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Sample records for gamow-teller unit cross

  1. Gamow-Teller matrix elements from 00 ( p,n) cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.; Goulding, C.A.; Greenfield, M.B.; Rapaport, J.; Bainum, D.E.; Foster, C.C.; Love, W.G.; Petrovich, F.

    1980-01-01

    After simple corrections for distortion effects, 120-MeV, 0 0 (p,n) cross sections are found to be proportional to the squares of the corresponding Fermi and Gamow-Teller matrix elements extracted from β-decay measurements. It is suggested that this proportionality can be used to extract Gamow-Teller matrix elements for transitions inaccessible to β decay

  2. Gamow teller strength from n-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1989-08-01

    Detailed studies of the spin-isospin structure of nuclear excitations are possible at TRIUMF's medium resolution spectrometer using the (n,p), ( p → , p →/ and (p,n) reactions. We discuss here results on isospin symmetry of inelastic nucleon scattering reactions populating isospin triads in A=6 and A=12 nuclei. The empirical ratio of L=0 isovector spin flip cross sections at 200-450 MeV and B(GT) for strong Gamow-Teller transitions in p-shell nuclei is found to be larger than calculated in the DWIA using a free NN t-matrix. Based on empirical values of σ/B(GT) the β + Gamow Teller strength function from (n,p) reactions on (sd) and (fp) shell targets is substantially quenched compared to current nuclear structure models using the free-nucleon axial-vector coupling constant. (Author) 33 refs., 6 figs

  3. Gamow-Teller Strength Distributions for Some Magic Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla ÇAKMAK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The total Gamow-Teller strengths and their energy distributions for 96Zr, 96Sr, 54Ca, 28O, 24C and 14C have been obtained within the framework of Random Phase Approximation (RPA. The effective interaction potential has been described by considering the commutativity of the Gamow-Teller operator with the central part of the nuclear Hamiltonian.

  4. Gamow-teller transitions: progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, G.

    1994-01-01

    The determination of the Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements from beta-decay and charge exchange reactions has led to a series of discoveries concerning the structure of the nucleus and the properties of spin-isospin transitions in nuclei. The study of GT distribution and strength, either by charge exchange or weak decay, provides excellent tests for nuclear models as these parameters are extremely sensitive to the details of nuclear structure. Recent improvements of these models have reduced, for the most part, differences between experiment and theory, allowing in turn a more reliable estimate of weak decay rates in stellar matter. A better understanding of the 'missing strength' and of the failure of many experiments to detect the strength that is present have also been obtained. Recently, it appears also that weak decay studies in selected region (proton or neutron rich) of the N-Z plane give access to the GT giant resonance. (J.S.). 65 refs., 10 figs

  5. Role of the momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marketin, Tomislav [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Paar, Nils; Vretenar, Dario [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-07-01

    A fully consistent calculation of the Gamow-Teller strength is presented, based on a microscopic theoretical framework. Nuclear ground state is determined using the relativistic Hartree-Bogolyubov (RHB) model with density dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants, and transition rates are calculated via proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle RPA using the same interaction as in the RHB equations. The (p,n) probe has a similar spin-isospin operator structure to the Gamow-Teller (GT) operator. However, they become comparable only if the GT cross section is measured at a very small momentum transfer q. At higher momentum transfer the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode occurs, with the r{sup 2}{sigma}{tau} transition operator. Unlike the Gamow-Teller operator which excites only the 0{Dirac_h}{omega} transitions, the isovector spin monopole operator can also excite 2{Dirac_h}{omega} transitions and can change the strength distribution at high excitation energies. We explore the strength beyond the resonance, examine the effect of momentum transfer on the total strength and compare the results with recent measurements.

  6. Gamow-Teller beta decay of proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.; Rykaczewski, K.

    1990-11-01

    The beta decays of 48 Mn and of even-even nuclei near the double shell-closures at 100 Sn and 146 Gd are currently investigated at the GSI on-line mass separator. Their Gamow-Teller strength are surveyed in their present experimental status, together with related results from the ISOLDE (CERN) and ISOCELE (Orsay) separators, and are compared with predictions from different nuclear models. The strength of the 0 + → 1 + Gamow-Teller transitions is compiled in tables and graphs. (orig.)

  7. Chiral filter, axial charges and Gamow-Teller strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1983-09-01

    The different ways that nuclear matter responds to the weak axial-vector current are interpreted in terms of modification of the ''vacuum'' in baryon-rich environments. The notion of ''chiral filter'' is introduced. Use of a ward identity is suggested. The Gamow-Teller quenching and the enhanced axial charge in O + O - transitions follow from this. I also discuss briefly possible relevance of the nucleon as a topological soliton configuration to the global property of nuclear axial response functions

  8. Magnetic Dipole and Gamow-Teller Modes in Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions: Impact on Supernova Dynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Byelikov, A.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Heger, A.; Kolbe, E.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Some aspects of the importance of neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei within supernova physics are discussed. It is argued that important constraints on the experimentally unknown cross sections can be obtained from experimental studies of the nuclear response in selected cases. Examples are neutral-current induced reactions on fp-shell nuclei extracted from high-resolution inelastic electron scattering data providing the M1 strength distributions and the production of the exotic heavy, odd-odd nuclei 138La and 180Ta through charged-current reactions dominated by Gamow-Teller transitions. The Gamow-Teller strength can deduced from the (3He,t) charge-exchange reaction at zero degree

  9. A study of Gamow-Teller strength in A=37 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufderheide, M.B.; Bloom, S.D.; Resler, D.A.; Goodman, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is made of the recent β+ decay measurements of Garcia et al., in order to see whether the 1981 37 Cl(p,n) 37 Ar measurements of Rapaport et al. are consistent with them. Garcia et al., were not able to determine the amount of Gamow-Teller strength in the isobaric analog state (IAS) or the Coulomb mixing of Fermi strength to a state near the IAS, and were forced to determine the amount of Gamow-Teller strength in the daughter 1371 keV state by making the branching ratios sum to unity. These uncertainties leave a range of possible values open which we investigate. We find that the experiments are consistent within part of this range. We also examine the effect of this range of allowed values on solar and supernova neutrino cross sections of 37 Cl and find weak dependence on the uncertainties described here. We discuss how this range can be narrowed so that the consistency of the two experiments can be conclusively tested

  10. Gamow Teller strength from charge exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1989-07-01

    Detailed studies of the spin-isospin structure of nuclear excitations are possible at TRIUMF's medium resolution spectrometer using the (n,p), ( p → , p →/ ) and (p,n) reactions. We discuss here results on isospin symmetry of inelastic nucleon scattering reactions populating isospin triads in A=6 and A=12 nuclei. The β + Gamow Teller strength function from (n,p) reactions on (sd) and (fp) shell targets is found to be substantially quenched compared to current nuclear structure models using the free-nucleon axial-vector coupling constant. (Author) 22 refs., 3 figs

  11. Lorentz-Lorenz quenching for the Gamow-Teller sum rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, J.; Ericson, M.; Figureau, A.

    1984-03-01

    We investigate the modification of the Gamow-Teller sum rule brought in by nucleonic excitations. The general trend of the data is well reproduced. The value of the force which mixes nucleonic and nuclear excitations is discussed

  12. Gamow-Teller strength functions from N-nucleus scattering experiments at 200-400 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver; Vetterli, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements of (n,p), (p vector, p vector') and (p,n) reactions at TRIUMF have made possible a detailed examination of the spin-isospin structure of nuclear excitations up to 50 MeV. Cross sections for 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn and spin-flip cross sections for 54 Fe (p vector, p vector') near 300 MeV have been used to estimate the nuclear response for different multipoles L, spin transfers (ΔS = 0,1), and isospins of the residual nucleus (T f = 1,2). Qualitative features of the spin-flip probabilities in (p vector, p vector') are in good agreement with recent surface-RPA calculations. Between 200 and 400 MeV the ΔL=0 spin-flip isovector component is well described by the central part V στ of the Franey-Love interaction. The Gamow-Teller strength S + in 54 Fe, which is of significance in models of pre-collapse supernovae, is found to be smaller by a factor of two than the best available shell model calculations. In (sd)-shell nuclei ( 24,26 Mg, 28 Si) about (70±15)% of the Gamow-Teller strength predicted by untruncated shell-model calculations is found at low excitation. (orig.)

  13. Ratio of Gamow-Teller to Fermi strength observed in /sup 13,14/C(p,n) at 492 and 590 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, J.L.; Rapaport, J.; Lisowski, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    It has been recognized for a number of years that certain spin-isospin components of the nucleon-nucleus effective interaction can be inferred from (p,n) reactions to states of known nuclear structure. For L = 0, S = 0 and L = 0, S = 1 transitions, the 0-degree (p,n) cross section can be related respectively to Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay matrix elements. If these transitions occur in the same nucleus, the ratio of isovector spin-flip to non-spin-flip effective interactions can be measured without regard for absolute normalization. The best reaction to measure this is /sup 14/C(p,n) which goes by a pure Gamow-Teller transition to the 1/sup /plus// state at 3.95 MeV in /sup 14/N, and Fermi transition to the 2.31 MeV 0/sup /plus// state. This work extends the ratio measurements made at lower energies (ref. 1, 2, 3) to 492 and 590 MeV. We also report on the /sup 13/C(p,n) reaction which goes by a pure GT transition to the 3.51 MeV 3/2/sup /minus// state in /sup 13/N, but by a mixed Fermi plus Gamow-Teller transition to the 1/2/sup /minus// ground state. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Gamow-Teller strength in the continuum studied via the (p,n) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakai, H.

    2002-01-01

    The double differential cross sections for θ lab between 0.0deg and 14.7deg and the polarization transfer coefficient D NN (0deg) for the 27 Al (p vector, n vector) reaction have been measured at a bombarding energy of 295 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique is applied for the cross section data to extract L=0, 1, 2, and 3 contributions. The Gamow-Teller (GT) strength B(GT) deduced from the L=0 contribution is compared with the B(GT) values calculated in a full sd shell-model space. The sum of B(GT) values up to 20 MeV excitation is S β- =4.0 ± 0.1 ± 0.1. A fairly large L=0 contribution is observed in the continuum region up to 50 MeV, which could be in part ascribed to the quenched GT strength. A limit on the effect that the Δ(1232)-isobar nucleon-hole admixture has upon the GT strength is estimated. (author)

  15. Gamow-Teller decay of T = 1 nuclei to odd-odd N = Z nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisetskiy, A F [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Gelberg, A [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Institute of Physical and Chemical Reasearch (RIKEN), Wako, 351-0198 (Japan); Brentano, P von [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Transition strengths of Gamow-Teller decay of T{sub z} = {+-}1 nuclei to N = Z odd-odd nuclei have been calculated in a two-nucleon approximation for spherical and deformed nuclei. The results obtained for the latter are quite close to the values obtained by full-space shell-model calculations and to the experiment.

  16. Observation of Fermi and Gamow-Teller strength in the 800 MeV(p,n) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, N S.P.; Lisowski, P W; Morgan, G L; Craig, P N; Jeppesen, R G; Lind, D A; Shepard, J R; Ullmann, J L; Zafiratos, C D; Goodman, C D

    1986-08-07

    Angular distributions have been measured for the (p,n) reaction on targets of /sup 6/Li, /sup 12/C, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N at 800 MeV with an energy resolution of 2.7 MeV allowing observation of discrete nuclear levels. As is the case at lower energies, this reaction is very selective, emphasizing Gamow-Teller (GT) and Fermi transitions. Absolute cross sections of pure GT transitions are reproduced by impulse approximation calculations. The ratio vertical strokeJsub(sigmatau)vertical stroke/sup 2//vertical strokeJsub(tau)vertical stroke/sup 2/ was extracted from /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N measurements at 800 MeV and from a /sup 13/C measurement at 318 MeV.

  17. Quenching of the Gamow-Teller matrix element in closed LS-shell-plus-one nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, I.S.

    1989-06-01

    It is evident that nuclear Gamow-Teller matrix elements determined from β-decay and charge-exchange reactions are significantly quenched compared to simple shell-model estimates based on one-body operators and free-nucleon coupling constants. Here we discuss the theoretical origins of this quenching giving examples from light nuclei near LS-closed shells, such as 16 0 and 40 Ca. (Author) 12 refs., 2 tabs

  18. QRPA estimate for the Δ(1232) cotribution to the Gamow-Teller decay of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhonen, J.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of the Δ(1232) isobars to the nuclear beta decay strength function is estimated in the framework of the charge-changing form of the QRPA. This procedure is applied to neutron-deficient tin isotopes. The results imply that the quenching of the low-energy Gamow-Teller decay strength cannot attributed to the presence of delta admixtures in the nuclear wave function. (orig.)

  19. Gamow-Teller strength in the β-decay of 36Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinder, W.; Adelberger, E.G.; Janas, Z.; Keller, H.; Krumbholz, K.; Pfuetzner, M.; Rykaczewski, K.

    1994-11-01

    The β-decay of 36 Ca has been studied at the projectile fragment separator at GSI Darmstadt. The Gamow-Teller strength function B(GT), deduced from the observed β-delayed proton- and γ-emission and from the measured half-life of 102(2) ms, is compared to results obtained from large-scale sd-shell model calculations. (orig.)

  20. Gamow-Teller strength functions from (→p,→p') scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausser, O.

    1987-01-01

    We present here recent (→p, →'p) results from TRIUMF that are relevant to the determination of spin-flip isovector strength functions in nuclei. Distortion factors needed for the extraction of nuclear-structure information have been deduced from cross sections and analyzing powers in elastic scattering for several energies and targets. Nonrelativistic optical potentials obtained by folding effective nucleon (N)-nucleus interactions with nuclear densities are found to overpredict both elastic and reaction cross sections, whereas Dirac calculations that include Pauli blocking are in good agreement with the data. Spin observables (S nn and A y ) for the quasi-elastic region in 54 Fe(→p, →p) at 290 MeV provide some evidence for the reduction of the effective proton mass predicted in relativistic mean-field theories as a consequence of the attractive scalar field in the nuclear medium. The energy dependence of the effective N-nucleus interaction at small momentum transfers has been investigated using isoscalar and isovector 1 + states in 28 Si as probe states. We find that the cross sections for the isovector transitions are in good agreement with predictions for the dominant Vστ part of the Franey-Love interaction. Gamow-Teller (GT) strength functions have been obtained in 24 Mg and 54 Fe from measurements of both cross sections and spin-flip probabilities S nn . The spin-flip cross sections σS nn are particularly useful in heavier nuclei to discriminate against a continuous background of ΔS = 0 excitations. In the (s, d) shell where full shell-model wave functions are available, the GT quenching factors (g A eff / g A free ) 2 ≅ 0.7 are in good agreement with those from recent (p, n) and (n, p) experiments. We show that a state-by-state comparison of (p, p') and (e, e') results has the potential of identifying pionic current contributions in (e, e'). The GT quenching factors in 54 Fe are smaller than in the (s, d) shell probably because of severely

  1. Study of the giant Gamow-Teller resonance in nuclear beta-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicklage, R.D. von; Hansen, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    A strong effort has been devoted to the development of new target-ion-source systems at ISOLDE which would give higher yields of proton-rich nuclei. The first break-trough has been obtained for the element argon where one recently was able to produce about three orders of magnitude higher yields than in the first experiments. This makes it possible to perform experiments, involving β-delayed protons and gamma-rays, which may give information about the giant Gamow-Teller resonance. This paper gives a report on the status of these experiments

  2. The beta-decay of 48Mn: improved data on Gamow-Teller quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szerypo, J.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Beta-decay studies of very proton-rich nuclides allow to investigate the phenomenon of quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions. A presentation of the experimental techniques is followed by the discussion of preliminray results of the measurements in comparison to shell-model calculations. A corresponding reinvestigation is discussed. A mass-separated 48 Mn beam was used from 12 C( 40 Ca,p3n) reactions. The 48 Mn decay spectroscopy was performed simultaneously in two beam lines of the mass separator. (G.P.) 13 refs.; 2 figs

  3. Gamow-Teller strength distributions and electron capture rates for 55Co and 56Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Rahman, Muneeb-Ur

    2005-01-01

    The Gamow-Teller strength (GT) distributions and electron capture rates on 55 Co and 56 Ni have been calculated using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. We calculate these weak interaction mediated rates over a wide temperature (0.01x10 9 -30x10 9 K) and density (10-10 11 gcm -3 ) domain. Electron capture process is one of the essential ingredients involved in the complex dynamics of supernova explosion. Our calculations of electron capture rates show differences with the reported shell model diagonalization approach calculations and are comparatively enhanced at presupernova temperatures. We note that the GT strength is fragmented over many final states

  4. Characteristics of the Gamow-Teller Force in the β- Decay of 40Zr98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raden Oktova

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of the β - decay force for the Gamow-Teller transition in the p-h and the p-p channels in the heavy neutron-rich nucleus 40 Zr 98 have been studied. The ground state single-particle levels in the parent nucleus were calculated self-consistently using the Fayans energy-density functional, and from them the quasi-particle basis was obtained using the BCS model. The residual charge-changing force responsible for the β - transition was taken as having a zero-range (a delta function); in the p-h channel the spin-isospin exchange → σ 1 . → σ 2 → τ 1 . → τ 2 term in the Migdal-Larkin force was used, and that in the p-p channel was a constant. The method employed was the proton-neutron QRPA (pnQRPA). The results show that the proton-neutron pairing p-p force in the Gamow-Teller decay is negligible for the nucleus considered. The value of the p-h force obtained is g ' = 0.735, slightly larger than the standard value of g ' = 0.7 commonly used for stable nuclei. (author)

  5. Gamow-Teller strength function for 90Zr: Effects of spin and isospin exchange forces, and ground-state correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Bloom, S.D.; Hausman, R.F. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Shell-model calculations of the Gamow-Teller strength function for 90 Zr have been performed utilizing a realistic finite-range two-body interaction in a model space consisting of the 2p and 1g shells. The effects of admixtures of two-particle two-hole excitations in 90 Nb, mostly due to the spin and isospin exchange components of the nucleon-nucleon force, are discussed. Ground state correlations in 90 Zr are also added via seniority-zero two-proton excitations from the 2p shell into the 1g/sub 9/2/ shell. With the correlations the Gamow-Teller strength function is in good agreement with the experimental results and accounts for essentially all of the observed dispersion of strength. The inclusion of these correlations does not, however, produce either a displacement of Gamow-Teller strength to higher excitation energies, or a significant change in the total strength. Thus, they cannot account for the observed Gamow-Teller quenching. The quenching factor derived by a comparison of our calculated results with experiment is 0.52

  6. Isospin symmetry of T-z=+/- 3/2 ->+/- 1/2 Gamow-Teller transitions in A=41 nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujita, Y; Shimbara, Y; Adachi, T; Berg, GPA; Fujita, H; Hatanaka, K; Kamiya, J; Nakanishi, K; Sakemi, Y; Sasaki, S; Shimizu, Y; Tameshige, Y; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M

    2004-01-01

    Under the assumption that isospin T is a good quantum number, isobaric analog states and various analogous transitions are expected in isobars with mass number A. The, strengths of T-z = +/-3/2 --> 1/2 analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and analogous M1 transitions within the A = 41 isobar

  7. Isospin symmetry of T-z=+/- 3/2 ->+/- 1/2 Gamow-Teller transitions in A=41 nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujita, Y; Shimbara, Y; Adachi, T; Berg, GPA; Fujita, H; Hatanaka, K; Kamiya, J; Nakanishi, K; Sakemi, Y; Sasaki, S; Shimizu, Y; Tameshige, Y; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M

    Under the assumption that isospin T is a good quantum number, isobaric analog states and various analogous transitions are expected in isobars with mass number A. The, strengths of T-z = +/-3/2 --> 1/2 analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and analogous M1 transitions within the A = 41 isobar

  8. The structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance and consequences for beta-delayed neutron spectra and element synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in β-delayed neutron emission are interpreted by structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance not included in the 'gross-theory' of β-decay. Inclusion of this structure of the β-decay function is important for calculations of β-decay production rates for heavy nuclides by astrophysical processes and thermonuclear explosions. (Auth.)

  9. Effect on Tensor Correlations on Gamow- Teller States in 90Zr and 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, C. L.; Sagawa, H.; Zhang, H. Q.

    2009-01-01

    The tensor terms of the Skyrme effective interaction are included in the self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus Random Phase Approximation (HF-RPA) model. The Gamow-Teller (GT) strength function of 9 0Z r and 2 08P b are calculated with and without the tensor terms. The main peaks are moved downwards by about 2 MeV when including the tensor contribution. About 10% of the non-energy weighted sum rule is shifted to the excitation energy region above 30 MeV by the RPA tensor correlations. The contribution of the tensor terms to the energy weighted sum rule is given analytically, and compared to the outcome of RPA. A microscopic origin of the quenching of GT sum rule is discussed in relation with the coupling to giant spin-quadrupole excitations by the tensor interactions.(author)

  10. Effect of Tensor Correlations on Gamow-Teller States in 90Zr and 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, C. L.; Zhang, H. Q.; Zhang, X. Z.

    2009-01-01

    The tensor terms of the Skyrme effective interaction are included in the self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus Random Phase Approximation (HF-RPA) model. The Gamow-Teller (GT) strength functions of 9 0Z r and 2 08P b is calculated with and without the tensor terms. The main peaks are moved downwards by about 2 MeV when including the tensor contribution. About 10% of the non-energy weighted sum rule is shifted to the excitation energy region above 30 MeV by the RPA tensor correlations. The contribution of the tensor terms to the energy weighted sum rule is given analytically, and compared to the outcome of RPA. A microscopic origin of the quenching of GT sum rule due to the tensor force is discussed.(author)

  11. Gamow-Teller resonances and a separable approximation for Skyrme tensor interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severyukhin A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A finite rank separable approximation for the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA with Skyrme interactions is applied to study properties of the Gamow-Teller (GT resonances in the neutron-rich Cd isotopes. This approximation enables one to reduce considerably the dimension of matrix that must be diagonalized to perform QRPA calculations in a very large configuration space. Our results from the SGII Skyrme interaction with the tensor interactions and the density-dependent zero-range pairing interaction show that the GT distribution is noticeably modified when the tensor correlations are taken into account. In particular, for 130Cd the dominant peak is moved 3.6 MeV downward and 10% of the GT distribution is shifted to the high excitation energy region near E=50MeV.

  12. Gamow-Teller Strengths from (3He,t) Charge-Exchange Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transition is the most popular nuclear weak process with the nature of spin-isospin excitation. GT transitions in pf-shell nuclei, including those starting from unstable nuclei, are of interest, due to their importance in astrophysical processes. Weak processes, however, gives us rather limited information on the GT response of nuclei. We introduce high-resolution ( 3 He, t) reaction at 0 0 and at an intermediate beam energy as a new spectroscopic tool for studying GT excitations. Owing to the high energy-resolution of the reaction (∼ 30 keV), individual transitions can be observed up to the region of GT giant resonance. Assuming isospin symmetry for the T z = ±1 → 0 isobaric analogous transitions in isobars with mass number A, we present a new method to deduce GT transition strengths starting from proton rich exotic nuclei

  13. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-01-01

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from 90 Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the β − and the β + channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L= 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  14. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marketin, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany and Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-10-20

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from {sup 90}Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the {beta}{sub -} and the {beta}{sub +} channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L= 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  15. Measurement of Gamow-Teller and spin dipole strength in the 45Sc(n,p)45Ca reaction at 198 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, W.P.; Celler, A.; Brown, B.A.; Long, S.; Raywood, K.

    1990-11-01

    The reaction 45 Sc(n,p) 45 Ca has been studied at an energy of 198 MeV with energy resolution of about 1 MeV. Measurements were carried out at nominal angles 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 degrees and spectra obtained up to ∼40 MeV excitation energy in 45 Ca. Significant Gamow-Teller strength is observed at an excitation energy of about 7 MeV, somewhat higher than predicted by shell model calculations. The strength observed is in agreement with calculations using g A /g V ≅ 1. The spin dipole giant resonance is seen with centroid at about 15 MeV excitation and total cross section of 25 mb/sr at an angle of 6 degrees. (Author) (22 refs., 9 figs.)

  16. Gamow-Teller transitions and neutron-proton-pair transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Isacker, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.

    2018-05-01

    We propose a schematic model of nucleons moving in spin-orbit partner levels, j = l ± 1/2, to explain Gamow-Teller and two-nucleon transfer data in N = Z nuclei above 40Ca. Use of the LS coupling scheme provides a more transparent approach to interpret the structure and reaction data. We apply the model to the analysis of charge-exchange, 42Ca(3He,t)42Sc, and np-transfer, 40Ca(3He,p)42Sc, reactions data to define the elementary modes of excitation in terms of both isovector and isoscalar pairs, whose properties can be determined by adjusting the parameters of the model (spin-orbit splitting, isovector pairing strength and quadrupole matrix element) to the available data. The overall agreement with experiment suggests that the approach captures the main physics ingredients and provides the basis for a boson approximation that can be extended to heavier nuclei. Our analysis also reveals that the SU(4)-symmetry limit is not realized in 42Sc.

  17. Nuclear structure properties and stellar weak rates for 76Se: Unblocking of the Gamow Teller strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Ishfaq, Mavra; Böyükata, Mahmut; Riaz, Muhammad

    2017-10-01

    At finite temperatures (≥ 107K), 76Se is abundant in the core of massive stars and electron capture on 76Se has a consequential role to play in the dynamics of core-collapse. The present work may be classified into two main categories. In the first phase we study the nuclear structure properties of 76Se using the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). The IBM-1 investigations include the energy levels, B (E 2) values and the prediction of the geometry. We performed the extended consistent-Q formalism (ECQF) calculation and later the triaxial formalism calculation (constructed by adding the cubic term to the ECQF). The geometry of 76Se can be envisioned within the formalism of the potential energy surface based on the classical limit of IBM-1 model. In the second phase, we reconfirm the unblocking of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength in 76Se (a test case for nuclei having N > 40 and Z fashion. Results are compared with experimental data and previous calculations. The calculated GT distribution fulfills the Ikeda sum rule. Rates for β-delayed neutrons and emission probabilities are also calculated. Our study suggests that at high stellar temperatures and low densities, the β+-decay on 76Se should not be neglected and needs to be taken into consideration along with electron capture rates for simulation of presupernova evolution of massive stars.

  18. Beta decay of 97Ag: evidence for the Gamow-Teller resonance near 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhiqiang

    1999-03-01

    In two complementary measurements, a cube like array of 6 Euroball-Cluster germanium detectors and a total-absorption γ-spectrometer were used to investigate the β decay of 97 Ag, a three proton-hole nucleus with respect to the 100 Sn core. The half-life and Q EC value of the decay of the 9/2 + ground-state of 97 Ag were determined to be 25.9(4) s and 6.98(11) MeV respectively. A total of 603 γ rays (578 new) was observed, and 151 levels (132 new) in 97 Pd have been identified. An interesting β-delayed γ cascade was observed, which comprises 6 γ-transitions with a de-excitation pattern involving an initial increase of the level spin. The Gamow-Teller (GT) β-decay strength distributions from the two measurements reveal a large GT resonance around 4 MeV with a width of about 1.8 MeV. The hindrance factor for the total GT strength summed from the ground-state up to 6 MeV excitation energy in 97 Pd, amounts to 4.3(6) with reference to a shell-model prediction. This factor is discussed in comparison with a core-polarization and a Monte-Carlo shell-model calculation. (orig.)

  19. Double Gamow-Teller Transitions and its Relation to Neutrinoless β β Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Menéndez, Javier; Yako, Kentaro

    2018-04-01

    We study the double Gamow-Teller (DGT) strength distribution of 48Ca with state-of-the-art large-scale nuclear shell model calculations. Our analysis shows that the centroid energy of the DGT giant resonance depends mostly on the isovector pairing interaction, while the resonance width is more sensitive to isoscalar pairing. Pairing correlations are also key in neutrinoless β β (0 ν β β ) decay. We find a simple relation between the centroid energy of the 48Ca DGT giant resonance and the 0 ν β β decay nuclear matrix element. More generally, we observe a very good linear correlation between the DGT transition to the ground state of the final nucleus and the 0 ν β β decay matrix element. The correlation, which originates on the dominant short-range character of both transitions, extends to heavier systems including several β β emitters and also holds in energy-density functional results. Our findings suggest that DGT experiments can be a very valuable tool to obtain information on the value of 0 ν β β decay nuclear matrix elements.

  20. Gamow-Teller strength and lepton captures rates on 66-71Ni in stellar matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    Charge-changing transitions play a significant role in stellar weak-decay processes. The fate of the massive stars is decided by these weak-decay rates including lepton (positron and electron) captures rates, which play a consequential role in the dynamics of core collapse. As per previous simulation results, weak interaction rates on nickel (Ni) isotopes have significant influence on the stellar core vis-à-vis controlling the lepton content of stellar matter throughout the silicon shell burning phases of high mass stars up to the presupernova stages. In this paper, we perform a microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller (GT) charge-changing transitions, in the β-decay and electron capture (EC) directions, for neutron-rich Ni isotopes (66-71Ni). We further compute the associated weak-decay rates for these selected Ni isotopes in stellar environment. The computations are accomplished by employing the deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) model. A recent study showed that the deformed pn-QRPA theory is well suited for the estimation of GT transitions. The astral weak-decay rates are determined over densities in the range of 10-1011g/cm3 and temperatures in the range of 0.01 × 109-30 × 109K. The calculated lepton capture rates are compared with the previous calculation of Pruet and Fuller (PF). The overall comparison demonstrates that, at low stellar densities and high temperatures, our EC rates are bigger by as much as two orders of magnitude. Our results show that, at higher temperatures, the lepton capture rates are the dominant mode for the stellar weak rates and the corresponding lepton emission rates may be neglected.

  1. Gamow-Teller strength in deformed nuclei within self-consistent pnQRPA with the Gogny force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martini M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA calculations using finite range Gogny force have been performed to study electromagnetic excitations of several axially-symmetric deformed nuclei up to the 238U. Here we present the extension of this approach to the charge-exchange nuclear excitations (pn-QRPA. In particular we focus on the Gamow-Teller (GT excitations. A comparison of the predicted GT strength distribution with existing experimental data is presented The role of nuclear deformation is shown. Special attention is paid to β-decay half-lives calculations for which experimental data exist.

  2. Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the beta-decay of 100Ag from total-absorption gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batist, L.; Bykov, A.; Moroz, F.; Wittmann, V.; Alkhazov, G.D.; Keller, H.; Kirchner, R.; Klepper, O.; Roeckl, E.; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. van; Reusen, G.; Plochocki, A.; Pfuetzner, M.; Rykaczewski, K.; Szerypo, J.; Zylicz, J.; Brown, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    The EC/β + -decay of the odd-odd nucleus 100 Ag was studied by means of total absorption γ-ray spectrometry. Most of the Gamow-Teller strength was found to be concentrated at an excitation energy of 5.6 MeV in 100 Pd, the FWHM of this resonance being 1.5 MeV. The measured strength distribution which is interpreted within the BCS approximation as being due to the dominant population of four-quasiparticle excitations, resembles the distribution predicted by an advanced shell-model calculation for the 98 Ag→ 98 Cd decay. (orig.)

  3. Breaking of the SU(4) limit for the Gamow-Teller strength in N{proportional_to}Z nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petermann, I. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Martinez-Pinedo, G. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Langanke, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Caurier, E. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg (France)

    2007-12-15

    We have performed large-scale shell model calculations of the Gamow-Teller strength distributions in N{proportional_to}Z pf-shell nuclei. These calculations were motivated by the experimental attempts to measure the low-lying GT strength for the even-even N=Z+2 or N=Z-2 nuclei {sup 46}Ti, {sup 50}Cr, {sup 54}Fe and {sup 62}Ge, where a sizable low-energy GT strength could be interpreted as reminiscence of SU(4) symmetry; in the limit of exact SU(4) symmetry the GT{sub -} strength would be concentrated in a single transition to the lowest T=0, J=1{sup +} state in the daughter. We confirm that the SU(4) symmetry is strongly broken by the spin-orbit interaction and by increasing neutron excess. (orig.)

  4. Gamow-Teller decay and nuclear deformation: implementing of a new total absorption spectrometer, study of isotopes N ≅ Z krypton and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, E.

    2002-12-01

    Nuclei with A ∼ 70 along the N=Z line are known to be the scene of phenomena closely related to the nuclear deformation and are of particular interest since theoretical mean field calculations predict that a large part of the Gamow-Teller resonance might be located below the ground state of the mother nucleus and then be accessible through β-decay studies. These results have shown the effect of the shape of the ground state on the intensity of the Gamow-Teller strength. Thus, the experimental determination, through δ-decay, of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution and the comparison to the theoretical predictions allow to pin down the quadrupolar deformation parameter of the ground state of the parent nucleus. In order to study the neutron deficient isotopes of krypton (A=72,73,74,75) and strontium (A=76,77,78) and to establish the β-strength on the full energy range, a new total absorption spectrometer (TAgS) has been built in the frame of an international collaboration and installed at the (SOLDE/CERN mass separator. For the data analysis, the response function R of the spectrometer has been calculated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations, based on the GEANT4 code, and of a statistical description of the level scheme in the daughter nucleus. The β-feeding distribution has been obtained from experimental spectra through a method based on Bayes theorem and then converted into Gamow-Teller strength. The results coming from the 74 Kr decay analysis allow to describe the ground state of such a nucleus as the coexistence of an oblate shape and of a prolate shape. In the case of 76 Sr, the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution strongly indicates a prolate deformation. (author)

  5. Gamow-Teller decay and nuclear deformation: implementing of a new total absorption spectrometer, study of isotopes N {approx_equal} Z krypton and strontium; Decroissance Gamow-Teller et deformation nucleaire: mise en oeuvre d'un nouveau spectrometre a absorption totale, etude d'isotopes N {approx_equal} Z de krypton et strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, E

    2002-12-01

    Nuclei with A {approx} 70 along the N=Z line are known to be the scene of phenomena closely related to the nuclear deformation and are of particular interest since theoretical mean field calculations predict that a large part of the Gamow-Teller resonance might be located below the ground state of the mother nucleus and then be accessible through {beta}-decay studies. These results have shown the effect of the shape of the ground state on the intensity of the Gamow-Teller strength. Thus, the experimental determination, through {delta}-decay, of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution and the comparison to the theoretical predictions allow to pin down the quadrupolar deformation parameter of the ground state of the parent nucleus. In order to study the neutron deficient isotopes of krypton (A=72,73,74,75) and strontium (A=76,77,78) and to establish the {beta}-strength on the full energy range, a new total absorption spectrometer (TAgS) has been built in the frame of an international collaboration and installed at the (SOLDE/CERN mass separator. For the data analysis, the response function R of the spectrometer has been calculated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations, based on the GEANT4 code, and of a statistical description of the level scheme in the daughter nucleus. The {beta}-feeding distribution has been obtained from experimental spectra through a method based on Bayes theorem and then converted into Gamow-Teller strength. The results coming from the {sup 74}Kr decay analysis allow to describe the ground state of such a nucleus as the coexistence of an oblate shape and of a prolate shape. In the case of {sup 76}Sr, the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution strongly indicates a prolate deformation. (author)

  6. Gamow-Teller transitions and proton-neutron pair correlation in N =Z odd-odd p -shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2017-10-01

    We have studied the Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions from N =Z +2 neighbors to N =Z odd-odd nuclei in the p -shell region by using isospin-projected and β γ -constraint antisymmetrized molecular dynamics combined with the generator coordinate method. The calculated GT transition strengths from 0+1 states to 1+0 states such as 6He(01+1 ) →6Li(11+0 ) , 10Be(01+1 ) →10B(11+0 ) , and 14C(01+1 ) →14N(12+0 ) exhaust more than 50% of the sum rule. These N =Z +2 initial states and N =Z odd-odd final states are found to dominantly have S =0 ,T =1 n n pairs and S =1 ,T =0 p n pairs, respectively. Based on the two-nucleon (N N ) pair picture, we can understand the concentration of the GT strengths as the spin-isospin-flip transition n n (S =0 ,T =1 )→p n (S =1 ,T =0 ) in L S coupling. The GT transition can be a good probe to identify the spin-isospin partner states with n n pairs and p n pairs of N =Z +2 and N =Z odd-odd nuclei, respectively.

  7. Beta decay of {sup 97}Ag: evidence for the Gamow-Teller resonance near {sup 100}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Zhiqiang

    1999-03-01

    In two complementary measurements, a cube like array of 6 Euroball-Cluster germanium detectors and a total-absorption {gamma}-spectrometer were used to investigate the {beta} decay of {sup 97}Ag, a three proton-hole nucleus with respect to the {sup 100}Sn core. The half-life and Q{sub EC} value of the decay of the 9/2{sup +} ground-state of {sup 97}Ag were determined to be 25.9(4) s and 6.98(11) MeV respectively. A total of 603 {gamma} rays (578 new) was observed, and 151 levels (132 new) in {sup 97}Pd have been identified. An interesting {beta}-delayed {gamma} cascade was observed, which comprises 6 {gamma}-transitions with a de-excitation pattern involving an initial increase of the level spin. The Gamow-Teller (GT) {beta}-decay strength distributions from the two measurements reveal a large GT resonance around 4 MeV with a width of about 1.8 MeV. The hindrance factor for the total GT strength summed from the ground-state up to 6 MeV excitation energy in {sup 97}Pd, amounts to 4.3(6) with reference to a shell-model prediction. This factor is discussed in comparison with a core-polarization and a Monte-Carlo shell-model calculation. (orig.)

  8. High-resolution study of Gamow-Teller transitions in the 47Ti(3He,t)47V reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganioǧlu, E.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Algora, A.; Csatlós, M.; Deaven, J. M.; Estevez-Aguado, E.; Guess, C. J.; Gulyás, J.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Honma, M.; Ishikawa, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Matsubara, H.; Meharchand, R.; Molina, F.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Otsuka, T.; Perdikakis, G.; Rubio, B.; Scholl, C.; Shimbara, Y.; Susoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thies, J. H.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Zenihiro, J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in nuclear structure and astrophysical nuclear processes, we have studied Tz=+3/2→+1/2, GT transitions starting from the 47Ti nucleus in the (3He,t) charge-exchange reaction at 0∘ and at an intermediate incident energy of 140 MeV/nucleon. The experiments were carried out at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka, using the high-resolution facility with a high-dispersion beam line and the Grand-Raiden spectrometer. With an energy resolution of 20 keV, individual GT transitions were observed and GT strength was derived for each state populated up to an excitation energy (Ex) of 12.5 MeV. The GT strength was widely distributed from low excitation energy up to 12.5 MeV, where we had to stop the analysis because of the high level density. The distribution of the GT strengths was compared with the results of shell model calculations using the GXPF1 interaction. The calculations could reproduce the experimental GT distributions well. The GT transitions from the ground state of 47Ti and the M1 transitions from the isobaric analog state in 47V to the same low-lying states in 47V are analogous. It was found that the ratios of GT transition strengths to the ground state, the 0.088-MeV state, and the 0.146-MeV state are similar to the ratios of the strengths of the analogous M1 transitions from the isobaric analog state (IAS) to these states. The measured distribution of the GT strengths was also compared with those starting from the Tz=+3/2 nucleus 41K to the Tz=+1/2 nucleus 41Ca.

  9. High-resolution study of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the light nuclei 9B and 13N using the (3He,t) charge-exchange reaction at 420 MeV beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholl, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Excited states in the light nuclei 9 B and 13 C were studied using the ( 3 He,t) charge-exchange reaction on 9 Be and 13 C targets. The measurements were performed at the research center for nuclear physics (RCNP) in Osaka, Japan, using the magnetic spectrometer Grand Raiden and the dispersive WS course. The 3 He beam with an energy of 420 MeV was accelerated by the RCNP Ring Cyclotron. The Grand Raiden spectrometer and the WS course allow to study the ( 3 He,t) charge-exchange reaction with an energy resolution of around 30 keV, which is one order of magnitude better than measurements with the (p,n) charge-exchange reaction. The high resolution allows to better separate individual states and to determine weak excitation strengths because of low background in the spectra. A total of 19 states in 13 N were studied, and a total of 20 states were observed in 9 B. Of these, 9 states in 13 C and 10 states in 9 B were identified as being excited by a Gamow-Teller transition. Charge-exchange reactions are related to beta-decay, and at zero momentum transfer a simple proportionality exists between the cross-section of the charge-exchange experiment and the Fermi (F) or Gamow-Teller (GT) beta-decay strength. While the Fermi strength B(F) is concentrated in the transition to the isobaric analog state, the Gamow-Teller strength B(GT) is scattered among the excited states. The main aim of the present study is to determine the B(GT) strengths in the nuclei 9 B and 13 N. The only charge-exchange study of 9 B was made 30 years ago with the (p,n) reaction and a resolution of around 300-400 keV. Many states, especially at high excitation energy, could not be resolved by that study. The present work was able to separate many weakly excited states with small decay width at high excitation energies (12-19 MeV) in 9 B and determine the B(GT) strength distribution by using recent high-precision beta-decay data. The results point to a strong difference in spatial structure between the

  10. High-resolution study of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the light nuclei {sup 9}B and {sup 13}N using the ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reaction at 420 MeV beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholl, Clemens

    2010-07-07

    Excited states in the light nuclei {sup 9}B and {sup 13}C were studied using the ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reaction on {sup 9}Be and {sup 13}C targets. The measurements were performed at the research center for nuclear physics (RCNP) in Osaka, Japan, using the magnetic spectrometer Grand Raiden and the dispersive WS course. The {sup 3}He beam with an energy of 420 MeV was accelerated by the RCNP Ring Cyclotron. The Grand Raiden spectrometer and the WS course allow to study the ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reaction with an energy resolution of around 30 keV, which is one order of magnitude better than measurements with the (p,n) charge-exchange reaction. The high resolution allows to better separate individual states and to determine weak excitation strengths because of low background in the spectra. A total of 19 states in {sup 13}N were studied, and a total of 20 states were observed in {sup 9}B. Of these, 9 states in {sup 13}C and 10 states in {sup 9}B were identified as being excited by a Gamow-Teller transition. Charge-exchange reactions are related to beta-decay, and at zero momentum transfer a simple proportionality exists between the cross-section of the charge-exchange experiment and the Fermi (F) or Gamow-Teller (GT) beta-decay strength. While the Fermi strength B(F) is concentrated in the transition to the isobaric analog state, the Gamow-Teller strength B(GT) is scattered among the excited states. The main aim of the present study is to determine the B(GT) strengths in the nuclei {sup 9}B and {sup 13}N. The only charge-exchange study of {sup 9}B was made 30 years ago with the (p,n) reaction and a resolution of around 300-400 keV. Many states, especially at high excitation energy, could not be resolved by that study. The present work was able to separate many weakly excited states with small decay width at high excitation energies (12-19 MeV) in {sup 9}B and determine the B(GT) strength distribution by using recent high-precision beta-decay data. The

  11. A study of Gamow-Teller transitions for N = Z nuclei, {sup 24}Mg, {sup 28}Si, and {sup 32}S, by a deformed QRPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Eunja; Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Soongsil University, Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxy Institute and Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    We investigated Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and strength distributions of s-d shell N = Z nuclei, {sup 24}Mg, {sup 28}Si, and {sup 32}S, by a deformed quasi-particle random phase approximation (DQRPA). In the DQRPA, we included particle model space up to p-f shell and considered explicitly the deformation as well as the like- and unlike-pairing correlations. Shell evolution by deformation and attractive force by unlike-pairing correlations turned out to play vital roles to reproduce the experimental GT data. Correlations between the deformation and the pairing correlations are also discussed with the comparison to the experimental data shape. (orig.)

  12. Study of Gamow-Teller giant resonance in /sup 90/Nb by the /sup 90/Zr(/sup 3/He,t)/sup 90/Nb reaction at 90 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.; Fujita, Y.; Katayama, I.; Morinobu, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Itahashi, T.; Ikegami, H. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics; Hayakawa, S. I.; Ikegami, Hidetsugu; Muraoka, Mitsuo [eds.; Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1980-01-01

    A Gamow-Teller giant resonance in /sup 90/Nb was excited by the /sup 90/Zr(/sup 3/He, t) reaction at 89.5 MeV. The strength of the resonance was localized in the energy region of Ex = 4.5 - 7.5 MeV. The transition was found to be dominated by the L = 2 transfer.

  13. Electromagnetic dipole and Gamow-Teller responses of even and odd {sup 90-94}{sub 40}Zr isotopes in QRPA calculations with the D1M Gogny force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deloncle, I. [CSNSM, CNRS et Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Peru, S. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Martini, M. [ESNT, CEA-Saclay, DSM, Irfu, Service de Physique Nucleaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-08-15

    In this paper we present theoretical results on the dipole response in the proton spin-saturated {sup 90-94}Zr isotopes. The electric and magnetic dipole excitations are obtained in Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov plus Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) calculations performed with the D1M Gogny force. A pnQRPA charge exchange code is used to study the Gamow-Teller response. The results on the pygmy, the giant dipole resonances as well as those on the magnetic nuclear spin-flip excitation and the Gamow-Teller transitions are compared with available experimental or theoretical information. In our approach, the proton pairing plays a role in the phonon excitations, in particular in the M1 nuclear spin-flip resonance. (orig.)

