly in large-bodied males. Inherited telomere length

  10. Class-Size Effects in Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassel, Karl Fritjof; Heinesen, Eskil

    2014-01-01

    We analyze class-size effects on academic achievement in secondary school in Denmark exploiting an institutional setting where pupils cannot predict class size prior to enrollment, and where post-enrollment responses aimed at affecting realized class size are unlikely. We identify class-size effects combining a regression discontinuity design with…

  11. Size and frequency of gaps in newly synthesized DNA of xeroderma pigmentosum human cells irradiated with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghini, R.; Cordeiro-Stone, M.; Schumacher, R.I.

    1981-01-01

    Native newly synthesized DNA from human cells (xeroderma pigmentosum type) irradiated with ultraviolet light releases short pieces of DNA (L-DNA) when incubated with the single-strand specific S 1 nuclease. This is not observed in the case of unirradiated cells. Previous experiments had shown that the L-DNA resulted from the action of S 1 nuclease upon gaps, i.e., single-stranded DNA discontinuities in larger pieces of double-stranded DNA. We verified that the duplex L-DNA, that arises from the inter-gap regions upon S 1 nuclease treatment, has a size which approximates the distance between two pyrimidine dimers on the same strand. A method was devised to measure the size of the gaps. These parameters have been considered in the proposition of a model for DNA synthesis on a template containing pyrimidine dimers

  12. Right sizing prevention. Food portion size effects on children's eating and weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Leann L; Savage, Jennifer S; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet

    2015-05-01

    Experimental findings provide consistent evidence that increasing the portion size of palatable, energy dense entrees relative to an age appropriate reference portion increases children's energy intake of the entree and the meal. Most of these studies have been conducted on preschool aged children between 2 and 6 years of age, in childcare or laboratory settings, using repeated measures designs. In these studies, children's intake is compared across a series of meals, where the size of the entrée portion is varied and other aspects of the meal, including the portion size of other items on the menu, are held constant. This paper provides an overview of what we know from this research, what is not known about the effects of portion size on children's intake and weight status, and points to some of the important unanswered questions and gaps in the literature. Lastly, we discuss how individual characteristics may make someone more or less susceptible to large portions of foods and how the palatability of foods may moderate observed associations among portion size, children's intake, and weight status. Future studies that address the gaps identified in this paper are needed to inform policy and to develop effective and efficient interventions to prevent childhood obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Air Gap Entrapped in Firefighter Protective Clothing on Thermal Resistance and Evaporative Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Hualing

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat and water vapor transfer behavior of thermal protective clothing is greatly influenced by the air gap entrapped in multilayer fabric system. In this study, a sweating hot plate method was used to investigate the effect of air gap position and size on thermal resistance and evaporative resistance of firefighter clothing under a range of ambient temperature and humidity. Results indicated that the presence of air gap in multilayer fabric system decreased heat and water vapor transfer abilities under normal wear. Moreover, the air gap position slightly influenced the thermal and evaporative performances of the firefighter clothing. In this study, the multilayer fabric system obtained the highest thermal resistance, when the air space was located at position B. Furthermore, the effect of ambient temperature on heat and water vapor transfer properties of the multilayer fabric system was also investigated in the presence of a specific air gap. It was indicated that ambient temperature did not influence the evaporative resistance of thermal protective clothing. A thermographic image was used to test the surface temperature of multilayer fabric system when an air gap was incorporated. These results suggested that a certain air gap entrapped in thermal protective clothing system could affect wear comfort.

  14. School size effects: review and conceptual analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Hendriks, Maria A.; Luyten, Johannes W.; Luyten, Hans; Hendriks, Maria; Scheerens, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, a review of international review studies on school size effects is presented. Next, ingredients of a more contextualized and tentative causal mediation model of school size effects are discussed. The chapter is completed by a short overview of school size effects as found in

  15. Effect Sizes in Gifted Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Marcia; Peters, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent calls for reporting and interpreting effect sizes have been numerous, with the 5th edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (2001) calling for the inclusion of effect sizes to interpret quantitative findings. Many top journals have required that effect sizes accompany claims of statistical significance.…

  16. Induced spectral gap and pairing correlations from superconducting proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William S.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically consider superconducting proximity effect, using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) theory, in heterostructure sandwich-type geometries involving a normal s -wave superconductor and a nonsuperconducting material with the proximity effect being driven by Cooper pairs tunneling from the superconducting slab to the nonsuperconducting slab. Applications of the superconducting proximity effect may rely on an induced spectral gap or induced pairing correlations without any spectral gap. We clarify that in a nonsuperconducting material the induced spectral gap and pairing correlations are independent physical quantities arising from the proximity effect. This is a crucial issue in proposals to create topological superconductivity through the proximity effect. Heterostructures of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) slabs on conventional s -wave superconductor (SC) substrates provide a platform, with proximity-induced topological superconductivity expected to be observed on the "naked" top surface of a thin TI slab. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on this naked surface. In addition, we compare against the induced spectral gap in heterostructures of SC with a normal metal or a semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman splitting potential (another promising platform for topological superconductivity). We find that for any model for the non-SC metal (including metallic TI) the induced spectral gap on the naked surface decays as L-3 as the thickness (L ) of the non-SC slab is increased in contrast to the slower 1 /L decay of the pairing correlations. Our distinction between proximity-induced spectral gap (with its faster spatial decay) and pairing correlation (with its slower spatial decay) has important implications for the currently active search for topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in various superconducting heterostructures.

  17. Quantum spill-out in few-nanometer metal gaps: Effect on gap plasmons and reflectance from ultrasharp groove arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjølstrup, Enok J. H.; Søndergaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Thomas G.

    2018-03-01

    Plasmons in ultranarrow metal gaps are highly sensitive to the electron density profile at the metal surfaces. Using a quantum mechanical approach and assuming local response, we study the effects of electron spill-out on gap plasmons and reflectance from ultrasharp metal grooves. We demonstrate that the mode index of ultranarrow gap plasmons converges to the bulk refractive index in the limit of vanishing gap and, thereby, rectify the unphysical divergence found in classical models. Surprisingly, spill-out also significantly increases the plasmonic absorption for few-nanometer gaps and lowers the reflectance from arrays of ultrasharp metal grooves. These findings are explained in terms of enhanced gap plasmon absorption taking place inside the gap 1-2 Å from the walls and delocalization near the groove bottom. Reflectance calculations taking spill-out into account are shown to be in much better agreement with measurements compared with classical models.

  18. Quantum spill-out in few-nanometer metal gaps: Effect on gap plasmons and reflectance from ultrasharp groove arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjølstrup, Enok Johannes Haahr; Søndergaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2018-01-01

    Plasmons in ultranarrow metal gaps are highly sensitive to the electron density profile at the metal surfaces. Using a quantum mechanical approach and assuming local response, we study the effects of electron spill-out on gap plasmons and reflectance from ultrasharp metal grooves.We demonstrate...... that the mode index of ultranarrow gap plasmons converges to the bulk refractive index in the limit of vanishing gap and, thereby, rectify the unphysical divergence found in classical models. Surprisingly, spill-out also significantly increases the plasmonic absorption for few-nanometer gaps and lowers...... the reflectance from arrays of ultrasharp metal grooves. These findings are explained in terms of enhanced gap plasmon absorption taking place inside the gap 1–2 °A from the walls and delocalization near the groove bottom. Reflectance calculations taking spill-out into account are shown to be in much better...

  19. Proximity effect gaps in S/N/FI structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huertas-Hernando, D.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    2005-01-01

    We study the proximity effect in hybrid structures consisting of superconductor and ferromagnetic insulator separated by a normal diffusive metal (S/N/FI structures). These stuctures were proposed to realize the absolute spin-valve effect. We pay special attention to the gaps in the density of

  20. Effects of poison panel shrinkage and gaps on fuel storage rack reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, W.A.; Mueller, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Fixed poison panels are used in spent fuel rack designs to increase enrichment limits and reduce cell spacing; therefore, assurances that the maximum rack reactivity will meet the design limit (0.95) throughout the lifetime of the racks depend on the continued effectiveness of the poison with time. Industry data have shown that poison panels will shrink under irradiated conditions. From recent data, however, poison panels have been found to have gaps spanning their width after relatively short operating periods. This paper presents results of studies showing the fuel rack reactivity changes associated with poison panel shrinkage and formation of gaps. The discovery of gaps in the fuel rack poison panels at an operating plant raises concerns regarding the effectiveness of the poison over the lifetime of the fuel racks. Studies performed to evaluate the effect of the poison panel shrinkage on reactivity show that reactivity changes from zero to several percent are possible depending on the initial panel size. Results of recent studies show that some gaps can be accommodated in the fuel rack poison panels at the fuel midplane without causing the fuel rack K eff limit to be exceeded. With worst-case assumptions concerning gap size and the number of panels affected, other actions will likely be required to show that the rack K eff design limit will not be exceeded

  1. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavi...... as the void grows to a size well above the characteristic material length....

  2. Cohort Size Effects and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Franklin D.

    1983-01-01

    Explores whether changes in the size of cohorts entering the labor force affected the propensity within the U.S. labor force to migrate and socioeconomic circumstances of migrants at destination within 1965-76. Suggests that a significant reduction in the volume of migration among members of the baby boom cohort was the primary adjustment…

  3. Size effects in manufacturing of metallic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, F; Biermann, D; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    In manufacturing of metallic components, the size of the part plays an important role for the process behaviour. This is due to so called size effects, which lead to changes in the process behaviour even if the relationship between the main geometrical features is kept constant. The aim of this p......In manufacturing of metallic components, the size of the part plays an important role for the process behaviour. This is due to so called size effects, which lead to changes in the process behaviour even if the relationship between the main geometrical features is kept constant. The aim...... of this paper is to give a systematic review on Such effects and their potential use or remedy. First, the typology of size effects will be explained, followed by a description of size effects on strength and tribology. The last three sections describe size effects on formability, forming processes and cutting...

  4. Effect of Guide Vane Clearance Gap on Francis Turbine Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Koirala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Francis turbine guide vanes have pivoted support with external control mechanism, for conversion of pressure to kinetic energy and to direct them to runner vanes. This movement along the support is dependent on variation of load and flow (operating conditions. Small clearance gaps between facing plates and the upper and lower guide vane tips are available to aid this movement, through which leakage flow occurs. This secondary flow disturbs the main flow stream, resulting performance loss. Additionally, these increased horseshoe vortex, in presence of sand, when crosses through the gaps, both the surfaces are eroded. This causes further serious effect on performance and structural property by increasing gaps. This paper discusses the observation of the severity in hydropower plants and effect of clearance gaps on general performance of the Francis turbine through computational methods. It also relates the primary result with the empirical relation for leakage flow prediction. Additionally, a possible method to computationally estimate thickness depletion has also been presented. With increasing clearance gap, leakage increases, which lowers energy conversion and turbine efficiency along with larger secondary vortex.

  5. Do class size effects differ across grades?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    This paper contributes to the class size literature by analyzing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enroled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class...... size cap that creates exogenous variation in class sizes. Significant (albeit modest) negative effects of class size increases are found for children on primary school levels. The effects on math abilities are statistically different across primary and secondary school. Larger classes do not affect...

  6. Effects of the source gap on transmission efficiency of a quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony Joseph, Mariya J; McIntosh, David; Gibson, Ray; Taylor, Stephen

    2018-02-28

    Recent trends towards miniature and portable quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) entail challenges in instrumental sensitivity, which is influenced by 3D fringe field effects on ion transmission in the Quadrupole Mass Filter (QMF). The relationship of these effects with the gap from the ion source to the QMF entrance (source gap) is significant and little explored. We examine transmission characteristics experimentally and use the results to test the predictive accuracy of a recently-developed 3D QMF simulation model. The model is then applied to directly investigate optimal transmission m/z ranges across multiple source gaps. Experimental: A portable single filter quadrupole mass spectrometer is used to analyse transmission characteristics across a range of common gases. We use an experimental approach originally proposed by Ehlert, enhanced with a novel method for absolute calibration of the transmission curve. Simulation: Custom QMF simulation software employs the boundary element method (BEM) to compute accurate 3D electric fields. This is used to study the effects of the source gap on transmission efficiency. Experimental findings confirm a centrally peaked transmission curve; simulations correctly predict the optimal transmission location (in m/z) and percentage, and extend the experimental trend. We compare several methods for determining fringe field length, demonstrating how the size of the physical source gap influences both the length and the intensity of the fringe field at the QMF entrance. A complex relationship with ion transmission is revealed in which different source gaps promote optimal transmission at differing m/z ranges. The presented results map the relationship between the source gap and transmission efficiency for the given instrument, using a simulation method transferrable to other setups. This is of importance to miniature and portable quadrupole mass spectrometers designed for specific applications, for the first time enabling the source

  7. Grain size dependent optical band gap of CdI2 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermally evaporated stoichiometric CdI2 films show good -axis alignment normal to substrate plane for film thickness up to 200 nm. The optical absorption data indicate an allowed direct interband transition across a gap of 3.6 eV in confirmation with earlier band structure calculations. However, part of the absorption ...

  8. Size Reduction of a DC Link Choke Using Saturation Gap and Biasing with Permanent Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguilar, Andres Revilla; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Zuccherato, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the design procedure of permanent magnet biased DC inductors using the Saturation-gap technique [1]. This biasing configuration can provide a 50% reduction in either the core volume or the number of turns, while meeting its current and inductance requirements. A design...

  9. Grain size dependent optical band gap of CdI2 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The dependence of band gap on film thickness (> 200 nm) can be explained qualitatively in terms of decreasing grain boundary barrier height ... The CdI2 thin films were grown on glass substrates at room temperature by thermal ... reflections were observed for higher film thicknesses than. 160 nm. This indicates a slight ...

  10. Prevention of the Portion Size Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Versluis (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAn increase in the portion size leads to an increase in energy intake, a phenomenon which is also referred to as the portion size effect. The increase in portion sizes in recent years is regarded as an important contributor to the increase in the prevalence of obesity. Hence, the aim

  11. Do Class Size Effects Differ across Grades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the class size literature by analysing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enrolled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class size cap that creates exogenous variation in…

  12. Efeito de diferentes tamanhos de clareiras, sobre o crescimento e a mortalidade de espécies arbóreas, em Moju-PA Effect of diferente gap sizes on the growth and mortality of arboreal species, in Moju-PA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cristóvam da Silva Jardim

    2007-01-01

    crescimento e mortalidade das espécies apresentaram variações em relação aos diferentes tamanhos de clareiras. J. copaia e N. suaveolens apresentaram melhor desempenho, tanto em termos de mortalidade como de crescimento em altura e diâmetro de base nas clareiras médias, todavia essa mortalidade foi elevada em comparação com S. pruriens.Growth and mortality of Sterculia pruriens, Vouacapoua americana, Jacaranda copaia, Protium paraensis, Newtonia suaveolens and Tabebuia serratifolia regarding different gap sizes, had been evaluated in Moju Pará Brazil(2º07'30"S and 2º12'06"S and longitude 48º46'57"W and 48º48'30"W. Nine gaps from forest harvesting had been selected and grouped in small gaps(200m²600m². Around the gaps square plots 5m side had been installed, starting in the gap border to forest inside, according to North, South, East and West directions. In these plots seedlings from natural regeneration of tree species were planted. In the each gap center was installed a square plot of 5m side as testimony, where the plantation was repeated. The total mortality average was 46.9%, not showing significant differences between the small gaps (41,05% and medium-sized gaps (43,86% but these had differed from the large gaps (54,96%. The small gaps environment was most favorable for the establishment of most species, except for J.copaia and N. suaveolens whose mortalities had been lesser in the medium-sized gaps, even so has not had significant differences in mortality between the different gap sizes. Mortality varied from 14,5%(S. pruriens in the small gaps to 70,1%(V. americana in large gaps, but S. pruriens showed lesser mortality in all sizes of gap. All species had shown greater mortality in large gaps, with remark for V. americana (70,1%, J. copaia (69,1% and N. suaveolens (58,7%. The mortality are between those finding in literature and for its variability they allow to conclude that if it cannot classify accurately the species in ecological groups only on

  13. Measuring a ballooning gap size of irradiated fuels by the indirect method of neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Cheul Muu; Lee, Seung Wook; Lim, In Cheol; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Young Jin

    2003-11-01

    An indirect method of a neutron radiography is mobilized for inspecting post irradiated nuclear fuel pins, UO 2 Si clad with Al, which swallowing, crack, ballooning, plug gap, thinning and so on, occurred. The system of an indirect method consists of a cask of carrying fuel pins, Dy converter, linear controller of converter, camera of monitoring fuel cassette. The nuclear sample pins of RISO and KAERI are exposed for 25 min. at the first exposure room, 10 7 cm 2 /sec flux. An activation image formed in the Dy foil is subsequently transferred in a dark room for a more than 8 hours to SR film using the decay radiation. Due to L/D ratio an unsharpness of 9.82∼14μm and a magnification of 1.0003 are given. After digitizing an image of SR film, the ballooning gap of plug is discernible by H/V filter of image processing

  14. Genome size variation in Orchidaceae subfamily Apostasioideae: filling the phylogenetic gap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jersáková, Jana; Trávníček, Pavel; Kubátová, B.; Krejčíková, Jana; Urfus, Tomáš; Liu, Z.-J.; Lamb, A.; Ponert, J.; Schulte, K.; Čurn, V.; Vrána, Jan; Leitch, I. J.; Suda, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 172, č. 1 (2013), s. 95-105 ISSN 0024-4074 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/12/1320 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : DNA base content * flow cytometry * nuclear C-value * phylogeny * orchids Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EF - Botanics (BU-J); EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 2.699, year: 2013

  15. Managing for diversity: harvest gap size drives complex light, vegetation, and deer herbivory impacts on tree seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael B. Walters; Evan J. Farinosi; John L. Willis; Kurt W. Gottschalk

    2016-01-01

    Many managed northern hardwood forests are characterized by low-diversity tree regeneration. Small harvest gaps, competition from shrub–herb vegetation, and browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) contribute to this pattern, but we know little about how these factors interact. With a stand-scale experiment, we examined the effects of...

  16. Mind the Gap: The Effect of Keyboard Key Gap and Pitch on Typing Speed, Accuracy, and Usability, Part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Heather; Pereira, Anna; Korshøj, Mette; Taylor, Laura; Barr, Alan; Rempel, David

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of key gap (distance between edges of keys) on computer keyboards on typing speed, percentage error, preference, and usability. In Parts 1 and 2 of this series, a small key pitch (center-to-center distance between keys) was found to reduce productivity and usability, but the findings were confounded by gap. In this study, key gap was varied while holding key pitch constant. Participants (N = 25) typed on six keyboards, which differed in gap between keys (1, 3, or 5 mm) and pitch (16 or 17 mm; distance between centers of keys), while typing speed, accuracy, usability, and preference were measured. There was no statistical interaction between gap and pitch. Accuracy was better for keyboards with a gap of 5 mm compared to a 1-mm gap (p = .04). Net typing speed (p = .02), accuracy (p = .002), and most usability measures were better for keyboards with a pitch of 17 mm compared to a 16-mm pitch. The study findings support keyboard designs with a gap between keys of 5 mm over 1 mm and a key pitch of 17 mm over 16 mm. These findings may influence keyboard standards and design, especially the design of small keyboards used with portable devices, such as tablets and laptops. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  17. A neutral model with fluctuating population size and its effective size.

    OpenAIRE

    Iizuka, Masaru; Tachida, Hidenori; Matsuda, Hirotsugu

    2002-01-01

    We consider a diffusion model with neutral alleles whose population size is fluctuating randomly. For this model, the effects of fluctuation of population size on the effective size are investigated. The effective size defined by the equilibrium average heterozygosity is larger than the harmonic mean of population size but smaller than the arithmetic mean of population size. To see explicitly the effects of fluctuation of population size on the effective size, we investigate a special case wh...

  18. Strong Plasmon Reflection at Nanometer-Size Gaps in Monolayer Graphene on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Chen, Jiaining; Nesterov, Maxim L.; Nikitin, Alexey Yu.; Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; Alonso-Gonzalez, Pablo; Slipchenko, Tetiana M.; Speck, Florian; Ostler, Markus; Seyller, Thomas; Crassee, Iris; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Martin-Moreno, Luis; Garcia de Abajo, F. Javier; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    Tip-enhanced infrared near-field microscopy is used to study propagating plasmons in epitaxial quasi-free-standing monolayer graphene on silicon carbide. We observe that plasmons are strongly reflected at graphene gaps at the steps between the substrate terraces. For the step height of only 1.5 nm, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than the plasmon wavelength, the reflection signal reaches 20 percent of its value at graphene edges, and it approaches 0.5 for steps of 5 nm. We support this observation with extensive numerical simulations and give physical rationale for this intriguing phenomenon. Our work suggests that plasmon propagation in graphene-based circuits can be controlled using ultracompact nanostructures. J. Chen et al., Nano Lett., DOI: 10.1021/nl403622t (2013).

  19. Size Effects on the Strength of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    The grain size effect and the specimen size effect on the strength of metals are briefly reviewed with respect to their history and current status of research. It is revealed that the fundamental strengthening mechanisms responsible for these two types of size effect are to increase the resistance...... to dislocation motion and to dislocation generation, respectively. It is shown that both strengthening mechanisms take place in some nanostructured metals, which leads to a suggestion to use these two mechanisms for optimizing the strength and ductility of nanostructured metals. This suggestion is verified...

  20. Nanocoatings size effect in nanostructured films

    CERN Document Server

    Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Size effect in structures has been taken into consideration over the last years. In comparison with coatings with micrometer-ranged thickness, nanostructured coatings usually enjoy better and appropriate properties, such as strength and resistance. These coatings enjoy unique magnetic properties and are used with the aim of producing surfaces resistant against erosion, lubricant system, cutting tools, manufacturing hardened sporadic alloys, being resistant against oxidation and corrosion. This book reviews researches on fabrication and classification of nanostructured coatings with focus on size effect in nanometric scale. Size effect on electrochemical, mechanical and physical properties of nanocoatings are presented.

  1. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M. I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    gradient plasticity formulations predict a negligible size effect under shear loading. By contrast, under equi-biaxial loading both plasticity formulations predict a strong size dependence with the flow strength scaling approximately inversely with the void-spacing. Excellent agreement is obtained between...

  2. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M.I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    and strain gradient plasticity formulations predict a negligible size effect under shear loading. By contrast, under equi-biaxial loading both plasticity formulations predict a strong size dependence with the flow strength approximately scaling inversely with the void spacing. Excellent agreement is obtained...

  3. The size effect in metal cutting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The size effect in metal cutting. 877. Figure 3. Variation of shear stress on shear plane when cutting. SAE 1112 steel (after Backer et al. 1952). Horizontal and vertical forces were measured for a number of depths of cut(t)when machining the same-sized surface as in grinding. The shear stress on the shear plane (τ) was ...

  4. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-01-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D y is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10 10 particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 μm horizontally and 0.55 μm vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H D of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit

  5. Measuring wage effects of plant size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Arai, Mahmood; Asplund, Rita

    1998-01-01

    distribution, comparable to the plant-size effects in other countries such as the U.S. with completely different institutions of wage setting. We also investigate the consequence of measurement error associated with the common practice of using midpoints of plant-size classes to estimate the plant size......There are large plant size–wage effects in the Nordic countries after taking into account individual and job characteristics as well as systematical sorting of the workers into various plant-sizes. The plant size–wage elasticities we obtain are, in contrast to other dimensions of the wage......–wage elasticity. Our results indicate that using size–class midpoints yields essentially the same results as using exact measures of plant size...

  6. Isotope effect on band gap and radiative transitions properties of boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Hua-Gen; Zhi, Chunyi; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Zhenxian; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Bando, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We have carried out an isotope study on the band gap and radiative transition spectra of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The direct band gap of BNNTs was determined at 5.38 eV, independent of the nanotube size and isotope substitution, by cathodoluminescences (CL) spectra. At lower energies, several radiative transitions were observed, and an isotope effect was revealed. In particular, we confirmed that the rich CL spectra between 3.0 and 4.2 eV reflect a phonon-electron coupling mechanism, which is characterized by a radiative transition at 4.09 eV. The frequency red shift and peak broadening due to isotopic effect have been observed. Our Fourier transform infrared spectra and density functional theory calculations suggest that those radiative transitions in BNNTs could be generated by a replacement of some nitrogen atoms with oxygen.

  7. Effects of coverage gap reform on adherence to diabetes medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Feng; Patel, Bimal V; Brunetti, Louis

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the impact of Part D coverage gap reform on diabetes medication adherence. Retrospective data analysis based on pharmacy claims data from a national pharmacy benefit manager. We used a difference-in-difference-indifference method to evaluate the impact of coverage gap reform on adherence to diabetes medications. Two cohorts (2010 and 2011) were constructed to represent the last year before Affordable Care Act (ACA) reform and the first year after reform, respectively. Each patient had 2 observations: 1 before and 1 after entering the coverage gap. Patients in each cohort were divided into groups based on type of gap coverage: no coverage, partial coverage (generics only), and full coverage. Following ACA reform, patients with no gap coverage and patients with partial gap coverage experienced substantial drops in copayments in the coverage gap in 2011. Their adherence to diabetes medications in the gap, measured by percentage of days covered, improved correspondingly (2.99 percentage points, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-5.48, P = .019 for patients with no coverage; 6.46 percentage points, 95% CI 3.34-9.58, P gap in 2011. However, their adherence did not increase (-0.13 percentage point, P = .8011). In the first year of ACA coverage gap reform, copayments in the gap decreased substantially for all patients. Patients with no coverage and patients with partial coverage in the gap had better adherence in the gap in 2011.

  8. Measuring wage effects of plant size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Arai, Mahmood; Asplund, Rita

    1998-01-01

    There are large plant size–wage effects in the Nordic countries after taking into account individual and job characteristics as well as systematical sorting of the workers into various plant-sizes. The plant size–wage elasticities we obtain are, in contrast to other dimensions of the wage distrib......–wage elasticity. Our results indicate that using size–class midpoints yields essentially the same results as using exact measures of plant size...

  9. Criticality effects of longitudinal gaps in poison for storage/transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of criticality calculations was performed with the AMPX/KENO system to determine the sensitivity of the NAC S/T cask 31 assembly basket, which is optimized for a design-basis fuel enrichment of 3.7 wt % 235 U, to axial gaps in the boron neutron poison. The results of these calculations show that axial gaps in the boron cause no statistically detectable change in k/sub eff/ until a minimum gap size is reached. The minimum gap size to change k/sub eff/ is dependent on the basket segment length, because a longer segment length results in fewer gaps for a given active fuel length. Longer segment lengths are less sensitive to gaps in the neutron poison. A typical segment length of 12 to 18 in. is projected for a casting of aluminum/boron alloy, indicating that axial gaps in the neutron poison of 1 in. would be acceptable. This gap thickness is much greater than the intersegment gap produced by modern casting techniques. The investigation described here demonstrated that an axial gap in neutron poison is acceptable for basket castings of large storage/transport casks. A precedent for such gaps is the NLI-6502 cask, so a cask basket with intersegment gaps should be licensable

  10. A small size 1-3 atm pulsed CO2 laser with series-connected spark gaps ultraviolet preionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silakhori, K; Jelvani, S; Ghanavati, F; Sajad, B; Talebi, M; Sadr, M R

    2014-01-01

    A small size pulsed CO2 laser with rounded edge flat profiled electrodes and variable gas pressure in 1-3 atm range has been constructed and characterized. The perionization system consists of a pair of 16 series-connected spark gaps located along either side of the main electrodes by which, the number of required preionization capacitors is reduced to 4. Sharpening of the main discharge has been performed using a 300 pF peaking capacitor. A maximum energy of 160 mJ/pulse was obtained for CO2:N2:He≡1:1:8 gas mixture and 33 kV discharge voltage. By increasing the laser gas pressure in 1-3 atm range, the duration of spike and tail parts of the laser pulses have been reduced from 110 ns and 4 μs to 37 ns and 1 μs, respectively.

  11. Detecting past changes of effective population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Natacha; Chevalet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and predicting population abundance is a major challenge confronting scientists. Several genetic models have been developed using microsatellite markers to estimate the present and ancestral effective population sizes. However, to get an overview on the evolution of population requires that past fluctuation of population size be traceable. To address the question, we developed a new model estimating the past changes of effective population size from microsatellite by resolving coalescence theory and using approximate likelihoods in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. The efficiency of the model and its sensitivity to gene flow and to assumptions on the mutational process were checked using simulated data and analysis. The model was found especially useful to provide evidence of transient changes of population size in the past. The times at which some past demographic events cannot be detected because they are too ancient and the risk that gene flow may suggest the false detection of a bottleneck are discussed considering the distribution of coalescence times. The method was applied on real data sets from several Atlantic salmon populations. The method called VarEff (Variation of Effective size) was implemented in the R package VarEff and is made available at https://qgsp.jouy.inra.fr and at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VarEff. PMID:25067949

  12. Detecting past changes of effective population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Natacha; Chevalet, Claude

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and predicting population abundance is a major challenge confronting scientists. Several genetic models have been developed using microsatellite markers to estimate the present and ancestral effective population sizes. However, to get an overview on the evolution of population requires that past fluctuation of population size be traceable. To address the question, we developed a new model estimating the past changes of effective population size from microsatellite by resolving coalescence theory and using approximate likelihoods in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. The efficiency of the model and its sensitivity to gene flow and to assumptions on the mutational process were checked using simulated data and analysis. The model was found especially useful to provide evidence of transient changes of population size in the past. The times at which some past demographic events cannot be detected because they are too ancient and the risk that gene flow may suggest the false detection of a bottleneck are discussed considering the distribution of coalescence times. The method was applied on real data sets from several Atlantic salmon populations. The method called VarEff (Variation of Effective size) was implemented in the R package VarEff and is made available at https://qgsp.jouy.inra.fr and at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VarEff.

  13. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  14. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  15. Size-effects in porous metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    The intrinsic size-effect for porous metals is investigated. The analyses are carried out numerically using a finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity model. Results for plane strain growth of cylindrical voids are presented in terms of response curves and curves...

  16. Size-effects in porous metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    The intrinsic size-effect for porous metals is investigated. The analyses are carried out numerically using a finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity model. Results for plane strain growth of cylindrical voids are presented in terms of response curves and curves...

  17. Effect of Group-Selection Opening Size on Breeding Bird Habitat Use in a Bottomland Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorman, C.E.; D.C. Guynn, Jr.

    2001-12-01

    Research on the effects of creating group-selection openings of various sizes on breeding birds habitat use in a bottomland hardwood forest of the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Creation of 0.5-ha group selection openings in southern bottomland forests should provide breeding habitat for some field-edge species in gaps and habitat for forest-interior species and canopy-dwelling forest-edge species between gaps provided that enough mature forest is made available.

  18. [Microclimate dynamics of pit and mound complex within different sizes of forest gaps in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Quan-Shuai; Wang, Jing-Hua; Duan, Wen-Biao; Chen, Li-Xin; Wang, Ting; Han, Dong-Hui; Gu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    An investigation was conducted in a 2.25 hm2 plot of Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest to study basic characteristics of 7 small gaps, 5 middle gaps, 3 large gaps and 7 closed stands within 38 pit and mound complexes caused by treefall in May 2012. From June to September 2012, the soil temperature, soil water content and relative humidity at five microsites (pit bottom, pit wall, mound top, mound face and undisturbed closed stands) were measured in six sunny days each month. The results showed that among the five microsites in every month, the mound top had the highest soil temperature and the lowest water content and relative humidity, and vice versa for the pit bottom. Mostly, the differences in the above indicators among the five microsites were significant. From June to September, the mean soil temperatures for all microsites at pit and mound complex in the various gaps and closed stands were in the order of large gap>middle gap >small gap>closed stand; but the soil water content ranked differently every month. In June, August and September, the mean relative humidities for all microsites in the various gaps and closed stands were in the order of closed stand>small gap>middle gap>large gap. Mostly, the differences in the above indicators between all microsites in the various gaps and closed stand were significant. The mean monthly soil temperature and relative humidity were highest in July, but lowest in September. The maximal mean monthly soil water content occurred in July and the minimal one in September for each microsite except the undisturbed closed stands, where the maximal mean monthly soil water content occurred in July. The variation of the microclimate at the pit and mound complex was mainly influenced by gap size, microsite, and time.

  19. EFFECTS OF EFFECTS OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Bioremediation has been proven to be the most effective method of cleaning up oil contaminated soils through the application of nutrients and microor the application of nutrients and microorganism. Hence, this ganism. Hence, this ganism. Hence, this research presents the research presents the research presents the ...

  20. Grain size and lattice parameter's influence on band gap of SnS thin nano-crystalline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Yashika [Department of Electronics, S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi-South Campus, New Delhi 110021 (India); Arun, P., E-mail: arunp92@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Electronics, S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Naudi, A.A.; Walz, M.V. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos, 3101 Oro Verde (Argentina); Albanesi, E.A. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos, 3101 Oro Verde (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Litoral (CONICET-UNL), Guemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2016-08-01

    Tin sulphide nano-crystalline thin films were fabricated on glass and Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) substrates by thermal evaporation method. The crystal structure orientation of the films was found to be dependent on the substrate. Residual stress existed in the films due to these orientations. This stress led to variation in lattice parameter. The nano-crystalline grain size was also found to vary with film thickness. A plot of band-gap with grain size or with lattice parameter showed the existence of a family of curves. This implied that band-gap of SnS films in the preview of the present study depends on two parameters, lattice parameter and grain size. The band-gap relation with grain size is well known in the nano regime. Experimental data fitted well with this relation for the given lattice constants. The manuscript uses theoretical structure calculations for different lattice constants and shows that the experimental data follows the trend. Thus, confirming that the band gap has a two variable dependency. - Highlights: • Tin sulphide films are grown on glass and ITO substrates. • Both substrates give differently oriented films. • The band-gap is found to depend on grain size and lattice parameter. • Using data from literature, E{sub g} is shown to be two parameter function. • Theoretical structure calculations are used to verify results.

  1. Effect of ferromagnetic exchange field on band gap and spin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Partha Goswami

    2018-02-19

    Feb 19, 2018 ... On account of the strong spin–orbit coupling, the system acts as a. QSH insulator for M = 0. As the exchange field (M) increases, the band-gap narrowing takes place followed by its recovery. The essential features of these curves, apart from the particle–hole symmetry, are (i) opening of an orbital gap due to ...

  2. Salary Structure Effects and the Gender Pay Gap in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbezat, Debra A.; Hughes, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents estimates of the gender salary gap and discrimination based on the most recent national faculty survey data. New estimates for 1999 indicate that male faculty members still earn 20.7% more than comparable female colleagues. Depending upon which decomposition technique is employed, the portion of this gap attributable to…

  3. Effect of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene nano-flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene have been investigated by means of density functional theory method. It is generally considered that the band gap increases with increasing coverage of hydrogen atom on the graphene. However, the present study shows that the band gap decreases first with increasing hydrogen coverage and reaches the lowest value at finite coverage (γ = 0.3). Next, the band gap increases to that of insulator with coverage from 0.3 to 1.0. This specific feature of the band gap is reasonably explained by broken symmetry model and the decrease of pi-conjugation. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphene are discussed. - Highlights: • Density functional theory calculations were carried out for hydrogen on graphene • Effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene were examined. • The band gap showed a minimum at a finite coverage. • Mechanism of specific band gap feature was discussed

  4. Application of back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) to predict crystallite size and band gap energy of ZnO quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelicano, Christian Mark; Rapadas, Nick; Cagatan, Gerard; Magdaluyo, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Herein, the crystallite size and band gap energy of zinc oxide (ZnO) quantum dots were predicted using artificial neural network (ANN). Three input factors including reagent ratio, growth time, and growth temperature were examined with respect to crystallite size and band gap energy as response factors. The generated results from neural network model were then compared with the experimental results. Experimental crystallite size and band gap energy of ZnO quantum dots were measured from TEM images and absorbance spectra, respectively. The Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm was used as the learning algorithm for the ANN model. The performance of the ANN model was then assessed through mean square error (MSE) and regression values. Based on the results, the ANN modelling results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Size-Effects in Void Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2005-01-01

    The size-effect on ductile void growth in metals is investigated. The analysis is based on unit cell models both of arrays of cylindrical voids under plane strain deformation, as well as arrays of spherical voids using an axisymmetric model. A recent finite strain generalization of two higher order...... strain gradient plasticity models is implemented in a finite element program, which is used to study void growth numerically. The results based on the two models are compared. It is shown how gradient effects suppress void growth on the micron scale when compared to predictions based on conventional...... models. This increased resistance to void growth, due to gradient hardening, is accompanied by an increase in the overall strength for the material. Furthermore, for increasing initial void volume fraction, it is shown that the effect of gradients becomes more important to the overall response but less...

  6. Effectiveness of elastic damping in the pivot joints of cargo boom of crane-manipulating installations at large gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagerev I.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article was the analysis of dynamic processes in the cylindrical hinges with large gaps in the cargo boom crane-manipulating installations of mobile machines in operation. Consider the design of damping device for articulated joints, which creates a braking force of elastic resistance to the displacement of the hinge pin within the large gap. The mechanism of action of the damping devices was considered. Analysis of the effectiveness of damping device for re-ducing the dynamic stress state in the elements of cargo boom metal structures depending on the gap size and the stiff-ness of the damping device was performed. Damping device with an elastic shock absorbing elements substantially reduces the additional impact load at the time of selection of the gap in the joint, slow the growth of clearance in the pivot joint, limit the size of the gap specified value, which must not be exceeded during the entire service life of swivel independently from the intensity of his load.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of size effect on the performance of hydrostatic bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongju Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For size effect on solid-liquid interface of hydrostatic bearing oil film gap flow in two-dimension, fluid dynamic method is applied to investigate the influence of size effect on bearing capacity, dynamic stiffness and other performances. With the consideration of size effect, Reynolds equation is modified by adopting velocity slip boundary condition into Reynolds equation. The sensitivity factors are used to make a quantitative and qualitative analysis. Numerical simulation results show that size effect will affect bearing performances to a certain degree and the effect curve of size effect on bearing performances are given. The four maximum oil film pressures reduce with the increase of slip length. The maximum sensitivity of bearing capacity is 81.94%.

  8. Size effect in the strength of concrete structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Karihaloo's size effect formula are also proposed. Keywords. Fictitious crack model; fracture process zone (FPZ); high strength concrete (HSC); size effect; three point bend (TPB) beam. 1. Introduction. The fracture mechanics size effect, as opposed to the Weibull statistical size effect, is a controversial topic in the fracture of ...

  9. Effects of Radial Gap Ratio between Impeller and Vaned Diffuser on Performance of Centrifugal Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadjavad Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A high-performance centrifugal compressor is needed for numerous industry applications nowadays. The radial gap ratio between the impeller and the diffuser vanes plays an important role in the improvement of the compressor performance. In this paper, the effects of the radial gap ratio on a high-pressure ratio centrifugal compressor are investigated using numerical simulations. The performance and the flow field are compared for six different radial gap ratios and five rotational speeds. The minimal radial gap ratio was 1.04 and the maximal was 1.14. Results showed that reducing the radial gap ratio decreases the choke mass flow rate. For the tip-speed Mach number (impeller inlet with Mu < 1, the pressure recovery and the loss coefficients are not sensitive to the radial gap ratio. However, for Mu ≥ 1, the best radial gap ratio is 1.08 for the pressure recovery and the loss coefficients. Furthermore, the impeller pressure ratio and efficiency are reduced by increasing the radial gap ratio. Finally, the compressor efficiency was compared for different radial gap ratios. For Mu < 1, the radial gap ratio does not have noticeable effects. In comparison, the radial gap ratio of 1.08 has the best performance for Mu ≥ 1.

  10. Biochar effects on soils: overview and knowledge gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, F. G. A.; Jeffery, S.; Bastos, A. C.; van der Velde, M.

    2012-04-01

    One of the cornerstones of the sustainable biochar concept is to improve, or at least to not deteriorate, soil quality and functioning. The idea of global sustainable biochar systems, with biochar applied to global cropland and grassland soils, has highlighted limitations in: i) current scientific understanding of biochar interactions with soil components, ii) the capacity to assess ecosystem services provided by soils, and iii) the uncertainty in spatio-temporal representation of both (i) and (ii). Pyrolysis conditions and feedstock characteristics largely control the physico-chemical properties of the resulting biochar, which in turn determine the suitability for a given application. Soils are highly heterogeneous systems at a range of scales. Combinations of land use, soil management and changing climatic conditions further enhance this heterogeneity. While this leads to difficulties in identifying the underlying mechanisms behind reported effects in the scientific literature, it also provides an opportunity for 'critical matching' of biochar properties that are best suited to a particular site (depending on soil type, hydrology, climate, land use, soil contaminants, etc.). Biochar's relatively long mean residence times in soils (100s of years) make it a potential instrument for sequestering carbon (if done sustainably). However, that same long mean residence time sets biochar apart from conventional soil amendments (such as manures and other organic fertilizers) that are considered as transient in the soil (1-10s of years). The functional life time of biochar in soils essentially moves biochar from a soil management tool to a geo-engineering technique. One of the consequences is that desired ecosystem services that are provided by soils, have to be projected for the same time period. This presentation aims to discuss critical knowledge gaps in biochar-soil-ecosystem interactions against a background of ecosystem services.

  11. Publication Bias in Psychology: A Diagnosis Based on the Correlation between Effect Size and Sample Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühberger, Anton; Fritz, Astrid; Scherndl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background The p value obtained from a significance test provides no information about the magnitude or importance of the underlying phenomenon. Therefore, additional reporting of effect size is often recommended. Effect sizes are theoretically independent from sample size. Yet this may not hold true empirically: non-independence could indicate publication bias. Methods We investigate whether effect size is independent from sample size in psychological research. We randomly sampled 1,000 psychological articles from all areas of psychological research. We extracted p values, effect sizes, and sample sizes of all empirical papers, and calculated the correlation between effect size and sample size, and investigated the distribution of p values. Results We found a negative correlation of r = −.45 [95% CI: −.53; −.35] between effect size and sample size. In addition, we found an inordinately high number of p values just passing the boundary of significance. Additional data showed that neither implicit nor explicit power analysis could account for this pattern of findings. Conclusion The negative correlation between effect size and samples size, and the biased distribution of p values indicate pervasive publication bias in the entire field of psychology. PMID:25192357

  12. The effect of gap fluctuations on interacting and non-interacting polarization for nano-superconducting grains in electron- and hole-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzali, R.; Alizadeh, A.

    2017-12-01

    The behavior of non-interacting and interacting polarization under influence of fluctuations of the superconducting gap with D-wave symmetry and under consideration of the gap dependence on nano- grain size is obtained in terms of the frequency, temperature and the size at zero and finite temperatures for rectangular cuprate nano-superconducting grains. By using Eliashberg equations and applying the relations of the fermionic dispersion for the hole-doped and electron-doped cuprates, we numerically compute the real part of size-dependent polarization for both types of cuprates. We show that the peak of real part of polarization moves to higher frequency by including the additional fluctuating part of gap (or the nano-size effect). Also, we obtain the temperatures for different frequencies, in which the effect of gap fluctuations fades. In the case of size-dependent gap, there is a critical frequency; for frequencies lower (higher) than the critical frequency, the nano-effect weakens (improves) the superconducting state. Moreover, it is concluded that the real part of polarization for hole- doped cuprates in terms of the grain size has more significant amount in comparison with electron-doped ones.

  13. Finite-size effects from giant magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Gleb [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: g.arutyunov@phys.uu.nl; Frolov, Sergey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: frolovs@aei.mpg.de; Zamaklar, Marija [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marzam@aei.mpg.de

    2007-08-27

    In order to analyze finite-size effects for the gauge-fixed string sigma model on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}, we construct one-soliton solutions carrying finite angular momentum J. In the infinite J limit the solutions reduce to the recently constructed one-magnon configuration of Hofman and Maldacena. The solutions do not satisfy the level-matching condition and hence exhibit a dependence on the gauge choice, which however disappears as the size J is taken to infinity. Interestingly, the solutions do not conserve all the global charges of the psu(2,2-vertical bar4) algebra of the sigma model, implying that the symmetry algebra of the gauge-fixed string sigma model is different from psu(2,2-vertical bar4) for finite J, once one gives up the level-matching condition. The magnon dispersion relation exhibits exponential corrections with respect to the infinite J solution. We also find a generalisation of our one-magnon configuration to a solution carrying two charges on the sphere. We comment on the possible implications of our findings for the existence of the Bethe ansatz describing the spectrum of strings carrying finite charges.

  14. Cohort Effects on the Gender Wage Gap in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naur, Michèle; Smith, Nina

    1996-01-01

    In this study the gender wage gap within three birth cohorts is analysed on the basis of a panel sample of Danish workers covering the period 1979-1990. During the latest decades there has been a considerable change in the female participat ion rate, the part time frequency and the educational...

  15. Effect of ferromagnetic exchange field on band gap and spin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polarisation is found to be electric field tunable as well. Finally, there is anticrossing of non-parabolic bands with opposite spins, the gap closing with same spins, etc. around the Dirac points. A direct electric field control of magnetism at the nanoscale is needed here. The magnetic multiferroics, like B i F e O 3 (BFO), are ...

  16. The effect of gap junctional distribution on defibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, James P.

    1998-03-01

    We summarize a mathematical theory for direct activation and defibrillation of cardiac tissue. We show that the direct stimulus and defibrillation thresholds are likely to be strongly affected by the gap junctional distribution and density, suggesting an indirect experimental test of the theory.

  17. Indirect effects of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality and canopy gap formation on epigaeic beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Smith, Annemarie; Hartzler, Diane M; Herms, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    Exotic herbivorous insects have drastically and irreversibly altered forest structure and composition of North American forests. For example, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) from Asia has caused wide-scale mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in eastern United States and Canada. We studied the effects of forest changes resulting from emerald ash borer invasion on epigaeic or ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) along a gradient of ash dieback and gap sizes in southeastern Michigan. Ground beetles were sampled in hydric, mesic, and xeric habitats in which black (Fraxinus nigra Marshall), green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (Fraxinus americana L.) ash were the most common species, respectively. During 2006-2007, we trapped 2,545 adult ground beetles comprising 52 species. There was a negative correlation between percent ash tree mortality in 2006 and catches of all beetles. Catches of Agonum melanarium Dejean (in 2006) and Pterostichus mutus (Say) (in 2006-2007) were negatively correlated with tree mortality and gap size, respectively. However, catches of Pterostichus corvinus Dejean were positively correlated with gap size in 2006. As ash mortality and average gap size increased from 2006 to 2007, catches of all beetles as well as P. mutus and Pterostichus stygicus (Say) increased (1.3-3.9 times), while species diversity decreased, especially in mesic and xeric stands. Cluster analysis revealed that beetle assemblages in hydric and mesic stand diverged (25 and 40%, respectively) in their composition from 2006 to 2007, and that hydric stands had the most unique beetle assemblages. Overall, epigaeic beetle assemblages were altered in ash stands impacted by emerald ash borer; however, these impacts may dissipate as canopy gaps close.

  18. Microscopic theory of substrate-induced gap effect on real AFM ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sivabrata Sahu

    2017-06-24

    Jun 24, 2017 ... interaction effects on band-gap opening in graphene. We consider here the impurity effect on both sublat- tices of graphene. The polarized substrate-induced gap may further induce spin polarization in the system. In the tight-binding model calculation, we introduce electron–electron interaction in A and B ...

  19. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are ...

  20. Effect of photonic band gap on entanglement dynamics of qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing-Nuo; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We study how the environment of photonic band gap (PBG) materials affects entanglement dynamics of qubits. Entanglement between the single qubit and the PBG environment is investigated through the von Neumann entropy while that for two initially entangled qubits in this PBG reservoir is through concurrence. Dynamics of these measurements are solved in use of the fractional calculus which has been shown appropriate for the systems with non-Markovian dynamics. Entropy dynamics of the single qub...

  1. Effect of noise exposure on gap detection in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybalko, Natalia; Syka, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 200, - (2005), s. 63-72 ISSN 0378-5955 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/04/1074; GA MZd(CZ) NR8113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : noise exposure * temporal resolution * gap detection Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2005

  2. Effects of Measurement Error on the Output Gap in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Koichiro Kamada; Kazuto Masuda

    2000-01-01

    Potential output is the largest amount of products that can be produced by fully utilizing available labor and capital stock; the output gap is defined as the discrepancy between actual and potential output. If data on production factors contain measurement errors, total factor productivity (TFP) cannot be estimated accurately from the Solow residual(i.e., the portion of output that is not attributable to labor and capital inputs). This may give rise to distortions in the estimation of potent...

  3. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Zhou Bin

    2016-01-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin–orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. (paper)

  4. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju

    2010-01-01

    find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal7, 8, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation...... plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium’s ideal strength9, 10. We develop a ‘stimulated slip’ model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning....... The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 relevant for applications....

  5. Ecological effects on effective population size in an annual plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient-limited soil can be a strong selective force on plant populations. In addition, ecological factors such as competitive interactions have been shown to have an effect on effective population size (Ne). Both Ne and selection are indicators of population evolutionary processes: selection can...

  6. Effects of Calibration Sample Size and Item Bank Size on Ability Estimation in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Alper; Weiss, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of calibration sample size and item bank size on examinee ability estimation in computerized adaptive testing (CAT). For this purpose, a 500-item bank pre-calibrated using the three-parameter logistic model with 10,000 examinees was simulated. Calibration samples of varying sizes (150, 250, 350, 500,…

  7. Modelling the effect of size-asymmetric competition on size inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Camilla Ruø; Weiner, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The concept of size asymmetry in resource competition among plants, in which larger individuals obtain a disproportionate share of contested resources, appears to be very straightforward, but the effects of size asymmetry on growth and size variation among individuals have proved...... to be controversial. It has often been assumed that competition among individual plants in a population has to be size-asymmetric to result in higher size inequality than in the absence of competition, but here we question this inference. Using very simple, individual-based models, we investigate how size symmetry...... of competition affects the development in size inequality between two competing plants and show that increased size inequality due to competition is not always strong evidence for size-asymmetric competition. Even absolute symmetric competition, in which all plants receive the same amount of resources...

  8. Board Size Effects in Closely Held Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Morten; Kongsted, H.C.; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    2004-01-01

    in simultanous equation analysis. In the present paper we reexaminethe causal relationship between board size and firm performance using adataset of more than 5,000 small and medium sized closely held corporationswith complete ownership information and detailed accounting data. We testthe potential endogeneity...

  9. Gender Gaps in the Effects of Childhood Family Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenøe, Anne Ardila; Lundberg, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    to male-female and brother-sister differences in teenage outcomes, educational attainment, and adult earnings and employment. Our results are consistent with U.S. findings that boys benefit more from an advantageous family environment than do girls in terms of the behavior and grade-school outcomes....... Father's education, which has not been examined in previous studies, is particularly important for sons. However, we find a very different pattern of parental influence on adult outcomes. The gender gaps in educational attainment, employment, and earnings are increasing in maternal education, benefiting...

  10. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  11. Evaluating the Effects of Programs for Reducing Achievement Gaps: A Case Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Tseng, Fen-Lan; Kuo, Nien-Ping; Chang, Tien-Ying; Chiou, Jia-Min

    2014-01-01

    Considering that achievement gaps have become a serious educational problem worldwide, the Ministry of Education in Taiwan has been addressing a series of policies to reduce achievement gaps, but the effect of these policies has not yet been carefully examined. Therefore, the present study investigated current educational policies, achievement gap…

  12. Effect of particle size distribution and concentration on flow behavior of dense slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2011), s. 53-65 ISSN 0272-6351 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/1574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : concentration effect * dense complex slurry * experimental investigation * flow behavior * particle size distribution effect * pressure drop Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.545, year: 2011

  13. [Effect sizes, statistical power and sample sizes in "the Japanese Journal of Psychology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzukawa, Yumi; Toyoda, Hideki

    2012-04-01

    This study analyzed the statistical power of research studies published in the "Japanese Journal of Psychology" in 2008 and 2009. Sample effect sizes and sample statistical powers were calculated for each statistical test and analyzed with respect to the analytical methods and the fields of the studies. The results show that in the fields like perception, cognition or learning, the effect sizes were relatively large, although the sample sizes were small. At the same time, because of the small sample sizes, some meaningful effects could not be detected. In the other fields, because of the large sample sizes, meaningless effects could be detected. This implies that researchers who could not get large enough effect sizes would use larger samples to obtain significant results.

  14. Adaptation Measurement of CAD/CAM Dental Crowns with X-Ray Micro-CT: Metrological Chain Standardization and 3D Gap Size Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tapie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing systems are increasingly used to produce dental prostheses, but the parts produced suffer from a lack of evaluation, especially concerning the internal gap of the final assembly, that is, the space between the prepared tooth and the prosthesis. X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (micro-CT is a noninvasive imaging technique enabling the internal inspection of the assembly. It has proved to be an efficient tool for measuring the gap. In this study, a critical review of the protocols using micro-CT to quantify the gap is proposed as an introduction to a new protocol aimed at minimizing errors and enabling comparison between CAD/CAM systems. To compare different systems, a standardized protocol is proposed including two reference geometries. Micro-CT is used to acquire the reference geometries. A new 3D method is then proposed and a new indicator is defined (Gap Size Distribution (GSD. In addition, the usual 2D measurements are described and discussed. The 3D gap measurement method proposed can be used in clinical case geometries and has the considerable advantage of minimizing the data processing steps before performing the measurements.

  15. How to Estimate and Interpret Various Effect Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Thompson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The present article presents a tutorial on how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes. The 5th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (2001) described the failure to report effect sizes as a "defect" (p. 5), and 23 journals have published author guidelines requiring effect size reporting. Although…

  16. Size Effect on Magnesium Alloy Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenming; Wang, Qigui; Luo, Alan A.; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Liming

    2016-06-01

    The effect of grain size on tensile and fatigue properties has been investigated in cast Mg alloys of Mg-2.98Nd-0.19Zn (1530 μm) and Mg-2.99Nd-0.2Zn-0.51Zr (41 μm). The difference between RB and push-pull fatigue testing was also evaluated in both alloys. The NZ30K05-T6 alloy shows much better tensile strengths (increased by 246 pct in YS and 159 pct in UTS) and fatigue strength (improved by ~80 pct) in comparison with NZ30-T6 alloy. RB fatigue testing results in higher fatigue strength compared with push-pull fatigue testing, mainly due to the stress/strain gradient in the RB specimen cross section. The material with coarse grains could be hardened more in the cyclic loading condition than in the monotonic loading condition, corresponding to the lower σ f and the higher σ f/ σ b or σ f/ σ 0.2 ratio compared to the materials with fine grains. The fatigue crack initiation sites and failure mechanism are mainly determined by the applied stress/strain amplitude. In LCF, fatigue failure mainly originates from the PSBs within the surface or subsurface grains of the samples. In HCF, cyclic deformation and damage irreversibly caused by environment-assisted cyclic slip is the crucial factor to influence the fatigue crack. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation, and the developed MSF models and fatigue strength models can be used to predict fatigue lives and fatigue strengths of cast magnesium alloys.

  17. Effects of Calcination Holding Time on Properties of Wide Band Gap Willemite Semiconductor Nanoparticles by the Polymer Thermal Treatment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Mustapha Alibe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Willemite is a wide band gap semiconductor used in modern day technology for optoelectronics application. In this study, a new simple technique with less energy consumption is proposed. Willemite nanoparticles (NPs were produced via a water–based solution consisting of a metallic precursor, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, and underwent a calcination process at 900 °C for several holding times between 1–4 h. The FT–IR and Raman spectra indicated the presence of metal oxide bands as well as the effective removal of PVP. The degree of the crystallization and formation of the NPs were determined by XRD. The mean crystallite size of the NPs was between 18.23–27.40 nm. The morphology, particle shape and size distribution were viewed with HR-TEM and FESEM analysis. The willemite NPs aggregate from the smaller to larger particles with an increase in calcination holding time from 1–4 h with the sizes ranging between 19.74–29.71 nm. The energy values obtained from the experimental band gap decreased with increasing the holding time over the range of 5.39 eV at 1 h to at 5.27 at 4 h. These values match well with band gap obtained from the Mott and Davis model for direct transition. The findings in this study are very promising and can justify the use of these novel materials as a potential candidate for green luminescent optoelectronic applications.

  18. Effect of Particle Size on Shear Stress of Magnetorheological Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjit Sarkar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological fluids (MRF, known for their variable shear stress contain magnetisable micrometer-sized particles (few micrometer to 200 micrometers in a nonmagnetic carrier liquid. To avoid settling of particles, smaller sized (3-10 micrometers particles are preferred, while larger sized particles can be used in MR brakes, MR clutches, etc. as mechanical stirring action in those mechanisms does not allow particles to settle down. Ideally larger sized particles provide higher shear stress compared to smaller sized particles. However there is need to explore the effect of particle sizes on the shear stress. In the current paper, a comparison of different particle sizes on MR effect has been presented. Particle size distributions of iron particles were measured using HORIBA Laser Scattering Particle Size Distribution Analyser. The particle size distribution, mean sizes and standard deviations have been presented. The nature of particle shapes has been observed using scanning electron microscopy. To explore the effect of particle sizes, nine MR fluids containing small, large and mixed sized carbonyl iron particles have been synthesized. Three concentrations (9%, 18% and 36% by volume for each size of particles have been used. The shear stresses of those MRF samples have been measured using ANTON PAAR MCR-102 Rheometer. With increase in volume fraction of iron particles, the MR fluids synthesized using “mixed sized particles” show better shear stress compared to the MR fluids containing “smaller sized spherical shaped particles” and “larger sized flaked shaped particles” at higher shear rate.

  19. The effectiveness of position- and composition-specific gap costs for protein similarity searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar; Gertz, E Michael; Altschul, Stephen F; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2008-07-01

    The flexibility in gap cost enjoyed by hidden Markov models (HMMs) is expected to afford them better retrieval accuracy than position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs). We attempt to quantify the effect of more general gap parameters by separately examining the influence of position- and composition-specific gap scores, as well as by comparing the retrieval accuracy of the PSSMs constructed using an iterative procedure to that of the HMMs provided by Pfam and SUPERFAMILY, curated ensembles of multiple alignments. We found that position-specific gap penalties have an advantage over uniform gap costs. We did not explore optimizing distinct uniform gap costs for each query. For Pfam, PSSMs iteratively constructed from seeds based on HMM consensus sequences perform equivalently to HMMs that were adjusted to have constant gap transition probabilities, albeit with much greater variance. We observed no effect of composition-specific gap costs on retrieval performance. These results suggest possible improvements to the PSI-BLAST protein database search program. The scripts for performing evaluations are available upon request from the authors.

  20. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eric Heidel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power.

  1. The gap-prepulse inhibition deficit of the cortical N1-P2 complex in patients with tinnitus: The effect of gap duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yunseo; Ahn, Joong Woo; Kwon, Chiheon; Kim, Do Youn; Suh, Myung-Whan; Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Hee Chan

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether gap-prepulse inhibition (GPI) deficit in patients with tinnitus occurred in the N1-P2 complex of the cortical auditory evoked potential. Auditory late responses to the intense sound of the GPI paradigm were obtained from 16 patients with tinnitus and 18 age- and hearing loss-matched controls without tinnitus. The inhibition degrees of the N1-P2 complex were assessed at 100-, 50-, and 20-ms gap durations with tinnitus-pitch-matched and non-matched frequency background noises. At the 20-ms gap condition with the tinnitus-pitch-matched frequency background noise, only the tinnitus group showed an inhibition deficit of the N1-P2 complex. The inhibition deficits were absent in both groups with longer gap durations. These findings suggested that the effect of tinnitus emerged depending on the cue onset timing and duration of the gap-prepulse. Since inhibition deficits were observed in both groups at the same 20-ms gap condition, but with the tinnitus-pitch-non-matched frequency background noise, the present study did not offer proof of concept for tinnitus filling in the gap. Additional studies on the intrinsic effects of different background frequencies on the gap processing are required in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inferring Past Effective Population Size from Distributions of Coalescent Times

    OpenAIRE

    Gattepaille, Lucie; G?nther, Torsten; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Inferring and understanding changes in effective population size over time is a major challenge for population genetics. Here we investigate some theoretical properties of random-mating populations with varying size over time. In particular, we present an exact solution to compute the population size as a function of time, N e ( t ) , based on distributions of coalescent times of samples of any size. This result reduces the problem of population size inference to a problem of estimating coale...

  3. The size effect in metal cutting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and when the size of the material removed decreases, the probability of encountering a stress-reducing defect decreases. Since the shear stress and strain in metal cutting is unusually high, discontinuous microcracks usually form on the metal-cutting shear plane. If the material being cut is very brittle, or the compressive ...

  4. Effects of sample size on the second magnetization peak in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the sample size decreases – a result that could be interpreted as a size effect in the order– disorder vortex matter phase transition. However, local magnetic measurements trace this effect to metastable disordered vortex states, revealing the same order–disorder transition induction in samples of different size. Keywords.

  5. Interpreting and Reporting Effect Sizes in Research Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Martha; Marsh, George E., II

    Since 1994, the American Psychological Association (APA) has advocated the inclusion of effect size indices in reporting research to elucidate the statistical significance of studies based on sample size. In 2001, the fifth edition of the APA "Publication Manual" stressed the importance of including an index of effect size to clarify…

  6. Knowledge Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Marjorie; Pedersen, Torben; Petersen, Bent

    2003-01-01

    , assimilating, and utilizing knowledge - are crucial determinants ofknowledge gap elimination. In contrast, the two factors deemed essential in traditionalinternationalization process theory - elapsed time of operations and experientiallearning - are found to have no or limited effect.Key words......: Internationalization, knowledge gap, absorptive capacity, learning box....

  7. Do forest gap model simulations of climate change effects have a catastrophist bias?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlanc, D.C. [Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN (United States). Dept. of Biology; Loehle, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Forest gap simulation models have been widely used to project potential effects of global climate change on forest ecosystems. These projections are given high visibility in governmental and intergovernmental reports that are part of the basis for formulating national and international policy regarding global change. The most recent draft report from the IPCC is but one of many cases where the results from forest gap simulation models have been used as the best available projection of the effects of climate change on forests.

  8. Performance of a Full-Size Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber Prototype for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Muon Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Abusleme, Angel; Bellerive, A.; Benhammou, Y.; Botte, J.; Cohen, H.; Davies, M.; Du, Y.; Gauthier, L.; Koffas, T.; Kuleshov, S.; Lefebvre, B.; Li, C.; Lupu, N.; Mikenberg, G.; Mori, D.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J.P.; Perez Codina, E.; Rettie, S.; Robichaud-Véronneau, A.; Rojas, R.; Shoa, M.; Smakhtin, V.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Toro, A.; Torres, H.; Ulloa, P.; Vachon, B.; Vasquez, G.; Vdovin, A.; Viel, S.; Walker, P.; Weber, S.; Zhu, C.

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the present design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The most important upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs). The NSWs will be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) detectors are designed to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. To validate the design, a full-size prototype sTGC detector of approximately 1.2 $\\times$ $1.0\\, \\mathrm{m}^2$ consisting of four gaps has been constructed. Each gap provides pad, strip and wire readouts. The sTGC intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured in a $32\\, \\mathrm{GeV}$ pion beam test at Fermilab. At perpendicular incidence angle, single gap position resolutions of about $50\\,\\mathrm{\\mu m...

  9. Performance of a Full-Size Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber Prototype for the ALTAS New Small Wheel Muon Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Stephen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the present design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The most important upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs). The NSWs will be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) detectors are designed to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. To validate the design, a full-size prototype sTGC detector of approximately 1.2 × 1.0 m^2 consisting of four gaps has been constructed. Each gap provides pad, strip and wire readouts. The sTGC intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured in a 32 GeV pion beam test at Fermilab. At perpendicular incidence angle, single gap position resolutions of about 50 μm have been obtained, uniform along the sTGC ...

  10. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis.

  11. Simulation of finite size effects of the fiber bundle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Han, Kui

    2018-01-01

    In theory, the macroscopic fracture of materials should correspond with the thermodynamic limit of the fiber bundle model. However, the simulation of a fiber bundle model with an infinite size is unrealistic. To study the finite size effects of the fiber bundle model, fiber bundle models of various size are simulated in detail. The effects of system size on the constitutive behavior, critical stress, maximum avalanche size, avalanche size distribution, and increased step number of external load are explored. The simulation results imply that there is no feature size or cut size for macroscopic mechanical and statistical properties of the model. The constitutive curves near the macroscopic failure for various system size can collapse well with a simple scaling relationship. Simultaneously, the introduction of a simple extrapolation method facilitates the acquisition of more accurate simulation results in a large-limit system, which is better for comparison with theoretical results.

  12. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaoka, Takeshi, E-mail: inaoka@phys.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  13. Sample Size Calculations for Precise Interval Estimation of the Eta-Squared Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of variance is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in the behavioral, educational, and social sciences, and special attention has been paid to the selection and use of an appropriate effect size measure of association in analysis of variance. This article presents the sample size procedures for precise interval estimation…

  14. MID-INFRARED IMAGING OF THE TRANSITIONAL DISK OF HD 169142: MEASURING THE SIZE OF THE GAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Science, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Maaskant, Koen; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Dominik, C.; Mulders, G. D. [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Okamoto, Y. K. [Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Kataza, H. [Department of Infrared Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Fukagawa, M. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Min, M. [Astronomical Institute Utrecht, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Yamashita, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fujiyoshi, T.; Fujiwara, H. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Miyata, T.; Sako, S. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Sakon, I.; Onaka, T. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-06-20

    The disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 169142 was imaged and resolved at 18.8 and 24.5 {mu}m using Subaru/COMICS. We interpret the observations using a two-dimensional radiative transfer model and find evidence for the presence of a large gap. The mid-infrared images trace dust that is emitted at the onset of a strong rise in the spectral energy distribution (SED) at 20 {mu}m, and are therefore very sensitive to the location and characteristics of the inner wall of the outer disk and its dust. We determine the location of the wall to be 23{sup +3}{sub -5} AU from the star. An extra component of hot dust must exist close to the star. We find that a hydrostatic optically thick inner disk does not produce enough flux in the near-infrared, and an optically thin, geometrically thick component is our solution to fit the SED. Considering the recent findings of gaps and holes in a number of Herbig Ae/Be group I disks, we suggest that such disk structures may be common in group I sources. Classification as group I should be considered a strong case for classification as a transitional disk, though improved imaging surveys are needed to support this speculation.

  15. MID-INFRARED IMAGING OF THE TRANSITIONAL DISK OF HD 169142: MEASURING THE SIZE OF THE GAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Maaskant, Koen; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Dominik, C.; Mulders, G. D.; Okamoto, Y. K.; Kataza, H.; Fukagawa, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Min, M.; Yamashita, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Fujiwara, H.; Miyata, T.; Sako, S.; Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.

    2012-01-01

    The disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 169142 was imaged and resolved at 18.8 and 24.5 μm using Subaru/COMICS. We interpret the observations using a two-dimensional radiative transfer model and find evidence for the presence of a large gap. The mid-infrared images trace dust that is emitted at the onset of a strong rise in the spectral energy distribution (SED) at 20 μm, and are therefore very sensitive to the location and characteristics of the inner wall of the outer disk and its dust. We determine the location of the wall to be 23 +3 –5 AU from the star. An extra component of hot dust must exist close to the star. We find that a hydrostatic optically thick inner disk does not produce enough flux in the near-infrared, and an optically thin, geometrically thick component is our solution to fit the SED. Considering the recent findings of gaps and holes in a number of Herbig Ae/Be group I disks, we suggest that such disk structures may be common in group I sources. Classification as group I should be considered a strong case for classification as a transitional disk, though improved imaging surveys are needed to support this speculation.

  16. Beyond size-number trade-offs: clutch size as a maternal effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2009-04-27

    Traditionally, research on life-history traits has viewed the link between clutch size and offspring size as a straightforward linear trade-off; the product of these two components is taken as a measure of maternal reproductive output. Investing more per egg results in fewer but larger eggs and, hence, offspring. This simple size-number trade-off has proved attractive to modellers, but our experimental studies on keelback snakes (Tropidonophis mairii, Colubridae) reveal a more complex relationship between clutch size and offspring size. At constant water availability, the amount of water taken up by a snake egg depends upon the number of adjacent eggs. In turn, water uptake affects hatchling size, and therefore an increase in clutch size directly increases offspring size (and thus fitness under field conditions). This allometric advantage may influence the evolution of reproductive traits such as growth versus reproductive effort, optimal age at female maturation, the body-reserve threshold required to initiate reproduction and nest-site selection (e.g. communal oviposition). The published literature suggests that similar kinds of complex effects of clutch size on offspring viability are widespread in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Our results also challenge conventional experimental methodologies such as split-clutch designs for laboratory incubation studies: by separating an egg from its siblings, we may directly affect offspring size and thus viability.

  17. Magnetic field effects on charge structure factors of gapped graphene structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Hamed; Tawoose, Nasrin

    2018-02-01

    We present the behaviors of dynamical and static charge susceptibilities of undoped gapped graphene using the Green's function approach in the context of tight binding model Hamiltonian. Specially, the effects of magnetic field on the plasmon modes of gapped graphene structure are investigated via calculating correlation function of charge density operators. Our results show the increase of magnetic field leads to disappear high frequency plasmon mode for gapped case. We also show that low frequency plasmon mode has not affected by increase of magnetic field and chemical potential. Finally the temperature dependence of static charge structure factor of gapp graphene structure is studied. The effects of both magnetic field and gap parameter on the static structure factor are discusses in details.

  18. Quantum size effect and thermal stability of carbon-nanotube-based quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, N.Y.; Peng, J.; Liang, S.D.; Li, Z.B.; Xu, N.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Based on semi-experience quantum chemical calculation, we have investigated the quantum size effect and thermal stability of open-end carbon nanotube (5, 5) quantum dots of 20 to 400 atoms. It was found that there is a gap in the energy band of all carbon nanotube (5, 5) quantum dots although a (5, 5) carbon nanotube is metallic. The energy gap of quantum dots is much dependent of the number of atoms in a dot, as a result of the quantization rules imposed by the finite scales in both radial and axial directions of a carbon nanotube quantum dot. Also, the heat of formation of carbon nanotube quantum dots is dependent of the size of a quantum dot. (author)

  19. Boundary effects and gapped dispersion in rotating fermionic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ebihara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the importance of boundary effects on fermionic matter in a rotating frame. By explicit calculations at zero temperature we show that the scalar condensate of fermion and anti-fermion cannot be modified by the rotation once the boundary condition is properly implemented. The situation is qualitatively changed at finite temperature and/or in the presence of a sufficiently strong magnetic field that supersedes the boundary effects. Therefore, to establish an interpretation of the rotation as an effective chemical potential, it is crucial to consider further environmental effects such as the finite temperature and magnetic field.

  20. Effective population size and genetic conservation criteria for bull trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce E. Rieman; F. W. Allendorf

    2001-01-01

    Effective population size (Ne) is an important concept in the management of threatened species like bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. General guidelines suggest that effective population sizes of 50 or 500 are essential to minimize inbreeding effects or maintain adaptive genetic variation, respectively....

  1. Density-dependent effects on growth, body size, and clutch size in Black Brant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedinger, James S.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Person, Brian T.; Eichholz, Michael W.; Herzog, Mark P.; Flint, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    We documented gosling size in late summer, adult body size, and clutch size of known-age Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) females nesting on the Tutakoke River colony between 1986 and 1995. During this period, the colony increased from 1,100 to >5,000 nesting pairs. Gosling mass at 30 days of age declined from 764 ± SE of 13 g and 723 ± 15 g for males and females, respectively, in the 1986 cohort, to 665 ± 18 g and 579 ± 18 g in the 1994 cohort. Gosling size was directly negatively correlated with number of Black Brant broods. We detected no trend in adult body size for individuals from these cohorts; in fact, adults from the 1992 and 1994 cohorts had the largest overall masses. Clutch size increased with age from 3.4 eggs for 2-year-old females to 4.4 eggs for 5-year-old females. Clutch size declined during the study by 0.20 (3-year-old females) to 0.45 (2-year-old females) eggs. Clutch size did not decline between the 1986 and 1990 cohorts for females that were >5 years old. Our results for clutch size and gosling size are similar to those recorded for Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens). Our failure to detect a trend in adult body size, however, differs from the response of other geese to increasing population density. We interpret this difference in effects of density on adult size between Black Brant and other geese as an indication of stronger selection against the smallest individuals in Black Brant relative to other species of geese.

  2. Portion size and intended consumption. Evidence for a pre-consumption portion size effect in males?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; te Raa, Wesselien; Hardman, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Larger portions increase energy intake (the 'portion size effect'); however, the mechanisms behind this effect are unclear. Although pre-meal intentions are thought to be an important determinant of energy intake, little research has examined how much of a meal individuals intend to eat when served standard versus larger portion sizes. Three studies examined the effect of manipulating portion size on intended food consumption. In Studies 1 (spaghetti bolognese) and 2 (curry and rice) male participants were shown an image of either a standard or a larger meal and indicated how much of the meal they intended to consume. In Study 3 male and female participants were served either a standard or a larger portion of ice cream for dessert, they indicated how much they intended to consume and then ate as much of the ice cream as they desired. Regardless of being shown standard or large portion sizes, in Studies 1 and 2 participants reported that they intended to eat the majority of the meal, equating to a large difference in intended energy consumption between portion size conditions (a 'pre-consumption portion size effect'). This finding was replicated in male participants in Study 3, although females intended to eat a smaller proportion of the larger portion of ice cream, compared to the standard portion. Both male and female participants tended to eat in accordance with their pre-meal intentions and a portion size effect on actual consumption was subsequently observed in males, but not in females. The portion size effect may be observed when measuring pre-meal intended consumption in males. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Information gaps in surveillance data and effects on the Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complete and accurate information on disease occurrence is crucial for effective public health response to disease outbreaks. In response to the 2014 Ebola epidemic in West Africa, Ghana intensified surveillance for the disease across the country. However, the case definition provided by the Ministry of Health ...

  4. Mind the gap : Societal limits to public library effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glorieux, Ignace; Kuppens, Toon; Vandebroeck, Dieter

    This article focuses on the effectiveness of Flemish (Belgian) public libraries in reaching a large and socially diverse public. A statistical model is developed which incorporates unique data gathered through a large-scale visitor survey, a survey of librarians and municipal demographic

  5. Assessing ecological effects of radionuclides: data gaps and extrapolation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Gilek, Michael; Sundell-Bergman, Synnoeve; Larsson, Carl-Magnus

    2004-01-01

    By inspection of the FASSET database on radiation effects on non-human biota, one of the major difficulties in the implementation of ecological risk assessments for radioactive pollutants is found to be the lack of data for chronic low-level exposure. A critical review is provided of a number of extrapolation issues that arise in undertaking an ecological risk assessment: acute versus chronic exposure regime; radiation quality including relative biological effectiveness and radiation weighting factors; biological effects from an individual to a population level, including radiosensitivity and lifestyle variations throughout the life cycle; single radionuclide versus multi-contaminants. The specificities of the environmental situations of interest (mainly chronic low-level exposure regimes) emphasise the importance of reproductive parameters governing the demography of the population within a given ecosystem and, as a consequence, the structure and functioning of that ecosystem. As an operational conclusion to keep in mind for any site-specific risk assessment, the present state-of-the-art on extrapolation issues allows us to grade the magnitude of the uncertainties as follows: one species to another > acute to chronic = external to internal = mixture of stressors> individual to population> ecosystem structure to function

  6. Electronic properties of graphene nano-flakes: Energy gap, permanent dipole, termination effect, and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Peeters, F. M.; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic properties of graphene nano-flakes (GNFs) with different edge passivation are investigated by using density functional theory. Passivation with F and H atoms is considered: C N c X N x (X = F or H). We studied GNFs with 10 c c , (ii) topological defects (pentagon and heptagon) break the symmetry of the GNFs and enhance the electric polarization, (iii) the mutual interaction of bilayer GNFs can be understood by dipole-dipole interaction which were found sensitive to the relative orientation of the GNFs, (iv) the permanent dipoles depend on the edge terminated atom, while the energy gap is independent of it, and (v) the presence of heptagon and pentagon defects in the GNFs results in the largest difference between the energy of the spin-up and spin-down electrons which is larger for the H-passivated GNFs as compared to F-passivated GNFs. Our study shows clearly the effect of geometry, size, termination, and bilayer on the electronic properties of small GNFs. This study reveals important features of graphene nano-flakes which can be detected using Raman spectroscopy

  7. Friction related size-effect in microforming – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chunju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a thorough literature review of the size effects of friction in microforming. During miniaturization, the size effects of friction occur clearly. The paper first introduces experimental research progress on size effects of friction in both micro bulk and sheet forming. The effects of several parameters are discussed. Based on the experimental results, several approaches have been performed to develop a model or functions to analyse the mechanism of size effects of friction, and simulate the micro deep drawing process by integrating them into an FE program. Following this, surface modification, e.g. a DLC film and a micro structure/textured surface, as a method to reduce friction are presented. Finally, the outlook for the size effect of friction in the future is assessed, based on the understanding of the current research progress.

  8. Application of size effect to compressive strength of concrete members

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    super-plasticizer (ratio of cement weight) to eliminate the out-of-plan size effect. The specimen thickness b is chosen to allow stable failure. The average concrete compressive strengths for the size, length and depth effect are. 52, 58, and 55 MPa respectively. 4.2 Mix design. The concrete mix proportions selected for the ...

  9. Size effect in the strength of concrete structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Longman) pp 151–165. Karihaloo B L 1999 Size effect in shallow and deep notched quasi-brittle structures. Int. J. Fracture. 95: 379–390. Karihaloo B L, Abdalla H M 2001 Size effect in hardened cement paste and high strength concrete. In. Fracture mechanics of concrete structures (eds) de Borst et al (Lisse: Balkema) vol.2 ...

  10. Modelling the effect of gap junctions on tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Bruce

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available When modelling tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology, continuum approximations to the discrete cell-level equations are used to maintain computational tractability. One of the most commonly used models is represented by the bidomain equations, the derivation of which relies on a homogenisation technique to construct a suitable approximation to the discrete model. This derivation does not explicitly account for the presence of gap junctions connecting one cell to another. It has been seen experimentally [Rohr, Cardiovasc. Res. 2004] that these gap junctions have a marked effect on the propagation of the action potential, specifically as the upstroke of the wave passes through the gap junction. In this paper we explicitly include gap junctions in a both a 2D discrete model of cardiac electrophysiology, and the corresponding continuum model, on a simplified cell geometry. Using these models we compare the results of simulations using both continuum and discrete systems. We see that the form of the action potential as it passes through gap junctions cannot be replicated using a continuum model, and that the underlying propagation speed of the action potential ceases to match up between models when gap junctions are introduced. In addition, the results of the discrete simulations match the characteristics of those shown in Rohr 2004. From this, we suggest that a hybrid model — a discrete system following the upstroke of the action potential, and a continuum system elsewhere — may give a more accurate description of cardiac electrophysiology.

  11. The Effect of Gap Angle on Tensile Strength of Preceramic Base Metal Solder Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Farnaz; Hashemi Ardakani, Zahra; Hashemi Ardakani, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    Soldering is a process commonly used in fabricating dental prosthesis. Since most soldered prosthesis fail at the solder joints; the joint strength is of utmost importance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap angle on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. A total number of 40 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated according to ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test. Samples were cut at the midpoint of the bar, and were placed at the considered angles by employing an explicitly designed device. They were divided into 4 groups regarding the gap angle; Group C (control group) with parallel gap on steady distance of 0.2mm, Group 1: 10°, Group 2: 20°, and Group3: 30° gap angles. When soldered, the specimens were all tested for tensile strength using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min with a preload of 10N. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to compare tensile strength among the groups (ptensile strength values obtained from the study groups were respectively 307.84, 391.50, 365.18, and 368.86 MPa. The tensile strength was not statistically different among the four groups in general (p≤ 0.490). Making the gap angular at the solder joints and the subsequent unsteady increase of the gap distance would not change the tensile strength of the joint.

  12. [Recombinant human gapM1 expressed in Pichia pastoris and its anti-diabetic effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiang; Du, Renqian; Li, Xi; Huang, Haiyan; Yu, Min; Tang, Qiqun

    2009-08-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine predominantly synthesized and secreted by adipocytes in the white adipose tissue, and it can lower the blood glucose level and increase free fatty acid oxidation. In the current study, we developed the globular domain of adiponectin (gapM1) to treat type II diabetes. In both flask and fermentor, we cultivated Pichia pastoris expressing recombinant gapM1 and established the purification procedure by using gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. To evaluate the biological activity of recombinant gapM1, we used rat type II diabetes model fed high-fat diet in combination with low-dose STZ (Streptozocin) induction. We purified 200 mg gapM1 with purity of 96% from 10 liters of supernatant. The recombinant gapM1 significantly lowered blood glucose (34.2%), serum triglyceride (79.6%) and total cholesterol (62.1%) in type II diabetes induced rat. Therefore, the recombinant human gapM1 is successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and effectively treated type II diabetes in rat models.

  13. Closing the 21st century global water gap: costs and effectiveness of adaptation measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Droogers, P.; Hunink, J.; Buitink, J.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Karssenberg, D.; Van Beek, L. P.; Straatsma, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    Water scarcity affects a major part of the globe, and is expected to increase significantly until 2100 as a result of climate change and socioeconomic developments. Yet, global projections are unavailable on the effectiveness and costs of adaptation measures to close the future water gap under global change. Here, we present a 21st century projection of the closure of the water gap under two contrasting climate and socio-economic scenarios: RCP2.6/SSP1(s1) and RCP8.5/SSP5(s5). We coupled a global hydrological model to water demand and redistribution model, and forced them with five General Circulation Models (GCMs) to assess the future water gap for 1604 water provinces covering most of the global land mass. Subsequently, using so-called water availability cost curves, we determined the water gap reduction that could be achieved by increasingly aggressive and expensive sets of adaptation measures, respectively aimed at improving agriculture, increasing water supply, and reducing water demands. Our results show that for s1, the water gap peaks around 2050 and declines towards 2100. Contrastingly, for s5, the gap increases linearly. Hotspots in water scarcity are found in the USA, India, and China. The proposed adaptation sets reduce the water gap, but for the majority of the hotspots are not sufficient to close the water gap completely. The median annual adaptation costs for the proposed measures amount to less than 2% of the GDP of the affected water provinces. Although these costs are already substantial, they do leave room for additional unorthodox adaptation measures.

  14. Various response of Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. regeneration in artifical gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibin; Zhao, Kuangji; Yang, Haijiao; Ma, Lvyi; Jia, Zhongkui

    2017-11-06

    Understanding the influence of gaps in promoting canopy recruitment will help to maintain structural stability and achieve continuous forest cover. We established three control plots and experimental plots with three replications each (gap sizes L-I, L-II, L-III, and L-IV) in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) plantation to test the short-term effects of gap size on the age distribution, density and growth, and annual height and ground diameter growth for regeneration established before (REBG) and after (REAG) gap creation. Age distribution exhibited an approximately normal distribution, with the numbers of REBG and REAG decreasing and increasing, respectively, as the age increased. Although there was no difference in density among gap size classes, regeneration growth positively responded to gap size, with maximum values observed in class L-III. Annual average height growth after (AAH-A) gap creation was significantly greater than that before (AAH-B) gap creation for REBG among gap sizes, suggesting that gaps promote the rapid growth of regeneration. However, the responses of height and ground diameter growth in REBG to gap size were not immediate and exhibited a response delay of 2-4 years. Similarly, for the height and ground diameter growth of REAG, significant differences were first observed within years 2-4 after germination in the same growing season for all gap size classes.

  15. Size-effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavity...... triaxiality, where cavitation instabilities are predicted by conventional plasticity theory, such instabilities are also found for the nonlocal theory, but the effects of gradient hardening delay the onset of the instability. Furthermore, in some cases the cavitation stress reaches a maximum and then decays...

  16. The strong effect of gaps on the required shaping of the ITER first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangeby, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Divertor tokamaks such as ITER also need limiters, namely for startup, rampdown, as well as protection of the main wall from normal and off-normal loads during the diverted phase. In future fusion devices the volume within the magnetic coils will be at a premium and it will be important to make the limiters as thin as possible. A continuous, or almost continuous, wall-limiter can be made thinner than a set of well spaced discrete limiters. The need to be able to remove and replace the components of a wall-limiter requires that its individual panels in fact be discrete but the gaps between the panels should be made as small as possible relative to the panel width to maximize the wall coverage and to minimize the extent of exposed panel edges. The modularity of a wall-limiter leads inevitably to misalignments. The gaps and misalignments reduce the power-handling capability of a modular wall-limiter relative to an ideal wall-limiter, i.e. one without any gaps or misalignments. It is shown that even small gaps and radial misalignments between the individual panels of a modular wall-limiter can require so much shaping, i.e. chamfering, of the panels in order to protect the panel edges that the peak deposited power flux density on the panel face considerably exceeds that for an ideal wall-limiter, typically by an order of magnitude. Nevertheless, compared with a set of discrete limiters which are separated by gaps larger than the limiter toroidal size, a modular, small-gap wall-limiter can still be thinner and can have lower peak deposited power flux densities (MW m -2 ), for a given total power load (MW).

  17. FILLED GAP EFFECT AND SEMANTIC PLAUSIBILITY IN BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE SENTENCE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Maia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Filled Gap Effect (FGE is investigated in Brazilian Portuguese through eye- tracking and self paced reading experiments. Results detect the presence of FGE, indicating that the parser is strictly syntactic in the early stage of processing. The final measures in the two experiments present discrepant results, motivating a discussion on possible good-enough effects.

  18. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size. PMID:25951408

  19. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-05-07

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size.

  20. Effect of band gap narrowing on GaAs tunnel diode I-V characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebib, A.; Hannanchi, R. [Laboratoire d' énergie et de matériaux, LabEM-LR11ES34-Université de sousse (Tunisia); Beji, L., E-mail: lotbej_fr@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire d' énergie et de matériaux, LabEM-LR11ES34-Université de sousse (Tunisia); EL Jani, B. [Unité de Recherche sur les Hétéro-Epitaxies et Applications, Faculté des Sciences, Université de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-12-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical study of current-voltage characteristics of C/Si-doped GaAs tunnel diode. For the investigation of the experimental data, we take into account the band-gap narrowing (BGN) effect due to heavily-doped sides of the tunnel diode. The BGN of the n- and p-sides of tunnel diode was measured by photoluminescence spectroscopy. The comparison between theoretical results and experimental data reveals that BGN effect enhances tunneling currents and hence should be considered to identify more accurately the different transport mechanisms in the junction. For C/Si-doped GaAs tunnel diode, we found that direct tunneling is the dominant transport mechanism at low voltages. At higher voltages, this mechanism is replaced by the rate-controlling tunneling via gap states in the forbidden gap.

  1. Effects of sample size on the second magnetization peak in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8+ crystals are observed at low temperatures, above the temperature where the SMP totally disappears. In particular, the onset of the SMP shifts to lower fields as the sample size decreases - a result that could be interpreted as a size effect in ...

  2. Effects of Seed Size on Germination and Early Morphorlogical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A research was carried out to determine the effects of seed size on germination and early growth rate of Gmelina arborea. Mature seeds of. Gmelina arborea were collected from the mother trees in Uyo Local Government Area, Akwa Ibom State. They were grouped into 3 categories as large seed size (LSS), medium seed ...