  14. Corrections to the free-nucleon values of the single-particle matrix elements of the M1 and Gamow-Teller operators, from a comparison of shell-model predictions with sd-shell data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.A.; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1983-01-01

    The magnetic dipole moments of states in mirror pairs of the sd-shell nuclei and the strengths of the Gamow-Teller beta decays which connect them are compared with predictions based on mixed-configuration shell-model wave functions. From this analysis we extract the average effective values of the single-particle matrix elements of the l, s, and [Y/sup( 2 )xs]/sup( 1 ) components of the M1 and Gamow-Teller operators acting on nucleons in the 0d/sub 5/2/, 1s/sub 1/2/, and 0d/sub 3/2/ orbits. These results are compared with the recent calculations by Towner and Khanna of the corrections to the free-nucleon values of these matrix elements which arise from the effects of isobar currents, mesonic-exchange currents, and mixing with configurations outside the sd shell

  15. Measurement of effective analyzing powers for the NTOF polarimeter at LAMPF and DLL(0 degree) for Gamow-Teller transitions in p-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of neutron polarization from (rvec p,rvec n) reactions can provide valuable clues toward understanding the isovector nucleon-nucleus interaction. A neutron time-of-flight polarimeter has been constructed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility to perform such measurements, but before the polarimeter can be used, its effective analyzing powers must be determined. This is accomplished by using the 14 C(rvec p,rvec n) 14 N reaction at a bombarding energy of 494 MeV to produce a beam of neutrons with known polarization, illuminating the detector with these neutrons, and measuring the azimuthal asymmetries after scattering from a hydrogenous analyzer fluid within the detector. Secondary measurements are made using the 2 H(rvec p,rvec n) 2 p reaction with bombarding energies of 318 and 494 MeV to produce a polarized neutron beam. The results from (rvec np) analyzing reactions within the detector agree with values anticipated from free nucleon-nucleon analyzing powers, but the results from (rvec np) analyzing reactions display a more than 33% reduction from the anticipated values. Additionally, measurements are made of the polarization transfer coefficient D LL (0 degree) for rvec p,rvec n Gamow-Teller reactions on 2 H, 7 Li 12 C, and 14 C targets. For a purely central interaction, one would expect that D LL (0 degree) ∼ -1/3 in the plane wave limit, but a simple average of the Jπ = 0 + → 1 + results at a bombardment energy of 494 MeV gives D LL (0 degree) = -0.689 ± 0.044. Thus, the measurements indicate that the nucleon-nucleus interaction -- which is largely central at 200 MeV -- has strong tensor contributions at higher energy

  16. Gamow-Teller strength distributions in 76Ge, 76,82Se, and 90,92Zr by the deformed proton-neutron QRPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Eunja; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2015-02-01

    The deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) has been developed and applied to evaluate Gamow-Teller (GT) transition strength distributions, including high-lying excited states. The data of high-lying excited states are recently available beyond one or two nucleon threshold by charge exchange reactions using hundreds of MeV projectiles. Our calculations started with single-particle states calculated using a deformed, axially symmetric Woods-Saxon potential. The neutron-neutron and proton-proton pairing correlations are explicitly taken into account at the deformed Bardeen-Cooper-Schriffer theory. Additionally, the ground state correlations and two-particle and two-hole mixing states were included in the deformed QRPA. In this work, we used a realistic two-body interaction, given by the Brueckner G-matrix based on the CD Bonn potential to reduce the ambiguity on the nucleon-nucleon interactions inside nuclei. We applied our formalism to the GT transition strengths for 76Ge, 76,82Se, and 90,92Zr, and compared the results with the available experimental data. The GT strength distributions were sensitive to the deformation parameter as well as its sign, i.e., oblate or prolate. The Ikeda sum rule, which is usually thought to be satisfied under the one-body current approximation, regardless of nucleon models, was used to test our numerical calculations and shown to be satisfied without introducing the quenching factor, if high-lying GT excited states were properly taken into account. Most of the GT strength distributions of the nuclei considered in this work have the high-lying GT excited states beyond one-nucleon threshold, which are shown to be consistent with the available experimental data.

  17. Does the delta quench Gamow-Teller strength in (p,n)- and (p vector,p vector')-reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterfeld, F.; Schulte, A.; Udagawa, T.; Yabe, M.

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic analyses of complete forward angle intermediate energy (p,n)-, ( 3 He,t)- and (p vector,p vector')-spin-flip spectra are presented for the reactions 90 Zr(p,n), 90 Zr( 3 He,t) and 90 Zr(p vector,p vector'). It is shown that the whole spectra up to high excitation energies (E X ∝50 MeV) are the result of correlated one-particle-one-hole (1p1h) spin-isospin transitions only. The spectra reflect, therefore, the linear spin-isospin response of the target nucleus to the probing external hadronic fields. Our results suggest that the measured (p,n)-, ( 3 He,t)- and (p vector,p vector')-cross sections are compatible with the transition strength predictions as obtained from random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. This means that the Δ isobar quenching mechanism is likely to be rather small. (orig.)

  18. Isospin symmetry of Tz =±3/2→±1/2 Gamow-Teller transitions in A=41 nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Adachi, T.; Berg, G. P.; Brown, B. A.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Uchida, M.; Wakasa, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2004-11-01

    Under the assumption that isospin T is a good quantum number, isobaric analog states and various analogous transitions are expected in isobars with mass number A . The strengths of Tz =±3/2→±1/2 analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and analogous M1 transitions within the A=41 isobar quartet are compared in detail. The Tz =+3/2→+1/2 GT transitions from the Jπ = 3/2+ ground state of 41K leading to excited Jπ = 1/2+ , 3/2+ , and 5/2+ states in 41Ca were measured using the ( 3He ,t) charge-exchange reaction. With a high energy resolution of 35 keV , many fragmented states were observed, and the GT strength distribution was determined up to 10 MeV excitation energy ( Ex ) . The main part of the strength was concentrated in the Ex =4 6 MeV region. A shell-model calculation could reproduce the concentration, but not so well details of the strength distribution. The obtained distribution was further compared with two results of 41Ti β decay studying the analogous Tz =-3/2→-1/2 GT strengths. They reported contradicting distributions. One-to-one correspondences of analogous transitions and analog states were assigned up to Ex =6 MeV in the comparison with one of these 41Ti β -decay results. Combining the spectroscopic information of the analog states in 41Ca and 41Sc , the most probable Jπ values were deduced for each pair of analog states. It was found that 5/2+ states carry the main part of the observed GT strength, while much less GT strength was carried by 1/2+ and 3/2+ states. The gross features of the GT strength distributions for each J were similar for the isospin analogous Tz =±3/2→±1/2 transitions, but the details were somewhat different. From the difference of the distributions, isospin-asymmetry matrix elements of ≈8 keV were deduced. The Coulomb displacement energy, which is sensitive to the configuration of states, showed a sudden increase of about 50 keV at the excitation energy of 3.8 MeV . The strengths of several M1 transitions to the

  19. Gamow-Teller response in the configuration space of a density-functional-theory-rooted no-core configuration-interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczka, M.; Kortelainen, M.; Satuła, W.

    2018-03-01

    Background: The atomic nucleus is a unique laboratory in which to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction. This includes a question concerning in medium renormalization of the axial-vector current, which still lacks satisfactory explanation. Study of spin-isospin or Gamow-Teller (GT) response may provide valuable information on both the quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant as well as on nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. Purpose: We have performed a seminal calculation of the GT response by using the no-core configuration-interaction approach rooted in multireference density functional theory (DFT-NCCI). The model treats properly isospin and rotational symmetries and can be applied to calculate both the nuclear spectra and transition rates in atomic nuclei, irrespectively of their mass and particle-number parity. Methods: The DFT-NCCI calculation proceeds as follows: First, one builds a configuration space by computing relevant, for a given physical problem, (multi)particle-(multi)hole Slater determinants. Next, one applies the isospin and angular-momentum projections and performs the isospin and K mixing in order to construct a model space composed of linearly dependent states of good angular momentum. Eventually, one mixes the projected states by solving the Hill-Wheeler-Griffin equation. Results: The method is applied to compute the GT strength distribution in selected N ≈Z nuclei including the p -shell 8Li and 8Be nuclei and the s d -shell well-deformed nucleus 24Mg. In order to demonstrate a flexibility of the approach we present also a calculation of the superallowed GT β decay in doubly-magic spherical 100Sn and the low-spin spectrum in 100In. Conclusions: It is demonstrated that the DFT-NCCI model is capable of capturing the GT response satisfactorily well by using a relatively small configuration space, exhausting simultaneously the GT sum rule. The model, due to its flexibility and broad range of applicability, may

  20. High-lying Gamow-Teller excited states in the deformed nuclei,76Ge,82Se and N = 20 nuclei in the island of inversion by the Deformed QRPA (DQRPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja

    2013-07-01

    With the advent of high analysis technology in detecting the Gamow-Teller (GT) excited states beyond one nucleon emission threshold, the quenching of the GT strength to the Ikeda sum rule (ISR) seems to be recovered by the high-lying (HL) GT states. We address that these HL GT excited states result from the smearing of the Fermi surface by the increase of the chemical potential owing to the deformation within a framework of the deformed quasi-particle random phase approximation (DQRPA). Detailed mechanism leading to the smearing is discussed, and comparisons to the available experimental data on 76Ge,82Se and N = 20 nuclei are shown to explain the strong peaks on the HL GT excited states.

  1. High-lying Gamow-Teller excited states in the deformed nuclei,76Ge,82Se and N = 20 nuclei in the island of inversion by the Deformed QRPA (DQRPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of high analysis technology in detecting the Gamow-Teller (GT) excited states beyond one nucleon emission threshold, the quenching of the GT strength to the Ikeda sum rule (ISR) seems to be recovered by the high-lying (HL) GT states. We address that these HL GT excited states result from the smearing of the Fermi surface by the increase of the chemical potential owing to the deformation within a framework of the deformed quasi-particle random phase approximation (DQRPA). Detailed mechanism leading to the smearing is discussed, and comparisons to the available experimental data on 76 Ge, 82 Se and N = 20 nuclei are shown to explain the strong peaks on the HL GT excited states

  2. Gamow-Teller strength functions and neutrino problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of spin strengths in nuclei is of vital importance in studies of nuclear double beta decay and in solar neutrino spectroscopy. The current status of these problems is outlined

  3. The gross theory model for neutrino-nucleus cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samana, A R; Barbero, C A; Krmpotic, F; Duarte, S B; Dimarco, A J

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear gross theory, originally formulated by Takahashi and Yamada (1969 Prog. Theor. Phys. 41 1470) for the β-decay, is applied to the electronic-neutrino nucleus reactions, employing a more realistic description of the energetics of the Gamow-Teller resonances. The model parameters are gauged from the most recent experimental data, both for β - -decay and electron capture, separately for even-even, even-odd, odd-odd and odd-even nuclei. The numerical estimates for neutrino-nucleus cross-sections agree fairly well with previous evaluations done within the framework of microscopic models. The formalism presented here can be extended to the heavy nuclei mass region, where weak processes are quite relevant, which is of astrophysical interest because of its applications in supernova explosive nucleosynthesis

  4. Energy dependence of the ratio of isovector effective interaction strengths |JστJτ| from 0° (p,n) cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, T. N.; Rapaport, J.; Bainum, D. E.; Goodman, C. D.; Foster, C. C.; Gaarde, C.; Larsen, J.; Goulding, C. A.; Horen, D. J.; Masterson, T.; Sugarbaker, E.

    1982-02-01

    Information concerning the ratio of the isovector effective interaction strengths |JστJτ| may be obtained from the ratio of (p,n) Gamow-Teller and isobaric analog state 0° differential cross sections. We have examined 0° (p,n) data for the energy range 5-200 MeV and find that for energies larger than 50 MeV and for targets with A=7-42 the product of the interaction-strength and distortion-factor ratios |JστJτ|(NστNτ)12 appears to be mass independent and linear as a function of bombarding energy. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 7Li, 13, 14C, 26Mg, 37Cl, 41Ca(p,n), measured σ(θ=0°), GT, IAS transitions, Ep=60-200 MeV. Deduced energy dependence, interaction strength ratio |JστJτ|.

  5. Allowed Gamow-Teller excitations from the ground state of N-14

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aroua, S.; Navrátil, Petr; Zamick, L.; Fayche, M. S.; Barret, B. R.; Vary, J. P.; Heyde, K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 720, 1/2 (2003), s. 71-83 ISSN 0375-9474 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : core shell-model * tensor interactions * light-nuclei Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.761, year: 2003

  6. Inelastic electron scattering, fine structure of M1 giant resonances and Gamow-Teller states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in obtaining detailed fine structure distributions of magnetic giant resonances in nuclei using high resolution inelastic electron scattering at low energy is discussed. Specific examples chosen are the medium heavy nuclei 40 42 44 48 Ca in which M1 excitations are due to neutron spin-flip transitions and the N=28 isotones 50 Ti, 52 Cr and 54 Fe where in addition also proton excitations contribute to the measured M1 strength. It is found that the M1 strength is very fragmented and considerably quenched in comparison to predictions of shell model calculations in a model space that includes up to 2p-2h excitations. Finally, the old problem of M1 strength in 208 Pb is revisited and the results of a form factor measurement of a recently discovered low lying Jsup(π)=1 + state by nuclear resonance fluorescence are presented. (Auth.)

  7. Beta-decay of {sup 103}In: evidence for the Gamow-Teller resonance near {sup 100}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karny, M. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Experimental Physics; Batist, L.; Brown, B.A. [and others

    1998-04-01

    The {beta} decay of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 103}In was investigated by using total absorption {gamma}-ray spectrometry on mass-separated sources. The measurement reveals a high-lying resonance of the {beta}-decay strength in striking disagreement with high-resolution {gamma}-ray data. The result is discussed in comparison with shell-model predictions. (orig.)

  8. Cross Selling Implementation From Outpatient Unit to Radiology Unit in Semen Gresik Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Rochmah, Thinni Nurul; Faradisa, Mutiara Ayu

    2013-01-01

    Thelow visitingnumberinhospital€™sunitarecloselyrelatedtomarketingactivities,includinginternal marketing which consistsof cross sellingfromother units.Thisstudy aims toanalyze crossselling implementation from Outpatient Unit to Radiology Unit in Semen Gresik Hospital. This study was a cross sectional analytic design. Samplewastakenbysimple random samplingwithsamplesize25respondents.Independentvariableswere marketing policy,employee commitment,perception, motivation,andreadiness ofcross sellin...

  9. Santee Cooper cross units 3 & 4: an EPCM success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickson, K.; Neher, S.; Koontz, N. [WorleyParons (United States)

    2009-05-15

    In late 2001, Santee Cooper began a project to add a third 600 MW unit to its coal-fired Cross Generating Station in Cross, S.C. Plans also included a fourth unit to be added later. The engineering, procurement and construction (EPCM) of Units 3 and 4 would eventually span almost seven years. The Cross Project demonstrates how Santee Cooper empowered its EPCM contractor to manage for change and how a well conceived plan and thoroughly developed schedule provide the necessary structure and flexibility to successful do so. The Cross Project experience reinforces the idea that for large projects an EPCM arrangement provides the agility necessary to manage change and the means to manage risk. The design, furnish and erect contracts were performance based contracts executed early to firm up the plant design and layout. 2 photos.

  10. Cross connecting absorber module inlets of multiple boiler units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirillo, A.J.; Sperber, P.K.; Belavadi, V.N.; Mukherji, A.

    1991-01-01

    The retrofitting of scrubbers downstream of existing balanced draft boilers is often accomplished by the addition of induced draft (ID) booster fans. By creating a common plenum between the ID fans and the ID booster fans of two or more boiler-absorber trains, absorber module capacity may be shared among multiple boiler units. At Harrison Power Station, three (3) 4,900,000 lb/hour boilers (640 MWe Gross) will be linked through a common plenum. This sharing capability precludes the need to add standby module capacity, thereby saving capital dollars and keeping project critical path schedules, which typically run through absorber procurement and construction, to a minimum. Through damper placement in the ductwork cross connections, unitized boiler-absorber module operation or common plenum operation may be obtained, thus providing both operational flexibility and reliability. Additionally, open plenum operation allows the removal of an absorber unit from service, while keeping its associated boiler on line, thereby precluding 'cold starts' and maintaining overall unit availabilities. As either unitized or common plenum operation is possible with the cross connection, the furnace draft control systems of each boiler must be examined for varying load operation and trip conditions. This paper addresses the means by which to analyze such cross connection operational scenarios while maintaining compliance with furnace flame out safety guidelines, and will discuss the physical design considerations, ramifications and benefits of same, with select emphasis on what is being implemented at the Harrison Power Station

  11. Gamow-Teller matrix elements from the C-12(d,He-2) and Mg-24(d,He-2) reactions at 170 MeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumer, C; Frekers, D; Schmidt, R; van den Berg, AM; Hannen, VM; Harakeh, MN; de Huu, MA; Wörtche, HJ; De Frenne, D; Hagemann, M; Heyse, J; Jacobs, E; Fujita, Y

    The Mg-24(d,He-2)Na-24 and the C-12(d,He-2)B-12 charge-exchange reactions have been studied at an incident energy of 170 MeV. The two protons in the S-1(0)(pp) state (indicated as He-2) were both momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. Background-free He-2 spectra with

  12. Nuclear structure information from nucleon-nucleus scattering experiments at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1989-02-01

    We discuss a variety of forward-angle measurements of cross sections for (n,p), (p,p') and (p,n) reactions which were carried out using the medium-resolution spectrometer (MRS) at TRIUMF. The ratio of L=0 isovector spinflip cross section and Gamow-Teller strength has been investigated at 200-450 MeV for several strong transitions of known B(GT) in p-shell nuclei. Isospin symmetry in N-nucleus reactions has been tested for Gamow-Teller transitions to isospin triads in A=6 and A=12 nuclei. The prospects of identifying orbital and meson exchange current contributions in M1 transitions from a state-by-state comparison of M1 and Gamow-Teller strength in sd shell nuclei are discussed. Finally we describe a test of the Gamow-Teller sum rule in 54 Fe where both S - and S + strength are substantial and have been extracted from a multipole decomposition of (p,n) and (n,p) angular distributions

  13. Using Sport Education to Implement a CrossFit Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    The sport education (SE) model has been used extensively to teach sports at the middle and high school levels, and the flexibility of the model has been demonstrated in its application to fitness units as well. Infusing new content into this well-established and familiar curricular model can increase student motivation and interest while…

  14. Unit root tests for cross-sectionally dependent panels : The influence of observed factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becheri, I.G.; Drost, F.C.; van den Akker, R.

    This paper considers a heterogeneous panel unit root model with cross-sectional dependence generated by a factor structure—the factor common to all units being an observed covariate. The model is shown to be Locally Asymptotically Mixed Normal (LAMN), with the random part of the limiting Fisher

  15. Associations among unit leadership and unit climates for implementation in acute care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Clayton J; Liu, Xuefeng; Aebersold, Michelle L; Tschannen, Dana; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Titler, Marita G

    2018-04-25

    Nurse managers have a pivotal role in fostering unit climates supportive of implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in care delivery. EBP leadership behaviors and competencies of nurse managers and their impact on practice climates are widely overlooked in implementation science. The purpose of this study was to examine the contributions of nurse manager EBP leadership behaviors and nurse manager EBP competencies in explaining unit climates for EBP implementation in adult medical-surgical units. A multi-site, multi-unit cross-sectional research design was used to recruit the sample of 24 nurse managers and 553 randomly selected staff nurses from 24 adult medical-surgical units from 7 acute care hospitals in the Northeast and Midwestern USA. Staff nurse perceptions of nurse manager EBP leadership behaviors and unit climates for EBP implementation were measured using the Implementation Leadership Scale and Implementation Climate Scale, respectively. EBP competencies of nurse managers were measured using the Nurse Manager EBP Competency Scale. Participants were emailed a link to an electronic questionnaire and asked to respond within 1 month. The contributions of nurse manager EBP leadership behaviors and competencies in explaining unit climates for EBP implementation were estimated using mixed-effects models controlling for nurse education and years of experience on current unit and accounting for the variability across hospitals and units. Significance level was set at α < .05. Two hundred sixty-four staff nurses and 22 nurse managers were included in the final sample, representing 22 units in 7 hospitals. Nurse manager EBP leadership behaviors (p < .001) and EBP competency (p = .008) explained 52.4% of marginal variance in unit climate for EBP implementation. Leadership behaviors uniquely explained 45.2% variance. The variance accounted for by the random intercepts for hospitals and units (p < .001) and years of nursing experience in current unit

  16. Testing for Unit Roots in Small Panels with Short-run and Long-run Cross-sectional Dependencies

    OpenAIRE

    Yoosoon Chang; Wonho Song

    2009-01-01

    An IV approach, using as instruments non-linear transformations of the lagged levels, is explored to test for unit roots in panels with general dependency and heterogeneity across cross-sectional units. We allow not only for the cross-sectional dependencies of innovations, but also for the presence of co-integration across cross-sectional levels. Unbalanced panels and panels with differing individual short-run dynamics and cross-sectionally related dynamics are also permitted. We also more ca...

  17. Cross-cultural medical education in the United States: key principles and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Joseph R; Cervantes, Marina C

    2009-09-01

    The field of cross-cultural care focuses on the ability to communicate effectively and provide quality health care to patients from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. In recent years, medical schools in the United States have increasingly recognized the growing importance of incorporating cross-cultural curricula into medical education. Cross-cultural medical education in the United States has emerged for four reasons: (1) the need for providers to have the skills to care for a diverse patient population; (2) the link between effective communication and health outcomes; (3) the presence of racial/ethnic disparities that are, in part, due to poor communication across cultures; and (4) medical school accreditation requirements. There are three major approaches to cross-cultural education: (1) the cultural sensitivity/awareness approach that focuses on attitudes; (2) the multicultural/categorical approach that focuses on knowledge; and (3) the cross-cultural approach that focuses on skills. The patient-based approach to cross-cultural care combines these three concepts into a framework that can be used to care for any patient, anytime, anywhere. Ultimately, if cross-cultural medical education is to evolve, students must believe it is important and understand that the categorical approach can lead to stereotyping; it should be taught using patient cases and highlighting clinical applications; it should be embedded in a longitudinal, developmentally appropriate fashion; and it should be integrated into the larger curriculum whenever possible. At the Harvard Medical School, we have tried to apply all of these lessons to our work, and we have started to develop a strategic integration process where we try to raise awareness, impart knowledge, and teach cross-cultural skills over the 4 years of schooling.

  18. Beta-decay studies near 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Karny, M.; Batist, L.; Banu, A.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Burkard, K.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Mandal, S.; Mazzocchi, C.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Muralithar, S.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2005-01-01

    The β-decay of 102 Sn was studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). A decay scheme has been constructed based on the γ-γ coincidence data. The total experimental Gamow-Teller strength B GT exp of 102 Sn was deduced from the TAS data to be 4.2(9). A search for β-delayed γ-rays of 100 Sn decay remained unsuccessful. However, a Gamow-Teller hindrance factor h = 2.2(3), and a cross-section of about 3nb for the production of 100 Sn in fusion-evaporation reaction between 58 Ni beam and 50 Cr target have been estimated from the data on heavier tin isotopes. The estimated hindrance factor is similar to the values derived for lower shell nuclei

  19. Changes in patient safety culture after restructuring of intensive care units: Two cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vifladt, Anne; Simonsen, Bjoerg O; Lydersen, Stian; Farup, Per G

    2016-02-01

    Compare changes in registered nurses' perception of the patient safety culture in restructured and not restructured intensive care units during a four-year period. Two cross-sectional surveys were performed, in 2008/2009 (time 1) and 2012/2013 (time 2). During a period of 0-3 years after time 1, three of six hospitals merged their general and medical intensive care units (restructured). The other hospitals maintained their structure of the intensive care units (not restructured). Intensive care units in hospitals at one Norwegian hospital trust. The safety culture was measured with Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. At times 1 and 2, 217/302 (72%) and 145/289 (50%) registered nurses participated. Restructuring was negatively associated with change in the safety culture, in particular, the dimensions of the safety culture within the unit level. The dimensions most vulnerable for restructuring were manager expectations and actions promoting safety, teamwork within hospital units and staffing. In this study, the restructuring of intensive care units was associated with a negative impact on the safety culture. When restructuring, the management should be particularly aware of changes in the safety culture dimensions manager expectations and actions promoting safety, teamwork within hospital units and staffing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing Information Usefulness by Line Managers’ Involvement in Cross-Unit Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Rodgers, Waymond

    2011-01-01

    Organization and management scholars have long advocated that efficient use of information is critical for firms to compete successfully in the modern marketplace. This study examines whether the use of managerial cross-unit involvement in an organization enhances managers’ propensity to use useful...... information provided by a functionally related unit in the organization. Senior line managers in a major global bank participated in our study in which they provided information related to their information processing and assessments of the usefulness of corporate audit information. We analyse the effect...

  1. Cross-Cultural Validity of the Ruminative Responses Scale in Argentina and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Fernán G; Rice, Kenneth G

    2017-09-01

    Although frequently used in the United States, the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) has not been extensively studied in cross-cultural samples. The present study evaluated the factor structure of Treynor et al.'s 10-item version of the RRS in samples from Argentina ( N = 308) and the United States ( N = 371). In addition to testing measurement invariance between the countries, we evaluated whether the maladaptive implications of rumination were weaker for the Argentinians than for the U.S. group. Self-critical perfectionism was the criterion in those tests. Partial scalar invariance supported an 8-item version of the RRS. There were no differences in factor means or factor correlations in RRS dimensions between countries. Brooding and Reflection were positively correlated with self-critical perfectionism in both countries, with no significant differences in the sizes of these relations between the two samples. Results are discussed in terms of psychometric and cross-cultural implications for rumination.

  2. Evaluation of intergranular cracks on the ring header cross at Grand Gulf Unit No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    A metallurgical investigation was performed on a sample of cracked ring header cross material from the Grand Gulf Unit No. 1 Nuclear Power Station. The cracks were located in a 6-7 in (15-17.5 cm) width band running circumferentially below the cross to cap weld with a similar band above the cross to discharger pipe weld. The indications were up to 19 mm in length and 6.0 mm in depth. This particular sample was cut from a cross which had not seen actual service but which had been used to qualify the induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) technique for the Grand Gulf units. The base material was SA 182 material manufactured to SA 403-type WP 304 stainless steel. The investigation consisted of visual/dye penetrant examination, chemical analysis, hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The evaluated cracks were intergranular and initiated on the forging's exterior surface. The grain size of the material was larger than ASTM 00 and no definitive corrosive species were found by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The cracking is considered to be the result of the forging having been overheated/burned during manufacture. (author)

  3. Extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii outbreak cross-transmitted in an intensive care unit and respiratory intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jin'e; Han, Shaoshan; Wu, Wenjing; Wang, Xue; Xu, Jiru; Han, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) is a great threat in intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to describe an XDRAB outbreak which was cross-transmitted in the ICU and respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) in a tertiary care hospital from January-March 2013. Patient and environmental surveillances were performed. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Genotypes were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A series of enhanced strategies were implemented to control the outbreak. A total of 11 patients were infected by XDRAB strains during this outbreak. Three patients in the ICU were found positive for XDRAB at the onset of the outbreak. Thereafter, infections were detected in 6 patients in the RICU, followed by reappearance of this strain in the ICU in 2 patients. All A baumannii strains isolated from patients and the environment were extensively drug resistant. MLST revealed them as ST368. After 3 rounds of environmental screening and cleaning, the laminar flow system connecting the ICU and RICU was found as the source of transmission. Successful control of this outbreak was achieved through multifaceted intervention measures. This study suggested the importance of thorough surveillance and disinfection of the environment, including concealed devices, in preventing the transmission of an outbreak. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Criteria of selection of basic linguacultural units within the context of cross-cultural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalupo Olga Ivanovna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problems associated with the analysis and selection of basic linguacultural units that are necessary for a more effective cross-cultural communication. To make the process of dialogue between different cultures and languages more appropriate and productive, it is necessary to possess certain knowledge, skills, which are acquired by man in the process of learning. Important in our opinion in this area are the mastery means which will prepare the person to communicate in a different communicative space. Such means, in our opinion, are the basic linguacultural units, which are considered as carriers of information and expression of cultural identity. They inform choice contributes to a worldview, understanding linguacultural picture of the world community. The basis of selection of linguistic units on the following criteria: the information content, functionality, sufficiency, cultural identity, realism, pivotal importance to the basic sense, social and cultural significance. Application of the proposed criteria allowing more appropriate to make the selection of the material and linguacultural integral components of the scope of cross-cultural interaction, which are characterized by their relevant material necessary for an adequate understanding of the processes occurring in different communicative space.

  5. Cross-National Investigation of Health Indicators among Sexual Minorities in Norway and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Watson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A cross-national study of young adult sexual minorities was conducted in order to explore the associations between sexual orientation and measures of depression, suicidality, and substance use. Two nationally representative data sets were explored from the United States (N = 14,335 and Norway (N = 2423. Results indicated that sexual minorities experienced multiple health disparities (depression, suicidality, and substance use compared to their heterosexual counterparts. We found similar patterns of depression, suicidality, and substance use for sexual minorities in both the United States and Norway. The highest odds of substance use were among heterosexual-identified Norwegian youth who reported same-sex sexual activity, and the highest odds of suicidality were found for bisexual young adults in Norway. These findings have implications for how we consider culture and social policy as barriers and/or opportunities for sexual minorities.

  6. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Factors Associated with School Bullying in Japan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Jeanne M.; Anngela-Cole, Linda; Wakita, Juri

    2010-01-01

    Researchers in both Japan and in the United States have documented that bullying is a common and potentially damaging form of violence among children. The authors' review highlights distinct cross-cultural patterns of personal, family, peer, and school characteristics that predict gender differences in bullying and victimization. Cross-cultural…

  7. Welcome to the wild west: protecting access to cross border fertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutcherson, Kimberley M

    2012-01-01

    As has been the case with other types of medical tourism, the phenomenon of cross border fertility care ("CBFC") has sparked concern about the lack of global or even national harmonization in the regulation of the fertility industry. The diversity of laws around the globe leads would-be parents to forum shop for a welcoming place to make babies. Focusing specifically on the phenomenon of travel to the United States, this Article takes up the question of whether there should be any legal barriers to those who come to the United States seeking CBFC. In part, CBFC suffers from the same general concerns raised about the use of fertility treatment in general, but it is possible to imagine a subset of arguments that would lead to forbidding or at least discouraging people from coming to the United States for CBFC, either as a matter of law or policy. This paper stands in opposition to any such effort and contemplates the moral and ethical concerns about CBFC and how, and if, those concerns warrant expression in law. Part I describes the conditions that lead some couples and individuals to leave their home countries to access fertility treatments abroad and details why the United States, with its comparatively liberal regulation of ART, has become a popular CBFC destination for travelers from around the world. Part II offers and refutes arguments supporting greater domestic control over those who seek to satisfy their desires for CBFC in the United States by reasserting the importance of the right of procreation while also noting appropriate concerns about justice and equality in the market for babies. Part III continues the exploration of justice by investigating the question of international cooperation in legislating against perceived wrongs. This Part concludes that consistent legislation across borders is appropriate where there is consensus about the wrong of an act, but it is unnecessary and inappropriate where there remain cultural conflicts about certain

  8. Early Adolescents' Responses upon Witnessing Peer Victimization: A Cross-Culture Comparison between Students in Taiwan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting-Lan; Bellmore, Amy

    2016-01-01

    To examine cross-cultural differences in behavior upon witnessing peer victimization and the reasons behind the behavior, this study evaluated the responses of early adolescents from both the United States and Taiwan. Two questions were addressed: (1) Do adolescents in Taiwan and in the United States differ in their willingness to help peer…

  9. A cross-cultural comparison of clinical supervision in South Korea and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Eunjung; Ellis, Michael V

    2013-06-01

    We investigated similarities and differences in clinical supervision in two cultures: South Korea and the United States The study had two parts: (1) a test of the cross-cultural equivalence of four supervision measures; and (2) a test of two competing models of cultural differences in the relations among supervisory style, role difficulties, supervisory working alliance, and satisfaction with supervision. Participants were 191 South Korean and 187 U.S. supervisees currently engaged in clinical supervision. The U.S. measures demonstrated sufficient measurement equivalence for use in South Korea. Cultural differences moderated the relations among supervisory styles, role difficulties, supervisory working alliance, and supervision satisfaction. Specifically, the relations among these variables were significantly stronger for U.S. than for South Korean supervisees. Implications for theory, research, and practice were discussed.

  10. A Cross-cultural Comparison of Objectivity in Childhood Games: Iran and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegarpour, Ali

    2011-07-01

    Games have been introduced as a means for studying cross-cultural differences and societies. This paper presents a case study in analogous games played by children in two different countries with two different cultures - Iran and the United States. Four examples are presented to demonstrate that games played by Iranian children are subject to less objectivity in their rules. Therefore, nonobjectivity may be a phenomenon that has roots in the society and the many differences between the two societies may very well be the results of this fundamental difference. If the presence of objectivity in childhood game rules could be, in actuality, indicative of objectivity in social and civil interactions in the everyday lives of the people, the direction of causality remains to be established. In other words, it remains unclear whether the games influence the culture or are influenced by the mandates of the society.

  11. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Three Risk Tolerance Measures: Turkey and the United States Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ruiz-Manjivar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An individual’s attitude toward financial risk tolerance (FRT is an important preference that influences financial decision-making under uncertainty. FRT involves inter-temporal resource allocation. Accurate and reliable measures of FRT are essential for professionals advising consumers as well as researchers who are trying to predict, and understand consumer behavior. This study explores cross-cultural risk tolerance by comparing random samples from Turkey, and the United States. Similar and distinctive attitudes and patterns regarding FRT are identified. Three subjective measures of FRT are employed in this study: Grable and Lytton (1999, Hanna, Gutter and Fan’s (2001 improved version of Barsky, Juster, Kimball and Shapiro (1997, and the Survey of Consumer Finance’s item on risk tolerance. Data was collected via an online survey that used the above-mentioned FRT measures. There were two versions: the original American English version, and a culturally translated Turkish version. To explore the correlation of FRT among measures, we use bivariate analysis by individually employing Pearson Chi-square test of independence, and cross tabulations analysis to each sample. In addition, by pooling both samples, we conduct cumulative logistic regression. We delineate FRT differences and consistencies between countries across subjective financial risk tolerance measures.

  12. BIGRE: A LOW CROSS-TALK INTEGRAL FIELD UNIT TAILORED FOR EXTRASOLAR PLANETS IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antichi, Jacopo; Mouillet, David; Puget, Pascal; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Dohlen, Kjetil; Gratton, Raffaele G.; Mesa, Dino; Claudi, Riccardo U.; Giro, Enrico; Boccaletti, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Integral field spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of extrasolar planets through high-contrast imaging since it allows us to obtain simultaneously a large number of monochromatic images. These can be used to calibrate and then to reduce the impact of speckles, once their chromatic dependence is taken into account. The main concern in designing integral field spectrographs for high-contrast imaging is the impact of the diffraction effects and the noncommon path aberrations together with an efficient use of the detector pixels. We focus our attention on integral field spectrographs based on lenslet arrays, discussing the main features of these designs: the conditions of appropriate spatial and spectral sampling of the resulting spectrograph's slit functions and their related cross-talk terms when the system works at the diffraction limit. We present a new scheme for the integral field unit based on a dual-lenslet device (BIGRE), that solves some of the problems related to the classical Traitement Integral des Galaxies par l'Etude de leurs Rays (TIGER) design when used for such applications. We show that BIGRE provides much lower cross-talk signals than TIGER, allowing a more efficient use of the detector pixels and a considerable saving of the overall cost of a lenslet-based integral field spectrograph.

  13. Rancang Bangun Perangkat Lunak Unit Kontrol Alat Ukur Sudu Cross Flow Water Turbine Berbasis Pengolahan Citra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Marliana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seiring dengan berkembangnya teknologi informasi dan komunikasi, alat ukur mengalami perkembangan yang cukup signifikan. Salah satu bentuk perkembangannya adalah dengan dibuatnya alat ukur sudu cross flow water turbine berbasis pengolahan citra oleh Rusweki dan Pradnyana pada tahun 2013. Namun, alat ukur ini masih dioperasikan secara manual. Tugas akhir ini bertujuan untuk melakukan pengembangan terhadap alat tersebut, khususnya dibidang rancang bangun perangkat lunak untuk unit kontrolnya. Metodologi yang diterapkan dalam tugas akhir ini yang pertama adalah mempelajari hal-hal yang berkaitan dengan topik bahasan dari berbagai literatur. Langkah kedua adalah menetukan perumusan masalah dan menentukan metode pembuatan perangkat lunak. Ketiga, pembuatan perangkat lunak dan verifikasi. Pada penelitian ini telah berhasil dirancang perangkat lunak untuk unit kontrol alat ukur sudu CFWT berbasis pengolahan citra. Berdasarkan hasil kalibrasi sensor inframerah Sharp GP2Y0A21 didapatkan bahwa nilai jarak adalah sama dengan 178924.57 dibagi dengan nilai output ADC desimal pangkat 1.08. Selisih maksimal antara jarak input dan jarak tempuh motor adalah 0.5mm, dan jarak kontrol antara 130-400mm. Dengn demikian, metode pengukuran menggunakan alat ini akan lebih mudah dan cermat, karena selain dapat mengukur benda dengan bentuk yang kompleks mngurangi resiko keausan benda an lebih teliti, juga bisa diakukan dengan mudah serta cepat karena adanya sistem kontrol

  14. Characteristics of unit-level patient safety culture in hospitals in Japan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Kitazawa, Takefumi; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2014-10-22

    Patient safety culture (PSC) has an important role in determining safety and quality in healthcare. Currently, little is known about the status of unit-level PSC in hospitals in Japan. To develop appropriate strategies, characteristics of unit-level PSC should be investigated. Work units may be classified according to the characteristics of PSC, and common problems and appropriate strategies may be identified for each work unit category. This study aimed to clarify the characteristics of unit-level PSC in hospitals in Japan. In 2012, a cross-sectional study was conducted at 18 hospitals in Japan. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire, developed by the United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, was distributed to all healthcare workers (n =12,076). Percent positive scores for 12 PSC sub-dimensions were calculated for each unit, and cluster analysis was used to categorise the units according to the percent positive scores. A generalised linear mixed model (GLMM) was used to analyse the results of the cluster analysis, and odds ratios (ORs) for categorisation as high-PSC units were calculated for each unit type. A total of 9,124 respondents (75.6%) completed the questionnaire, and valid data from 8,700 respondents (72.0%) were analysed. There were 440 units in the 18 hospitals. According to the percent positive scores for the 12 sub-dimensions, the 440 units were classified into 2 clusters: high-PSC units (n =184) and low-PSC units (n =256). Percent positive scores for all PSC sub-dimensions for high-PSC units were significantly higher than those for low-PSC units. The GLMM revealed that the combined unit type of 'Obstetrics and gynaecology ward, perinatal ward or neonatal intensive care unit' was significantly more likely to be categorised as high-PSC units (OR =9.7), and 'Long-term care ward' (OR =0.2), 'Rehabilitation unit' (OR =0.2) and 'Administration unit' (OR =0.3) were significantly less likely to be categorised as high

  15. Cross-sectional multicenter study of patients with urea cycle disorders in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Mendel; Lee, Brendan; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Summar, Marshall L; Yudkoff, Marc; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Kerr, Douglas S; Diaz, George A; Seashore, Margaretta R; Lee, Hye-Seung; McCarter, Robert J; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Batshaw, Mark L

    2008-08-01

    Inherited urea cycle disorders comprise eight disorders (UCD), each caused by a deficiency of one of the proteins that is essential for ureagenesis. We report on a cross-sectional investigation to determine clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with UCD in the United States. The data used for the analysis was collected at the time of enrollment of individuals with inherited UCD into a longitudinal observation study. The study has been conducted by the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium within the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) funded by the National Institutes of Health. One-hundred eighty-three patients were enrolled into the study. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency was the most frequent disorder (55%), followed by argininosuccinic aciduria (16%) and citrullinemia (14%). Seventy-nine percent of the participants were white (16% Latinos), and 6% were African American. Intellectual and developmental disabilities were reported in 39% with learning disabilities (35%) and half had abnormal neurological examination. Sixty-three percent were on a protein restricted diet, 37% were on Na-phenylbutyrate and 5% were on Na-benzoate. Forty-five percent of OTC deficient patients were on L-citrulline, while most patients with citrullinemia (58%) and argininosuccinic aciduria (79%) were on L-arginine. Plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids were reduced in patients treated with ammonia scavenger drugs. Plasma glutamine levels were higher in proximal UCD and in neonatal type disease. The RDCRN allows comprehensive analyses of rare inherited UCD, their frequencies and current medical practices.

  16. Disgust and Contamination: A Cross-National Comparison of Ghana and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Alexander J.; Dzokoto, Vivian A.

    2012-01-01

    The emotion of disgust, with feelings of revulsion and behavioral withdrawal, make it a prime emotion to aid in the avoidance of sources of contamination, including sources of potential infectious disease. We tested the theory that living in a region with a historically high prevalence of infectious diseases would promote higher levels of disgust and contamination sensitivity as a protective measure. A sample of undergraduates from Ghana (n = 103, 57 women), a country with a historically high prevalence of infectious diseases, showed significantly higher scores on scales assessing disgust, contamination, and disease susceptibility than a sample of undergraduates from the United States (n = 96, 58 women), a country with lower levels of disease threat. Contamination sensitivity mediated the national differences in disgust. Disgust connoting contamination also produced larger cross-national effect sizes than other types of disgust. Finally, a factor analysis on the Ghanaian responses to one of the disgust scales did not resemble the usual three-factor solution found in West. Taken together, the results were consistent with the hypothesis that a region with a higher prevalence of infectious disease threats would produce greater sensitivity to disgust and contamination than seen in lower disease threat regions. This first study on disgust in Africa showed that disgust sensitivity could differ considerably from that in the West. PMID:23450744

  17. Career Counseling Centers in Higher Education: A Study of Cross-Cultural Applications from the United States to Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Michael; Lee, Je-Kyung

    2003-01-01

    Interest in career development and career counseling is growing in Korea. Nevertheless, neither the research nor the literature adequately address the question as to what applications can be cross-culturally transferred from career counseling centers in the United States to Korea. This study qualitatively examines the practice of career counseling…

  18. Overview of a Project to Quantify Seismic Performance Factors for Cross Laminated Timber Structures in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Omar Amini; John W. van de Lindt; Shiling Pei; Douglas Rammer; Phil Line; Marjan Popovski

    2014-01-01

    Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) has been extensively used in Europe and is now gaining momentum in North America; both Canada and more recently the U.S. Construction projects have shown that CLT can effectively be used as an alternative construction material in mid-rise structures and has significant potential in commercial and industrial buildings. In the United States,...

  19. Cross-cultural comparisons of bullying among university students : perspectives from Argentina, Estonia, Finland and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Pörhölä, Maili; Cvancara, Kristen; Kaal, Esta; Tampere, Kaja; Torres, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The chapter compares bullying experiences among university students between four countries and aims to provide an understanding of the cultural features which might affect these experiences. We start by providing a summary of the results from a cross-cultural survey conducted among undergraduate students in Argentina, Estonia, Finland and the United States. We continue discussing the ways in which the current cultural, political, historical and economic status and challenges in...

  20. Bed Utilisation in an Irish Regional Paediatric Unit A Cross-Sectional Study Using the Paediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (PAEP)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó hAiseadha, Coilín

    2016-05-01

    Increasing demand for limited healthcare resources raises questions about appropriate use of inpatient beds. In the first paediatric bed utilisation study at a regional university centre in Ireland, we conducted a cross-sectional study to audit the utilisation of inpatient beds at the Regional Paediatric Unit (RPU) in University Hospital Limerick (UHL), Limerick, Ireland and also examined hospital activity data, to make recommendations for optimal use of inpatient resources.

  1. Cross-Linguistic Analysis of Vietnamese and English with Implications for Vietnamese Language Acquisition and Maintenance in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang Tang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two overall goals of this paper are a to provide a linguistic basis for promoting first language maintenance of Vietnamese in a larger United States context and b to stimulate future research in language acquisition of Vietnamese-English speakers. This paper is divided into three sections. Section 1 discusses previous studies on first language (L1 maintenance among Vietnamese Americans. Section 2 presents a cross-linguistic comparison of Vietnamese and English across speech-sound, word, and grammatical language levels. A cross-linguistic analysis may help educators better understand speaking patterns of Vietnamese American students. Based on this cross-linguistic comparison, Section 3 presents potential bi-directional interactions between Vietnamese and English within an individual speaker. These predictions are intended to provide a framework for future empirical studies related to bilingual development.

  2. Opto-mechanical design of a new cross dispersion unit for the CRIRES+ high resolution spectrograph for the VLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizon, Jean Louis; Klein, Barbara; Oliva, Ernesto; Löwinger, Tom; Anglada Escude, Guillem; Baade, Dietrich; Bristow, Paul; Dorn, Reinhold J.; Follert, Roman; Grunhut, Jason; Hatzes, Artie; Heiter, Ulrike; Ives, Derek; Jung, Yves; Kerber, Florian; Lockhart, Matt; Marquart, Thomas; Origlia, Livia; Pasquini, Luca; Paufique, Jerome; Piskunov, N.; Pozna, Eszter; Reiners, Ansgar; Smette, Alain; Smoker, Jonathan; Seemann, Ulf; Stempels, Eric; Valenti, Elena

    2014-07-01

    CRIRES is one of the few IR (0.92-5.2 μm) high-resolution spectrographs in operation at the VLT since 2006. Despite good performance it suffers a limitation that significantly hampers its ability: a small spectral coverage per exposure. The CRIRES upgrade (CRIRES+) proposes to transform CRIRES into a cross-dispersed spectrograph while maintaining the high resolution (100000) and increasing the wavelength coverage by a factor 10 compared to the current capabilities. A major part of the upgrade is the exchange of the actual cryogenic pre-disperser module by a new cross disperser unit. In addition to a completely new optical design, a number of important changes are required on key components and functions like the slit unit and detectors units. We will outline the design of these new units fitting inside a predefined and restricted space. The mechanical design of the new functions including a description and analysis will be presented. Finally we will present the strategy for the implementation of the changes.

  3. The Magnitude and Time Course of Muscle Cross-section Decrease in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaf, D. Ten; Hemmen, B.; Meent, H. van de; Bovend'Eerdt, T.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bedriddenness and immobilization of patients at an intensive care unit may result in muscle atrophy and devaluation in quality of life. The exact effect of immobilization on intensive care unit patients is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitude and time course

  4. Cross-cultural adjustment to the United States: The role of contextualized extraversion change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqiao eLiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Personality traits can predict how well sojourners and expatriates adjust to new cultures, but the adjustment process remains largely unexamined. Based on recent findings that reveal personality traits predict as well as respond to life events and experiences, this research focuses on within-person change in contextualized extraversion and its predictive validity for cross-cultural adjustment in international students who newly arrived in U.S. colleges. We proposed that the initial level as well as the rate of change in school extraversion (i.e., contextualized extraversion that reflects behavioral tendency in school settings will predict cross-cultural adjustment, withdrawal cognitions, and school satisfaction. Latent growth modeling of three-wave longitudinal surveys of 215 new international students (54% female, Mage = 24 years revealed that the initial level of school extraversion significantly predicted cross-cultural adjustment, (lower withdrawal cognitions, and satisfaction, while the rate of change (increase in school extraversion predicted cross-cultural adjustment and (lower withdrawal cognitions. We further modeled global extraversion and cross-cultural motivation as antecedents and explored within-person change in school extraversion as a proximal factor that affects adjustment outcomes. The findings highlight the malleability of contextualized personality, and more importantly, the importance of understanding within-person change in contextualized personality in a cross-cultural adjustment context. The study points to more research that explicate the process of personality change in other contexts.