  3. Effective population size and evolutionary dynamics in outbred ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Census population size, sex-ratio and female reproductive success were monitored in 10 laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster selected for different ages of reproduction. With this demographic information, we estimated eigenvalue, variance and probability of allele loss effective population sizes. We conclude ...

  4. THE EFFECT OF PROJECTION ON DERIVED MASS-SIZE AND LINEWIDTH-SIZE RELATIONSHIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Rahul; Kauffmann, Jens; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Collins, David C.; Norman, Michael L.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Power-law mass-size and linewidth-size correlations, two of 'Larson's laws', are often studied to assess the dynamical state of clumps within molecular clouds. Using the result of a hydrodynamic simulation of a molecular cloud, we investigate how geometric projection may affect the derived Larson relationships. We find that large-scale structures in the column density map have similar masses and sizes to those in the three-dimensional simulation (position-position-position, PPP). Smaller scale clumps in the column density map are measured to be more massive than the PPP clumps, due to the projection of all emitting gas along lines of sight. Further, due to projection effects, structures in a synthetic spectral observation (position-position-velocity, PPV) may not necessarily correlate with physical structures in the simulation. In considering the turbulent velocities only, the linewidth-size relationship in the PPV cube is appreciably different from that measured from the simulation. Including thermal pressure in the simulated line widths imposes a minimum line width, which results in a better agreement in the slopes of the linewidth-size relationships, though there are still discrepancies in the offsets, as well as considerable scatter. Employing commonly used assumptions in a virial analysis, we find similarities in the computed virial parameters of the structures in the PPV and PPP cubes. However, due to the discrepancies in the linewidth-size and mass-size relationships in the PPP and PPV cubes, we caution that applying a virial analysis to observed clouds may be misleading due to geometric projection effects. We speculate that consideration of physical processes beyond kinetic and gravitational pressure would be required for accurately assessing whether complex clouds, such as those with highly filamentary structure, are bound.

  5. The effects of meal size, body size and temperature on gastric evacuation in pikeperch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koed, Anders

    2001-01-01

    Prey size had no effect on the gastric evacuation rate of pikeperch Stizostedion lucioperca. The gastric evacuation was adequately described applying an exponent of 0.5 in the power model. Applying length instead of weight of pikeperch in the gastric evacuation model resulted in a change of estim...

  6. Effect of a gap opening on the conductance of graphene with magnetic barrier structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmailpour, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    In the present study Klein tunneling in a single-layer gapped graphene was investigated by transfer matrix method under normal magnetic field for one and two magnetic barriers. Calculations show that electron transmission through a magnetic barrier is deflected to positive angles and reduces as the magnitude of magnetic field and especially the energy gap increases. This reduction is even more significant in larger fields so that after reaching a specific value of energy gap, an effective confinement for fermions and suppression of Klein tunneling is reached particularly in normal incidence and the conductance becomes zero. Unlike one barrier, the process of tunneling through two magnetic barriers induces symmetric transmission probability versus the incident angle; even, for lower energy gaps, electron transmission probability increases which in turn reduces total conductance via proper changes in the value of the magnetic field and energy gap. In general, it is concluded that confining electrons in asymmetric transmission through one barrier is conducted better than two barriers.

  7. A Case Study in Effectively Bridging the Business Skills Gap for the Information Technology Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal study of information technology (IT) managers at a Fortune 200 company in the Southwest United States was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a training program at bridging the perceived business skills gap for IT employees. A needs assessment was carried out, resulting in a 4-module training program. The program was evaluated…

  8. Disturbance and diversity of wood-inhabiting fungi: effects of canopy gaps and downed woody debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas J. Brazee; Daniel L. Lindner; Anthony W. D' Amato; Shawn Fraver; Jodi A. Forrester; David J. Mladenoff

    2014-01-01

    Experimental canopy gap formation and additions of coarse woody debris (CWD) are techniques intended to mimic the disturbance regime and accelerate the development of northern hardwood forests. The effects of these techniques on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning were investigated by surveying the abundance and diversity of wood-inhabiting fungi in six treatments...

  9. Bridging the Rural-Urban Literacy Gap in China: A Mediation Analysis of Family Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingying; Li, Hui; Wang, Dan

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the effects of family involvement on the literacy gap between rural and urban Chinese primary students via mediation analysis. Altogether, 1080 students in Grades 1, 3, and 5 were randomly sampled from three urban and three rural primary schools from Shandong and Guizhou Provinces, representing eastern and western China,…

  10. Soil properties in old-growth Douglas-fir gaps in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Griffiths; Andrew N. Gray; Thomas A. Spies

    2010-01-01

    This study had three objectives: (1) to determine if there are correlations between aboveground vegetation and belowground soil properties within large 50-m-diameter gaps, (2) to determine how large gaps influence forest soils compared with nongap soils, and (3) to measure the effects of differently sized gaps on gap soils. Circular canopy gaps were created in old-...

  11. Effects of weak nonlinearity on dispersion relations and frequency band-gaps of periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the behaviour of linear periodic structures can be traced back over 300 years, to Sir Isaac Newton, and still attracts much attention. An essential feature of periodic struc-tures is the presence of frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate....... Determination of band-gaps and the corresponding attenuation levels is an im-portant practical problem. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants, and the method of space-harmonics. However, application....... The present work deals with analytically predicting dynamic responses for nonlinear continuous elastic periodic structures. Specifically, the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion re-lation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending os-cillations are analyzed...

  12. Effect of the plate surface characteristics and gap height on yield stresses of a magnetorheological fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkkari, I; Syrjala, S; Kostamo, E; Kostamo, J; Pietola, M

    2012-01-01

    Effects of the plate material, surface roughness and measuring gap height on static and dynamic yield stresses of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid were investigated with a commercial plate–plate magnetorheometer. Magnetic and non-magnetic plates with smooth (Ra ∼ 0.3 μm) and rough (Ra ∼ 10 μm) surface finishes were used. It was shown by Hall probe measurements and finite element simulations that the use of magnetic plates or higher gap heights increases the level of magnetic flux density and changes the shape of the radial flux density profile. The yield stress increase caused by these factors was determined and subtracted from the measured values in order to examine only the effect of the wall characteristics or the gap height. Roughening of the surfaces offered a significant increase in the yield stresses for non-magnetic plates. With magnetic plates the yield stresses were higher to start with, but roughening did not increase them further. A significant part of the difference in measured stresses between rough non-magnetic and magnetic plates was caused by changes in magnetic flux density rather than by better contact of the particles to the plate surfaces. In a similar manner, an increase in gap height from 0.25 to 1.00 mm can lead to over 20% increase in measured stresses due to changes in the flux density profile. When these changes were compensated the dynamic yield stresses generally remained independent of the gap height, even in the cases where it was obvious that the wall slip was present. This suggests that with MR fluids the wall slip cannot be reliably detected by comparison of flow curves measured at different gap heights. (paper)

  13. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  14. Finite size effects in the intermittency analysis of the fragment-size correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.; Ploszajczak, M.; Tucholski, A.

    1991-01-01

    An influence of the finite size effect on the fragment-size correlations in the nuclear multifragmentation is studied using the method of scaled factorial moments for a 1 - dim percolation model and for a statistical model of the fragmentation process, which for a certain value of a tuning parameter yields the power-law behaviour of the fragment-size distribution. It is shown that the statistical models of this type contain only repulsive correlations due to the conservation laws. The comparison of the results with those obtained in the non-critical 1 - dim percolation and in the 3 - dim percolation at around the critical point is presented. Correlations in the 1 - dim percolation model are analysed analytically and the mechanism of the attractive correlations in 1 - dim and 3 - dim is identified. (author) 30 refs., 7 figs

  15. Size effects in finite systems with long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscar, E. S.; Horowitz, C. M.

    2018-03-01

    Small systems consisting of particles interacting with long-range potentials exhibit enormous size effects. The Tsallis conjecture [Tsallis, Fractals 3, 541 (1995), 10.1142/S0218348X95000473], valid for translationally invariant systems with long-range interactions, states a well-known scaling relating different sizes. Here we propose to generalize this conjecture to systems with this symmetry broken, by adjusting one parameter that determines an effective distance to compute the strength of the interaction. We apply this proposal to the one-dimensional Ising model with ferromagnetic interactions that decay as 1 /r1 +σ in the region where the model has a finite critical temperature. We demonstrate the convenience of using this generalization to study finite-size effects, and we compare this approach with the finite-size scaling theory.

  16. Effect of operating parameters and membrane characteristics on air gap membrane distillation performance for the treatment of highly saline water

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jingli

    2016-04-07

    In this study, ten different commercially available PTFE, PP and PVDF membranes were tested in desalination of highly saline water by air gap membrane distillation (AGMD). Process performance was investigated under different operating parameters, such as feed temperatures, feed flow velocities and salt concentrations reaching 120 g/L, and different membrane characteristics, such as membrane material, thickness, pore size and support layer, using a locally designed and fabricatd AGMD module and spacer. Results showed that increasing feed temperature increases permeate flux regardless of the feed concentration. However, feed flow velocity does not significantly affect the flux, especially at low feed temperatures. The PP membrane showed a better performance than the PVDF and PTFE membranes. Permeate flux decreases with the increase of salt concentration of feed solution, especially at higher concentrations above 90 g/L. The existence of membrane support layer led to a slight decrease of permeate flux. Membranes with pore sizes of 0.2 and 0.45 μm gave the best performance. Smaller pore size led to lower flux and larger pore size led to pore wetting due to lower LEP values. The effect of concentration polarization and temperature polarization has also been studied and compared.

  17. Retrieval of Gap Fraction and Effective Plant Area Index from Phase-Shift Terrestrial Laser Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyare Pueschel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of canopy structure is crucial for modeling eco-physiological processes. Two commonly used metrics for characterizing canopy structure are the gap fraction and the effective Plant Area Index (PAIe. Both have been successfully retrieved with terrestrial laser scanning. However, a systematic assessment of the influence of the laser scan properties on the retrieval of these metrics is still lacking. This study investigated the effects of resolution, measurement speed, and noise compression on the retrieval of gap fraction and PAIe from phase-shift FARO Photon 120 laser scans. We demonstrate that FARO’s noise compression yields gap fractions and PAIe that deviate significantly from those based on scans without noise compression and strongly overestimate Leaf Area Index (LAI estimates based on litter trap measurements. Scan resolution and measurement speed were also shown to impact gap fraction and PAIe, but this depended on leaf development phase, stand structure, and LAI calculation method. Nevertheless, PAIe estimates based on various scan parameter combinations without noise compression proved to be quite stable.

  18. Impulse Waveform Effects on the Behavior of Nonuniform Field Sulfur Hexafluoride Short Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Jamal Yousef

    The current state of the knowledge on the mechanisms of failure of electronegative gases indicates that, for gases such as SF_6, breakdown occurs by the leader mechanism in nonuniform field geometries (utilization factors <2/3) typically at pressures above 0.05 MPa and gaps longer than a few cm. The precursor leader is the only active mechanism under positive polarity, and the dominant one under negative polarity where it competes with the stem leader. Not only does this thesis addresses the question of breakdown mechanisms in short gaps, under both polarities, and for surface as well as gas discharges but also focuses on the impulse waveform effects. Gas discharges are investigated in a point-to -plane geometry, with a fixed gap length of 5 mm and a variable point radius of 0.25-5 mm. The placement of a solid dielectric film parallel to and 1.5 mm distant from the gap axis enables the examination of surface discharges. The pressure range investigated is 0.1-0.5 MPa. The waveforms used are 0.0075/80 mus for the steep fronted impulse and 0.6-1/80-2000 mus for the lightning surge. Both terminal and optical measurements are conducted to which statistical analysis is applied. Effects of impulse waveform on initiation, propagation, stabilization, and modes of discharge development of both gas and surface discharges are determined. Computer simulation of corona stabilization has conformed the experimental findings reported.

  19. Effects of window size and shape on accuracy of subpixel centroid estimation of target images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Sharon S.

    1993-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for increasing the accuracy of subpixel centroid estimation of (nearly) point target images in cases where the signal-to-noise ratio is low and the signal amplitude and shape vary from frame to frame. In the algorithm, the centroid is calculated over a data window that is matched in width to the image distribution. Fourier analysis is used to explain the dependency of the centroid estimate on the size of the data window, and simulation and experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effects of window size for two different noise models. The effects of window shape were also investigated for uniform and Gaussian-shaped windows. The new algorithm was developed to improve the dynamic range of a close-range photogrammetric tracking system that provides feedback for control of a large gap magnetic suspension system (LGMSS).

  20. Effect of particle size on the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ryan J; Zukoski, Charles F

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature of a broad class of molecules is shown to depend on molecular size. This dependency results from the size dependence of the pair potential. A generalized equation of state is used to estimate how the volume fraction at the glass transition depends on the size of the molecule, for rigid molecule glass-formers. The model shows that at a given pressure and temperature there is a size-induced glass transition: For molecules larger than a critical size, the volume fraction required to support the effective pressure due to particle attractions is above that which characterizes the glassy state. This observation establishes the boundary between nanoparticles, which exist in liquid form only as dispersions in low molecular weight solvents and large molecules which form liquids that have viscosities below those characterized by the glassy state.

  1. Interviewer Effects on a Network-Size Filter Question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josten Michael

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that survey interviewers may be tempted to manipulate answers to filter questions in a way that minimizes the number of follow-up questions. This becomes relevant when ego-centered network data are collected. The reported network size has a huge impact on interview duration if multiple questions on each alter are triggered. We analyze interviewer effects on a network-size question in the mixed-mode survey “Panel Study ‘Labour Market and Social Security’” (PASS, where interviewers could skip up to 15 follow-up questions by generating small networks. Applying multilevel models, we find almost no interviewer effects in CATI mode, where interviewers are paid by the hour and frequently supervised. In CAPI, however, where interviewers are paid by case and no close supervision is possible, we find strong interviewer effects on network size. As the area-specific network size is known from telephone mode, where allocation to interviewers is random, interviewer and area effects can be separated. Furthermore, a difference-in-difference analysis reveals the negative effect of introducing the follow-up questions in Wave 3 on CAPI network size. Attempting to explain interviewer effects we neither find significant main effects of experience within a wave, nor significantly different slopes between interviewers.

  2. Effects of Hand Proximity and Movement Direction in Spatial and Temporal Gap Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemers, Michael; Fischer, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on the interplay between static manual postures and visual attention revealed enhanced visual selection near the hands (near-hand effect). During active movements there is also superior visual performance when moving toward compared to away from the stimulus (direction effect). The “modulated visual pathways” hypothesis argues that differential involvement of magno- and parvocellular visual processing streams causes the near-hand effect. The key finding supporting this hypothesis is an increase in temporal and a reduction in spatial processing in near-hand space (Gozli et al., 2012). Since this hypothesis has, so far, only been tested with static hand postures, we provide a conceptual replication of Gozli et al.’s (2012) result with moving hands, thus also probing the generality of the direction effect. Participants performed temporal or spatial gap discriminations while their right hand was moving below the display. In contrast to Gozli et al. (2012), temporal gap discrimination was superior at intermediate and not near hand proximity. In spatial gap discrimination, a direction effect without hand proximity effect suggests that pragmatic attentional maps overshadowed temporal/spatial processing biases for far/near-hand space. PMID:28018268

  3. Effects of hand proximity and movement direction in spatial and temporal gap discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wiemers

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on the interplay between static manual postures and visual attention revealed enhanced visual selection near the hands (near-hand effect. During active movements there is also superior visual performance when moving towards compared to away from the stimulus (direction effect. The modulated visual pathways hypothesis argues that differential involvement of magno- and parvocellular visual processing streams causes the near-hand effect. The key finding supporting this hypothesis is an increase in temporal and a reduction in spatial processing in near-hand space (Gozli, West, & Pratt, 2012. Since this hypothesis has, so far, only been tested with static hand postures, we provide a conceptual replication of Gozli et al.’s result with moving hands, thus also probing the generality of the direction effect. Participants performed temporal or spatial gap discriminations while their right hand was moving below the display. In contrast to Gozli et al. (2012, temporal gap discrimination was superior at intermediate and not near hand proximity. In spatial gap discrimination, a direction effect without hand proximity effect suggests that pragmatic attentional maps overshadowed temporal/spatial processing biases for far/near-hand space.

  4. Effect of interfragmentary gap on the mechanical behavior of mandibular angle fracture with three fixation designs: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Russell; Liu, Yunfeng; Wang, Joanne Helen; Baur, Dale Allen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate stress and strain distribution numerically on a normal mandible under physiological occlusal loadings. The results were compared with those of mandibles that had an angle fracture stabilized with different fixation designs under the same loadings. The amount of displacement at two interfragmentary gaps was also studied. A three-dimensional (3D) virtual mandible was reconstructed with an angle fracture that had a fracture gap of either 0.1 or 1 mm. Three types of plate fixation designs were used: Type I, a miniplate was placed across the fracture line following the Champy technique; Type II, two miniplates were used; and Type III, a reconstruction plate was used on the inferior border of the mandible. Loads of 100 and 500 N were applied to the models. The maximum von Mises stress, strain, and displacement were computed using finite element analysis. The results from the control and experimental groups were analyzed and compared. The results demonstrated that high stresses and strains were distributed to the condylar and angular areas regardless of the loading position. The ratio of the plate/bone average stress ranged from 215% (Type II design) to 848% (Type I design) irrespective of the interfragmentary gap size. With a 1-mm fracture gap, the ratio of the plate/bone stress ranged from 204% (Type II design) to 1130% (Type I design). All strains were well below critical bone strain thresholds. Displacement on the cross-sectional mapping at fracture interface indicated that uneven movement occurred in x, y, and z directions. Interfragmentary gaps between 0.1 and 1 mm did not have a substantial effect on the average stress distribution to the fractured bony segments; however, they had a greater effect on the stress distribution to the plates and screws. Type II fixation was the best mechanical design under bite loads. Type I design was the least stable system and had the highest stress distribution and the largest displacement

  5. Electrostatic tuning of Kondo effect in a rare-earth-doped wide-band-gap oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-04-29

    As a long-lived theme in solid-state physics, the Kondo effect reflects the many-body physics involving the short-range Coulomb interactions between itinerant electrons and localized spins in metallic materials. Here we show that the Kondo effect is present in ZnO, a prototypical wide-band-gap oxide, doped with a rare-earth element (Gd). The localized 4f electrons of Gd ions do not produce remanent magnetism, but interact strongly with the host electrons, giving rise to a saturating resistance upturn and negative magnetoresistance at low temperatures. Furthermore, the Kondo temperature and resistance can be electrostatically modulated using electric-double-layer gating with liquid ionic electrolyte. Our experiments provide the experimental evidence of tunable Kondo effect in ZnO, underscoring the magnetic interactions between localized and itinerant electrons and the emergent transport behaviors in such doped wide-band-gap oxides.

  6. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  7. The Effect of an Annular Celotex(r) Gap on the 9975 Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    Following a drop test at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), radiographs of a 9975 drum package showed that separations, normal to the axial direction, had formed in the Celotex(R). Because the Celotex(R) acts as a thermal insulator, concerns arose as to the effect gaps in the material would have on the packaging components during and after a hypothetical fire transient. The effect of Celotex(R) gaps on the content temperature was estimated using a thermal model developed with the MSC/THERMAL(R) heat transfer software. The model included the effects of internal heat conduction and thermal radiation. Convection and thermal radiation boundary conditions were applied to the model. The thermal analysis supported the expectation that small separations in the fiberboard insulation will not degrade the thermal performance of the 9975 package in a Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) fire

  8. Band gap widening and quantum tunnelling effects of Ag/MgO/p-Si MOS structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, Norlida; Badar, Nurhanna; Fadilah Chayed, Nor; Firdaus Kasim, Muhd

    2016-10-01

    MgO films of various thicknesses were fabricated via the pulsed laser deposition method. The MgO thin films obtained have the advantage of high quality mirror finish, good densification and of uniform thickness. The MgO thin films have thicknesses of between 43 to 103 nm. They are polycrystalline in nature with oriented growth mainly in the direction of the [200] and [220] crystal planes. It is observed that the band gap of the thin films increases as the thickness decreases due to quantum effects, however, turn-on voltage has the opposite effect. The decrease of the turn-on as well as the tunnelling voltage of the thinner films, despite their larger band gap, is a direct experimental evidence of quantum tunnelling effects in the thin films. This proves that quantum tunnelling is more prominent in low dimensional structures.

  9. Long-Term Effects of School Size on Students' Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humlum, Maria Knoth; Smith, Nina

    We estimate the effect of school size on students' long-term outcomes such as high school completion, being out of the labor market, and earnings at the age of 30. We use rich register data on the entire population of Danish children attending grade 9 in the period 1986-2004. This allows us...... to compare the results of different fixed effect and instrumental variables estimators. We use the natural population variation in the residentail catchment areas and school openings and closures to instrument for actual school size. We find a robust positive but numerically fairly small relationship between...... school size and alternative measures of long-term success in the educational system and the labor market. The positive impact of school size seems mainly to be driven by boys, students from families with a low educational level and students attending schools in urban areas....

  10. Specimen size effects on the tensile strength and fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teran, J.; Gonzalez, J. L.; Hallen, J. M.; Martinez, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an experimental research was conducted to determine size and orientation effects on tension and toughness properties through CTOD-R curves, using standard and miniature specimens taken from a structural steel plate.Compliance function estimation for the miniature size sample through load-displacement curves was considered. Experimental and statistical results showed that size and orientation affect tensioned toughness properties. The miniature tension test specimens showed strength values slightly greater than the standard ones but with less ductility. Miniature specimen CTOD-R curves showed sensibility to load changes and measurement method of crack aperture and crack length. Inconsistency in fracture toughness for specimen orientation longitudinal circumferential (LC) regarding size effect was also observed. Short orientations showed less strength and toughness than the other directions. (Author) 27 refs

  11. Finite-size effects in a cellular automaton for diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froboese, K.

    1989-01-01

    The question whether diffusion in the hard-square lattice gas is blocked in the thermodynamic limit is mapped to the problem whether percolation occurs in the time evolution of a cellular automaton. The final states of the cellular automaton are investigated for varying lattice sizes from 6 x 6 up to 20,035 x 20,032. The results seem to indicate that there is a percolation threshold, i.e., a range of concentrations for which diffusion is blocked. However, since this cannot be true for the infinite system, as proven rigorously, it is concluded that finite-size effects persist for this system up to very large sizes

  12. Effects of Kaolin particle size and annealing temperature on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of kaolin particle sizes on the resistivity of zinc-kaolin composite resistors have been investigated. The composite resistors have been produced from kaolin particle sizes ranging from 0.063 mm to 0.5 mm. The resistors were produced in a mould to a dimension of 65 mm x 6.5 mm x 3.2 mm with dry zinc and ...

  13. Portfolio effects and firm size distribution : carbonated soft drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Ciara Whelan; Patrick P. Walsh

    2002-01-01

    PUBLISHED We use rich brand level retail data to demonstrate that the firm size distribution in Carbonated Soft Drinks is mainly an outcome of the degree to which firms own a portfolio of brands across segments of the market, and not from performance within segments. In addition, while the number of firms in each segment is limited by segment size relative to sunk cost and competition in a segment, idiosyncratic firm effects make some firms more likely to participate in any given segment. ...

  14. Effect of pre-heated composites and flowable liners on Class II gingival margin gap formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Blunck, Uwe; Denehy, Gerald; Munoz, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of preheated composites (PHC) and flowable liners (FL) on the gingival margin gap formation of Class II composite restorations compared to the placement of room temperature composites (RTC). Class II composite restorations were prepared on 40 extracted mandibular third molars, with the gingival margin located 1 mm below the CEJ in dentin. Optibond FL (Kerr), microhybrid Filtek Z-250 (3M ESPE) and Flow-It (Jeneric Pentron) were used to evaluate five study groups: 1) PHC, 130 degrees F/54.4 degrees C; 2) PHC, 155 degrees F/68.3 degrees C; 3) FL cured prior to the first increment composite; 4) FL cured simultaneously with the first increment composite and 5) RTC (Control). Impressions were taken with quick set polyvinyl siloxane impression material, and epoxy resin replicas were evaluated under SEM (200x). Gingival margin adaptation was quantitatively evaluated in terms of percentage of gap formation according to a modified ordinal scoring criteria. All margins were evaluated twice for reliability assessment. A non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine whether significant differences in gap formation existed among the study groups. A high level of agreement was observed between duplicate measurements of the percentage of gap formation (intra-class correlation = 0.956, p high degree of intra-examiner reliability was confirmed.

  15. Anisotropic Effective Mass, Optical Property, and Enhanced Band Gap in BN/Phosphorene/BN Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang

    2015-10-28

    Phosphorene is receiving great research interests because of its peculiar physical properties. Nonetheless, the phosphorus has a trouble of degradation due to oxidation. Hereby, we propose that the electrical and optical anisotropic properties can be preserved by encapsulating into hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We found that the h-BN contributed to enhancing the band gap of the phosphorene layer. Comparing the band gap of the pristine phosphorene layer, the band gap of the phosphorene/BN(1ML) system was enhanced by 0.15 eV. It was further enhanced by 0.31 eV in the BN(1ML)/phosphorene/BN(1ML) trilayer structure. However, the band gap was not further enhanced when we increased the thickness of the h-BN layers even up to 4 MLs. Interestingly, the anisotropic effective mass and optical property were still preserved in BN/phosphorene/BN heterostructures. Overall, we predict that the capping of phosphorene by the h-BN layers can be an excellent solution to protect the intrinsic properties of the phosphorene.

  16. Size-effects on yield surfaces for micro reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2011-01-01

    Size effects in heterogeneous materials are studied using a rate independent higher order strain gradient plasticity theory, where strain gradient effects are incorporated in the free energy of the material. Numerical studies are carried out using a finite element method, where the components....... The center of the yield surface is tracked under uniaxial loading both in the transverse and longitudinal directions and an anisotropic Bauschinger effect is shown to depend on the size of the fibers. Results are compared to conventional predictions, and size-effects on the kinematic hardening...... of the plastic strain tensor appear as free variables in addition to the displacement variables. Non-conventional boundary conditions are applied at material interfaces to model a constraint on plastic flow due to dislocation blocking. Unit cell calculations are carried out under generalized plane strain...

  17. Size-effect of explosive sensitivity under low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Danzhu; Chen, Pengwan; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-06-01

    Low velocity impact may ignite the solid high explosives and cause undesired explosion incidents. The safety of high explosives under low velocity impact is one of the most important problems in handling, manufacture, storage, and transportation procedures. More and more evaluation tests have been developed for low velocity impact scenarios, including, but not limited to the drop hammer impact test, the Susan test, the Spigot test, and the Steven test, with a charge mass varying from tens of milligrams to several kilograms. The effects of specimen size on explosive sensitivity were found in our drop hammer impact test and Steven tests, including the threshold velocity/height and reaction violence. To further analyze the size effects on explosive sensitivity under low velocity impacts, we collected the impact sensitivity data of several PBX explosives in the drop hammer test, the Steven test, the Susan test and the Spigot test. The effective volume of explosive charge and the threshold specific mechanical energy were introduced to investigate the size-effect on the explosive ignition thresholds. The effective volumes of explosive charge in Steven test and Spigot test were obtained by numerical simulation, due to the localization of the impact. The threshold specific mechanical energy is closely related to the effective volume of explosive charge. The results show that, with the increase of effective volume, the specific mechanical energy needed for explosive ignition decreases and trends to reach a constant value. The mechanisms of size effects on explosive sensitivity are also discussed.

  18. Specimen size effect of explosive sensitivity under low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Danzhu; Chen, Pengwan; Dai, Kaida; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Low velocity impact may ignite the solid high explosives and cause undesired explosion incidents. The safety of high explosives under low velocity impact is one of the most important issues in handling, manufacture, storage, and transportation procedures. Various evaluation tests have been developed for low velocity impact scenarios, including, but not limited to the drop hammer test, the Susan test, the Spigot test, and the Steven test, with a charge mass varying from tens of milligrams to several kilograms. The effects of specimen size on explosive sensitivity were found in some impact tests such as drop hammer test and Steven tests, including the threshold velocity/height and reaction violence. To analyse the specimen size effects on explosive sensitivity under low velocity impacts, we collected the impact sensitivity data of several PBX explosives in the drop hammer test, the Steven test, the Susan test and the Spigot test. The effective volume of explosive charge and the critical specific mechanical energy were introduced to investigate the size-effect on the explosive reaction thresholds. The effective volumes of explosive charge in Steven test and Spigot test were obtained by numerical simulation, due to the deformation localization of the impact loading. The critical specific mechanical energy is closely related to the effective volume of explosive charge. The results show that, with the increase of effective volume, the critical mechanical energy needed for explosive ignition decreases and tends to reach a constant value. The mechanisms of size effects on explosive sensitivity are also discussed.

  19. Effect of small mapping population sizes on reliability of quantitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A limitation of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping is that accuracy of determining QTL position and effects are largely determined by population size. Despite the importance of this concept, known as the "Beavis effect there has generally been a lack of understanding by molecular geneticists and breeders. One possible ...

  20. Effects of Particle Size Distribution on Bioremediation of Crude Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioremediation has been proven to be the most effective method of cleaning up oil contaminated soils through the application of nutrients and microorganism. Hence, this research presents the effects of particle size distribution on bioremediation of crude oil polluted sandy soils. Six different soil samples were sieved using ...

  1. Faraday effect and λ-modulation absorption spectra of GaP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkova, P N; Dimov, T N; Iliev, I A

    2007-01-01

    There are presented the absorption optical spectra of GaP measured by λ-modulation method at room temperature in the spectral region from 505 nm to 700 nm. It is not possible even by λ-modulation to be registered at room temperature the wave bands due to the exciton-phonon interaction. The absorption spectra of GaP carried out by a λ-modulation can be separated exactly in the spectral parts as follows: the transmittance region where the absorption is too slightly expressed; the region determined by the phonon-assisted indirect transitions; the region of the interband absorption. The purpose of Faraday rotation measurements is to establish the influence of the exciton-phonon interaction on the magneto-optical effect. The magneto-optical effect has been investigated by a φ-modulation. The spectral dependence of dn/dλ in the transmittance region is determined by the φ-modulated spectra

  2. Electron Beam Adjustment in PLATO RTS 2 Including the Effect of Air Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, M C; Trindade, A; Rodrigues, P; Peralta, L

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Beam characterization for electron dose calculations in PLATO RTS 2 treatment planning system requires the tuning of two adjustment parameters: sqx (the initial angular spread) and FMCS (a "fudge" multiple Coulomb scattering parameter). This work provides a set of suggestions to optimise electron dose calculations with PLATO, taking into account the effect of air gaps between the electron applicator and the patient skin. Material and Methods: Two adjustment criteria have been followed: one which uses just one input data set corresponding to the standard (null) air gap and another one that takes into account the whole range of clinically used distances between the electron applicator and the patient surface. The adjusted values of sqx were compared with experimental data and GEANT3 Monte Carlo code results. A systematic study has been carried out of the effect of both adjustment parameters on electron dose calculations in water. Comparisons of dose distributions and point dose values ha...

  3. Modeling the Effect of Tumor Size in Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschraegen, Claire; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gábor; Gordon, Richard; Royce, Melanie E.; Vlastos, Georges; Tai, Patricia; Storme, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The purpose of this study was to determine the type of relationship between tumor size and mortality in early breast carcinoma. Methods: The data was abstracted from 83,686 cases registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of women diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma between 1988 and 1997 presenting with a T1–T2 lesion and no metastasis in whom axillary node dissection was performed: 58,070 women were node-negative (N0) and 25,616 were node-positive (N+). End point was death from any cause. Tumor size was modeled as a continuous variable by proportional hazards using a generalized additive models procedure. Results: Functionally, a Gompertzian expression exp(-exp(-(size-15)/10)) provided a good fit to the effect of tumor size (in millimeters) on mortality, irrespective of nodal status. Quantitatively, for tumor size between 3 and 50 mm, the increase of crude cumulative death rate (number of observed deaths divided by the number of patients at risk) increased with size from 10% to 25% for N0 and from 20% to 40% for N+. Conclusions: The functional relationship of tumor size with mortality is concordant with current knowledge of tumor growth. However, its qualitative and quantitative independence of nodal status is in contradiction with the prevailing concept of sequential disease progression from primary tumor to regional nodes. This argues against the perception that nodal metastases are caused by the primary tumor. PMID:15650642

  4. Effect of Gap Distance on Tensile Strength of Preceramic Base Metal Solder Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Fattahi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. In order to fabricate prostheses with high accuracy and durability, soldering techniques have been introduced to clinical dentistry. However, these prostheses always fail at their solder joints. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap distance on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. Materials and methods. Based on ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test, 40 specimens were fabricated from a Ni-Cr alloy and cut at the midpoint of 3-mm diameter bar and placed at desired positions by a specially designed device. The specimens were divided into four groups of 10 samples according to the desired solder gap distance: Group1: 0.1mm; Group2: 0.25mm; Group3: 0.5mm; and Group4: 0.75mm. After soldering, specimens were tested for tensile strength by a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min with a preload of 10N. Results. The mean tensile strength values of the groups were 162, 307.8, 206.1 and 336.7 MPa, respectively. The group with 0.75-mm gap had the highest and the group with 0.1-mm gap had the lowest tensile strength. Bonferroni test showed that Group1 and Group4 had statistically different values (P=0.023, but the differences between other groups were not significant at a significance level of 0.05. Conclusion. There was no direct relationship between increasing soldering gap distance and tensile strength of the solder joints.

  5. Effect of gap distance on tensile strength of preceramic base metal solder joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Farnaz; Motamedi, Milad

    2011-01-01

    In order to fabricate prostheses with high accuracy and durability, soldering techniques have been introduced to clinical dentistry. However, these prostheses always fail at their solder joints. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap distance on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. Based on ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test, 40 specimens were fabricated from a Ni-Cr alloy and cut at the midpoint of 3-mm diameter bar and placed at desired positions by a specially designed device. The specimens were divided into four groups of 10 samples according to the desired solder gap distance: Group1: 0.1mm; Group2: 0.25mm; Group3: 0.5mm; and Group4: 0.75mm. After soldering, specimens were tested for tensile strength by a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min with a preload of 10N. The mean tensile strength values of the groups were 162, 307.8, 206.1 and 336.7 MPa, respectively. The group with 0.75-mm gap had the highest and the group with 0.1-mm gap had the lowest tensile strength. Bonferroni test showed that Group1 and Group4 had statistically different values (P=0.023), but the differences between other groups were not sig-nificant at a significance level of 0.05. There was no direct relationship between increasing soldering gap distance and tensile strength of the solder joints.

  6. The effect of particle shape and size on cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Particle shape and size have been well-recognized to exhibit important effect on drug delivery and as an excellent candidate for drug delivery applications. The recent advances in the "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches make it possible to develop different shaped and sized polymeric nanostructures, which provide a chance to tailor the shape of the nanostructures as a drug carrier. Presently, a large amount of cellular uptake data is available for particle shape and size effect on drug delivery. However, the effect has not been well formulated or described quantitatively. In the present paper, the dynamic process of the effects of particle shape and size on cellular uptake is analyzed, quantitative expression for the influence of particle shape and size on cellular uptake is proposed on the basis of local geometric feature of particle shape and diffusion approach of a particle in a medium rationally, and the relevant parameters in the formulation are determined by the available test data. The results indicate the validity of the present formulations.

  7. Specific cesium activity in freshwater fish and the size effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, A.O.; Ryabov, I.N.; USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow

    1992-01-01

    The specific Cs-137 activity of muscle tissues of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) from the cooling pond of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant caught in 1987 and 1988 increased almost linearly with fish weight ('size effect') in contrast to liver tissue, whose specific activity remained independent of weight. A kinetic model for uptake and excretion was developed to describe the size effect in muscle tissue by introducing a weight-dependent Cs biological half-time to fish. Similar size effects of specific Cs-137 activity were also found for other species of fish from cooling pond, but were primarily attributed to changes in feeding habits with increasing weight of fish rather than to metabolic changes in feeding habits with both of muscle and liver tissue increased with fish weight for those species in contrast to silver carp. (author). 12 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Patch Size and Population Density: the Effect of Immigration Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Bowman

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Many habitat fragmentation experiments make the prediction that animal population density will be positively related to fragment, or patch, size. The mechanism that is supposed to result in this prediction is unclear, but several recent reviews have demonstrated that population density often is negatively related to patch size. Immigration behavior is likely to have an important effect on population density for species that do not show strong edge effects, for species that have low emigration rates, and during short-term habitat fragmentation experiments. We consider the effect that different kinds of immigration behaviors will have on population density and we demonstrate that only a minority of possible scenarios produce positive density vs. patch size relationships. More commonly, these relationships are expected to be negative. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering autecological mechanisms, such as immigration behavior, when developing the predictions that we test in habitat fragmentation or other experiments.

  9. Does neighborhood size really cause the word length effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitard, Dominic; Saint-Aubin, Jean; Tehan, Gerald; Tolan, Anne

    2018-02-01

    In short-term serial recall, it is well-known that short words are remembered better than long words. This word length effect has been the cornerstone of the working memory model and a benchmark effect that all models of immediate memory should account for. Currently, there is no consensus as to what determines the word length effect. Jalbert and colleagues (Jalbert, Neath, Bireta, & Surprenant, 2011a; Jalbert, Neath, & Surprenant, 2011b) suggested that neighborhood size is one causal factor. In six experiments we systematically examined their suggestion. In Experiment 1, with an immediate serial recall task, multiple word lengths, and a large pool of words controlled for neighborhood size, the typical word length effect was present. In Experiments 2 and 3, with an order reconstruction task and words with either many or few neighbors, we observed the typical word length effect. In Experiment 4 we tested the hypothesis that the previous abolition of the word length effect when neighborhood size was controlled was due to a confounded factor: frequency of orthographic structure. As predicted, we reversed the word length effect when using short words with less frequent orthographic structures than the long words, as was done in both of Jalbert et al.'s studies. In Experiments 5 and 6, we again observed the typical word length effect, even if we controlled for neighborhood size and frequency of orthographic structure. Overall, the results were not consistent with the predictions of Jalbert et al. and clearly showed a large and reliable word length effect after controlling for neighborhood size.

  10. Size effect in resin/glass composite flexure strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, G R; McCool, J I; Boberick, K G; Zhang, H Q

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that composite restorative materials possess an elastic-brittle nature and therefore will exhibit a size effect for flexure strength data. The experimental material consisted of 20 wt% 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA, 10 wt% colloidal silica, and 70 wt% Sr glass and was cured by light irradiation. Two sizes of flexure specimens were fabricated: 3.2x1.6x35 mm, and 6.25x3.1x35 mm. Half of the specimens made were soaked to equilibrium weight gain in 50:50 ethanol:water. The fracture strengths were measured in four-point bending tests. The beams under load were modelled by the finite element package ABAQUS. A statistical fracture mechanics methodology embodied in a public domain computer program called CARES/LIFE, developed by NASA, utilized the ABAQUS input and the fracture strengths of the smaller specimens to predict the fracture strengths of the larger specimens. In making the computation it used an approach that combines a Weibull distribution of flaw size with Batdorf's fracture mechanical model for failure at a material flaw. Both the soaked and unsoaked specimens exhibited Weibull behaviour, with shape parameters ranging from 4.04 to 8.15. Soaking had a clearly detrimental effect on the strengths of specimens of both sizes, and produced a comparable percentage reduction in the estimated scale parameter of the fracture strength distribution. Both the soaked and unsoaked specimens also exhibited a clear and comparable size effect, i.e. the larger specimens had a fracture strength that was lower than that of the smaller specimens by roughly the same percentage. Moreover, the magnitude of the size effect was well predicted by the CARES/LIFE methodology for both the soaked and the dry specimens. The elastic-brittle character of both soaked and unsoaked composite specimens was validated by load-deflection data, the magnitude of the Weibull shape parameters of the observed fracture strength data (<10), and the observed effect

  11. Effect of loading condition, specimen geometry, size-effect and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IC were dependent on material prop- erties and independent of specimen geometry and size. Xu & Reinhardt (1999b, c) developed analytical methods for TPBT and CT or wedge splitting test (WST) to determine the values of double-K fracture parameters. From the available experimental results, it was also shown that.

  12. Size effect in tension perpendicular to the grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Clorius, Christian Odin; Damkilde, Lars

    1999-01-01

    The strength in tension perpendicular to the grain is known to decrease with an increase in the stressed volume. Usually this size effect is explained on a stochastic basis, that is an explanation relying on an increased probability of encountering a strength reducing flaw when the volume...... of the material under stress is increased. This paper presents a small experimental investigation on specimens with well defined structural orientation of the material. The experiments exhibit a larger size effect than expected and furthermore the data and the nature of the failures encountered suggest...

  13. R2 effect-size measures for mediation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Amanda J.; MacKinnon, David P.; Taborga, Marcia P.; Taylor, Aaron B.

    2010-01-01

    R2 effect-size measures are presented to assess variance accounted for in mediation models. The measures offer a means to evaluate both component paths and the overall mediated effect in mediation models. Statistical simulation results indicate acceptable bias across varying parameter and sample-size combinations. The measures are applied to a real-world example using data from a team-based health promotion program to improve the nutrition and exercise habits of firefighters. SAS and SPSS computer code are also provided for researchers to compute the measures in their own data. PMID:19363189

  14. Cohesive stresses and size effect in quasi-brittle materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Cohesive stresses and size effect in quasi-brittle materials. 465. 10−3. 10−1. 101 r. 10−1. 100 σ n. /f' t. Figure 5. Size effect law for an edge crack with Dugdale's model. Expressed in terms of r = a0/cf ,s = 1/(1 + r), the far field nominal stress will be. σN = (. 0.903/α. ︸︷︷︸. B. ) ft. [. 1/. (. 1 + r. ︸︷︷︸ β. )]1/2 . (14).

  15. Effects of elastic anisotropy in phononic band-gap plates with two-dimensional lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the effects of elastic anisotropy of constituent materials in square-lattice phononic-crystal plates. Using general elastodynamic calculations and the finite element (FE) method, this study analyses phononic-crystal plates constituted by (1) anisotropic scatterers embedded in an epoxy plate and (2) air holes etched on an anisotropic plate. The full band gaps can be modulated, opened and closed by changing the orientation of the square lattice relative to the crystallographic coordinate system of the anisotropic materials, and the elastic anisotropy varies the dispersion curves of the phononic-crystal plate waves with the rotation of the square lattice. Acoustic power transmission calculations show incident plate mode-dependent spectral gaps, the appearances of which in the frequency spectrum can also be modulated and shifted using elastic anisotropy. The effects of elastic anisotropy demonstrated here enable tailoring frequency band gaps and dispersion curves for functional control of acoustic-wave energy flows in phononic-crystal plates. Applications include acoustic waveguiding, confining, self-collimating and perfect acoustic focusing.

  16. Effect of Temperature on Photonic Band Gaps in Semiconductor-Based One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Malik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the temperature and angle of incidence on the photonic band gap (PBG for semiconductor-based photonic crystals has been investigated. The refractive index of semiconductor layers is taken as a function of temperature and wavelength. Three structures have been analyzed by choosing a semiconductor material for one of the two materials in a bilayer structure. The semiconductor material is taken to be ZnS, Si, and Ge with air in first, second, and third structures respectively. The shifting of band gaps with temperature is more pronounced in the third structure than in the first two structures because the change in the refractive index of Ge layers with temperature is more than the change of refractive index of both ZnS and Si layers with temperature. The propagation characteristics of the proposed structures are analyzed by transfer matrix method.

  17. Polarization field gradient effects in inhomogeneous metal-ferroelectric bilayers: Optical response and band gap tunability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivas C, H., E-mail: hvivasc@unal.edu.co [Grupo de las Propiedades Opticas de los Materiales (POM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 (Colombia); Vargas-Hernandez, C. [Grupo de las Propiedades Opticas de los Materiales (POM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 (Colombia)

    2012-06-15

    Optical constants, reflectivity response and direct band gap energy (E{sub g}{sup d}) were calculated and simulated by developing an electrodynamic-based model for a three medium system, namely vacuum/ferroelectric film/metallic substrate. Depolarization effects due to the contact between the metallic substrate and the FE film, as well as the spatially dependent profile of the dielectric susceptibility {epsilon}(z) enter into the formalism by adapting the phenomenological Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory (LGD). Absorption coefficient is obtained from the Lambert-Beer-Bouguer (LBB) approximation and the direct band gap energy as a function of the characteristic length is calculated by using the general Tauc power law. Numerical simulations lead to range of values for tunable E{sub g}{sup d} from 2.6 to 2.8 eV for characteristic lengths up to 30% the thickness of the film, in concordance with recent reports.

  18. Core size effects on safety performances of LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Hahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An oxide fuel small size core (1200 MWt) was analyzed in comparison with a large size core (3600 MWt) in order to evaluate the size effects on transient safety performances of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). In the first part of the study, main static safety parameters (i.e., Doppler coefficient, sodium void effect, etc.) of the two cores were characterized, and the second part of the study was focused on the dynamic behavior of the cores in two representative transient events: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) and the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). Margins to fuel melting and sodium boiling have been evaluated for these representative transients. Results show that the small core has a generally better or equivalent level of safety performances during these events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  19. Assessing climate change effects on long-term forest development: adjusting growth, phenology, and seed production in a gap model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.; Jorritsma, I.T.M.; Kramer, K.

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of forest development to climate change is assessed using a gap model. Process descriptions in the gap model of growth, phenology, and seed production were adjusted for climate change effects using a detailed process-based growth modeland a regression analysis. Simulation runs over

  20. Adaptive evolution and effective population size in wild house mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Phifer-Rixey, M.; Bonhomme, F.; Boursot, P.; Churchill, G. A.; Piálek, Jaroslav; Tucker, P.; Nachman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 10 (2012), s. 2949-2955 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0640 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : substitution * adaptation * evolution * effective population size * house mouse Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 10.353, year: 2012

  1. Effect Sizes in Single Case Research: How Large is Large?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard I.; Brossart, Daniel F.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Long, James R.; De-Alba, Roman Garcia; Baugh, Frank G.; Sullivan, Jeremy R.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the problem of interpreting effect sizes in single case research. Nine single case analytic techniques were applied to a convenience sample of 77 published interrupted time series (AB) datasets, and the results were compared by technique across the datasets. Reanalysis of the published data helped answer questions about the…

  2. effect of limestone particle size on bone quality of layers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UFS

    Peer-reviewed paper: 10th World Conference on Animal Production. 41. Effect of limestone particle size on bone quality characteristics of hens at end-of-lay. F.H. de Witt. #. , N.P. Kuleile .... 18 g), were obtained from a commercial egg producer and randomly allocated to the three treatments (n. = 23). At 70 weeks of age, ...

  3. Distinguishing crystallite size effects from those of structural disorder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stacking faults, in particular, are ubiquitous in layered materials and aside from broadening also induce peaks due to select reflections to shift away from the Bragg positions. The effect of structural disorder has to be suitably discounted before the application of the Scherrer formula for the estimation of crystallite size.

  4. Effects of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles prepared by precipitation. YAN DONG, YANJIAO CHANG, QIAN WANG, JIN TONG and JIANG ZHOU∗. Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), College of Biological and Agricultural Engineering,. Jilin University, 5988 Renmin Street, ...

  5. Distinguishing crystallite size effects from those of structural disorder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Both crystallite size effects and structural disorder contribute to the broadening of lines in the powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns of layered materials. Stacking faults, in particular, are ubiquitous in layered materials and aside from broadening also induce peaks due to select reflections to shift away from the ...

  6. Effects of reaction temperature on size and optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effects of reaction temperature on size and optical properties of. CdSe nanocrystals. SHUTANG CHEN, XIAOLING ZHANG*, YANBING ZHAO and QIUHUA ZHANG. Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, P.R. China. MS received 15 March 2009; revised 6 July 2009.

  7. Short communication Effective population size and inbreeding rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    201010100

    2013-05-30

    May 30, 2013 ... Understanding and estimating effective population size for practical application in marine species management. Conservation Biology 25 (3), 438-449. Mapiye, C., Chimonyo, M., Muchenje, V., Dzama, K., Marufu, M.C. & Raats, J.G., 2007. Potential for value-addition of Nguni cattle products in the communal ...

  8. Effective population size and evolutionary dynamics in outbred ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RESEARCH ARTICLE. Effective population size and evolutionary dynamics in outbred laboratory populations of Drosophila. LAURENCE D. MUELLER1∗, AMITABH JOSHI1,2, MARTA SANTOS1 and MICHAEL R. ROSE1. 1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.

  9. Finite-size effects for anisotropic bootstrap percolation : Logarithmic corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enter, Aernout C. D.; Hulshof, Tim

    In this note we analyse an anisotropic, two-dimensional bootstrap percolation model introduced by Gravner and Griffeath. We present upper and lower bounds on the finite-size effects. We discuss the similarities with the semi-oriented model introduced by Duarte.

  10. Cohesive stresses and size effect in quasi-brittle materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... consideration, a Newtonian approach based on local stress intensity factors is presented. Through this approach, it is shown that Ba z ˘ ant's size effect law is the first (and dominant) term in a series expansion for the nominal stress. Furthermore, analytical expressions for are derived for selected specimen geometries.

  11. Effect of limestone particle size on bone quality characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of different limestone particle sizes in layer diets on bone quality characteristics at end-of-lay hens. Calcitic limestone (360 g Ca/kg DM) that is extensively used in commercial poultry diets was obtained from a specific South African source. Limestone particles were graded as ...

  12. Size effect on strength and lifetime probability distributions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Size effect on strength and lifetime probability distributions of quasibrittle structures. #. ZDEN ˇEK P BAŽANT1,∗ and JIA-LIANG LE2. 1Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University,. 2145 Sheridan Road, CEE/A135, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. 2Department of Civil Engineering, University ...

  13. Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Applying Bootstrap Resampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjanovic, Erin S.; Osborne, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Confidence intervals for effect sizes (CIES) provide readers with an estimate of the strength of a reported statistic as well as the relative precision of the point estimate. These statistics offer more information and context than null hypothesis statistic testing. Although confidence intervals have been recommended by scholars for many years,…

  14. The effect of surface albedo and grain size distribution on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sand dams are very useful in arid and semi arid lands (ASALs) as facilities for water storage and conservation. Soils in ASALs are mainly sandy and major water loss is by evaporation and infiltration. This study investigated the effect of sand media characteristics, specifically surface albedo, grain size and stratification on ...

  15. Size effect in self consolidating concrete beams with and without ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The aim of this study is to obtain the fracture characteristics of low and medium compressive strength self consolidating concrete (SCC) for notched and un-notched plain concrete beams by using work of fracture GF and size effect model Gf methods and comparing them with those of normal concrete and high.

  16. Effect of preparation temperature and ions doping on size ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Binary and quaternary amorphous nano powders are prepared by wet reduction method. Cobalt boride nano catalyst is synthesized at 10 and 60 ºC. Effect of preparation temperature on size and morphology was studied. Co-M-Zr-B (M: Cr, Mo and W) as quaternary catalysts are also prepared in order to studying ions ...

  17. Application of size effect to compressive strength of concrete members

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    9, Mabuk-ri, Guseong-eup, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 449-713, Korea e-mail: kimjinkeun@kaist.ac.kr; yist@kopec.co.kr. Abstract. It is important to consider the effect of size when estimating the ultimate strength of a concrete member under ...

  18. An Introductory Summary of Various Effect Size Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Susan

    This paper provides a tutorial summary of some of the many effect size choices so that members of the Southwest Educational Research Association would be better able to follow the recommendations of the American Psychological Association (APA) publication manual, the APA Task Force on Statistical Inference, and the publication requirements of some…

  19. EFFECT OF FARM SIZE AND FREQUENCY OF CUTTING ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to ascertain the effect of farm size and frequency of cutting on the output of fluted pumpkin (Telfeiria sp) through a survey of some farms in Itu Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State. Thirty-two farmers were selected and interview schedules administered to them to obtain the relevant ...

  20. Sampling strategies for estimating brook trout effective population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew R. Whiteley; Jason A. Coombs; Mark Hudy; Zachary Robinson; Keith H. Nislow; Benjamin H. Letcher

    2012-01-01

    The influence of sampling strategy on estimates of effective population size (Ne) from single-sample genetic methods has not been rigorously examined, though these methods are increasingly used. For headwater salmonids, spatially close kin association among age-0 individuals suggests that sampling strategy (number of individuals and location from...

  1. Short communication: Effective population size and inbreeding rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short communication: Effective population size and inbreeding rate of indigenous Nguni cattle under in situ conservation in the low-input communal production ... as not at risk of extinction, while the individual enterprises were classified as being endangered-maintained without the exchange of germ plasm among them.

  2. Rolling induced size effects in elastic–viscoplastic sheet metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2015-01-01

    Rolling processes for which the characteristic length scale reaches into the range where size effects become important are receiving increased interest. In particularly, this is owed to the roll-molding process under development for high-throughput of micron-scale surface features. The study pres...

  3. Effect of limestone particle size on egg production and eggshell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different limestone particle sizes had no effect on any of the tested egg production and eggshell quality parameters. These results suggested that larger particles limestone are not necessarily essential to provide sufficient Ca2+ to laying hens for egg production and eggshell quality at end-of-lay, provided that the dietary Ca ...

  4. Effects of posterior condylar osteophytes on gap balancing in computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty with posterior cruciate ligament sacrifice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriphirom, Pornpavit; Siramanakul, Chaiyaporn; Chanopas, Boonyawat; Boonruksa, Sirisuk

    2018-01-04

    Gap planning in navigated total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a critical concern. Osteophytes are normally removed prior to gap planning, with the exception of posterior condylar osteophytes of the femur, which are removed after posterior condylar resection. This study investigated how posterior condylar osteophytes affect gap balancing during surgery. This prospective study was conducted on 40 primary varus osteoarthritic knees with a posterior condylar osteophyte that underwent TKA navigation. For all knees, computed tomography (CT) was performed to evaluate osteophyte position. The extension gap and flexion gap were determined under navigation using a tension device with a distraction force of 44 lb. The extension gap and flexion gap were measured before and after osteophyte removal. This study revealed that the average osteophyte thickness after removal was 7.75 ± 5.34 mm. The average extension gap change was 0.64 ± 0.80 mm, and the average flexion gap change was 0.85 ± 1.12 mm. With respect to increases in the medial extension gap, lateral extension gap, medial flexion gap and lateral flexion gap, the average effects of posterior condylar osteophyte removal were 0.74 ± 0.81 mm, 0.53 ± 0.96 mm, 0.71 ± 0.97 mm and 1.00 ± 1.41 mm, respectively. Posterior condylar osteophyte thickness was also significantly associated with increases in the lateral extension gap (R 2  = 0.107, p = 0.03), medial flexion gap (R 2  = 0.101, p = 0.04) and lateral flexion gap (R 2  = 0.107, p = 0.04). These results indicated that posterior condylar osteophytes of the femur affect gap balancing during TKA navigation.

  5. Subharmonic energy-gap structure and heating effects in superconducting niobium point contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, K.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    1989-01-01

    We present experimental data of the temperature-dependent subharmonic energy-gap structure (SGS) in the current-voltage (I-V) curves of superconducting niobium point contacts. The observed SGS is modified by heating effects. We construct a model of the quasiparticle conductance of metallic...... superconducting weak links that includes the heating effects self-consistently. Our model is combined with that of Octavio, Blonder, Klapwijk, and Tinkham [Phys. Rev. B 27, 6739 (1983)], which is based on the idea of multiple Andreev scattering in the contact. The shape and the temperature variation...

  6. Gap-flow Mediated Transport of Pollution to a Remote Coastal Site: Effects upon Aerosol Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, G.; Martin, A.; Petters, M.; Prather, K. A.; Taylor, H.; Rothfuss, N.; DeMott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    During the CalWater 2015 field campaign, observations of aerosol size, concentration, chemical composition, and cloud activity were made at Bodega Bay, CA on the remote California coast. Strong anthropogenic influence on air quality, aerosol physicochemical properties and cloud activity was observed at Bodega Bay during periods of special meteorological conditions, known as Petaluma Gap Flow, in which air from California's interior is transported to the coast. This study utilizes single particle mass spectrometry, along with aerosol physical and chemical measurements and meteorological measurements to show that the dramatic change in aerosol properties is strongly related to regional meteorology and anthropogenically-influenced chemical processes in California's Central Valley. The change in airmass properties from those typical of a remote marine environment to properties of a continental regime has impacts on atmospheric radiative balance and cloud formation that must be accounted for in regional climate simulation.

  7. The effect of roll gap geometry on microstructure in cold-rolled aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishin, Oleg; Bay, B.; Winther, G.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure and texture are analyzed through the thickness of two aluminum plates cold-rolled 40% with different roll gap geometries. It is found that both texture and microstructure are strongly affected by the rolling geometry. After rolling with intermediate-size draughts a rolling...... layers. In these layers, extended planar dislocation boundaries are frequently found to be inclined closely to the rolling direction. The subsurface and central layers of this plate exhibit microstructures similar to those in the plate rolled with intermediate draughts. It is suggested...... that the development of different textures and microstructures at different depths is related to the activation of different slip systems due to through-thickness strain gradients....

  8. Infrared reflectance spectra: effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, J. E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-10-01

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  9. On size-effects in single crystal wedge indentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Wedge indentation in single crystals is studied numerically, with emphasis on size-effects on the micron scale. Under the assumption of a perfectly sharp wedge indenter, a linear relationship between indentation force and indentation depth would be predicted from conventional theories lacking con...... are included in the model due to the addition of gradient terms in both the free energy as well as through a dissipation potential. The finite element solution method is presented, which delivers the slip-rate field and the velocity-field based on two minimum principles.......Wedge indentation in single crystals is studied numerically, with emphasis on size-effects on the micron scale. Under the assumption of a perfectly sharp wedge indenter, a linear relationship between indentation force and indentation depth would be predicted from conventional theories lacking...... constitutive length parameters to model sizeeffects. The problem is studied numerically using a strain gradient crystal visco-plasticity theory formulated along the lines proposed by Fleck andWillis (2009). It is shown how the force-indentation relation is affected due to size-dependence in the material. Size-effects...

  10. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Aono, H

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10(4)) to O(10(1)) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  11. The Effect of Size and Ecology on Extinction Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, C.; Yuan, A.; Heim, N.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Although life on Earth first emerged as prokaryotic organisms, it eventually evolved into billions of different species. However, extinctions on Earth, especially the five mass extinctions, have decimated species. So what leads to a species survival or demise during a mass extinction? Are certain species more susceptible to extinctions based on their size and ecology? For this project, we focused on the data of marine animals. To examine the impact of size and ecology on a species's likelihood of survival, we compared the sizes and ecologies of the survivors and victims of the five mass extinctions. The ecology, or life mode, of a genus consists of the combination of tiering, motility, and feeding mechanism. Tiering refers to the animal's typical location in the water column and sediments, motility refers to its ability to move, and feeding mechanism describes the way the organism eats; together, they describe the animal's behavior. We analyzed the effect of ecology on survival using logistic regression, which compares life mode to the success or failure of a genus during each mass extinction interval. For organism size, we found the extinct organisms' mean size (both volume and length) and compared it with the average size of survivors on a graph. Our results show that while surviving genera of mass extinctions tended to be slightly larger than those that went extinct, there was no significant difference. Even though the Permian (Changhsingian) and Triassic (Rhaetian) extinctions had larger surviving species, likewise the difference was small. Ecology had a more obvious impact on the likelihood of survival; fast-moving, predatory pelagic organisms were the most likely to go extinct, while sedentary, infaunal suspension feeders had the greatest chances of survival. Overall, ecology played a greater role than size in determining the survival of a species. With this information, we can use ecology to predict which species would survive future extinctions.

  12. Effects of portion size on chronic energy intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pentel Paul R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study experimentally examined the effects of repeated exposure to different meal portion sizes on energy intake. Methods Nineteen employees of a county medical center were given free box lunches for two months, one month each of 1528 and 767 average kcal. Foods were identical in the two conditions, but differed in portion size. Meals averaged 44% calories from fat. Participants self-reported how much of each lunch was eaten. Unannounced 24-hour dietary recalls were also conducted by phone twice per week during each exposure period. Results Mean energy intake at the lunch meal was 332 kcal/day higher in large lunch than in small lunch periods (p Conclusion This study suggests that chronic exposure to large portion size meals can result in sustained increases in energy intake and may contribute to body weight increases over time.

  13. System size effect on the critical behavior in nuclear multifragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, B., E-mail: bb_22@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Gauhati University, Guwahati-781014 (India); Talukdar, R. [Department of Physics, Gauhati University, Guwahati-781014 (India)

    2011-08-01

    Attempt has been made to examine the role of system size on the traditional signatures of critical behavior from a comparative study of Mg-Em at 4.5 A GeV and Kr-Em at 0.95 A GeV interactions. A number of relevant observables such as fluctuation in the sizes of the largest cluster, reduced variance and the mean value of second moment of charge distribution were estimated with the experimental data. From a comparison of our results with that of EOS collaboration for Au, La and Kr on carbon at 1 A GeV, a definite systematic variation in the heights and positions of the peaks could be observed with the change of fragmenting nuclei thereby confirming the effect of system size on MF mechanism.

  14. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 μg/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 μg/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 μg/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 μg/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation

  15. Size Effect of Defects on the Mechanical Properties of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngho; Hyun, Sangil

    2018-03-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional material, has been studied and utilized for its excellent material properties. In reality, achieving a pure single-crystalline structure in graphene is difficult, so usually graphene may have various types of defects in it. Vacancies, Stone-Wales defects, and grain boundaries can drastically change the material properties of graphene. Graphene with vacancy defects has been of interest because it is a two-dimensional analogy of three-dimensional porous materials. It has efficient material properties, and can function as a part of modern devices. The mechanical properties have been studied by using molecular dynamics for either a single vacancy defect with various sizes or multiple vacancy defects with same defect ratios. However, it is not clear which one has more influence on the mechanical properties between the size of the defects and the defect ratio. Therefore, we investigated the hole-size effect on the mechanical properties of single-crystalline graphene at various defect ratios. A void defect with large size can have a rather high tensile modulus with a low fracture strain compared to a void defect with small size. We numerically found that the tensile properties of scattered single vacancies is similar to that of amorphous graphene. We suspect that this is due to the local orbital change of the carbon atoms near the boundary of the void defects, so-called the interfacial phase.

  16. Why herd size matters - mitigating the effects of livestock crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næss, Marius Warg; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Analysing the effect of pastoral risk management strategies provides insights into a system of subsistence that have persevered in marginal areas for hundreds to thousands of years and may shed light into the future of around 200 million households in the face of climate change. This study investigated the efficiency of herd accumulation as a buffer strategy by analysing changes in livestock holdings during an environmental crisis in the Saami reindeer husbandry in Norway. We found a positive relationship between: (1) pre- and post-collapse herd size; and (2) pre-collapse herd size and the number of animals lost during the collapse, indicating that herd accumulation is an effective but costly strategy. Policies that fail to incorporate the risk-beneficial aspect of herd accumulation will have a limited effect and may indeed fail entirely. In the context of climate change, official policies that incorporate pastoral risk management strategies may be the only solution for ensuring their continued existence.

  17. Effects of dynamical paths on the energy gap and the corrections to the free energy in path integrals of mean-field quantum spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yang Wei

    2018-03-01

    In current studies of mean-field quantum spin systems, much attention is placed on the calculation of the ground-state energy and the excitation gap, especially the latter, which plays an important role in quantum annealing. In pure systems, the finite gap can be obtained by various existing methods such as the Holstein-Primakoff transform, while the tunneling splitting at first-order phase transitions has also been studied in detail using instantons in many previous works. In disordered systems, however, it remains challenging to compute the gap of large-size systems with specific realization of disorder. Hitherto, only quantum Monte Carlo techniques are practical for such studies. Recently, Knysh [Nature Comm. 7, 12370 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms12370] proposed a method where the exponentially large dimensionality of such systems is condensed onto a random potential of much lower dimension, enabling efficient study of such systems. Here we propose a slightly different approach, building upon the method of static approximation of the partition function widely used for analyzing mean-field models. Quantum effects giving rise to the excitation gap and nonextensive corrections to the free energy are accounted for by incorporating dynamical paths into the path integral. The time-dependence of the trace of the time-ordered exponential of the effective Hamiltonian is calculated by solving a differential equation perturbatively, yielding a finite-size series expansion of the path integral. Formulae for the first excited-state energy are proposed to aid in computing the gap. We illustrate our approach using the infinite-range ferromagnetic Ising model and the Hopfield model, both in the presence of a transverse field.

  18. Looking for the GAP effect in manual responses and the role of contextual influences in reaction time experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Jr. A.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When the offset of a visual stimulus (GAP condition precedes the onset of a target, saccadic reaction times are reduced in relation to the condition with no offset (overlap condition - the GAP effect. However, the existence of the GAP effect for manual responses is still controversial. In two experiments using both simple (Experiment 1, N = 18 and choice key-press procedures (Experiment 2, N = 12, we looked for the GAP effect in manual responses and investigated possible contextual influences on it. Participants were asked to respond to the imperative stimulus that would occur under different experimental contexts, created by varying the array of warning-stimulus intervals (0, 300 and 1000 ms and conditions (GAP and overlap: i intervals and conditions were randomized throughout the experiment; ii conditions were run in different blocks and intervals were randomized; iii intervals were run in different blocks and conditions were randomized. Our data showed that no GAP effect was obtained for any manipulation. The predictability of stimulus occurrence produced the strongest influence on response latencies. In Experiment 1, simple manual responses were shorter when the intervals were blocked (247 ms, P < 0.001 in relation to the other two contexts (274 and 279 ms. Despite the use of choice key-press procedures, Experiment 2 produced a similar pattern of results. A discussion addressing the critical conditions to obtain the GAP effect for distinct motor responses is presented. In short, our data stress the relevance of the temporal allocation of attention for behavioral performance.

  19. Far Sidelobe Effects from Panel Gaps of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluxa, Pedro R.; Duenner, Rolando; Maurin, Loiec; Choi, Steve K.; Devlin, Mark J.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Shuay-Pwu, P. Ho; Koopman, Brian J.; Louis, Thibaut; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a 6 meter diameter CMB telescope located at 5200 meters in the Chilean desert. ACT has made arc-minute scale maps of the sky at 90 and 150 GHz which have led to precise measurements of the fine angular power spectrum of the CMB fluctuations in temperature and polarization. One of the goals of ACT is to search for the B-mode polarization signal from primordial gravity waves, and thus extending ACT's data analysis to larger angular scales. This goal introduces new challenges in the control of systematic effects, including better understanding of far sidelobe effects that might enter the power spectrum at degree angular scales. Here we study the effects of the gaps between panels of the ACT primary and secondary reflectors in the worst case scenario in which the gaps remain open. We produced numerical simulations of the optics using GRASP up to 8 degrees away from the main beam and simulated timestreams for observations with this beam using real pointing information from ACT data. Maps from these simulated timestreams showed leakage from the sidelobes, indicating that this effect must be taken into consideration at large angular scales.

  20. Inferring Saving in Training Time From Effect Size Estimates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burright, Burke

    2000-01-01

    .... Students' time saving represents a major potential benefit of using them. This paper fills a methodology gap in estimating the students' timesaving benefit of asynchronous training technologies...

  1. Study on the Size Effect of Auxetic Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus-Michalska, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of scale of an auxetic cellular material sample on the evaluation of elastic properties. Size and boundary effects are studied in detail. This is achieved by conducting computer simulations of the auxetic structure under the typical loading exerted by the compression and simple shearing test performed by means of ABAQUS FEA. The material microstructure is discretized by the plane network of Timoshenko beam elements. The results of the studies give insight to the scale effects. Structures with designed properties can be potentially used for engineering applications.

  2. Effect and its threshold of ELF magnetic fields on gap junctional intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yiti; Hu Genlin; Zeng Qunli; Jiang Huai; Xu Zhengping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields and carcinogenesis. Methods: The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique was used to determine the effect of ELF magnetic fields and its threshold on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Results: FRAP analysis indicated that 0.4 mT ELF or more could inhibit GJIC, and 0.2 mT ELF or more could enhance the inhibition of GJIC by TPA. Conclusion: ELF magnetic fields might act as a cancer promoter or work in synergy with other cancer promoters

  3. Effects of symmetry reduction on magnon band gaps in two-dimensional magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu; Tang, Xiaoli; Su, Hua; Bai, Feiming; Jing, Yulan; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2014-02-01

    Effects of symmetry reduction on the magnon band gaps (MBGs) in two-dimensional (2D) magnonic crystals (MCs) were investigated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz equation with the plane wave method. The symmetry reduction is achieved by introducing additional scatterers into each unit cell or by reorienting noncircular scatterers. The numerical results show that the MBGs in a square lattice can be improved by introducing additional scatterers or rotating the square rods. In honeycomb and triangular lattices, the MBGs can be improved only by introducing additional scatterers, however, rotating the square rods is an invalid way to increase the MBGs.

  4. Effect of nanofillers' size on surface properties after toothbrush abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Larissa M; Masouras, Konstantinos; Watts, David C; Pimenta, Luiz A; Silikas, Nick

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effect of filler-particle size of experimental and commercial resin composites, undergoing toothbrush abrasion, on three surface properties: surface roughness (SR), surface gloss (G) and color stability (CS). Four model (Ivoclar/Vivadent) and one commercial resin composite (Tokuyama) with varying filler-size from 100-1000 nm were examined. Six discs (10 mm x 2 mm) from each product were prepared and mechanically polished. The samples were then submitted to 20,000 brushing strokes in a toothbrush abrasion machine. SR parameters (Ra, Rt and RSm), G, and CS were measured before and after toothbrush abrasion. Changes in SR and G were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, with Bonferroni post hoc test. CS values were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test (alpha=0.05). Initial G values ranged between 73-87 gloss units (GU) and were reduced after toothbrush abrasion to a range of 8-64 GU. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in significant modifications in SR and G amongst the materials tested, attributed to filler sizes. There was statistically significant difference in color (delta E* ranged from 0.38-0.88). Filler size did not affect color stability. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in rougher and matte surfaces for all materials tested. Although the individual differences in surface roughness among filler sizes were not always significant, the correlation showed a trend that larger filler sizes resulted in higher surface roughness after abrasion for the SR parameters Ra and Rt (r = 0.95; r = 0.93, respectively). RSm showed an increase after toothbrush abrasion for all resin composites, however no significant correlation was detected (r = 0.21).There was a significant correlation between G and Ra ratios (r = - 0.95).

  5. Effective Zakat Distribution: Highlighting Few Issues and Gaps in Kedah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashraf Al Haq

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify what are the impediments in implementing an effective Zakah distribution in Kedah, Malaysia. Auspiciously, post-colonial Malaysia is experiencing robustness in terms of Zakah collections, as the statistics are currently signifying, but at the same breath the degree of effectiveness in Zakah distribution has not been providentially catching that optimistic evolution. And even if, the Zakah is duly distributed, the point to note is that the effectivity of that distribution has indubitably remained in question. So this gap is an issue that has been observed by the givers, and if the collection is to increase further, the issue of effectivity in Zakah distribution needs to show a healthier trend to convince these worried payers. The implications of resolving the issues discussed below may assist to enhance this sector, if timely addressed and taken applicable measures for remediation. DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v9i2.4002

  6. Size Effect on the Mechanical Properties of CF Winding Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuqing; Yin, Zhongwei

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical properties of filament winding composites are usually tested by NOL ring samples. Few people have studied the size effect of winding composite samples on the testing result of mechanical property. In this research, winding composite thickness, diameter, and geometry of NOL ring samples were prepared to investigate the size effect on the mechanical strength of carbon fiber (CF) winding composite. The CF T700, T1000, M40, and M50 were adopted for the winding composite, while the matrix was epoxy resin. Test results show that the tensile strength and ILSS of composites decreases monotonically with an increase of thickness from 1 mm to 4 mm. The mechanical strength of composite samples increases monotonically with the increase in diameter from 100 mm to 189 mm. The mechanical strength of composite samples with two flat sides are higher than those of cyclic annular samples.

  7. Effective source size as related to 252Cf neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Nobuo; Enomoto, Shigemasa; Tachikawa, Noboru; Nojiri, Toshiaki.

    1977-01-01

    The effective source size in 252 Cf thermal neutron radiography, relating to its geometrical unsharpness in image formation, is experimentally studied. A neutron radiographic system consists of a 160 μg 252 Cf neutron source, water moderator and divergent cadmium lined collimator. Thermal neutron image detection is performed with using a LiF scintillator and a high speed X-ray film to employ direct exposure method. The modulation transfer function, used for describing image quality, is derived from radiographic image corresponding to a cadmium plate with sharp edge. The modulation transfer function for the system is expressed by the product of the function for both geometrical and inherent unsharpness, and allows isolation of geometrical unsharpness as related to the effective size of the thermal neutron source. It is found to be 80 -- 90% of the collimator inlet diameter. (auth.)

  8. Gap junction channel. Its aqueous nature as indicated by deuterium oxide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verselis, V.; Brink, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of temperature and solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) on axoplasmic (ga) and gap junctional (gj) conductances were examined in the earthworm septate median giant axon (MGA). The temperature coefficients (Q10) for ga and gj were 1.4 and 1.5, respectively, between 5 and 15 degrees C. Substitution with D 2 O rapidly reduced both ga and gj by 20% and increased the Q10's to 1.5 and 1.8, respectively. The reduction in ga upon substitution with D 2 O and with cooling in either solvent reflects the changes that occur in solvent viscosity, which indicates that ion mobility in axoplasm, as in free solution, is primarily governed by viscous properties of the solvent. The similar initial reduction observed for gj suggests that solvent occupies the gap junction channel volume and influences transjunctional ion mobility. With time there was a further reduction in gj at 20 degrees C and a larger Q10 in D 2 O. The enhanced effects of D 2 O on gj cannot be accounted for by solvent viscosity alone and may be due to an increased hydration of the channels and/or the transport ions and by isotope effects of hydrogen-deuterium exchange on the channel protein that reduce gj

  9. Effect of eating rate on binge size in Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissileff, Harry R; Zimmerli, Ellen J; Torres, Migdalia I; Devlin, Michael J; Walsh, B Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Effect of eating rate on binge size in bulimia nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating. During binge eating episodes, patients often describe the rapid consumption of food, and laboratory studies have shown that during binges patients with BN eat faster than normal controls (NC), but the hypothesis that a rapid rate of eating contributes to the excessive intake of binge meals has not yet been experimentally tested. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of eating rate on binge size in BN, in order to determine whether binge size is mediated, in part, by rate of eating. Thirteen BN and 14 NC subjects were asked to binge eat a yogurt shake that was served at a fast rate (140g/min) on one occasion and at a slow rate (70g/min) on another. NC subjects consumed 169 g more when eating at the fast rate than when eating at the slow rate. In contrast, consumption rates failed to influence binge size in patients with BN (fast: 1205 g; slow: 1195 g). Consequently, there was a significant group by rate interaction. As expected, patients with BN consumed more overall than NC subjects (1200 g vs. 740 g). When instructed to binge in the eating laboratory, patients with BN ate equally large amounts of food at a slow rate as at a fast rate. NC subjects ate less at a slow rate. These findings indicate that in a structured laboratory meal paradigm binge size is not affected by rate of eating. PMID:17996257

  10. Quasiparticle self-consistent GW theory of III-V nitride semiconductors: Bands, gap bowing, and effective masses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede; Gorczyca, I.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic band structures of InN, GaN, and a hypothetical ordered InGaN2 compound, all in the wurtzite crystal structure, are calculated using the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation. This approach leads to band gaps which are significantly improved compared to gaps calculated...... on the basis of the local approximation to density functional theory, although generally overestimated by 0.2–0.3 eV in comparison with experimental gap values. Details of the electronic energies and the effective masses including their pressure dependence are compared with available experimental information....... The band gap of InGaN2 is considerably smaller than what would be expected by linear interpolation implying a significant band gap bowing in InGaN alloys....

  11. Response to recurrent selection under small effective population size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Jr. Cláudio Lopes de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A formula was derived for the prediction of the response to recurrent selection when the effective population size (Ne is small. Usually, responses to selection have been estimated by Rs = icsigma²A/sigmaPh, where i, c, sigma²A, and sigmaPh stand for standardized selection differential, parental control, additive variance, and phenotypic standard deviation, respectively. This expression, however, was derived under the assumption of infinite population size. By introducing the effects of finite population size, the expression derived was Rs = [ic(sigma²A + deltaFD1/sigmaPh] - DFID, where deltaF, ID and D1 are the changes in the inbreeding coefficient, the inbreeding depression, and the covariance of additive and homozygous dominance effects, respectively. Thus, the predicted responses to selection based on these expressions will be smaller than those based on the standard procedures for traits with a high level of dominance such as yield. Responses to five cycles of half-sib selection were predicted for maize by both expressions, considering that 100 progenies were evaluated and 10 S1 progenies were recombined, which corresponds to Ne = 10 for each cycle. The accumulated response to selection estimated with the new expression was about 47 and 28% smaller than that based on the standard expression for yield and plant height, respectively. Thus, the expression usually used overestimates the responses to selection, which is in agreement with reported results, because it does not take into account the effective population size that is generally small in recurrent selection programs

  12. Landscape Heterogeneity–Biodiversity Relationship: Effect of Range Size

    OpenAIRE

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; Yamakita, Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, wherea...

  13. The effects of the Histone Deacetylase (HDAC Inhibitor 4-Phenylbutyrate on gap junction conductance and permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eKaufman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal resistance is a key factor in determining cardiac action potential propagation. Action potential conduction velocity has been shown to be proportional to the square root of longitudinal resistance. A major determinant of longitudinal resistance in myocardium is the gap junction channel, comprised of connexin proteins. Within the ventricular myocardium connexin 43 (Cx43 is the dominantly expressed connexin. Reduced numbers of gap junction channels will result in an increase in longitudinal resistance creating the possibility of slowed conduction velocity while increased numbers of channels would potentially result in an increase in conduction velocity. We sought to determine if inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC by 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB, a known inhibitor of HDAC resulted in an increase in junctional conductance and permeability, which is not the result of changes in single channel unitary conductance. These experiments were performed using HEK-293 cells and HeLa cells stably transfected with Cx43. Following treatment with increasing concentrations of 4-PB up-regulation of Cx43 was observed via Western blot analysis. Junctional (gj conductance and unitary single channel conductance were measured via whole-cell patch clamp. In addition intercellular transfer of Lucifer Yellow (LY was determined by fluorescence microscopy. The data in this study indicates that 4-PB is able to enhance functional Cx43 gap junction coupling as indicated by LY dye transfer and multichannel and single channel data along with Western blot analysis. As a corollary, pharmacological agents such as 4-PB have the potential, by increasing intercellular coupling, to reduce the effect of ischemia. It remains to be seen whether drugs like 4-PB will be effective in preventing cardiac maladies.

  14. An analysis of hot plate initial temperature effect on rectangular narrow gap quenching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M-Hadi Kusuma; Mulya Juarsa; Anhar Riza Antariksawan; Nandy Putra

    2012-01-01

    The understanding about thermal management in the event of a severe accident such as the melting nuclear reactor fuel and reactor core, became a priority to maintain the integrity of reactor pressure vessel. Thus the debris will not out from the reactor pressure vessel and resulting impact of more substantial to the environment. One way to maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel was cooling of the excess heat generated due to the accident. To get understanding of this aspect, there search focused on the effect of the initial temperature of the hot plate in the rectangular narrow gap quenching process. The initial temperature effect on quenching process is related to cooling process (thermal management) when the occurrence of a nuclear accident due to loss of coolant accident or severe accident. In order to address the problem, it is crucial to conduct research to get a better understanding of thermal management regarding to nuclear cooling accident. The research focused on determining the rewetting temperature of hot plate cooling on 220°C, 400°C, and 600°C with 0.2 liters/sec cooling water flowrate. Experiments were carried out by injecting 85°C cooling water temperature into the narrow gap at flowrates of 0.2 liters/sec. Data of transient temperature measurements were recorded using a data acquisition system in order to know the rewetting temperature during the quenching process. This study aims to understand the effect of hot plate initial temperature on rewetting during rectangular narrow gap quenching process. The results obtained show that the rewetting point on cooling the hot plate 220°C, 400°C and 600°occurs at varying rewetting temperatures. At 220°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 220°C. At 400°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 379.51°C. At 600°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 426.63°C. Significant differences of hot plate

  15. Size effects on magnetoelectric response of multiferroic composite with inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Y.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xu, K.Y., E-mail: kyxu@shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Chen, T. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Aifantis, E.C. [Laboratory of Mechanics and Materials (LMM), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); School of Mechanics and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); International Laboratory for Modern Functional Materials, ITMO University, St. Petersburg 191002 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the influence of size effects on the magnetoelectric performance of multiferroic composite with inhomogeneities. Based on a simple model of gradient elasticity for multiferroic materials, the governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained from an energy variational principle. The general formulation is applied to consider an anti-plane problem of multiferroic composites with inhomogeneities. This problem is solved analytically and the effective magnetoelectric coefficient is obtained. The influence of the internal length (grain size or particle size) on the effective magnetoelectric coefficients of piezoelectric/piezomagnetic nanoscale fibrous composite is numerically evaluated and analyzed. The results suggest that with the increase of the internal length of piezoelectric matrix (PZT and BaTiO{sub 3}), the magnetoelectric coefficient increases, but the rate of increase is ratcheting downwards. If the internal length of piezoelectric matrix remains unchanged, the magnetoelectric coefficient will decrease with the increase of internal length scale of piezomagnetic nonfiber (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). In a composite consisiting of a piezomagnetic matrix (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) reinforced with piezoelectric nanofibers (BaTiO{sub 3}), an increase of the internal length in the piezomagnetic matrix, results to a decrease of the magnetoelectric coefficient, with the rate of decrease diminishing.

  16. Size effects on free vibration of heterogeneous beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanati Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of microstructure on the free vibration of geometrically similar heterogeneous beams with free-free boundary conditions was numerically investigated by detailed finite element analysis (FEA to identify and quantify any effect of beam size on transverse modal frequencies when the microstructural scale is comparable to the overall size. ANSYS Mechanical APDL was used to generate specific unit cells at the microstructural scale comprised of two isotropic materials with different material properties. Unit cell variants containing voids and inclusions were considered. At the macroscopic scale, four beam sizes consisting of one, two, three or four layers of defined unit cells were represented by repeatedly regenerating the unit cell as necessary. In all four beam sizes the aspect ratio was kept constant. Changes to the volume fractions of each material were introduced while keeping the homogenized properties of the beam fixed. The influence of the beam surface morphology on the results was also investigated. The ANSYS results were compared with the analytical results from solution to Timoshenko beam and nonlocal Timoshenko beam as well as numerical results for a Micropolar beam. In nonlocal Timoshenko beams the Eringen’s small length scale coefficients were estimated for some of the studied models. Numerical analyses based on Micropolar theory were carried out to study the modal frequencies and a method was suggested to estimate characteristic length in bending and coupling number via transverse vibration which verifies the use of Micropolar elasticity theory in dynamic analysis.

  17. The effect of the shape of gaps on microenvironmental conditions and seedling recruitment in Molinietum caeruleae meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cessation of the management of semi-natural habitats such as grasslands and meadows contributes to secondary succession and encroachment of native and alien tall-growing perennials, large tussock grasses, shrubs, and trees. Thus, the formation of gaps in the plant canopy and litter, enabling seedling recruitment, appears to be a very effective method for the restoration of several plant communities. The main objective of the research was to assess the effect of the shape of openings on microenvironmental conditions and seedling recruitment in Molinietum caeruleae patches in various habitat conditions. In all study patches, circular and linear openings, comparable in area, were randomly created through the removal of plant canopy and litter layer. The circular gaps presented greater light availability and lower soil humidity than linear openings, while soil temperature within differently shaped openings was similar. Regardless of differences in microenvironmental conditions, the total number of seedlings in differently shaped gaps did not vary considerably. Three plant categories were found: (i those recruited mostly in circular openings, (ii those recruited mostly in linear gaps, (iii those colonizing circular and linear gaps similarly. The colonizers of circular gaps represented various synecological groups (ruderal, grasslands and meadows, young tree communities and diverse life forms (therophytes, hemicryptophytes, chamaephytes, phanerophytes, while the colonizers of linear gaps were meadow and grassland hemicryptophytes. The formation of linear openings contributes to increases in the abundance of meadow taxa, while the creation of circular openings may have a negative effect, contributing to the promotion of the secondary succession process.

  18. Size-dependent nonlocal effects in plasmonic semiconductor particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Mortensen, N. Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmons (LSP) in semiconductor particles are expected to exhibit spatial nonlocal response effects as the geometry enters the nanometer scale. To investigate these nonlocal effects, we apply the hydrodynamic model to nanospheres of two different semiconductor materials: intrinsic...... InSb and n-doped GaAs. Our results show that the semiconductors indeed display nonlocal effects, and that these effects are even more pronounced than in metals. In a 150 nm InSb particle at 300 K, the LSP frequency is blueshifted 35%, which is orders of magnitude larger than the blueshift in a metal...... particle of the same size. This property, together with their tunability, makes semiconductors a promising platform for experiments in nonlocal effects. Copyright (C)EPLA, 2017...

  19. Beam size effects in the radiative Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczekowski, M.

    1990-01-01

    In some electromagnetic processes the measured cross section can be substantially smaller than calculated in standard Quantum Electrodynamics. The process of single bremsstrahlung, e + e - → e + e - γ is an example of such effect. If the size of the effect for large angle γ radiation is similar to its magnitude at low angles, then standard calculations of the radiative Bahbha background to e.g. the reaction used in counting the number of neutrino generations, e + e - → νν-barγ, at LEP energies can be overestimated by 10-20%. 5 refs., 5 figs. (author)

  20. Impact of substrate on performance of band gap engineered graphene field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Durgesh Laxman; Sivasankaran, K.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the graphene field effect transistor (G-FET) to enhance the drain current saturation and to minimize the drain conductance (gd) using numerical simulation. This work focus on suppressing the drain conductance using silicon substrate. We studied the impact of different substrate on the performance of band gap engineered G-FET device. We used a non-equilibrium green function with mode space (NEGF_MS) to model the transport behavior of carriers for 10 nm channel length G-FET device. We compared the drain current saturation of G-FET at higher drain voltage regime on silicon, SiC, and the SiO2 substrate. This paper clearly demonstrates the effect of substrate on an electric field near drain region of G-FET device. It is shown that the substrate of G-FET is not only creating a band gap in graphene, which is important for current saturation and gd minimization, but also selection of suitable substrate can suppress generation of carrier concentration near drain region is also important.

  1. Size effects in PbTiO3 nanocrystals: Effect of particle size on spontaneous polarization and strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Rawn, C. J.; Porter, W. D.; Payzant, E. A.; Safari, A.