  5. Cross-cultural adjustment to the United States: the role of contextualized extraversion change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengqiao; Huang, Jason L

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits can predict how well-sojourners and expatriates adjust to new cultures, but the adjustment process remains largely unexamined. Based on recent findings that reveal personality traits predict as well as respond to life events and experiences, this research focuses on within-person change in contextualized extraversion and its predictive validity for cross-cultural adjustment in international students who newly arrived in US colleges. We proposed that the initial level as well as the rate of change in school extraversion (i.e., contextualized extraversion that reflects behavioral tendency in school settings) will predict cross-cultural adjustment, withdrawal cognitions, and school satisfaction. Latent growth modeling of three-wave longitudinal surveys of 215 new international students (54% female, M age = 24 years) revealed that the initial level of school extraversion significantly predicted cross-cultural adjustment, (lower) withdrawal cognitions, and satisfaction, while the rate of change (increase) in school extraversion predicted cross-cultural adjustment and (lower) withdrawal cognitions. We further modeled global extraversion and cross-cultural motivation as antecedents and explored within-person change in school extraversion as a proximal factor that affects adjustment outcomes. The findings highlight the malleability of contextualized personality, and more importantly, the importance of understanding within-person change in contextualized personality in a cross-cultural adjustment context. The study points to more research that explicate the process of personality change in other contexts.

  6. Cross-cultural adjustment to the United States: the role of contextualized extraversion change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengqiao; Huang, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits can predict how well-sojourners and expatriates adjust to new cultures, but the adjustment process remains largely unexamined. Based on recent findings that reveal personality traits predict as well as respond to life events and experiences, this research focuses on within-person change in contextualized extraversion and its predictive validity for cross-cultural adjustment in international students who newly arrived in US colleges. We proposed that the initial level as well as the rate of change in school extraversion (i.e., contextualized extraversion that reflects behavioral tendency in school settings) will predict cross-cultural adjustment, withdrawal cognitions, and school satisfaction. Latent growth modeling of three-wave longitudinal surveys of 215 new international students (54% female, Mage = 24 years) revealed that the initial level of school extraversion significantly predicted cross-cultural adjustment, (lower) withdrawal cognitions, and satisfaction, while the rate of change (increase) in school extraversion predicted cross-cultural adjustment and (lower) withdrawal cognitions. We further modeled global extraversion and cross-cultural motivation as antecedents and explored within-person change in school extraversion as a proximal factor that affects adjustment outcomes. The findings highlight the malleability of contextualized personality, and more importantly, the importance of understanding within-person change in contextualized personality in a cross-cultural adjustment context. The study points to more research that explicate the process of personality change in other contexts. PMID:26579033

  7. Patient Safety Culture in Intensive Care Units from the Perspective of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Sedigheh; Moladoost, Azam; Bahrami, Masoud; Farzi, Saba; Etminani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    One of the goals of nursing is providing safe care, prevention of injury, and health promotion of patients. Patient safety in intensive care units is threatened for various reasons. This study aimed to survey patient safety culture from the perspective of nurses in intensive care units. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016. Sampling was done using the convenience method. The sample consisted of 367 nurses working in intensive care units of teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Data collection was performed using a two-part questionnaire that included demographic and hospital survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) questionnaire. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation). Among the 12 dimensions of safety culture, the nurses assigned the highest score to "team work within units" (97.3%) and "Organizational learning-continuous improvement" (84%). They assigned the least score to "handoffs and transitions"(21.1%), "non-punitive response to errors" (24.7%), "Staffing" (35.6%), "Communication openness" (47.5%), and "Teamwork across units" (49.4%). The patient safety culture dimensions have low levels that require adequate attention and essential measures of health care centers including facilitating teamwork, providing adequate staff, and developing a checklist of handoffs and transitions. Furthermore, to increase reporting error and to promote a patient safety culture in intensive care units, some strategies should be adopted including a system-based approach to deal with the error.

  8. Multipole decomposition analysis of the 27Al, 90Zr, 208Pb(p, n) reactions at 295 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, T.; Greenfield, M.B.; Koori, N.; Okihana, A.; Hatanaka, K.

    1996-01-01

    Differential cross sections at θ lab between 0 and 15 and the polarization transfer D NN at zero degrees for the 27 Al, 90 Zr, 208 Pb(p,n) reactions are measured at a bombarding energy of 295 MeV. A multipole decomposition (MD) technique is applied to extract L=0, L=1, and L≥2 contributions to the cross sections. The summed Gamow-Teller strength B(GT) is compared with shell-model calculations for the 27 Al(p,n) and 90 Zr(p,n) reactions. The usefulness of the polarization transfer observable in the MD analysis is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Microscopic calculation of neutrino capture rates in /sup 69,71/Ga and the detection of solar and galactic neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, K.; Klapdor, H.V.; Metzinger, J.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations of the neutrino capture cross sections for /sup 69,71/Ga based on a microscopic treatment of the Gamow-Teller matrix elements are presented. A strong enhancement of the cross section for highly energetic neutrinos is found compared to previous phenomenological estimates. As a consequence, the present assumptions on the signal from 8 B neutrinos in 71 Ga have to be revised. A non-negligible solar model dependent background of 8 B neutrinos has to be expected in a gallium solar neutrino experiment together with the pp signal. The calculations yield a larger sensitivity of the gallium detector than assumed previously for galactic neutrinos

  10. Organisational and environmental characteristics of residential aged care units providing highly person-centred care: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated factors that define residential aged care units that are perceived as being highly person-centred. The purpose of this study was to explore factors characterising residential aged care units perceived as being highly person-centred, with a focus on organisational and environmental variables, as well as residents' and staff' characteristics. A cross-sectional design was used. Residents ( n  = 1460) and staff ( n  = 1213) data from 151 residential care units were collected, as well as data relating to characteristics of the organisation and environment, and data measuring degree of person-centred care. Participating staff provided self-reported data and conducted proxy ratings on residents . Descriptive and comparative statistics, independent samples t-test, Chi 2 test, Eta Squared and Phi coefficient were used to analyse data. Highly person-centred residential aged care units were characterized by having a shared philosophy of care, a satisfactory leadership, interdisciplinary collaboration and social support from colleagues and leaders, a dementia-friendly physical environment, staff having time to spend with residents, and a smaller unit size. Residential aged care units with higher levels of person-centred care had a higher proportion of staff with continuing education in dementia care, and a higher proportion of staff receiving regular supervision, compared to units with lower levels of person-centred care. It is important to target organisational and environmental factors, such as a shared philosophy of care, staff use of time, the physical environment, interdisciplinary support, and support from leaders and colleagues, to improve person-centred care in residential care units. Managers and leaders seeking to facilitate person-centred care in daily practice need to consider their own role in supporting, encouraging, and supervising staff.

  11. Sports Business Unit Meets Cross-Curricular Learning Goals: Grades 9-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    A new online learning tool called the eCommSports Kit links a seven-step sports marketing curriculum with a school team to give students real-life experience in developing and executing a plan to boost game attendance. The kit, available through http://www.ecommsports.com, takes teens on a cross-curricular journey through conducting business…

  12. Cross-cultural similarities and differences in person-body reasoning: experimental evidence from the United Kingdom and Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emma; Burdett, Emily; Knight, Nicola; Barrett, Justin

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a cross-cultural investigation of person-body reasoning in the United Kingdom and northern Brazilian Amazon (Marajó Island). The study provides evidence that directly bears upon divergent theoretical claims in cognitive psychology and anthropology, respectively, on the cognitive origins and cross-cultural incidence of mind-body dualism. In a novel reasoning task, we found that participants across the two sample populations parsed a wide range of capacities similarly in terms of the capacities' perceived anchoring to bodily function. Patterns of reasoning concerning the respective roles of physical and biological properties in sustaining various capacities did vary between sample populations, however. Further, the data challenge prior ad-hoc categorizations in the empirical literature on the developmental origins of and cognitive constraints on psycho-physical reasoning (e.g., in afterlife concepts). We suggest cross-culturally validated categories of "Body Dependent" and "Body Independent" items for future developmental and cross-cultural research in this emerging area. Copyright © 2011 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  13. Cross-cultural temperamental differences in infants, children, and adults in the United States of America and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaias, Larissa M; Räikkönen, Katri; Komsi, Niina; Gartstein, Maria A; Fisher, Philip A; Putnam, Samuel P

    2012-04-01

    Cross-cultural differences in temperament were investigated between infants (n = 131, 84 Finns), children (n = 653, 427 Finns), and adults (n = 759, 538 Finns) from the United States of America and Finland. Participants from both cultures completed the Infant Behavior Questionnaire, Childhood Behavior Questionnaire and the Adult Temperament Questionnaire. Across all ages, Americans received higher ratings on temperamental fearfulness than Finnish individuals, and also demonstrated higher levels of other negative affects at several time points. During infancy and adulthood, Finns tended to score higher on positive affect and elements of temperamental effortful control. Gender differences consistent with prior studies emerged cross-culturally, and were found to be more pronounced in the US during childhood and in Finland during adulthood. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2012 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  14. Cross-cultural Temperamental Differences in Infants, Children, and Adults in the United States of America and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaias, Larissa M.; Gartstein, Maria A.; Fisher, Philip A.; Putnam, Samuel P.; Räikkönen, Katri; Komsi, Niina

    2012-01-01

    Cross-cultural differences in temperament were investigated between infants (n = 131, 84 Finns), children (n = 653, 427 Finns), and adults (n = 759, 538 Finns) from the United States of America and Finland. Participants from both cultures completed the Infant Behavior Questionnaire, Childhood Behavior Questionnaire, and the Adult Temperament Questionnaire. Across all ages, Americans received higher ratings on temperamental fearfulness than Finnish individuals, and also demonstrated higher levels of other negative affects at several time points. During infancy and adulthood, Finns tended to score higher on positive affect and elements of temperamental effortful control. Gender differences consistent with prior studies emerged cross-culturally, and were found to be more pronounced in the U.S. during childhood and in Finland during adulthood. PMID:22428997

  15. Are cultures becoming individualistic? A cross-temporal comparison of individualism-collectivism in the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Takeshi

    2012-02-01

    Individualism-collectivism is one of the best researched dimensions of culture in psychology. One frequently asked but underexamined question regards its cross-temporal changes: Are cultures becoming individualistic? One influential theory of cultural change, modernization theory, predicts the rise of individualism as a consequence of economic growth. Findings from past research are generally consistent with this theory, but there is also a body of evidence suggesting its limitations. To examine these issues, cross-temporal analyses of individualism-collectivism in the United States and Japan were conducted. Diverging patterns of cultural changes were found across indices: In both countries, some of the obtained indices showed rising individualism over the past several decades, supporting the modernization theory. However, other indices showed patterns that are best understood within the frameworks of a shifting focus of social relationships and a persisting cultural heritage. A comprehensive theory of cultural change requires considerations of these factors in addition to the modernization effect.

  16. Indirect Transportation Cost in the border crossing process: The United States–Mexico trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Obed Figueroa Ortiz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a Social Accounting Matrix as database, a Computable General Equilibrium model is implemented in order to estimate the Indirect Transportations Costs (ITC present in the border crossing for the U.S.–Mexico bilateral trade. Here, an “iceberg–type” transportation function is assumed to determine the amount of loss that must be faced as a result of border crossing process through the ports of entry existing between the two countries. The study period covers annual data from 1995 to 2009 allowing the analysis of the trend of these costs considering the trade liberalisation that is experienced. Results show that the ITC have experienced a decrease of 12% during the period.Test

  17. Cross-connected onsite emergency A.C. power supplies for multi-unit nuclear power plant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martore, J.A.; Voss, J.D.; Duncil, B.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, utility management, both at the corporate and plant operations levels, have reinforced their commitment to assuring increased plant reliability and availability. One means of achieving this objective involves an effective preventive maintenance program with technical specifications which allow implementation of certain preventive maintenance without plant shutdown. To accomplish this, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has proposed a design change for San Onofre nuclear generating station (SONGS) units 2 and 3 to permit on emergency diesel generator for one unit to perform as an available AC power source for both units. Technical specifications for SCE's SONGS units 2 and 3, as at most nuclear power plants, currently require plant shutdown should one of the two dedicated onsite emergency AC power sources (diesel generators) become inoperable for more than 72 hours. This duration hinders root cause failure analysis, tends to limit the flexibility of preventive maintenance and precludes plant operation in the event of component failure. Therefore, this proposed diesel generator cross-connect design change offers an innovative means for averting plant shutdown should a single diesel generator become inoperable for longer than 72 hours. (orig./GL)

  18. International migration patterns of physicians to the United States: a cross-national panel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Peter S

    2007-12-01

    To analyze the dynamics of physician international migration patterns and identify the countries deviating most from expected migration rates. A negative binomial log-linear model of physician migration to the United States from every other country was constructed using a panel of country-level data for years 1994-2000. The model was used to identify factors associated with physician migration and to identify countries with higher or lower rates of physician migration than expected. Physician migration varied with a country's GDP per capita in an inverse-U pattern, with highest migration rates from middle-income countries. The absence of medical schools, immigrant networks in the United States, medical instruction in English, proximity to the United States, and the lack of political and civil liberties were also associated with higher migration rates. Countries with higher-than-predicted migration rates included Iceland, Albania, Armenia, Dominica, Lebanon, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, and Bulgaria. Countries with lower-than-predicted migration rates included Mexico, Japan, Brazil, Zimbabwe, Mauritania, Portugal, Senegal, and France. This analysis shows that many of the most powerful factors associated with physician migration are difficult or impossible for countries to change through public policy. GDP per capita and proximity to the U.S. are two of the most powerful predictors of physician migration. Networks of immigrants in the U.S. and fewer political and civil liberties also put countries at higher risk for physician emigration. Several other factors that were associated with physician migration might be more easily amenable to policy intervention. These factors include the absence of a medical school and medical instruction in English. Policies addressing these factors would involve making several difficult tradeoffs, however. Other examples of policies that are effective in minimizing physician migration might be found by examining countries with lower

  19. Social representation of hearing aids: cross-cultural study in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Danermark, Berth; Vinay; Ahmadi, Tayebeh; Tomé, David; Krishna, Rajalakshmi; Germundsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background The current study was aimed at understanding the social representation of hearing aids in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. We also compared these results to explore the cross-cultural differences and similarities among these countries. Methods The study involved a cross-sectional design, and the data were collected from four different countries using the snowball sampling method. Data were analyzed using a content analysis to identify the most-similar categories of responses reported, a co-occurrences analysis to see which of these categories are reported commonly, and a chi-square analysis to study if there was any association between positive, neutral, and negative connotations among participants in different countries. Results The current study revealed four different social representations of hearing aids from India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom, and also a global index. Conclusion The study results provide very useful insights into how hearing aids are represented in the society. These findings may have important implications for public education and also for manufacturers from the viewpoint of designing and marketing hearing aids in different countries. PMID:26504376

  20. Social representation of hearing aids: cross-cultural study in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchaiah V

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vinaya Manchaiah,1 Berth Danermark,2 Vinay,3 Tayebeh Ahmadi,4 David Tomé,5 Rajalakshmi Krishna,6 Per Germundsson7 1Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas, USA; 2Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 3Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 4Department of Audiology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Audiology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal; 6All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, University of Mysore, Mysore, India; 7The Department of Health and Welfare Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden Background: The current study was aimed at understanding the social representation of hearing aids in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. We also compared these results to explore the cross-cultural differences and similarities among these countries. Methods: The study involved a cross-sectional design, and the data were collected from four different countries using the snowball sampling method. Data were analyzed using a content analysis to identify the most-similar categories of responses reported, a co-occurrences analysis to see which of these categories are reported commonly, and a chi-square analysis to study if there was any association between positive, neutral, and negative connotations among participants in different countries. Results: The current study revealed four different social representations of hearing aids from India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom, and also a global index. Conclusion: The study results provide very useful insights into how hearing aids are represented in the society. These findings may have important implications for public education and also for manufacturers from the viewpoint of designing and marketing hearing aids in different countries. Keywords: hearing aids

  1. Children's health retention in South Korea and the United States: a cross-cultural comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Betsy M; Chang, Nahn Joo; Choi, Sang Soon

    2003-12-01

    In recent decades, great strides have been made globally in decreasing child mortality. However, given that many countries still do not have basic healthcare, additional emphasis is being placed on health promotion activities among industrialized nations. As cultural differences of individual countries impact these health promotion practices, the cultural characteristics influencing children and families in two countries, South Korea and the United States, were compared. Major child health risk factors were examined, and health retention strategies tailored to the cultural characteristics and needs of the populations of each country are proposed, using the Neuman Systems Model as a guideline.

  2. Surgical Procedures of the Elbow: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Observational Study in the United States

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    Ahmet Kinaci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Elbow surgery is shared by several subspecialties. We were curious about the most common elbow surgeries and their corresponding diagnoses in the United States.   Methods:  We used the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS and the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery (NSAS data gathered in 2006-databases that together provide an estimate of all inpatient and ambulatory surgical care in the US.  Results:  An estimated 150,000 elbow surgeries were performed in the US in 2006, 75% in an outpatient setting. The most frequent diagnosis treated operative was enthesopathy (e.g. lateral epicondylitis and it was treated with several different procedures. More than three quarters of all elbow surgeries treated enthesopathy, cubital tunnel syndrome, or fracture (radial head in particular. Arthroscopy and arthroplasty accounted for less than 10% of all elbow surgeries.  Conclusions:  Elbow surgery in the United States primarily addresses enthesopathies such as tennis elbow, cubital tunnel syndrome, and trauma. It is notable that some of the most common elbow surgeries (those that address enthesopathy and radial head fracture are some of the most variably utilized and debated.

  3. Nurse managers' decision-making in daily unit operation in peri-operative settings: a cross-sectional descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siirala, Eriikka; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Junttila, Kristiina

    2016-09-01

    To describe the tactical and the operational decisions made by nurse managers when managing the daily unit operation in peri-operative settings. Management is challenging as situations change rapidly and decisions are constantly made. Understanding decision-making in this complex environment helps to develop decision support systems to support nurse managers' operative and tactical decision-making. Descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were collected from 20 nurse managers with the think-aloud method during the busiest working hours and analysed using thematic content analysis. Nurse managers made over 700 decisions; either ad hoc (n = 289), near future (n = 268) or long-term (n = 187) by nature. Decisions were often made simultaneously with many interruptions. Ad hoc decisions covered staff allocation, ensuring adequate staff, rescheduling surgical procedures, confirmation tangible resources and following-up the daily unit operation. Decisions in the near future were: planning of surgical procedures and tangible resources, and planning staff allocation. Long-term decisions were: human recourses, nursing development, supplies and equipment, and finances in the unit. Decision-making was vulnerable to interruptions, which sometimes complicated the managing tasks. The results can be used when planning decision support systems and when defining the nurse managers' tasks in peri-operative settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Prospective cross-sectional study of tuberculosis screening in United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarzooqi, Farida; Alkhemeiri, Aysha; Aljaberi, Ahmed; Hashmey, Rayhan; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2018-05-01

    Intense migrations from tuberculosis endemic areas to Gulf countries create special risks for people in the region. The purpose of this study was to provide data that could justify implementing universal, regular TB screening in UAE. This prospective, cross-sectional study used interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) to screen for TB among Emirati citizens between August-2016 and May-2017; expatriates were not included in this study. Participants were recruited from Emiratis attending Tawam Hospital Polyclinics for problems unrelated to TB risk assessment. IGRA was requested for all enrolled participants. A risk-assessment questionnaire was completed by all participants. In addition, a retrospective review of IGRA results (January-2011 to April-2016) was conducted to compare prevalence of positive IGRA in the 'prospective sample' with that in 'patients screened in the past'. Four hundred fifty-five participants (69% females) were enrolled in this study. Participants' age (mean±SD) was 42±16y. The majority of participants had traveled to or had helpers from TB-endemic areas. Two hundred forty (53%) participants had IGRA test. Forty-five (18.8%) participants had positive IGRA, similar to the retrospective results of 12.4% to 23.5%. The prevalence of positive-IGRA in this study is high. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. MEASUREMENT OF ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE CUFF PRESSURE IN MECHANICALLYVENTILATED PATIENTS ON ARRIVAL TO INTENSIVE CARE UNIT - A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Ajjappa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The monitoring of Endotracheal Tube (ETT cuff pressure in intubated patients on arrival to intensive care unit is very essential. The cuff pressure must be within an optimal range of 20-30cm H2O ensuring ventilation with no complications related to cuff overinflation and underinflation. This can be measured with a cuff pressure manometer. The aim of the study is to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure in patients on arrival to intensive care unit and to identify prevalence of endotracheal cuff underinflation and overinflation. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was done on mechanically-ventilated patients who were intubated in casualty (emergency department on arrival to intensive care unit in S.S. Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Davangere. About 50 critically-ill patients intubated with a high volume, low pressure endotracheal tube were included in the study. An analogue manometer was used to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure. It was compared with the recommended level. The settings of mechanical ventilation, endotracheal tube size and peak airway pressure were recorded. RESULTS It was found that the mean cuff pressure was 64.10 cm of H2O with a standard deviation of 32.049. Of the measured cuff pressures, only 2% had pressures within an optimal range (20-30cm of H2O. 88% had cuff pressures more than 30cm of H2O. The mean peak airway pressure found to be 20.50cm of H2O with a Standard Deviation (SD of 5.064. CONCLUSION This study is done to emphasise the importance of cuff pressure measurement in all mechanically-ventilated patients as cuff pressure is found to be high in most of the patients admitted to intensive care unit. Complications of overinflation and underinflation can only be prevented if the acceptable cuff pressures are achieved.

  6. Patient safety culture in intensive care units from the perspective of nurses: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Farzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the goals of nursing is providing safe care, prevention of injury, and health promotion of patients. Patient safety in intensive care units is threatened for various reasons. This study aimed to survey patient safety culture from the perspective of nurses in intensive care units. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016. Sampling was done using the convenience method. The sample consisted of 367 nurses working in intensive care units of teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Data collection was performed using a two-part questionnaire that included demographic and hospital survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation. Results: Among the 12 dimensions of safety culture, the nurses assigned the highest score to “team work within units” (97.3% and “Organizational learning-continuous improvement” (84%. They assigned the least score to “handoffs and transitions”(21.1%, “non-punitive response to errors” (24.7%, “Staffing” (35.6%, “Communication openness” (47.5%, and “Teamwork across units” (49.4%. Conclusions: The patient safety culture dimensions have low levels that require adequate attention and essential measures of health care centers including facilitating teamwork, providing adequate staff, and developing a checklist of handoffs and transitions. Furthermore, to increase reporting error and to promote a patient safety culture in intensive care units, some strategies should be adopted including a system-based approach to deal with the error.

  7. Cross-national comparison of socioeconomic inequalities in obesity in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Arjumand; Brown, Rashida; Nguyen, Quynh C; Loopstra, Rachel; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-10-31

    Prior cross-national studies of socioeconomic inequalities in obesity have only compared summary indices of inequality but not specific, policy-relevant dimensions of inequality: (a) shape of the socioeconomic gradient in obesity, (b) magnitude of differentials in obesity across socioeconomic levels and, (c) level of obesity at any given socioeconomic level. We use unique data on two highly comparable societies - U.S. and Canada - to contrast each of these inequality dimensions. Data came from the 2002/2003 Joint Canada/U.S. Survey of Health. We calculated adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) for obesity (compared to normal weight) by income quintile and education group separately for both nations and, between Canadians and Americans in the same income or education group. In the U.S., every socioeconomic group except the college educated had significant excess prevalence of obesity. By contrast in Canada, only those with less than high school were worse off, suggesting that the shape of the socioeconomic gradient differs in the two countries. U.S. differentials between socioeconomic levels were also larger than in Canada (e.g., PR quintile 1 compared to quintile 5 was 1.82 in the U.S. [95 % CI: 1.52-2.19] but 1.45 in Canada [95 % CI: 1.10-1.91]). At the lower end of the socioeconomic gradient, obesity was more prevalent in the U.S. than in Canada. Our results suggest there is variation between U.S. and Canada in different dimensions of socioeconomic inequalities in obesity. Future research should examine a broader set of nations and test whether specific policies or environmental exposures can explain these differences.

  8. Mobile Phone Use in Psychiatry Residents in the United States: Multisite Cross-Sectional Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Shih; Torous, John; Boland, Robert; Conrad, Erich

    2017-11-01

    Mobile technology ownership in the general US population and medical professionals is increasing, leading to increased use in clinical settings. However, data on use of mobile technology by psychiatry residents remain unclear. In this study, our aim was to provide data on how psychiatric residents use mobile phones in their clinical education as well as barriers relating to technology use. An anonymous, multisite survey was given to psychiatry residents in 2 regions in the United States, including New Orleans and Boston, to understand their technology use. All participants owned mobile phones, and 79% (54/68) used them to access patient information. The majority do not use mobile phones to implement pharmacotherapy (62%, 42/68) or psychotherapy plans (90%, 61/68). The top 3 barriers to using mobile technology in clinical care were privacy concerns (56%, 38/68), lack of clinical guidance (40%, 27/68), and lack of evidence (29%, 20/68). We conclude that developing a technology curriculum and engaging in research could address these barriers to using mobile phones in clinical practice. ©Shih Gipson, John Torous, Robert Boland, Erich Conrad. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 01.11.2017.

  9. Cross-cultural validation of Harter's Self-Perception Profile forchildren in the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eapen, V.; Naqvi, A.; Al-Dhaheri, Aisha S.

    2000-01-01

    Harter's Self-Perception Profile for children (SPPC) is a self-reportinginventory for ascertain children's perception of themselves in variousspecific domains of their life, as well as their sense of global self-worth.A few studies have examined the psychometric properties of this instrument inthe Western setting, but none have investigated this in an Arabic culture.Psychometric properties of the SPPC were examined using a sample of 100schoolchildren aged 8 to 16 years in the United Arab Emirates. The internalconsistency reliability was found to be excellent with Chronbach's alpha,ranging from 0.86 to 0.92. Significant age and gender differences were foundwith the internal consistency reliability scores, being higher in childrenaged 13 to 16 years (0.88 to 0.93) when compared to younger children,especially bys aged 8 to 12 years (0.54 to 0.66), suggesting a need toexercise caution while using this scale in young boys in this culture.Behavioral conduct subscale was found to have the highest reliability scoreand the strongest correlation to global self-worth (r=0.54) for both youngerand older children in our sample. This in contract to findings from similarstudies carried out on American and Dutch samples, where this subscale wasfound to have the lowest reliability score and the weakest correlation withone's global self-worth. The findings indicate that the SPPC is a reliableand internally valid instrument for use in the Arab culture. (author)

  10. Work with visual display units and musculoskeletal disorders: A cross-sectional study

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    Matteo Riccò

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological studies have shown that employees working with visual display units (VDU are more likely to complain about musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. The aim of this study has been to evaluate associations among MSDs and individuals and work-related factors. Material and Methods: A total of 1032 VDU workers were assessed about their personal (i.e., age, working history, smoking history, physical activity and work-related factors (i.e., predominant job tasks performed, work posture. Work environment was evaluated regarding fulfillment of the standard ISO 9241-5:1998. The investigation required a direct observation of participants (in order to accurately assess the prevalence of MSDs and workstations. Adjusted odds ratios (ORa were calculated by means of the logistic regression model. Results: Prevalence of MSDs was relatively high (53%. In general, MSDs were significantly associated with female sex (OR = 2.832, 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.178–3.683, age ≥ 50 years old (OR = 2.231, 95% CI: 1.236–4.026, longer exposure to VDU, both as working history (10–14 years: OR = 1.934, 95% CI: 1.301–2.875; ≥ 15 years: OR = 2.223, 95% CI: 1.510–3.271 and working time (30–39 h/week: OR = 1.537, 95% CI: 1.087–2.273. Inappropriate workstation design was confirmed by the multivariate analysis as a risk factor for MSDs (ORa = 2.375, 95% CI: 1.124–5.018. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal disorders were significantly associated with individual factors as well as characteristics of work environment. An appropriate design of workstations may significantly reduce their prevalence amongst VDU workers. Med Pr 2016;67(6:707–719

  11. A cross-sectional study of emergency department boarding practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Stephen R; Vaughns, Frances L; Gautreau, Marc A; Cogdell, Matthew W; Meisel, Zachary

    2014-05-01

    The median emergency department (ED) boarding time for admitted patients has been a nationally reportable core measure that now also affects ED accreditation and reimbursement. However, no direct national probability samples of ED boarding data have been available to guide this policy until now. The authors studied new National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) survey items to establish baseline values, to generate hypotheses for future research, and to help improve survey quality in the future. This was a cross-sectional, multistage, stratified annual analysis of EDs and ED visits from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey public use files from 2007 to 2010, a total of 139,502 visit records. These data represent the only national measure of ED boarding. The main outcome of interest was boarding duration for individual patient visits. Data analyses accounted for complex sampling design. The national median boarding time was 79 minutes, with an interquartile range of 36 to 145 minutes. The prevalence of boarding for more than 2 hours among admitted patients was 32% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 30% to 35%). Average ED volume, occupancy, acuity, and hospital admission rates increased abruptly from the second to the third quartile of median boarding duration. The half of hospitals with the longest median boarding times accounted for 73% of ED visits and 79% of ED hospitalizations nationally. Thirty-nine percent of EDs (95% CI = 32% to 46%) reported never holding patients for more than 2 hours, but visit-level analysis at these EDs found that 21% of admissions did in fact stay in the ED over 2 hours. Only 19% of EDs (95% CI = 16% to 22%) used a strategy of moving admitted patients to alternative sites in the hospital during crowded times. In this national survey, ED boarding of admitted patients disproportionately affects hospitals with higher ED volumes, which also see sicker patients who wait longer to be seen, but not hospitals with

  12. Social Media Use among United Kingdom Vascular Surgeons: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Andrew R; McDonald, James J; Brady, Richard R W

    2016-05-01

    Engagement with social media (SM) is increasing within the general population and medical professionals. Overall, SM engagement is divided between closed, private networks and open, public platforms, such as LinkedIn and Twitter. As engagement with SM is known to vary between specialties, this study was undertaken to evaluate the uptake of SM among vascular surgeons and to describe user demographics associated with SM engagement. Vascular surgeons were identified from the 2013 Vascular Society of Great Britain and Ireland Quality Improvement Project and cross-referenced with the General Medical Council registry. Identified individual surgeons were manually searched for on common SM platforms and via Google to identify both SM profiles and personal/partnership practice websites. In total, 472 surgeons (442 men, 93.6%) from 112 National Health Service Trusts were identified. Three hundred forty (63.7%) graduated from UK universities with a mean graduating year of 1987 (range 1969-2000). Cumulatively, they performed 36,300 procedures (mean 72/surgeon; range 3-257). Overall, SM engagement was 47.4%; 217 (46.0%) had LinkedIn accounts and 23 (4.8%) had Twitter profiles. LinkedIn users had a mean of 69 connections (range 0-500+) and had a mean graduating year of 1988 (range 1969-2000). Twitter users had a mean of 258 followers (range 2-2424) and had tweeted a mean of 450 times (range 0-2865); they graduated more recently than their non-Twitter engaged colleagues (mean graduation 1991 vs. 1987, P = 0.006). Overall, SM usage was associated with a more recent graduation (P = 0.038) and with working in the private sector (21.4% vs. 13.7%, P = 0.029). There were demographic differences between those who had LinkedIn and Twitter accounts. Twitter and LinkedIn engagement among vascular surgeons is higher than that of other surgical specialties. There is a significant link between the experience of the surgeon and with SM use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Evolving impact of environmental laws on cross-border power between Mexico and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barron, J.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a growing concern among some United States (US) residents that the increasing number of merchant power plants planned for the Mexican side of the US/Mexican border could contribute to increased air pollution and the misuse of finite water resources in the border region. The case of Border Power Plant Working Group v. DOE, et al. is examined in this paper, providing a focus for a discussion of the border region's future as US merchant power producers continue to position themselves to provide electricity in California. One of the factors in the push to develop power generation on the Mexican side of the border was California's electricity crisis of 2000-2001, and plans have been drawn up to build 22 plants between Mexicali and Ciudad Juarez. A history of the Border Power Plant Working Group (BPPWG) was presented, along with details of the government's granting of permits for the power plants after environmental assessments. By suing the government BPPWG hoped to set a standard for future power plant development in the area. The lawsuit addressed the following 4 primary concerns: air emissions; emission offsets; water cooling; and wastewater discharge. BPPWG aimed to achieve the 3 following results: protective legislation in the 4 U.S. border states that would preclude the use of massive amounts of water in border power plant cooling systems; a critical area designation with pollution limits set low enough to require catalytic control systems; and an overarching annex to the La Paz Agreement that would create a formal bi-national agreement governing the above actions for both countries. A review of environmental law in both countries was presented, along with a description of the proposed plants. A complete review of the lawsuit was provided, along with eventual rulings against the BPPWG. It was concluded that the case showed that power developers had proved that although the plants would contribute to the environmental degradation of the region, the

  14. Electronic gaming machines and gambling disorder: a cross-cultural comparison between Brazil and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Gustavo Costa; Leppink, Eric W.; Yaemi, Ana; Mariani, Mirella; Tavares, Hermano; Grant, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The objective of this paper is to perform a cross-cultural comparison of gambling disorder (GD) due to electronic gaming machines (EGM), a form of gambling that may have a high addictive potential. Our goal is to investigate two treatment-seeking samples of adults collected in Brazil and the United States, countries with different socio-cultural backgrounds. This comparison may lead to a better understanding of cultural influences on GD. Methods The total studied sample involved 733 treatment-seeking subjects: 353 men and 380 women (average age = 45.80, standard deviation ±10.9). The Brazilian sample had 517 individuals and the American sample 216. Subjects were recruited by analogous strategies. Results We found that the Brazilian sample was younger, predominantly male, less likely to be Caucasian, more likely to be partnered, had a faster progression from recreational gambling to GD, and were more likely to endorse chasing losses. Conclusion This study demonstrated that there are significant differences between treatment-seeking samples of adults presenting GD due to EGM in Brazil and in the United States. These findings suggest that cultural aspects may have a relevant role in GD due to EGM. PMID:26474662

  15. The occurrence of adverse events potentially attributable to nursing care in medical units: cross sectional record review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Tchouaket, Eric; Clarke, Sean; Blais, Régis

    2014-06-01

    Ensuring the safety of hospitalized patients remains a major challenge for healthcare systems, and nursing services are at the center of hospital care. Yet our knowledge about safety of nursing care is quite limited. In fact, most earlier studies examined one, or at most two, indicators, thus presenting an incomplete picture of safety at an institutional or broader level. Furthermore, methodologies have differed from one study to another, making benchmarking difficult. The aim of this study was to describe the frequencies of six adverse events widely considered in the literature to be nursing-sensitive outcomes and to estimate the degree to which these events could be attributed to nursing care. Cross-sectional review of charts of 2699 patients hospitalized on 22 medical units in 11 hospitals in Quebec, Canada. The events included: pressure sores, falls, medication administration errors, pneumonias, urinary infections, and inappropriate use of restraints. Experienced nurse reviewers abstracted patients' charts based on a grid developed for the study. Patient-level risk for at least one of these six adverse events was 15.3%, ranging from 9% to 28% across units. Of the 412 patients who experienced an event, 30% experienced two or more, for a total of 568 events. The risk of experiencing an adverse event with consequences was 6.2%, with a unit-level range from 3.2% to 13.5%. Abstractors concluded that 76.8% of the events were attributable to nursing care. While the measurement approach adopted here has limitations stemming from reliance on review of documentation, it provided a practical means of assessing several nursing-sensitive adverse events simultaneously. Given that patient safety issues are so complex, tracking their prevalence and impact is important, as is finding means of evaluating progress in reducing them. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The reversal of fortunes: trends in county mortality and cross-county mortality disparities in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ezzati

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Counties are the smallest unit for which mortality data are routinely available, allowing consistent and comparable long-term analysis of trends in health disparities. Average life expectancy has steadily increased in the United States but there is limited information on long-term mortality trends in the US counties This study aimed to investigate trends in county mortality and cross-county mortality disparities, including the contributions of specific diseases to county level mortality trends.We used mortality statistics (from the National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS] and population (from the US Census to estimate sex-specific life expectancy for US counties for every year between 1961 and 1999. Data for analyses in subsequent years were not provided to us by the NCHS. We calculated different metrics of cross-county mortality disparity, and also grouped counties on the basis of whether their mortality changed favorably or unfavorably relative to the national average. We estimated the probability of death from specific diseases for counties with above- or below-average mortality performance. We simulated the effect of cross-county migration on each county's life expectancy using a time-based simulation model. Between 1961 and 1999, the standard deviation (SD of life expectancy across US counties was at its lowest in 1983, at 1.9 and 1.4 y for men and women, respectively. Cross-county life expectancy SD increased to 2.3 and 1.7 y in 1999. Between 1961 and 1983 no counties had a statistically significant increase in mortality; the major cause of mortality decline for both sexes was reduction in cardiovascular mortality. From 1983 to 1999, life expectancy declined significantly in 11 counties for men (by 1.3 y and in 180 counties for women (by 1.3 y; another 48 (men and 783 (women counties had nonsignificant life expectancy decline. Life expectancy decline in both sexes was caused by increased mortality from lung cancer, chronic obstructive

  17. Anxiety- and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Patients With Breast Cancer: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of China and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Jin You; Qian Lu; Michael J. Zvolensky; Zhiqiang Meng; Kay Garcia; Lorenzo Cohen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Literature has documented the prevalence of anxiety and its adverse effect on quality of life among patients with breast cancer from Western countries, yet cross-cultural examinations with non-Western patients are rare. This cross-cultural study investigated differences in anxiety and its association with quality of life between US and Chinese patients with breast cancer. Methods: Patients with breast cancer from the United States and China completed measures for anxiety (Spielberger...

  18. A cross-cultural study of gambling disorder: a comparison between women from Brazil and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo C. Medeiros

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To perform a cross-cultural comparison of gambling disorder (GD in women from Brazil and the United States, two countries with pronounced social and cultural differences. We hoped to produce insight into the impact of cultural influences on the presentation of GD in women, which may be useful for the development of culturally-sensitive interventions. Method: We assessed 681 women with GD: 406 from a Brazilian sample and 275 from a U.S. sample. We assessed demographic and gambling behavior variables in addition to co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Results: Fewer Brazilian participants were Caucasian (73.3 vs. 91.3%; p = 0.022. Also, Brazilian women had lower levels of education (59.9% with high school or less vs. 44.4%; p < 0.001, and were more likely to have a current partner (54.9 vs. 43.4%; p = 0.003. Brazilian gamblers also reported lower urge scores (6.6±4.3 vs. 11.6±2.4; p < 0.001 and higher chasing rates (89.1 vs. 80.0%; p = 0.002. Brazilian gamblers reported higher rates of bingo gambling (19.2 vs. 5.7%; p < 0.001, but lower rates of card game gambling (5.8 vs. 23.1%; p < 0.001. Finally, Brazilian gamblers were more likely to endorse a history of major depressive disorder (36.9 vs. 24.4%; p = 0.001. Conclusions: This study reinforces the need for further general cross-cultural research on GD and particularly for studies investigating how gender mediates these differences. Finally, the differences noted in this analysis suggest that the findings of predominantly Anglo-Saxon cultures may not be generalizable to other world populations.

  19. Frailty in community-dwelling older people in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Jaber Al-Kuwaiti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFrailty describes the ageing-associated loss of physiological and psychological reserves leading to an increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Many developed countries view frailty as a major priority for their health and social care systems. Less is known about frailty in less-developed countries. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of frailty in a sample of community dwelling older people in the United Arab Emirates.MethodsThis was a cross sectional study of community dwelling Emirati adults aged 55 years and older (n=160 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Data was collected at interview by questionnaire and physical measurements. Frailty was defined according to the criteria of the Fried Frailty Index. The prevalence of frailty and its association with selected independent variables was assessed.ResultsThe overall prevalence of frailty (95% CI was 47% (39-55. Higher levels of frailty were seen in older age groups, women, those who were non-married, those with recent hospital admission, those with co-morbid conditions, those on more than five medications and those with lower forced expiratory volume and mini-mental state examination score. After adjustment in a multiple logistic regression model only age and gender were found to be independently associated with frailty.ConclusionA high prevalence of frailty was found amongst older Emiratis. Given that frailty is associated with adverse health outcomes and can be a means of identifying opportunities for intervention in clinical practice and health policy, further attention and consideration within professional and public health policy circles is needed.

  20. Korean Social Studies Preservice Teachers' Cross-Cultural Learning and Global Perspective Development: Crossing Borders between Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonjung; Choi, Minsik

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cross-cultural learning experiences on Korean preservice social studies teachers' global perspectives development. Social studies preservice teachers in a large woman's university in Korea participated in a cross-cultural learning course, which focused on critical understanding of globalization and global…

  1. Cross-Sectional Multi-Center Study of Patients with Urea Cycle Disorders in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Mendel; Lee, Brendan; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Summar, Marshall L.; Yudkoff, Marc; Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Diaz, George A.; Seashore, Margaretta R.; Lee, Hye-Seung; McCarter, Robert J.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Batshaw, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Inherited urea cycle disorders comprise eight disorders (UCD), each caused by a deficiency of one of the protein that is essential for ureagenesis. We report on a cross sectional investigation to determine clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with UCD in the United States. The data used for the analysis was collected at the time of enrollment of individuals with inherited UCD into a longitudinal observation study. The study has been conducted by the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) within the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) funded by the National Institutes of Health. One hundred eighty three patients were enrolled into the study. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency was the most frequent disorder (55%), followed by argininosuccinic aciduria (17%) and citrullinemia (11%). 79% of the participants were white (16% Latinos), and 6% were African American. Intellectual and developmental disabilities were reported in 39% with learning disabilities (35%) and half had abnormal neurological examination. 63% were on a protein restricted diet, 37% were on Na-phenylbutyrate and 5% were on Na-benzoate. 45% of OTC deficient patients were on L-citrulline, while most patients with citrullinemia (58%) and argininosuccinic (79%) were on L-arginine. Plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids were reduced in patients treated with ammonia scavenger drugs. Plasma glutamine levels were higher in proximal UCD disorders and in the neonatal type disease. The RDCRN allows comprehensive analyses of rare inherited UCD, their frequencies and current medical practices. PMID:18562231

  2. A cross-cultural clinical comparison between subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder from the United States and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Gustavo C; Torres, Albina R; Boisseau, Christina L; Leppink, Eric W; Eisen, Jane L; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; do Rosário, Maria C; Mancebo, Maria C; Rasmussen, Steven A; Ferrão, Ygor A; Grant, Jon E

    2017-08-01

    Although OCD is a global problem, the literature comparing, in a direct and standardized way, the manifestations across countries is scarce. Therefore, questions remain as to whether some important clinical findings are replicable worldwide, especially in the developing world. The objective of this study was to perform a clinical comparison of OCD patients recruited in the United States (U.S.) and Brazil. Our sample consisted of 1187 adult, treatment-seeking OCD outpatients from the U.S. (n=236) and Brazil (n=951). With regards to the demographics, U.S. participants with OCD were older, more likely to identify as Caucasian, had achieved a higher educational level, and were less likely to be partnered when compared to Brazilians. Concerning the clinical variables, after controlling for demographics the two samples presented largely similar profiles. Brazilian participants with OCD, however, endorsed significantly greater rates of generalized anxiety disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, whereas U.S. subjects were significantly more likely to endorse a lifetime history of addiction (alcohol-use and substance-use disorders). This is the largest direct cross-cultural comparison to date in the OCD field. Our results provide much needed insight regarding the development of culture-sensitive treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychological effects of (non)employment: A cross-national comparison of the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnambs, Timo; Stiglbauer, Barbara; Selenko, Eva

    2015-12-01

    The involuntary loss of employment has been shown to deteriorate subjective well-being. Adopting a cross-cultural perspective on Jahoda's (1982) deprivation model this study examines several latent and manifest benefits of work that were expected to mediate the effects of employment status on well-being. It was hypothesized that in more collectivistic societies the decline in subjective well-being would be a consequence of a diminished sense of collective purpose for the non-employed, whereas in individualistic societies the crucial factors would be a loss of social status and financial benefits. The findings from two representative national surveys conducted in the United States (N = 1,093) and Japan (N = 647) provided partial support for these hypotheses. Cultural differences moderated the effects of employment status on the benefits of work. As a consequence, different processes mediated the decline in well-being for the non-employed in the two countries. These results are embedded within the wider discourse on culture and its effect on unemployment. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Coping behavior and risk and resilience stress factors in French regional emergency medicine unit workers: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, A I; Sturzu, L M; Picard, J P; Druot, F; Grama, F; Bobirnac, G

    2016-01-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) has the highest workload in a hospital, offering care to patients in their most acute state of illness, as well as comforting their families and tending to stressful situations of the physical and psychological areal. Method. A cross-sectional survey of 366 Emergency Unit staff members including medical doctors, medical residents, medical nurses and ward aids, was undergone. Study participants came from four periphery hospitals in the Moselle Department of Eastern France with similar workforce and daily patient loads statistics. The instruments used were the Perceived Stress Scale PSS-10 and the Brief COPE questionnaire. Conclusions. Perceived work overload and overall stress is strongly related to work hours and tend to have a stronger influence on doctors than on the nursing staff. Substance use is a common coping method for medical interns, consistent with prior research. The regular assessment of the ED staff perception of stress and stress related factors is essential to support organizational decisions in order to promote a better work environment and better patient care.

  5. Breast cancer screening awareness, knowledge, and practice among arab women in the United Arab Emirates: a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusra E Elobaid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer screening can reduce morbidity and mortality and improve the survival rate for this malignancy. Low participation in screening programs has been attributable to many factors including lack of knowledge. The aim of this study was to assess breast cancer screening knowledge, attitudes and practices among women of screening age (≥40 years old in the city of Al Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 using the Breast Cancer Awareness Measure (CAM. Four out of twelve cultural and religious community centers in Al Ain city were randomly selected. Two hundred and forty seven women were interviewed. Chi Square test and regression analysis were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Despite the increase in the uptake of screening modalities in our study group, a lack of knowledge about breast cancer screening is still evident. Almost half (44.8% of women who never had a Clinical Breast Exam (CBE and 44.1% of women who never had a mammography expressed a lack of knowledge about the existence of these screening techniques. Nearly one third of the participants interpreted the presence of a breast lump incorrectly and, moreover, expressed fewer worries about the nature of the lump than would normally be expected. CONCLUSIONS: The National screening program needs to be improved and directed towards more efficient and targeted utilization of resources. Healthcare professionals play a major role in alerting women to the importance of periodic screening.

  6. Systemic risk score evaluation in ischemic stroke patients (SCALA): a prospective cross sectional study in 85 German stroke units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, Christian; Goertler, Michael; Röther, Joachim; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Darius, Harald; Nabavi, Darius Günther; Kim, In-Ha; Theobald, Karlheinz; Diener, Han-Christoph

    2007-11-01

    Stratification of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke (IS) by risk of recurrent stroke can contribute to optimized secondary prevention. We therefore aimed to assess cardiovascular risk factor profiles of consecutive patients hospitalized with TIA/IS to stratify the risk of recurrent stroke according to the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) and of future cardiovascular events according to the ankle brachial index (ABI) as a marker of generalized atherosclerosis In this cross-sectional observational study, 85 neurological stroke units throughout Germany documented cardiovascular risk factor profiles of 10 consecutive TIA/IS patients on standardized questionnaires. Screening for PAD was done with Doppler ultrasonography to calculate the ABI. A total of 852 patients (57% men) with a mean age of 67+/-12.4 years were included of whom 82.9 % had IS. The median National Institutes of Health stroke sum score was 4 (TIA: 1). Arterial hypertension was reported in 71%, diabetes mellitus in 26%, clinical PAD in 10%, and an ABI or = 3 was observed in 58%, which in two previous retrospective analyses corresponded to a recurrent stroke risk of > or = 4%/year. The correlation between the ESRS and the ABI was low (r = 0.21). A high proportion of patients had asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease and a considerable risk of recurrent stroke according to the ABI and ESRS category. The prognostic accuracy as well as the potential benefit of various risk stratification scores in secondary stroke prevention require validation in a larger prospective study.

  7. 36 CFR 212.8 - Permission to cross lands and easements owned by the United States and administered by the Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permission to cross lands and easements owned by the United States and administered by the Forest Service. 212.8 Section 212.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of...

  8. Cross-validation of the Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning Scale in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald H. Lein

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The purpose of this study was to cross-validate the factor structure of the previously developed Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning (TBL Scale among students in an entry-level doctor of physical therapy (DPT program in the United States. Methods Toward the end of the semester in 2 patient/client management courses taught using TBL, 115 DPT students completed the Student Perceptions of TBL Scale, with a response rate of 87%. Principal component analysis (PCA and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA were conducted to replicate and confirm the underlying factor structure of the scale. Results Based on the PCA for the validation sample, the original 2-factor structure (preference for TBL and preference for teamwork of the Student Perceptions of TBL Scale was replicated. The overall goodness-of-fit indices from the CFA suggested that the original 2-factor structure for the 15 items of the scale demonstrated a good model fit (comparative fit index, 0.95; non-normed fit index/Tucker-Lewis index, 0.93; root mean square error of approximation, 0.06; and standardized root mean square residual, 0.07. The 2 factors demonstrated high internal consistency (alpha= 0.83 and 0.88, respectively. DPT students taught using TBL viewed the factor of preference for teamwork more favorably than preference for TBL. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence supporting the replicability of the internal structure of the Student Perceptions of TBL Scale when assessing perceptions of TBL among DPT students in patient/client management courses.

  9. Structured expert elicitation about Listeria monocytogenes cross-contamination in the environment of retail deli operations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelzer, Karin; Oliver, Haley F; Kohl, Larry R; Hollingsworth, Jill; Wells, Martin T; Wiedmann, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is among the foodborne pathogens with the highest death toll in the United States. Ready-to-eat foods contaminated at retail are an important source of infection. Environmental sites in retail deli operations can be contaminated. However, commonly contaminated sites are unlikely to come into direct contact with food and the public health relevance of environmental contamination has remained unclear. To identify environmental sites that may pose a considerable cross-contamination risk, to elucidate potential transmission pathways, and to identify knowledge gaps, we performed a structured expert elicitation of 41 experts from state regulatory agencies and the food retail industry with practical experience in retail deli operations. Following the "Delphi" method, the elicitation was performed in three consecutive steps: questionnaire, review and discussion of results, second questionnaire. Hands and gloves were identified as important potential contamination sources. However, bacterial transfers to and from hands or gloves represented a major data gap. Experts agreed about transfer probabilities from cutting boards, scales, deli cases, and deli preparation sinks to product, and about transfer probabilities from floor drains, walk-in cooler floors, and knife racks to food contact surfaces. Comparison of experts' opinions to observational data revealed a tendency among experts with certain demographic characteristics and professional opinions to overestimate prevalence. Experts' votes clearly clustered into separate groups not defined by place of employment, even though industry experts may have been somewhat overrepresented in one cluster. Overall, our study demonstrates the value and caveats of expert elicitation to identify data gaps and prioritize research efforts. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. A Cross-National Comparison of Risk Factors for Teen Dating Violence in Mexico and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludin, Samantha; Bottiani, Jessika H; Debnam, Katrina; Solis, Mercedes Gabriela Orozco; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2018-03-01

    Involvement in dating violence has been linked with negative health outcomes including depressive symptomology, substance use, and later expressions of aggressing and victimizing behaviors. Less is known about the prevalence and mental health correlates of teen dating violence in countries like Mexico where adult partner violence is high. Additional research on teen dating violence is also needed, as it may be an important precursor to adult partner violence and linked to other mental health problems. The current study used self-report ratings to assess the similarities and differences in risk factors associated with dating violence among middle school students in Mexico and the United States. The US sample (N us  = 15,099; M us  = 12.8; 49.5% female) included non-Hispanic Caucasian (24.9%), Hispanic American (20.3%), and African American (24.2%) adolescents. The Mexican sample (N Mexico  = 2211; M Mexico  = 13.67; 51% female) included 93.1% adolescents of Hispanic or Latin descent. Logistic regressions showed that dating violence victimization was reported at similar rates in the cross-national samples, though exposure to risk factors like deviant peers and substance use differed significantly by country. Our analyses indicated that, although the country of residence was not significantly associated with dating violence victimization, the strength of the association between some known risk factors and dating violence victimization varied as a function of nationality, such that there was a significant interaction between country of residence, Mexico or the US, and experiencing internalizing symptoms on experiencing physical dating violence victimization. This study contributes to the growing body of literature on dating violence, both inside and outside the US.

  11. A Cross-National Review of Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Children and Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lee; Bond, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The most thoroughly researched topic in relation to autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) is the evaluation of interventions. Educational psychology in the United Kingdom and Ireland is the most closely allied profession to school psychology in the United States. In considering what is published by and for the profession, it is important to include…

  12. Comparison of intensive care unit medication errors reported to the United States' MedMarx and the United Kingdom's National Reporting and Learning System: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahr, Joyce A; Shore, Andrew D; Harris, Lindsay H; Rogers, Philippa; Panesar, Sukhmeet; Matthew, Linda; Pronovost, Peter J; Cleary, Kevin; Pham, Julius C

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to compare the characteristics of medication errors reported to 2 national error reporting systems by conducting a cross-sectional analysis of errors reported from adult intensive care units to the UK National Reporting and Learning System and the US MedMarx system. Outcome measures were error types, severity of patient harm, stage of medication process, and involved medications. The authors analyzed 2837 UK error reports and 56 368 US reports. Differences were observed between UK and US errors for wrong dose (44% vs 29%), omitted dose (8.6% vs 27%), and stage of medication process (prescribing: 14% vs 49%; administration: 71% vs 42%). Moderate/severe harm or death was reported in 4.9% of UK versus 3.4% of US errors. Gentamicin was cited in 7.4% of the UK versus 0.7% of the US reports (odds ratio = 9.25). There were differences in the types of errors reported and the medications most often involved. These differences warrant further examination.

  13. Early 20th Century Education in the United States: The Role of the Brothers of Holy Cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Philip C.

    2007-01-01

    The French Revolution bears an ironic responsibility for generating works of charity. To counteract the devastating social effects of that late 18th century uprising, numerous religious communities were founded in France, among them the Congregation of Holy Cross. The Congregation of Holy Cross, the founding religious community behind the…

  14. Urban sprawl, obesity, and cancer mortality in the United States: cross-sectional analysis and methodological challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrigan, David; Tatalovich, Zaria; Pickle, Linda W; Ewing, Reid; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2014-01-06

    Urban sprawl has the potential to influence cancer mortality via direct and indirect effects on obesity, access to health services, physical activity, transportation choices and other correlates of sprawl and urbanization. This paper presents a cross-sectional analysis of associations between urban sprawl and cancer mortality in urban and suburban counties of the United States. This ecological analysis was designed to examine whether urban sprawl is associated with total and obesity-related cancer mortality and to what extent these associations differed in different regions of the US. A major focus of our analyses was to adequately account for spatial heterogeneity in mortality. Therefore, we fit a series of regression models, stratified by gender, successively testing for the presence of spatial heterogeneity. Our resulting models included county level variables related to race, smoking, obesity, access to health services, insurance status, socioeconomic position, and broad geographic region as well as a measure of urban sprawl and several interactions. Our most complex models also included random effects to account for any county-level spatial autocorrelation that remained unexplained by these variables. Total cancer mortality rates were higher in less sprawling areas and contrary to our initial hypothesis; this was also true of obesity related cancers in six of seven U.S. regions (census divisions) where there were statistically significant associations between the sprawl index and mortality. We also found significant interactions (p urban sprawl for total and obesity related cancer mortality in both sexes. Thus, the association between urban sprawl and cancer mortality differs in different regions of the US. Despite higher levels of obesity in more sprawling counties in the US, mortality from obesity related cancer was not greater in such counties. Identification of disparities in cancer mortality within and between geographic regions is an ongoing public

  15. Shifting tides in the emigration patterns of Canadian physicians to the United States: a cross-sectional secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Thomas R; Petterson, Stephen; Finnegan, Sean; Bazemore, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The relative ease of movement of physicians across the Canada/US border has led to what is sometimes referred to as a 'brain drain' and previous analysis estimated that the equivalent of two graduating classes from Canadian medical schools were leaving to practice in the US each year. Both countries fill gaps in physician supply with international medical graduates (IMGs) so the movement of Canadian trained physicians to the US has international ramifications. Medical school enrolments have been increased on both sides of the border, yet there continues to be concerns about adequacy of physician human resources. This analysis was undertaken to re-examine the issue of Canadian physician migration to the US. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2015 American Medical Association (AMA) Masterfile to identify and locate any graduates of Canadian schools of medicine (CMGs) working in the United States in direct patient care. We reviewed annual reports of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS); the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry (CAPER); and the Canadian Collaborative Centre for Physician Resources (C3PR). Beginning in the early 1990s the number of CMGs locating in the U.S. reached an all-time high and then abruptly dropped off in 1995. CMGs are going to the US for post-graduate training in smaller numbers and, are less likely to remain than at any time since the 1970's. This four decade retrospective found considerable variation in the migration pattern of CMGs to the US. CMGs' decision to emigrate to the U.S. may be influenced by both 'push' and 'pull' factors. The relative strength of these factors changed and by 2004, more CMGs were returning from abroad than were leaving and the current outflow is negligible. This study supports the need for medical human resource planning to assume a long-term view taking into account national and international trends to avoid the rapid changes that were observed. These results are of importance to medical

  16. Prevalence of Diabetes among Migrant Women and Duration of Residence in the United Arab Emirates: A Cross Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed M; Ali, Raghib; Loney, Tom; Aziz, Faisal; ElBarazi, Iffat; Al Dhaheri, Salma; Farooqi, M Hamed; Blair, Iain

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the highest in United Arab Emirates (UAE), however data for the expatriate population is limited. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of T2DM amongst migrant women and test the hypothesis that acculturation (measured by years of residency) is associated with an increased risk of T2DM. This was a cross-sectional study and we recruited a representative sample (n = 599, 75% participation rate) of migrant women aged 18 years and over in Al Ain, UAE. The American Diabetes Association criteria were used to diagnose T2DM. An adapted WHO STEPS questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic, lifestyle and clinical data. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify correlates of T2DM including length of UAE residence. The mean age of participants was 34.1 (± 9.5) years. Of the study participants, based on HbA1C levels, 18.6% (95% CI: 13.9-24.4) had prediabetes and 10.7% (95% CI: 7.2-15.6) had T2DM. Prevalence of prediabetes was 8.5% for Filipinos, 16.7% for Arabs and 30.3% for South Asians. Similarly the prevalence of T2DM was 1.7% for Filipinos, 12.2% for Arabs and 16.7% for South Asians. Significant correlates of overall T2DM (measured and known diabetes) included length of UAE residence for more than 10 years (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 2.74, 95% CI: 1.21-6.20), age ≥40 years (AOR = 3.48, 95% CI: 1.53-7.87) and South Asian nationality (AOR 2.10, 95% CI: 0.94-4.70). Diabetes is a significant public health problem among migrant women in the UAE, particularly for South Asians. Longer length of residence in the UAE is associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes.

  17. The Portrayal of Older People in Television Advertisements: A Cross-Cultural Content Analysis of the United States and South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungkwan; Kim, Bong-Chul; Han, Sangpil

    2006-01-01

    A cross-cultural content analysis of 2,295 prime-time television ads--859 ads from the United States and 1,436 ads from South Korea--was conducted to examine the differences in the portrayal of older people between U.S. and Korean ads. In two countries, the underrepresentation of older people in ads was found in terms of proportions of the actual…

  18. Nursing unit teams matter: Impact of unit-level nurse practice environment, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, and quality of care, and patient adverse events--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Timmermans, Olaf; Weeks, Susan Mace; van Heusden, Danny; Wouters, Kristien; Franck, Erik

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the impact of nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events variables at the nursing unit level. Nurse practice environment studies show growing insights and knowledge about determining factors for nurse workforce stability, quality of care, and patient safety. Until now, international studies have primarily focused on variability at the hospital level; however, insights at the nursing unit level can reveal key factors in the nurse practice environment. A cross-sectional design with a survey. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 1108 nurses assigned to 96 nursing units completed a structured questionnaire composed of various validated instruments measuring nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout, nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events. Associations between the variables were examined using multilevel modelling techniques. Various unit-level associations (simple models) were identified between nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout dimensions, and nurse reported outcome variables. Multiple multilevel models showed various independent variables such as nursing management at the unit level, social capital, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization as important predictors of nurse reported outcome variables such job satisfaction, turnover intentions, quality of care (at the unit, the last shift, and in the hospital within the last year), patient and family complaints, patient and family verbal abuse, patient falls, nosocomial infections, and medications errors. Results suggested a stable nurse work force, with the capability to achieve superior quality and patient safety outcomes, is associated with unit-level favourable perceptions of nurse work environment factors, workload, decision latitude, and social capital, as well low levels of burnout

  19. The beliefs in the inheritance of risk factors for suicide scale (BIRFSS): cross-cultural validation in Estonia, Malaysia, Romania, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Loibl, Lisa Mariella; Swami, Viren; Vintilă, Mona; Kõlves, Kairi; Sinniah, Dhachayani; Pillai, Subash Kumar; Ponnusamy, Subramaniam; Sonneck, Gernot; Furnham, Adrian; Lester, David

    2008-12-01

    The genetics of suicide is increasingly recognized and relevant for mental health literacy, but actual beliefs may lag behind current knowledge. We examined such beliefs in student samples (total N = 686) from Estonia, Malaysia, Romania, the United Kingdom, and the United States with the Beliefs in the Inheritance of Risk Factors for Suicide Scale. Cultural effects were small, those of key demographics nil. Several facets of construct validity were demonstrated. Marked differences in perceived plausibility of evidence about the genetics of suicide according to research design, observed in all samples, may be of general interest for investigating lay theories of abnormal behavior and communicating behavioral and psychiatric genetic research findings.

  20. A Cross-Country Comparison of Virtual Discussion Board Use in United States and Costa Rican Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Kari; Saxon, Terrill F.; Trumble, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to compare the use of virtual discussion boards in various educational settings in the United States and Costa Rica. Participants included professors of education, in-service and pre-service teachers in the United States and Costa Rica where a survey was used that included demographic, knowledge, attitude, and…

  1. Injury mitigation estimates for an intersection driver assistance system in straight crossing path crashes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, John M; Sherony, Rini; Gabler, Hampton C

    2017-05-29

    Accounting for one fifth of all crashes and one sixth of all fatal crashes in the United States, intersection crashes are among the most frequent and fatal crash modes. Intersection advanced driver assistance systems (I-ADAS) are emerging vehicle-based active safety systems that aim to help drivers safely navigate intersections. The objective of this study was to estimate the number of crashes and number of vehicles with a seriously injured driver (Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale [MAIS] 3+) that could be prevented or reduced if, for every straight crossing path (SCP) intersection crash, one of the vehicles had been equipped with an I-ADAS. This study retrospectively simulated 448 U.S. SCP crashes as if one of the vehicles had been equipped with I-ADAS. Crashes were reconstructed to determine the path and speeds traveled by the vehicles. Cases were then simulated with I-ADAS. A total of 30 variations of I-ADAS were considered in this study. These variations consisted of 5 separate activation timing thresholds, 3 separate computational latency times, and 2 different I-ADAS response modalities (i.e., a warning or autonomous braking). The likelihood of a serious driver injury was computed for every vehicle in every crash using impact delta-V. The results were then compiled across all crashes in order to estimate system effectiveness. The model predicted that an I-ADAS that delivers an alert to the driver has the potential to prevent 0-23% of SCP crashes and 0-25% of vehicles with a seriously injured driver. Conversely, an I-ADAS that autonomously brakes was found to have the potential to prevent 25-59% of crashes and 38-79% of vehicles with a seriously injured driver. I-ADAS effectiveness is a strong function of design. Increasing computational latency time from 0 to 0.5 s was found to reduce crash and injury prevention estimates by approximately one third. For an I-ADAS that delivers an alert, crash/injury prevention effectiveness was found to be very sensitive to

  2. WIMS-IST/DRAGON-IST side-step calculation of reactivity device and structural material incremental cross sections for Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmani, M.; McArthur, R.; Kim, B.G.; Kim, S.M.; Seo, H.-B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the calculation of two-group incremental cross sections for all of the reactivity devices and incore structural materials for an RFSP-IST full-core model of Wolsong NPP Unit 1, in support of the conversion of the reference plant model to two energy groups. This is of particular interest since the calculation used the new standard 'side-step' approach, which is a three-dimensional supercell method that employs the Industry Standard Toolset (IST) codes DRAGON-IST and WIMS-IST with the ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library. In this technique, the macroscopic cross sections for the fuel regions and the device material specifications are first generated using the lattice code WIMS-IST with 89 energy groups. DRAGON-IST then uses this data with a standard supercell modelling approach for the three-dimensional calculations. Incremental cross sections are calculated for the stainless-steel adjuster rods (SS-ADJ), the liquid zone control units (LZCU), the shutoff rods (SOR), the mechanical control absorbers (MCA) and various structural materials, such as guide tubes, springs, locators, brackets, adjuster cables and support bars and the moderator inlet nozzle deflectors. Isotopic compositions of the Zircaloy-2, stainless steel and Inconel X-750 alloys in these items are derived from Wolsong NPP Unit 1 history dockets. Their geometrical layouts are based on applicable design drawings. Mid-burnup fuel with no moderator poison was assumed. The incremental cross sections and key aspects of the modelling are summarized in this paper. (author)

  3. Cross-cultural comparison of need importance and need satisfaction during adolescence: Turkey and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortaçsu, N

    1997-09-01

    Turkish and U.S. adolescents' views concerning the importance of different needs and instrumentality of relationships with mothers, fathers, siblings, and same-sex friends for need satisfaction were examined and compared. Questionnaires covered needs related to crucial issues of adolescence, namely, relatedness and autonomy/individuation. Participants were 12- to 17-year-old boys and girls from intact families. Cross-cultural differences in ascribed importance of needs related to some aspects of relatedness and autonomy/individuation emerged. Cross-cultural similarities in ascribed importance of needs related to feelings of basic acceptance and need for self-understanding/development also emerged. Turkish adolescents perceived mothers as more instrumental for need satisfaction than did U.S. adolescents. Gender differences in importance ascribed to different needs also emerged. Cross-cultural differences were consistent with differences in predominant values and model family dynamics of the respective countries.

  4. Migration from Mexico to the United States and subsequent risk for depressive and anxiety disorders: a cross-national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslau, Joshua; Borges, Guilherme; Tancredi, Daniel; Saito, Naomi; Kravitz, Richard; Hinton, Ladson; Vega, William; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2011-04-01

    Migration is suspected to increase risk for depressive and anxiety disorders. To test the hypothesized increase in risk for depressive and anxiety disorders after arrival in the United States among Mexican migrants. We combined data from surveys conducted separately in Mexico and the United States that used the same diagnostic interview. Discrete time survival models were specified to estimate the relative odds of first onset of depressive disorders (major depressive episode and dysthymia) and anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder) among migrants after their arrival in the United States compared with nonmigrant Mexicans who have a migrant in their immediate family. Population surveys in the United States and Mexico. Two thousand five hundred nineteen nonmigrant family members of migrants in Mexico and 554 Mexican migrants in the United States. First onset of any depressive or anxiety disorder. After arrival in the United States, migrants had a significantly higher risk for first onset of any depressive or anxiety disorder than did nonmigrant family members of migrants in Mexico (odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.94). Associations between migration and disorder varied across birth cohorts. Elevated risk among migrants relative to nonmigrants was restricted to the 2 younger cohorts (those aged 18-25 or 26-35 years at interview). In the most recent birth cohort, the association between migration and first onset of any depressive or anxiety disorder was particularly strong (odds ratio, 3.89; 95% confidence interval, 2.74-5.53). This is, to our knowledge, the first study to compare risk for first onset of psychiatric disorder between representative samples of migrants in the United States and nonmigrants in Mexico. The findings are consistent with the hypothesized adverse effect of migration from Mexico to the United States on the mental health of migrants, but only among

  5. [Cross sectional study of structural quality of German intensive care units. A reevaluation of the DIVI register].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölsch, C; Kofahl, N; Waydhas, C; Stiletto, R

    2013-09-01

    Effectiveness of intensive care treatment is essential to cope with increasing costs. The German national register of intensive care established by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI) contains basic data on the structure of intensive care units in Germany. A repeat analysis of data of the DIVI register within 8 years provides information for the development of intensive care units under different economic circumstances. The recent data on the structure of intensive care units were obtained in 2008 and compared with the primary multicenter study from 2000. The hospitals selected were a representative sample for the whole of Germany. Data on the status of the hospital, staff and technical facilities, foundation of the hospital and the statistics of mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed. The technical facilities and the number of staff have improved from 2000 to 2008. A smaller availability of diagnostic procedures and staff remain in hospitals for basic treatment outside normal working hours. The average utilization of intensive care unit beds was not altered. The existence of intermediate care units did not significantly change the proportion of patients with artificial ventilation or ventilation times. The number of beds in intensive care units was unchanged as was the average number of beds in units and the number of patients treated. A relevant number of beds of intensive care units shifted towards hospitals with private foundation without changes in the overall numbers. The structure of the hospitals was comparable at both time points. The introduction of intermediate care units did not alter ventilation parameters of patients in 2008 compared with 2000. There is no obvious medical reason for the shift of intensive care beds towards private hospitals. The number of staff and patients varied considerably between the intensive care units. The average number of patients treated per bed was not different between the

  6. Studying Cross-Cultural Differences in Temperament in the First Year of Life: United States and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montirosso, Rosario; Cozzi, Patrizia; Putnam, Samuel P.; Gartstein, Maria A.; Borgatti, Renato

    2011-01-01

    An Italian translation of the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised (IBQ-R) was developed and evaluated with 110 infants, demonstrating satisfactory internal consistency, discriminant validity, and construct validity in the form of gender and age differences, as well as factorial integrity. Cross-cultural differences were subsequently evaluated…

  7. Studying cross-cultural differences in temperament in toddlerhood: United States of America (U.S.) and Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Patrizia; Putnam, Samuel P; Menesini, Ersilia; Gartstein, Maria A; Aureli, Tiziana; Calussi, Pamela; Montirosso, Rosario

    2013-06-01

    Cross-cultural differences between matched samples (N=306) of Italian and U.S. toddlers were evaluated. Italian toddlers received higher scores on cuddliness, impulsivity, low intensity pleasure, perceptual sensitivity and positive anticipation, whereas US toddlers were higher on frustration, high-intensity pleasure, inhibitory control, shyness, and soothability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Comparative Cross-Cultural Examination of Community Art Education Programs in South Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ryan; Kim, Junghee

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted comparative cross-cultural research to examine a select group of the available and more noteworthy art education organizations and their programs after observing significant differences in the community art education programs offered in Tucson, Arizona, and Anyang, South Korea. The study reports several major differences…

  9. Cross-Cultural Variations in Identifying Embedded Figures: Comparisons from the United States, Germany, Russia, and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnen, Ulrich; Hannover, Bettina; Roeder, Ute; Shah, Ashiq Ali; Schubert, Benjamin; Upmeyer, Arnold; Zakaria, Saliza

    2001-01-01

    Examined cross-cultural differences in field dependence, hypothesizing differences according to the degree of individualism or collectivism within college students' respective cultures. Data from U.S., German, Russian, and Malaysian students indicated that field dependence did not differ between samples representing similar cultures. U.S. And…

  10. Cross-Cultural Findings on Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing Psychopathology: Comparing Adolescents in the United States, Russia, and Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab-Stone, M.; Koposov, R.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.; Ruchkin, V.

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate cross-cultural differences in the relation between community violence and psychopathology. A self-report survey was conducted in a representative sample of 3,309 14-17 year old adolescents from urban communities in the US (N = 1,343), Belgium (N = 946) and Russia (N =

  11. A Cross-cultural Comparison of Interpersonal Violence in the Lives of College Students from Two Colleges from The Bahamas and the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Fielding

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a dearth of studies that compare interpersonal violence cross nationally. This paper reports the findings of a cross-sectional study which compares and contrasts violence in the lives of 740 college students, as children and as adults, in The Bahamas and the United States of America. Overall, students in The Bahamas were subjected to more violence (more frequently spanked than their American counterparts. Frequency of spanking when the student was a preteen and teenager were linked to anger outbursts in adulthood, and higher numbers of anger outbursts were linked with violent behaviours of students. Although Bahamian students were exposed to more violence than the American students, this did not result in Bahamian students being more violent than American students in interpersonal relationships. However, Bahamian students were more likely than American students to anticipate using corporal punishment on their children and to condone violence in marital relationships.

  12. Assessment and management of pain in newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Natália Pinheiro Braga; Rossato, Lisabelle Mariano; Bueno, Mariana; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Costa, Taine; Guedes, Danila Maria Batista

    2017-09-12

    to determine the frequency of pain, to verify the measures adopted for pain relief during the first seven days of hospitalization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to identify the type and frequency of invasive procedures to which newborns are submitted. cross-sectional retrospective study. Out of the 188 hospitalizations occurred during the 12-month period, 171 were included in the study. The data were collected from the charts and the presence of pain was analyzed based on the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and on nursing notes suggestions of pain. For statistical analysis, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used, and the significance level was set at 5%. there was at least one record of pain in 50.3% of the hospitalizations, according to the pain scale adopted or nursing note. The newborns underwent a mean of 6.6 invasive procedures per day. Only 32.5% of the pain records resulted in the adoption of pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention for pain relief. newborns are frequently exposed to pain and the low frequency of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions reinforces the undertreatment of this condition. determinar a frequência de dor e verificar as medidas realizadas para seu alívio durante os sete primeiros dias de internação na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, bem como identificar o tipo e frequência de procedimentos invasivos aos quais os recém-nascidos foram submetidos. estudo retrospectivo transversal. Das 188 internações ocorridas no período estipulado de 12 meses, 171 foram incluídas na pesquisa. Os dados foram coletados a partir dos prontuários e a presença de dor foi analisada tanto com base na escala de dor Neonatal Infant Pain Scale quanto mediante anotação de enfermagem sugestiva de dor. Para análise estatística, utilizou-se o programa Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, adotando-se nível de significância de 5%. em 50,3% das internações houve ao menos um registro de dor

  13. Drug education in bolivian schools: A feasibility study for cross-cultural application of a preventive curricular unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gerardo M.; Moreno, Veronica Kaune

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adapting and implementing in La Paz, Bolivia a drug education course originally developed for use in the middle schools in the United States. On the basis of teacher and student evaluations, it was concluded that the unit is a viable, culturally relevant and effective method of drug education in the public and private schools in La Paz. Implications for the prevention of other health-related problems and for implementation of a demandreduction strategy to prevent drug abuse throughout the Americas are discussed.

  14. Team-based working and employee well-being: A cross-cultural comparison of United Kingdom and Hong Kong health services

    OpenAIRE

    So, T.T.C; West, Michael; Dawson, J.F

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of team-based working, team structure, and job design on employee well-being (in term of job satisfaction and work stress) in staff working in healthcare organizations in Hong Kong. Cross-cultural differences in the impact of job design, team structure, and employee well-being outcomes between United Kingdom and Hong Kong were also investigated. A group of 197 staff from two Hong Kong hospitals were compared to a sample of 270 UK staff working in National Health...

  15. Face and Facework in Conflict: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of China, Germany, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetzel, John; Ting-Toomey, Stella; Masumoto, Tomoko; Yokochi, Yumiko; Pan, Xiaohui; Takai, Jiro; Wilcox, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigates face and facework during conflicts among undergraduate students across four national cultures: China, Germany, Japan, and the United States. Presents major findings concerning self-construals; power distance; individualistic, small-power distance cultures; large-power distance cultures; and relational closeness and status. Discusses…

  16. A Cross-Cultural Study of the Career Maturity of Korean and United States High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Hak

    2001-01-01

    High school students in Korea (n=331) and the United States (n=266) completed the Career Attitude Maturity Inventory in Korean or English versions. Constructs of career maturity were similar across both cultures. Level of maturity was culture related: U.S. students had greater confidence; Koreans were more prepared. (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

  17. Contact and Connection: A Cross-Cultural Look at Parenting Styles in Bali and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestenberg-Amighi, Janet

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that a culturally approved style of nonverbal parent-infant interaction influences the unfolding parent-child relationship and the child's social development. The author, an anthropologist, compares parenting styles in the "low-contact" culture of the United States with parenting in the "high-contact"…

  18. Educational inequalities in parental care time: Cross-national evidence from Belgium, Denmark, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Pablo; Ghysels, Joris

    2017-03-01

    This study uses time-diary data for dual-earner couples from Belgium, Denmark, Spain, and the United Kingdom to analyze educational inequalities in parental care time in different national contexts. For mothers, education is significantly associated with parenting involvement only in Spain and the United Kingdom. In Spain these differences are largely explained by inequalities in mothers' time and monetary resources, but not in the United Kingdom, where less-educated mothers disproportionally work in short part-time jobs. For fathers, education is associated with parenting time in Denmark, and particularly in Spain, while the wife's resources substantially drive these associations. On weekends, the educational gradient in parental care time applies only to Spain and the United Kingdom, two countries with particularly large inequalities in parents' opportunities to engage in parenting. The study shows country variations in educational inequalities in parenting, suggesting that socioeconomic resources, especially from mothers, shape important variations in parenting involvement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Students' Preferences for Lecturers' Personalities in Britain, Malaysia and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian; Maakip, Ismail; Ahmad, Sharani; Hudani, Nurul; Voo, Peter S. K.; Christopher, Andrew N.; Garwood, Jeanette

    2007-01-01

    This study examined students' preferences for lecturers' personalities on three continents. Two-hundred and 35 university students in Malaysia, 347 university students in Britain and 139 university students in the United States provided ratings of 30 desirable and undesirable lecturer trait characteristics, which were coded into an internally…

  20. Behavioral Profiles of Children with Williams Syndrome from Spain and the United States: Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Débora; Brun-Gasca, Carme; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2017-01-01

    To identify similarities and differences in the behavioral profile of children with Williams syndrome from Spain (n = 53) and the United States (n = 145), we asked parents of 6- to 14-year-olds with Williams syndrome to complete the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18. The distribution of raw scores was significantly higher for the Spanish sample than…

  1. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus Aureus and Cross-Contamination in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Efficacy of Mupirocin Ointment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Talon; C. Rouget; V. Cailleaux; P. Bailly; M. Thouverez; F. Barale; Y. Michel-Briand

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA six month prospective study was carried out in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of a university hospital to assess the incidence and routes of exogenous colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 157 patients were included in the study. One thousand one hundred and eleven

  2. Uncertainties in modeling low-energy neutrino-induced reactions on iron-group nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Suzuki, T.; Honma, M.; Marketin, T.

    2011-01-01

    Charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections for 54,56 Fe and 58,60 Ni are calculated and compared using frameworks based on relativistic and Skyrme energy-density functionals and on the shell model. The current theoretical uncertainties in modeling neutrino-nucleus cross sections are assessed in relation to the predicted Gamow-Teller transition strength and available data, to multipole decomposition of the cross sections, and to cross sections averaged over the Michel flux and Fermi-Dirac distribution. By employing different microscopic approaches and models, the decay-at-rest (DAR) neutrino- 56 Fe cross section and its theoretical uncertainty are estimated to be th =(258±57)x10 -42 cm 2 , in very good agreement with the experimental value exp =(256±108±43)x10 -42 cm 2 .

  3. Quality of doctoral nursing education in the United Kingdom: exploring the views of doctoral students and staff based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Hugh; Keeney, Sinead; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of doctoral education in nursing in the United Kingdom. In recent decades, doctoral education programmes in nursing are increasing worldwide. There are many reasons for this and concerns have been raised regarding the quality of provision in and across countries. To date, the quality of doctoral education on a global level has not been reported in the literature. This United Kingdom study is part of a seven country investigation into the quality of doctoral education in nursing (Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States of America). A quantitative study using a cross-sectional comparative survey design. An online survey was administered to collect the views of doctoral students and staff members on four domains: programme, faculty/staff, resource and evaluation. The study was carried out between 2010-2012. In most cases, staff perceived these more positively than students and the differences in perception were often statistically significant. Interestingly, many students rated the quality of supervision as excellent, whereas no staff member rated supervision this highly. The crucial importance of resources was confirmed in the path analysis of the four Quality of Doctoral Nursing Education domains. This demonstrates that investment in resources is much more cost-effective than investment in the other domains in relation to improving the overall quality of doctoral education in nursing. This study has wide-ranging implications for how the quality of doctoral education is monitored and enhanced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Barriers to Exercise in Younger and Older Non-Exercising Adult Women: A Cross Sectional Study in London, United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Walid El; Lovell, Geoff

    2009-01-01

    A survey of 100 women in the south of London, United Kingdom (UK) compared exercise barrier intensities between non-exercising younger (20-27 years) and older (28-35 years) adult women; and examined childcare duties as perceived barriers to exercise. Perceived barriers to exercise were examined using an Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS) comprising four subscales (exercise milieu; time expenditure; physical exertion; family discouragement). Participants’ number of children was also noted...

  5. Aging in a cultural context: cross-national differences in disability and the moderating role of personal control among older adults in the United States and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Philippa; Smith, Jacqui

    2011-07-01

    We investigate cross-national differences in late-life health outcomes and focus on an intriguing difference in beliefs about personal control found between older adult populations in the U.K. and United States. We examine the moderating role of control beliefs in the relationship between physical function and self-reported difficulty with daily activities. Using national data from the United States (Health and Retirement Study) and England (English Longitudinal Study on Ageing), we examine the prevalence in disability across the two countries and show how it varies according to the sense of control. Poisson regression was used to examine the relationship between objective measures of physical function (gait speed) and disability and the modifying effects of control. Older Americans have a higher sense of personal control than the British, which operates as a psychological resource to reduce disability among older Americans. However, the benefits of control are attenuated as physical impairments become more severe. These results emphasize the importance of carefully considering cross-national differences in the disablement process as a result of cultural variation in underlying psychosocial resources. This paper highlights the role of culture in shaping health across adults aging in different sociopolitical contexts.

  6. Report to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Struble, G.L.

    1983-02-01

    Measurements for nuclear data applicactions are described including branching ratio in 7 Be decay, kerma factor for carbon, photoneutron cross sections, neutron differential scattering cross sections, half-life of 77 Kr, stellar neutron capture rates for 86 87 88 Sr, neutron total cross sections, 142 143 144 Nd neutron capture nucleo-synthesis, half-life of 163 Ho, thermal neutron fission of 236 Np, revised branching ratios in 237 U and 238 Pu decays, and levels of 244 Cm populated by the beta decay of 10-hour 244 Am and 26-minute /sup 244m/Am. Calculations discussed include systematic test of microscopic optical models for nucleon scattering in the range 7 to 60 MeV, Lanczos method shell-model calculations of GamowTeller strength functions, explosive nucleosynthesis and direct radiative capture rates, and calculation of fission cross sections. Evaluated data libraries are briefly discussed

  7. Evaluating the predictability of distance race performance in NCAA cross country and track and field from high school race times in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusa, Jamie L

    2017-12-30

    Successful recruiting for collegiate track & field athletes has become a more competitive and essential component of coaching. This study aims to determine the relationship between race performances of distance runners at the United States high school and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) levels. Conditional inference classification tree models were built and analysed to predict the probability that runners would qualify for the NCAA Division I National Cross Country Meet and/or the East or West NCAA Division I Outdoor Track & Field Preliminary Round based on their high school race times in the 800 m, 1600 m, and 3200 m. Prediction accuracies of the classification trees ranged from 60.0 to 76.6 percent. The models produced the most reliable estimates for predicting qualifiers in cross country, the 1500 m, and the 800 m for females and cross country, the 5000 m, and the 800 m for males. NCAA track & field coaches can use the results from this study as a guideline for recruiting decisions. Additionally, future studies can apply the methodological foundations of this research to predicting race performances set at different metrics, such as national meets in other countries or Olympic qualifications, from previous race data.

  8. Contextualizing Obesity and Diabetes Policy: Exploring a Nested Statistical and Constructivist Approach at the Cross-National and Subnational Government Level in the United States and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo J. Gómez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background This article conducts a comparative national and subnational government analysis of the political, economic, and ideational constructivist contextual factors facilitating the adoption of obesity and diabetes policy. Methods We adopt a nested analytical approach to policy analysis, which combines cross-national statistical analysis with subnational case study comparisons to examine theoretical prepositions and discover alternative contextual factors; this was combined with an ideational constructivist approach to policy-making. Results Contrary to the existing literature, we found that with the exception of cross-national statistical differences in access to healthcare infrastructural resources, the growing burden of obesity and diabetes, rising healthcare costs and increased citizens’ knowledge had no predictive affect on the adoption of obesity and diabetes policy. We then turned to a subnational comparative analysis of the states of Mississippi in the United States and Rio Grande do Norte in Brazil to further assess the importance of infrastructural resources, at two units of analysis: the state governments versus rural municipal governments. Qualitative evidence suggests that differences in subnational healthcare infrastructural resources were insufficient for explaining policy reform processes, highlighting instead other potentially important factors, such as state-civil societal relationships and policy diffusion in Mississippi, federal policy intervention in Rio Grande do Norte, and politicians’ social construction of obesity and the resulting differences in policy roles assigned to the central government. Conclusion We conclude by underscoring the complexity of subnational policy responses to obesity and diabetes, the importance of combining resource and constructivist analysis for better understanding the context of policy reform, while underscoring the potential lessons that the United States can learn from Brazil.

  9. Cross-cultural comparison of successful aging definitions between Chinese and Hmong elders in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Annie L; Seal, David W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to elicit the definitions of successful aging according to Chinese and Hmong elders living in Milwaukee, WI. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 44 elders (Hmong n = 21 and Chinese n = 23). Findings show some similarities in the Chinese and Hmong elders' definitions though specific cultural differences exist. Chinese elders emphasized physical health and mobility, mental health, positive attitudes, shedding responsibilities, positive family relationships, financial stability, social engagement, religious faith, and accomplishments and volunteer work. Hmong elders emphasized physical health and mobility, mental health, harmonious relationships, positive family relationships, tangible family support, financial stability, social engagement, and religious faith. Cross-cultural comparisons of the findings highlight the cultural heterogeneity between these two subgroups. Implications for practice are discussed.

  10. Emotional eating and eating psychopathology in nonclinical groups: a cross-cultural comparison of women in Japan and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, G; Matoba, M

    1999-11-01

    Emotional eating is associated with eating psychopathology among Western populations. It is not known whether the same conclusions hold in non-Western cultures, where norms for emotional expression differ. This study examined whether emotional eating has the same eating psychopathology correlates in different cultures. Three groups of nonclinical women were compared-Japanese living in Japan; Japanese living in the United Kingdom; and British living in the United Kingdom. They completed an Emotional Eating Scale and the Eating Disorders Inventory. There were different patterns of association between emotional eating and eating attitudes in the three groups. British women showed a strong linkage, Japanese women living in Japan showed no association, and Japanese women in the United Kingdom showed an intermediate pattern. Emotional eating may be less of an index of eating psychopathology in non-Western cultures. However, there appears to be an acculturative process, linking the two when one enters a Western culture. This cross-cultural difference may have implications for the targeting of therapies, although this conclusion requires support from further research. Copyright 1999 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Cross-cultural comparison of long-term care in the United States and Finland: Research done through a short-term study-abroad experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Tina M; Gilland, Sarah; Frank, Jacquelyn B; Murphy, Bridget C; English, Courtney; Meade, Jana; Morrow, Kaylee; Rush, Evan

    2017-01-01

    In May 2014, a short-term study-abroad experience was conducted in Finland through a course offered at Indiana State University (ISU). Students and faculty from ISU and Eastern Illinois University participated in the experience, which was created to facilitate a cross-cultural comparison of long-term-care settings in the United States and Finland. With its outstanding system of caring for the health and social needs of its aging populace, Finland is a logical model to examine when considering ways to improve the quality of life for older adults who require care in the United States . Those participating in the course visited a series of long-term-care facilities in the region surrounding Terre Haute, Indiana, then travelled to Lappeenranta, Finland to visit parallel sites. Through limited-participation observation and semistructured interviews, similarities and differences in experiences, educations, and policies affecting long-term care workers in the United States and Finland were identified and are described here.

  12. Hospitals, finance, and health system reform in Britain and the United States, c. 1910-1950: historical revisionism and cross-national comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsky, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Comparative histories of health system development have been variously influenced by the theoretical approaches of historical institutionalism, political pluralism, and labor mobilization. Britain and the United States have figured significantly in this literature because of their very different trajectories. This article explores the implications of recent research on hospital history in the two countries for existing historiographies, particularly the coming of the National Health Service in Britain. It argues that the two hospital systems initially developed in broadly similar ways, despite the very different outcomes in the 1940s. Thus, applying the conceptual tools used to explain the U.S. trajectory can deepen appreciation of events in Britain. Attention focuses particularly on working-class hospital contributory schemes and their implications for finance, governance, and participation; these are then compared with Blue Cross and U.S. hospital prepayment. While acknowledging the importance of path dependence in shaping attitudes of British bureaucrats toward these schemes, analysis emphasizes their failure in pressure group politics, in contrast to the United States. In both countries labor was also crucial, in the United States sustaining employment-based prepayment and in Britain broadly supporting system reform.

  13. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Use in Pediatric Cardiac ICUs in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy, and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskote, Aparna U; Tume, Lyvonne N; Trieschmann, Uwe; Menzel, Christoph; Cogo, Paola; Brown, Katherine L; Broadhead, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of near-infrared spectroscopy across pediatric cardiac ICUs, there is significant variability and equipoise with no universally accepted management algorithms. We aimed to explore the use of near-infrared spectroscopy in pediatric cardiac ICUs in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy, and Germany. A cross-sectional multicenter, multinational electronic survey of one consultant in each pediatric cardiac ICU. Pediatric cardiac ICUs in the United Kingdom and Ireland (n = 13), Italy (n = 12), and Germany (n = 33). Questionnaire targeted to establish use, targets, protocols/thresholds for intervention, and perceived usefulness of near-infrared spectroscopy monitoring. Overall, 42 of 58 pediatric cardiac ICUs (72%) responded: United Kingdom and Ireland, 11 of 13 (84.6%); Italy, 12 of 12 (100%); and Germany, 19 of 33 (57%, included all major centers). Near-infrared spectroscopy usage varied with 35% (15/42) reporting that near-infrared spectroscopy was not used at all (7/42) or occasionally (8/42); near-infrared spectroscopy use was much less common in the United Kingdom (46%) when compared with 78% in Germany and all (100%) in Italy. Only four units had a near-infrared spectroscopy protocol, and 18 specifically used near-infrared spectroscopy in high-risk patients; 37 respondents believed that near-infrared spectroscopy added value to standard monitoring and 23 believed that it gave an earlier indication of deterioration, but only 19 would respond based on near-infrared spectroscopy data alone. Targets for absolute values and critical thresholds for intervention varied widely between units. The reasons cited for not or occasionally using near-infrared spectroscopy were expense (n = 6), limited evidence and uncertainty on how it guides management (n = 4), difficulty in interpretation, and unreliability of data (n = 3). Amongst the regular or occasional near-infrared spectroscopy users (n = 35), 28 (66%) agreed that a multicenter study is warranted

  14. Factors associated with self-medication among expatriate high school students: a cross-sectional survey in United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ilyas Shehnaz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to assess factors associated with self-medication (SM among expatriate high school students of United Arab Emirates using a validated questionnaire. Most common reasons for self-medication in 324 participating students were: presence of mild illness and previous experiences. High risk practices like altering the dose, discontinuation of medication and self-medication without adult guidance were observed. The likelihood of SM was 4.9 times (95%C.I.: 2.0-12.2 in students not utilizing private healthcare services than those who were utilizing these services. Increased efforts are needed to prevent the risks of self-medication in adolescents through healthcare education for both parents and adolescents.