    2005-04-01

    The spontaneous polarization (Ps) and spontaneous strains (xi) in mechanically unclamped and surface charge compensated PbTiO3 nanocrystals were determined as a function of particle size in the range <150nm by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray powder diffraction, respectively. Significant deviations from bulk order parameters (P,xi) have been observed as the particle size decreased below ˜100nm. The critical size (rc) below which the ferroelectric tetragonal phase transforms to the paraelectric cubic phase was determined as ˜15nm. The depression in transition temperature with particle size is 14 °C at 28 nm. No change in the order of m3m →4mm ferrodistortive phase transition is observed. A simple analysis showed that ΔHtr/(kBT )˜103 at 25 °C for r =16nm, indicating that the stabilization of the cubic phase at rc cannot be linked to an instability in dipolar ordering due to thermal agitations. Comparison of the spontaneous volumetric strains with the strain induced by surface stress indicated that the effect of surface stress on ferroelectric phase stability was negligible. Anomalies in electrostrictive properties were determined for r →rc. The observed size dependence of PS is attributed to the reduced extent of long-range dipole-dipole interactions that arise due to the changes in bonding characteristics of ions with decreasing particle size in the perovskite lattice, in conformity with a recent study by Tsunekawa et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 (16), 4340 (2000)].

  2. Effective particle size from molecular dynamics simulations in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul M.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Redondo, Antonio; Vorobieff, Peter; Kober, Edward M.

    2018-04-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. This procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ˜ 0.75σ , where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective "hydrodynamic" radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ , but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.

  3. Effective particle size from molecular dynamics simulations in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul M.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Redondo, Antonio; Vorobieff, Peter; Kober, Edward M.

    2017-12-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. This procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ˜ 0.75σ , where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective "hydrodynamic" radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ , but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.

  4. Finite size effects in simulations of protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Pawar

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the soluble protofibrillar species that proceed amyloid fibril formation are associated with a range of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. Computer simulations of the processes that lead to the formation of these oligomeric species are starting to make significant contributions to our understanding of the determinants of protein aggregation. We simulate different systems at constant concentration but with a different number of peptides and we study the how the finite number of proteins affects the underlying free energy of the system and therefore the relative stability of the species involved in the process. If not taken into account, this finite size effect can undermine the validity of theoretical predictions regarding the relative stability of the species involved and the rates of conversion from one to the other. We discuss the reasons that give rise to this finite size effect form both a probabilistic and energy fluctuations point of view and also how this problem can be dealt by a finite size scaling analysis.

  5. Shaking and Blending Effect on Microalgae Concentrates Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUDI PARWADANI AJI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae concentrates (paste can be used as an alternative feed to replace live microalgae for aquaculture due to its nutritional value and convenience. However, the clumping of cells and negative buoyancy of algae concentrate can affect bivalve culture as bivalves only capture particles in suspension and ingest a certain size range of particles. This study investigated the effect of shaking and blending treatments on the preparation of food suspensions prepared from algae concentrates (Isochrysis and Pavlova. The results indicated that the higher the shaking time (5, 10, and 15 times or blending time (10, 30, and 60 seconds, the smaller was the diameter of the resulting algae particles. Moreover, the greater the volume of algae concentrate used in preparation, the larger the diameter of algae particles produced. Shaking may be the best option because it is cheaper and simpler. However, all the treatments provided a suitable particle size range for ingestion by bivalves.

  6. Particle shape effects on subvisible particle sizing measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchi, Richard E; Carrier, Michael J; Cohen, Joshua B; Boger, Shir; Montgomery, Christopher B; Hu, Zhishang; Ripple, Dean C

    2015-03-01

    Particle analysis tools for the subvisible (shape in comparison studies, we have used the methods of photolithography to create rods and disks. Although the rods are highly monodisperse, the instruments produce broadened peaks and report mean size parameters that are different for different instruments. We have fabricated a microfluidic device that simultaneously performs ESZ and FI measurements on each particle to elucidate the causes of discrepancies and broadening. Alignment of the rods with flow causes an oversizing by FI and undersizing by ESZ. FI also oversizes rods because of the incorrect edge definition that results from diffraction and imperfect focus. We present an improved correction algorithm for this effect that reduces discrepancies for rod-shaped particles. Tumbling of particles is observed in the microfluidic ESZ/FI and results in particle oversizing and breadth of size distribution for the monodisperse rods. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Effects of Resection of Posterior Condyles of Femur on Extension Gap of Knee Joint in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung-Suk; Kim, Chang-Wan; Seo, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Do-Hun; Kim, Ok-Gul; Lee, Chang-Rack

    2017-06-01

    When evaluating the effects of the preparation of the flexion gap on the extension gap in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the effects of posterior condylar resection and osteophyte removal on the extension gap should be differentiated. Although the amount of osteophytes differs between patients, posterior condylar resection is a procedure that is routinely implemented in TKA. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the resection of the posterior condyle of the femur on the extension gap in posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA. We enrolled 40 knees that underwent PS TKA between July 2010 and February 2011 with no or minimal osteophytes in the posterior compartment and a varus deformity of <15°. We measured the extension gap before and after the resection of the posterior condyle of the femur using a tensor under 20 and 40 lb of distraction force. Under 20 lb of distraction force, the average extension gap was 13.3 mm (standard deviation [SD], 1.6) before and 13.8 mm (SD, 1.6) after posterior condylar resection. Under 40 lb of distraction force, the average extension gap was 15.1 mm (SD, 1.5) before and 16.1 mm (SD, 1.7) after posterior condylar resection. The resection of the posterior condyle of the femur in PS TKA increased the extension gap. However, this increase was only by approximately 1 mm. In conclusion, posterior condylar resection does increase the extension gap by approximately 1 mm. However, in most case, this change in unlikely to be clinically important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Climate Change Effects on Shallow Landslide Location, Size, and Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellugi, D.; McKean, J. A.; Rulli, M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow landslides which typically involve just the soil mantle are influenced by root strength, storm-induced shallow pore pressures, and soil thickness. Field mapping indicates that landslides commonly occur in steep and topographically convergent areas along the soil-bedrock boundary. The susceptibility of a landscape to shallow landslides is controlled by topography and vegetation, while landslide triggering events are mostly related to hydrologic factors such as rainfall total and storm intensity and duration. Climate change can potentially affect both landslide susceptibility and triggering through changes in the hydro-meteorological variables as well as through feedbacks among climate, hydrology and vegetation. Vegetation (and forests in particular) plays an important role through the stabilizing effect of root systems and through its dynamic role on the hydrological cycle. Vegetation type and survival is directly related to climate through temperature and precipitation, and vegetation type could change significantly as some species may not survive while others could be displaced to more favorable locations in response to climate change. In addition, changes in soil moisture can negatively affect forest health by promoting forest disease, insect infestations and fires, and causing significant changes in forest composition. The conversion of forest vegetation to weaker-rooted or sparsely distributed vegetation as well as other disturbances to the forest ecosystem can enhance landslide susceptibility. Assessing the impact of climate change on shallow landsliding is challenging because we are currently unable to predict the size and location of landslides. Under the assumption that landslide location and size are controlled by the spatial structure of pore pressure development, soil depth, and vegetation across the landscape, we adopt a novel search procedure based on graph partitioning techniques to reformulate classical "factor of safety" analysis of a

  9. Effects of shape, size, and chromaticity of stimuli on estimated size in normally sighted, severely myopic, and visually impaired students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hsiu-Feng; Chen, Chun-Ching

    2010-06-01

    Effects of shape, size, and chromaticity of stimuli on participants' errors when estimating the size of simultaneously presented standard and comparison stimuli were examined. 48 Taiwanese college students ages 20 to 24 years old (M = 22.3, SD = 1.3) participated. Analysis showed that the error for estimated size was significantly greater for those in the low-vision group than for those in the normal-vision and severe-myopia groups. The errors were significantly greater with green and blue stimuli than with red stimuli. Circular stimuli produced smaller mean errors than did square stimuli. The actual size of the standard stimulus significantly affected the error for estimated size. Errors for estimations using smaller sizes were significantly higher than when the sizes were larger. Implications of the results for graphics-based interface design, particularly when taking account of visually impaired users, are discussed.

  10. Effect of particle size on degree of inversion in ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, M.; Butt, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Ferrites with the spinel structure are important materials because of their structural, magnetic and electrical properties. The suitability of these materials depends on both the intrinsic behavior of the material and the effects of the grain size. Moessbauer spectroscopy was employed to investigate the cation distribution and degree of inversion in bulk and nano sized particles of CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/, MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ ferrites. The Moessbauer spectra of all bulk ferrites showed complete magnetic behavior, whereas nanoparticle ferrites showed combination of ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic components. Moreover, the cation distribution in nanoparticle materials was also found to be different to that of their bulk counterparts indicating the particle size dependency. The inversion of Cu and Ni ions in bulk sample was greater than that of nanoparticles; whereas the inversion of Mn ions was less in bulk material as compared to the nanoparticles. Hence the degree of inversion decreased in CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ samples whereas, it increased in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as the particle size decreased and thus showed the anomalous behavior in this case. The nanoparticle samples also showed paramagnetic behaviour due to superparamagnetism and this effect is more prominent in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Moessbauer spectra of bulk and nanoparticles CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ is shown. (Orig./A.B.)

  11. The causal effect of board size in the performance of small and medium-sized firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Morten; Kongsted, Hans Christian; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    Empirical studies of large publicly traded firms have shown a robust negative relationship between board size and firm performance. The evidence on small and medium-sized firms is less clear; we show that existing work has been incomplete in analyzing the causal relationship due to weak...

  12. [Estimates of effective population size inPinus silvestris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, K; Gregorius, H R

    1972-01-01

    The effective population size for inbreeding has been estimated in a 70 years old population of Scotch Pine in three consecutive years to be 0.46, 0.55 and 0.61 respectively of the actual total population. The following formula was developed to determine differences among trees as regards their male or female flowering and their "maleness" and "femaleness":[Formula: see text] wheren e is the total effective population size for inbreeding,n e ' the male effective part,n e ″ the female effective part, andM a measure for monoecy ranging in values between zero (dioecy) and unity (ideal monoecy). The degree of monoecy was 70, 82 and 78 percent respectively in the three years.Correlation between male flowering over the three years was fairly strong; the same was found for female flowering. But correlation between male and female flowering was weak, both within the same year and over the three year period. Correlation of numbers of female strobili and numbers of ripe cones was weak also.The population model on which the above formulae is based is that of a clonal 'Seed Orchard' where seedlings of several clones are randomly distributed on evenly spaced plots.

  13. Finite-size effects on multibody neutrino exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Abada, A; Rodríguez-Quintero, J; Abada, As

    1998-01-01

    The effect of multibody massless neutrino exchanges between neutrons inside a finite-size neutron star is studied. We use an effective Lagrangian, which incorporates the effect of the neutrons on the neutrinos. Following Schwinger, it is shown that the total interaction energy density is computed by comparing the zero point energy of the neutrino sea with and without the star. It has already been shown that in an infinite-size star the total energy due to neutrino exchange vanishes exactly. The opposite claim that massless neutrino exchange would produce a huge energy is due to an improper summation of an infrared-divergent quantity. The same vanishing of the total energy has been proved exactly in the case of a finite star in a one-dimensional toy model. Here we study the three-dimensional case. We first consider the effect of a sharp star border, assumed to be a plane. We find that there is a non- vanishing of the zero point energy density difference between the inside and the outside due to the refraction ...

  14. No Effect of Featural Attention on Body Size Aftereffects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian David Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure to images of narrow bodies has been shown to induce a perceptual aftereffect, such that observers’ point of subjective normality (PSN for bodies shifts towards narrower bodies. The converse effect is shown for adaptation to wide bodies. In low-level stimuli, object attention (attention directed to the object and spatial attention (attention directed to the location of the object have been shown to increase the magnitude of visual aftereffects, while object-based attention enhances the adaptation effect in faces. It is not known whether featural attention (attention directed to a specific aspect of the object affects the magnitude of adaptation effects in body stimuli. Here, we manipulate the attention of Caucasian observers to different featural information in body images, by asking them to rate the fatness or sex typicality of male and female bodies manipulated to appear fatter or thinner than average. PSNs for body fatness were taken at baseline and after adaptation, and a change in PSN (ΔPSN was calculated. A body size adaptation effect was found, with observers who viewed fat bodies showing an increased PSN, and those exposed to thin bodies showing a reduced PSN. However, manipulations of featural attention to body fatness or sex typicality produced equivalent results, suggesting that featural attention may not affect the strength of the body size aftereffect.

  15. Size-effect features on the magnetothermopower of bismuth nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrea, E.; Nicorici, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In this work we have studied the magnetic field dependence of the thermopower (TEP) and resistance of glass-coated Bi wires with diameter (d) from 100 nm to at 1.5 μm below 80 K. Nanowires have anomalously large values of the thermopower (+100 μV K.1) and relatively high effective resistivities, but their frequencies of SdH oscillations remain those of bulk Bi. The TEP stays positive in longitudinal magnetic fields up to 15 T, where the surface scattering of charge carriers is negligible. Our analysis shows that the anomalous thermopower has a diffusion origin and is a consequence of the microstructure rather than the result of the strong scattering of electrons by the wire walls. The intensities of field at which the size-effect features appear on the magnetothermopower curves correspond to a value at which the diameter of the hole cyclotron orbit equals d. Size-effect features were observed only for set of nanowires with d = 100-350 nm, where diffusion TEP is dominant. The contribution of the phonon-drag effect was observed in a wire with diameter larger than 400 nm and becomes dominant at diameter of 1 μm. (authors)

  16. GM biofortified crops: potential effects on targeting the micronutrient intake gap in human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Steur, Hans; Mehta, Saurabh; Gellynck, Xavier; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2017-04-01

    Genetic engineering has been successfully applied to increase micronutrient content in staple crops. Nutrition evidence is key to ensure scale-up and successful implementation. Unlike conventional plant breeding efforts, research on the efficacy or effectiveness of GM biofortified crops on nutritional status in human populations is lacking. This review reports on the potential role of GM biofortified crops in closing the micronutrient gap - increasing the dietary intake of micronutrients in human populations. To date, one clinical trial in the United States reported a high bio-conversion rate of β-carotene in Golden Rice, and potential effects of GM biofortified crop consumption on dietary intake and nutritional outcomes are promising. However, further research needs to confirm the ex ante assessments in target regions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. [Estimates of the size of inhibitory areas in crowding effects in periphery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarko, V M; Danilova, M V; Solnushkin, S D; Chikhman, V N

    2014-01-01

    In psychophysical experiments we studied how surround influences recognition of test objects. The tests were low-contrast Landolt rings of the size 1.1, 1.5 and 2.3 deg. Their centers were located at 13.2 deg from the fixation point. The additional objects were similar Landolt rings or rings without gaps. The distance between the centers of the test and the additional objects varied from 2.2 to 13.2 deg. Inone experiment, the task of the observer was to identify both the test objects and the surrounding objects. In the second experiment the stimulus layout was the same, but'identification of only the test stimulus was required. In both experiments, deterioration of performance was found at all distances between the test objects and the surround, but the deterioration was more significant when the observer carried out the dual task. The data showed that the size of the inhibitory areas in our case does not comply with the Bouma low which states that the size of the interaction areas are equal to half of the eccentricity where the test is presented. Further deterioration of performance in the dual task reveals the contribution of attention into peripheral crowding effects.

  18. Size Effect Studies on Tensile Tests for Hot Stamping Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodu; Li, Yuanyuan; Han, Xianhong; Zhang, Junbo

    2018-02-01

    Tensile tests have been widely used to determine basic mechanical properties of materials. However, the properties measured may be related to geometrical factors of the tested samples especially for high-strength steels; this makes the properties' definitions and comparisons difficult. In this study, a series of tensile tests of ultra-high-strength hot-stamped steel were performed; the geometric shapes and sizes as well as the cutting direction were modified. The results demonstrate that the hot-stamped parts were isotropic and the cutting direction had no effect; the measured strengths were practically unrelated to the specimen geometries, including both size and shape. The elongations were slightly related to sample sizes within the studied range but highly depended on the sample shape, represented by the coefficient K. Such phenomena were analyzed and discussed based on microstructural observations and fracture morphologies. Moreover, two widely used elongation conversion equations, the Oliver formula and Barba's law, were introduced to verify their applicability, and a new interpolating function was developed and compared.

  19. Finite-size effects in Luther-Emery phases of Holstein and Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, J.; Hesselmann, S.; Wessel, S.; Assaad, F. F.; Hohenadler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The one-dimensional Holstein model and its generalizations have been studied extensively to understand the effects of electron-phonon interaction. The half-filled case is of particular interest, as it describes a transition from a metallic phase with a spin gap due to attractive backscattering to a Peierls insulator with charge-density-wave order. Our quantum Monte Carlo results support the existence of a metallic phase with dominant power-law charge correlations, as described by the Luther-Emery fixed point. We demonstrate that for Holstein and also for purely fermionic models the spin gap significantly complicates finite-size numerical studies, and explains inconsistent previous results for Luttinger parameters and phase boundaries. On the other hand, no such complications arise in spinless models. The correct low-energy theory of the spinful Holstein model is argued to be that of singlet bipolarons with a repulsive, mutual interaction. This picture naturally explains the existence of a metallic phase, but also implies that gapless Luttinger liquid theory is not applicable.

  20. The flexoelectric effect associated size dependent pyroelectricity in solid dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Gang; Liu, Zhiguo; Xie, Qiyun; Guo, Yanyan; Li, Wei; Yan, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenological thermodynamic theory is used to investigate the effect of strain gradient on the pyroelectric effect in centrosymmetric dielectric solids. Direct pyroelectricity can exist as external mechanical stress is applied to non-pyroelectric dielectrics with shapes such as truncated pyramids, due to elastic strain gradient induced flexoelectric polarization. Effective pyroelectric coefficient was analyzed in truncated pyramids. It is found to be controlled by size, ambient temperature, stress, and aspect ratio and depends mainly on temperature sensitivity of flexoelectric coefficient (TSFC) and strain gradient of the truncated pyramids dielectric solids. These results show that the pyroelectric property of Ba 0.67 Sr 0.33 TiO 3 above T c similar to PZT and other lead-based ferroelectrics can be obtained. This feature might widely broaden the selection of materials for infrared detectors with preferable properties

  1. The flexoelectric effect associated size dependent pyroelectricity in solid dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Gang; Liu, Zhiguo; Xie, Qiyun; Guo, Yanyan; Li, Wei; Yan, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    A phenomenological thermodynamic theory is used to investigate the effect of strain gradient on the pyroelectric effect in centrosymmetric dielectric solids. Direct pyroelectricity can exist as external mechanical stress is applied to non-pyroelectric dielectrics with shapes such as truncated pyramids, due to elastic strain gradient induced flexoelectric polarization. Effective pyroelectric coefficient was analyzed in truncated pyramids. It is found to be controlled by size, ambient temperature, stress, and aspect ratio and depends mainly on temperature sensitivity of flexoelectric coefficient (TSFC) and strain gradient of the truncated pyramids dielectric solids. These results show that the pyroelectric property of Ba0.67Sr0.33TiO3 above Tc similar to PZT and other lead-based ferroelectrics can be obtained. This feature might widely broaden the selection of materials for infrared detectors with preferable properties.

  2. Pleiotropic Effects of DDT Resistance on Male Size and Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostant, Wayne G; Bowyer, Jemima; Coupland, Jack; Facey, James; Hosken, David J; Wedell, Nina

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the evolution and spread of insecticide resistance requires knowing the relative fitness of resistant organisms. In the absence of insecticides, resistance is predicted to be costly. The Drosophila melanogaster DDT resistance allele (DDT-R) is associated with a male mating cost. This could be because resistant males are generally smaller, but DDT-R may also alter courtship behaviours. Here we tested for body size and courtship effects of DDT-R on mating success in competitive and non-competitive mating trials respectively. We also assessed relative aggression in resistant and susceptible males because aggression can also influence mating success. While the effect of DDT-R on male size partly contributed to reduced mating success, resistant males also had lower rates of courtship and were less aggressive than susceptible males. These differences contribute to the observed DDT-R mating costs. Additionally, these pleiotropic effects of DDT-R are consistent with the history and spread of resistance alleles in nature.

  3. Effect Sizes for Research Univariate and Multivariate Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grissom, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Noted for its comprehensive coverage, this greatly expanded new edition now covers the use of univariate and multivariate effect sizes. Many measures and estimators are reviewed along with their application, interpretation, and limitations. Noted for its practical approach, the book features numerous examples using real data for a variety of variables and designs, to help readers apply the material to their own data. Tips on the use of SPSS, SAS, R, and S-Plus are provided. The book's broad disciplinary appeal results from its inclusion of a variety of examples from psychology, medicine, educa

  4. Size-effects in plane strain sheet-necking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Redanz, Pia

    2004-01-01

    A finite strain generalization of the strain gradient plasticity theory by Fleck and Hutchinson (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49 (2001a) 2245) is proposed and used to study size effects in plane strain necking of thin sheets using the finite element method. Both sheets with rigid grips at the ends...... and specimens with shear free ends are analyzed. The strain gradient plasticity theory predicts delayed onset of localization when compared to conventional theory, and it depresses deformation localization in the neck. The sensitivity to imperfections is analyzed as well as differently hardening materials. (C...

  5. Size-effects in plane strain sheet-necking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Redanz, Pia

    2003-01-01

    A finite strain generalization of the strain gradient plasticity theory by Fleck and Hutchinson (2001) is proposed and used to study size effects in plane strain necking of thin sheets using the finite element method. Both sheets with rigid grips at the ends and specimens with shear free ends...... are analyzed. The strain gradient plasticity theory predicts delayed onset of localization when compared to conventional theory, and it depresses deformation localization in the neck. The sensitivity to imperfections is analyzed as well as differently hardening materials....

  6. Effect of Global-GAP Policy on Climate Change Perceptions of Smallholder French Beans Farmers in Central and Eastern Regions, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Shimon Otieno

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The risks posed by climate change to Sub Saharan Africa’s (SSA smallholder fresh export fruit and vegetables production are amplifying the significance of farmers’ climate change perceptions in enhancing adoption of suitable adaptation strategies. Production of fresh export fruit and vegetables in Kenya has increasingly been done under the Global-GAP standard scheme by smallholder farmers to improve both environmental conservation and market access. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Global-GAP policy on climate change perceptions of smallholder French beans farmers. The analysis was based on data collected from a random sample of 616 households interviewed in the Central and Eastern regions of Kenya. The study used principal component analysis (PCA to extract farmers’ key prevailing climate change perceptions and logit regression model to examine the effect of Global-GAP policy on climate change perceptions among other socio-economic factors. The PCA analysis extracted three components proxying for ‘droughts’, ‘delay in rainy seasons’, ‘diseases and pests’ and three proxying for ‘hot days’, ‘floods’, and ‘diseases and pests’ as summarizing maximum variance in the perceptions in the Central and Eastern region respectively. The common, study area-wide climate change perception was identified as incidence of diseases and pest. Logit regression analysis found that Global-GAP policy significantly influenced and improved farmers’ probability of perceiving climate change. Other factors found to influence farmers’ probability of having the identified climate change perceptions included regional specificity, access to agricultural extension service, access to credit, plot size, and soil fertility. The policy implication of this study is that the government and service providers should mainstream factors like Global-GAP compliance and regional considerations found to improve probability of

  7. Transport, retention, and size perturbation of graphene oxide in saturated porous media: Effects of input concentration and grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurately predicting the fate and transport of graphene oxide (GO) in porous media is critical to assess its environmental impact. In this work, sand column experiments were conducted to determine the effect of input concentration and grain size on transport, retention, and size perturbation of GO ...

  8. Transport of dissolved organic matter in Boom Clay: Size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durce, D.; Aertsens, M.; Jacques, D.; Maes, N.; Van Gompel, M.

    2018-01-01

    A coupled experimental-modelling approach was developed to evaluate the effects of molecular weight (MW) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on its transport through intact Boom Clay (BC) samples. Natural DOM was sampled in-situ in the BC layer. Transport was investigated with percolation experiments on 1.5 cm BC samples by measuring the outflow MW distribution (MWD) by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). A one-dimensional reactive transport model was developed to account for retardation, diffusion and entrapment (attachment and/or straining) of DOM. These parameters were determined along the MWD by implementing a discretisation of DOM into several MW points and modelling the breakthrough of each point. The pore throat diameter of BC was determined as 6.6-7.6 nm. Below this critical size, transport of DOM is MW dependent and two major types of transport were identified. Below MW of 2 kDa, DOM was neither strongly trapped nor strongly retarded. This fraction had an averaged capacity factor of 1.19 ± 0.24 and an apparent dispersion coefficient ranging from 7.5 × 10- 11 to 1.7 × 10- 11 m2/s with increasing MW. DOM with MW > 2 kDa was affected by both retardation and straining that increased significantly with increasing MW while apparent dispersion coefficients decreased. Values ranging from 1.36 to 19.6 were determined for the capacity factor and 3.2 × 10- 11 to 1.0 × 10- 11 m2/s for the apparent dispersion coefficient for species with 2.2 kDa < MW < 9.3 kDa. Straining resulted in an immobilisation of in average 49 ± 6% of the injected 9.3 kDa species. Our findings show that an accurate description of DOM transport requires the consideration of the size effects.

  9. Effects of corm size and storage period on allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi nasiry mahalati

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to correlate corm size and storage period of corms to allocation of assimilates in different parts of the plant an experiment was conducted during growth period of 2004 and 2005 in Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Treatments were four groups of corm size (3-6, 6-9, 9-12 and 12-15 g either stored for a period of time before planting or sown directly without storage. Experiment was conducted in a Complete Randomized Block design with three replications. Results indicated that storing corms before planting had a negative effect on number, area, length and width of leaf and also on weight of leaf, weight of main shoot, weight of leaves of lateral shoots and total weight of plant. However, weight of corm, number and weight of lateral shoots and area of lateral leaf was not affected by storing the corms. Nevertheless, in the second year, number, length and weight of leaf on main shoot, number of cormlet, number, area and weight of leaf on lateral shoots, total weight of plant, corm weight, weight of main shoot and weight of lateral buds was reduced while leaf width were not affected. Effect of corm size on almost all measured parameters was positive and with increasing corm weight an increasing trend was observed in the above parameters. No flower was observed on corms which were stored, while corms which planted after lifting produced flowers and Larger corms of 9-12 and 12-15 g were superior in terms of number of flowers per unit area and also weight of flower and stigma per unit area. Corms with 9-15 grams planted immediately after lifting the corms produced higher yield.

  10. Effects of Kurozu concentrated liquid on adipocyte size in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Kumi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kurozu concentrated liquid (KCL is used as a health-promoting supplement for the treatment of disorders such as cancer, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension in Japan. We investigated the possible anti-obesity effects of KCL in rats. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed American Institute of Nutrition 76 formula diet and were orally administrated KCL or acetic acid at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight or deionized water for 4 weeks. Adipocyte size, DNA content in subcutaneous adipose tissue, lipid levels in the serum and liver, and the rate of fatty acid excretion were determined. Effects of KCL on pancreatic lipase activity and 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation were investigated in vitro. Results In the KCL group, the average adipocyte size in subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues was significantly reduced. The KCL-administered rats displayed greater numbers of small adipocytes in the subcutaneous, perirenal and mesenteric adipose tissues than did rats from the other groups. In the KCL group, the DNA content in subcutaneous adipose tissue was significantly increased. The rate of fatty acid excretion was significantly increased in the KCL group. Furthermore, KCL significantly inhibited pancreatic lipase activity in vitro, and also significantly inhibited fat accumulation and mRNA expression of fatty acid binding protein 2 (aP2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated γ (PPARγ in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte. The levels of serum and liver lipids, the concentration of serum glucose, and the levels of adiponectin were similar among the 3 groups. Conclusion Oral administration of KCL decreases the adipocyte size via inhibition of dietary fat absorption and reductions of PPARγ and aP2 mRNA expression levels in adipocytes.

  11. Size Effects on Deformation and Fracture of Scandium Deuteride Films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresi, C. S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hintsala, E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hysitron, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yang, Nancy Y. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kammler, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moody, N. R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gerberich, W. W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Metal hydride films have been observed to crack during production and use, prompting mechanical property studies of scandium deuteride films. The following focuses on elastic modulus, fracture, and size effects observed in the system for future film mechanical behavior modeling efforts. Scandium deuteride films were produced through the deuterium charging of electron beam evaporated scandium films using X-ray diffraction, scanning Auger microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction to monitor changes in the films before and after charging. Scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and focused ion beam machined micropillar compression tests were used for mechanical characterization of the scandium deuteride films. The micropillars showed a size effect for flow stress, indicating that film thickness is a relevant tuning parameter for film performance, and that fracture was controlled by the presence of grain boundaries. Elastic modulus was determined by both micropillar compression and nanoindentation to be approximately 150 GPa, Fracture studies of bulk film channel cracking as well as compression induced cracks in some of the pillars yielded a fracture toughness around 1.0 MPa-m1/2. Preliminary Weibull distributions of fracture in the micropillars are provided. Despite this relatively low value of fracture toughness, scandium deuteride micropillars can undergo a large degree of plasticity in small volumes and can harden to some degree, demonstrating the ductile and brittle nature of this material

  12. Generation time and effective population size in Polar Eskimos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Shuichi; Forster, Peter

    2008-01-01

    North Greenland Polar Eskimos are the only hunter–gatherer population, to our knowledge, who can offer precise genealogical records spanning several generations. This is the first report from Eskimos on two key parameters in population genetics, namely, generation time (T) and effective population size (Ne). The average mother–daughter and father–son intervals were 27 and 32 years, respectively, roughly similar to the previously published generation times obtained from recent agricultural societies across the world. To gain an insight for the generation time in our distant ancestors, we calculated maternal generation time for two wild chimpanzee populations. We also provide the first comparison among three distinct approaches (genealogy, variance and life table methods) for calculating Ne, which resulted in slightly differing values for the Eskimos. The ratio of the effective to the census population size is estimated as 0.6–0.7 for autosomal and X-chromosomal DNA, 0.7–0.9 for mitochondrial DNA and 0.5 for Y-chromosomal DNA. A simulation of alleles along the genealogy suggested that Y-chromosomal DNA may drift a little faster than mitochondrial DNA in this population, in contrast to agricultural Icelanders. Our values will be useful not only in prehistoric population inference but also in understanding the shaping of our genome today. PMID:18364314

  13. Effect of phantom size and composition on neutron dosemeter reading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Tanner, J.E.; Stewart, R.D.; Michel, R.; Murphy, M.K.; Traub, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Unmoderated and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron sources were used to irradiate several types of personal neutron dosemeters. The dosemeters were irradiated on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms with frontal dimensions of 40 x 40 cm 2 and 30 x 30 cm 2 ; both phantoms were 15 cm thick. Monte Carlo computer calculations of the neutron spectra and the ratios of dose equivalents at the surfaces of these phantoms were performed using the MCNP computer code. Additional calculations were performed for a 241 Am-Be neutron source and for phantoms composed of International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) tissue and of water; the water phantom used the design specified recently by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The calculations indicated negligible differences in the effects that either of the PMMA phantoms produced on the neutron energy spectra studied. However, the dose equivalent at the surface of the 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 PMMA phantom differed from the dose equivalents at the surfaces of the water phantom and the ICRU tissue phantom by about 4%. Dosemeters irradiated on the two different sized PMMA phantoms, using unmoderated and D 2 O moderated 252 Cf neutron sources, gave nearly identical readings. All of the phantoms had similar effects on the neutron spectra, producing additional low energy neutrons. It was concluded that either size of PMMA phantom could be used for the irradiations required by the US dosimetry accreditation programmes. (author)

  14. Enhanced Antisaccade Abilities in Children with Tourette syndrome: the Weakening of the Gap-Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eParvinchi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a childhood onset disorder of motor and vocal tics. The neural networks underlying TS overlap with those of saccade eye movements. Thus, deviations on saccadic tasks can provide important information about psychopathology of TS. Tourette syndrome often coexists with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD. Hence, we manipulated various components of a saccade task to measure its effects on saccades of children with TS-only, TS+ADHD, TS+ADHD+OCD and healthy controls. Children looked towards (prosaccade or in the opposite direction (antisaccade of a peripheral target as soon as it appeared. The prosaccade and antisaccade tasks were presented in three conditions. In the Gap200 condition, the fixation dot disappeared 200 msec prior to the appearance of the peripheral target, In the Gap800 condition, the fixation dot disappeared 800 msec prior to the appearance of the peripheral target and in Overlap200 the fixation dot disappeared 200 msec after the appearance of the peripheral target. Fixation-offset manipulations had different effects on each group’s antisaccades. The TS+ADHD+OCD group’s antisaccade latencies and error rates remained relatively unchanged in the three conditions and displayed a pattern of eye movements that can be interpreted as enhanced. Alternatively, the TS+ADHD group displayed an overall pattern of longer saccadic latencies. Findings corroborate the hypothesis that the combination of tic disorder and ADHD results in unique behavioural profiles. It is plausible that a subgroup of children with TS develop an adaptive ability to control their tics which generalizes to enhanced volitional control of saccadic behaviour as well. Supporting evidence and other findings are discussed.

  15. Effect of apigenin on gap junctional intercellular communication in human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Jibing; Zou, Huihui; Huang, Xudong

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effect of apigenin on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (HTFs) and its underlying mechanism. After a 48 h treatment of cultured HTFs with apigenin (80 micromol/L), the GJIC was detected by a scrape-loading/dye transfer technique with Lucifer yellow dye and rhodamine (Rh) dextran. The coupling index represents a quantification of GJIC where a high coupling index is associated with a greater number of cells demonstrating cell-cell communication through gap junction channels. The changes in connexin 43 (Cx43) distribution and the expression of Cx43 at the protein and mRNA levels were statistically compared between the two groups by means of immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functioning of GJIC in the HTFs was significantly enhanced after 48 hours by apigenin treatment when compared with the control cells. In the apigenin group, the intercellular dye transfer grade was above 9, while this value was only grade 3-4 in the control group. The coupling index was significantly increased up to 9.205+/-0.3621 in the apigenin group, compared with 5.1775+/-0.3177 in the control group (F=279.581, P=0.000). The expression of Cx43 at the protein and mRNA levels was significantly up-regulated in the apigenin group compared with the control group. Apigenin can significantly enhance the function of GJIC in HTFs by up-regulating the expression of Cx43 at both the protein and mRNA levels, suggesting that the enhancement of GJIC in HTFs by apigenin probably acts as an important mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of apigenin on HTF proliferation.

  16. Walking reduces the gap between encoding and sensorimotor alignment effects in spatial updating of described environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ilaria; Murgia, Mauro; Sors, Fabrizio; Agostini, Tiziano

    2017-04-01

    Spatial updating allows people to keep track of the self-to-object relations during movement. Previous studies demonstrated that physical movement enhanced spatial updating in remote environments, but failed to find the same effect in described environments. However, these studies mainly considered rotation as a physical movement, without examining other types of movement, such as walking. We investigated how walking affects spatial updating within described environments. Using the judgement of relative directions task, we compared the effects of imagination of rotation, physical rotation, and walking on spatial updating. Spatial updating was evaluated in terms of accuracy and response times in different perspectives, and by calculating two indexes, namely the encoding and sensorimotor alignment effects. As regards response times, we found that in the imagination of rotation and physical rotation conditions the encoding alignment effect was higher than the sensorimotor alignment effect, while in the walking condition this gap disappeared. We interpreted these results in terms of an enhanced link between allocentric and sensorimotor representations, due to the information acquired through walking.

  17. Pacific salmon and the coalescent effective population size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Cenik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Pacific salmon include several species that are both commercially important and endangered. Understanding the causes of loss in genetic variation is essential for designing better conservation strategies. Here we use a coalescent approach to analyze a model of the complex life history of salmon, and derive the coalescent effective population (CES. With the aid of Kronecker products and a convergence theorem for Markov chains with two time scales, we derive a simple formula for the CES and thereby establish its existence. Our results may be used to address important questions regarding salmon biology, in particular about the loss of genetic variation. To illustrate the utility of our approach, we consider the effects of fluctuations in population size over time. Our analysis enables the application of several tools of coalescent theory to the case of salmon.

  18. Cost-effective unilateral climate policy design: Size Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph; Fischer, Carolyn; Rosendahl, Knut Einar

    2011-07-01

    Given the bleak prospects for a global agreement on mitigating climate change, pressure for unilateral abatement is increasing. A major challenge is emissions leakage. Border carbon adjustments and output-based allocation of emissions allowances can increase effectiveness of unilateral action but introduce distortions of their own. We assess antileakage measures as a function of abatement coalition size. We first develop a partial equilibrium analytical framework to see how these instruments affect emissions within and outside the coalition. We then employ a computable general equilibrium model of international trade and energy use to assess the strategies as the coalition grows. We find that full border adjustments rank first in global cost-effectiveness, followed by import tariffs and output-based rebates. The differences across measures and their overall appeal decline as the abatement coalition grows. In terms of cost, the coalition countries prefer border carbon adjustments; countries outside the coalition prefer output-based rebates.(Author)

  19. Fe magnetic impurity effect in Au atomic sized conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ienaga, Koichiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Kawae, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Quantum Physics, Kyushu University, Moto-oka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Tsujii, Hiroyuki, E-mail: te208276@s.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Education, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, 920-1192 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the electrical conductance in Au nanowire containing 0.07 at.%Fe ions (AuFe nanowire) with mechanically controllable break junction technique to investigate the magnetic impurity effects in the atomic-sized conductance. At room temperature, we observe not only conductance steps at the integer multiples of G{sub 0} = 2e{sup 2}/h, but also steps deviating from them in AuFe nanowire. Moreover, these features persist down to T = 4.2 K. The scattering between the conduction electrons and Fe magnetic ions may lift the spin degeneracy of the transmission probability, which is responsible for the deviation. Zero bias anomaly is observed in the AuFe nanowire with the contact diameter larger than {approx}3 nm in the current-voltage (I-V) measurements at T = 4.2 K, which may be caused by Kondo effect.

  20. Health effects and toxicity mechanisms of rare earth elements-Knowledge gaps and research prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Giovanni; Guida, Marco; Tommasi, Franca; Oral, Rahime

    2015-05-01

    In the recent decades, rare earth elements (REE) have undergone a steady spread in several industrial and medical applications, and in agriculture. Relatively scarce information has been acquired to date on REE-associated biological effects, from studies of bioaccumulation and of bioassays on animal, plant and models; a few case reports have focused on human health effects following occupational REE exposures, in the present lack of epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed groups. The literature is mostly confined to reports on few REE, namely cerium and lanthanum, whereas substantial information gaps persist on the health effects of other REE. An established action mechanism in REE-associated health effects relates to modulating oxidative stress, analogous to the recognized redox mechanisms observed for other transition elements. Adverse outcomes of REE exposures include a number of endpoints, such as growth inhibition, cytogenetic effects, and organ-specific toxicity. An apparent controversy regarding REE-associated health effects relates to opposed data pointing to either favorable or adverse effects of REE exposures. Several studies have demonstrated that REE, like a number of other xenobiotics, follow hormetic concentration-related trends, implying stimulatory or protective effects at low levels, then adverse effects at higher concentrations. Another major role for REE-associated effects should be focused on pH-dependent REE speciation and hence toxicity. Few reports have demonstrated that environmental acidification enhances REE toxicity; these data may assume particular relevance in REE-polluted acidic soils and in REE mining areas characterized by concomitant REE and acid pollution. The likely environmental threats arising from REE exposures deserve a new line of research efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Computation of Effect Size for Moderating Effects of Categorical Variables in Multiple Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinis, Herman; Pierce, Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    The computation and reporting of effect size estimates is becoming the norm in many journals in psychology and related disciplines. Despite the increased importance of effect sizes, researchers may not report them or may report inaccurate values because of a lack of appropriate computational tools. For instance, Pierce, Block, and Aguinis (2004)…

  2. Filling Predictable and Unpredictable Gaps, with and without Similarity-Based Interference: Evidence for LIFG Effects of Dependency Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiken, Kimberly; McElree, Brian; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2015-01-01

    One of the most replicated findings in neurolinguistic literature on syntax is the increase of hemodynamic activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) in response to object relative (OR) clauses compared to subject relative clauses. However, behavioral studies have shown that ORs are primarily only costly when similarity-based interference is involved and recently, Leiken and Pylkkänen (2014) showed with magnetoencephalography (MEG) that an LIFG increase at an OR gap is also dependent on such interference. However, since ORs always involve a cue indicating an upcoming dependency formation, OR dependencies could be processed already prior to the gap-site and thus show no sheer dependency effects at the gap itself. To investigate the role of gap predictability in LIFG dependency effects, this MEG study compared ORs to verb phrase ellipsis (VPE), which was used as an example of a non-predictable dependency. Additionally, we explored LIFG sensitivity to filler-gap order by including right node raising structures, in which the order of filler and gap is reverse to that of ORs and VPE. Half of the stimuli invoked similarity-based interference and half did not. Our results demonstrate that LIFG effects of dependency can be elicited regardless of whether the dependency is predictable, the stimulus materials evoke similarity-based interference, or the filler precedes the gap. Thus, contrary to our own prior data, the current findings suggest a highly general role for the LIFG in dependency interpretation that is not limited to environments involving similarity-based interference. Additionally, the millisecond time-resolution of MEG allowed for a detailed characterization of the temporal profiles of LIFG dependency effects across our three constructions, revealing that the timing of these effects is somewhat construction-specific.

  3. Filling Predictable and Unpredictable Gaps, with and without Similarity-Based Interference: Evidence for LIFG Effects of Dependency Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiken, Kimberly; McElree, Brian; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2015-01-01

    One of the most replicated findings in neurolinguistic literature on syntax is the increase of hemodynamic activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) in response to object relative (OR) clauses compared to subject relative clauses. However, behavioral studies have shown that ORs are primarily only costly when similarity-based interference is involved and recently, Leiken and Pylkkänen (2014) showed with magnetoencephalography (MEG) that an LIFG increase at an OR gap is also dependent on such interference. However, since ORs always involve a cue indicating an upcoming dependency formation, OR dependencies could be processed already prior to the gap-site and thus show no sheer dependency effects at the gap itself. To investigate the role of gap predictability in LIFG dependency effects, this MEG study compared ORs to verb phrase ellipsis (VPE), which was used as an example of a non-predictable dependency. Additionally, we explored LIFG sensitivity to filler-gap order by including right node raising structures, in which the order of filler and gap is reverse to that of ORs and VPE. Half of the stimuli invoked similarity-based interference and half did not. Our results demonstrate that LIFG effects of dependency can be elicited regardless of whether the dependency is predictable, the stimulus materials evoke similarity-based interference, or the filler precedes the gap. Thus, contrary to our own prior data, the current findings suggest a highly general role for the LIFG in dependency interpretation that is not limited to environments involving similarity-based interference. Additionally, the millisecond time-resolution of MEG allowed for a detailed characterization of the temporal profiles of LIFG dependency effects across our three constructions, revealing that the timing of these effects is somewhat construction-specific. PMID:26635655

  4. Filling predictable and unpredictable gaps, with and without similarity-based interference: Evidence for LIFG effects of dependency processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly eLeiken

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the most replicated findings in neurolinguistic literature on syntax is the increase of hemodynamic activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG in response to object relative clauses (ORs compared to subject relative clauses (SRs. However, behavioral studies have shown that ORs are primarily only costly when similarity-based interference is involved and recently, Leiken & Pylkkänen (2014 showed with magnetoencephalography (MEG that an LIFG increase at an OR gap is also dependent on such interference. However, since ORs always involve a cue indicating an upcoming dependency formation, OR dependencies could be processed already prior to the gap-site and thus show no sheer dependency effects at the gap itself. To investigate the role of gap predictability in LIFG dependency effects, this MEG study compared ORs to Verb Phrase Ellipsis (VPE, which was used as an example of a non-predictable dependency. Additionally, we explored LIFG sensitivity to filler-gap order by including Right Node Raising (RNR structures, in which the order of filler and gap is reverse to that of ORs and VPE. Half of the stimuli invoked similarity-based interference and half did not. Our results demonstrate that LIFG effects of dependency can be elicited regardless of whether the dependency is predictable, the stimulus materials evoke similarity-based interference, or the filler precedes the gap. Thus, contrary to our own prior data, the current findings suggest a highly general role for the LIFG in dependency interpretation that is not limited to environments involving similarity-based interference. Additionally, the millisecond time-resolution of MEG allowed for a detailed characterization of the temporal profiles of LIFG dependency effects across our three constructions, revealing that the timing of these effects is somewhat construction-specific.