  15. Behavioral Profiles of Children With Williams Syndrome From Spain and the United States: Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Débora; Brun-Gasca, Carme; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Mervis, Carolyn B

    2017-03-01

    To identify similarities and differences in the behavioral profile of children with Williams syndrome from Spain (n = 53) and the United States (n = 145), we asked parents of 6- to 14-year-olds with Williams syndrome to complete the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18. The distribution of raw scores was significantly higher for the Spanish sample than the American sample for all of the higher-order factors and half of both the empirically based and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-oriented scales. In contrast, analyses based on country-specific T-scores indicated that the distribution for the Spanish sample was significantly higher than for the American sample only on the Social Problems scale. No gender differences were found. Genetic and cultural influences on children's behavior and cultural influences on parental ratings of behavior are discussed.

  16. The comparative burden of mild, moderate and severe Fibromyalgia: results from a cross-sectional survey in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldenberg Don

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterized by chronic, widespread pain, fatigue, and other symptoms; yet few studies have comprehensively assessed its humanistic burden. This observational study evaluates the impact of FM severity on patients' symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQoL, and productivity in the United States. Methods 203 FM subjects were recruited from 20 physician offices. Subjects completed a questionnaire including the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF, Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and questions about demographics, pain and other symptoms, HRQoL and productivity. FIQ total scores were used to define FM severity, with 0- Results Mean (SD age was 47.9 (10.9; 95% were female. Most (92% were prescribed medication for FM; 24% and 66% reported moderate and severe FM, respectively. Mean (SD scores were: 6.3 (2.1 for pain intensity; 0.35 (0.35 for EQ-5D; 30.7 (14.2 for MAF; 57.5 (18.4 for MOS-SS Sleep Problems Index; 10.2 (4.8 for HADS anxiety and 9.4 (4.4 for HADS depression. Subjects with worse FM severity reported significantly increased pain severity, HRQoL, fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety and depression (p Conclusions FM imposes a substantial humanistic burden on patients in the United States, and leads to substantial productivity loss, despite treatment. This burden is higher among subjects with worse FM severity.

  17. A Cross-Sectional Study of Tobacco Advertising, Promotion, and Sponsorship in Airports across Europe and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Soong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship (TAPS bans are effective and are increasingly being implemented in a number of venues and countries, yet the state of TAPS in airports and their effect on airport smoking behavior is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of TAPS in airports across Europe and the US, and to begin to examine the relationship between TAPS and smoking behaviors in airports. We used a cross-sectional study design to observe 21 airports in Europe (11 and the US (10. Data collectors observed points of sale for tobacco products, types of products sold, advertisements and promotions, and branding or logos that appeared in the airport. Tobacco products were sold in 95% of all airports, with significantly more sales in Europe than the US. Advertisements appeared mostly in post-security areas; however, airports with advertisements in pre-security areas had significantly more smokers observed outdoors than airports without advertisements in pre-security areas. Tobacco branding appeared in designated smoking rooms as well as on non-tobacco products in duty free shops. TAPS are widespread in airports in Europe and the US and might be associated with outdoor smoking, though further research is needed to better understand any relationship between the two. This study adds to a growing body of research on tobacco control in air transit and related issues. As smoke-free policies advance, they should include comprehensive TAPS bans that extend to airport facilities.

  18. A Cross-Sectional Study of Tobacco Advertising, Promotion, and Sponsorship in Airports across Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Andrea; Navas-Acien, Ana; Pang, Yuanjie; Lopez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Esquinas, Esther; Stillman, Frances A

    2016-09-28

    Tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship (TAPS) bans are effective and are increasingly being implemented in a number of venues and countries, yet the state of TAPS in airports and their effect on airport smoking behavior is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of TAPS in airports across Europe and the US, and to begin to examine the relationship between TAPS and smoking behaviors in airports. We used a cross-sectional study design to observe 21 airports in Europe (11) and the US (10). Data collectors observed points of sale for tobacco products, types of products sold, advertisements and promotions, and branding or logos that appeared in the airport. Tobacco products were sold in 95% of all airports, with significantly more sales in Europe than the US. Advertisements appeared mostly in post-security areas; however, airports with advertisements in pre-security areas had significantly more smokers observed outdoors than airports without advertisements in pre-security areas. Tobacco branding appeared in designated smoking rooms as well as on non-tobacco products in duty free shops. TAPS are widespread in airports in Europe and the US and might be associated with outdoor smoking, though further research is needed to better understand any relationship between the two. This study adds to a growing body of research on tobacco control in air transit and related issues. As smoke-free policies advance, they should include comprehensive TAPS bans that extend to airport facilities.

  19. Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded

  20. Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-05

    The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded. (DMC)

  1. Use of Videoconferencing for Lactation Consultation: An Online Cross-Sectional Survey of Mothers' Acceptance in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mona F; Springer, Cary M; Spence, Marsha L; Hansen-Petrik, Melissa B; Kavanagh, Katherine F

    2018-05-01

    Suboptimal breastfeeding duration and exclusivity rates are a public health concern. Therefore, there is a need for identifying effective tools for use in interventions targeting specific barriers to optimal breastfeeding outcomes. Research aim: This study aimed to assess the relationship between acceptance of remote lactation consultation using videoconferencing and (a) maternal demographic factors, (b) technology acceptance subscales, (c) maternal learning style preferences, and (d) other potentially explanatory maternal factors. This was a cross-sectional, online study. English-speaking mothers of at least 18 years of age, with an infant age 4 months or younger, and who reported initiating breastfeeding were eligible to participate. Mothers were recruited from 27 randomly selected states. One hundred one mothers completed the survey, resulting in a response rate of 71%. The main outcome was acceptance of videoconferencing use for lactation consultation. No significant differences were found in acceptance by maternal demographic factors or learning style preferences. Acceptance was significantly related to perceived ease of use ( r = .680, p acceptance of videoconferencing for lactation consultation ( r = .432, p model ( R 2 = .616, p acceptance, maternal age was inversely related. This sample of mothers indicated general acceptance of videoconferencing for lactation consultation, with younger mothers and those perceiving it to be more useful demonstrating greater acceptance.

  2. Effect of a culture-based screening algorithm on tuberculosis incidence in immigrants and refugees bound for the United States: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yecai; Posey, Drew L; Cetron, Martin S; Painter, John A

    2015-03-17

    Before 2007, immigrants and refugees bound for the United States were screened for tuberculosis (TB) by a smear-based algorithm that could not diagnose smear-negative/culture-positive TB. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention implemented a culture-based algorithm. To evaluate the effect of the culture-based algorithm on preventing the importation of TB to the United States by immigrants and refugees from foreign countries. Population-based, cross-sectional study. Panel physician sites for overseas medical examination. Immigrants and refugees with TB. Comparison of the increase of smear-negative/culture-positive TB cases diagnosed overseas among immigrants and refugees by the culture-based algorithm with the decline of reported cases among foreign-born persons within 1 year after arrival in the United States from 2007 to 2012. Of the 3 212 421 arrivals of immigrants and refugees from 2007 to 2012, a total of 1 650 961 (51.4%) were screened by the smear-based algorithm and 1 561 460 (48.6%) were screened by the culture-based algorithm. Among the 4032 TB cases diagnosed by the culture-based algorithm, 2195 (54.4%) were smear-negative/culture-positive. Before implementation (2002 to 2006), the annual number of reported cases among foreign-born persons within 1 year after arrival was relatively constant (range, 1424 to 1626 cases; mean, 1504 cases) but decreased from 1511 to 940 cases during implementation (2007 to 2012). During the same period, the annual number of smear-negative/culture-positive TB cases diagnosed overseas among immigrants and refugees bound for the United States by the culture-based algorithm increased from 4 to 629. This analysis did not control for the decline in new arrivals of nonimmigrant visitors to the United States and the decrease of incidence of TB in their countries of origin. Implementation of the culture-based algorithm may have substantially reduced the incidence of TB among newly arrived, foreign-born persons in

  3. Inverse Association between Diabetes and Altitude: A Cross Sectional Study in the Adult Population of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolcott, Orison O.; Castillo, Oscar A.; Gutierrez, Cesar; Elashoff, Robert M.; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether geographical elevation is inversely associated with diabetes, while adjusting for multiple risk factors. Design and Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of publicly available online data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2009. Final dataset included 285,196 US adult subjects. Odds ratios were obtained from multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression analysis. Results Among US adults (≥20 years old), the odds ratio for diabetes were 1.00 between 0−499 m of altitude (reference), 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 1.01) between 500−1,499 m, and 0.88 (0.81 to 0.96) between 1,500−3,500 m, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, ethnicity, self-reported fruit and vegetable consumption, self-reported physical activity, current smoking status, level of education, income, health status, employment status, and county-level information on migration rate, urbanization, and latitude. The inverse association between altitude and diabetes in the US was found among men [0.84 (0.76 to 0.94)], but not women [1.09 (0.97 to 1.22)]. Conclusions Among US adults, living at high altitude (1,500−3,500 m) is associated with lower odds of having diabetes than living between 0−499 m, while adjusting for multiple risk factors. Our findings suggest that geographical elevation may be an important factor linked to diabetes. PMID:24890677

  4. Depressive symptoms and positive affect in Chinese and United States breast cancer survivors: a cross-cultural comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, Kathrin; Kavanagh, April; Meng, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhen; Chandwani, Kavita D; Garcia, Kay; Perkins, George H; McQuade, Jennifer; Raghuram, Nelamangala V; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Liao, Zhongxing; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao; Chen, Jiayi; Guo, Xiaoma; Liu, Luming; Arun, Banu; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2017-07-01

    Research in the area of cultural response pattern on questionnaires in the oncological setting and direct cross-cultural comparisons are lacking. This study examined response pattern in the reporting of depressive symptoms in Chinese and US women with breast cancer. We hypothesized that Chinese women are less likely to endorse positive affect items compared to their US counterparts. Additionally, we explored cultural differences in the association between positive affect and QOL. Secondary analyses of baseline assessments of two mind-body intervention studies for women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy in the USA (N = 62) and China (N = 97) are presented. All participants completed measures of depressive symptoms (CES-D) and cancer-specific QOL (FACT-B). We examined cultural differences on positive and negative affect items on the CES-D. Controlling for demographic factors, ANCOVA revealed a significant cultural difference in positive (F = 7.99, p = 0.005) but not negative affect (p = 0.82) with Chinese women reporting lower positive affect compared to US women (Chinese = 6.97 vs. US = 8.31). There was also a significant cultural difference (F = 3.94, p = 0.03) in the association between positive affect and QOL so that lower positive affect was more strongly associated with worse emotional well-being in Chinese (beta = 0.57, p different cultures to ascertain effective delivery of clinical services to those in need.

  5. Barriers to Exercise in Younger and Older Non-Exercising Adult Women: A Cross Sectional Study in London, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Walid El; Lovell, Geoff

    2009-01-01

    A survey of 100 women in the south of London, United Kingdom (UK) compared exercise barrier intensities between non-exercising younger (20–27 years) and older (28–35 years) adult women; and examined childcare duties as perceived barriers to exercise. Perceived barriers to exercise were examined using an Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS) comprising four subscales (exercise milieu; time expenditure; physical exertion; family discouragement). Participants’ number of children was also noted. Non-exercising older women reported significantly higher total exercise barriers, as well as across three barrier subscales: exercise milieu, time expenditure, and family discouragement. For both age groups, significant correlation existed between number of children and women’s total exercise barrier scores. Number of children explained ≈25% and ≈30% of the variance of younger and older women’s total barrier scores respectively. For both women groups, the strongest correlation between exercise barrier and number of children was for the time expenditure subscale. Broad grouping of 20–35 year old non-exercising women does not reflect a homogenous sample. Age categories employing narrower age brackets are recommended. Issues surrounding family responsibilities e.g. childcare duties may be shared between these groups and require further research and policy attention. PMID:19440527

  6. Barriers to Exercise in Younger and Older Non-Exercising Adult Women: A Cross Sectional Study in London, United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Lovell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 100 women in the south of London, United Kingdom (UK compared exercise barrier intensities between non-exercising younger (20-27 years and older (28-35 years adult women; and examined childcare duties as perceived barriers to exercise. Perceived barriers to exercise were examined using an Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS comprising four subscales (exercise milieu; time expenditure; physical exertion; family discouragement. Participants’ number of children was also noted. Non-exercising older women reported significantly higher total exercise barriers, as well as across three barrier subscales: exercise milieu, time expenditure, and family discouragement. For both age groups, significant correlation existed between number of children and women’s total exercise barrier scores. Number of children explained »25% and »30% of the variance of younger and older women’s total barrier scores respectively. For both women groups, the strongest correlation between exercise barrier and number of children was for the time expenditure subscale. Broad grouping of 20-35 year old non-exercising women does not reflect a homogenous sample. Age categories employing narrower age brackets are recommended. Issues surrounding family responsibilities e.g. childcare duties may be shared between these groups and require further research and policy attention.

  7. Barriers to exercise in younger and older non-exercising adult women: a cross sectional study in London, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid; Lovell, Geoff

    2009-04-01

    A survey of 100 women in the south of London, United Kingdom (UK) compared exercise barrier intensities between non-exercising younger (20-27 years) and older (28-35 years) adult women; and examined childcare duties as perceived barriers to exercise. Perceived barriers to exercise were examined using an Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS) comprising four subscales (exercise milieu; time expenditure; physical exertion; family discouragement). Participants' number of children was also noted. Non-exercising older women reported significantly higher total exercise barriers, as well as across three barrier subscales: exercise milieu, time expenditure, and family discouragement. For both age groups, significant correlation existed between number of children and women's total exercise barrier scores. Number of children explained approximately 25% and approximately 30% of the variance of younger and older women's total barrier scores respectively. For both women groups, the strongest correlation between exercise barrier and number of children was for the time expenditure subscale. Broad grouping of 20-35 year old non-exercising women does not reflect a homogenous sample. Age categories employing narrower age brackets are recommended. Issues surrounding family responsibilities e.g. childcare duties may be shared between these groups and require further research and policy attention.

  8. Job burnout among critical care nurses from 14 adult intensive care units in northeastern China: a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Chun; Huang, De-Sheng; Guan, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The shortage of qualified nurses is one of the critical challenges in the field of healthcare. Among the contributing factors, job burnout has been indicated as a risk factor for the intention to leave. The purpose of this study was to provide a better understanding of the local status and reference data for coping strategies for intensive care unit (ICU)-nurse burnout among Liaoning ICU nurses. Design Observational study. Setting 17 ICUs from 10 tertiary-level hospitals in Liaoning, China. Participants 431 ICU nurses from 14 ICUs nested in 10 tertiary-level hospitals in Liaoning, China, were invited during October and November 2010. Primary measures Burnout was measured using the 22-item Chinese version of Maslach Burnout Inventory-Health Service Survey (MBI-HSS) questionnaires. Results 14 ICUs responded actively and were included; the response rate was 87.7% among the 486 invited participants from these 17 ICUs. The study population was a young population, with the median age 25 years, IQR 23–28 years and female nurses accounted for the major part (88.5%). 68 nurses (16%) were found to have a high degree of burnout, earning high emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores together with a low personal accomplishment score. Conclusions The present study indicated a moderate distribution of burnout among ICU nurses in Liaoning, China. An investigation into the burnout levels of this population could bring more attention to ICU caregivers. PMID:24948747

  9. High prevalence of diabetes among migrants in the United Arab Emirates using a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nabil; Albadawi, Salah; Abusnana, Salah; Mairghani, Maisoon; Hussein, Amal; Al Awadi, Fatheya; Madani, Abdulrazak; Zimmet, Paul; Shaw, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    In 2011, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) had the 10th highest diabetes prevalence globally, but this was based on data that excluded migrants who comprise 80% of the population. This study assessed diabetes prevalence across the UAE population. A random sample of migrants was recruited from the visa renewal centers. Data were collected using interviews, anthropometric measurements and fasting blood for glucose, lipids and genetic analyses. 2724 adults completed the questionnaires and blood tests. Of these, 81% were males, 65% were ≤40 years old and 3% were above 60 years. Diabetes, based on self-report or fasting plasma glucose ≥7.0 mmol/l, showed a crude prevalence of 15.5%, of whom 64.2% were newly diagnosed. Overall age- and sex-adjusted diabetes prevalence, according to the world mid-year population of 2013, was 19.1%. The highest prevalence was in Asians (16.4%) and non-Emirati Arabs (15.2%) and lowest in Africans and Europeans (11.9%). It increased with age: 6.3% in 18-30 years and 39.7% in 51 to 60 years. Lower education, obesity, positive family history, hypertension, dyslipidemia, snoring, and low HDL levels, all showed significant associations with diabetes. The high diabetes prevalence among migrants in the UAE, 64% of which was undiagnosed, necessitates urgent diabetes prevention and control programs for the entire UAE population.

  10. A cross-cultural examination of use of corporal punishment on children: a focus on Sweden and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, J S

    1982-01-01

    It appears that Sweden and the United States may be a study in contrasts regarding the sanction and use of corporal punishment on children. A 1979 study of American parents noted that 81% of them employed corporal punishment with children. A different study done in Sweden in 1978 noted that only 26% of parents used corporal punishment with children. What points to the differences in these parenting patterns within the two countries? In addition, a 1977 U.S. Supreme Court case entitled Ingraham vs. Wright ruled that "schools are empowered to carry out corporal punishment." This court case involved two high school boys in Florida who had been repeatedly struck with wooden paddles. In contrast, Sweden had statutes which prohibited corporal punishment of children in their secondary schools as early as the 1920s. In 1957, the country passed a law which defined corporal punishment as unacceptable for small children in the schools. Then, in 1979, the Swedish government passed a statute prohibiting corporal punishment by parents. Are there differences in the way the two countries view law and its uses? Or, do the cultures sanction violence in general or just violence against children in different ways? This article examines some of the similarities and differences found in American and Swedish treatment of children and proposes what appear to be extreme differences in the way the countries and their people approach corporal punishment.

  11. Cross-Disciplinary Perceptions of Structured Interprofessional Rounds in Promoting Teamwork Within an Academic Tertiary Care Obstetric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Anthony; Vijjeswarapu, Mary A; Hickey, Margaret; Acker, David; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Tsen, Lawrence C

    2017-06-01

    In 2005, physician and nursing leaders at Brigham and Women's Hospital initiated structured interprofessional rounds (SIPRs) on the labor and delivery (L&D) suite to improve team communication. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of providers' perceptions of SIPRs and their effectiveness in improving teamwork. We hypothesized that on average, providers would perceive SIPRs as being effective in promoting teamwork, but ratings would differ among professional groups. After a factor analysis and internal consistency assessment, a 19-item paper-based questionnaire was used to evaluate providers' perceptions using a 5-point Likert scale. Respondents included L&D nurses, midwives, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists who participate in SIPRs. The primary aim was to evaluate the providers' perceptions of SIPRs and their association with professional roles. The outcome was total response score for each provider, ranging from 19 to 95; perception of SIPRs as being effective in promoting teamwork was defined as having a total response score of >66.5 (mean score, >3.5 per question). A univariable linear regression model was performed, followed by a multivariable analysis adjusting for predictors that modified the outcome; predictors included years of professional practice, years of experience on the L&D suite, number of clinical work hours worked weekly, and principal shift assignment among nurses. The associations between these predictors and providers' perceptions were assessed as a secondary aim. A total of 234 practitioners responded (100% response rate). The mean total response score (SD) for all providers was 73.3 (9.5). After multivariable adjustment, the mean total response scores were significantly higher for obstetric providers than for anesthesia (Δ mean, 6.5, 95% CI, 0.3, 12.7 P = .036) and midwifery (Δ mean, 12.5, 95% CI, 2.0, 23.0, P = .009) providers. Providers scored significantly lower if they worked >60 clinical hours per week compared with ≤20 (

  12. A cross sectional study of surgical training among United Kingdom general practitioners with specialist interests in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, H J M; Fitzgerald, J E F; Reilly, J; Beamish, A J; Gokani, V J

    2015-04-08

    Increasing numbers of minor surgical procedures are being performed in the community. In the UK, general practitioners (family medicine physicians) with a specialist interest (GPwSI) in surgery frequently undertake them. This shift has caused decreases in available cases for junior surgeons to gain and consolidate operative skills. This study evaluated GPwSI's case-load, procedural training and perceptions of offering formalised operative training experience to surgical trainees. Prospective, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. A novel, 13-item, self-administered questionnaire was distributed to members of the Association of Surgeons in Primary Care (ASPC). A total 113 of 120 ASPC members completed the questionnaire, representing a 94% response rate. Respondents were general practitioners practising or intending to practice surgery in the community. Respondents performed a mean of 38 (range 5-150) surgical procedures per month in primary care. 37% (42/113) of respondents had previously been awarded Membership or Fellowship of a Surgical Royal College; 22% (25/113) had completed a surgical certificate or diploma or undertaken a course of less than 1 year duration. 41% (46/113) had no formal British surgical qualifications. All respondents believed that surgical training in primary care could be valuable for surgical trainees, and the majority (71/113, 63%) felt that both general practice and surgical trainees could benefit equally from such training. There is a significant volume of surgical procedures being undertaken in the community by general practitioners, with the capacity and appetite for training of prospective surgeons in this setting, providing appropriate standards are achieved and maintained, commensurate with current standards in secondary care. Surgical experience and training of GPwSI's in surgery is highly varied, and does not yet benefit from the quality assurance secondary care surgical training in the UK undergoes. The Royal Colleges of

  13. The portrayal of older people in television advertisements: a cross-cultural content analysis of the United States and South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Oungkwan; Kim, Bong-Chul; Han, Sangpil

    2006-01-01

    A cross-cultural content analysis of 2295 prime-time television ads--859 ads from the United States and 1436 ads from South Korea-was conducted to examine the differences in the portrayal of older people between U.S. and Korean ads. In two countries, the underrepresentation of older people in ads was found in terms of proportions of the actual population. The findings also showed that older people are more likely to play major roles in Korean television ads than in U.S. ads. In terms of the attributes of older people depicted in ads, differences between U.S. and Korean ads were also found. The results showed that Korean television ads are likely to more positively depict older people than American television ads are. These findings supported the basic assumption of cross-cultural advertising, in which the differences in cultural values between the two cultures are related to the differences in the contents of their advertisements. However, the problems of underrepresentation and stereotypes in the portrayal of older people were still identified both in Korean and U.S. prime-time television ads.

  14. Cancer-related marketing centrality motifs acting as pivot units in the human signaling network and mediating cross-talk between biological pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan; Chen, Lina; Li, Xia; Jia, Xu; Feng, Chenchen; Zhang, Liangcai; He, Weiming; Lv, Junjie; He, Yuehan; Li, Weiguo; Qu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Yanyan; Shi, Yuchen

    2013-12-01

    Network motifs in central positions are considered to not only have more in-coming and out-going connections but are also localized in an area where more paths reach the networks. These central motifs have been extensively investigated to determine their consistent functions or associations with specific function categories. However, their functional potentials in the maintenance of cross-talk between different functional communities are unclear. In this paper, we constructed an integrated human signaling network from the Pathway Interaction Database. We identified 39 essential cancer-related motifs in central roles, which we called cancer-related marketing centrality motifs, using combined centrality indices on the system level. Our results demonstrated that these cancer-related marketing centrality motifs were pivotal units in the signaling network, and could mediate cross-talk between 61 biological pathways (25 could be mediated by one motif on average), most of which were cancer-related pathways. Further analysis showed that molecules of most marketing centrality motifs were in the same or adjacent subcellular localizations, such as the motif containing PI3K, PDK1 and AKT1 in the plasma membrane, to mediate signal transduction between 32 cancer-related pathways. Finally, we analyzed the pivotal roles of cancer genes in these marketing centrality motifs in the pathogenesis of cancers, and found that non-cancer genes were potential cancer-related genes.

  15. Anxiety- and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Patients With Breast Cancer: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of China and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin You

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Literature has documented the prevalence of anxiety and its adverse effect on quality of life among patients with breast cancer from Western countries, yet cross-cultural examinations with non-Western patients are rare. This cross-cultural study investigated differences in anxiety and its association with quality of life between US and Chinese patients with breast cancer. Methods: Patients with breast cancer from the United States and China completed measures for anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast. Results: After controlling for demographic and medical characteristics, Chinese patients reported higher levels of trait and state anxiety than US patients. Although there was an association between anxiety and quality of life in both groups of patients, the association between state anxiety and quality of life was stronger among Chinese patients than among US patients, with the association between trait anxiety and quality of life the same between the two cultural samples. Conclusion: These findings suggest that anxiety and its association with quality of life among patients with breast cancer varies depending on cultural context, which reveals greater anxiety and poorer quality of life among Chinese patients compared with US patients. This suggests greater unmet psychosocial needs among Chinese patients and highlights the need to build comprehensive cancer care systems for a better quality of life in Chinese populations.

  16. Spin-flip isovector giant resonances from the 90Zr (n,p) 90Y reaction at 200 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raywood, K.J.; Spicer, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    Doubly differential cross sections of the reaction 90 Zr(n,p) 90 Y have been measured at 200 MeV for excitations up to 38 MeV in the residual nucleus. An overall resolution of 1.3 MeV was achieved. The spectra show qualitative agreement in shape and magnitude with recent RPA calculations; however all of the calculations underestimate the high excitation region of the spectra. A multipole decomposition of the data has been performed using differential cross sections calculated in the DWIA. An estimate of the Gamow-Teller strength in the reaction is given. The isovector spin-flip dipole giant resonance has been identified and there is also an indication of isovector monopole strength. 39 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  17. Development of a novel walkability index for London, United Kingdom: cross-sectional application to the Whitehall II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima C. Stockton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is essential for health; walking is the easiest way to incorporate activity into everyday life. Previous studies report positive associations between neighbourhood walkability and walking but most focused on cities in North America and Australasia. Urban form with respect to street connectivity, residential density and land use mix—common components of walkability indices—differs in European cities. The objective of this study was to develop a walkability index for London and test the index using walking data from the Whitehall II Study.  Methods A neighbourhood walkability index for London was constructed, comprising factors associated with walking behaviours: residential dwelling density, street connectivity and land use mix. Three models were produced that differed in the land uses included. Neighbourhoods were operationalised at three levels of administrative geography: (i 21,140 output areas, (ii 633 wards and (iii 33 local authorities. A neighbourhood walkability score was assigned to each London-dwelling Whitehall II Study participant (2003–04, N = 3020, mean ± SD age = 61.0 years ± 6.0 based on residential postcode. The effect of changing the model specification and the units of enumeration on spatial variation in walkability was examined. Results There was a radial decay in walkability from the centre to the periphery of London. There was high inter-model correlation in walkability scores for any given neighbourhood operationalisation (0.92–0.98, and moderate-high correlation between neighbourhood operationalisations for any given model (0.39–0.70. After adjustment for individual level factors and area deprivation, individuals in the most walkable neighbourhoods operationalised as wards were more likely to walk >6 h/week (OR = 1.4; 95 % CI: 1.1–1.9 than those in the least walkable. Conclusions Walkability was associated with walking time in adults. This

  18. Development of a novel walkability index for London, United Kingdom: cross-sectional application to the Whitehall II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Jemima C; Duke-Williams, Oliver; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Mindell, Jennifer S; Brunner, Eric J; Shelton, Nicola J

    2016-05-18

    Physical activity is essential for health; walking is the easiest way to incorporate activity into everyday life. Previous studies report positive associations between neighbourhood walkability and walking but most focused on cities in North America and Australasia. Urban form with respect to street connectivity, residential density and land use mix-common components of walkability indices-differs in European cities. The objective of this study was to develop a walkability index for London and test the index using walking data from the Whitehall II Study. A neighbourhood walkability index for London was constructed, comprising factors associated with walking behaviours: residential dwelling density, street connectivity and land use mix. Three models were produced that differed in the land uses included. Neighbourhoods were operationalised at three levels of administrative geography: (i) 21,140 output areas, (ii) 633 wards and (iii) 33 local authorities. A neighbourhood walkability score was assigned to each London-dwelling Whitehall II Study participant (2003-04, N = 3020, mean ± SD age = 61.0 years ± 6.0) based on residential postcode. The effect of changing the model specification and the units of enumeration on spatial variation in walkability was examined. There was a radial decay in walkability from the centre to the periphery of London. There was high inter-model correlation in walkability scores for any given neighbourhood operationalisation (0.92-0.98), and moderate-high correlation between neighbourhood operationalisations for any given model (0.39-0.70). After adjustment for individual level factors and area deprivation, individuals in the most walkable neighbourhoods operationalised as wards were more likely to walk >6 h/week (OR = 1.4; 95 % CI: 1.1-1.9) than those in the least walkable. Walkability was associated with walking time in adults. This walkability index could help urban planners identify and design neighbourhoods in

  19. Cross-cultural comparisons of attitudes toward schizophrenia amongst the general population and physicians: a series of web-based surveys in Japan and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Misty; Hori, Hiroaki; Sartorius, Norman; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-02-28

    Cross-cultural differences in attitudes toward schizophrenia are suggested, while no studies have compared such attitudes between the United States and Japan. In our previous study in Japan (Hori et al., 2011), 197 subjects in the general population and 112 physicians (excluding psychiatrists) enrolled in a web-based survey using an Internet-based questionnaire format. Utilizing the identical web-based survey method in the United States, the present study enrolled 172 subjects in the general population and 45 physicians. Participants' attitudes toward schizophrenia were assessed with the English version of the 18-item questionnaire used in our previous Japanese survey. Using exploratory factor analysis, we identified four factors labeled "social distance," "belief of dangerousness," "underestimation of patients' abilities," and "skepticism regarding treatment." The two-way multivariate analysis of covariance on the four factors, with country and occupation as the between-subject factors and with potentially confounding demographic variables as the covariates, revealed that the general population in the US scored significantly lower than the Japanese counterparts on the factors "social distance" and "skepticism regarding treatment" and higher on "underestimation of patients' abilities." Our results suggest that culture may have an important role in shaping attitudes toward mental illness. Anti-stigma campaigns that target culture-specific biases are considered important. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electronic gaming machines and gambling disorder: A cross-cultural comparison between treatment-seeking subjects from Brazil and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Gustavo C; Leppink, Eric W; Yaemi, Ana; Mariani, Mirella; Tavares, Hermano; Grant, Jon E

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this paper is to perform a cross-cultural comparison of gambling disorder (GD) due to electronic gaming machines (EGM), a form of gambling that may have a high addictive potential. Our goal is to investigate two treatment-seeking samples of adults collected in Brazil and the United States, countries with different socio-cultural backgrounds. This comparison may lead to a better understanding of cultural influences on GD. The total studied sample involved 733 treatment-seeking subjects: 353 men and 380 women (average age=45.80, standard deviation ±10.9). The Brazilian sample had 517 individuals and the American sample 216. Subjects were recruited by analogous strategies. We found that the Brazilian sample was younger, predominantly male, less likely to be Caucasian, more likely to be partnered, tended to have a faster progression from recreational gambling to GD, and were more likely to endorse chasing losses. This study demonstrated that there are significant differences between treatment-seeking samples of adults presenting GD due to EGM in Brazil and in the United States. These findings suggest that cultural aspects may have a relevant role in GD due to EGM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cross-national differences in clinically significant cannabis problems: epidemiologic evidence from 'cannabis-only' smokers in the United States, Mexico, and Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posada-Villa Jose

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies show wide variability in the occurrence of cannabis smoking and related disorders across countries. This study aims to estimate cross-national variation in cannabis users' experience of clinically significant cannabis-related problems in three countries of the Americas, with a focus on cannabis users who may have tried alcohol or tobacco, but who have not used cocaine, heroin, LSD, or other internationally regulated drugs. Methods Data are from the World Mental Health Surveys Initiative and the National Latino and Asian American Study, with probability samples in Mexico (n = 4426, Colombia (n = 5,782 and the United States (USA; n = 8,228. The samples included 212 'cannabis only' users in Mexico, 260 in Colombia and 1,724 in the USA. Conditional GLM with GEE and 'exact' methods were used to estimate variation in the occurrence of clinically significant problems in cannabis only (CO users across these surveyed populations. Results The experience of cannabis-related problems was quite infrequent among CO users in these countries, with weighted frequencies ranging from 1% to 5% across survey populations, and with no appreciable cross-national variation in general. CO users in Colombia proved to be an exception. As compared to CO users in the USA, the Colombia smokers were more likely to have experienced cannabis-associated 'social problems' (odds ratio, OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.4, 6.3; p = 0.004 and 'legal problems' (OR = 9.7; 95% CI = 2.7, 35.2; p = 0.001. Conclusions This study's most remarkable finding may be the similarity in occurrence of cannabis-related problems in this cross-national comparison within the Americas. Wide cross-national variations in estimated population-level cumulative incidence of cannabis use disorders may be traced to large differences in cannabis smoking prevalence, rather than qualitative differences in cannabis experiences. More research is needed to identify conditions that

  2. Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and ICU Mobility Scale: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yurika Maria Fogaça; Nawa, Ricardo Kenji; Figueiredo, Thais Borgheti; Martins, Lourdes; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To translate the Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and the ICU Mobility Scale (IMS) into Portuguese, creating versions that are cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil, and to determine the interobserver agreement and reliability for both versions. Methods: The processes of translation and cross-cultural validation consisted in the following: preparation, translation, reconciliation, synthesis, back-translation, review, approval, and pre-test. The Portuguese-language versions of both instruments were then used by two researchers to evaluate critically ill ICU patients. Weighted kappa statistics and Bland-Altman plots were used in order to verify interobserver agreement for the two instruments. In each of the domains of the instruments, interobserver reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The correlation between the instruments was assessed by Spearman's correlation test. Results: The study sample comprised 103 patients-56 (54%) of whom were male-with a mean age of 52 ± 18 years. The main reason for ICU admission (in 44%) was respiratory failure. Both instruments showed excellent interobserver agreement (κ > 0.90) and reliability (α > 0.90) in all domains. Interobserver bias was low for the IMS and the Perme Score (−0.048 ± 0.350 and −0.06 ± 0.73, respectively). The 95% CIs for the same instruments ranged from −0.73 to 0.64 and −1.50 to 1.36, respectively. There was also a strong positive correlation between the two instruments (r = 0.941; p < 0.001). Conclusions: In their versions adapted for use in Brazil, both instruments showed high interobserver agreement and reliability. PMID:28117473

  3. Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and ICU Mobility Scale: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurika Maria Fogaça Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To translate the Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and the ICU Mobility Scale (IMS into Portuguese, creating versions that are cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil, and to determine the interobserver agreement and reliability for both versions. Methods: The processes of translation and cross-cultural validation consisted in the following: preparation, translation, reconciliation, synthesis, back-translation, review, approval, and pre-test. The Portuguese-language versions of both instruments were then used by two researchers to evaluate critically ill ICU patients. Weighted kappa statistics and Bland-Altman plots were used in order to verify interobserver agreement for the two instruments. In each of the domains of the instruments, interobserver reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The correlation between the instruments was assessed by Spearman's correlation test. Results: The study sample comprised 103 patients-56 (54% of whom were male-with a mean age of 52 ± 18 years. The main reason for ICU admission (in 44% was respiratory failure. Both instruments showed excellent interobserver agreement ( > 0.90 and reliability ( > 0.90 in all domains. Interobserver bias was low for the IMS and the Perme Score (−0.048 ± 0.350 and −0.06 ± 0.73, respectively. The 95% CIs for the same instruments ranged from −0.73 to 0.64 and −1.50 to 1.36, respectively. There was also a strong positive correlation between the two instruments (r = 0.941; p < 0.001. Conclusions: In their versions adapted for use in Brazil, both instruments showed high interobserver agreement and reliability.

  4. The Knowledge-about-Older-Patients - Quiz (KOP-Q) for nurses: Cross-cultural validation between the Netherlands and United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, Jeroen; Hoogerduijn, Jita G; Klaassen, Sharon; Lagerwey, Mary D; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2017-08-01

    The Knowledge about Older Patients-Quiz (KOP-Q) is designed as a unidimensional scale measuring knowledge of hospital nurses about older patients. Furthermore, the KOP-Q measures a second unidimensional construct, certainty of hospital nurses about their knowledge. The KOP-Q is developed and validated in the Netherlands. Whether the KOP-Q can be used in other countries is unknown given the cultural and language differences. Investigate the level of measurement invariance of the KOP-Q between the Netherlands and United States of America (USA). A multicenter international cross-sectional design. Four general hospitals in the Netherlands and four general hospitals in the USA. Nurses from the Netherlands (n=201) and the USA (n=130) were invited to participate by email from the ward manager, distributing flyers and present messages on the online hospital communication boards. Questions of the KOP-Q were completed online. The level of measurement invariance (configural, metric or scalar invariance) across countries was tested by running increasingly constrained structural equation models, and testing whether these models fitted the data. Both the knowledge and certainty construct of the KOP-Q proved unidimensional in the Netherlands and USA sample. Test results of the measurement invariance across the Netherlands and USA indicated a stable, partial scalar invariance (15 items full scalar invariance) for the knowledge items and full scalar invariance for the certainty items. The KOP-Q shows to function uniformly across both language groups and can therefore be used to assess nurses' knowledge and their certainty about this knowledge which can be important for educational and/or quality improvement programs in the USA. Furthermore, the KOP-Q is suitable to make comparisons between the Netherlands and the USA using latent variable models. Before the KOP-Q can be used in other countries, cross-cultural tests should again be performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  5. Energy dependence of isovector and isoscalar 1+ excitations in 28Si(p,p/sup '/) between 200 and 400 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.; Sawafta, R.; Jeppesen, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Forward-angle cross sections for 1 + , T = 1 and 1 + , T = 0 states in 28 Si excited by the (p,p') reaction have been measured to determine the energy dependence of important pieces of the effective nucleon-nucleus interaction. The isovector spin-transfer transitions depend on energy as expected from distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations based on the dominant V/sub Σ//sub tau/ part of the Franey-Love interaction. The parts of this interaction responsible for exciting the 9.5 MeV isosca- lar spin-flip transition predict a weaker energy dependence than is observed experimentally. The summed Gamow-Teller strength for isovector transitions below 14.5 MeV is found to be (0.89 +- 0.09) times the result of large-scale shell model calculations

  6. Search for the signature of a halo structure in the p(6He,6Li)n reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina-Gil, M.D.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J.M.; Chartier, M.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Blumenfeld, Y.; and others.

    1995-01-01

    The elastic scattering p( 6 He, 6 He)p and charge exchange reaction p( 6 He, 6 Li)n have been measured in reverse kinematics with a secondary 6 He beam. The angular distributions for these reactions were obtained. In the case of the charge exchange reaction, the ratio of the cross section for the Gamow-Teller transition to the ground state, and for the Fermi transition to the isobaric analog state is a measure of the relative strength of the two components of the exchange interaction. This ratio is found compatible with existing systematics for stable T=1 nuclei, and no clear signature of a halo structure was found in the present data. (author)

  7. Improved predictions of nuclear data: A continued challenge in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.

    2001-01-01

    Although important effort has been devoted in the last decades to measure reaction cross sections and decay half-lives of interest in astrophysics, most of the nuclear astrophysics applications still require the use of theoretical predictions to estimate experimentally unknown rates. The nuclear ingredients to the reaction or weak interaction models should preferentially be estimated from microscopic or semi-microscopic global predictions based on sound and reliable nuclear models which, in turn, can compete with more phenomenological highly-parametrized models in the reproduction of experimental data. The latest developments made in deriving the nuclear inputs of relevance in astrophysics applications are reviewed. It mainly concerns nuclear structure properties (atomic masses, deformations, radii, etc...), nuclear level densities, nucleon and α-optical potentials, γ-ray and Gamow-Teller strength functions

  8. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on the integral representation for structure functions and target mass effects, multiscale properties of DNA primary structure including cross-scale correlations, dissipative evolution of the elementary act, the fine structure of the M T =1 Gamow-Teller resonance in 147g Tb→ 147 Gd β + /EC decay, the behaviour of the TVO temperature sensors in the magnetic fields, a fast method for searching for tracks in multilayer drift chambers of HADES spectrometer, a novel approach to particle track etching including surfactant enhanced control of pore morphology, azimuthal correlations of secondary particles in 32 S induced interactions with Ag(Br) nuclei at 4.5 GeV/ c/ nucleon

  9. Examining cross-cultural differences in autism spectrum disorder: A multinational comparison from Greece, Italy, Japan, Poland, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, J L; Matheis, M; Burns, C O; Esposito, G; Venuti, P; Pisula, E; Misiak, A; Kalyva, E; Tsakiris, V; Kamio, Y; Ishitobi, M; Goldin, R L

    2017-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by social and communication impairments as well as restricted, repetitive behavior patterns. Despite the fact that ASD is reported worldwide, very little research exists examining ASD characteristics on a multinational scale. Cross-cultural comparisons are especially important for ASD, since cultural differences may impact the perception of symptoms. Identifying behaviors that are similarly reported as problematic across cultures as well as identifying behaviors in which there is cultural variation could aid in the development and refinement of more universally effective measures. The present study sought to examine similarities and differences in caregiver endorsement of symptom severity through scores on the Baby Infant Screen for Children with aUtIsm Traits (BISCUIT). The BISCUIT was utilized to examine ASD core symptomology in 250 toddlers diagnosed with ASD from Greece, Italy, Japan, Poland, and the United States. Significant differences in overall ASD symptom severity and endorsement were found between multinational groups. Implications of the results are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Social networks and substance use among at-risk emerging adults living in disadvantaged urban areas in the southern United States: a cross-sectional naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jalie A; Cheong, JeeWon; Chandler, Susan D; Crawford, Scott M; Simpson, Cathy A

    2015-09-01

    Substance use and risk-taking are common during emerging adulthood, a transitional period when peer influences often increase and family influences decrease. Investigating relationships between social network features and substance use can inform community-based prevention programs. This study investigated whether substance use among emerging adults living in disadvantaged urban areas was influenced by peer and family social network messages that variously encouraged and discouraged substance use. Cross-sectional, naturalistic field study. Lower-income neighborhoods in Birmingham, Alabama, USA with 344 participants (110 males, 234 females, ages 15-25 years; mean = 18.86 years), recruited via respondent-driven sampling. During structured interviews conducted in community locations, the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test assessed substance use and related problems. Predictor variables were network characteristics, including presence of substance-using peers, messages from friends and family members about substance use and network sources for health information. Higher substance involvement was associated with friend and family encouragement of use and having close peer network members who used substances (Ps Social networks appear to be important in both promoting and preventing substance use in disadvantaged young adults in the United States. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. The association between patient safety culture and burnout and sense of coherence: A cross-sectional study in restructured and not restructured intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vifladt, Anne; Simonsen, Bjoerg O; Lydersen, Stian; Farup, Per G

    2016-10-01

    To study the associations between registered nurses' (RNs) perception of the patient safety culture (safety culture) and burnout and sense of coherence, and to compare the burnout and sense of coherence in restructured and not restructured intensive care units (ICUs). Cross-sectional study. RNs employed at seven ICUs in six hospitals at a Norwegian Hospital Trust. One to four years before the study, three hospitals merged their general and medical ICUs into one general mixed ICU. The safety culture, burnout and sense of coherence were measured with the questionnaires Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, Bergen Burnout Indicator and Sense of Coherence. Participant characteristics and working in restructured and not restructured ICUs were registered. In total, 143/289(49.5%) RNs participated. A positive safety culture was statistically significantly associated with a low score for burnout and a strong sense of coherence. No statistically significant differences were found in burnout and sense of coherence between RNs in the restructured and not restructured ICUs. In this study, a positive safety culture was associated with absence of burnout and high ability to cope with stressful situations. Burnout and sense of coherence were independent of the restructuring process. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Staff working in hospital units with greater social capital experience less work-home conflict: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Anika; Kuntz, Ludwig; Miedaner, Felix

    2017-10-01

    When the interplay between work and private life does not function correctly (work-home conflict), this constitutes a well-known risk factor for poorer health, increased absenteeism and lower work performance. Information about influencing factors of work-home conflict is therefore indispensable in order to avoid it. In this study, we analyse whether a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity' (organizational social capital) can reduce an employee's conflict between work and private life. This study investigates the link between organizational social capital and work-home conflict in health professionals. This issue was investigated using a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. Data from questionnaires completed by physicians and nurses (n=1733) were linked with structural data from 66 neonatal intensive care units in Germany. Using multi-level analyses, we investigated associations between organizational social capital at the ward level and work-home conflict at the level of individual employees, taking into account additional structural and individual characteristics. Employees on wards with greater social capital reported significantly less work-home conflict. Our results support the hypothesis that organizational social capital is an important collective resource. As such, more attention should be given to establishing a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity', and this should be encouraged in a targeted fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and ICU Mobility Scale: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yurika Maria Fogaça; Nawa, Ricardo Kenji; Figueiredo, Thais Borgheti; Martins, Lourdes; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2016-01-01

    To translate the Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and the ICU Mobility Scale (IMS) into Portuguese, creating versions that are cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil, and to determine the interobserver agreement and reliability for both versions. The processes of translation and cross-cultural validation consisted in the following: preparation, translation, reconciliation, synthesis, back-translation, review, approval, and pre-test. The Portuguese-language versions of both instruments were then used by two researchers to evaluate critically ill ICU patients. Weighted kappa statistics and Bland-Altman plots were used in order to verify interobserver agreement for the two instruments. In each of the domains of the instruments, interobserver reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The correlation between the instruments was assessed by Spearman's correlation test. The study sample comprised 103 patients-56 (54%) of whom were male-with a mean age of 52 ± 18 years. The main reason for ICU admission (in 44%) was respiratory failure. Both instruments showed excellent interobserver agreement ( > 0.90) and reliability ( > 0.90) in all domains. Interobserver bias was low for the IMS and the Perme Score (-0.048 ± 0.350 and -0.06 ± 0.73, respectively). The 95% CIs for the same instruments ranged from -0.73 to 0.64 and -1.50 to 1.36, respectively. There was also a strong positive correlation between the two instruments (r = 0.941; p composta por 103 pacientes, sendo a maioria homens (n = 56; 54%), com média de idade = 52 ± 18 anos. O principal motivo de internação nas UTIs foi insuficiência respiratória (em 44%). Os dois instrumentos apresentaram excelente concordância interobservador (> 0,90) e confiabilidade ( > 0,90) em todos os domínios. Constatou-se um baixo viés interobservador na EMU e no Perme Escore (-0,048 ± 0,350 e -0,06 ± 0,73, respectivamente). Os IC95% para os mesmos instrumentos variaram

  14. The real economic effects of cross-delisting from the United States: Evidence on post-operating performance, financial constraints and stock crash risk =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sonia Maria da Silva Faria Nogueira da

    In this study we examine the economic consequences for firms that cross-delisted from a U.S. stock exchange. Using a sample of foreign firms that cross-delisted from U.S. exchange markets from 2000 to 2012, we investigate the long-term performance, the level of financial constraints, and the likelihood of stock price crashes after the cross-delisting event. We document several new findings as follows: i) cross-delisted firms have less growth opportunities, in the long-run, than their cross-listed peers; ii) after the adoption of Rule 12h-6 of 2007, cross-delisted firms exhibit a significant decline in operating performance; iii) cross-delisted firms underperform their cross-listed peers as they experience negative average abnormal returns, especially in the post-cross-delisting period; iv) cross-delisted firms face higher financial constraints post-delisting than their cross-listed counterparts, and also tend to save more cash out of cash flows; v) the increase in financial constraints post-cross-delisting seems to be primarily driven by informational frictions that constrain access to external financing, which are stronger for firms from countries with weaker investor protection and less developed capital markets; vi) cross-delisted firms experience a significant increase in crash risk associated with earnings management in the post-delisting period relative to a control sample of cross-listed firms, and this effect is more pronounced for delisted firms from countries with weaker investor protection and poor quality of their information environment; vii) cross-delisted firms that engage in earnings management to inflate reported earnings prior to a seasoned equity offering are more likely to a subsequent stock price crash.

  15. Search for weak M 1 transitions in 48Ca with inelastic proton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathy, M.; Birkhan, J.; Matsubara, H.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Tamii, A.

    2017-05-01

    Background: The quenching of spin-isospin modes in nuclei is an important field of research in nuclear structure. It has an impact on astrophysical reaction rates and on fundamental processes like neutrinoless double-β decay. Gamow-Teller (GT) and spin-flip M 1 strengths are quenched. Concerning the latter, the Jπ=1+ resonance in the doubly magic nucleus 48Ca, dominated by a single transition, serves as a reference case. Purpose: The aim of the present work is to search for weak M 1 transitions in 48Ca with a high-resolution (p ,p') experiment at 295 MeV and forward angles including 0∘ and a comparison with results from a similar study using backward-angle electron scattering at low momentum transfers in order to estimate their contribution to the total B (M 1 ) strength in 48Ca. Methods: The spin-M 1 cross sections of individual peaks in the spectra are deduced with a multipole decomposition analysis (MDA) and converted to reduced spin-M 1 transition strengths by using the unit cross-section method. For a comparison with electron-scattering results, corresponding reduced B (M 1 ) transition strengths are extracted following the approach outlined in Birkhan et al. [Phys. Rev. C 93, 041302(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.041302]. Results: In total, 30 peaks containing a M 1 contribution are found in the excitation energy region 7-13 MeV. The resulting B (M 1 ) strength distribution compares well to the electron-scattering results considering different factors limiting the sensitivity in both experiments and the enhanced importance of mechanisms breaking the proportionality of nuclear cross sections and electromagnetic matrix elements for weak transitions as studied here. The total strength of 1.14(7) μN2 deduced assuming a nonquenched isoscalar part of the (p ,p') cross sections agrees with the (e ,e') result of 1.21(13) μN2. A bin-wise analysis above 10 MeV provides an upper limit of 1.51(17) μN2. Conclusions: The present results confirm the previous electron

  16. Bed Utilisation in an Irish Regional Paediatric Unit – A Cross-Sectional Study Using the Paediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (PAEP

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    Coilín ÓhAiseadha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Increasing demand for limited healthcare resources raises questions about appropriate use of inpatient beds. In the first paediatric bed utilisation study at a regional university centre in Ireland, we conducted a cross-sectional study to audit the utilisation of inpatient beds at the Regional Paediatric Unit (RPU in University Hospital Limerick (UHL, Limerick, Ireland and also examined hospital activity data, to make recommendations for optimal use of inpatient resources. Methods We used a questionnaire based on the paediatric appropriateness evaluation protocol (PAEP, modified and validated for use in the United Kingdom, to prospectively gather data regarding reasons for admission and for ongoing care after 2 days, from case records for all inpatients during 11 days in February (winter and 7 days in May–June (summer. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analysis to explore associations between failure to meet PAEP criteria and patient attributes including age, gender, admission outside of office hours, arrival by ambulance, and private health insurance. Inpatient bed occupancy and day ward activity were also scrutinised. Results Mean bed occupancy was 84.1%. In all, 12/355 (3.4%, 95% CI: 1.5%–5.3% of children failed to meet PAEP admission criteria, and 27/189 (14.3%, 95% CI: 9.3%–19.3% who were still inpatients after 2 days failed to meet criteria for ongoing care. 35/355 (9.9%, 95% CI: 6.8%–13.0% of admissions fulfilled only the PAEP criterion for intravenous medications or fluid replacement. A logistic regression model constructed by forward selection identified a significant association between failure to meet PAEP criteria for ongoing care 2 days after admission and admission during office hours (08.00–17.59 (P = .020, and a marginally significant association between this outcome and arrival by ambulance (P = .054. Conclusion At a mean bed occupancy of 84.1%, an Irish RPU can achieve 96.6% appropriate admissions

  17. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Predict Medication Compliance Behavior in Patients with Depression in Southern United States in 2016 in a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Britney; Sharma, Manoj; Bennett, Russell; Mawson, Anthony R; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Sung, Jung Hye

    2018-03-01

    Introduction: Depression is a major public health issue. One of the concerns in depression research and practice pertains to non-compliance to prescribed medications. The purpose of the study was to predict compliance with medication use for patients with depression using social cognitive theory (SCT). Based on this study it was envisaged that recommendations for interventions to enhance compliance for medication use could be developed for patients with depression. Methods: The study was conducted using cross sectional design (n=148) in southern United States with a convenience sample of clinic-based depression patients with a 37-item valid and reliable questionnaire. Sample size was calculated to be 148 using G*Power (five predictors with a 0.80 power at the 0.05 alpha level and an estimated effect size of 0.10 with an inflation by 10% for missing data). Social cognitive theory constructs of expectations, self-efficacy and self-efficacy in overcoming barriers, self-control, and environment were reified. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Self-control for taking medication for depression (P=0.04), expectations for taking medication for depression (P=0.025), age (P<0.0001) and race (P=0.04) were significantly related to intent for taking medication for depression (Adjusted R 2 = 0.183). In race, Blacks had lower intent to take medication for depression. Conclusion: Social cognitive theory is weakly predictive with low explained variance for taking medication for depression. It needs to be bolstered by newer theories like integrative model or multi-theory model of health behavior change for designing educational interventions aimed at enhancing compliance to medication for depression.

  18. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Predict Medication Compliance Behavior in Patients with Depression in Southern United States in 2016 in a Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britney Bennett

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is a major public health issue. One of the concerns in depression research and practice pertains to non-compliance to prescribed medications. The purpose of the study was to predict compliance with medication use for patients with depression using social cognitive theory (SCT. Based on this study it was envisaged that recommendations for interventions to enhance compliance for medication use could be developed for patients with depression. Methods: The study was conducted using cross sectional design (n=148 in southern United States with a convenience sample of clinic-based depression patients with a 37-item valid and reliable questionnaire. Sample size was calculated to be 148 using G*Power (five predictors with a 0.80 power at the 0.05 alpha level and an estimated effect size of 0.10 with an inflation by 10% for missing data. Social cognitive theory constructs of expectations, self-efficacy and self-efficacy in overcoming barriers, self-control, and environment were reified. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Self-control for taking medication for depression (P=0.04, expectations for taking medication for depression (P=0.025, age (P<0.0001 and race (P=0.04 were significantly related to intent for taking medication for depression (Adjusted R2 = 0.183. In race, Blacks had lower intent to take medication for depression. Conclusion: Social cognitive theory is weakly predictive with low explained variance for taking medication for depression. It needs to be bolstered by newer theories like integrative model or multi-theory model of health behavior change for designing educational interventions aimed at enhancing compliance to medication for depression.

  19. 24/7 in-house intensivist coverage and fellowship education: a cross-sectional survey of academic medical centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Guzman, Enrique; Colbert, Colleen Y; Mannino, David M; Davenport, Daniel L; Arroliga, Alejandro C

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the current staffing models of practice and the frequency of 24/7 coverage in academic medical centers in the United States and to assess the perceptions of critical care trainees and program directors toward these models. A cross-sectional national survey was conducted using an Internet-based survey platform. The survey was distributed to fellows and program directors of 374 critical care training programs in US academic medical centers. We received 518 responses: 138 from program directors (PDs) (37% of 374 programs) and 380 fellow responses. Coverage by a board-certified or board-eligible intensivist physician 24/7 was reported by 33% of PD respondents and was more common among pediatric and surgical critical care programs. Mandatory in-house call for critical care trainees was reported by 48% of the PDs. Mandatory call was also more common among pediatric-critical care programs compared with the rest (P 24/7 coverage would be associated with better patient care in the ICU and improved education for the fellows, although 65% of them believed this model would have a negative impact on trainees' autonomy. Intensivist coverage 24/7 was not commonly used in US academic centers responding to our survey. Significant differences in coverage models among critical care medicine specialties appear to exist. Program director and trainee respondents believed that 24/7 coverage was associated with better outcomes and education but also expressed concerns about the impact of this model on fellows' autonomy.

  20. Barriers and facilitators to care for the terminally ill: a cross-country case comparison study of Canada, England, Germany, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christopher A; Howell, Doris; Zakus, David; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-02-01

    Why do many patients not die at their preferred location? Analyze system-level characteristics influencing the ability to implement best practices in delivering care for terminally ill adults (barriers and facilitators). Cross-country comparison study from a "most similar-most different" perspective, triangulating evidence from a scoping review of the literature, document analyses, and semi-structured key informant interviews. Case study of Canada, England, Germany, and the United States. While similar with regard to leading causes of death, patient needs, and potential avenues to care, different models of service provision were employed in the four countries studied. Although hospice and palliative care services were generally offered with standard care along the disease continuum and in various settings, and featured common elements such as physical, psycho-social, and spiritual care, outcomes (access, utilization, etc.) varied across jurisdictions. Barriers to best practice service provision included legislative (including jurisdictional), regulatory (e.g. education and training), and financial issues as well as public knowledge and perception ("giving up hope") challenges. Advance care planning, dedicated and stable funding toward hospice and palliative care, including caregiver benefits, population aging, and standards of practice and guidelines to hospice and palliative care, were identified as facilitators. Successful implementation of effective and efficient best practice approaches to care for the terminally ill, such as shared care, requires concerted action to align these system-level characteristics; many factors were identified as being essential but not sufficient. Policy implementation needs to be tailored to the respective health-care system(s), monitored, and fine-tuned.

  1. Branding Asklepios and the Traditional and Variant Serpent Symbol Display Among Health Professional Schools in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Claus; Martelon, MaryKate

    2016-05-25

    History supports the staff and single serpent, the asklepian, as the symbol of healing and medicine, yet its confusion with the caduceus (a winged staff with two snakes wrapped around it) persists. No population-based information on serpent symbol use exists. To determine the prevalence of asklepian and caduceus display among Internet images of medical and health professional schools' emblems, and to compare asklepian and caduceus display between medical and health professional schools, examining the effects of school longevity and geographic location on symbol display. This cross-sectional survey examined Internet websites and Google Images associated with medical and other health professional schools in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada from 2013 to 2015. The primary outcome was display of a traditional or variant asklepian or caduceus among current and past emblems in Google Images. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for the comparison of medical versus other health professional schools were calculated by logistic regression. Differences among schools' longevity were assessed with Student's t-tests and linear regression. Among images of current and past emblems of 482 schools-159 medical schools and 323 health professional schools-107 (22.2%) emblems displayed only the traditional, and 205 (42.5%) any, asklepian. Adjusting for geographic region and longevity, medical schools were 59% less likely than health professional schools to display the traditional asklepian (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.24-0.71, P=.001), and were 7.7 times more likely than health professional schools to display the traditional caduceus. Medical schools were 8% less likely than health professional schools to display any asklepian (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.62-1.38, P=.70), and were 3.3 times more likely than health professional schools to display any caduceus. Schools' preference of the asklepian over the caduceus confirmed historical origins. Less asklepian and more caduceus display by

  2. Diagnosis of post-traumatic sepsis according to "Sepsis guidelines": a cross-sectional survey of sepsis in a trauma intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao TANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of post-traumatic sepsis, and to evaluate the rationality of the 1992, 2001 and 2012 international sepsis definitions in diagnosing post-traumatic sepsis in a trauma intensive care unit (ICU in China. Methods  A one-day cross-sectional survey of trauma patients who met the inclusion criteria was conducted from 8:00 a.m., June 16, 2014 to 8:00 a.m., June 17, 2014 in the trauma ICU of Daping Hospital. The survey data included demographic information, clinical characteristics, pertinent scores (APACHE Ⅱ, SOFA, GCS, ISS and injury mechanism. According to the definition of sepsis as depicted in the 1992, 2001, and 2012 "International Guideline of Sepsis", the patients were divided into A, B and C groups. The infection site, infection pathogens, and key medical treatment were recorded, the infection identified, and the 28day mortality recorded. A positive pathogen culture of respiratory and urinary tracts, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and wound secretion was adopted as the diagnostic "gold standard" for septic infection. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the three versions of the guidelines were statistically analyzed and the diagnostic feasibility of each definition was assessed. Results  A total of 30 trauma patients were enrolled, twenty-three patients met the 1992 sepsis criteria, 22 met the 2001 criteria, and 20 met the 2012 criteria. The prevalence rates were 76.7%, 73.3%, and 66.7%, respectively, and there was no significant statistical difference. Four patients died within 28 days, which was in line with the diagnostic criteria of the three versions of the sepsis criteria. The 28-day mortality in the three sepsis guidelines groups was 17.4%, 18.2%, and 25.0%, respectively, indicating no statistical difference. By adopting culture-positive pathogens as the "gold standard" of septic infection, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the group A was 77.8% and 25

  3. State Firearm Laws and Interstate Firearm Deaths From Homicide and Suicide in the United States: A Cross-sectional Analysis of Data by County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Elinore J; Morrison, Christopher N; Branas, Charles C; Wiebe, Douglas J

    2018-03-05

    Firearm laws in one state may be associated with increased firearm death rates from homicide and suicide in neighboring states are uncertain. To determine whether counties located closer to states with lenient firearm policies have higher firearm death rates. This cross-sectional study of firearm death rates by county for January 2010 to December 2014 examined data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for firearm suicide and homicide decedents for 3108 counties in the 48 contiguous states of the United States. Each county was assigned 2 scores, a state policy score (range, 0-12) based on the strength of its state firearm laws, and an interstate policy score (range, -1.33 to 8.31) based on the sum of population-weighted and distance-decayed policy scores for all other states. Counties were divided into those with low, medium, and high home state and interstate policy scores. County-level rates of firearm, nonfirearm, and total homicide and suicide. With multilevel Bayesian spatial Poisson models, we generated incidence rate ratios (IRR) comparing incidence rates between each group of counties and the reference group, counties with high home state and high interstate policy scores. Stronger firearm laws in a state were associated with lower firearm suicide rates and lower overall suicide rates regardless of the strength of the other states' laws. Counties with low state scores had the highest rates of firearm suicide. Rates were similar across levels of interstate policy score (low: IRR, 1.34; 95% credible interval [CI], 1.11-1.65; medium: IRR, 1.36, (95% CI, 1.15-1.65; and high: IRR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.20-1.73). Counties with low state and low or medium interstate policy scores had the highest rates of firearm homicide. Counties with low home state and interstate scores had higher firearm homicide rates (IRR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.02-1.88) and overall homicide rates (IRR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03-1.67). Counties in states with low firearm policy scores had lower

  4. Cross-Cultural Studies of Implicit Theories of Creativity: A Comparative Analysis between the United States and the Main Ethnic Groups in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Suzanna J.; Puccio, Gerard J.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the extent of influence of culture on implicit theories of creativity among laypeople from the United States and Singapore, as well as the ethnic groups in Singapore. Adaptive and innovative styles of creativity were examined, as well as their own conceptions of creativity. Laypersons from the United States and Singapore were…

  5. History of Giant Resonances and Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Arima, A

    1999-01-01

    The history of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions is reviewed. The importance of configuration mixing and core polarization to explain the quenching phenomena is shown, and discussed in the context of the recent measurement of the Gamow-Teller strength in sup 9 sup 0 Nb. It is confirmed that the contribution of the DELTA-hole excitation to the quenching of spin matrix elements is small.

  6. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Boiling Water Reactor Benchmark Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison of contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a boiling water reactor calculational benchmark problem. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The benchmark problem was originally evaluated by Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library. In this paper, the Westinghouse RAPTOR-M3G three-dimensional discrete ordinates code was used. A variety of cross-section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ALPAN-VII.0 developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculated fast reaction rates using the four aforementioned cross-section libraries in the pressure vessel capsule, for six dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 8% was observed. As such, it is concluded that the results calculated by RAPTOR-M3G are consistent with the benchmark and further that the different vintage BUGLE cross-section libraries investigated are largely self-consistent.

  7. Dementia care worker stress associations with unit type, resident, and work environment characteristics: a cross-sectional secondary data analysis of the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resources Project (SHURP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Barbara; De Geest, Sabina; Fierz, Katharina; Beckmann, Sonja; Zúñiga, Franziska

    2017-03-01

    Although caring for residents with dementia in nursing homes is associated with various stressors for care workers, the role of the unit type, and particularly the proportion of residents with dementia, remains unclear. This study aimed to explore associations between unit type and care worker stress, taking into account additional potential stressors. This cross-sectional study was a secondary data analysis in the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resources Project, which included data from 3,922 care workers from 156 Swiss nursing homes. Care workers' stress was measured with a shortened version of the Health Professions Stress Inventory. Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess care worker stress and its relationships with three unit types (special care units and others with high or low proportions of residents with dementia), work environment factors, and aggressive resident behavior. After including all potential stressors in the models, no significant differences between the three unit types regarding care worker stress were found. However, increased care worker stress levels were significantly related to lower ratings of staffing and resources adequacy, the experience of verbal aggression, and the observation of verbal or physical aggression among residents. Although the unit type plays only a minor role regarding care worker stress, this study confirms that work environment and aggressive behavior of residents are important factors associated with work-related stress. To prevent increases of care worker stress, interventions to improve the work environment and strengthen care workers' ability to cope with aggressive behavior are suggested.

  8. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sermeus, Walter; Van den Heede, Koen; Sloane, Douglas M; Busse, Reinhard; McKee, Martin; Bruyneel, Luk; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Griffiths, Peter; Moreno-Casbas, Maria Teresa; Tishelman, Carol; Scott, Anne; Brzostek, Tomasz; Kinnunen, Juha; Schwendimann, Rene; Heinen, Maud; Zikos, Dimitris; Sjetne, Ingeborg Strømseng; Smith, Herbert L; Kutney-Lee, Ann

    2012-03-20

    To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. Nurses were surveyed in general acute care hospitals (488 in 12 European countries; 617 in the United States); patients were surveyed in 210 European hospitals and 430 US hospitals. 33 659 nurses and 11 318 patients in Europe; 27 509 nurses and more than 120 000 patients in the US. Nurse outcomes (hospital staffing, work environments, burnout, dissatisfaction, intention to leave job in the next year, patient safety, quality of care), patient outcomes (satisfaction overall and with nursing care, willingness to recommend hospitals). The percentage of nurses reporting poor or fair quality of patient care varied substantially by country (from 11% (Ireland) to 47% (Greece)), as did rates for nurses who gave their hospital a poor or failing safety grade (4% (Switzerland) to 18% (Poland)). We found high rates of nurse burnout (10% (Netherlands) to 78% (Greece)), job dissatisfaction (11% (Netherlands) to 56% (Greece)), and intention to leave (14% (US) to 49% (Finland, Greece)). Patients' high ratings of their hospitals also varied considerably (35% (Spain) to 61% (Finland, Ireland)), as did rates of patients willing to recommend their hospital (53% (Greece) to 78% (Switzerland)). Improved work environments and reduced ratios of patients to nurses were associated with increased care quality and patient satisfaction. In European hospitals, after adjusting for hospital and nurse characteristics, nurses with better work environments were half as likely to report poor or fair care quality (adjusted odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.61) and give their hospitals poor or failing grades on patient safety (0.50, 0.44 to 0.56). Each additional patient per nurse increased the odds of nurses reporting poor or fair

  9. Cross-border ties as a source of risk and resilience: Do cross-border ties moderate the relationship between migration-related stress and psychological distress among Latino migrants in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jacqueline M.; Alcántara, Carmela; Rudolph, Kara E.; Viruell-Fuentes, Edna A.

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the associations between health and the cross-border ties that migrants maintain with their family members in communities of origin. We draw on theory related to social ties, ethnic identity, and mental health to examine cross-border ties as potential moderators of the association between migration-related stress and psychological distress among Latino migrants. Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Survey, we find that remittance sending is associated with significantly lower levels of psychological distress for Cuban migrants, and difficulty visiting home is associated with significantly greater psychological distress for Puerto Rican migrants. There were significant associations between migration-related stressors and psychological distress, although these associations fell to non-significance after accounting for multiple testing. We found little evidence that cross-border ties either buffer or exacerbate the association between migration-related stressors and psychological distress. We consider the findings within the current political and historical context of cross-border ties and separation. PMID:27803264

  10. Cross-border Ties as Sources of Risk and Resilience: Do Cross-border Ties Moderate the Relationship between Migration-related Stress and Psychological Distress for Latino Migrants in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jacqueline M; Alcántara, Carmela; Rudolph, Kara E; Viruell-Fuentes, Edna A

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have examined the associations between health and the cross-border ties that migrants maintain with their family members in communities of origin. We draw on theory related to social ties, ethnic identity, and mental health to examine cross-border ties as potential moderators of the association between migration-related stress and psychological distress among Latino migrants. Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Survey, we find that remittance sending is associated with significantly lower levels of psychological distress for Cuban migrants, and difficulty visiting home is associated with significantly greater psychological distress for Puerto Rican migrants. There were significant associations between migration-related stressors and psychological distress, although these associations fell to nonsignificance after accounting for multiple testing. We found little evidence that cross-border ties either buffer or exacerbate the association between migration-related stressors and psychological distress. We consider the findings within the current political and historical context of cross-border ties and separation. © American Sociological Association 2016.

  11. Cross-Cultural Adaptation in the Discourse of Education and Motherhood: An Autoethnography of a Korean International Graduate Student Mother in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yunjeong

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the cross-cultural adaption experience of myself as a Korean graduate student woman coming from a Confucian-heritage culture. The study focuses on the multiple roles I played as an Asian graduate student mother in the host cultural environment and the way I have undergone throughout the process of my adaptation. As a research…

  12. Cross-Cultural Analysis of HPT: An Empirical Investigation of HPT Competencies in the Workplace in the United States and South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Ramaswamy N.; Klein, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research in the areas of human performance technology (HPT), organizational development, and cross-cultural training has suggested the need for developing managerial competencies that are effective in diverse cultural settings. Some competencies such as technical proficiency, knowledge of company systems, adaptability, and the ability to…

  13. Reception in Chile of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law Model Law on Cross-Border Insolvency: Brief analysis of the center of main interests of the debtor as a new connecting factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Daniel Levy Morchio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyze the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-border Insolvency and its incorporation into national law by means of the entry into force of the new Law of Insolvency and Re-entrepreneurship, paying special attention to the concept of center of main interests of the debtor, as a new factor of connection between jurisdictions. For this, we will begin with the situation of cross-border insolvency in Chile prior to the new law, will analyze the origin, structure and objectives of the model law and the way in which was introduced in Chile, to finally study the concept of center of main interests of the debtor.

  14. Cross-cultural generality and specificity in self-regulation: avoidance personal goals and multiple aspects of well-being in the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Andrew J; Sedikides, Constantine; Murayama, Kou; Tanaka, Ayumi; Thrash, Todd M; Mapes, Rachel R

    2012-10-01

    The authors examined avoidance personal goals as concurrent (Study 1) and longitudinal (Study 2) predictors of multiple aspects of well-being in the United States and Japan. In both studies, participants adopted more avoidance personal goals in Japan relative to the United States. Both studies also demonstrated that avoidance personal goals were significant negative predictors of the most relevant aspects of well-being in each culture. Specifically, avoidance personal goals were negative predictors of intrapersonal and eudaimonic well-being in the United States and were negative predictors of interpersonal and eudaimonic well-being in Japan. The findings clarify and extend puzzling findings from prior empirical work in this area, and raise provocative possibilities about the nature of avoidance goal pursuit.

  15. An analysis of national and cross-national consumer segments using the food-related lifestyle instrument in Denmark, France, Germany and the United Kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone; Grunert, Klaus G.

    1996-01-01

    Food markets are claimed to be characterized by two opposing tendencies: On the one hand, food culture seems to be a domain of increasingly transnational character. On the other hand, there is substantial evidence that food culture has considerabl inertia. This papers reports a series of studies...... aimed at investigating whether cross-national food consumer segments can be found. Food consumer segments are derived using the food-related lifestyle instrument, which characterizes consumers by ho employ food and eating to obtain life values. The instrument, which has been developed especially...... have at least weak cross-cultural comparability. Nation-wise cluster analysis using Ward method yielded sets of five or six segments per country. The segments were named the uninvolved, the careless, the rational, the conservative, and the adventurous food consumers. A comparison of the segment...

  16. Right place, wrong species: a 20-year review of rabies virus cross species transmission among terrestrial mammals in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Wallace

    Full Text Available In the continental US, four terrestrial mammalian species are reservoirs for seven antigenic rabies virus variants. Cross species transmission (CST occurs when a rabies virus variant causes disease in non-reservoir species.This study analyzed national surveillance data for rabies in terrestrial mammals. The CST rate was defined as: number of rabid non-reservoir animals/number of rabid reservoir animals. CST rates were analyzed for trend. Clusters of high CST rate counties were evaluated using space-time scanning statistics.The number of counties reporting a raccoon variant CST rate >1.0 increased from 75 in 1992 to 187 in 2011; counties with skunk variant CST rates >1.0 remained unchanged during the same period. As of 2011, for every rabid raccoon reported within the raccoon variant region, there were 0.73 cases of this variant reported in non-reservoir animals. Skunks were the most common non-reservoir animal reported with the raccoon rabies variant. Domestic animals were the most common non-reservoir animal diagnosed with a skunk rabies virus variant (n = 1,601. Cross species transmission rates increased fastest among domestic animals.Cross species transmission of rabies virus variants into non-reservoir animals increases the risk of human exposures and threatens current advances toward rabies control. Cross species transmission in raccoon rabies enzootic regions increased dramatically during the study period. Pet owners should vaccinate their dogs and cats to ensure against CST, particularly in regions with active foci of rabies circulation. Clusters of high CST activity represent areas for further study to better understand interspecies disease transmission dynamics. Each CST event has the potential to result in a rabies virus adapted for sustained transmission in a new species; therefore further understanding of the dynamics of CST may help in early detection or prevention of the emergence of new terrestrial rabies virus variants.

  17. Salmonella and raw shell eggs: results of a cross-sectional study of contamination rates and egg safety practices in the United Kingdom catering sector in 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, R; Little, C L; Mitchell, R T

    2005-02-01

    This study was prompted by epidemiological investigations of the unusual number of Salmonella Enteritidis outbreaks associated with the use of eggs in catering premises in England and Wales during 2002. The aims of the study, performed between April and May 2003, were to establish the rate of Salmonella contamination in raw shell eggs from catering premises, investigate any correlation between the origin and type of eggs and the presence of particular serotypes or phage types (PTs) of Salmonella, and examine the use of raw shell eggs in catering premises in the United Kingdom. A total of 34,116 eggs (5,686 pooled samples of six eggs) were collected from 2,104 catering premises, most of which were eggs produced in the United Kingdom (88%). Salmonella was isolated from 17 pools (0.3%) of eggs. Of these, 15 were Salmonella Enteritidis, which were further characterized to PTs as follows: PT6 (0.1%), PT4 (0.07%), PT12 (0.04%), PT1 (0.04%), and PT14b (0.02%). Salmonella Livingstone and Salmonella Typhimurium definitive type 7 resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline were also isolated. The Salmonella contamination rate of eggs produced in the United Kingdom appears to have decreased significantly since 1995 and 1996. This trend is reflected in the decrease of Salmonella Enteritidis and, in particular, Salmonella Enteritidis PT4. The impact of the United Kingdom Food Standards Agency's advice on the use of eggs, issued in January 2003, is discussed.

  18. Double differentiation in a cross-national comparison of populist political movements and online media uses in the United States and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groshek (Jacob); J.M. Engelbert (Jiska)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn a context of highly visible and politically influential populist movements, this study considers the online self-representation of the Tea Party Patriots (TPP) in the United States and the Party for Freedom (PVV) in the Netherlands. A multi-methodological approach was adopted to

  19. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports in Early Childhood Classrooms in the United States and South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Elizabeth A.; Noh, Jina; Heo, Kay H.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the implementation of critical features associated with positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in early childhood classrooms in the United States and South Korea. Each country has a distinct approach to providing early education for young children. There is some evidence that preschool teachers' approaches to…

  20. Cross-Cultural Comparison of Effective Leadership in Schools for Children with Blindness or Low Vision in the United States and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, Paul M.; Oyinlade, A. Olu

    2016-01-01

    In this project, the authors used the Essential Behavioral Leadership Qualities (EBLQ) method of measuring leadership effectiveness to assess and compare the effectiveness of principals (leaders) of residential schools for children with blindness or low vision in the United States (U.S.) and Nigeria. A total of 248 teachers (subordinates) in 25…

  1. Studying Cross-Cultural Differences in the Development of Infant Temperament: People's Republic of China, the United States of America, and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartstein, Maria A.; Gonzalez, Carmen; Carranza, Jose A.; Ahadi, Stephan A.; Ye, Renmin; Rothbart, Mary K.; Yang, Suh Wen

    2006-01-01

    Investigated early development of temperament across three cultures: People's Republic of China (PRC), United States of America (US), and Spain, utilizing a longitudinal design (assessments at 3, 6, and 9 months of age). Selection of these countries presented an opportunity to conduct Eastern-Western/Individualistic-Collectivistic comparisons. The…

  2. The Value of Non-Work Time in Cross-National Quality of Life Comparisons: The Case of the United States vs. the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, C.M.C.; DiPrete, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons of wellbeing between the United States and Western Europe generally show that most Americans have higher standards of living than do Western Europeans at comparable locations in their national income distributions. These comparisons of wellbeing typically privilege disposable income and

  3. A Cross-Cultural Assessment of Three Theories of Pro-Environmental Behavior: A Comparison between Business Students of Chile and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordano, Mark; Welcomer, Stephanie; Scherer, Robert F.; Pradenas, Lorena; Parada, Victor

    2011-01-01

    We surveyed business students in the United States (n = 256) and Chile (n = 310) to compare three theories of pro-environmental behavior.We examined Ajzen and Fishbein's theory of reasoned action, Schawartz's norm activation theory, and the values-beliefs-norms theory created by Stern, Dietz, Abel, Guagnano, and Kalof. We produced reliable…

  4. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Knowledge and Stigma Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder among College Students in Lebanon and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Rita; Daou, Nidal; DeNigris, Danielle; Shane-Simpson, Christina; Brooks, Patricia J.; Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Although misconceptions associated with ASD are apparent worldwide, they may differ across cultures. This study compares knowledge and stigma associated with ASD in a country with limited autism resources, Lebanon, and a country with substantial autism resources, the United States (US). College students in the US (N = 346) and Lebanon (N = 329)…

  5. The Cross-Cultural study of Emotional Expression in Japan and the United States : The Non-monolithic Nature of Individualism and Collectivism

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Isamu; Stephan, Cookie White; Stephan, Walter G.; Morrison, Shara L.

    1996-01-01

    In this study 3 hypotheses were tested concerning differences between the expression of emotions in collectivistic and individualistic cultures using samples from Japan and the United States. American participants anticipated feeling more comfortable expressing emotions that affirm independence but participants from Japan anticipated feeling equally comfortable expressing independent and interdependent emotions. Japanese participants anticipated feeling equally comfortable expressing emotions...

  6. A Cross-Cultural Examination of University Students' Motivation toward Band and Academics in Singapore and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Leonard; Miksza, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how university band students' (non--music majors) motivational goal orientations toward band and academics differ across participants from Singapore (n = 200) and the United States (n = 227) and examine how they relate to a suite of adaptive dispositions (i.e., flow, grit, and commitment) relevant for…

  7. Cross-cultural Study of Understanding of Scale and Measurement: Does the everyday use of US customary units disadvantage US students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Cesar

    2013-06-01

    Following a sociocultural perspective, this study investigates how students who have grown up using the SI (Système International d'Unités) (metric) or US customary (USC) systems of units for everyday use differ in their knowledge of scale and measurement. Student groups were similar in terms of socioeconomic status, curriculum, native language transparency of number word structure, type of school, and makeup by gender and grade level, while varying by native system of measurement. Their performance on several tasks was compared using binary logistic regression, ordinal logistic regression, and analysis of variance, with gender and grade level as covariates. Participants included 17 USC-native and 89 SI-native students in a school in Mexico, and 31 USC-native students in a school in the Midwestern USA. SI-native students performed at a significantly higher level estimating the length of a metre and a conceptual task (coordinating relative size and absolute size). No statistically significant differences were found on tasks involving factual knowledge about objects or units, scale construction, or estimation of other units. USC-native students in the US school performed at a higher level on smallest known object. These findings suggest that the more transparent SI system better supports conceptual thinking about scale and measurement than the idiosyncratic USC system. Greater emphasis on the SI system and more complete adoption of the SI system for everyday life may improve understanding among US students. Advancing sociocultural theory, systems of units were found to mediate learner's understanding of scale and measurement, much as number words mediate counting and problem solving.

  8. The application of civil commitment law and practices to a case of delusional disorder: a cross-national comparison of legal approaches in the United States and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Philip; Goldstein, Robert Lloyd

    2006-01-01

    Legal approaches to civil commitment in the United States and the United Kingdom are compared. A concise overview of the historical evolution of civil commitment in both countries precedes a discussion of the present scheme of commitment standards in each system. These current standards in U.S. and U.K. jurisdictions are then applied to a hypothetical case of delusional disorder. A discussion of the constructive use of civil commitment in patients with delusional disorder who may be dangerous focuses on its value as a preventive measure against potential harm to self or others, as well as the pros and cons of coercive assessment and treatment. Despite the many differences in approach to commitment, the authors concur that in both countries the patient with delusional disorder was committable before the commission of a serious criminal offense.

  9. Social media use, body image, and psychological well-being: a cross-cultural comparison of Korea and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Lee, Hye Eun; Choi, Jounghwa; Kim, Jang Hyun; Han, Hae Lin

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the relationships among social media use for information, self-status seeking and socializing, body image, self-esteem, and psychological well-being, and some cultural effects moderating these relationships. Americans (n = 502) and Koreans (n = 518) completed an online survey. The main findings showed that (a) social media use for information about body image is negatively related to body satisfaction in the United States and Korea, while social media use for self-status seeking regarding body image is positively related to body satisfaction only in Korea; and (b) body satisfaction has direct and indirect positive effects on psychological well-being manifested in similar ways in the United States and Korea. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  10. Silver-embedded screens in the intensive care unit. A new tool to control multi-drug resistant bacterial cross-transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J; Ramirez, P; Villarreal, E; Gordon, M; Cuesta, S; Piñol, M; Frasquet, J; Castellanos, Á

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of silver-embedded surfaces (BactiBlock®) to prevent surface colonization by multi-resistant bacteria (MRB) and to reduce the incidence of MRB colonization and infection in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). A 6-month prospective observational study in a 24-bed mixed ICU divided into two identical subunits (12 beds each) was designed. Seven solid mobile screens were placed in one of the subunits while in the other cloth screens remained. Solid screens were constructed with high-density polyethylene embedded in Bactiblock®. To evaluate the effectiveness of screens coated with Bactiblock®, number of MRB isolates on screens were compared for 6 months. Likewise, numbers of new patients and ICU-stays with MRB colonization in the two subunits were compared. One hundred forty screen samples were collected in 10-point prevalent days. MRB were detected on 28 (20.0%) samples. Over the 70 samples taken on cloth folding screens, MRB were detected in 25 (35.7%), while only 3 (4.3%) of the 70 samples taken on Bactiblock® screens were positive for MRB (p unit with Bactiblock® screens presented fewer number of ICU stays with MRB colonization (27.8% vs 47.1%; p units, proving to be an useful tool in the control of MRB.

  11. Attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration: a cross-cultural study of male and female physicians and nurses in the United States and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, M; Nasca, T J; Cohen, M J; Fields, S K; Rattner, S L; Griffiths, M; Ibarra, D; de Gonzalez, A A; Torres-Ruiz, A; Ibarra, G; Garcia, A

    2001-01-01

    Inter-professional collaboration between physicians and nurses, within and between cultures, can help contain cost and insure better patient outcomes. Attitude toward such collaboration is a function of the roles prescribed in the culture that guide professional behavior. The purpose of the study was to test three research hypotheses concerning attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration across genders, disciplines, and cultures. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration was administered to 639 physicians and nurses in the United States (n = 267) and Mexico (n = 372). Attitude scores were compared by gender (men, women), discipline (physicians, nurses), and culture (United States, Mexico) by using a three-way factorial analysis of variance design. Findings confirmed the first research hypothesis by demonstrating that both physicians and nurses in the United States would express more positive attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration than their counterparts in Mexico. The second research hypothesis, positing that nurses as compared to physicians in both countries would express more positive attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration, was also supported. The third research hypothesis that female physicians would express more positive attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration than their male counterparts was not confirmed. Collaborative education for medical and nursing students, particularly in cultures with a hierarchical model of inter-professional relationship, is needed to promote positive attitudes toward complementary roles of physicians and nurses. Faculty preparation for collaboration is necessary in such cultures before implementing collaborative education.

  12. On the possibility of producing true real-time retinal cross-sectional images using a graphics processing unit enhanced master-slave optical coherence tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Frederick; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    In a previous report, we demonstrated master-slave optical coherence tomography (MS-OCT), an OCT method that does not need resampling of data and can be used to deliver en face images from several depths simultaneously. In a separate report, we have also demonstrated MS-OCT's capability of producing cross-sectional images of a quality similar to those provided by the traditional Fourier domain (FD) OCT technique, but at a much slower rate. Here, we demonstrate that by taking advantage of the parallel processing capabilities offered by the MS-OCT method, cross-sectional OCT images of the human retina can be produced in real time. We analyze the conditions that ensure a true real-time B-scan imaging operation and demonstrate in vivo real-time images from human fovea and the optic nerve, with resolution and sensitivity comparable to those produced using the traditional FD-based method, however, without the need of data resampling.

  13. A cross-sectional study of emergency care utilization and associated costs of violent-related (assault) injuries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monuteaux, Michael C; Fleegler, Eric W; Lee, Lois K

    2017-11-01

    Violent-related (assault) injuries are a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Many violent injury victims seek treatment in the emergency department (ED). Our objectives were to (1) estimate rates of violent-related injuries evaluated in United States EDs, (2) estimate linear trends in ED visits for violent-related injuries from 2000 to 2010, and (3) to determine the associated health care and work-loss costs. We examined adults 18 years and older from a nationally representative survey (the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey) of ED visits, from 2000 to 2010. Violent injury was defined using International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev.-Clinical Modification, diagnosis and mechanism of injury codes. We calculated rates of ED visits for violent injuries. Medical and work-loss costs accrued by these injuries were calculated for 2005, inflation-adjusted to 2011 dollars using the WISQARS Cost of Injury Reports. An annual average of 1.4 million adults were treated for violent injuries in EDs from 2000 to 2010, comprising 1.6% (95% confidence interval, 1.5%-1.6%) of all US adult ED visits. Young adults (18-25 years), men, nonwhites, uninsured or publically insured patients, and those residing in high poverty urban areas were at increased risk for ED visits for violent injury. The 1-year, inflation-adjusted medical and work-loss cost of violent-inflicted injuries in adults in the United States was US $49.5 billion. Violent injuries account for over one million ED visits annually among adults, with no change in rates over the past decade. Young black men are at especially increased risk for ED visits for violent injuries. Overall, violent-related injuries resulted in substantial financial and societal costs. Epidemiological study, level III.

  14. [Visual communication in the prevention of cross infection: study performed at the intensive care unit of the Evangélic Hospital on Londrina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldy, J L; Russo, S; Jabur, A; Fantinato, I C; Yamamura, M

    1990-01-01

    The influence of posters with illustrations, instructions, and appeals for hand-washing was evaluated in terms of their effect on the frequency of occurrence this procedure, before the contact with the patients, in the Intensive Therapy Unit of the Hospital Evangélico, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil. The influence of posters was statistically significant on the frequency of hand-washing by physicians, trained-nurses and laboratory technicians, but not in respect to physical-therapists, or blood-bank and X-ray technicians.

  15. Border Crossing Points, US-Mexico Border, 2015, NAVTEQ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NAVTEQ Border Crossings for the United States. The Border Crossing layer contains all international border crossings for all motorway crossings, as well as other...

  16. Reasoning About Cultural and Genetic Transmission: Developmental and Cross-Cultural Evidence From Peru, Fiji, and the United States on How People Make Inferences About Trait Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Cristina; Boyd, Robert; Henrich, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Using samples from three diverse populations, we test evolutionary hypotheses regarding how people reason about the inheritance of various traits. First, we provide a framework for differentiat-ing the outputs of mechanisms that evolved for reasoning about variation within and between (a) biological taxa and (b) culturally evolved ethnic categories from (c) a broader set of beliefs and categories that are the outputs of structured learning mechanisms. Second, we describe the results of a modified "switched-at-birth" vignette study that we administered among children and adults in Puno (Peru), Yasawa (Fiji), and adults in the United States. This protocol permits us to study perceptions of prenatal and social transmission pathways for various traits and to differentiate the latter into vertical (i.e., parental) versus horizontal (i.e., peer) cultural influence. These lines of evidence suggest that people use all three mechanisms to reason about the distribution of traits in the population. Participants at all three sites develop expectations that morphological traits are under prenatal influence, and that belief traits are more culturally influenced. On the other hand, each population holds culturally specific beliefs about the degree of social influence on non-morphological traits and about the degree of vertical transmission-with only participants in the United States expecting parents to have much social influence over their children. We reinterpret people's differentiation of trait transmission pathways in light of humans' evolutionary history as a cultural species. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  17. Efficiency of Executive Function: A Two-Generation Cross-Cultural Comparison of Samples From Hong Kong and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefson, Michelle R; Ng, Florrie Fei-Yin; Wang, Qian; Hughes, Claire

    2017-05-01

    Although Asian preschoolers acquire executive functions (EFs) earlier than their Western counterparts, little is known about whether this advantage persists into later childhood and adulthood. To address this gap, in the current study we gave four computerized EF tasks (providing measures of inhibition, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and planning) to a large sample ( n = 1,427) of 9- to 16-year-olds and their parents. All participants lived in either the United Kingdom or Hong Kong. Our findings highlight the importance of combining developmental and cultural perspectives and show both similarities and contrasts across sites. Specifically, adults' EF performance did not differ between the two sites; age-related changes in executive function for both the children and the parents appeared to be culturally invariant, as did a modest intergenerational correlation. In contrast, school-age children and young adolescents in Hong Kong outperformed their United Kingdom counterparts on all four EF tasks, a difference consistent with previous findings from preschool children.