  5. Whole dairy matrix or single nutrients in assessment of health effects: current evidence and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorning, Tanja Kongerslev; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; de Groot, Lisette; Dupont, Didier; Feeney, Emma; Ipsen, Richard; Lecerf, Jean Michel; Mackie, Alan; McKinley, Michelle C; Michalski, Marie-Caroline; Rémond, Didier; Risérus, Ulf; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Tholstrup, Tine; Weaver, Connie; Astrup, Arne; Givens, Ian

    2017-05-01

    Foods consist of a large number of different nutrients that are contained in a complex structure. The nature of the food structure and the nutrients therein (i.e., the food matrix) will determine the nutrient digestion and absorption, thereby altering the overall nutritional properties of the food. Thus, the food matrix may exhibit a different relation with health indicators compared to single nutrients studied in isolation. The evidence for a dairy matrix effect was presented and discussed by an expert panel at a closed workshop, and the following consensus was reached: 1 ) Current evidence does not support a positive association between intake of dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease (i.e., stroke and coronary heart disease) and type 2 diabetes. In contrast, fermented dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt, generally show inverse associations. 2 ) Intervention studies have indicated that the metabolic effects of whole dairy may be different than those of single dairy constituents when considering the effects on body weight, cardiometabolic disease risk, and bone health. 3 ) Different dairy products seem to be distinctly linked to health effects and disease risk markers. 4 ) Different dairy structures and common processing methods may enhance interactions between nutrients in the dairy matrix, which may modify the metabolic effects of dairy consumption. 5 ) In conclusion, the nutritional values of dairy products should not be considered equivalent to their nutrient contents but, rather, be considered on the basis of the biofunctionality of the nutrients within dairy food structures. 6 ) Further research on the health effects of whole dairy foods is warranted alongside the more traditional approach of studying the health effects of single nutrients. Future diet assessments and recommendations should carefully consider the evidence of the effects of whole foods alongside the evidence of the effects of individual nutrients. Current knowledge gaps and

  6. Reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of chemical compositions and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashori, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Amir

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the effects of wood species, particle sizes and hot-water treatment on some physical and mechanical properties of wood-plastic composites were studied. Composites of thermoplastic reinforced with oak (Quercus castaneifolia) and pine (Pinus eldarica) wood were prepared. Polypropylene (PP) and maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP) were used as the polymer matrix and coupling agent, respectively. The results showed that pine fiber had significant effect on the mechanical properties considered in this study. This effect is explained by the higher fiber length and aspect ratio of pine compared to the oak fiber. The hot-water treated (extractive-free) samples, in both wood species, improved the tensile, flexural and impact properties, but increased the water absorption for 24h. This work clearly showed that lignocellulosic materials in both forms of fiber and flour could be effectively used as reinforcing elements in PP matrix. Furthermore, extractives have marked effects on the mechanical and physical properties. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Na and Ca on particle size; Effect of filtering on UV absorbance

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Effects of Na and Ca on particle size; Effect of filtering on UV absorbance. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Bouchard, D., C. Knightes, X....

  8. A preliminary study of material homogeneity for size effect investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krompholz, K.; Kamber, J.; Kalkhof, D.

    1999-06-01

    The forged material 20 MnMoNi 55, material number 1.6310 (heat number 69906) with a heat treatment of 900 {sup o}C, water quenched, 730 {sup o}C, air cooled, was subjected to an intensive quality control consisting of chemical analysis, metallography, hardness tests, tensile tests, and impact tests. Six plates of the material were investigated, and all specimens were taken from a diagonal of each plate in three positions, outer margins and the centre of the plates. The quality control exhibits the following results: (1) The material fulfill the material specification in all respects. (2) This material is a fine grained homogeneous ferritic material of bainitic structure; neither from the chemical analysis, metallography, nor from hardness tests influences from the position of the specimens taken from the plates could be derived. (3) The tensile tests clearly revealed position dependent material properties. With the exception of one plate, one of the selected positions exhibits no natural yield strength, higher rupture strength, and lower elongation to fracture compared with the other two positions at 293 K and 573 K. (4) Many of the data obtained from the impact tests at room temperature were larger than the capacity of the impact machine, i.e. 225 Joule; the experimental condition was changed from tests at 573 K to tests at 253 K to obtain data from the transition region. The main conclusions drawn for the size effect experiments where that all the tensile test results for different specimen sizes have to be discussed with respect of the specimen positions within the plates, and that for all bend bar as well as impact experiments with different specimen sizes the notch depth to specimen width ratio a/w has to be changed from a/w = 0.2 to a/w = 0.3 to get reasonable results within the frame of the available test equipment. (author)

  9. Finite-size effects in the three-state quantum asymmetric clock model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlen, G. v.; Rittenberg, V.

    1983-04-01

    The one-dimensional quantum Hamiltonian of the asymmetric three-state clock model is studied using finite-size scaling. Various boundary conditions are considered on chains containing up to eight sites. We calculate the boundary of the commensurate phase and the mass gap index. The model shows an interesting finite-size dependence in connexion with the presence of the incommensurate phase indicating that for the infinite system there is no Lifshitz point. (orig.)

  10. Effects of Diet on Brain Plasticity in Animal and Human Studies: Mind the Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tytus Murphy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary interventions have emerged as effective environmental inducers of brain plasticity. Among these dietary interventions, we here highlight the impact of caloric restriction (CR: a consistent reduction of total daily food intake, intermittent fasting (IF, every-other-day feeding, and diet supplementation with polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs on markers of brain plasticity in animal studies. Moreover, we also discuss epidemiological and intervention studies reporting the effects of CR, IF and dietary polyphenols and PUFAs on learning, memory, and mood. In particular, we evaluate the gap in mechanistic understanding between recent findings from animal studies and those human studies reporting that these dietary factors can benefit cognition, mood, and anxiety, aging, and Alzheimer’s disease—with focus on the enhancement of structural and functional plasticity markers in the hippocampus, such as increased expression of neurotrophic factors, synaptic function and adult neurogenesis. Lastly, we discuss some of the obstacles to harnessing the promising effects of diet on brain plasticity in animal studies into effective recommendations and interventions to promote healthy brain function in humans. Together, these data reinforce the important translational concept that diet, a modifiable lifestyle factor, holds the ability to modulate brain health and function.

  11. Review of the effects of protection in marine protected areas: current knowledge and gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeda–Martínez, C.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPAs and the conservation of marine environments must be based on reliable information on the quality of the marine environment that can be obtained in a reasonable timeframe. We reviewed studies that evaluated all aspects related to the effectiveness of MPAs in order to describe how the studies were conducted and to detect fields in which research is lacking. Existing parameters used to evaluate the effectiveness of MPAs are summarised. Two-hundred and twenty-two publications were reviewed. We identified the most commonly used study subjects and methodological approaches. Most of the studies concentrated on biological parameters. Peer reviewed studies were based on control vs. impact design. BACI and mBACI designs were used in very few studies. Through this review, we have identified gaps in the objectives assigned to MPAs and the way in which they have been evaluated. We suggest some guidelines aimedat improving the assessment of the effects of protection in MPAs.

  12. Effect of head size on 10B dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.

    1992-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for treatment of brain tumors is based on the utilization of large epithermal-neutron fields. Epithermal neutrons thermalize at depths of ∼2.5 cm inside the head and provide a maximum thermal fluence at deep-seated tumor sites with minimum damage to normal tissue. Brain tissue is a highly scattering medium for epithermal and thermal neutrons; therefore, a broad treatment field enables epithermal neutrons to enter the head over a large area. These neutrons slow down as they undergo scattering collisions and contribute to the thermal-neutron fluence at the tumor location. With the use of large neutron fields, the size of the head affects the thermal-neutron distribution and thereby the 10 B absorbed dose distribution inside the head. In this paper, the authors describe measurements using a boron trifluoride (BF 3 )-filled proportional counter to determine the effect of head size on 10 B absorbed dose distributions for a broad field accelerator epithermal-neutron source

  13. Nosewitness Identification: Effects of Lineup Size and Retention Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Laura; Soares, Sandra C; Costa, Liliana P; Pinto, Elisa; Ferreira, Jacqueline H T; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Silva, Carlos F; Olsson, Mats J

    2016-01-01

    Although canine identification of body odor (BO) has been widely used as forensic evidence, the concept of nosewitness identification by human observers was only recently put to the test. The results indicated that BOs associated with male characters in authentic crime videos could later be identified in BO lineup tests well above chance. To further evaluate nosewitness memory, we assessed the effects of lineup size (Experiment 1) and retention interval (Experiment 2), using a forced-choice memory test. The results showed that nosewitness identification works for all lineup sizes (3, 5, and 8 BOs), but that larger lineups compromise identification performance in similarity to observations from eye- and earwitness studies. Also in line with previous eye- and earwitness studies, but in disagreement with some studies on odor memory, Experiment 2 showed significant forgetting between shorter retention intervals (15 min) and longer retention intervals (1-week) using lineups of five BOs. Altogether this study shows that identification of BO in a forensic setting is possible and has limits and characteristics in line with witness identification through other sensory modalities.

  14. Cytokine effects on gap junction communication and connexin expression in human bladder smooth muscle cells and suburothelial myofibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Heinrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The last decade identified cytokines as one group of major local cell signaling molecules related to bladder dysfunction like interstitial cystitis (IC and overactive bladder syndrome (OAB. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC is essential for the coordination of normal bladder function and has been found to be altered in bladder dysfunction. Connexin (Cx 43 and Cx45 are the most important gap junction proteins in bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC and suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF. Modulation of connexin expression by cytokines has been demonstrated in various tissues. Therefore, we investigate the effect of interleukin (IL 4, IL6, IL10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFβ1 on GJIC, and Cx43 and Cx45 expression in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC and human suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HBSMC and hsMF cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy. In cytokine stimulated cultured hBSMC and hsMF GJIC was analyzed via Fluorescence Recovery after Photo-bleaching (FRAP. Cx43 and Cx45 expression was assessed by quantitative PCR and confocal immunofluorescence. Membrane protein fraction of Cx43 and Cx45 was quantified by Dot Blot. Upregulation of cell-cell-communication was found after IL6 stimulation in both cell types. In hBSMC IL4 and TGFβ1 decreased both, GJIC and Cx43 protein expression, while TNFα did not alter communication in FRAP-experiments but increased Cx43 expression. GJ plaques size correlated with coupling efficacy measured, while Cx45 expression did not correlate with modulation of GJIC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding of specific cytokine effects on GJIC support the notion that cytokines play a pivotal role for pathophysiology of OAB and IC. Interestingly, the effects were independent from the classical definition of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. We conclude, that

  15. Effects of Hydrograph Shape on Sediment Transport and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, S.; Hempel, L. A.; Grant, G.

    2017-12-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects of differently shaped hydrographs on sediment transport and size, and those that have, largely focused on sediment transport dynamics in fixed-width flumes with armored streambeds. To better understand how hydrograph shape controls transport dynamics in a more complex channel, we conducted a set of Froude-scaled physical experiments in an adjustable width flume with an un-armored bed that developed a meandering planform pattern with pool-riffle morphology. Experiments were conducted in a 12.2m long, 1.5m wide stream table at the University of British Columbia. Sediment size range from fine sand to small gravel, with a median grain size of 1.5mm. While hydrographs had different shapes, magnitudes, and durations, we kept total equilibrium feed mass equivalent among experiments. Sediment was fed at a constant rate at the inlet and, due to the adjustable boundary design, was continuously recruited from channel banks so that the channel was never supply limited. Sediment was collected at the outlet; sediment mass was measured every 10-15 minutes and grain size was sampled every 30 minutes. We found that sediment transport pattern reflects the rate of channel evolution and excavation over the course of the hydrograph. We introduce a new metric, cumulative sediment concentration, to evaluate temporal trends in sediment transport rate. Cumulative sediment concentration increased during rates of rapid channel excavation, particularly during the rising limb of the hydrograph as curvature developed, and decreased during periods of slow or no morphologic change. Slowly rising hydrographs had multiple peaks in the cumulative sediment concentration curve that reflected rapid channel excavation, then stability, following an increase in flow, whereas quickly rising hydrographs had cumulative sediment concentration curves that continuously increased. The latter suggests that during quickly rising hydrographs, the flow rises faster than

  16. Artificial fish schools : Collective effects of school size, body size, and body form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, H.; Hemelrijk, C.K.

    2003-01-01

    Individual-based models of schooling in fish have demonstrated that, via processes of self-organization. artificial fish may school in the absence of a leader or external stimuli, using local information only. We study for the first time how body size and body form of artificial fish affect school

  17. Chalcogenophene comonomer comparison in small band gap diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated polymers for high-performing field-effect transistors and organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ashraf, Raja Shahid

    2015-01-28

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based copolymers with different chalcogenophene comonomers (thiophene, selenophene, and tellurophene) for use in field-effect transistors and organic photovoltaic devices are reported. The effect of the heteroatom substitution on the optical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties and charge carrier mobilities of these polymers is discussed. The results indicate that by increasing the size of the chalcogen atom (S < Se < Te), polymer band gaps are narrowed mainly due to LUMO energy level stabilization. In addition, the larger heteroatomic size also increases intermolecular heteroatom-heteroatom interactions facilitating the formation of polymer aggregates leading to enhanced field-effect mobilities of 1.6 cm2/(V s). Bulk heterojunction solar cells based on the chalcogenophene polymer series blended with fullerene derivatives show good photovoltaic properties, with power conversion efficiencies ranging from 7.1-8.8%. A high photoresponse in the near-infrared (NIR) region with excellent photocurrents above 20 mA cm-2 was achieved for all polymers, making these highly efficient low band gap polymers promising candidates for use in tandem solar cells. (Graph Presented).

  18. A systematic literature review on the efficacy–effectiveness gap: comparison of randomized controlled trials and observational studies of glucose-lowering drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankarfeldt MZ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mikkel Z Ankarfeldt,1,2 Erpur Adalsteinsson,1 Rolf HH Groenwold,2,3 M Sanni Ali,2,3,4 Olaf H Klungel,2,3 On behalf of GetReal Work Package 2 1Novo Nordisk A/S, 2Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 4Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology, Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Aim: To identify a potential efficacy–effectiveness gap and possible explanations (drivers of effectiveness for differences between results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs and observational studies investigating glucose-lowering drugs. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted in English language articles published between 1 January, 2000 and 31 January, 2015 describing either RCTs or observational studies comparing glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs (GLP-1 with insulin or comparing dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i with sulfonylurea, all with change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c as outcome. Medline, Embase, Current Content, and Biosis were searched. Information on effect estimates, baseline characteristics of the study population, publication year, study duration, and number of patients, and for observational studies, characteristics related to confounding adjustment and selection- and information bias were extracted. Results: From 312 hits, 11 RCTs and 7 observational studies comparing GLP-1 with insulin, and from 474 hits, 16 RCTs and 4 observational studies comparing DPP-4i with sulfonylurea were finally included. No differences were observed in baseline characteristics of the study populations (age, sex, body mass index, time since diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and HbA1c or effect sizes across study designs. Mean effect sizes ranged from −0.43 to 0.91 and from −0.80 to 1.13 in RCTs and

  19. Effect of Calcaneus Fracture Gap Without Step-Off on Stress Distribution Across the Subtalar Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Brett; Joyce, Donald A; Werner, Frederick W; Iannolo, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Subtalar arthritis is a common consequence following calcaneal fracture, and its development is related to the severity of the fracture. Previous calcaneal fracture models have demonstrated altered contact characteristics when a step-off is created in the posterior facet articular surface. Changes in posterior facet contact characteristics have not been previously characterized for calcaneal fracture gap without step-off. The contact characteristics (peak pressure, area of contact, and centroid of pressure) of the posterior facet of the subtalar joint were determined in 6 cadaveric specimens. After creating a calcaneal fracture to simulate a Sanders type II fracture, the contact characteristics were determined with the posterior facet anatomically reduced followed by an incremental increase in fracture gap displacement of 2, 3, and 5 mm without a step-off of the articular surface. Peak pressure on the medial fragment was significantly less with a 5-mm gap compared to a 2- or 3-mm gap, or reduced. On the lateral fragment, the peak pressure was significantly increased with a 5-mm gap compared to a 2- or 3-mm gap. Contact area significantly changed with increased gap. In this study, there were no significant differences in contact characteristics between a <3-mm gap and an anatomically reduced fracture, conceding the study limitations including limiting axial loading to 50% of donor body weight. A small amount of articular incongruity without a step-off can be tolerated by the subtalar joint, in contrast to articular incongruity with a step-off present.

  20. Effects of major-road vehicle speed and driver age and gender on left-turn gap acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuedong; Radwan, Essam; Guo, Dahai

    2007-07-01

    Because the driver's gap-acceptance maneuver is a complex and risky driving behavior, it is a highly concerned topic for traffic safety and operation. Previous studies have mainly focused on the driver's gap acceptance decision itself but did not pay attention to the maneuver process and driving behaviors. Using a driving simulator experiment for left-turn gap acceptance at a stop-controlled intersection, this study evaluated the effects of major traffic speed and driver age and gender on gap acceptance behaviors. The experiment results illustrate relationships among drivers' left-turn gap decision, driver's acceleration rate, steering action, and the influence of the gap-acceptance maneuver on the vehicles in the major traffic stream. The experiment results identified an association between high crash risk and high traffic speed at stop-controlled intersections. The older drivers, especially older female drivers, displayed a conservative driving attitude as a compensation for reduced driving ability, but also showed to be the most vulnerable group for the relatively complex driving maneuvers.

  1. Effect of nitrogen and water deficit type on the yield gap between the potential and attainable wheat yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit and N fertilizer are the two primary limiting factors for wheat yield in the North China plain, the most important winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. production area in China. Analyzing the yield gap between the potential yield and the attainable yield can quantify the potential for increasing wheat production and exploring the limiting factors to yield gap in the high-yielding farming region of North China Plain. The Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT model was used to identify methods to increase the grain yield and decrease the gap. In order to explore the impact of N and cultivars on wheat yield in the different drought types, the climate conditions during 1981 to 2011 growing seasons was categorized into low, moderate, and severe water deficit classes according to the anomaly percentage of the water deficit rate during the entire wheat growing season. There are differences (P < 0.0001 in the variations of the potential yields among three cultivars over 30 yr. For all three water deficit types, the more recent cultivars Jimai22 and Shijiazhuang8 had higher yields compared to the older 'Jinan17'. As the N fertilizer rate increased, the yield gap decreased more substantially during the low water deficit years because of the significant increase in attainable yield. Overall, the yield gaps were smaller with less water stress. Replacement of cultivars and appropriate N fertilizer application based on the forecasted drought types can narrow the yield gap effectively.

  2. Effect of Particle Size on Shear Stress of Magnetorheological Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Chiranjit Sarkar; Harish Hirani

    2015-01-01

    Magnetorheological fluids (MRF), known for their variable shear stress contain magnetisable micrometer-sized particles (few micrometer to 200 micrometers) in a nonmagnetic carrier liquid. To avoid settling of particles, smaller sized (3-10 micrometers) particles are preferred, while larger sized particles can be used in MR brakes, MR clutches, etc. as mechanical stirring action in those mechanisms does not allow particles to settle down. Ideally larger sized particles provide higher shear str...

  3. Estimation of the effective intercellular diffusion coefficient in cell monolayers coupled by gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Hofgaard, Johannes P; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-07-16

    A recently developed dye-based assay to study gap junction permeability is analysed. The assay is based on electroporation of dye into a large number of connexin 43 expressing cells, grown to confluency on electrically conductive slides. The subsequent intercellular spread of dye to non-electroporated parts of the monolayer enables estimation of the intercellular coupling. So far, the extent of dye spread has been analyzed in qualitative terms only and not in a manner based directly on the physics of the underlying diffusion process. We apply a continuum approximation assuming that the observed dye spread can be described by Fick's law of diffusion. Deduced from Fick's law, new measures are presented which directly relate the observed spread of dye to the diffusion coefficient. The theoretical framework enables the estimation of an effective diffusion coefficient from Fick's law independently of the specific indicator substance used in the assay. For Lucifer Yellow, diffusion stops within few minutes after the electroporation. Therefore only an order-of-magnitude estimate of the diffusion coefficient can be given for this dye. In terms of the underlying diffusion coefficient, the hitherto used measures give a relatively poor degree of quantification. In contrast, the present methods may yield direct information on the effective intercellular diffusion coefficient and hence provide additional and more precise information as to the permeability modulating effect of various substances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of particle size on the thermoluminescent response of hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera V, A.; Zarate M, J.; Contreras, M. E.; Rivera M, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present the study of the structural characterization and the thermoluminescent response of the hydroxyapatite as a function of the calcination temperature and the effect of the particle size. For precipitation synthesis, calcium nitrate (Ca(NO 3 ) 2 and dibasic ammonium phosphate ((NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 ) were used as precursors and ammonium hydroxide (NH 4 OH) as a ph controlling agent. The characterization of the samples was carried out by the techniques of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The powders obtained are composed of hydroxyapatite, with a different degree of dehydroxylation. The thermoluminescent characterization indicates that at higher calcination temperature there is a higher thermoluminescent response, the calcined powders at 1300 degrees Celsius show a very well defined brightness curve with a higher intensity, with its maximum intensity located at a temperature of 210 degrees Celsius, which indicates that this material can be used as a dosimeter. (Author)

  5. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Cu2ZnSnSe4 quantum dots with controllable size and quantum confinement effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Kai; Lu, SiHeng; Wang, Hao; Sun, YuXiu; Liu, JingBing; Yan, Hui

    2013-09-01

    Cu2ZnSnSe4 quantum dots (QDs) with controllable sizes have been synthesized via a hot-injection method. The diameters of the QDs range from 3.2 to 10.1 nm with the tunable band gap from 1.27 to 1.54 eV by adjusting the reaction temperatures from 180 to 240 °C. Structural and Raman scattering data confirm that Cu2ZnSnSe4 is obtained without other secondary phases. The band gaps of the QDs with diameters less than 4.6 nm show an obvious blue shift to higher energy due to quantum confinement effect. It indicates that the Cu2ZnSnSe4 QDs can be a potential candidate for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells in the future.

  6. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Kolomenskiy

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering.

  7. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering.

  8. Why Are We Unable Bridging Theory-Practice Gap in Context of Plethora of Literature on Its Causes, Effects and Solutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinyaduka, Bryson D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper raises pertinent issues regarding an obvious gap that prevails between theory and practice in various professions. The paper makes it clear that there is theory-practice gap among professions; however, it focuses more on informing theory-practice gap in the teaching profession. The paper identifies and informs of causes, effects and…

  9. Radiotelemetry and wildlife: Highlighting a gap in the knowledge on radiofrequency radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmori, Alfonso, E-mail: balmaral@jcyl.es

    2016-02-01

    Radio transmitters and associated devices may induce negative effects that can bias the results of ongoing research. The main documented effects of radio transmitters on animals include reduced survival, decreased productivity, changes in behaviour and movement patterns and a biased sex ratio. The only factors that have claimed responsibility for these possible damages are the weight of the radio transmitter and associated devices, and the attachment type. The electromagnetic radiation produced by radio transmitters has not been considered so far in research. There have been no studies evaluating the effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation (radiofrequency signals) necessary for tracking, although the problems found were significantly associated with the length of time that animals had been carrying their radio transmitters. Similar problems as those in radiotracked animals have been found in numerous studies with animals exposed to radiofrequency radiation for a sufficient amount of time. Laboratory scientists investigating the orientation of animals know they have to shield the place where experiments are performed to prevent interference from man-made radiation, as anthropogenic signals may distort the results. It is paradoxical that, at the same time, field scientists investigating the movements and other aspects of animal biology are providing animals with radio transmitters that emit the same type of radiation, since this may affect the results concerning their orientation and movement. This paper identifies gaps in the knowledge that should be investigated in-depth. The possibility that the radiofrequency radiation from radiotracking devices is responsible for the findings should be considered. Considering this factor may allow researchers to best understand the long-term effects found. - Highlights: • Radiotracking may induce negative effects that can bias the results. • Effects have been documented on survival, reproduction and behaviour.

  10. Highly efficient graphene-on-gap modulator by employing the hybrid plasmonic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiliang; Hao, Ran; Ye, Ziwei; Qin, Pengfei; Chen, Wenchao; Chen, Hongsheng; Jin, Xiaofeng; Yang, Dongxiao; Li, Erping

    2017-05-01

    We propose a highly efficient graphene-on-gap modulator (GOGM) by employing the hybrid plasmonic effect, whose modulation efficiency (up to 1.23 dB/μm after optimization) is ∼12-fold larger than that of the present graphene-on-silicon modulator (∼0.1  dB/μm). The proposed modulator has the advantage of a short modulation length of ∼3.6  μm, a relatively low insertion loss of ∼0.32  dB, and a larger modulation bandwidth of ∼0.48  THz. The physical insight is investigated, showing that both the slow light effect and the overlap between graphene and the mode field contribute. Moreover, an efficient taper coupler has been designed to convert the quasi-transverse electric mode of conventional silicon waveguide to the hybrid plasmonic mode of GOGM, with a high coupling efficiency of 91%. This Letter may promote the design of high-performance on-chip electro-optical modulators.

  11. Superconducting Gap Symmetry of LaFeP(O,F Observed by Impurity Doping Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Miyasaka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated Mn, Co and Ni substitution effects on polycrystalline samples of LaFePO0.95F0.05 by resistivity and magnetoresistance measurements. In LaFe1-xMxPO0.95F0.05 (M = Mn, Co and Ni, the superconducting transition temperature (Tc monotonously decreases with increasing the impurity doping level of x. There is a clear difference of Tc suppression rates among Mn, Co and Ni doping cases, and the decreasing rate of Tc by Mn doping as a magnetic impurity is larger than those by the nonmagnetic doping impurities (Co/Ni. This result indicates that in LaFePO0.95F0.05, Tc is rapidly suppressed by the pair-breaking effect of magnetic impurities, and the pairing symmetry is a full-gapped s-wave. In the nonmagnetic impurity-doped systems, the residual resistivity in the normal state has nearly the same value when Tc becomes zero. The residual resistivity value is almost consistent with the universal value of sheet resistance for two-dimensional superconductors, suggesting that Tc is suppressed by electron localization in Co/Ni-doped LaFePO0.95F0.05.

  12. [Clinical effect observation of biodegradable conduit small gap tublization repairing peripheral nerve injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei-xun; Kou, Yu-hui; Han, Na; Dang, Yu; Xue, Feng; Wang, Tian-bing; Xu, Hai-lin; Chen, Jian-hai; Yang, Ming; Lu, Hao; Yin, Xiao-feng; Bai, Lu; Wang, Yan-hua; An, Shuai; Zhang, Dian-ying; Fu, Zhong-guo; Jiang, Bao-guo

    2012-12-18

    To observe the clinical effect of biodegradable conduit small gap tublization to repair peripheral nerve injury. In the study, 30 cases of fresh peripheral nerve injury in the upper extremities were recruited. After formally informed and obtaining the consent, the recruited patients were divided into the degradable chitin conduit tublization group (experimental group: 15 cases) and traditional epineurial neurorrhaphy group (control group: 15 cases). Their nerve functional recovery conditions were clinically observed according to the standard score methods provided by SHEN Ning-jiang and British Medical Research Council. The excellent and good rates of the overall nerve functional recovery were calculated. The electrophysiologic study was carried out after 6 months. Of the total 30 cases, 28 were followed up, and there were 14 cases in the degradable chitin conduit tublization group and traditional epineurial neurorrhaphy group. The operation procedure was very simple, and the mean suture time [(8.0±0.8) min] was 20% shorter than that of the traditional epineurial neurorrhaphy group [(10.0±0.6) min]. All the wounds in the degradable chitin conduit tublization group healed as expected without rejection, hypersensitive reaction or anomalous draining. Electrophysiology examination results after 6 months displayed that the sensory nerves conduction velocity recovery rate was 77.37% of the normal value, and motor nerve conduction velocity recovery rate was 70.09% in the degradable chitin conduit tublization group. The sensory nerves conduction velocity recovery rate was 61.69% of the normal value, and motor nerve conduction velocity recovery rate was 56.15% in the traditional epineurial neurorrhaphy group. The exact propability methods was applied in the comparison of sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity recovery rate, and there was no statistically significant of two groups(sensory nerve conduction velocity recovery rate P=0.678;motor nerve conduction velocity

  13. Indentation size effect of Y-TZP dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majić Renjo, Marijana; Ćurković, Lidija; Štefančić, Sanja; Ćorić, Danko

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and analyze the indentation size effect (ISE) in Vickers hardness of monolithic yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) dental ceramics without and with the addition of dental dye A3. The ISE is analyzed using the Mayer law, a proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model and a modified proportional specimen resistance (MPSR) model. Two samples of Y-TZP dental ceramics, trade names BruxZir (provided by Glidewell Laboratories, CA, USA), were investigated. The first sample was polished Y-TZP and the second sample was polished Y-TZP with the addition of dental dye A3, by VITA Classical Shade Guide. The Vickers hardness was measured under the following loads: 0.49N, 0.98N, 1.96N, 4.90, 9.81N and 29.42N. Thirty indentations were made on each sample, under each load. Relationships between the applied load, F, and the resulting indentation size, d, have been analyzed by the Mayer law, the PSR model and the MPSR model. The Meyer index (n) for both Y-TZP dental ceramics is less than 2, which indicates that hardness is dependent on test loads. The PSR model and the MPSR model were used to calculate "true" Vickers hardness or load-independent hardness. All applied mathematical models are suitable for the data analysis, which is confirmed with high correlation coefficients, but the best correlation between measured values and mathematical models was achieved with the MPSR model with a correlation coefficient of 0.9999. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. FDI technology spillover and threshold effect of the technology gap: regional differences in the Chinese industrial sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Huifang; Cao, Zhiyong; Wang, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new perspective that there is a double-threshold effect in terms of the technology gap existing in the foreign direct investment (FDI) technology spillover process in different regional Chinese industrial sectors. In this paper, a double-threshold regression model was established to examine the relation between the threshold effect of the technology gap and technology spillover. Based on the provincial panel data of Chinese industrial sectors from 2000 to 2011, the empirical results reveal that there are two threshold values, which are 1.254 and 2.163, in terms of the technology gap in the industrial sector in eastern China. There are also two threshold values in both the central and western industrial sector, which are 1.516, 2.694 and 1.635, 2.714, respectively. The technology spillover is a decreasing function of the technology gap in both the eastern and western industrial sectors, but a concave curve function of the technology gap is in the central industrial sectors. Furthermore, the FDI technology spillover has increased gradually in recent years. Based on the empirical results, suggestions were proposed to elucidate the introduction of the FDI and the improvement in the industrial added value in different regions of China.

  15. Landscape heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship: effect of range size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Katayama

    Full Text Available The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, whereas narrow-ranging species are positively associated with landscape homogeneity in the form of either open or forest habitats. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to explore the effects of climate, evapotranspiration, and landscape heterogeneity on the richness and abundance of breeding land-bird species. The richness of wide-ranging species and the total species richness were highest in heterogeneous landscapes, where many wide-ranging species showed the highest abundance. In contrast, the richness of narrow-ranging species was not highest in heterogeneous landscapes; most of those species were abundant in either open or forest landscapes. Moreover, in open landscapes, narrow-ranging species increased their species richness with decreasing temperature. These results indicate that heterogeneous landscapes are associated with rich bird diversity but that most narrow-ranging species prefer homogeneous landscapes--particularly open habitats in colder regions, where grasslands have historically predominated. There is a need to reassess the generality of the heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship, with attention to the characteristics of species assemblages determined by environments at large spatiotemporal scales.

  16. Landscape Heterogeneity–Biodiversity Relationship: Effect of Range Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; Yamakita, Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, whereas narrow-ranging species are positively associated with landscape homogeneity in the form of either open or forest habitats. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to explore the effects of climate, evapotranspiration, and landscape heterogeneity on the richness and abundance of breeding land-bird species. The richness of wide-ranging species and the total species richness were highest in heterogeneous landscapes, where many wide-ranging species showed the highest abundance. In contrast, the richness of narrow-ranging species was not highest in heterogeneous landscapes; most of those species were abundant in either open or forest landscapes. Moreover, in open landscapes, narrow-ranging species increased their species richness with decreasing temperature. These results indicate that heterogeneous landscapes are associated with rich bird diversity but that most narrow-ranging species prefer homogeneous landscapes—particularly open habitats in colder regions, where grasslands have historically predominated. There is a need to reassess the generality of the heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship, with attention to the characteristics of species assemblages determined by environments at large spatiotemporal scales. PMID:24675969

  17. Landscape heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship: effect of range size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; Yamakita, Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, whereas narrow-ranging species are positively associated with landscape homogeneity in the form of either open or forest habitats. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to explore the effects of climate, evapotranspiration, and landscape heterogeneity on the richness and abundance of breeding land-bird species. The richness of wide-ranging species and the total species richness were highest in heterogeneous landscapes, where many wide-ranging species showed the highest abundance. In contrast, the richness of narrow-ranging species was not highest in heterogeneous landscapes; most of those species were abundant in either open or forest landscapes. Moreover, in open landscapes, narrow-ranging species increased their species richness with decreasing temperature. These results indicate that heterogeneous landscapes are associated with rich bird diversity but that most narrow-ranging species prefer homogeneous landscapes--particularly open habitats in colder regions, where grasslands have historically predominated. There is a need to reassess the generality of the heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship, with attention to the characteristics of species assemblages determined by environments at large spatiotemporal scales.

  18. Impact of high-frequency pumping on anomalous finite-size effects in three-dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervishko, Anastasiia A.; Yudin, Dmitry; Shelykh, Ivan A.

    2018-02-01

    Lowering of the thickness of a thin-film three-dimensional topological insulator down to a few nanometers results in the gap opening in the spectrum of topologically protected two-dimensional surface states. This phenomenon, which is referred to as the anomalous finite-size effect, originates from hybridization between the states propagating along the opposite boundaries. In this work, we consider a bismuth-based topological insulator and show how the coupling to an intense high-frequency linearly polarized pumping can further be used to manipulate the value of a gap. We address this effect within recently proposed Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory that allows us to map a time-dependent problem into a stationary one. Our analysis reveals that both the gap and the components of the group velocity of the surface states can be tuned in a controllable fashion by adjusting the intensity of the driving field within an experimentally accessible range and demonstrate the effect of light-induced band inversion in the spectrum of the surface states for high enough values of the pump.

  19. Radiotelemetry and wildlife: Highlighting a gap in the knowledge on radiofrequency radiation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Radio transmitters and associated devices may induce negative effects that can bias the results of ongoing research. The main documented effects of radio transmitters on animals include reduced survival, decreased productivity, changes in behaviour and movement patterns and a biased sex ratio. The only factors that have claimed responsibility for these possible damages are the weight of the radio transmitter and associated devices, and the attachment type. The electromagnetic radiation produced by radio transmitters has not been considered so far in research. There have been no studies evaluating the effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation (radiofrequency signals) necessary for tracking, although the problems found were significantly associated with the length of time that animals had been carrying their radio transmitters. Similar problems as those in radiotracked animals have been found in numerous studies with animals exposed to radiofrequency radiation for a sufficient amount of time. Laboratory scientists investigating the orientation of animals know they have to shield the place where experiments are performed to prevent interference from man-made radiation, as anthropogenic signals may distort the results. It is paradoxical that, at the same time, field scientists investigating the movements and other aspects of animal biology are providing animals with radio transmitters that emit the same type of radiation, since this may affect the results concerning their orientation and movement. This paper identifies gaps in the knowledge that should be investigated in-depth. The possibility that the radiofrequency radiation from radiotracking devices is responsible for the findings should be considered. Considering this factor may allow researchers to best understand the long-term effects found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Meaning and Symmetry on Judgments of Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reber, Rolf; Christensen, Bo T.; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that people judge words as having bigger font size than non-words. This finding has been interpreted in terms of processing fluency, with higher fluency leading to judgments of bigger size. If so, symmetric numbers (e.g., 44) which can be processed more fluently are predicted...... to be judged as larger than asymmetric numbers (e.g., 43). However, recent research found that symmetric numbers were judged to be smaller than asymmetric numbers. This finding suggests that the mechanisms underlying size judgments may differ in meaningful and meaningless materials. Supporting this notion, we...... showed in Experiment 1 that meaning increased judged size, whereas symmetry decreased judged size. In the next two experiments, we excluded several alternative explanations for the differences in size judgments between meaningful and meaningless materials in earlier studies. This finding contradicts...

  1. Heater size effect on subcooled pool boiling of FC-72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Rishi; Kim, Jungho [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on pool boiling using heaters larger than the capillary length. For large heaters and/or high gravity conditions, boiling is dominated by buoyancy, and the heat transfer is heater size independent. Much less is known about boiling on small heaters and at low gravity levels. The ratio of heater size L{sub h} to capillary length L{sub c} is an important parameter in the determination of heater size dependence on heat transfer. As the ratio L{sub h}/L{sub c} decreases due to a decrease in either heater size or gravity, surface tension forces become dominant. It is proposed that transition from buoyancy to surface tension dominated boiling occurs when the heater size and bubble departure diameter are of the same order. Previous work in variable gravity with flat surfaces has shown that the heat transfer was heater size independent only when the ratio L{sub h}/L{sub c} was considerably larger than 1. An array of 96 platinum resistance heater elements in a 10 x 10 configuration with individual elements 0.7 x 0.7 mm{sup 2} in size was used to vary heater size and measure the heat transfer. The threshold value of L{sub h}/L{sub c} above which pool boiling is heater size independent was found to be about 2.8. (author)

  2. Heater size effect on subcooled pool boiling of FC-72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Rishi; Kim, Jungho

    2009-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on pool boiling using heaters larger than the capillary length. For large heaters and/or high gravity conditions, boiling is dominated by buoyancy, and the heat transfer is heater size independent. Much less is known about boiling on small heaters and at low gravity levels. The ratio of heater size L h to capillary length L c is an important parameter in the determination of heater size dependence on heat transfer. As the ratio L h /L c decreases due to a decrease in either heater size or gravity, surface tension forces become dominant. It is proposed that transition from buoyancy to surface tension dominated boiling occurs when the heater size and bubble departure diameter are of the same order. Previous work in variable gravity with flat surfaces has shown that the heat transfer was heater size independent only when the ratio L h /L c was considerably larger than 1. An array of 96 platinum resistance heater elements in a 10 x 10 configuration with individual elements 0.7 x 0.7 mm 2 in size was used to vary heater size and measure the heat transfer. The threshold value of L h /L c above which pool boiling is heater size independent was found to be about 2.8. (author)

  3. Strain-induced band-gap engineering of graphene monoxide and its effect on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H. H.; Rhim, S. H.; Hirschmugl, C. J.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, M.; Weinert, M.; Chen, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations we demonstrate the feasibility of band-gap engineering in two-dimensional crystalline graphene monoxide (GMO), a recently reported graphene-based material with a 1:1 carbon/oxygen ratio. The band gap of GMO, which can be switched between direct and indirect, is tunable over a large range (0-1.35 eV) for accessible strains. Electron and hole transport occurs predominantly along the zigzag and armchair directions (armchair for both) when GMO is a direct- (indirect-) gap semiconductor. A band gap of ˜0.5 eV is also induced in graphene at the K' points for GMO/graphene hybrid systems.

  4. The Effect of Size on the Oxygen Electroreduction Activity of Mass‐Selected Platinum Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Alonso, Francisco; McCarthy, David Norman; Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev

    2012-01-01

    A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt nanopartic......A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt...... nanoparticles (jk=kinetic current density, see picture)....

  5. The effect of size on the oxygen electroreduction activity of mass-selected platinum nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Alonso, Francisco; McCarthy, David N; Nierhoff, Anders

    2012-01-01

    A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt nanopartic......A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt...... nanoparticles (j(k) =kinetic current density, see picture)....

  6. Importing equality? The effects of increased competition on the gender wage gap

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra E. Black; Elizabeth Brainerd

    1999-01-01

    It is now well documented that the gender wage gap declined substantially in the 1980s, despite rising overall wage inequality. While Blau and Kahn (JoLE 1997) attribute much of this improvement to gains in women's relative labor market experience and other observable characteristics, a substantial part of the decline in the gender wage gap remains unexplained, and may be due to reduced discrimination against women in the labor market. This paper tests the hypothesis (based on Becker 1957) th...

  7. Star junctions and watermelons of pure or random quantum Ising chains: finite-size properties of the energy gap at criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2015-06-01

    We consider M  ⩾  2 pure or random quantum Ising chains of N spins when they are coupled via a single star junction at their origins or when they are coupled via two star junctions at the their two ends leading to the watermelon geometry. The energy gap is studied via a sequential self-dual real-space renormalization procedure that can be explicitly solved in terms of Kesten variables containing the initial couplings and and the initial transverse fields. In the pure case at criticality, the gap is found to decay as a power-law {ΔM}\\propto {{N}-z(M)} with the dynamical exponent z(M)=\\frac{M}{2} for the single star junction (the case M   =   2 corresponds to z   =   1 for a single chain with free boundary conditions) and z(M)   =   M  -  1 for the watermelon (the case M   =   2 corresponds to z   =   1 for a single chain with periodic boundary conditions). In the random case at criticality, the gap follows the Infinite Disorder Fixed Point scaling \\ln {ΔM}=-{{N}\\psi}g with the same activated exponent \\psi =\\frac{1}{2} as the single chain corresponding to M   =   2, and where g is an O(1) random positive variable, whose distribution depends upon the number M of chains and upon the geometry (star or watermelon).

  8. The effect of group size on vigilance in Ruddy Turnstones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuller, R.A.; Bearhop, S.; Metcalfe, N.B.; Piersma, T.

    2013-01-01

    Foraging birds can manage time spent vigilant for predators by forming groups of various sizes. However, group size alone will not always reliably determine the optimal level of vigilance. For example, variation in predation risk or food quality between patches may also be influential. In a field

  9. Effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli–Euler beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with analytically predicting the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli– Euler beam performing bending oscillations. Two cases are considered: (i) large transverse deflections, where nonlinear (true) curvature...

  10. Producer firms, technology diffusion and spillovers to local suppliers : Examining the effects of Foreign Direct Investment and the technology gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordaan, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct a detailed examination of the effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and the technology gap on local technology dissemination and spillovers. Using unique firm level data from surveys among FDI firms and domestic producer firms and a random sample of their suppliers in

  11. Estimating the Effect of State Zero Tolerance Laws on Exclusionary Discipline, Racial Discipline Gaps, and Student Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, F. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Zero tolerance discipline policies have come under criticism as contributors to racial discipline gaps; however, few studies have explicitly examined such policies. This study utilizes data from two nationally representative data sources to examine the effect of state zero tolerance laws on suspension rates and principal perceptions of problem…

  12. The Adoption of Smoking and Its Effect on the Mortality Gender Gap in Netherlands : A Historical Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Fanny; van Poppel, Frans

    2015-01-01

    We examine in depth the effect of differences in the smoking adoption patterns of men and women on the mortality gender gap in Netherlands, employing a historical perspective. Using an indirect estimation technique based on observed lung cancer mortality from 1931 to 2012, we estimated lifetime

  13. The Adoption of Smoking and Its Effect on the Mortality Gender Gap in Netherlands: A Historical Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, F.; van Poppel, F.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    We examine in depth the effect of differences in the smoking adoption patterns of men and women on the mortality gender gap in Netherlands, employing a historical perspective. Using an indirect estimation technique based on observed lung cancer mortality from1931 to 2012, we estimated lifetime

  14. Effects of electrode gap and electric current on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Guoo-Shyng Wang; Hsu, Shun-Yao

    2018-04-01

    Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmental friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrode gap and electric current on chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water. Deep ocean water was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum-plated titanium anode and cathode in a constant-current operation mode. Results showed that current density, chlorine concentration, and electrolyte temperature increased with electric current, while electric efficiency decreased with electric current and electrode gap. An electrode gap of less than 11.7 mm, and a low electric current appeared to be a more energy efficient design and operation condition for the electrolysis system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The climate mitigation gap: education and government recommendations miss the most effective individual actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynes, Seth; Nicholas, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    Current anthropogenic climate change is the result of greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere, which records the aggregation of billions of individual decisions. Here we consider a broad range of individual lifestyle choices and calculate their potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries, based on 148 scenarios from 39 sources. We recommend four widely applicable high-impact (i.e. low emissions) actions with the potential to contribute to systemic change and substantially reduce annual personal emissions: having one fewer child (an average for developed countries of 58.6 tonnes CO2-equivalent (tCO2e) emission reductions per year), living car-free (2.4 tCO2e saved per year), avoiding airplane travel (1.6 tCO2e saved per roundtrip transatlantic flight) and eating a plant-based diet (0.8 tCO2e saved per year). These actions have much greater potential to reduce emissions than commonly promoted strategies like comprehensive recycling (four times less effective than a plant-based diet) or changing household lightbulbs (eight times less). Though adolescents poised to establish lifelong patterns are an important target group for promoting high-impact actions, we find that ten high school science textbooks from Canada largely fail to mention these actions (they account for 4% of their recommended actions), instead focusing on incremental changes with much smaller potential emissions reductions. Government resources on climate change from the EU, USA, Canada, and Australia also focus recommendations on lower-impact actions. We conclude that there are opportunities to improve existing educational and communication structures to promote the most effective emission-reduction strategies and close this mitigation gap.

  16. Gap Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-25

    Gap Resolution is a software package that was developed to improve Newbler genome assemblies by automating the closure of sequence gaps caused by repetitive regions in the DNA. This is done by performing the follow steps:1) Identify and distribute the data for each gap in sub-projects. 2) Assemble the data associated with each sub-project using a secondary assembler, such as Newbler or PGA. 3) Determine if any gaps are closed after reassembly, and either design fakes (consensus of closed gap) for those that closed or lab experiments for those that require additional data. The software requires as input a genome assembly produce by the Newbler assembler provided by Roche and 454 data containing paired-end reads.

  17. Effects of primary and secondary morphological family size in monolingual and bilingual word processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, K.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.; Schreuder, R.; Baayen, Harald

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated primary and secondary morphological family size effects in monolingual and bilingual processing, combining experimentation with computational modeling. Family size effects were investigated in an English lexical decision task for Dutch-English bilinguals and English

  18. Effects of gap distance and working gas on energy spectra of electrons in atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinxian; Tan, Zhenyu; Liu, Yadi; Li, Xiaotong; Pan, Jie; Wang, Xiaolong

    2018-03-01

    This work presents an investigation on the effects of the gap distance and working gas on the energy spectra of electrons (ESEs) in the atmospheric pressure plasma jets, and the corresponding mechanisms are also analyzed in detail based on the energy conservation of electrons in the development of discharge. The investigation is carried out by means of the numerical simulation based on a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model and gives the following results. There are the same characteristics of the spatiotemporal evolution of the energy spectrum of electrons for the considered gap distances below 1 cm. For each gap distance, there is a characteristic time (CT) in the evolution of ESE. Before the CT, the peak value of ESE decreases, the peak position shifts toward high energy, and the distribution of ESE becomes wider and wider, but the reverse is true after the CT. With the decrease in the gap distance, the CT of ESE decreases, and the average energy of electrons (AEEs) increases. Small gap distance leads to both smaller peak value of ESE and the peak position shifting toward high energy. This effect reaches its most prominent level at about 0.16 ns and then becomes evidently weak after 0.5 ns, staying at a nearly stable state where the differences between the ESEs due to different gap distances are very small. In contrast with argon, the ESE in helium is of low peak value and large distribution range, and the corresponding AEE is obviously large. These differences originate mainly from the obviously different thresholds and frequencies of inelastic collisions in argon and helium.

  19. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water: particle size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winward, G P; Avery, L M; Stephenson, T; Jefferson, B

    2008-02-01

    The impact of water quality on the ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water was investigated with reference to urban water reuse. Direct UV disinfection of grey water did not meet the stringent California State Title 22 criteria for unrestricted urban water reuse due to the presence of particulate material ranging from or = 2000 microm in size. Grey water was manipulated by settling to produce fractions of varying particle size distributions and blending was employed post-disinfection to extract particle-associated coliforms (PACs). The efficacy of UV disinfection was found to be linked to the particle size of the grey water fractions. The larger particle size fractions with a mean particle size of 262 microm and above were observed to shield more coliforms from UV light than did the smaller particles with a mean particle size below 119 microm. Up to 70% of total coliforms in the larger particle size fractions were particle-associated following a UV dose (fluence) of 260 mJ.cm(-2) and would remain undetected by standard coliform enumeration techniques. Implications for urban water reuse are discussed and recommendations made for grey water treatment to ensure removal of particle-associated indicator bacteria and pathogens prior to UV disinfection.

  20. Treatment effect on biases in size estimation in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Youssef; Fruth, Martina B; Pauli, Paul; Kinateder, Max; Reichenberger, Jonas; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    The current study investigates biases in size estimations made by spider-phobic and healthy participants before and after treatment. Forty-one spider-phobic and 20 healthy participants received virtual reality (VR) exposure treatment and were then asked to rate the size of a real spider immediately before and, on average, 15days after the treatment. During the VR exposure treatment skin conductance response was assessed. Prior to the treatment, both groups tended to overestimate the size of the spider, but this size estimation bias was significantly larger in the phobic group than in the control group. The VR exposure treatment reduced this bias, which was reflected in a significantly smaller size rating post treatment. However, the size estimation bias was unrelated to the skin conductance response. Our results confirm the hypothesis that size estimation by spider-phobic patients is biased. This bias is not stable over time and can be decreased with adequate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. THE EFFECT OF SEDIMENT GRAIN SIZE ON HEAVY METAL CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Maslennikova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the natural surroundings tectonical, climatological, dynamic and physico-chemical conditions of sedimentation are the crucial factors in the process of sediment composition formation. Grain size is one of the most investigated reasons of space and temporary variability in heavy metal concentration. In general, the data on grain size measurement afford to appreciate sorption capacity of sediments and arrange them. The dependence heavy metal content on grain size of sediments has been examined in the enormous amount of research works. The main conclusion is that if grain size decreases, metal content increases.We have carried out sediment grain size measurement of two lakes (Chebachje Lake, Piketnoye Lake located in the South of Western Siberia, Russia. To define grain size of these sediments the sorting of samples collected layer-by-layer has been conducted by nest of sieves (from 43 to 1000 µm. Accomplished examinations allow to state that layer-by-layer grain size measurement of sediments has significant importance in reconstruction of paleoecologic peculiarities and also influences organic and inorganic matter concentrating in the sediments in dynamics

  2. Effect of size heterogeneity on community identification in complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danon, L.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Arenas, A.

    2008-01-01

    Identifying community structure can be a potent tool in the analysis and understanding of the structure of complex networks. Up to now, methods for evaluating the performance of identification algorithms use ad-hoc networks with communities of equal size. We show that inhomogeneities in community sizes can and do affect the performance of algorithms considerably, and propose an alternative method which takes these factors into account. Furthermore, we propose a simple modification of the algorithm proposed by Newman for community detection (Phys. Rev. E 69 066133) which treats communities of different sizes on an equal footing, and show that it outperforms the original algorithm while retaining its speed.

  3. Body size as a predictor of species loss effect on ecosystem functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Séguin, Annie; Harvey, Éric; Archambault, Philippe; Nozais, Christian; Gravel, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop predictive indicators of the effect of species loss on ecosystem functioning. Body size is often considered as a good indicator because of its relationship to extinction risk and several functional traits. Here, we examined the predictive capacity of species body size in marine and freshwater multitrophic systems. We found a significant, but weak, effect of body size on functioning. The effect was much stronger when considering the effect of body size within...

  4. Investigating the effect of the reality gap on the human psychophysiological state in the context of human-swarm interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Podevijn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The reality gap is the discrepancy between simulation and reality—the same behavioural algorithm results in different robot swarm behaviours in simulation and in reality (with real robots. In this paper, we study the effect of the reality gap on the psychophysiological reactions of humans interacting with a robot swarm. We compare the psychophysiological reactions of 28 participants interacting with a simulated robot swarm and with a real (non-simulated robot swarm. Our results show that a real robot swarm provokes stronger reactions in our participants than a simulated robot swarm. We also investigate how to mitigate the effect of the reality gap (i.e., how to diminish the difference in the psychophysiological reactions between reality and simulation by comparing psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed on a computer screen and psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality. Our results show that our participants tend to have stronger psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality (suggesting a potential way of diminishing the effect of the reality gap.

  5. Finite size effects in lattice QCD with dynamical Wilson fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, B.

    2004-06-01

    Due to limited computing resources choosing the parameters for a full lattice QCD simulation always amounts to a compromise between the competing objectives of a lattice spacing as small, quarks as light, and a volume as large as possible. Aiming at pushing unquenched simulations with the standard Wilson action towards the computationally expensive regime of small quark masses, the GRAL project addresses the question whether computing time can be saved by sticking to lattices with rather modest numbers of grid sites and extrapolating the finite-volume results to the infinite volume (prior to the usual chiral and continuum extrapolations). In this context we investigate in this work finite-size effects in simulated light hadron masses. Understanding their systematic volume dependence may not only help saving computer time in light quark simulations with the Wilson action, but also guide future simulations with dynamical chiral fermions which for a foreseeable time will be restricted to rather small lattices. We analyze data from hybrid Monte Carlo simulations with the N{sub f} = 2 Wilson action at two values of the coupling parameter, {beta} = 5.6 (lattice spacing {alpha} {approx} 0.08 fm) and {beta} = 5.32144 ({alpha} {approx} 0.13 fm). The larger {beta} corresponds to the coupling used previously by SESAM/T{chi}L. The considered hopping parameters {kappa} = 0.1575, 0.158 (at the larger {beta}) and {kappa} = 0.1665 (at the smaller {beta}) correspond to quark masses of 85, 50 and 36% of the strange quark mass, respectively. At each quark mass we study at least three different lattice extents in the range from L = 10 to L = 24 (0.85-2.04 fm). Estimates of autocorrelation times in the stochastic updating process and of the computational cost of every run are given. For each simulated sea quark mass we calculate quark propagators and hadronic correlation functions in order to extract the pion, rho and nucleon masses as well as the pion decay constant and the quark mass

  6. The effect of meal size on gastric evacuation in whiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Gerner

    1998-01-01

    Gastric evacuation experiments were performed on whiting Merlangius merlangus fed discrete meals of different sizes. Herring Clupea harengus, sandeel Ammodytes tobianus, common goby Pomatoschistus microps, and brown shrimp Crangon crangon were tested as prey. A simple power model to describe...... gastric evacuation was evaluated and compared with a power model expanded as a function of meal size. The model parameters were estimated by means of nonlinear least squares. When all meal sizes were included the estimates of the power (curvature) parameter in the expanded model were within the range 0.......36-0.77 for the different prey. The power estimates in the simple model were generally close to 0.5. The exception was crustacean prey, which gave a higher value. In the simple model the power estimate represents a compromise between the curvatures of the curves fitted to the observations for each meal size...

  7. Shear strength and microstructure of polydisperse packings: The effect of size span and shape of particle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azéma, Emilien; Linero, Sandra; Estrada, Nicolas; Lizcano, Arcesio

    2017-08-01

    By means of extensive contact dynamics simulations, we analyzed the effect of particle size distribution (PSD) on the strength and microstructure of sheared granular materials composed of frictional disks. The PSDs are built by means of a normalized β function, which allows the systematic investigation of the effects of both, the size span (from almost monodisperse to highly polydisperse) and the shape of the PSD (from linear to pronouncedly curved). We show that the shear strength is independent of the size span, which substantiates previous results obtained for uniform distributions by packing fraction. Notably, the shear strength is also independent of the shape of the PSD, as shown previously for systems composed of frictionless disks. In contrast, the packing fraction increases with the size span, but decreases with more pronounced PSD curvature. At the microscale, we analyzed the connectivity and anisotropies of the contacts and forces networks. We show that the invariance of the shear strength with the PSD is due to a compensation mechanism which involves both geometrical sources of anisotropy. In particular, contact orientation anisotropy decreases with the size span and increases with PSD curvature, while the branch length anisotropy behaves inversely.

  8. Switching-on quantum size effects in silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Chenxi; Wang, Liwei; Wei, Muan; Mastronardi, Melanie L; Casillas, Gilberto; Breu, Josef; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-27

    The size-dependence of the absolute luminescence quantum yield of size-separated silicon nanocrystals reveals a "volcano" behavior, which switches on around 5 nm, peaks at near 3.7-3.9 nm, and decreases thereafter. These three regions respectively define: i) the transition from bulk to strongly quantum confined emissive silicon, ii) increasing confinement enhancing radiative recombination, and iii) increasing contributions favoring non-radiative recombination. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  10. Dual conception of risk in the Iowa Gambling Task: Effects of sleep deprivation and test-retest gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha eSingh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT is often understood in terms of intertemporal choices, i.e., preference for immediate outcomes in favor of delayed outcomes is considered risky. According to behavioral economics, decision makers refrain from choosing the short-sighted immediate gain because, over time (10 trials, the immediate gains result in a net loss. Instead decision makers are expected to maximize their gains by choosing options that, over time (10 trials, result in net gain. However, task choices are sometimes made on the basis of the frequency of reward and punishment such that infrequent punishments are favored over frequent punishments. The presence of these two attributes (intertemporality and frequency may correspond to the emotion-cognition dichotomy and reflect a dual conception of risk. Decision making on the basis of the two attributes was tested under two conditions: test-retest gap and sleep deprivation. An interaction between these two was expected to attenuate the difference between the two attributes (n=40 male. Analysis of the effects of IGT attribute type (intertemporal vs. frequency, sleep deprivation (sleep deprivation vs. no sleep deprivation, and test-retest gap (short vs. long showed a significant effect of IGT attribute type thus confirming the difference between the two attributes. Sleep deprivation had no effect on the attributes, but test-retest gap and the three-way interaction between attribute type, test-retest gap, and sleep deprivation were significant. Post-hoc tests showed sleep deprivation and short test-retest gap to attenuate the difference between the two attributes. As expected intertemporal decision making benefited from repeated task exposure. The findings add to understanding of the emotion-cognition dichotomy and show a time-dependent effect of a universally experienced constraint (sleep deprivation.

  11. The effect of gap width on viscous stresses within the leakage across a bileaflet valve pivot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Brandon R; Andersen, Morten E; Fründ, Ernst Torben

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Stresses of leakage flow may contribute to the increased tendency for thromboembolic complications in patients with mechanical valves. In bileaflet valves, leakage occurs primarily in the pivots, and the width of the pivot gap influences viscous stress magnitudes...... were performed, varying gap width between the leaflet and housing in the pivot region. To validate these calculations, steady leakage across a scaled in-vitro model of a single pivot was initiated, and velocity measurements at specific locations within flow the pivot were obtained using one......-component laser Doppler velocimetry. RESULTS: The average viscous stresses on the housing surface of the pivot increased from 198 to 299 Pa, and on the leaflet surface from 242 to 271 Pa, as gap width was increased from 100 to 300 microm. These stresses were similar in magnitude to the maximum turbulent stresses...

  12. The effect of repeated preheating of dimethacrylate and silorane-based composite resins on marginal gap of class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Jafari Navimipour, Elmira; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Salari, Ashkan

    2017-01-01

    Background. One of the problems with composite resin restorations is gap formation at resin‒tooth interface. The present study evaluated the effect of preheating cycles of silorane- and dimethacrylate-based composite resins on gap formation at the gingival margins of Class V restorations. Methods. In this in vitro study, standard Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 48 bovine incisors. For restorative procedure, the samples were randomly divided into 2 groups based on the type of composite resin (group 1: di-methacrylate composite [Filtek Z250]; group 2: silorane composite [Filtek P90]) and each group was randomly divided into 2 subgroups based on the composite temperature (A: room temperature; B: after 40 preheating cycles up to 55°C). Marginal gaps were measured using a stereomicroscope at ×40 and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Inter- and intra-group comparisons were analyzed with post-hoc Tukey tests. Significance level was defined at P composite resin type, preheating and interactive effect of these variables on gap formation were significant (Pcomposite resins (Pcomposite resins at room temperature compared to composite resins after 40 preheating cycles (Pcomposite re-sins. Preheating of silorane-based composites can result in the best marginal adaptation.

  13. Population modeling using harpacticoid copepods : Bridging the gap between individual-level effects and protection goals of environmental risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Lundström Belleza, Elin

    2014-01-01

    To protect the environment from contaminants, environmental risk assessment (ERA) evaluates the risk of adverse effects to populations, communities and ecosystems. Environmental management decisions rely on ERAs, which commonly are based on a few endpoints at the individual organism level. To bridge the gap between what is measured and what is intended for protection, individual-level effects can be integrated in population models, and translated to the population level. The general aim of th...

  14. Highlighting biome-specific sensitivity of fire size distributions to time-gap parameter using a new algorithm for fire event individuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oom, Duarte; Silva, Pedro C.; Bistinas, Ioannis; Pereira, José M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed spatial-temporal characterization of individual fire dynamics using remote sensing data is important to understand fire-environment relationships, to support landscape-scale fire risk management, and to obtain improved statistics on fire size distributions over broad areas. Previously,

  15. Effect of beamlet step-size on IMRT plan quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guowei; Jiang Ziping; Shepard, David; Earl, Matt; Yu, Cedric

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which beamlet step-size impacts the quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans. Treatment planning for IMRT begins with the application of a grid that divides each beam's-eye-view of the target into a number of smaller beamlets (pencil beams) of radiation. The total dose is computed as a weighted sum of the dose delivered by the individual beamlets. The width of each beamlet is set to match the width of the corresponding leaf of the multileaf collimator (MLC). The length of each beamlet (beamlet step-size) is parallel to the direction of leaf travel. The beamlet step-size represents the minimum stepping distance of the leaves of the MLC and is typically predetermined by the treatment planning system. This selection imposes an artificial constraint because the leaves of the MLC and the jaws can both move continuously. Removing the constraint can potentially improve the IMRT plan quality. In this study, the optimized results were achieved using an aperture-based inverse planning technique called direct aperture optimization (DAO). We have tested the relationship between pencil beam step-size and plan quality using the American College of Radiology's IMRT test case. For this case, a series of IMRT treatment plans were produced using beamlet step-sizes of 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm. Continuous improvements were seen with each reduction in beamlet step size. The maximum dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was reduced from 134.7% to 121.5% and the mean dose to the organ at risk (OAR) was reduced from 38.5% to 28.2% as the beamlet step-size was reduced from 10 to 1 mm. The smaller pencil beam sizes also led to steeper dose gradients at the junction between the target and the critical structure with gradients of 6.0, 7.6, 8.7, and 9.1 dose%/mm achieved for beamlet step sizes of 10, 5, 2, and 1 mm, respectively

  16. Effect of silica particle size on macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimasa Kusaka

    Full Text Available Amorphous silica particles, such as nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter particles, are used in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, paints, cosmetics, and food. Nevertheless, the immunotoxicity of these particles and the relationship between silica particle size and pro-inflammatory activity are not fully understood. In this study, we addressed the relationship between the size of amorphous silica (particle dose, diameter, number, and surface area and the inflammatory activity (macrophage phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, IL-1β secretion, cell death and lung inflammation. Irrespective of diameter size, silica particles were efficiently internalized by mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages via an actin cytoskeleton-dependent pathway, and induced caspase-1, but not caspase-11, activation. Of note, 30 nm-1000 nm diameter silica particles induced lysosomal destabilization, cell death, and IL-1β secretion at markedly higher levels than did 3000 nm-10000 nm silica particles. Consistent with in vitro results, intra-tracheal administration of 30 nm silica particles into mice caused more severe lung inflammation than that of 3000 nm silica particles, as assessed by measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice, and by the micro-computed tomography analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that silica particle size impacts immune responses, with submicron amorphous silica particles inducing higher inflammatory responses than silica particles over 1000 nm in size, which is ascribed not only to their ability to induce caspase-1 activation but also to their cytotoxicity.

  17. The effect of meal size on gastric evacuation in whiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Gerner

    1998-01-01

    Gastric evacuation experiments were performed on whiting Merlangius merlangus fed discrete meals of different sizes. Herring Clupea harengus, sandeel Ammodytes tobianus, common goby Pomatoschistus microps, and brown shrimp Crangon crangon were tested as prey. A simple power model to describe gast...... into account in the estimation procedure by expressing stomach contents relative to meal size. (C) 1998 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.......36-0.77 for the different prey. The power estimates in the simple model were generally close to 0.5. The exception was crustacean prey, which gave a higher value. In the simple model the power estimate represents a compromise between the curvatures of the curves fitted to the observations for each meal size...

  18. Bridging English Language Learner Achievement Gaps through Effective Vocabulary Development Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Despite a well-documented history of immigration in the United States of America and rise in population of students that speak a language other than English, academic achievement gaps between English Language Learners and their native English language speaking counterparts from Grades Pre-Kindergarten through the college/university level still…

  19. The effect of gap width on viscous stresses within the leakage across a bileaflet valve pivot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Brandon R; Andersen, Morten E; Fründ, Ernst Torben

    2008-01-01

    reported within the pivots in previous studies. Velocities measured experimentally were even larger than those estimated computationally. CONCLUSION: These experiments suggest that viscous stresses in leakage flow across a bileaflet mitral valve increase with gap width, and may contribute more to blood...

  20. Effect of Al doping on microstructure and optical band gap of ZnO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    % AZO indicating a blue-shift for 1% AZO film. However, for 2% AZO film, a decrease in band gap compared to pure ZnO is observed indicating a red-shift of fundamental absorption edge. Electrical resistance shows an initial decrease with.

  1. Effects of Forest Gaps on Litter Lignin and Cellulose Dynamics Vary Seasonally in an Alpine Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how forest gaps and the associated canopy control litter lignin and cellulose dynamics by redistributing the winter snow coverage and hydrothermal conditions in the growing season, a field litterbag trial was conducted in the alpine Minjiang fir (Abies faxoniana Rehder and E.H. Wilson forest in a transitional area located in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River and the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Over the first year of litter decomposition, the litter exhibited absolute cellulose loss and absolute lignin accumulation except for the red birch litter. The changes in litter cellulose and lignin were significantly affected by the interactions among gap position, period and species. Litter cellulose exhibited a greater loss in the winter with the highest daily loss rate observed during the snow cover period. Both cellulose and lignin exhibited greater changes under the deep snow cover at the gap center in the winter, but the opposite pattern occurred under the closed canopy in the growing season. The results suggest that decreased snowpack seasonality due to winter warming may limit litter cellulose and lignin degradation in alpine forest ecosystems, which could further inhibit litter decomposition. As a result, the ongoing winter warming and gap vanishing would slow soil carbon sequestration from foliar litter in cold biomes.

  2. Filling Gaps in Biogeochemical Understanding of Wildfire Effects on Watersheds and Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Charles; Covino, Timothy; Chow, Alex

    2017-04-01

    Large, high-severity wildfires alter the biogeochemical conditions that determine how watersheds retain and release nutrients and influence stream water quality. These effects are commonly expected to abate within a few years, but recent studies show that post-fire watershed changes can have persistent, but poorly-understood biogeochemical consequences. Owing to the increased frequency and extent of high-severity wildfires predicted for western North America, and the growing awareness of the links between wildfire and clean water supply, there is a need to address these knowledge gaps. For the past 15 years we have tracked stream nutrients, chemistry, temperature, and sediment after the 2002 Hayman Fire, the largest wildfire in Colorado history. Our earlier work showed that headwater catchments that experienced extensive, high-severity forest fires had elevated stream nitrate, temperature, and turbidity for five post-fire years. Recent sampling, conducted 13 and 14 years after the fire, found that turbidity had largely returned to pretreatment levels, but that stream nitrate remained an order of magnitude above pre-fire levels in catchments with extensive high-severity wildfire. Stream temperature and total dissolved nitrogen concentration also remained higher in those catchments compared to unburned streams. Decreased plant demand is the mechanism commonly credited for post-fire nutrient losses, though our current work is evaluating the implications of soil and stream nutrient uptake and supply on persistent nitrogen (N) export from severely-burned catchments. For example, we have measured higher total soil N and higher net N mineralization in severely-burned portions of the Hayman Fire compared to moderately or unburned areas, indicating that higher soil N supply may contribute to N losses from upland soils. Conversely, using a nutrient tracer approach we found reduced N uptake in burned streams, which suggests a switch from the N-limited conditions typical of

  3. Effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2016-02-01

    The paper deals with analytically predicting the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending oscillations. Two cases are considered: (i) large transverse deflections, where nonlinear (true) curvature, nonlinear material and nonlinear inertia owing to longitudinal motions of the beam are taken into account, and (ii) mid-plane stretching nonlinearity. A novel approach is employed, the method of varying amplitudes. As a result, the isolated as well as combined effects of the considered sources of nonlinearities are revealed. It is shown that nonlinear inertia has the most substantial impact on the dispersion relation of a non-uniform beam by removing all frequency band-gaps. Explanations of the revealed effects are suggested, and validated by experiments and numerical simulation.

  4. The Gap Within the Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Michelmore

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaps in educational achievement between high- and low-income children are growing. Administrative data sets maintained by states and districts lack information about income but do indicate whether a student is eligible for subsidized school meals. We leverage the longitudinal structure of these data sets to develop a new measure of economic disadvantage. Half of eighth graders in Michigan are eligible for a subsidized meal, but just 14% have been eligible for subsidized meals in every grade since kindergarten. These children score 0.94 standard deviations below those who are never eligible for meal subsidies and 0.23 below those who are occasionally eligible. There is a negative, linear relationship between grades spent in economic disadvantage and eighth-grade test scores. This is not an exposure effect; the relationship is almost identical in third-grade, before children have been exposed to varying years of economic disadvantage. Survey data show that the number of years that a child will spend eligible for subsidized lunch is negatively correlated with her or his current household income. Years eligible for subsidized meals can therefore be used as a reasonable proxy for income. Our proposed measure can be used to estimate heterogeneous effects in program evaluations, to improve value-added calculations, and to better target resources.

  5. Particle contamination effects in EUVL: enhanced theory for the analytical determination of critical particle sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Gerd; Govindjee, Sanjay

    2012-03-01

    Existing analytical and numerical methodologies are discussed and then extended in order to calculate critical contamination-particle sizes, which will result in deleterious effects during EUVL E-chucking in the face of an error budget on the image-placement-error (IPE). The enhanced analytical models include a gap dependant clamping pressure formulation, the consideration of a general material law for realistic particle crushing and the influence of frictional contact. We present a discussion of the defects of the classical de-coupled modeling approach where particle crushing and mask/chuck indentation are separated from the global computation of mask bending. To repair this defect we present a new analytic approach based on an exact Hankel transform method which allows a fully coupled solution. This will capture the contribution of the mask indentation to the image-placement-error (estimated IPE increase of 20%). A fully coupled finite element model is used to validate the analytical models and to further investigate the impact of a mask back-side CrN-layer. The models are applied to existing experimental data with good agreement. For a standard material combination, a given IPE tolerance of 1 nm and a 15 kPa closing pressure, we derive bounds for single particles of cylindrical shape (radius × height < 44 μm) and spherical shape (diameter < 12 μm).

  6. The Effects of Elbow Bracing on Medial Elbow Joint Space Gapping Associated With Repetitive Throwing in High School Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Hiroshi; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Takei, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    Throwing athletes risk medial elbow injury from extreme valgus stress generated across the medial elbow during throwing. Braces have been developed to protect the elbow joint; however, no previous study has investigated the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping associated with repetitive throwing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping during repetitive throwing. Our hypothesis was that an elbow brace may reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five high school baseball players participated in this study. Each subject pitched 100 times under 2 conditions: control (without elbow brace) and elbow brace. The ulnohumeral joint space was measured ultrasonically before pitching and after every block of 20 pitches. Measurement of the ulnohumeral joint space was carried out using ultrasound with the forearm hanging by the side. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used to compare ulnohumeral joint space with repeated pitching and between the elbow brace and control conditions. In the control condition, ulnohumeral joint space after 60 pitches was significantly greater than that before pitching ( P space was not significantly different after repeated pitching. When comparing these 2 conditions, ulnohumeral joint space in the control condition was significantly greater than that in the elbow brace condition after 60 pitches ( P space gapping with repeated throwing when determined ultrasonically by measuring the ulnohumeral joint space under gravity load. An elbow brace worn during baseball pitching practice may help reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping.

  7. Effects of spatial subsidies and habitat structure on the foraging ecology and size of geckos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy A Briggs

    Full Text Available While it is well established that ecosystem subsidies--the addition of energy, nutrients, or materials across ecosystem boundaries--can affect consumer abundance, there is less information available on how subsidy levels may affect consumer diet, body condition, trophic position, and resource partitioning among consumer species. There is also little information on whether changes in vegetation structure commonly associated with spatial variation in subsidies may play an important role in driving consumer responses to subsidies. To address these knowledge gaps, we studied changes in abundance, diet, trophic position, size, and body condition of two congeneric gecko species (Lepidodactylus spp. that coexist in palm dominated and native (hereafter dicot dominated forests across the Central Pacific. These forests differ strongly both in the amount of marine subsidies that they receive from seabird guano and carcasses, and in the physical structure of the habitat. Contrary to other studies, we found that subsidy level had no impact on the abundance of either gecko species; it also did not have any apparent effects on resource partitioning between species. However, it did affect body size, dietary composition, and trophic position of both species. Geckos in subsidized, dicot forests were larger, had higher body condition and more diverse diets, and occupied a much higher trophic position than geckos found in palm dominated, low subsidy level forests. Both direct variation in subsidy levels and associated changes in habitat structure appear to play a role in driving these responses. These results suggest that variation in subsidy levels may drive important behavioral responses in predators, even when their numerical response is limited. Strong changes in trophic position of consumers also suggest that subsidies may drive increasingly complex food webs, with longer overall food chain length.

  8. Effects of spatial subsidies and habitat structure on the foraging ecology and size of geckos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Amy A.; Young, Hillary S.; McCauley, Douglas J.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Fisher, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    While it is well established that ecosystem subsidies—the addition of energy, nutrients, or materials across ecosystem boundaries—can affect consumer abundance, there is less information available on how subsidy levels may affect consumer diet, body condition, trophic position, and resource partitioning among consumer species. There is also little information on whether changes in vegetation structure commonly associated with spatial variation in subsidies may play an important role in driving consumer responses to subsidies. To address these knowledge gaps, we studied changes in abundance, diet, trophic position, size, and body condition of two congeneric gecko species (Lepidodactylus spp.) that coexist in palm dominated and native (hereafter dicot dominated) forests across the Central Pacific. These forests differ trongly both in the amount of marine subsidies that they receive from seabird guano and carcasses, and in the physical structure of the habitat. Contrary to other studies, we found that subsidy level had no impact on the abundance of either gecko species; it also did not have any apparent effects on resource partitioning between species. However, it did affect body size, dietary composition, and trophic position of both species. Geckos in subsidized, dicot forests were larger, had higher body condition and more diverse diets, and occupied a much higher trophic position than geckos found in palm dominated, low subsidy level forests. Both direct variation in subsidy levels and associated changes in habitat structure appear to play a role in driving these responses. These results suggest that variation in subsidy levels may drive important behavioral responses in predators, even when their numerical response is limited. Strong changes in trophic position of consumers also suggest that subsidies may drive increasingly complex food webs, with longer overall food chain length.

  9. Effects of particle size and moisture content on the apparent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was further observed that the flours with smaller particle size produced pastes which were more viscous with more suspended and less sedimented or less aggregated particles; and hence are more likely suitable for the processing of most quality traditional foods like Kunu, Tuwo (Hausa); nri-oka, akamu (Ibo); eko, kokoro ...

  10. EFFECT OF FARM SIZE AND FREQUENCY OF CUTTING ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elasticity of production with respect to farm size was 0.71 while that with respect to frequency of cutting was 1.93. It was therefore recommended that research should be conducted to ascertain optimum frequency of cutting that would produce maximum output of the vegetable as well as the development of high yielding ...

  11. Finite-Size Effects for Some Bootstrap Percolation Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enter, A.C.D. van; Adler, Joan; Duarte, J.A.M.S.

    The consequences of Schonmann's new proof that the critical threshold is unity for certain bootstrap percolation models are explored. It is shown that this proof provides an upper bound for the finite-size scaling in these systems. Comparison with data for one case demonstrates that this scaling

  12. Origin of size effect on efficiency of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A.; Tromholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    on the voltage dependence of photocurrent and dark current is the key to understanding size limitation of the organic photovoltaics (OPV) efficiency. Practical methods to overcome this limitation as well as the possibility of producing concentrator OPV cells operating under sunlight concentrations higher than 10...

  13. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  14. The effect of animal size and adaptation on defoliation, selective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A conceptual model of the veld-herbivore relationship is presented. Large-sized, largely grazing animals feed relatively unselectively on abundant roughage. The carrying capacity of veld for them is high. They are low producers per animal, but high producers per ha. Per unit of metabolic mass they have a relatively minor ...

  15. Effects of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... The present work investigated the influence of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles (ANPs) prepared through precipitation. ANPs were fabricated using absolute ethanol containing surfactants (Tween80, Span80 and mixtures of Tween80 and Span80 with ratios of 25/75, 50/50 and ...

  16. The Effect of Organizational Size on Sport Centers' Employees Burnout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ATHANASIOS KOUSTELIOS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizational size and its relation with burnout were examined among 163 sport centres employees in Greece. Findings showed that there is a significant difference on employees' burnout between small and large sport organizations. Particularly, it was found that employees in small sport organizations experienced lower level of Emotional Exhaustion (p<.05 and higher level of Personal Accomplishment (p<.005.

  17. Effect of population size on prospect of species survival

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, - (2006), s. 137-150 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6111303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : population * size * survival Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.196, year: 2006

  18. EFFECTS OF FISHING ON THE SIZE AND DOMINANCE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dataset of linefish catch, effort and fish size distribution records has been assembled from archives to cover three short periods over the 100 years from 1897 to 1998 in four regions of the former Cape Colony, South Africa. Linefish catch and effort have increased several-fold over the period. Aggregate catch per unit effort ...

  19. The effects of gold nanoparticles size and concentration on viscosity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate viscosity in relation with the temperature, flow activation energy and dielectric properties for 10, 20 and 50 nm gold nanoparticles size (GNPs) in addition to absorption and fluorescence spectra at different concentrations (0.2 × 10-3 to 1 × 10-2%) in an attempt to cover and understand ...

  20. Effective population size and evolutionary dynamics in outbred ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion is too fast to be due to the de novo appearance of bene- ficial mutations. Likewise, the relatively similar .... lation size (Ne), which behaves in a similar fashion to N in the Wright–Fisher model. In some cases ... variation, giving the appearance that the population is smaller than traditional theory would suggest. In our ...

  1. Effects of nanoscale size dependent parameters on lattice thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tice thermal conductivity to that of the reported experimental curve. ... Introduction. Determination of thermal conductivity of semiconductor nanowires plays a crucial role in ..... experimental values. In order to calculate lattice thermal conductivity for Si nanowires, the crystal size dependent parameters should be taken care of.

  2. Effect of Family Size and Sex Preference on Contraceptive Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining whether son preference exists in the study area as well as establishing the ideal family size among married women. These were correlated with contraceptive behaviour in order to establish their relationships. The study was conducted to a sample of 135 randomly ...

  3. Effects of axial gap and nozzle distribution on aerodynamic forces of a supersonic partial-admission turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng JIANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The turbine in an LH2/LOX rocket engine is designed as a two-stage supersonic partial-admission turbine. Three-dimensional steady and unsteady simulations were conducted to analyze turbine performance and aerodynamic forces on rotor blades. Different configurations were employed to investigate the effects of the axial gap and nozzle distribution on the predicted performance and aerodynamic forces. Rotor blades experience unsteady aerodynamic forces because of the partial admission. Aerodynamic forces show periodicity in the admission region, and are close to zero after leaving the admission region. The unsteady forces in frequency domain indicate that components exist in a wide frequency region, and the admission passing frequency is dominant. Those multiples of the rotational frequency which are multiples of the nozzle number in a full-admission turbine are notable components. Results show that the turbine efficiency decreases as the axial gap between nozzles and the 1st stage rotor (rotor 1 increases. Fluctuation of the circumferential aerodynamic force on rotor 1 blades decreases with the axial gap increasing. The turbine efficiency decreases as the circumferential spacing between nozzles increases. Fluctuations of the circumferential and axial aerodynamic forces increase as the circumferential spacing increases. As for the non-equidistant nozzle distribution, it produces similar turbine performance and amplitude-frequency characteristics of forces to those of the normal configuration, when the mean spacing is equal to that of the normal case. Keywords: Aerodynamic force, Axial gap, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD, Nozzle distribution, Partial admission, Turbine

  4. Effect of Mefloquine, a Gap Junction Blocker, on Circadian Period2 Gene Oscillation in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmi Koo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is localized in an area of the ventral hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Previous studies have shown that pacemaker neurons in the SCN are highly coupled to one another, and this coupling is crucial for intrinsic self-sustainability of the SCN central clock, which is distinguished from peripheral oscillators. One plausible mechanism underlying the intercellular communication may involve direct electrical connections mediated by gap junctions.MethodsWe examined the effect of mefloquine, a neuronal gap junction blocker, on circadian Period 2 (Per2 gene oscillation in SCN slice cultures prepared from Per2::luciferase (PER2::LUC knock-in mice using a real-time bioluminescence measurement system.ResultsAdministration of mefloquine causes instability in the pulse period and a slight reduction of amplitude in cyclic PER2::LUC expression. Blockade of gap junctions uncouples PER2::LUC-expressing cells, in terms of phase transition, which weakens synchrony among individual cellular rhythms.ConclusionThese findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions play an important role in synchronizing the central pacemaker neurons and contribute to the distinct self-sustainability of the SCN master clock.

  5. Class Size Effects on Fourth-Grade Mathematics Achievement: Evidence from TIMSS 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2016-01-01

    Class size reduction policies have been widely implemented around the world in recent years. However, findings about the effects of class size on student achievement have been mixed. This study examines class size effects on fourth-grade mathematics achievement in 14 European countries using data from TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and…

  6. Effect of graphene grains size on the microwave electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of graphene/polymer multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhir, Polina P.; Paddubskaya, Alesia G.; Volynets, Nadzeya I.; Batrakov, Konstantin G.; Maksimenko, Sergey A.; Golubeva, Elena N.; Valusis, Gintaras; Kaplas, Tommi; Reckinger, Nicolas; Lobet, Michael; Lambin, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    The influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grain size on the electromagnetic (EM) shielding performance of graphene/polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) multilayers in Ka-band was studied both experimentally and theoretically. We found that increasing the average graphene grain size from 20 to 400 μm does not change the EM properties of heterostructures consisting of graphene layers sandwiched between submicron thick PMMA spacers. The independence of EM interference shielding effectiveness on the graphene grain size between 20 and 400 μm allows one to use cheaper (or more convenient regimes of CVD) graphene samples with low crystallinity and small grain size in the development of new graphene-based passive EM devices operated at high frequencies.

  7. The Role of Social Norms in the Portion Size Effect: Reducing normative relevance reduces the effect of portion size on consumption decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris eVersluis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available People typically eat more from large portions of food than from small portions. An explanation that has often been given for this so-called portion size effect is that the portion size acts as a social norm and as such communicates how much is appropriate to eat. In this paper, we tested this explanation by examining whether manipulating the relevance of the portion size as a social norm changes the portion size effect, as assessed by prospective consumption decisions. We conducted one pilot experiment and one full experiment in which participants respectively indicated how much they would eat or serve themselves from a given amount of different foods. In the pilot (N = 63, we manipulated normative relevance by allegedly basing the portion size on the behavior of either students of the own university (in-group or of another university (out-group. In the main experiment (N = 321, we told participants that either a minority or majority of people similar to them approved of the portion size. Results show that in both experiments, participants expected to serve themselves and to eat more from larger than from smaller portions. As expected, however, the portion size effect was less pronounced when the reference portions were allegedly based on the behavior of an out-group (pilot or approved only by a minority (main experiment. These findings suggest that the portion size indeed provides normative information, because participants were less influenced by it if it communicated the behaviors or values of a less relevant social group. In addition, in the main experiment, the relation between portion size and the expected amount served was partially mediated by the amount that was considered appropriate, suggesting that concerns about eating an appropriate amount indeed play a role in the portion size effect. However, since the portion size effect was weakened but not eliminated by the normative relevance manipulations and since mediation was only partial

  8. Troubled by unequal pay rather than low pay: The incentive effects of a top management team pay gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relationships with firm performance of the internal pay gap among individual members of the top management team (TMT and the compensation level of TMT members relative to their industry peers. We find that pay gap is positively related to firm performance and that this positive relation is stronger when the TMT pay level is higher than the industry median. However, we do not observe such effects in Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs, in which both the executive managerial market and compensation are government-regulated. We also document that cutting central SOE managers’ pay level can increase firm value, whereas doing so for local SOE managers has the opposite effect. Our findings have important implications for research on TMT compensation as well as for policy makers considering SOE compensation reform.

  9. Children's accuracy of portion size estimation using digital food images: effects of interface design and size of image on computer screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to test the effect of image size and presence of size cues on the accuracy of portion size estimation by children. Children were randomly assigned to seeing images with or without food size cues (utensils and checked tablecloth) and were presented with sixteen food models (foods co...

  10. The Effect of Plot Size on Some Pratylenchus Penetrans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pratylenchus penetrans counts obtained from a rose field, sampled sequentially by decreasing the plot sizes were computed to obtain the respective sample means, variance and k-value of the negative binomial distribution. Plots 21 m x 80 m, 3.6 m x 3.6 m and 0.6 m x 0.6 m were sampled for the nematode. It is reported ...

  11. ANALYSIS OF GAP FORMATION AT TOOTH-COMPOSITE RESIN INTERFACE: EFFECT OF C-FACTOR AND LIGHT-CURING PROTOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Gustavo Oliveira; da Silva, Antônio Henrique Monteiro da Fonseca Thomé; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; Barcellos, Alexandre de Araújo Lima; Sampaio, Eduardo Martins; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of C-factor and light-curing protocol on gap formation in composite resin restorations. Material and Methods: Cylindrical cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (A=1.0, B=2.0 and C=3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 30 human molars and restored in a single increment with P 60. The composite resin was light-cured according to two protocols: standard - 850 mW/cm2 / 20 s and gradual - 100 up to 1000 mW/cm2/ 10 s + 1000 mW/cm2 / 10 s. After storage in distilled water (37°C/7 days), the restorations were cut into three slices in a buccolingual direction and the gap widths were analyzed using a 3D-scanning system. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=0.05). Results: ANOVA detected a significant influence for the C-factor and light-curing protocol as independent factors, and for the double interaction C-factor vs. light-curing protocol. Cavities with higher C-factor presented the highest gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol led to smaller gap formation at cavity interfaces. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that the C-factor played an essential role in gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol may allow relaxation of composite resin restoration during polymerization reaction. PMID:19089143

  12. Analysis of gap formation at tooth-composite resin interface: effect of C-factor and light-curing protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Oliveira dos Santos

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of C-factor and light-curing protocol on gap formation in composite resin restorations. Material and METHODS: Cylindrical cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (A=1.0, B=2.0 and C=3.0 mm were prepared on the occlusal surface of 30 human molars and restored in a single increment with P 60. The composite resin was light-cured according to two protocols: standard - 850 mW/cm² / 20 s and gradual - 100 up to 1000 mW/cm² / 10 s + 1000 mW/cm² / 10 s. After storage in distilled water (37°C/7 days, the restorations were cut into three slices in a buccolingual direction and the gap widths were analyzed using a 3D-scanning system. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (alpha=0.05. RESULTS: ANOVA detected a significant influence for the C-factor and light-curing protocol as independent factors, and for the double interaction C-factor vs. light-curing protocol. Cavities with higher C-factor presented the highest gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol led to smaller gap formation at cavity interfaces. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the C-factor played an essential role in gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol may allow relaxation of composite resin restoration during polymerization reaction.