  18. Validation of the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey (NSS-8) in six Norwegian neonatal intensive care units: a quantitative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Inger Hilde; Svindseth, Marit Følsvik; Nesset, Erik; Orner, Roderick; Iversen, Valentina Cabral

    2018-03-27

    The experience of having their new-borns admitted to an intensive care unit (NICU) can be extremely distressing. Subsequent risk of post-incident-adjustment difficulties are increased for parents, siblings, and affected families. Patient and next of kin satisfaction surveys provide key indicators of quality in health care. Methodically constructed and validated survey tools are in short supply and parents' experiences of care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units is under-researched. This paper reports a validation of the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey (NSS-8) in six Norwegian NICUs. Parents' survey returns were collected using the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey (NSS-13). Data quality and psychometric properties were systematically assessed using exploratory factor analysis, tests of internal consistency, reliability, construct, convergent and discriminant validity. Each set of hospital returns were subjected to an apostasy analysis before an overall satisfaction rate was calculated. The survey sample of 568 parents represents 45% of total eligible population for the period of the study. Missing data accounted for 1,1% of all returns. Attrition analysis shows congruence between sample and total population. Exploratory factor analysis identified eight factors of concern to parents,"Care and Treatment", "Doctors", "Visits", "Information", "Facilities", "Parents' Anxiety", "Discharge" and "Sibling Visits". All factors showed satisfactory internal consistency, good reliability (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.70-0.94). For the whole scale of 51 items α 0.95. Convergent validity using Spearman's rank between the eight factors and question measuring overall satisfaction was significant on all factors. Discriminant validity was established for all factors. Overall satisfaction rates ranged from 86 to 90% while for each of the eight factors measures of satisfaction varied between 64 and 86%. The NSS-8 questionnaire is a valid and reliable scale for measuring parents' assessment of

  19. Seroprevalence of five neglected parasitic diseases among immigrants accessing five infectious and tropical diseases units in Italy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, G; Di Girolamo, C; Zammarchi, L; Angheben, A; Morandi, M; Tais, S; Degani, M; El Hamad, I; Caligaris, S; Ciannameo, A; Grilli, E; Urbinati, L; Monteiro, G B; Scarcella, C; Petrosillo, N; Digaetano, M; Rabbi, L; Bazzanini, N; Cacciatore, F; Marta, B L; Moro, M L; Bartoloni, A; Viale, P; Verucchi, G

    2017-05-01

    This multicentre cross-sectional study aims to estimate the prevalence of five neglected tropical diseases (Chagas disease, filariasis, schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis and toxocariasis) among immigrants accessing health care facilities in five Italian cities (Bologna, Brescia, Florence, Rome, Verona). Individuals underwent a different set of serological tests, according to country of origin and presence of eosinophilia. Seropositive patients were treated and further followed up. A total of 930 adult immigrants were enrolled: 477 men (51.3%), 445 women (47.9%), eight transgender (0.8%); median age was 37.81 years (range 18-80 years). Most of them had come from the African continent (405/930, 43.5%), the rest from East Europe, South America and Asia, and 9.6% (89/930) were diagnosed with at least one of the infections under study. Seroprevalence of each specific infection varied from 3.9% (7/180) for Chagas disease to 9.7% (11/113) for toxocariasis. Seropositive people were more likely to be 35-40 years old and male, and to come from South East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa or South America. The results of our study confirm that neglected tropical diseases represent a substantial health problem among immigrants and highlight the need to address this emerging public health issue. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Using cross-classified multilevel models to disentangle school and neighborhood effects: an example focusing on smoking behaviors among adolescents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Erin C; Richmond, Tracy K; Milliren, Carly E; Subramanian, S V

    2015-01-01

    Despite much interest in understanding the influence of contexts on health, most research has focused on one context at a time, ignoring the reality that individuals have simultaneous memberships in multiple settings. Using the example of smoking behavior among adolescents in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we applied cross-classified multilevel modeling (CCMM) to examine fixed and random effects for schools and neighborhoods. We compared the CCMM results with those obtained from a traditional multilevel model (MLM) focused on either the school and neighborhood separately. In the MLMs, 5.2% of the variation in smoking was due to differences between neighborhoods (when schools were ignored) and 6.3% of the variation in smoking was due to differences between schools (when neighborhoods were ignored). However in the CCMM examining neighborhood and school variation simultaneously, the neighborhood-level variation was reduced to 0.4%. Results suggest that using MLM, instead of CCMM, could lead to overestimating the importance of certain contexts and could ultimately lead to targeting interventions or policies to the wrong settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Scope of practice and supervision of orthodontic therapists in the United Kingdom: Part 1: a national cross-sectional survey of orthodontists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Charlotte A; Ahmed, Farooq; Waring, David; Malik, Ovais H

    2018-03-01

    Since the introduction of orthodontic therapists (OTs), there has been little research on the scope of practice and the level of supervision they receive. This study investigates how OTs are being utilised and supervised, and how this compares with current recommendations. A postal cross-sectional survey was mailed to all UK General Dental Council (GDC) registered specialist orthodontists. A 59.7% response rate (747) was achieved. 52% of the respondents reported they worked with/employed an OT. The majority of orthodontists worked with an OT in primary care (67%) seeing predominantly NHS (56%) patients and performed a wide range of duties. Orthodontists reported a perceived increase in clinical output (74%) and time available for treatment planning (61%). The majority (85%) of orthodontists indicated they provide a written prescription for the OT. Forty-two per cent reported the prescription did not contain the required information as stipulated by the GDC. OTs are valued members of the orthodontic team, improving productivity and allowing orthodontists more time for treatment planning. The majority of orthodontists appeared to be working to the BOS and GDC recommendations, with greater awareness needed regarding the provision of a written treatment prescription.

  2. How health service delivery guides the allocation of major trauma patients in the intensive care units of the inclusive (hub and spoke) trauma system of the Emilia Romagna Region (Italy). A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Annalisa; Gordini, Giovanni; Ventura, Chiara; Barozzi, Marco; Caspani, Maria Luisa Rita; Fabbri, Andrea; Ferrari, Anna Maria; Ferri, Enrico; Giugni, Aimone; Marino, Massimiliano; Martino, Costanza; Pizzamiglio, Mario; Ravaldini, Maurizio; Russo, Emanuele; Trabucco, Laura; Trombetti, Susanna; De Palma, Rossana

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate cross-sectional patient distribution and standardised 30-day mortality in the intensive care units (ICU) of an inclusive hub and spoke trauma system. Setting ICUs of the Integrated System for Trauma Patient Care (SIAT) of Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with a population of approximately 4.5 million. Participants 5300 patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) >15 were admitted to the regional ICUs and recorded in the Regional Severe Trauma Registry between 2007 and 2012. Patients were classified by the Abbreviated Injury Score as follows: (1) traumatic brain injury (2) multiple injuriesand (3) extracranial lesions. The SIATs were divided into those with at least one neurosurgical level II trauma centre (TC) and those with a neurosurgical unit in the level I TC only. Results A higher proportion of patients (out of all SIAT patients) were admitted to the level I TC at the head of the SIAT with no additional neurosurgical facilities (1083/1472, 73.6%) compared with the level I TCs heading SIATs with neurosurgical level II TCs (1905/3815; 49.9%). A similar percentage of patients were admitted to level I TCs (1905/3815; 49.9%) and neurosurgical level II TCs (1702/3815, 44.6%) in the SIATs with neurosurgical level II TCs. Observed versus expected mortality (OE) was not statistically different among the three types of centre with a neurosurgical unit; however, the best mean OE values were observed in the level I TC in the SIAT with no neurosurgical unit. Conclusion The Hub and Spoke concept was fully applied in the SIAT in which neurosurgical facilities were available in the level I TC only. The performance of this system suggests that competition among level I and level II TCs in the same Trauma System reduces performance in both. The density of neurosurgical centres must be considered by public health system governors before implementing trauma systems. PMID:28965094

  3. Characterizing Geosocial-Networking App Use Among Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Multi-City Cross-Sectional Survey in the Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dustin T; Park, Su Hyun; Hambrick, H Rhodes; Dangerfield Ii, Derek T; Goedel, William C; Brewer, Russell; Mgbako, Ofole; Lindsey, Joseph; Regan, Seann D; Hickson, DeMarc A

    2018-06-14

    Understanding where and how young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) in the southern United States meet their sexual partners is germane to understanding the underlying factors contributing to the ongoing HIV transmission in this community. Men who have sex with men (MSM) commonly use geosocial networking apps to meet sexual partners. However, there is a lack of literature exploring geosocial networking app use in this particular population. Our aim was to examine the characteristics, preferences, and behaviors of a geographically diverse sample of geosocial networking app-using YBMSM in the southern United States. Data were collected from a sample of 75 YBMSM across three cities (Gulfport, Mississippi; Jackson, Mississippi; and New Orleans, Louisiana). Multiple aspects of geosocial networking app use were assessed, including overall app use, age of participant at first app use, specific apps used, reasons for app use, photos presented on apps, logon times and duration, number of messages sent and received, and characteristics of and behaviors with partners met on apps. Survey measures of app-met partner and sexual behavior characteristics assessed at midpoint (Day 7) and completion visits (Day 14) were compared using McNemar's test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In addition, we assessed activity spaces derived from GPS devices that participants wore for 2 weeks. Of the 70 participants who responded to the overall app-use item, almost three-quarters (53/70, 76%) had ever used geosocial networking apps. Jack'd was the most commonly used geosocial networking app (37/53, 70%), followed by Adam4Adam (22/53, 42%), and Grindr (19/53, 36%). The mean and median number of apps used were 4.3 (SD 2.7) and 4.0 (range 0-13), respectively. Most app-using participants displayed their face on the profile picture (35/52, 67%), whereas fewer displayed their bare legs (2/52, 4%) or bare buttocks (or ass; 2/52, 4%). The mean age at the initiation of app use was 20.1 years (SD 2

  4. Perceived quality of life in partners of patients undergoing treatment in somatic health, mental health, or substance use disorder units: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Bente; Weimand, Bente M; Ruud, Torleif; Høie, Magnhild M; Vederhus, John-Kåre

    2017-08-30

    This study explores (1) differences in socio-demographic, social/familial, and health variables and perceived quality of life (QoL) among partners of patients with somatic illness, mental illness, or substance use disorder (SUD); and (2) identifies factors associated with QoL. Participants (N = 213) in this cross-sectional study were recruited from inpatient or outpatient services in five hospitals in Norway, 2013-2014. QoL was measured by the QoL-5, a generic five-item questionnaire. Differences between groups were examined using Chi-square for categorical variables and Kruskal-Wallis for contiuous variables. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with QoL. The mean QoL score was similar to that of a general population sample, and 13% of the sample had a markedly low QoL. Partners in the SUD group experienced worse socio-demographic conditions in terms of occupation and income, but QoL did not differ significantly among the three groups. In a regression model, perceived family cohesion was positively associated with QoL while psychological distress (Symptom Checklist-10) was negatively related to it. The model explained 56% of the variance in QoL. When patients are ill, clinicians should consider the partners' QoL, and brief QoL tools can be used to identify those who are struggling most. Reduced QoL is associated with higher psychological distress and lower family cohesion. Treatment initiatives focusing on these themes may serve as preventive measures to help the most vulnerable families cope with their difficult life situation.

  5. Family members' satisfaction with care and decision-making in intensive care units and post-stay follow-up needs-a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frivold, Gro; Slettebø, Åshild; Heyland, Daren K; Dale, Bjørg

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' satisfaction with care and decision-making during the intensive care units stay and their follow-up needs after the patient's discharge or death. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted. Family members of patients recently treated in an ICU were participating. The questionnaire contented of background variables, the instrument Family Satisfaction in ICU (FS-ICU 24) and questions about follow-up needs. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics and a multiple linear regression were used in the analysis. A total of 123 (47%) relatives returned the questionnaire. Satisfaction with care was higher scored than satisfaction with decision-making. Follow- up needs after the ICU stay was reported by 19 (17%) of the participants. Gender and length of the ICU stay were shown as factors identified to predict follow-up needs.

  6. Cross-sectional point prevalence survey to study the environmental contamination of nosocomial pathogens in intensive care units under real-life conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, I; Mayr, A; Kreidl, P; Brühwasser, C; Hinterberger, G; Fritz, A; Posch, W; Fuchs, S; Obwegeser, A; Orth-Höller, D; Lass-Flörl, C

    2018-01-01

    In intensive care units (ICUs), inanimate surfaces and equipment may be contaminated by nosocomial pathogens, including multi-drug-resistant micro-organisms. To assess the degree of environmental contamination close to and distant from patients, and contamination of healthcare workers' (HCWs) hands with nosocomial pathogens under real-life conditions and to investigate potential transmission events. Over the course of three weeks, agar contact samples were taken close to and distant from patient areas and from HCWs' hands in eight ICUs of a tertiary care hospital in Innsbruck, Austria. Each ICU was visited once without announcement. Species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed according to standard methods, and corresponding strains from patient, environment and hand samples were genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Among 523 samples, HCWs' hands were most frequently contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria (15.2%), followed by areas close to patients (10.9%) and areas distant from patients (9.1%). Gram-positive bacteria were identified most often (67.8%), with Enterococcus spp. being the most prevalent species (70% vancomycin sensitive and 30% vancomycin resistant) followed by Staphylococcus aureus, of which 64% were classified as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular typing documented identical strains among patient, environment and hand isolates. This study found widespread contamination of the ICU environment with clinically relevant pathogens, including multi-drug-resistant micro-organisms, despite cleaning and disinfection. The bioburden might not be restricted to areas close to patients. The role of extended environmental disinfection of areas distant from patients in order to improve infection prevention needs further discussion. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Speak-up culture in an intensive care unit in Hong Kong: a cross-sectional survey exploring the communication openness perceptions of Chinese doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, George Wing Yiu; Pun, Jack Kwok Hung; So, Eric Hang Kwong; Chiu, Wendy Wai Hang; Leung, Avis Siu Ha; Stone, Yuk Han; Lam, Chung Ling; Lai, Sarah Pui Wa; Leung, Rowlina Pui Wah; Luk, Hing Wah; Leung, Anne Kit Hung; Au Yeung, Kin Wah; Lai, Kang Yiu; Slade, Diana; Chan, Engle Angela

    2017-08-11

    Despite growing recognition of the importance of speaking up to protect patient safety in critical care, little research has been performed in this area in an intensive care unit (ICU) context. This study explored the communication openness perceptions of Chinese doctors and nurses and identified their perceptions of issues in ICU communication, their reasons for speaking up and the possible factors and strategies involved in promoting the practice of speaking up. A mixed-methods design with quantitative and sequential qualitative components was used. Eighty ICU staff members from a large public hospital in Hong Kong completed a questionnaire regarding their perceptions of communication openness. Ten clinicians whose survey responses indicated support for open communication were then interviewed about their speak-up practices. The participating ICU staff members had similar perceptions of their openness to communication. However, the doctors responded more positively than the nurses to many aspects of communication openness. The two groups also had different perceptions of speaking up. The interviewed ICU staff members who indicated a high level of communication openness reported that their primary reasons for speaking up were to seek and clarify information, which was achieved by asking questions. Other factors perceived to influence the motivation to speak up included seniority, relationships and familiarity with patient cases. Creating an atmosphere of safety and equality in which team members feel confident in expressing their personal views without fear of reprisal or embarrassment is necessary to encourage ICU staff members, regardless of their position, to speak up. Because harmony and saving face is valued in Chinese culture, training nurses and doctors to speak up by focusing on human factors and values rather than simply addressing conflict management is desirable in this context. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  8. Tobacco smoking using Midwakh is an emerging health problem--evidence from a large cross-sectional survey in the United Arab Emirates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Houqani

    Full Text Available Accurate information about the prevalence and types of tobacco use is essential to deliver effective public health policy. We aimed to study the prevalence and modes of tobacco consumption in the United Arab Emirates (UAE, particularly focusing on the use of Midwakh (Arabic traditional pipe.We studied 170,430 UAE nationals aged ≥ 18 years (44% males and 56% females in the Weqaya population-based screening program in Abu Dhabi residents during the period April 2008-June 2010. Self-reported smoking status, type, quantity and duration of tobacco smoked were recorded. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study findings; prevalence rates used the screened sample as the denominator.The prevalence of smoking overall was 24.3% in males and 0.8% in females and highest in males aged 20-39. Mean age (SD of smokers was 32.8 (11.1 years, 32.7 (11.1 in males and 35.7 (12.1 in females. Cigarette smoking was the commonest form of tobacco use (77.4% of smokers, followed by Midwakh (15.0%, shisha (waterpipe (6.8%, and cigar (0.66%. The mean durations of smoking for cigarettes, Midwakh, shisha and cigars were 11.4, 9.3, 7.6 and 11.0 years, respectively.Smoking is most common among younger UAE national men. The use of Midwakh and the relatively young age of onset of Midwakh smokers is of particular concern as is the possibility of the habit spreading to other countries. Comprehensive tobacco control laws targeting the young and the use of Midwakh are needed.

  9. Prevalence, impact and care of foot problems in people with rheumatoid arthritis: results from a United Kingdom based cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oonagh Wilson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA derive from a combination of inflammation, altered foot mechanics, deformity and secondary skin lesions. Guidelines recommend regular review of patients’ feet, but the extent to which the general population of RA patients report foot symptoms and access foot care has not been established. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence, impact and care of foot problems in all patients with RA in one geographical area and identify factors associated with accessing foot care. Methods Cross-sectional survey of a random sample of patients with RA, who resided within a single community-based National Health Service (NHS podiatry service. The questionnaire collected demographic data (age, gender, local deprivation score, clinical data (disease duration, arthritis medications, disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ, current foot problems, foot care accessed (podiatry, orthotics and/or orthopaedics and care received, measures of impact (Foot Impact Scale and ability to work. Results Of 1003 total eligible patients in the target population, 739 were posted survey packs. Of these 413 (56% replied. Responders and non-responders had similar age (63.5 yr. vs.61.5 yr, gender (74.1%F vs. 75.2%F, and highest deprivation category (13.3% vs.15.9%. Of the responders 92.1% reported current foot problems: articular 73.8%, cutaneous lesions 65.4%, structural 57.6%, extra-articular 42.6%. Responders’ median (IQR disease duration 10 (5–20 years, HAQ 1.5 (0.75–2.0, FISIF 10 (6–14 and FISAP 16 (7–23 and 37.8% reported impacts on work. While 69.5% had accessed foot care there were differences in the route of access (by gender and whether independent or NHS provision and were older (64.9 yr. vs 60.4 yr. p = 0.001, had longer disease duration (12 yr. vs 7 yr. p < 0.001 and had a greater proportion of females (72.2% vs 61.7% p = 0.04 than those who had not accessed

  10. Trends in resource utilization by children with neurological impairment in the United States inpatient health care system: a repeat cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay G Berry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Care advances in the United States (US have led to improved survival of children with neurological impairment (NI. Children with NI may account for an increasing proportion of hospital resources. However, this assumption has not been tested at a national level.We conducted a study of 25,747,016 US hospitalizations of children recorded in the Kids' Inpatient Database (years 1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006. Children with NI were identified with International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses resulting in functional and/or intellectual impairment. We assessed trends in inpatient resource utilization for children with NI with a Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test using all 4 y of data combined. Across the 4 y combined, children with NI accounted for 5.2% (1,338,590 of all hospitalizations. Epilepsy (52.2% [n = 538,978] and cerebral palsy (15.9% [n = 164,665] were the most prevalent NI diagnoses. The proportion of hospitalizations attributable to children with NI did not change significantly (p = 0.32 over time. In 2006, children with NI accounted for 5.3% (n = 345,621 of all hospitalizations, 13.9% (n = 3.4 million of bed days, and 21.6% (US$17.7 billion of all hospital charges within all hospitals. Over time, the proportion of hospitalizations attributable to children with NI decreased within non-children's hospitals (3.0% [n = 146,324] in 1997 to 2.5% [n = 113,097] in 2006, p<.001 and increased within children's hospitals (11.7% [n = 179,324] in 1997 to 13.5% [n = 209,708] in 2006, p<0.001. In 2006, children with NI accounted for 24.7% (2.1 million of bed days and 29.0% (US$12.0 billion of hospital charges within children's hospitals.Children with NI account for a substantial proportion of inpatient resources utilized in the US. Their impact is growing within children's hospitals. We must ensure that the current health care system is staffed, educated, and equipped to serve this growing segment of vulnerable children.

  11. Utility of the Care Dependency Scale in predicting care needs and health risks of elderly patients admitted to a geriatric unit: a cross-sectional study of 200 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroszkiewicz, Halina; Sierakowska, Matylda; Muszalik, Marta

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of the Polish version of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) in predicting care needs and health risks of elderly patients admitted to a geriatric unit. This was a cross-sectional study of 200 geriatric patients aged ≥60 years, chronologically admitted to a geriatrics unit in Poland. The study was carried out using the Polish version of the CDS questionnaire to evaluate biopsychosocial needs and the level of care dependency. The mean age of the participating geriatric patients was 81.8±6.6. The mean result of the sum of the CDS index for all the participants was 55.3±15.1. Detailed analysis of the results of evaluation of the respondents' functional condition showed statistically significant differences in the levels of care dependency. Evaluation of the patients' physical performance in terms of the ability to do basic activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (I-ADL) showed statistically significant differences between the levels of care dependency. Patients with high dependency were more often prone to pressure ulcers - 13.1±3.3, falls (87.2%), poorer emotional state - 6.9±3.6, mental function - 5.1±2.8, and more often problems with locomotion, vision, and hearing. The results showed that locomotive disability, depression, advanced age, and problem with vision and hearing are connected with increasing care dependency. CDS evaluation of each admitted geriatric patient enables us to predict the care needs and health risks that need to be reduced and the disease states to be improved. CDS evaluation should be accompanied by the use of other instruments and assessments to evaluate pressure ulcer risk, fall risk, and actions toward the improvement of subjective well-being, as well as correction of vision and hearing problems where possible and assistive devices for locomotion.

  12. Circulating insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and terminal duct lobular unit involution of the breast: a cross-sectional study of women with benign breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Hisani N; Sherman, Mark E; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Figueroa, Jonine D; Khodr, Zeina G; Falk, Roni T; Pollak, Michael; Patel, Deesha A; Palakal, Maya M; Linville, Laura; Papathomas, Daphne; Geller, Berta; Vacek, Pamela M; Weaver, Donald L; Chicoine, Rachael; Shepherd, John; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Fan, Bo; Malkov, Serghei; Herschorn, Sally; Hewitt, Stephen M; Brinton, Louise A; Gierach, Gretchen L

    2016-02-18

    Terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs) are the primary structures from which breast cancers and their precursors arise. Decreased age-related TDLU involution and elevated mammographic density are both correlated and independently associated with increased breast cancer risk, suggesting that these characteristics of breast parenchyma might be linked to a common factor. Given data suggesting that increased circulating levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) factors are related to reduced TDLU involution and increased mammographic density, we assessed these relationships using validated quantitative methods in a cross-sectional study of women with benign breast disease. Serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and IGF-I:IGFBP-3 molar ratios were measured in 228 women, ages 40-64, who underwent diagnostic breast biopsies yielding benign diagnoses at University of Vermont affiliated centers. Biopsies were assessed for three separate measures inversely related to TDLU involution: numbers of TDLUs per unit of tissue area ("TDLU count"), median TDLU diameter ("TDLU span"), and number of acini per TDLU ("acini count"). Regression models, stratified by menopausal status and adjusted for potential confounders, were used to assess the associations of TDLU count, median TDLU span and median acini count per TDLU with tertiles of circulating IGFs. Given that mammographic density is associated with both IGF levels and breast cancer risk, we also stratified these associations by mammographic density. Higher IGF-I levels among postmenopausal women and an elevated IGF-I:IGFBP-3 ratio among all women were associated with higher TDLU counts, a marker of decreased lobular involution (P-trend = 0.009 and breast cancer risk. If confirmed in prospective studies with cancer endpoints, these data may suggest that evaluation of IGF signaling and its downstream effects may have value for risk prediction and suggest strategies for breast cancer chemoprevention through inhibition of the IGF system.

  13. Cross-unit coalitions and flexible hierarchy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter

    Internationale organisationer befinder sig i turbulente miljøer, der udfordrer organisationernes evne til at tilpasse sig. Uden tilpasning kan autoritet ikke fastholdes. Autoritet bliver en udfordring fordi IGOs er sammensatte systemer af forskellige grupper i gensidig udvikling. Grupper der er i...

  14. Utility of the Care Dependency Scale in predicting care needs and health risks of elderly patients admitted to a geriatric unit: a cross-sectional study of 200 consecutive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroszkiewicz H

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Halina Doroszkiewicz,1 Matylda Sierakowska,2 Marta Muszalik3 1Department of Geriatrics, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland; 2Department of Integrated Medical Care, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland; 3Department and Clinic of Geriatrics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Bydgoszcz, Poland Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of the Polish version of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS in predicting care needs and health risks of elderly patients admitted to a geriatric unit.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 200 geriatric patients aged ≥60 years, chronologically admitted to a geriatrics unit in Poland. The study was carried out using the Polish version of the CDS questionnaire to evaluate biopsychosocial needs and the level of care dependency.Results: The mean age of the participating geriatric patients was 81.8±6.6. The mean result of the sum of the CDS index for all the participants was 55.3±15.1. Detailed analysis of the results of evaluation of the respondents’ functional condition showed statistically significant differences in the levels of care dependency. Evaluation of the patients’ physical performance in terms of the ability to do basic activities of daily living (ADL and instrumental ADL (I-ADL showed statistically significant differences between the levels of care dependency. Patients with high dependency were more often prone to pressure ulcers – 13.1±3.3, falls (87.2%, poorer emotional state – 6.9±3.6, mental function – 5.1±2.8, and more often problems with locomotion, vision, and hearing. The results showed that locomotive disability, depression, advanced age, and problem with vision and hearing are connected with increasing care dependency.Conclusion: CDS evaluation of each admitted geriatric patient enables us to predict the care needs and health risks that need to be reduced and the disease states to be improved. CDS

  15. An Examination of the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire Performance in a Countrywide American Sample of Children: Cross-Cultural Differences in Age and Impact in the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DunnGalvin, Audrey; Koman, Elizabeth; Raver, Elizabeth; Frome, Hayley; Adams, Melissa; Keena, Aisleen; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B; Gallagher, Patricia Leahy; Flokstra-de Blok, Bertine; Dubois, Anthony; Pyrz, Katarzyna; Bindslev-Jensen, Cartsen; Stensgaard, Anette; Boyle, Robert; Vickers, Bea; Smith, Jared; Thisanayagam, Umasunthar; Greenhawt, Matthew

    It is important to ensure that tools are valid and reliable in the context in which they are used. The development of age and country norms is part of this process. The primary aim of the present study was to examine the performance of the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire - Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF) in a countrywide American sample of children with food allergy. The secondary aim was to compare age differences in impact across 9 European countries. In a cross-sectional quantitative design, questionnaires were completed by the parents of 1029 food-allergic children (0-12 years). Participants were recruited via support groups and allergists. Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis of variance and tests for internal consistency and validity. The average score was calculated for each age group in 15 studies in Ireland, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Israel, and the United Kingdom. The FAQLQ-PF has high convergent validity (child: r = 0.49, n = 695, P = .01; parent: r = 0.36, n = 696, P = .01) and discriminant validity, parent: t (719) = 4.67, P = .001 (anaphylaxis yes vs no); t (513), P = .009 (single vs multiple allergens). Internal consistency was excellent (r = 0.96). US health-related quality of life was worse than European health-related quality of life, as indicated by higher FAQLQ-PF scores in US samples. Burden increased with age in all populations. The FAQLQ-PF is appropriate for use in an American population. Findings will form the basis for further work in the development of an online manual with food allergy-normed age scores to allow for precise measurement, interpretation of scores, and comparison across countries and cultures, in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of a tobacco point-of-sale display ban on youth in the United Kingdom: findings from a repeat cross-sectional survey pre-, mid- and post-implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Ford

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The display of tobacco products at the point-of-sale (POS allows tobacco companies to showcase their products and communicate with consumers. Evidence suggests that exposure to POS tobacco displays is associated with impulse tobacco purchasing among adult smokers and smoking susceptibility among never smoking youth. In the United Kingdom (UK a ban on the open display of tobacco products was phased in between 2012 and 2015. Three waves of the Youth Tobacco Policy Survey were used to examine the impact of the ban on youth pre-, mid- and post-implementation. Methods A repeat cross-sectional survey was conducted with 11-16 year olds across the UK. Data was collected via an in-home face-to-face interview and self-completion questionnaire at three time points: pre- (2011, n=1373, mid- (2014, n=1205, and post-display ban (2016, n=1213. We examined whether the salience of displays was associated with smoking susceptibility among never smokers. Measures also explored cigarette brand awareness, attractiveness of displays and support for a display ban. Results In 2011, pre-ban, susceptibility to smoke was positively associated with noticing cigarettes displayed at POS and higher brand awareness. Susceptibility to smoke decreased from 28% in 2011 (pre-ban to 18% in 2016 (post-ban, with the mean number of brands recalled falling from 1.56 (SD=1.88 in 2011 to 1.01 (SD=1.42 in 2016. With respect to support for the ban, in 2016 the vast majority of our sample (87% indicated that shops should have to keep cigarettes behind closed shutters. They also felt that having them behind closed shutters made them seem unappealing (73% and made them think that it's not ok to smoke (83%. Conclusions That smoking susceptibility was lower following the ban suggests that placing tobacco out of sight helps safeguard young people and justifies this policy approach in the UK and elsewhere.

  17. The impact of healthcare professionals' personality and religious beliefs on the decisions to forego life sustaining treatments: an observational, multicentre, cross-sectional study in Greek intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntantana, Asimenia; Matamis, Dimitrios; Savvidou, Savvoula; Marmanidou, Kyriaki; Giannakou, Maria; Gouva, Μary; Nakos, George; Koulouras, Vasilios

    2017-07-21

    To assess the opinion of intensive care unit (ICU) personnel and the impact of their personality and religious beliefs on decisions to forego life-sustaining treatments (DFLSTs). Cross-sectional, observational, national study in 18 multidisciplinary Greek ICUs, with >6 beds, between June and December 2015. 149 doctors and 320 nurses who voluntarily and anonymously answered the End-of-Life (EoL) attitudes, Personality (EPQ) and Religion (SpREUK) questionnaires. Multivariate analysis was used to detect the impact of personality and religious beliefs on the DFLSTs. The participation rate was 65.7%. Significant differences in DFLSTs between doctors and nurses were identified. 71.4% of doctors and 59.8% of nurses stated that the family was not properly informed about DFLST and the main reason was the family's inability to understand medical details. 51% of doctors expressed fear of litigation and 47% of them declared that this concern influenced the information given to family and nursing staff. 7.5% of the nurses considered DFLSTs dangerous, criminal or illegal. Multivariate logistic regression identified that to be a nurse and to have a high neuroticism score were independent predictors for preferring the term 'passive euthanasia' over 'futile care' (OR 4.41, 95% CI 2.21 to 8.82, ppersonality trait (OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.25 to 4.80, ppersonality and religious beliefs influence the attitudes of ICU personnel when making decisions to forego life-sustaining treatments. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Nucleon charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, W.P.; Spicer, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    An historical review of the development of ideas pertaining to Gamow-Teller giant resonances is given, and a description of the emergence of techniques for the study of charge exchange reactions - particularly the technical advances which yielded the recent volume of new date. The present status of charge exchange reactions is reviewed and assessed. Evidence is presented from the 14 C(p,n) reaction for the dominance of the spin-isospin component of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in intermediate energy reactions. In (p,n) reactions the Gamow-Teller giant resonance dominates the spectra, with higher multipoles contributing. By contrast, in (n,p) reactions in the heavier nuclei, the Gamow-Teller transitions are substantially Pauli-blocked and the spin dipole resonance dominates, with contributions from higher multipoles. Discussions of the multipole decomposition process, used to obtain from the data the contributions of the different multipoles, and the contributions of the multipoles, are given

  19. The beta strength function structure in β+ decay of lutetium, thulium and cesium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhazov, G.D.; Bykov, A.A.; Vitman, V.D.; Naumov, Yu.V.; Orlov, S.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    The spectra of total γ-absorption in the decays of some Lutecium, Thulium and Cesium isotopes have been measured. The probabilities for level population in the decay of the isotopes have been determined. The deduced beta strength functions reveal pronounced structure. Calculations of the strength functions using the Saxon-Woods potential and the residual Gamow-Teller interaction are presented. It is shown that in β + decay of light Thulium and Cesium isotopes the strength function comprises more than 70% of the Gamow-Teller excitations with μsub(tau) = +1. This result is the first direct observation of the Gamow-Teller resonance in β + decay of nuclei with Tsub(z) > O. (orig.)

  20. Nucleus as a chiral filter: the role of the Δ(1232)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Mannque.

    1982-03-01

    We describe how two different modes of chiral symmetry can be seen in nuclei. In particular, it is shown that the nuclear axial charge or more precisely the O + O - , ΔT=1 transition at zero momentum transfer probe the nuclear configuration wherein the axial charge gsub(A) is effectively enhanced in nuclear medium due to soft pions, symptomatic of the Goldstone realization of chiral symmetry in the medium while the Gamow-Teller resonances probe the configuration wherein soft pions are no longer operative, suggesting an approach toward the Wigner realization of chiral symmetry. Using the celebrated Adler-Weisberger relation, it is argued that the observed approximately 50% quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength reflects the possibility that the Gamow-Teller operator sees the quarks inside the bag, blind to the Goldstone vacuum outside. Some implications on chiral phase transitions are also discussed

  1. Stream Crossings

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Physical measurements and attributes of stream crossing structures and adjacent stream reaches which are used to provide a relative rating of aquatic organism...

  2. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  3. $\\beta$- decay of $^{58}$Zn. A critical test for the charge-exchange reaction as a probe for the $\\beta$- decay strength distribution

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS353 \\\\ \\\\ Due to its importance in fundamental physics and astrophysics, a great effort both theoretically and experimentally is devoted to study Gamow Teller (GT)-strength. The GT-strength and its distribution play a key role in late stellar evolution. During the pre-supernova core-collapse of massive stars, the electron capture and nuclear $\\beta$ -decay determine the electron-to-baryon ratio, which influences the infall dynamics and the mass of the final core. The cross-section of the charge-exchange reaction at forward angles with energies above 100~MeV is expected to be proportional to the squares of Fermi and GT matrix elements. This proportionality should provide a Q-value free method to probe the weak interaction strength and renormalization effects in nuclei. Thus charge-exchange reactions are often used to determine the experimental GT-strength. However, the connection between the GT-strength and the cross-section of the charge-exchange reaction is partially model-dependent and the question aris...

  4. Prevalence of mental distress and associated factors among caregivers of patients with severe mental illness in the outpatient unit of Amanuel Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2013: Cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintayehu, Mezinew; Mulat, Haregwoin; Yohannis, Zegeye; Adera, Tewodros; Fekade, Maereg

    2015-01-01

    Caregivers like family members or other relatives are central and provide not only practical help and personal care but also give emotional support, and they are suffering from plenty of challengeable tasks. These, eventually, cast out family caregivers into multidimensional problems prominently for mental distress like depression, anxiety, sleep problem and somatic disorder which are followed by physiologic changes and impaired health habits that ultimately lead to illness and possibly to death. Numerous studies demonstrate that mental distress of caregivers are two times compared to general populations. Despite it was not uncommon to observe manifestations of caregivers' mental distress, yet there was no study on this area. Therefore, this study was intended to assess the prevalence of mental distress and associated factors among the caregivers of persons with severe mental illness in the out patients unit of Amanuel Hospital, Ethiopia. Institutional based cross sectional study was conducted from May 1 to 31, 2013 at Amanuel Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Systematic random sampling technique with "k" interval of 13 was employed to withdraw a total of 423 participants from study population. Five psychiatric nurses carried out interview by using standardized and validated Self Reported Questionnaire (SRQ 20). Descriptive statistics, binary and multivariate logistic regression analysis were conducted. This study revealed that the overall prevalence of mental distress was found to be 221(56.7 %). The factors like missed social support, two or more times admission of patient, care giving for psychotic patient, being farmer and being female were found to be predictors for mental distress of caregivers with this [AOR 95 % CI = 9.523(5.002, 18.132)], 3.293(1.474, 3.3560), 2.007(1.109, 3.634), 2.245(1.129, 4.463) and 3.170(1.843, 5.454)] respectively. In this respect the study observed that there was a higher level of mental distress experienced by caregivers of

  5. Electrical dipole polarizability and spin M1 strength from {sup 48}Ca(p,p') data under 0; Elektrische Dipol-Polarisierbarkeit und Spin-M1-Staerke aus {sup 48}Ca(p,p')-Daten unter 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkhan, Jonny Hubertus

    2016-07-01

    only up to an excitation energy of 60 MeV. Taking into account the excitation energy range from E{sub x}=10 MeV to E{sub x}=60 MeV the polarisability of the nucleus {sup 48}Ca was estimated to be α{sub D}=(2.09±0.02) fm{sup 3}. This result deviates significantly from a theoretical prediction of α{sub D}=(2.31±0.09) fm{sup 3} based on the energy density functional theory. The result of this work could further constrain the range of the parameters of the nuclear models and might give new insights on the neutron skin thickness of {sup 48}Ca as far as a theoretical prediction for the correlation between the polarisability and neutron skin thickness is available especially for the energy region investigated in this work. In the nucleus {sup 48}Ca, almost the full experimentally accessible spin-M1 strength is exhausted by a single spin-flip transition. The corresponding state is the prominent 1{sup +}-state at E{sub x}=10.22 MeV. The configuration of the nucleus {sup 48}Ca leads to nearly pure spin-flip transitions of the neutrons. In this case the isoscalar transition matrix element is as large as the isovector one. This means that the nucleus {sup 48}Ca is a reference case whereas the nucleus {sup 208}Pb is another one because its isoscalar and isovector M1 strength is well separated. The extraction of the total electromagnetic M1 strength was based on a method that had been successfully applied to Gamow-Teller transitions in other analyses in the framework of a distorted wave impulse approximation. This method allows to calculate the strength from the measured isovector cross section at θ{sub CM}=0 mainly by a single conversion factor, the so-called ''unit cross section''. The method was used for the analysis of this work assuming that isospin symmetry is given for isobars and that the unit cross section is the same for isovector spin-M1 excitations as well as for the excitations of analogue states. The problem was to extract the isovector part of

  6. $\\beta$-delayed neutron spectroscopy of $^{130-132}$ Cd isotopes with the ISOLDE decay station and the VANDLE array

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to use the new ISOLDE decay station and the neutron detector VANDLE to measure the $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission of N=82-84 $^{130-132}$Cd isotopes. The large delayed neutron emission probability observed in a previous ISOLDE measurement is indicative of the Gamow-Teller transitions due to the decay of deep core neutrons. Core Gamow-Teller decay has been experimentally proven in the $^{78}$Ni region for the N>50 nuclei using the VANDLE array. The spectroscopic measurement of delayed neutron emission along the cadmium isotopic chain will allow us to track the evolution of the single particle states and the shell gap.

  7. Structure of β-decay strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, Y.V.; Bykov, A.A.; Izosimov, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical studies on the structure of the Gamow--Teller β-decay strength functions are reviewed. Also considered are processes such as M1 γ decay of analog states, the emission of delayed protons, neutrons, and α particles, delayed fission, and the (p, n) reaction at proton energies 100--200 MeV. The results of measurements of the strength functions by γ-ray total absorption are analyzed. It is shown that the β + decay of nuclei far from the stability band exhibits a new type of collective charge-exchange excitation: Gamow--Teller resonance with μ/sub tau/ = +1

  8. Sum rules for nuclear excitations with the Skyrme-Landau interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kehfei; Luo Hongde; Ma Zhongyu; Feng Man; Shen Qingbiao

    1991-01-01

    The energy-weighted sum rules for electric, magnetic, Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions with the Skyrme-Landau interaction are derived from the double commutators and numerically calculated in a HF + RPA formalism. As a numerical check of the Thouless theorem, our self-consistent calculations show that the calculated RPA strengths exhaust more than 85% of the sum rules in most cases. The well known non-energy-weighted sum rules for Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions are also checked numerically. The sum rules are exhausted by more than 94% in these cases. (orig.)

  9. "Units of Comparison" across Languages, across Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Lardiere's keynote article adverts to a succession of "units of comparison" that have been employed in the study of cross-linguistic differences, including mid-twentieth-century structural patterns, generative grammar's parameters, and (within contemporary Minimalism) features. This commentary expands on the idea of units of cross-linguistic…

  10. Measurement and microscopic analysis of the 11B(p,p') reaction at Ep = 150 MeV. Part I: Inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannen, V.M.; Van den Berg, A.M.; Bieber, R.K.; Harakeh, M.N.; De Huu, M.A.; Kruesemann, B.A.M.; Van der Werf, S.Y.; Woertche, H.J.; Amos, K.; Deb, P.K.; Ellinghaus, F.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.; Schmidt, R.; Hagemann, M.

    2001-01-01

    Cross sections and analyzing powers for the 11 B(p.p') reaction have been measured using a 150 MeV polarized proton beam from the AGOR cyclotron at KVI. For the stronger inelastic transitions, also spin-flip probabilities have been extracted. A fully microscopic distorted-wave analysis of the elastic and inelastic data has been made, using density-dependent effective interactions and input from shell-model calculations in a complete (0+2) ℎω model space for normal parity transitions and in a 1 ℎω model space for non-normal parity transitions. With the help of these model calculations spin-isovector M1 strengths for the negative-parity states at excitation energies of 2.125 MeV (J π = 1/2 - ), 4.445 MeV (J π 5/2 - ), 5.020 MeV (J π = 3/2 - ) and 8.920 MeV (J π 5/2 - ) have been extracted and compared to known Gamow-Teller strengths for the analog transitions to 11 C

  11. Spin and isospin modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Sagawa, H.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Spin and isospin modes in nuclei are investigated. We discuss some of the following topics. 1. Spin-dipole excitations in 12 C and 16 O are studied (1). Effects of tensor and spin-orbit interactions on the distribution of the strengths are investigated, and neutral current neutrino scattering cross sections in 16 O are obtained for heavy-flavor neutrinos from the supernovae. 2. Gamow-Teller (GT) and spin-dipole (SD) modes in 208 Bi are investigated. Quenching and fragmentation of the GT strength are discussed (2). SD excitations and electric dipole (E1) transitions between the GT and SD states are studied (3). Calculated E1 strengths are compared with the sum rule values obtained within the 1p-1h and 1p-1h + 2p-2h configuration spaces. 3. Coulomb displacement energy (CDE) of the IAS of 14 Be is calculated, and the effects of the halo on the CDE and the configuration of the halo state are investigated. 4. Spreading width of IAS and isospin dependence of the width are investigated (4). Our formula for the width explains very well the observed isospin dependence (5). (author)

  12. Spin dipole and quadrupole resonances in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, F.T.; Love, W.G.; Bimbot, L.; Fergerson, R.W.; Glashausser, C.; Green, A.; Jones, K.; Nanda, S.

    1989-01-01

    Angular distributions of the double differential cross section d 2 σ/dΩ dE(σ) and the spin-flip probability S nn have been measured for inclusive proton inelastic scattering from 40 Ca at 319 MeV. Excitation energies (ω) up to about 40 MeV have been investigated over the angular range from 3.5 degree to 12 degree in the laboratory (0.3 to 0.9 fm -1 ). Here, multipole decompositions of angular distributions of σS nn for the 40 Ca(rvec p,rvec p ') reaction at 319 MeV have been performed in order to compare ΔS=1 strength observed with sum rules. In contrast to the well-known quenching of Gamow-Teller and M1 resonances, the spin-dipole resonance has a total measured strength which is larger than that predicted by the energy-weighted sum rule. The spin-dipole strength distribution supports asymmetric widths predicted by calculations including 2p-2h mixing. The spin-quadrupole resonance is observed near ω=35 MeV and its total strength for ω<40 MeV estimated

  13. Nuclear structure and weak rates of heavy waiting point nuclei under rp-process conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Böyükata, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the weak interaction mediated rates of the heavy waiting point (WP) nuclei 80Zr, 84Mo, 88Ru, 92Pd and 96Cd along N = Z line were studied within the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1) and the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA). The energy levels of the N = Z WP nuclei were calculated by fitting the essential parameters of IBM-1 Hamiltonian and their geometric shapes were predicted by plotting potential energy surfaces (PESs). Half-lives, continuum electron capture rates, positron decay rates, electron capture cross sections of WP nuclei, energy rates of β-delayed protons and their emission probabilities were later calculated using the pn-QRPA. The calculated Gamow-Teller strength distributions were compared with previous calculation. We present positron decay and continuum electron capture rates on these WP nuclei under rp-process conditions using the same model. For the rp-process conditions, the calculated total weak rates are twice the Skyrme HF+BCS+QRPA rates for 80Zr. For remaining nuclei the two calculations compare well. The electron capture rates are significant and compete well with the corresponding positron decay rates under rp-process conditions. The finding of the present study supports that electron capture rates form an integral part of the weak rates under rp-process conditions and has an important role for the nuclear model calculations.

  14. Nuclear chiral axial currents and applications to few-nucleon systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, Alessandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This Thesis is divided into three main parts. The first part discusses basic aspects of chiral effective field theory and the formalism, based on time ordered perturbation theory, used to to derive the nuclear potentials and currents from the chiral Lagrangians. The second part deals with the actual derivation, up to one loop, of the two-nucleon potential and one- and two-nucleon weak axial charge and current. In both derivations ultraviolet divergences generated by loop corrections are isolated using dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. A complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power counting is constructed. The third part of this Thesis discusses two applications: (i) the calculation of the Gamow-Teller matrix element of tritium, used to constrain the single low-energy constant entering the axial current; (ii) the calculation of neutrino-deuteron inclusive cross sections at low energies. These results have confirmed previous predictions obtained in phenomenological approaches. These latter studies have played an important role in the analysis and interpretation of experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  15. Amanda Cross and Androgyny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kania Richard R. E.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Amanda Cross is the pen name Carolyn Heilbrun used for her mystery fiction. In two of her novels she employed the theme of androgyny. She also wrote the non-fiction, 1973 Toward a Recognition of Androgyny in which she promoted androgyny as aspect of her approach to feminism, an intellectual denial of any significant differences between the sexes. While that thread of American feminism has lost favor in current feminist ideologies, matters of gender identity are rising in prominence in American social and political thought, reviving the debate on male and female roles and identities in the United States.

  16. Pharmaceutical product cross-contamination: industrial and clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    problems. Pharmaceutical product cross-contamination is a serious problem which has been detected as an obstacle ... In the pharmaceutical care of patients in developed countries, cross-contamination ..... neonatal intensive care units.

  17. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  18. Part-time work, women’s work–life conflict, and job satisfaction : A cross-national comparison of Australia, the Netherlands, Germany, Sweden, and the United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, Anne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837865; Craig, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    This study uses the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) 2013 ‘Family and Changing Gender Roles’ module (N = 1773) to examine cross-country differences in the relationship between women’s part-time work and work–life conflict and job satisfaction. We hypothesize that part-time work will lead

  19. Centroid crossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for finding peaks in data spectra. It is based on calculating a moving centroid across the spectrum and picking off the points between which the calculated centroid crosses the channel number. Interpolation can then yield a more precise peak location. This algorithm can be implemented very efficiently requiring about one addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division operation per data point. With integer data and a centroid window equal to a power of two (so that the division can be done with shifts), the algorithm is particularly suited to efficient machine language implementation. With suitable adjustments (involving only little overhead except at suspected peaks), it is possible to minimize either false peak location or missing good peaks. Extending the method to more dimensions is straightforward although interpolating is more difficult. The algorithm has been used on a variety of nuclear data spectra with great success

  20. Diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to food environment sub-types: a cross-sectional analysis of Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States Census, and food establishment data

    OpenAIRE

    Frankenfeld, Cara L; Leslie, Timothy F; Makara, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Background Social and spatial factors are an important part of individual and community health. The objectives were to identify food establishment sub-types and evaluate prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to these sub-types in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. A measure of retail food environment was calculated as the ratio of number of sources of unhealthier food options (fast food, ...

  1. Knowledge Globalization within and across the People's Republic of China and the United States: A Cross-National Study of Internationalization of Educational Research in the Early 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Robert J.; Kan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study examines globalization within and across China and the United States in conjunction with a portrayal of the nature of the scholarly endeavors over the past 10 years in the two preeminent educational research journals of these countries. By extensive analyses of topics, methodology, and citations the research clarifies the global and…

  2. Unit Manning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinniss, Mike

    2003-01-01

    .... This decision combines two crucial initiatives: first, transforming the Army from an individual soldier replacement system to a unit manning system that enhances cohesion and keeps trained soldiers, leaders, and commanders together longer, thereby...