  13. Estimation of the effective intercellular diffusion coefficient in cell monolayers coupled by gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Hofgaard, Johannes P; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A recently developed dye-based assay to study gap junction permeability is analysed. The assay is based on electroporation of dye into a large number of connexin 43 expressing cells, grown to confluency on electrically conductive slides. The subsequent intercellular spread of dye to non-electropo......A recently developed dye-based assay to study gap junction permeability is analysed. The assay is based on electroporation of dye into a large number of connexin 43 expressing cells, grown to confluency on electrically conductive slides. The subsequent intercellular spread of dye to non......-electroporated parts of the monolayer enables estimation of the intercellular coupling. So far, the extent of dye spread has been analyzed in qualitative terms only and not in a manner based directly on the physics of the underlying diffusion process....

  14. Dynamic finite size effects in spiking neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Buice

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamics of a deterministic finite-sized network of synaptically coupled spiking neurons and present a formalism for computing the network statistics in a perturbative expansion. The small parameter for the expansion is the inverse number of neurons in the network. The network dynamics are fully characterized by a neuron population density that obeys a conservation law analogous to the Klimontovich equation in the kinetic theory of plasmas. The Klimontovich equation does not possess well-behaved solutions but can be recast in terms of a coupled system of well-behaved moment equations, known as a moment hierarchy. The moment hierarchy is impossible to solve but in the mean field limit of an infinite number of neurons, it reduces to a single well-behaved conservation law for the mean neuron density. For a large but finite system, the moment hierarchy can be truncated perturbatively with the inverse system size as a small parameter but the resulting set of reduced moment equations that are still very difficult to solve. However, the entire moment hierarchy can also be re-expressed in terms of a functional probability distribution of the neuron density. The moments can then be computed perturbatively using methods from statistical field theory. Here we derive the complete mean field theory and the lowest order second moment corrections for physiologically relevant quantities. Although we focus on finite-size corrections, our method can be used to compute perturbative expansions in any parameter.

  15. Micro-mechanical investigation of the effect of fine content on mechanical behavior of gap graded granular materials using DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Habib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a micro-mechanical study of the effect of fine content on the behavior of gap graded granular samples by using numerical simulations performed with the Discrete Element Method. Different samples with fine content varied from 0% to 30% are simulated. The role of fine content in reinforcing the granular skeleton and in supporting the external deviatoric stress is then brought into the light.

  16. The P Value Problem in Otolaryngology: Shifting to Effect Sizes and Confidence Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Peter M; Townsend, Melanie Elizabeth; Bhatt, Neel K; Kao, W Katherine; Sinha, Parul; Neely, J Gail

    2017-06-01

    There is a lack of reporting effect sizes and confidence intervals in the current biomedical literature. The objective of this article is to present a discussion of the recent paradigm shift encouraging the use of reporting effect sizes and confidence intervals. Although P values help to inform us about whether an effect exists due to chance, effect sizes inform us about the magnitude of the effect (clinical significance), and confidence intervals inform us about the range of plausible estimates for the general population mean (precision). Reporting effect sizes and confidence intervals is a necessary addition to the biomedical literature, and these concepts are reviewed in this article.

  17. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO2 photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Band gap engineering using anion dopants. • Mid band energy level. • Ti 3+ and oxygen vacancies as impurities states. • Valence band tail extension due to doping. • Wider solar light absorption. - Abstract: A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO 2 band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO 2 was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti 3+ impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti 3+ ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO 2 shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO 2 with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO 2 uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO 2 . This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  18. Effect of solvents on optical band gap of silicon-doped graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tul Ain, Qura; Al-Modlej, Abeer; Alshammari, Abeer; Naeem Anjum, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence on the optical band gap when the same amount of silicon-doped graphene oxide was dissolved in three different solvents namely, distilled water, benzene, and dichloroethane. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy was used to analyse the optical properties of the solutions. Among all these solutions distilled water containing silicon-doped graphene oxide has the smallest optical band gap of 2.9 eV and is considered a semiconductor. Other solutions are not considered as semiconductors as they have optical band gaps greater than 4 eV. It was observed that there is an increase in the value of optical band gap of distilled water, benzene, and dichloroethane solutions indicating a rise in the insulating behaviour. In this experiment, graphene oxide was synthesised from graphite powder by modified Hummer’s method and was then doped with silicon. Synthesis and doping of graphene oxide were confirmed by various characterization techniques. Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy was used for identification of surface functional groups. X-ray diffraction was carried out to confirm the formation of crystalline graphene oxide and silicon doped graphene oxide. In x-ray diffraction pattern, shifting of intensity peak from a 2θ value of 26.5° to 10° confirmed the synthesis of graphene oxide and various intensity peaks at different values of 2θ confirmed doping of graphene oxide with silicon. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated that graphene oxide sheets were decorated with spherical silicon nanoparticles. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed that silicon doped graphene oxide powder contained 63.36% carbon, 34.05% oxygen, and 2.6% silicon.

  19. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee, E-mail: sharifahbee@um.edu.my

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Band gap engineering using anion dopants. • Mid band energy level. • Ti{sup 3+} and oxygen vacancies as impurities states. • Valence band tail extension due to doping. • Wider solar light absorption. - Abstract: A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO{sub 2} band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO{sub 2} was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti{sup 3+} impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti{sup 3+} ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO{sub 2} shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO{sub 2} with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO{sub 2} uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO{sub 2}. This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  20. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of size-tunable zinc oxide architectures by multiple size reduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyeong-Ho; Hwang, Seon-Yong; Jung, Sang Hyun; Kang, Semin; Shin, Hyun-Beom; Kang, Ho Kwan; Ko, Chul Ki; Zhang Xin; Hill, Ross H; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple size reduction technique for fabricating 400 nm zinc oxide (ZnO) architectures using a silicon master containing only microscale architectures. In this approach, the overall fabrication, from the master to the molds and the final ZnO architectures, features cost-effective UV photolithography, instead of electron beam lithography or deep-UV photolithography. A photosensitive Zn-containing sol–gel precursor was used to imprint architectures by direct UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL). The resulting Zn-containing architectures were then converted to ZnO architectures with reduced feature sizes by thermal annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. The imprinted and annealed ZnO architectures were also used as new masters for the size reduction technique. ZnO pillars of 400 nm diameter were obtained from a silicon master with pillars of 1000 nm diameter by simply repeating the size reduction technique. The photosensitivity and contrast of the Zn-containing precursor were measured as 6.5 J cm −2 and 16.5, respectively. Interesting complex ZnO patterns, with both microscale pillars and nanoscale holes, were demonstrated by the combination of dose-controlled UV exposure and a two-step UV-NIL.

  1. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of size-tunable zinc oxide architectures by multiple size reduction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Ho Park, Xin Zhang, Seon-Yong Hwang, Sang Hyun Jung, Semin Kang, Hyun-Beom Shin, Ho Kwan Kang, Hyung-Ho Park, Ross H Hill and Chul Ki Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple size reduction technique for fabricating 400 nm zinc oxide (ZnO architectures using a silicon master containing only microscale architectures. In this approach, the overall fabrication, from the master to the molds and the final ZnO architectures, features cost-effective UV photolithography, instead of electron beam lithography or deep-UV photolithography. A photosensitive Zn-containing sol–gel precursor was used to imprint architectures by direct UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL. The resulting Zn-containing architectures were then converted to ZnO architectures with reduced feature sizes by thermal annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. The imprinted and annealed ZnO architectures were also used as new masters for the size reduction technique. ZnO pillars of 400 nm diameter were obtained from a silicon master with pillars of 1000 nm diameter by simply repeating the size reduction technique. The photosensitivity and contrast of the Zn-containing precursor were measured as 6.5 J cm−2 and 16.5, respectively. Interesting complex ZnO patterns, with both microscale pillars and nanoscale holes, were demonstrated by the combination of dose-controlled UV exposure and a two-step UV-NIL.

  2. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO2 photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-01-01

    A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO2 band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO2 was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti3+ impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti3+ ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO2 shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO2 with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO2 uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO2. This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  3. Thermo-Structural Response Caused by Structure Gap and Gap Design for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-structural response of solid rocket motor nozzles is widely investigated in the design of modern rockets, and many factors related to the material properties have been considered. However, little work has been done to evaluate the effects of structure gaps on the generation of flame leaks. In this paper, a numerical simulation was performed by the finite element method to study the thermo-structural response of a typical nozzle with consideration of the structure gap. Initial boundary conditions for thermo-structural simulation were defined by a quasi-1D model, and then coupled simulations of different gap size matching modes were conducted. It was found that frictional interface treatment could efficiently reduce the stress level. Based on the defined flame leak criteria, gap size optimization was carried out, and the best gap matching mode was determined for designing the nozzle. Testing experiment indicated that the simulation results from the proposed method agreed well with the experimental results. It is believed that the simulation method is effective for investigating thermo-structural responses, as well as designing proper gaps for solid rocket motor nozzles.

  4. A framework for effective implementation of lean production in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Belhadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper aims at developing an effective framework including all the components necessary for implementing lean production properly in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises. Design/methodology/approach: The paper begins with the review of the main existing framework of lean implementation in order to highlight shortcomings in the literature through a lack of suitable framework for small companies. To overcome this literature gap, data of successful initiatives of lean implementation were collected based on a multiple case study approach. These initiatives has been juxtaposed in order to develop a new, practical and effective framework that includes all the components (process, tools, success factors that are necessary to implement lean in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises. Findings: The proposed framework presents many significant contributions: First, it provides an overcoming for the limitations of the existing frameworks by proposing for consultants, researchers and organizations an effective framework for lean implementation in SMEs that allows SMEs to benefit from competitive advantages  gained by lean. Second, it brings together a set of the more essential and critical elements of lean implementation commonly used by SMEs and derived from the practical experiences of them in lean implementation. Finally, it highlights the successful experiences of small companies in implementing lean programs and then proves that lean can give a relevant results even for SMEs. Research limitations/implications: The proposed framework presents a number of limitations and still evokes extension for further researches: Although it was derived from practical experiences of SMEs, the proposed framework is not supported by practical implementation. On the other hand and even though the elements in the proposed framework from the practical experiences of four SMEs, the identified elements need to be generalized and enriching by conducting

  5. Effect of grain size on the high temperature mechanical properties of type 316LN stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Lee, Y. S.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Cho, H. D.; Han, C. H

    2001-02-01

    Nitrogen increases the high temeprature mechanical properties and decreases grain size. The effect of nitrogen on the high temperature mechanical properties was investigated in the viewpoint of grain size. Tensile strength increases with the decrease of grain size and agrees with the Hall-Petch relationship. Effect of grain size on the low cycle fatigue life properties were investigated as measuring the fatigue life from the results which had been obtained by the constant strain rate and various strain range. There was no effect on the low cycle fatigue properties by the grain size. The time to rupture decreased with the increase of grain size. The steady state creep rate decreased to a minimum and then increased as the grain size increased. This result agrees with the result predicted from Garofalo equation. The rupture elongation at the intermediate grain size showed a minimum due to the cavity formed easily by carbide precipitates in the grain boundaries.

  6. Electric field engineering using quantum-size-effect-tuned heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Adinolfi, V.

    2013-07-03

    A quantum junction solar cell architecture was recently reported that employs colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) on each side of the p-n junction. This architecture extends the range of design opportunities for CQD photovoltaics, since the bandgap can be tuned across the light-absorbing semiconductor layer via control over CQD size, employing solution-processed, room-temperature fabricated materials. We exploit this feature by designing and demonstrating a field-enhanced heterojunction architecture. We optimize the electric field profile within the solar cell through bandgap engineering, thereby improving carrier collection and achieving an increased open circuit voltage, resulting in a 12% improvement in power conversion efficiency.

  7. Nature of size effects in compact models of field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torkhov, N. A., E-mail: trkf@mail.ru [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Scientific-Research Institute of Semiconductor Devices, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Babak, L. I.; Kokolov, A. A.; Salnikov, A. S.; Dobush, I. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Novikov, V. A., E-mail: novikovvadim@mail.ru; Ivonin, I. V. [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-07

    Investigations have shown that in the local approximation (for sizes L < 100 μm), AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures satisfy to all properties of chaotic systems and can be described in the language of fractal geometry of fractional dimensions. For such objects, values of their electrophysical characteristics depend on the linear sizes of the examined regions, which explain the presence of the so-called size effects—dependences of the electrophysical and instrumental characteristics on the linear sizes of the active elements of semiconductor devices. In the present work, a relationship has been established for the linear model parameters of the equivalent circuit elements of internal transistors with fractal geometry of the heteroepitaxial structure manifested through a dependence of its relative electrophysical characteristics on the linear sizes of the examined surface areas. For the HEMTs, this implies dependences of their relative static (A/mm, mA/V/mm, Ω/mm, etc.) and microwave characteristics (W/mm) on the width d of the sink-source channel and on the number of sections n that leads to a nonlinear dependence of the retrieved parameter values of equivalent circuit elements of linear internal transistor models on n and d. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the size effects in semiconductors determined by the fractal geometry must be taken into account when investigating the properties of semiconductor objects on the levels less than the local approximation limit and designing and manufacturing field effect transistors. In general, the suggested approach allows a complex of problems to be solved on designing, optimizing, and retrieving the parameters of equivalent circuits of linear and nonlinear models of not only field effect transistors but also any arbitrary semiconductor devices with nonlinear instrumental characteristics.

  8. Surfactant effects in magnetite nanoparticles of controlled size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardia, P.; Batlle-Brugal, B.; Roca, A.G.; Iglesias, O.; Morales, M.P.; Serna, C.J.; Labarta, A.; Batlle, X.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles of controlled size within 6 and 20 nm in diameter were synthesised by thermal decomposition of an iron organic precursor in an organic medium. Particles were coated with oleic acid. For all samples studied, saturation magnetisation M s is size-independent, and reaches a value close to that expected for bulk magnetite, in contrast to results in small particle systems for which M s is usually much smaller due to surface spin disorder. The coercive field for the 6 nm particles is in agreement with coherent rotation, taking the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account. Both results suggest that the oleic acid molecules covalently bonded to the nanoparticle surface yield a strong reduction in the surface spin disorder. However, although the saturated state may be similar, the approach to saturation is different and, in particular, the high-field differential susceptibility is one order of magnitude larger than in bulk materials. The relevance of these results in biomedical applications is discussed

  9. Optical Forces at the Nanoscale: Size and Electrostatic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sevilla, Paloma; Prorok, Katarzyna; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Marqués, Manuel I; García-Martín, Antonio; García Solé, José; Haro-González, Patricia; Jaque, Daniel

    2018-01-10

    The reduced magnitude of the optical trapping forces exerted over sub-200 nm dielectric nanoparticles complicates their optical manipulation, hindering the development of techniques and studies based on it. Improvement of trapping capabilities for such tiny objects requires a deep understanding of the mechanisms beneath them. Traditionally, the optical forces acting on dielectric nanoparticles have been only correlated with their volume, and the size has been traditionally identified as a key parameter. However, the most recently published research results have shown that the electrostatic characteristics of a sub-100 nm dielectric particle could also play a significant role. Indeed, at present it is not clear what optical forces depend. In this work, we designed a set of experiments in order to elucidate the different mechanism and properties (i.e., size and/or electrostatic properties) that governs the magnitude of optical forces. The comparison between experimental data and numerical simulations have shown that the double layer induced at nanoparticle's surface, not considered in the classical description of nanoparticle's polarizability, plays a relevant role determining the magnitude of the optical forces. Here, the presented results constitute the first step toward the development of the dielectric nanoparticle over which enhanced optical forces could be exerted, enabling their optical manipulation for multiples purposes ranging from fundamental to applied studies.

  10. Effect of the Crystallization Process on the Marginal and Internal Gaps of Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of the crystallization process on lithium disilicate ceramic crowns fabricated using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM system and to determine whether the effect of crystallization is clinically acceptable by comparing values of fit before and after the crystallization process. The mandibular right first molar was selected as the abutment for the experiments. Fifteen working models were prepared. Lithium disilicate crowns appropriate for each abutment were prepared using a commercial CAD/CAM system. Gaps in the marginal area and 4 internal areas of each crown were measured twice—before and after crystallization—using the silicone replica technique. The mean values of fit before and after crystallization were analyzed using a paired t-test to examine whether the conversion that occurred during crystallization affected marginal and internal gaps (α=0.05. Gaps increased in the marginal area and decreased in the internal areas after crystallization. There were statistically significant differences in all of the investigated areas (P<0.05. None of the values for marginal and internal fit of lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns after crystallization exceeded 120 μm, which is the clinically acceptable threshold.

  11. The Effect of Trade Openness and Income on the Size of a Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner TURAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of trade openness and per capita GDP on the size of government for Turkey and South Korea by means of ARDL approach to co-integration. We use different proxies to measure the size of government because not all measures of government size are appropriate to be employed in the estimates. Among the three (four different measures of government size of Korea (Turkey, only one for each country has a co-integrating relationship with openness and per capita GDP. Long run coeffi cients suggest that per capita GDP has a positive and signifi cant effect on the government sizes for Turkey and Korea, implying the validity of the Wagner’s law. However, while openness has a negative effect on government size for Turkey, it has a positive effect for Korea. Our results clearly highlight the importance of choosing an appropriate proxy for government size to reach robust and consistent results.

  12. Effects of manganese doping on the structure evolution of small-sized boron clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingquan; Qu, Xin; Wang, Yanchao; Lv, Jian; Zhang, Lijun; Hu, Ziyu; Gu, Guangrui; Ma, Yanming

    2017-07-01

    Atomic doping of clusters is known as an effective approach to stabilize or modify the structures and properties of resulting doped clusters. We herein report the effect of manganese (Mn) doping on the structure evolution of small-sized boron (B) clusters. The global minimum structures of both neutral and charged Mn doped B cluster \\text{MnB}nQ (n  =  10-20 and Q  =  0, ±1) have been proposed through extensive first-principles swarm-intelligence based structure searches. It is found that Mn doping has significantly modified the grow behaviors of B clusters, leading to two novel structural transitions from planar to tubular and then to cage-like B structures in both neutral and charged species. Half-sandwich-type structures are most favorable for small \\text{MnB}n-/0/+ (n  ⩽  13) clusters and gradually transform to Mn-centered double-ring tubular structures at \\text{MnB}16-/0/+ clusters with superior thermodynamic stabilities compared with their neighbors. Most strikingly, endohedral cages become the ground-state structures for larger \\text{MnB}n-/0/+ (n  ⩾  19) clusters, among which \\text{MnB}20+ adopts a highly symmetric structure with superior thermodynamic stability and a large HOMO-LUMO gap of 4.53 eV. The unique stability of the endohedral \\text{MnB}\\text{20}+ cage is attributed to the geometric fit and formation of 18-electron closed-shell configuration. The results significantly advance our understanding about the structure and bonding of B-based clusters and strongly suggest transition-metal doping as a viable route to synthesize intriguing B-based nanomaterials.

  13. "PowerUp"!: A Tool for Calculating Minimum Detectable Effect Sizes and Minimum Required Sample Sizes for Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Design Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo; Maynard, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This paper and the accompanying tool are intended to complement existing supports for conducting power analysis tools by offering a tool based on the framework of Minimum Detectable Effect Sizes (MDES) formulae that can be used in determining sample size requirements and in estimating minimum detectable effect sizes for a range of individual- and…

  14. Body size as a predictor of species loss effect on ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguin, Annie; Harvey, Éric; Archambault, Philippe; Nozais, Christian; Gravel, Dominique

    2014-04-09

    There is an urgent need to develop predictive indicators of the effect of species loss on ecosystem functioning. Body size is often considered as a good indicator because of its relationship to extinction risk and several functional traits. Here, we examined the predictive capacity of species body size in marine and freshwater multitrophic systems. We found a significant, but weak, effect of body size on functioning. The effect was much stronger when considering the effect of body size within trophic position levels. Compared to extinctions ordered by body size, random extinction sequences had lower multiple species loss effects on functioning. Our study is the first to show experimentally, in multitrophic systems, a more negative impact of ordered extinction sequences on ecosystem functioning than random losses. Our results suggest apparent ease in predicting species loss effect on functioning based on easily measured ecological traits that are body size and trophic position.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Effect Sizes Reported at Multiple Time Points Using General Linear Mixed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musekiwa, Alfred; Manda, Samuel O. M.; Mwambi, Henry G.; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of longitudinal studies combines effect sizes measured at pre-determined time points. The most common approach involves performing separate univariate meta-analyses at individual time points. This simplistic approach ignores dependence between longitudinal effect sizes, which might result in less precise parameter estimates. In this paper, we show how to conduct a meta-analysis of longitudinal effect sizes where we contrast different covariance structures for dependence between effect sizes, both within and between studies. We propose new combinations of covariance structures for the dependence between effect size and utilize a practical example involving meta-analysis of 17 trials comparing postoperative treatments for a type of cancer, where survival is measured at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post randomization. Although the results from this particular data set show the benefit of accounting for within-study serial correlation between effect sizes, simulations are required to confirm these results. PMID:27798661

  16. Nonspecific effects of the gap junction blocker mefloquine on fast hippocampal network oscillations in the adult rat in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C J; Ul Haq, R; Liotta, A; Anderson, M L; Heinemann, U

    2011-09-29

    It has been suggested that gap junctions are involved in the synchronization during high frequency oscillations as observed during sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs) and during recurrent epileptiform discharges (REDs). Ripple oscillations during SPW-Rs, possibly involved in memory replay and memory consolidation, reach frequencies of up to 200 Hz while ripple oscillations during REDs display frequencies up to 500 Hz. These fast oscillations may be synchronized by intercellular interactions through gap junctions. In area CA3, connexin 36 (Cx36) proteins are present and potentially sensitive to mefloquine. Here, we used hippocampal slices of adult rats to investigate the effects of mefloquine, which blocks Cx36, Cx43 and Cx50 gap junctions on both SPW-Rs and REDs. SPW-Rs were induced by high frequency stimulation in the CA3 region while REDs were recorded in the presence of the GABA(A) receptor blocker bicuculline (5 μM). Both, SPW-Rs and REDs were blocked by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. Mefloquine (50 μM), which did not affect stimulus-induced responses in area CA3, neither changed SPW-Rs nor superimposed ripple oscillations. During REDs, 25 and 50 μM mefloquine exerted only minor effects on the expression of REDs but significantly reduced the amplitude of superimposed ripples by ∼17 and ∼54%, respectively. Intracellular recordings of CA3 pyramidal cells revealed that mefloquine did not change their resting membrane potential and input resistance but significantly increased the afterhyperpolarization following evoked action potentials (APs) resulting in reduced probability of AP firing during depolarizing current injection. Similarly, mefloquine caused a reduction in AP generation during REDs. Together, our data suggest that mefloquine depressed RED-related ripple oscillations by reducing high frequency discharges and not necessarily by blocking electrical coupling. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Class Size Effects on Mathematics Achievement in Cyprus: Evidence from TIMSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Shen, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Class size reduction has been viewed as one school mechanism that can improve student achievement. Nonetheless, the literature has reported mixed findings about class size effects. We used 4th- and 8th-grade data from TIMSS 2003 and 2007 to examine the association between class size and mathematics achievement in public schools in Cyprus. We…

  18. Effects of Aperture Size on Q factor and Shielding Effectiveness of a Cubic Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Stefan; Chromy, Stephan; Dickmann, Stefan; Schaarschmidt, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The EMC properties of a cubic metallic shield are highly affected by its resonances. At the resonant frequencies, the shielding effectiveness (SE) collapses, which results in high field strengths inside the cavity. This can cause failure or even breakdown of electronic devices inside the shield. The resonant behaviour is mainly determined by the quality or Q factor of the shield. In this paper, the effects of the aperture size on the Q factor and the SE of an electrically large, cubic shield are analysed. At first, a method is developed in order to determine the Q factor based on the resonance behaviour of the shield in time domain. Only the first resonance of the shield is considered therefore. The results are evaluated for different aperture diameters and compared with theory for the Q factor. The dominant coupling mechanism of electromagnetic energy into the shield is thus identified. Then the effect of aperture size on the SE is analysed. The excitation of resonances is very probable if the interfering signal is an ultrawideband (UWB) pulse, which constitutes a typical intentional electromagnetic interference (IEMI) scenario. Therefore, the relation between aperture size and SE is analysed using the theory of the transient SE for a broadband signal with a constant spectral density distribution. The results show, that a worst case aperture size exists, where the SE has its minimum.

  19. Effects of Aperture Size on Q factor and Shielding Effectiveness of a Cubic Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The EMC properties of a cubic metallic shield are highly affected by its resonances. At the resonant frequencies, the shielding effectiveness (SE collapses, which results in high field strengths inside the cavity. This can cause failure or even breakdown of electronic devices inside the shield. The resonant behaviour is mainly determined by the quality or Q factor of the shield. In this paper, the effects of the aperture size on the Q factor and the SE of an electrically large, cubic shield are analysed. At first, a method is developed in order to determine the Q factor based on the resonance behaviour of the shield in time domain. Only the first resonance of the shield is considered therefore. The results are evaluated for different aperture diameters and compared with theory for the Q factor. The dominant coupling mechanism of electromagnetic energy into the shield is thus identified. Then the effect of aperture size on the SE is analysed. The excitation of resonances is very probable if the interfering signal is an ultrawideband (UWB pulse, which constitutes a typical intentional electromagnetic interference (IEMI scenario. Therefore, the relation between aperture size and SE is analysed using the theory of the transient SE for a broadband signal with a constant spectral density distribution. The results show, that a worst case aperture size exists, where the SE has its minimum.

  20. Turbulence Model Sensitivity and Scour Gap Effect of Unsteady Flow around Pipe: A CFD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbod Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed.

  1. Gender Gaps in the Effects of Childhood Family Environment: Do They Persist into Adulthood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenøe, Anne Ardila

    2017-01-01

    to male–female and brother–sister differences in adolescent outcomes, educational attainment, and adult earnings and employment. Our results are consistent with U.S. findings that boys benefit more from an advantageous family environment than do girls in terms of grade-school outcomes. Father’s education......, which has not been examined in previous studies, is particularly important for sons. However, we find a very different pattern of parental influence on adult outcomes. Gender gaps in educational attainment, employment, and earnings are increasing in maternal education, benefiting daughters. Paternal...

  2. Evaluation of the Company Size Effect on Latin American Stock Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Benjamín Duarte Duarte

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the existence of the size effect on the most important stock markets in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru for the period between 2002 and 2012, using the cross-section contrast methodology of the size effect in the CAPM context. Results show that there is reversed effect in some of the Latin American markets.

  3. Medical Modeling of Particle Size Effects for CB Inhalation Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    warfare) may create adverse health effects when inhaled. Once the materials enter the respiratory tract, they may deposit on the airway surfaces...mppd.htm). New features in this version include a deposition model specifically for nanoparticles, nonuniform lung ventilation to include the effect ... mechanisms cause local lesions, but the more virulent strains may then spread throughout the body via blood or lymph (Celli 2008). The effects of

  4. Effect of particle size on kinetics crystallization of an iron-rich glass

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Kovacova, Milota; Rincón López, Jesús María

    2008-01-01

    The effect of glass particle size on the crystallization kinetics of an iron-rich glass from a nickel leaching waste has been investigated by means of differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results show that the crystallization of a pyroxene phase occurs by bulk nucleation from a constant number of nuclei. The crystallization mode and the dimensionality of crystals are strongly dependent of the glass particle size, being 100µm the critical size. Glass fractions with particle size >100µm sho...

  5. Size-effects in indium gallium arsenide nanowire field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zota, Cezar B., E-mail: cezar.zota@eit.lth.se; Lind, E. [Department of Electrical and Information Technology, Lund University, Lund 22101 (Sweden)

    2016-08-08

    We fabricate and analyze InGaAs nanowire MOSFETs with channel widths down to 18 nm. Low-temperature measurements reveal quantized conductance due to subband splitting, a characteristic of 1D systems. We relate these features to device performance at room-temperature. In particular, the threshold voltage versus nanowire width is explained by direct observation of quantization of the first sub-band, i.e., band gap widening. An analytical effective mass quantum well model is able to describe the observed band structure. The results reveal a compromise between reliability, i.e., V{sub T} variability, and on-current, through the mean free path, in the choice of the channel material.

  6. Numerical Evaluation of Size Effect on the Stress-Strain Behaviour of Geotextile-Reinforced Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinpour, I.; Mirmoradi, S.H.; Barari, Amin

    2010-01-01

    , the confining pressure and the type of geotextile. Modeling was performed on samples with five different diameters: 38, 100, 200, 500 and 600 mm. The elastic-plastic Mohr-Coulomb model was used to simulate sand behavior. Results showed that small-sized samples show higher values of peak strength and higher......This paper studies the effect of sample size on the stress-strain behavior and strength characteristics of geotextile reinforced sand using the finite element numerical analysis. The effect of sample size was investigated by studying the effects of varying the number of geotextile layers...... axial strain at failure in comparison with large-sized samples. The size effect on the behavior of samples became further apparent when the number of geotextile layers was increased or the confining pressure was decreased. In addition, the results indicated that the magnitude of the size effect...

  7. An Effective Gap Filtering Method for Landsat ETM+ SLC-Off Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulki Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ scan line corrector (SLC failed on 31 May 2003, causing the SLC to turn off. Many gap-filled products were developed and deployed to combat this situation. The majority of these products used a primary image taken by the SLC when functioning properly in an attempt to correct SLC-off images. However, temporal atmospheric elements could not be reliably reflected using a primary image, and therefore the corrected image was not viable for use by monitoring systems. To bypass this limitation, this study has developed the Gap Interpolation and Filtering (GIF method that relies on one-dimensional interpolation filtering to conveniently recover pixels within a single image at a high level of accuracy without borrowing from images acquired at a different time or by another sensor. The GIF method was compared to two other methods—Global Linear Histogram Match (GLHM, and the Local Linear Histogram Match (LLHM—both developed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA and United States Geological Survey (USGS to determine its accuracy. The GIF method accuracy was found superior in land, sea, and cloud imaging. In particular, its sea and cloud images returned Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values close to or less than 1. We expect the GIF method developed in this research to be of invaluable aid to monitoring systems that depend heavily on Landsat imagery.

  8. Effects of the current boundary conditions at the plasma-gun gap on density in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Roman; Lodestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) was a toroidal magnetic-confinement device without toroidal magnetic-field coils or a central transformer but which generated core-plasma currents by dynamo processes driven by coaxial plasma-gun injection into a flux-conserving vessel. Record electron temperatures in a spheromak (Te˜500eV) were achieved, and final results of the SSPX program were reported in [1]. Plasma density, which depended strongly on wall conditions, was an important parameter in SSPX. It was observed that density rises with Igun and that confinement improved as the density was lowered. Shortly after the last experiments, a new feature was added to the Corsica code's solver used to reconstruct SSPX equilibria. Motivated by n=0 fields observed in NIMROD simulations of SSPX, an insulating boundary condition was implemented at the plasma-gun gap. Using this option we will perform new reconstructions of SSPX equilibria and look for correlations between the location of the separatrix (which moves up the gun wall and onto the insulating gap as Igun increases) and plasma density and magnetic-flux amplification [2].[4pt] [1] H. S. McLean, APS, DPP, Dallas, TX, 2008.[0pt] [2] E. B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007).

  9. Effect of soldering techniques and gap distance on tensile strength of soldered Ni-Cr alloy joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Yeob; Lee, Jong-Hyuk

    2010-12-01

    The present study was intended to evaluate the effect of soldering techniques with infrared ray and gas torch under different gap distances (0.3 mm and 0.5 mm) on the tensile strength and surface porosity formation in Ni-Cr base metal alloy. Thirty five dumbbell shaped Ni-Cr alloy specimens were prepared and assigned to 5 groups according to the soldering method and the gap distance. For the soldering methods, gas torch (G group) and infrared ray (IR group) were compared and each group was subdivided by corresponding gap distance (0.3 mm: G3 and IR3, 0.5 mm: G5, IR5). Specimens of the experimental groups were sectioned in the middle with a diamond disk and embedded in solder blocks according to the predetermined distance. As a control group, 7 specimens were prepared without sectioning or soldering. After the soldering procedure, a tensile strength test was performed using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed 1 mm/min. The proportions of porosity on the fractured surface were calculated on the images acquired through the scanning electronic microscope. Every specimen of G3, G5, IR3 and IR5 was fractured on the solder joint area. However, there was no significant difference between the test groups (P > .05). There was a negative correlation between porosity formation and tensile strength in all the specimens in the test groups (P tensile strength of joints and porosity formations between the gas-oxygen torch soldering and infrared ray soldering technique or between the gap distance of 0.3 mm and 0.5 mm.

  10. Effects of the gap between socioeconomic status and perceived social class on suicidal ideation: Unique perspectives using a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Yoo, Ki-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of gaps between socioeconomic status (SES; household income and education) and perceived social class on suicidal ideation. Longitudinal data from the 2009 and 2011 Korean Health Panel Survey were used. Our sample consisted of 12,357 subjects included in the 2009 survey and 11,758 subjects included in the 2011 survey. We analyzed rates of suicidal ideation as a function of the gap between SES and perceived social class, defined as the difference between household income and education-high (H; college or higher), medium (M; high school), low (L; middle school or lower)-and perceived social class (H, M, and L). Among respondents whose actual and perceived levels of household income (HH: odds ratio [OR]=0.611 [95% CI [confidence interval]: 0.486-0.768], LL: OR=1.829 [95% CI: 1.489-2.247]) and education (HH: OR=0.788 [95% CI: 0.622-0.998], LL: OR 1.853 [95% CI: 1.476-2.328]) were the same, suicidal ideation increased as perceived social class decreased. The adjusted effect of the association between SES and perceived social class on suicidal ideation decreased according to the same pattern. This study suggests that the gap between SES and perceptions of one's position in the social hierarchy explains a substantial part of inequalities in suicidal ideation. It is important to consider the impact of the slopes of both gaps on suicidal ideation rather than focus only on perceived social class. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Vocabulary Size on Online Lexical Processing by Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Franzo; Edwards, Jan R

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between vocabulary size and the speed and accuracy of lexical processing in preschoolers between the ages of 30-46 months using an automatic eye tracking task based on the looking-while-listening paradigm (Fernald, Zangl, Portillo, & Marchman, 2008) and mispronunciation paradigm (White & Morgan, 2008). Children's eye gaze patterns were tracked while they looked at two pictures (one familiar object, one unfamiliar object) on a computer screen and simultaneously heard one of three kinds of auditory stimuli: correct pronunciations of the familiar object's name, one-feature mispronunciations of the familiar object's name, or a nonword. The results showed that children with larger expressive vocabularies, relative to children with smaller expressive vocabularies, were more likely to look to a familiar object upon hearing a correct pronunciation and to an unfamiliar object upon hearing a novel word. Results also showed that children with larger expressive vocabularies were more sensitive to mispronunciations; they were more likely to look toward the unfamiliar object rather than the familiar object upon hearing a one-feature mispronunciation of a familiar object-name. These results suggest that children with smaller vocabularies, relative to their larger-vocabulary age peers, are at a disadvantage for learning new words, as well as for processing familiar words.

  12. Effect Size in Efficacy Trials of Women With Decreased Sexual Desire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, Robert E; Clayton, Anita H

    2018-03-22

    Regarding hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in women, some reviewers judge the effect size small for medications vs placebo, but substantial for cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or mindfulness meditation training (MMT) vs wait list. However, we lack comparisons of the effect sizes for the active intervention itself, for the control treatment, and for the differential between the two. For efficacy trials of HSDD in women, compare effect sizes for medications (testosterone/testosterone transdermal system, flibanserin, and bremelanotide) and placebo vs effect sizes for psychotherapy and wait-list control. We conducted a literature search for mean changes and SD on main measures of sexual desire and associated distress in trials of medications, CBT, or MMT. Effect size was used as it measures the magnitude of the intervention without confounding by sample size. Cohen d was used to determine effect sizes. For medications, mean (SD) effect size was 1.0 (0.34); for CBT and MMT, 1.0 (0.36); for placebo, 0.55 (0.16); and for wait list, 0.05 (0.26). Recommendations of psychotherapy over medication for treatment of HSDD are premature and not supported by data on effect sizes. Active participation in treatment conveys considerable non-specific benefits. Caregivers should attend to biological and psychosocial elements, and patient preference, to optimize response. Few clinical trials of psychotherapies were substantial in size or utilized adequate control paradigms. Medications and psychotherapies had similar, large effect sizes. Effect size of placebo was moderate. Effect size of wait-list control was very small, about one quarter that of placebo. Thus, a substantial non-specific therapeutic effect is associated with receiving placebo plus active care and evaluation. The difference in effect size between placebo and wait-list controls distorts the value of the subtraction of effect of the control paradigms to estimate intervention effectiveness. Pyke RE, Clayton AH

  13. Effects of portland cement particle size on heat of hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Following specification harmonization for portland cements, FDOT engineers reported signs of : deterioration in concrete elements due to temperature rise effects. One of the main factors that affect : concrete temperature rise potential is the heat g...

  14. Estimating required information size by quantifying diversity in random-effects model meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Thorlund, Kristian; Brok, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing awareness that meta-analyses require a sufficiently large information size to detect or reject an anticipated intervention effect. The required information size in a meta-analysis may be calculated from an anticipated a priori intervention effect or from...... an intervention effect suggested by trials with low-risk of bias. METHODS: Information size calculations need to consider the total model variance in a meta-analysis to control type I and type II errors. Here, we derive an adjusting factor for the required information size under any random-effects model meta......-trial variability and a sampling error estimate considering the required information size. D2 is different from the intuitively obvious adjusting factor based on the common quantification of heterogeneity, the inconsistency (I2), which may underestimate the required information size. Thus, D2 and I2 are compared...

  15. Micro-environmental changes induced by shape and size of forest openings: effects on Austrocedrus chilensis and Nothofagus dombeyi seedlings performance in a Pinus contorta plantation of Patagonia, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pafundi, L.; Urretavizcaya, M.F.; Defosse, G.E.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: to analyze, within a Pinus contorta plantation, the effects of artificially created small rectangular and small medium circular canopy gaps on: i) photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), and soil temperature and moisture, and ii) survival and growth of planted Austrocedrus chilensis and Nothofagus dombeyi seedlings, species which formerly composed the natural forest of the area. Study area: A 2 ha stand of a Pinus contorta stand in Los Alerces National Park, Argentina (42°43’S, 71°43’W, 490 m.a.s.l.). Material and methods: The Pinus contorta stand was 25 yr old, 22 m height and 26 cm DBH, presenting 1000 trees ha-1 of density and 53 m2 ha-1 of basal area. In 2009, rectangular and circular gaps were created within the stand and then seedlings were planted. During two growing seasons (2010-2011 and 2011-2012), PAR, soil temperature and moisture were measured in gaps and understory (control), and seedling survival and growth in gaps. Main results: During both seasons, soil temperature did not differ among gaps and control, whereas PAR and soil moisture were lower in control than in gaps. Seedling survival was high in all gaps regardless of species and season. Seedlings showed higher diameter growth in rectangular than in circular gaps. Research highlights: Austrocedrus chilensis and N. dombeyi seedlings survival is high and their growth slightly affected, when planted in differently-sized canopy gaps within a Pinus contorta plantation in Patagonia. However, other gap sizes and stand densities should be tested before recommending which one shows better results for reconverting monocultures into former native forests. Abbreviations used: PAR (Photosynthetic Active Radiation); DBH (Diameter at Breast Height); INTA (Argentinean Institute of Agricultural Technology); IFONA (Argentinean Forest Institute). (Author)

  16. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosapia eLauro Grotto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: 1 they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious emotions to combine into structured group patterns; 2 they have a certain degree of stability in time; 3 they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; 4 they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical 'leadership’ pattern, and in 'cognitive’ terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e. the group behaves 'as if’ it was assuming that…. Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: 1 are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? 3 can these states be differentiated in structural terms? 3 to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical

  17. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical "leadership" pattern, and in "cognitive" terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves "as if" it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical setting.

  18. Effect of accelerating gap geometry on the beam breakup instability in linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Marder, B.M.; Coleman, P.D.; Clark, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The electron beam in a linear induction accelerator is generally susceptible to growth of the transverse beam breakup instability. In this paper we analyze a new technique for reducing the transverse coupling between the beam and the accelerating cavities, thereby reducing beam breakup growth. The basic idea is that the most worrisome cavity modes can be cutoff by a short section of coaxial transmission line inserted between the cavity structure and the accelerating gap region. We have used the three-dimensional simulation code SOS to analyze this problem. In brief, we find that the technique works, provided that the lowest TE mode cutoff frequency in the coaxial line is greater than the frequency of the most worrisome TM mode of the accelerating cavity

  19. Effects of the Planetary Temperature on the Circumplanetary Disk and on the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulágyi, J.

    2017-06-01

    Circumplanetary disks (CPDs) regulate the late accretion to the giant planet and serve as the birthplace for satellites. Understanding their characteristics via simulations also helps to prepare for their observations. Here we study disks around 1, 3, 5, and 10 M Jup planets with 3D global radiative hydrodynamic simulations with sub-planet peak resolution and various planetary temperatures. We found that as the 1 M Jup planet radiates away its formation heat, the circumplanetary envelope transitions to a disk between {T}p=6000 and 4000 K. In the case of 3-10 M Jup planets, a disk always forms. The temperature profile of the CPDs is very steep, the inner 1/6th is higher than the silicate condensation temperature, and the entire disk is higher than the water freezing point, making satellite formation impossible in this early stage (<1 Myr). Satellites might form much later and first in the outer parts of the disk, migrating inwards later on. Our disk masses are 1, 7, and 20 40× {10}-3 {M}{Jup} for the 1, 3, 5, and 10 M Jup gas giants, respectively, and we provide an empirical formula to estimate the subdisk masses based on the planet- and circumstellar disk (CSD) mass. Our finding is that the cooler the planet, the lower the temperature of the subdisk, and the higher the vertical influx velocities. The planetary gap is also both deeper and wider. We also show that the gaps in 2D and 3D are different. The subdisk eccentricity increases with {M}{{p}} and violently interacts with the CSD, making satellite-formation less likely when {M}{{p}}≳ 5{M}{Jup}.

  20. A Size and Boundary Effects Model for Quasi-Brittle Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The fracture behaviors of quasi-brittle materials are commonly specimen size (size effect and crack size (boundary effect dependent. In this study, a new failure model is developed for characterizing the size and boundary effects. The derivative of the energy release rate is firstly introduced to predict the nominal strength dominated by the strength mechanism. Combined with the energy criterion for the energy mechanism, an asymptotic model is developed to capture the effect of any crack size on the nominal strength, and its expression for geometrically similar specimens is also established, which is able to characterize the size effect. Detailed comparisons of the proposed model with the size effect law and the boundary effect model are performed, respectively. The nominal strength predictions based on the proposed model are validated with the experimental results of cracked three-point bending beam specimens made of concrete, of limestone and of hardened cement paste and compared with the model predictions given by the size effect law and the boundary effect model.