  3. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  4. Drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanchik, N P; Demin, A V; Khrustalev, N N; Linnik, G N; Lovchev, S V; Rozin, M M; Sidorov, R V; Sokolov, S I; Tsaregradskiy, Yu P

    1981-01-01

    A drilling unit is proposed which includes a hydraulic lifter, hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump with valve distribution and sectional drilling pump with separators of the working and flushing fluid. In order to reduce metal consumption and the overall dimensions of the drilling unit, the working cavity of each cylinder of the hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump is equipped with suction and injection valves and is hydraulically connected to the working cavity by one of the sections of the drilling pump.

  5. Safety of the batteries and power units used in insulin pumps: A pilot cross-sectional study by the Association for the Study of Innovative Diabetes Treatment in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Takashi; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Sakane, Naoki; Kuroda, Akio; Hirota, Yushi; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2017-10-21

    We investigated the safety of the batteries and power units used in insulin pumps in Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to the 201 members of the Association for Innovative Diabetes Treatment in Japan. A total of 56 members responded, and among the 1,499 active devices, 66 had episodes of trouble related to the batteries and power units. The ratio of reported troubles to the number of insulin pumps was significantly higher in insulin pumps with a continuous glucose monitoring sensor compared with insulin pumps without a continuous glucose monitoring sensor (odds ratio 2.82, P batteries varied; alkaline batteries purchased at drug stores and other shops accounted for 19.7%. Termination of battery life within 72 h of use was reported most frequently (50.0%), suspension of the insulin pump (21.2%) and leakage of the battery fluid (4.5%) followed. A total of 53.2% of the reported insulin pumps needed to be replaced, and 37.1% of them recovered after replacement of the battery. As trouble related to the batteries and power units of insulin pumps was frequent, practical guidance should be provided to respective patients regarding the use of reliable batteries, and to be well prepared for unexpected insulin pump failure. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Triton beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.Y.; Wu, Y.; Ishikawa, S.; Sasakawa, T.

    1990-01-01

    Triton β-decay has been calculated using wave functions for 3 He and 3 H obtained from (Coulomb-modified) Faddeev equations for various interactions. We get a value for the Gamow-Teller matrix element of √3 (0.962±0.002) without regards to two- or three-nucleon inteactions. This value agrees with the experimental value. (orig.)

  7. Excitation of giant resonances via charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions can be useful for identifying isovector resonances. At present the most promising use of charge-exchange reactions with respect to giant resonances is to locate and study Gamow-Teller (GT) resonances. Detailed comparisons between GT and M1 strengths can yield further structure information. 7 figures

  8. Charge exchange probes of nuclear structure and interactions with emphasis on (p,n)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    New results from (p,n) studies at IUCF show that it is possible to observe Gamow-Teller (GT) strength and extract GT matrix elements from (p,n) measurements. The charge exchange reactions ( 6 Li, 6 He) and (π + ,π 0 ) involve different projectile quantum numbers, and the relationships of these reactions to (p,n) is discussed

  9. Low-energy Electro-weak Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazit, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Chiral effective field theory (EFT) provides a systematic and controlled approach to low-energy nuclear physics. Here, we use chiral EFT to calculate low-energy weak Gamow-Teller transitions. We put special emphasis on the role of two-body (2b) weak currents within the nucleus and discuss their applications in predicting physical observables.

  10. Searches for exotic interactions in nuclear beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 640 S Shaw Lane, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    This contribution presents current efforts in the search for exotic interactions in nuclear β decay using a calorimetric technique for the measurement of the β energy spectrum shape. We describe the criteria for the choice of sensitive candidates in Gamow-Teller transitions and present the status of measurements performed in {sup 6}He and {sup 20}F decay.

  11. Prof. Ikeda’s important contributions to nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brink, D M

    2010-01-01

    Professor Ikeda has made many fundamental contributions to nuclear physics, especially to the theory of Gamow-Teller giant resonances, to nuclear cluster physics, to hypernuclear physics, and to the physics of neutron-rich nuclei. He also has played an important role in the education of young researchers in Japan and on the contacts between theoreticians and experimentalists.

  12. Configuration mixing for spin-isospin modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, Munetake

    2005-01-01

    Development of theories of configuration mixing is reviewed, concentrating on their application to spin-isospin modes, especially to the Gamow-Teller transitions. This talk is divided into three historical stages, the first order configuration mixing as the first stage, the second order configuration mixing as the second stage, and the delta-isobar-hole mixing as the third stage

  13. [Developments in medical units. 1915].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    In 1915 the political, economic, and social instability initiated the destruction of medical units; they had no administrative bases and they lacked the resources. However, needs encouraged that structures arose to meet the wounded, fractured, and traumatized, called “blood” hospitals and so-called crosses and sanitary trains.

  14. Cross Coursing in Mathematics: Physical Modelling in Differential Equations Crossing to Discrete Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We give an example of cross coursing in which a subject or approach in one course in undergraduate mathematics is used in a completely different course. This situation crosses falling body modelling in an upper level differential equations course into a modest discrete dynamical systems unit of a first-year mathematics course. (Contains 1 figure.)

  15. Women Mentoring in the Academe: A Faculty Cross-Racial and Cross-Cultural Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guramatunhu-Mudiwa, Precious; Angel, Roma B.

    2017-01-01

    Two women faculty members, one White from the southeastern United States and one Black African from Zimbabwe, purposefully explored their informal mentoring relationship with the goal of illuminating the complexities associated with their cross-racial, cross-cultural experience. Concentrating on their four-year mentor-mentee academic relationship…

  16. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  17. Border Crossing/Entry Data - Boarder Crossing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Border Crossing/Entry Data provides summary statistics for incoming crossings at the U.S.-Canadian and the U.S.-Mexican border at the port level. Data are available...

  18. The pCS20 PCR assay for Ehrlichia ruminantium does not cross-react with the novel deer ehrlichial agent found in white-tailed deer in the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Mahan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available White-tailed deer are susceptible to heartwater (Ehrlichia [Cowdria] ruminantium infection and are likely to suffer high mortality if the disease spreads to the United States. It is vital, therefore, to validate a highly specific and sensitive detection method for E. ruminantium infection that can be reliably used in testing white-tailed deer, which are reservoirs of antigenically or genetically related agents such as Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Anaplasma (Ehrlichia phagocytophilum (HGE agent and Ehrlichia ewingii. Recently, a novel but as yet unnamed ehrlichial species, the white-tailed deer ehrlichia (WTDE, has been discovered in deer populations in the United States. Although the significance of WTDE as a pathogen is unknown at present, it can be distinguished from other Ehrlichia spp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In this study it was differentiated from E. ruminantium by the use of the pCS20 PCR assay which has high specificity and sensitivity for the detection of E. ruminantium. This assay did not amplify DNA from the WTDE DNA samples isolated from deer resident in Florida, Georgia and Missouri, but amplified the specific 279 bp fragment from E. ruminantium DNA. The specificity of the pCS20 PCR assay for E. ruminantium was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Similarly, the 16S PCR primers (nested that amplify a specific 405-412 bp fragment from the WTDE DNA samples, did not amplify any product from E. ruminantium DNA. This result demonstrates that it would be possible to differentiate between E. ruminantium and the novel WTDE agent found in white tailed deer by applying the two respective PCR assays followed by Southern hybridizations. Since the pCS20 PCR assay also does not amplify any DNA products from E. chaffeensis or Ehrlichia canis DNA, it is therefore the method of choice for the detection of E. ruminantium in these deer and other animal hosts.

  19. Portable field water sample filtration unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, A.J.; Young, G.G.

    1977-01-01

    A lightweight back-packable field-tested filtration unit is described. The unit is easily cleaned without cross contamination at the part-per-billion level and allows rapid filtration of boiling hot and sometimes muddy water. The filtration results in samples that are free of bacteria and particulates and which resist algae growth even after storage for months. 3 figures

  20. An intersection test for panel unit roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanck, C.

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a new panel unit root test based on Simes' ( 1986) classical intersection test. The test is robust to general patterns of cross-sectional dependence and yet is straightforward to implement, only requiring p-values of time series unit root tests of the series in the panel, and

  1. Radiological unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMay, C.A.G.; Gibbons, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The technique of analogous superposition is applied for exact representation of the absorbtion and transmission coefficients of a two-dimensional arrangement of elements taken up by a body in a cross-sectional plane. End values of the elements which are arranged along a beam path are read by storage tubes and added, in order to obtain pseudo boundary values which can then be compared with corresponding real boundary values. By returning the fault signal to the storage tubes, iteration is possible. Suitable storage tubes, black diagrams for data processing as well as suitable means to indicate the output signals derived from the storage tubes are given. (ORU/LH) [de

  2. Obesity Among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States: Data From the Cross-Sectional Medical Monitoring Project and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Paul, Angela M; Wei, Stanley C; Mattson, Christine L; Robertson, McKaylee; Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C; Bell, Tanvir K; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-07-01

    Our objective was to compare obesity prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults receiving care and the U.S. general population and identify obesity correlates among HIV-infected men and women.Cross-sectional data was collected in 2009 to 2010 from 2 nationally representative surveys: Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).Weighted prevalence estimates of obesity, defined as body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m, were compared using prevalence ratios (PR, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Correlates of obesity in HIV-infected adults were examined using multivariable logistic regression.Demographic characteristics of the 4006 HIV-infected adults in MMP differed from the 5657 adults from the general U.S. population in NHANES, including more men (73.2% in MMP versus 49.4% in NHANES, respectively), black or African Americans (41.5% versus 11.6%), persons with annual incomes obese (PR 0.5, CI 0.5-0.6) and HIV-infected women were more likely to be obese (PR1.2, CI 1.1-1.3) compared with men and women in the general population, respectively. Among HIV-infected women, younger age was associated with obesity (60 years). Among HIV-infected men, correlates of obesity included black or African American race/ethnicity, annual income >$20,000 and 200 cells/μL.Obesity is common, affecting 2 in 5 HIV-infected women and 1 in 5 HIV-infected men. Correlates of obesity differ for HIV-infected men and women; therefore, different strategies may be needed for the prevention and treatment.

  3. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonstad Kåre

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  4. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL) in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvrud, Christian; Nonstad, Kåre; Palmstierna, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors. PMID:19371413

  5. The impact of nurse working hours on patient safety culture: a cross-national survey including Japan, the United States and Chinese Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghui; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Ito, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Huang, Chiu-Chin; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2013-10-07

    A positive patient safety culture (PSC) is one of the most critical components to improve healthcare quality and safety. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has been used to assess PSC in 31 countries. However, little is known about the impact of nurse working hours on PSC. We hypothesized that long nurse working hours would deteriorate PSC, and that the deterioration patterns would vary between countries. Moreover, the common trends observed in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan may be useful to improve PSC in other countries. The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of long nurse working hours on PSC in Japan, the US, and Chinese Taiwan using HSOPS. The HSOPS questionnaire measures 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, with higher scores indicating a more positive PSC. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a generalized linear mixed model to evaluate the impact of working hours on PSC outcome measures (patient safety grade and number of events reported). Tukey's test and Cohen's d values were used to verify the relationships between nurse working hours and the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC. Nurses working ≥60 h/week in Japan and the US had a significantly lower OR for patient safety grade than those working working ≥40 h/week had a significantly higher OR for the number of events reported. The mean score on 'staffing' was significantly lower in the ≥60-h group than in the Japan and Chinese Taiwan. Patient safety grade deteriorated and the number of events reported increased with long working hours. Among the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, long working hours had an impact on 'staffing' and 'teamwork within units' in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan.

  6. Exploring the relationship between general practice characteristics, and attendance at walk-in centres, minor injuries units and EDs in England 2012/2013: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammes, Peter; Morris, Richard W; Brangan, Emer; Checkland, Kath; England, Helen; Huntley, Alyson; Lasserson, Daniel; MacKichan, Fiona; Salisbury, Chris; Wye, Lesley; Purdy, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    For several years, EDs in the UK NHS have faced considerable increases in attendance rates. Walk-in centres (WiCs) and minor injuries units (MIUs) have been suggested as solutions. We aimed to investigate the associations between practice and practice population characteristics with ED attendance rates or combined ED/WiC/MIU attendance, and the associations between WiC/MIU and ED attendance. We used general practice-level data including 7462 English practices in 2012/2013 and present adjusted regression coefficients from linear multivariable analysis for relationships between patients' emergency attendance rates and practice characteristics. Every percentage-point increase in patients reporting inability to make an appointment was associated with an increase in emergency attendance by 0.36 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.66) per 1000 population. Percentage-point increases in patients unable to speak to a general practitioner (GP)/nurse within two workdays and patients able to speak often to their preferred GP were associated with increased emergency attendance/1000 population by 0.23 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.42) and 0.10 (95% CI 0.00 to 0.19), respectively. Practices in areas encompassing several towns (conurbations) had higher attendance than rural practices, as did practices with more non-UK-qualified GPs. Practice population characteristics associated with increased emergency attendance included higher unemployment rates, higher percentage of UK whites and lower male life expectancy, which showed stronger associations than practice characteristics. Furthermore, higher MIU or WiC attendance rates were associated with lower ED attendance rates. Improving availability of appointments and opportunities to speak a GP/nurse at short notice might reduce ED attendance. Establishing MIUs and WiCs might also reduce ED attendance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Factors associated with secondhand smoke incursion into the homes of non-smoking residents in a multi-unit housing complex: a cross-sectional study in Seoul, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghoon Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a multi-unit housing (MUH complex, secondhand smoke (SHS can pass from one living space to another. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of SHS incursion, and to establish the relationship between SHS incursion and socio-demographic and built environmental factors in MUH in Korea. Methods A population-based sample of 2600 residents (aged ≥19 years living in MUH from across the city of Seoul, Korea, was obtained through a web-based selection panel. The residents completed a questionnaire detailing socio-demographic factors, smoking status, frequency of SHS incursion, and built environmental factors. The presence of a personal smoke-free home rule was determined by residents declaring that no one smoked inside the home. Results Of the 2600 participants, non-smoking residents who lived in homes with a personal smoke-free rule were selected for further analysis (n = 1784. In the previous 12 months, 74.7% of residents had experienced SHS incursion ≥1 times. A multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis indicated that residents who spent more time at home, lived with children, supported the implementation of smoke-free regulations in MUH, lived in small homes, lived in homes with natural ventilation provided by opening a front door or the windows and front door, and lived in homes with more frequent natural ventilation were more likely to report SHS incursion into their homes. Conclusions The majority of the non-smoking residents experienced SHS incursion, even with a personal smoke-free rule in their homes. A smoke-free policy in MUH is needed to protect residents from SHS exposure when they are at home.

  8. Cross-Sectional Study of Unmet Mental Health Need in 5- to 7-Year Old Latino Children in the United States: Do Teachers and Parents Make a Difference in Service Utilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppelberg, Claudio O; Hollinshead, Marisa O; Collins, Brian A; Nieto-Castañon, Alfonso

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the rates of mental health service utilization in young Latino children of immigrants in relation to maternal and teacher reports of child mental health need. Specific knowledge is lacking about gaps in service utilization among young Latino children, the fastest growing and possibly the most underserved segment of the US child population. The associations of mental health service utilization (Service Assessment for Children and Adolescents) and mental health need (clinical levels of internalizing, externalizing, or total problems reported by mothers [Child Behavior Checklist] and teachers [Teacher's Report Form]) were examined in a community sample of young Latino children of immigrants ( n = 228; mean age = 6) and compared across mothers' and teachers' responses. Mother-teacher agreement was also studied. Sixty-five children (28.5 %) had a mental health need; most (76.9 %) of these received no services. For all types of mental health need, service utilization was more likely when need was reported by mothers rather than teachers ( p = .03). Teachers' reports were not associated with service utilization. Mother-teacher agreement was low for externalizing ( r = .23; p ≤ 0.01) and total problems ( r = .21; p ≤ 0.05), and nonsignificant for internalizing problems. This study is the first in the United States to document, in such a young Latino group, high rates of unmet need comparable to those among older Latino youth; low or no mother-teacher agreement on which children had a mental health need; low utilization of school-based services; and a lack of association between service utilization and teacher-reported mental health need-both for externalizing and internalizing problems. These findings suggest that schools are not effectively leveraging mental health services for young Latino children. Potential factors responsible for the findings are discussed.

  9. Preferences for care towards the end of life when decision-making capacity may be impaired: A large scale cross-sectional survey of public attitudes in Great Britain and the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Clarke

    Full Text Available There is continuing public debate about treatment preferences at the end of life, and the acceptability and legal status of treatments that sustain or end life. However, most surveys use binary yes/no measures, and little is known about preferences in neurological disease when decision-making capacity is lost, as most studies focus on cancer. This study investigates changes in public preferences for care towards the end of life, with a focus on measures to sustain or end life.Large-scale international public opinion surveys using a six-stage patient vignette, respondents chose a level of intervention for each stage as health and decision-making capacity deteriorated. Cross-sectional representative samples of the general public in Great Britain and the USA (N = 2016. Primary outcome measure: changes in respondents' preferences for care, measured on a four-point scale designed before data collection. The scale ranged from: maintaining life at all costs; to intervention with agreement; to no intervention; to measures for ending life.There were no significant differences between GB and USA. Preference for measures to sustain life at all costs peaked at short-term memory loss (30.2%, n = 610. Respondents selecting 'measures to help me die peacefully' increased from 3.9% to 37.0% as the condition deteriorated, with the largest increase occurring when decision-making capacity was lost (10.3% to 23.0%. Predictors of choosing 'measures to help me die peacefully' at any stage were: previous personal experience (OR = 1.34, p<0.010, and older age (OR = 1.09 per decade, p<0.010. Negative predictors: living with children (OR = 0.72, p<0.010 and being of "black" race/ethnicity (OR = 0.45, p<0.001.Public opinion was uniform between GB and USA, but markedly heterogeneous. Despite contemporaneous capacitous consent providing an essential legal safeguard in most jurisdictions, there was a high prevalence of preference for "measures to end my life peacefully" when

  10. Diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to food environment sub-types: a cross-sectional analysis of Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States Census, and food establishment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenfeld, Cara L; Leslie, Timothy F; Makara, Matthew A

    2015-05-14

    Social and spatial factors are an important part of individual and community health. The objectives were to identify food establishment sub-types and evaluate prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to these sub-types in the Washington DC metropolitan area. A cross-sectional study design was used. A measure of retail food environment was calculated as the ratio of number of sources of unhealthier food options (fast food, convenience stores, and pharmacies) to healthier food options (grocery stores and specialty food stores). Two categories were created: ≤ 1.0 (healthier options) and > 1.0 (unhealthier options). k-means clustering was used to identify clusters based on proportions of grocery stores, restaurants, specialty food, fast food, convenience stores, and pharmacies. Prevalence data for county-level diabetes, obesity, and consumption of five or more fruits or vegetables per day (FV5) was obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Multiple imputation was used to predict block-group level health outcomes with US Census demographic and economic variables as the inputs. The healthier options category clustered into three sub-types: 1) specialty food, 2) grocery stores, and 3) restaurants. The unhealthier options category clustered into two sub-types: 1) convenience stores, and 2) restaurants and fast food. Within the healthier options category, diabetes prevalence in the sub-types with high restaurants (5.9 %, p = 0.002) and high specialty food (6.1 %, p = 0.002) was lower than the grocery stores sub-type (7.1 %). The high restaurants sub-type compared to the high grocery stores sub-type had significantly lower obesity prevalence (28.6 % vs. 31.2 %, p restaurants (including fast food) sub-type was significantly associated with lower diabetes and obesity, and higher FV prevalence compared to grocery store sub-type. These results suggest that there are sub-types within larger categories of

  11. Failure of hospital employees to comply with smoke-free policy is associated with nicotine dependence and motives for smoking: a descriptive cross-sectional study at a teaching hospital in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Kenrick

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoke-free policy aims to protect the health of the population by reducing exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, and World Health Organisation (WHO guidance notes that these policies are only successful if there is full and proper enforcement. We aimed to investigate the problem of resistance to smoking restrictions and specifically compliance with smoke-free policy. We hypothesised that an explanation for non-compliance would lie in a measurable difference between the smoking behaviours of compliant and non-compliant smokers, specifically that non-compliance would be associated with nicotine dependence and different reasons for smoking. Methods We conducted a questionnaire-based, descriptive, cross-sectional study of hospital employees. Seven hundred and four members of staff at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, completed the questionnaire, of whom 101 were smokers. Comparison between compliant and non-compliant smokers was made based on calculated scores for the Fagerström test and the Horn-Waingrow scale, and level of agreement with questions about attitudes. For ordinal data we used a linear-by-linear association test. For non-parametric independent variables we used the Mann-Whitney test and for associations between categorical variables we used the chi-squared test. Results The demographic composition of respondents corresponded with the hospital's working population in gender, age, job profile and ethnicity. Sixty nine smokers reported they were compliant while 32 were non-compliant. Linear-by-linear association analysis of the compliant and non-compliant smokers' answers for the Fagerström test suggests association between compliance and nicotine dependence (p = 0.049. Mann-Whitney test analysis suggests there is a statistically significant difference between the reasons for smoking of the two groups: specifically that non-compliant smokers showed habitual smoking behaviour (p = 0.003. Overall

  12. Microcontroller Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulaev, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    The general purpose micro controller unit based on 8-bit single-chip microcomputer of the MCS-51 family is described. The controller has the data and program memories, a serial interface and an external bus for functional I/O extensions. The controller consists of a microcomputer chip, up to 4 ROM-RAM chips and 10 SSI and MSI chips, and it measures 160x120 mm. Both hardware and software micro system debugging tools are described. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Solar unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, A M; Trushevskiy, S N; Tveryanovich, E V

    1982-01-01

    A solar unit is proposed which contains an inclined solar collector with supply and outlet pipelines, the first of which is connected to the source of a heat carrier, while the second is connected through the valve to the tank for collecting heated heat carrier equipped with a device for recovery. In order to improve the effectiveness of heating the heat carrier, it additionally contains a concentrator of solar radiation and a device for maintaining a level of the heat carrier in the collector in the zone of the focal spot of the concentrator, while the heat pipeline is connected to the source of the heat carrier with the help of a device for maintaining the level of the heat carrier.

  14. Transition crossing in the RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the study of various longitudinal problems pertaining to the transition-energy crossing in the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Scaling laws are provided for the effects of chromatic non-linearity, self-field mismatch, and microwave instability. It is indicated that the beam loss and bunch-area growth are mainly caused by the chromatic non-linear effect, which is enhanced by the space-charge force near transition. Computer simulation using the program TIBETAN shows that a ''γ T -jump'' of about 0.8 unit within a time period of 60 ms is adequate to achieve a ''clean'' crossing, provided that the remnant voltage of the 160 MHz rf system is less than 10 kV. 13 refs., 5 figs

  15. Termination unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  16. Termination unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  17. FEMA DFIRM Cross Sections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — FEMA Cross Sections are required for any Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map database where cross sections are shown on the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally...

  18. Border Crossing Entry Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) Border Crossing/Entry Data provides summary statistics for inbound crossings at the U.S.-Canadian and the U.S.-Mexican...

  19. Boundaries, injective envelopes, and reduced crossed products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryder, Rasmus Sylvester

    In this dissertation, we study boundary actions, equivariant injective envelopes, as well as theideal structure of reduced crossed products. These topics have recently been linked to thestudy of C-simple groups, that is, groups with simple reduced group C-algebras.In joint work with Matthew Kennedy......, we consider reduced twisted crossed products overC-simple groups. For any twisted C-dynamical system over a C-simple group, we provethat there is a one-to-one correspondence between maximal invariant ideals in the underlyingC-algebra and maximal ideals in the reduced crossed product. When......*-algebras, and relate the intersection property for group actions on unital C*-algebras to the intersection property for theequivariant injective envelope. Moreover, we also prove that the equivariant injective envelopeof the centre of the injective envelope of a unital C*-algebra can be regarded as a C...

  20. Data analysis of grade crossing incidents : research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Incidents and fatalities at highway-rail grade crossing in the United States have declined significantly over the past two decades despite a significant increase in both train and vehicle traffic. Therefore, to provide a more realistic comparison of ...

  1. Magnitude and patterns of child sexual abuse: A retrospective cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    retrospective cross-sectional study among male pediatric patients at ... HIV on the first presentation of the incident to the emergency unit. ..... sexual abuse a qualitative interview study with ... exposure prophylaxis programme Malawi Med J.

  2. Can One Undergraduate Course Increase Cross-Cultural Competence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Lois

    2015-01-01

    The majority of students who took this general education undergraduate course in developing cross-cultural understanding at a state college in the northeastern United States reported that their level of cross-cultural competence and global awareness increased by the end of the course. The primary course objective was to help students better…

  3. Encouraging emergence of cross-business strategic initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Canales, J. Ignacio; Caldart, Adrián

    2017-01-01

    We explore how strategic initiatives emerge at the business unit level in the context of multi-business firms. Findings show that such initiatives create cross-business synergies in the absence of any direct intervention from the headquarters. Four factors appeared to foster the development of autonomous cross-business collaboration: a sense of urgency at the level of the firm, the existence of a few broad but strong corporate strategic guidelines, the existence of a set of cross-business int...

  4. Simulation of motor unit recruitment and microvascular unit perfusion: spatial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglevand, A J; Segal, S S

    1997-10-01

    Muscle fiber activity is the principal stimulus for increasing capillary perfusion during exercise. The control elements of perfusion, i.e., microvascular units (MVUs), supply clusters of muscle fibers, whereas the control elements of contraction, i.e., motor units, are composed of fibers widely scattered throughout muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine how the discordant spatial domains of MVUs and motor units could influence the proportion of open capillaries (designated as perfusion) throughout a muscle cross section. A computer model simulated the locations of perfused MVUs in response to the activation of up to 100 motor units in a muscle with 40,000 fibers and a cross-sectional area of 100 mm2. The simulation increased contraction intensity by progressive recruitment of motor units. For each step of motor unit recruitment, the percentage of active fibers and the number of perfused MVUs were determined for several conditions: 1) motor unit fibers widely dispersed and motor unit territories randomly located (which approximates healthy human muscle), 2) regionalized motor unit territories, 3) reversed recruitment order of motor units, 4) densely clustered motor unit fibers, and 5) increased size but decreased number of motor units. The simulations indicated that the widespread dispersion of motor unit fibers facilitates complete capillary (MVU) perfusion of muscle at low levels of activity. The efficacy by which muscle fiber activity induced perfusion was reduced 7- to 14-fold under conditions that decreased the dispersion of active fibers, increased the size of motor units, or reversed the sequence of motor unit recruitment. Such conditions are similar to those that arise in neuromuscular disorders, with aging, or during electrical stimulation of muscle, respectively.

  5. Nuclear structure around doubly-magic nuclei: lifetime measurements in the vicinity of 68Ni and search for isomers around 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celikovic, Igor

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the structure of nuclei around 68 Ni as well as the production, separation and identification of proton-rich isotopes lying in the vicinity of the doubly-magic 100 Sn nucleus.In the first part, we discuss the evolution of collectivity and the interplay between collective and single-particle degrees of freedom in nuclei around 68 Ni. We measured lifetimes in Zn isotopes around N = 40 produced in 238 U + 70 Zn deep-inelastic collisions at GANIL. We used a plunger device and the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The nuclei of interest were identified by the VAMOS spectrometer and the γ-rays with the EXOGAM array. The reduced electromagnetic transitions probabilities were extracted from the lifetimes. Several transitions and lifetimes are reported for the first time. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of shell model calculations. In the second part, the partial conservation of seniority in the g 9/2 shell and its influence on one-particle transfer is discussed. The third part presents the analysis of an in-beam test performed at RIKEN (Japan) to evaluate two settings of the BigRIPS separator for optimizing the production and selection of 100 Sn. This study has been used to setup our subsequent experiment, dedicated to the measurement of the Gamow-Teller strength in the decay of 100 Sn, to the mapping of the proton drip-line and the study of short-lived isomers in this mass region. Nuclei around 100 Sn were produced by fragmentation of a 345 MeV/u 124 Xe beam on a Be target. The production cross-sections of nuclei around 100 Sn were measured. The search for new isotopes and new isomers in all identified nuclei is presented. (author) [fr

  6. Cross Selling Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nufer, Gerd; Kelm, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Erfolgreiches Cross Selling Management bietet die Möglichkeit, die Profitabilität von Neu- oder Bestandskunden zu steigern und kann zur Verbesserung der Kundenzufriedenheit, Kundenbindung und Verlängerung des Kundenlebenszyklus beitragen. Um erfolgreiches Cross Selling Management zu betreiben, sind ein systematisches Vorgehen und die Bereitstellung von Unternehmensressourcen notwendig. Umfangreiche vorbereitende Maßnahmen stellen sicher, dass Cross Selling nicht dem Zufall überlassen wird. De...

  7. Cross currency swap valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Boenkost, Wolfram; Schmidt, Wolfgang M.

    2004-01-01

    Cross currency swaps are powerful instruments to transfer assets or liabilities from one currency into another. The market charges for this a liquidity premium, the cross currency basis spread, which should be taken into account by the valuation methodology. We describe and compare two valuation methods for cross currency swaps which are based upon using two different discounting curves. The first method is very popular in practice but inconsistent with single currency swap valuation methods....

  8. Effects of driver attention on rail crossing safety and : The effects of auditory warnings and driver distraction on rail crossing safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Train-vehicle/train collisions at highway-rail grade crossings (crossings) continue to be a major issue in the US and around the world. Although the United States has made great strides in improving safety at crossings since the 1970s, vehicle-train ...

  9. Crossed modules of racks

    OpenAIRE

    Crans, Alissa S.; Wagemann, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    We generalize the notion of a crossed module of groups to that of a crossed module of racks. We investigate the relation to categorified racks, namely strict 2-racks, and trunk-like objects in the category of racks, generalizing the relation between crossed modules of groups and strict 2-groups. Then we explore topological applications. We show that by applying the rack-space functor, a crossed module of racks gives rise to a covering. Our main result shows how the fundamental racks associate...

  10. [Factors associated with cross-nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Seehausen, Mariana Pujól; Oliveira, Maria Inês Couto de; Boccolini, Cristiano Siqueira

    2017-05-01

    This article aims to estimate the prevalence and analyze the factors associated with cross-nursing. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 with interviews with a representative sample of mothers of infants less than one-year-old (n' = 695) attended in nine primary health units in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Sociodemographic characteristics were studied; pregnancy, childbirth and primary care assistance; maternal habits and baby features. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) were obtained by Poisson Regression, retaining variables associated with the outcome in the final model (p ≤ 0.05). Cross-nursing was practiced by 29.4% of the mothers. Most practitioner mothers were relatives or friends. The following variables were directly associated with cross-nursing: being an adolescent mother (PR' = 1.595), smoking (PR' = 1.396), alcohol consumption (PR' = 1.613), inappropriate baby feeding habits (PR' = 1.371) and infant's age in months (PR' = 1.066). Maternal formal employment was inversely associated with the practice (PR' = 0.579). Cross-nursing has a relevant prevalence among mothers assisted by primary health care units in Rio de Janeiro City. This issue should be addressed, especially among the most vulnerable groups, due to the association with adolescence and with unhealthy habits.

  11. Renal cell carcinoma in patient with crossed fused renal ectopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Cakmak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal cell carcinomas have rarely been reported in patients with crossed fused renal ectopia. We presented a patient with right to left crossed fused kidney harbouring renal tumor. The most frequent tumor encountered in crossed fused renal ectopia is renal cell carcinoma. In this case, partial nephrectomy was performed which pave way to preservation of the uninvolved both renal units. Due to unpredictable anatomy, careful preoperative planning and meticulous delineation of renal vasculature is essential for preservation of the uninvolved renal units.

  12. Precision measurements in the weak interaction framework: development of realistic simulations for the LPCTrap device installed at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    This work belongs to the effort presently deployed to measure the angular correlation parameter a_β_ν in three nuclear beta decays ("6He"+, "3"5Ar"+ and "1"9Ne"+). The V-A structure of the weak interaction implies that a_β_ν = +1 for a pure Fermi transition and a_β_ν = -1/3 for a pure Gamow-Teller transition. A thorough measurement of this parameter to check any deviation from these values may lead to the discovery of possible exotic currents. Furthermore, the measurement of a_β_ν in mirror transitions allows the extraction of V_u_d, the first element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. The LPCTrap apparatus, installed at GANIL, is designed to ready a continuous ion beam for injection in a dedicated Paul trap. This latter device allows to have a quasi-punctual source from which the decay products are detected in coincidence. It is from the study of the recoil ion time-of-flight (TOF) distribution that a_β_ν is withdrawn and, since 2010, the associated Shake-Off (SO) probabilities. This study requires the complete simulation of the LPCTrap experiments. The major part of this work is dedicated to such simulations, especially to the modeling of the trapped ion cloud dynamic. The Clouda program, which takes advantage of graphics processing unit (GPU), was developed in this context and its full characterization is presented here. Three important aspects are addressed: the electromagnetic trapping field, the realistic collisions between the ions and the buffer gas atoms and the space charge effect. The present work shows the importance of these simulations to increase the control of the systematic errors on a_β_ν. (author) [fr

  13. Transition crossing in the main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes the study of various longitudinal problems pertaining to the transition-energy crossing in the proposed Fermi Lab Main Injector. The theory indicates that the beam loss and bunch-area growth are mainly caused by the chromatic non-linear effect, which is enhanced by the space-charge force near transition. Computer simulation using the program TIBETAN shows that a ''γ T jump'' of about 1.5 unit within 1 ms is adequate to achieve a ''clean'' crossing in the currently proposed h=588 scenario. 19 refs., 4 figs

  14. Multifractal Cross Wavelet Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Gao, Xing-Lu; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H. Eugene

    Complex systems are composed of mutually interacting components and the output values of these components usually exhibit long-range cross-correlations. Using wavelet analysis, we propose a method of characterizing the joint multifractal nature of these long-range cross correlations, a method we call multifractal cross wavelet analysis (MFXWT). We assess the performance of the MFXWT method by performing extensive numerical experiments on the dual binomial measures with multifractal cross correlations and the bivariate fractional Brownian motions (bFBMs) with monofractal cross correlations. For binomial multifractal measures, we find the empirical joint multifractality of MFXWT to be in approximate agreement with the theoretical formula. For bFBMs, MFXWT may provide spurious multifractality because of the wide spanning range of the multifractal spectrum. We also apply the MFXWT method to stock market indices, and in pairs of index returns and volatilities we find an intriguing joint multifractal behavior. The tests on surrogate series also reveal that the cross correlation behavior, particularly the cross correlation with zero lag, is the main origin of cross multifractality.

  15. Evaluated cross section libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqurno, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    The dosimetry tape (ENDF/B-IV tape 412) was issued in a general CSEWG distribution, August 1974. The pointwise cross section data file was tested with specified reference spectra. A group averaged cross section data file (620 groups based on tape 412) was tested with the above spectra and the results are presented in this report

  16. Jet inclusive cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons

  17. Optical programmable Boolean logic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2011-11-10

    Logic units are the building blocks of many important computational operations likes arithmetic, multiplexer-demultiplexer, radix conversion, parity checker cum generator, etc. Multifunctional logic operation is very much essential in this respect. Here a programmable Boolean logic unit is proposed that can perform 16 Boolean logical operations from a single optical input according to the programming input without changing the circuit design. This circuit has two outputs. One output is complementary to the other. Hence no loss of data can occur. The circuit is basically designed by a 2×2 polarization independent optical cross bar switch. Performance of the proposed circuit has been achieved by doing numerical simulations. The binary logical states (0,1) are represented by the absence of light (null) and presence of light, respectively.

  18. Cross-cultural comparison of maternal sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jodi A; Sadeh, Avi; Kwon, Robert; Goh, Daniel Y T

    2013-11-01

    To characterize cross-cultural sleep patterns and sleep problems in a large sample of mothers of children (ages birth to 6 years) in multiple predominantly Asian and predominantly Caucasian countries. Mothers of 10,085 young children (predominantly Asian countries/regions: China, Hong Kong, India, Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand; predominantly Caucasian countries: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, United States) completed an internet-based expanded version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Mothers in predominantly Asian countries/regions had later bedtimes, decreased number and duration of night wakings, more nighttime sleep, and more total sleep than mothers from predominantly Caucasian countries, P cross-cultural findings of young children. Psychosocial factors were found to be the best predictors of poor sleep, irrespective of culture. Further studies are needed to understand the impact of these findings.

  19. The Design of Cluster Randomized Trials with Random Cross-Classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerbeek, Mirjam; Safarkhani, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    Data from cluster randomized trials do not always have a pure hierarchical structure. For instance, students are nested within schools that may be crossed by neighborhoods, and soldiers are nested within army units that may be crossed by mental health-care professionals. It is important that the random cross-classification is taken into account…

  20. SI units in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, P S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1978-11-01

    The proposal of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements that the special units of radiation and radioactivity-roentgen, rad, rem and curie-be replaced by the International System (SI) of Units has been accepted by international bodies. This paper reviews the resons for introducing the new units and their features. The relation between the special units and the corresponding SI units is discussed with examples. In spite of anticipated difficulties, the commission recommends a smooth and efficient changeover to the SI units in ten years.

  1. Crossing simple resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances

  2. Cross-impact method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzić Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper displays the application of the Cross-Impact method in pedagogy, namely a methodological approach which crosses variables in a novel, but statistically justified manner. The method is an innovation in pedagogy as well as in research methodology of social and psychological phenomena. Specifically, events and processes are crossed, that is, experts' predictions of about future interaction of events and processes. Therefore, this methodology is futuristic; it concerns predicting future, which is of key importance for pedagogic objectives. The paper presents two instances of the cross-impact approach: the longer, displayed in fourteen steps, and the shorter, in four steps. They are both accompanied with mathematic and statistical formulae allowing for quantification, that is, a numerical expression of the probability of a certain event happening in the future. The advantage of this approach is that it facilitates planning in education which so far has been solely based on lay estimates and assumptions.

  3. Cross-Platform Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina ENACHE

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-platform - a concept becoming increasingly used in recent years especially in the development of mobile apps, but this consistently over time and in the development of conventional desktop applications. The notion of cross-platform software (multi-platform or platform-independent refers to a software application that can run on more than one operating system or computing architecture. Thus, a cross-platform application can operate independent of software or hardware platform on which it is execute. As a generic definition presents a wide range of meanings for purposes of this paper we individualize this definition as follows: we will reduce the horizon of meaning and we use functionally following definition: a cross-platform application is a software application that can run on more than one operating system (desktop or mobile identical or in a similar way.

  4. Floodplain Cross Section Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This table is required for any Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map database where cross sections are shown on the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally any FIRM...

  5. Multitrajectory eikonal cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    With the use of reference and distorted transition operators, a time-correlation-function representation of the inelastic differential cross section has recently been used to obtain distorted eikonal cross sections. These cross sections involve straight-line and reference classical translational trajectories that are unaffected by any internal-state changes which have occurred during the collision. This distorted eikonal theory is now extended to include effects of internal-state changes on the translational motion. In particular, a different classical trajectory is associated with each pair of internal states. Expressions for these inelastic cross sections are obtained in terms of time-ordered cosine and sine memory functions using the Zwanzig-Feshbach projection-operator method. Explicit formulas are obtained in the time-disordered perturbation approximation

  6. HARP MHI- Cross Seamount

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PIFSC and Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) conducted passive acoustic monitoring for cetaceans at Cross Seamount in 2005 and 2006 using a High-Frequency...

  7. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  8. Cross validation in LULOO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Paul Haase; Nørgård, Peter Magnus; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1996-01-01

    The leave-one-out cross-validation scheme for generalization assessment of neural network models is computationally expensive due to replicated training sessions. Linear unlearning of examples has recently been suggested as an approach to approximative cross-validation. Here we briefly review...... the linear unlearning scheme, dubbed LULOO, and we illustrate it on a systemidentification example. Further, we address the possibility of extracting confidence information (error bars) from the LULOO ensemble....

  9. Metoda Criss-Cross

    OpenAIRE

    Papež, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the criss-cross method, which solves the tasks of linear programming and does not need primar or dual feasibility of the basis. At first, the single-phase simplex method, that needs primal feasibility, gets described. After that, we describe the dual simplex method, which needs dual feasibility. The criss-cross method combines both of these methods. All of mentioned methods are explained and demonstrated in several examples.

  10. A simple nonstationary-volatility robust panel unit root test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demetrescu, Matei; Hanck, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    We propose an IV panel unit root test robust to nonstationary error volatility. Its finite-sample performance is convincing even for many units and strong cross-correlation. An application to GDP prices illustrates the inferential impact of nonstationary volatility. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Comprehensive stroke units: a review of comparative evidence and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel K Y; Cordato, Dennis; O'Rourke, Fintan; Chan, Daniel L; Pollack, Michael; Middleton, Sandy; Levi, Chris

    2013-06-01

    Stroke unit care offers significant benefits in survival and dependency when compared to general medical ward. Most stroke units are either acute or rehabilitation, but comprehensive (combined acute and rehabilitation) model (comprehensive stroke unit) is less common. To examine different levels of evidence of comprehensive stroke unit compared to other organized inpatient stroke care and share local experience of comprehensive stroke units. Cochrane Library and Medline (1980 to December 2010) review of English language articles comparing stroke units to alternative forms of stroke care delivery, different types of stroke unit models, and differences in processes of care within different stroke unit models. Different levels of comparative evidence of comprehensive stroke units to other models of stroke units are collected. There are no randomized controlled trials directly comparing comprehensive stroke units to other stroke unit models (either acute or rehabilitation). Comprehensive stroke units are associated with reduced length of stay and greatest reduction in combined death and dependency in a meta-analysis study when compared to other stroke unit models. Comprehensive stroke units also have better length of stay and functional outcome when compared to acute or rehabilitation stroke unit models in a cross-sectional study, and better length of stay in a 'before-and-after' comparative study. Components of stroke unit care that improve outcome are multifactorial and most probably include early mobilization. A comprehensive stroke unit model has been successfully implemented in metropolitan and rural hospital settings. Comprehensive stroke units are associated with reductions in length of stay and combined death and dependency and improved functional outcomes compared to other stroke unit models. A comprehensive stroke unit model is worth considering as the preferred model of stroke unit care in the planning and delivery of metropolitan and rural stroke services

  12. The (n,p) reaction as a probe of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, K.P.; Celler, A.

    1988-08-01

    An account is given of some results of studies of the (n,p) reaction on nuclear targets at TRIUMF. The (n,p) reaction, inducing spin flip transitions in isospin space, appears to exhibit a unique sensitivity to certain aspects of nuclear structure. The TRIUMF facility is the first to exploit the (n,p) reaction as a detailed probe of nuclear structure at energies above 65 MeV. In the (n,p) reaction Fermi transitions are absent, but there is a dramatic impact on Gamow-Teller and other collective transactions. Some nuclear transition matrix elements can be estimated on the basis of (n,p) measurements. Experiments have been carried out at TRIUMF on Li 6 , Fe 5 4, and Zr 9 0 targets. The calibration of the (n,p) reaction as a probe of the Gamow-Teller strength B + GT has been achieved for three targets. (L.L.) (45 refs., 10 figs.)

  13. Nuclear properties for astrophysical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kratz, K.L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernchemie

    1994-09-23

    We tabulate the ground-state odd-proton and odd-neutron spins, proton and neutron pairing gaps, binding energies, neuton separation energies, quantities related to {beta}-delayed one, two and three neutron emission probabilities, {beta}-decay Q values and half-lives with respect to Gamow-Teller decay, proton separation energies, and {alpha}-decay Q values and half-lives. The starting point of the calculations is a calculation of nuclear ground-states and (information based on the finite-range droplet model and the folded-Yukawa single-particle model published in a previous issue of ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES. The {beta}-delayed neutron-emission probabilities and Gamow-Teller {beta}-decay rates are obtained from a QRPA model that uses single-particle levels and wave-functions at the calculated nuclear ground-state shape as the starting point.

  14. Angle-averaged Compton cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a photon by an individual free electron is characterized by six quantities: α = initial photon energy in units of m 0 c 2 ; α/sub s/ = scattered photon energy in units of m 0 c 2 ; β = initial electron velocity in units of c; phi = angle between photon direction and electron direction in the laboratory frame (LF); theta = polar angle change due to Compton scattering, measured in the electron rest frame (ERF); and tau = azimuthal angle change in the ERF. We present an analytic expression for the average of the Compton cross section over phi, theta, and tau. The lowest order approximation to this equation is reasonably accurate for photons and electrons with energies of many keV

  15. Angle-averaged Compton cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a photon by an individual free electron is characterized by six quantities: ..cap alpha.. = initial photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..cap alpha../sub s/ = scattered photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..beta.. = initial electron velocity in units of c; phi = angle between photon direction and electron direction in the laboratory frame (LF); theta = polar angle change due to Compton scattering, measured in the electron rest frame (ERF); and tau = azimuthal angle change in the ERF. We present an analytic expression for the average of the Compton cross section over phi, theta, and tau. The lowest order approximation to this equation is reasonably accurate for photons and electrons with energies of many keV.

  16. Perfil de idosos admitidos em unidades de terapia intensiva gerais em Rio Grande, RS: resultados de um estudo de demanda Profile of the elderly admitted into general intensive care units in Rio Grande, Southern Brazil: results of a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo C. Schein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo conhecer o perfil do paciente com 60 anos ou mais de idade internado nas duas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI do município de Rio Grande, RS. Utilizando-se de delineamento transversal, entre abril/2007 e março/2008, entrevistadores previamente treinados aplicaram questionário padrão investigando sobre suas características demográficas, socioeconômicas e ambientais, utilização prévia de serviços de saúde e condições clínicas, que em 90% dos casos foram respondidos por familiares. Os 213 idosos hospitalizados neste período provinham, em sua maioria, do próprio município, eram casados, tinham mais de 70 anos, cinco anos de escolaridade, dois ou mais salários mínimos de renda familiar mensal, viviam em casa própria com outras duas pessoas e não possuíam plano de saúde; 88% foram à consulta médica nos últimos seis meses e 56% foram hospitalizados nos últimos 12 meses; metade deles chegaram à UTI inconscientes, por problemas clínicos oriundos da enfermaria do próprio hospital, onde 147 foram submetidos a ventilação mecânica, e 45% do grupo total evoluiu para óbito, em média, no oitavo dia. Estes dados mostram que é possível identificar idosos com maior potencial de internação em UTI também a partir de suas condições socioeconômicas e ambientais.This study aimed at assessing the profile of patients aged > 60 years admitted into intensive care units (ICU in the city of Rio Grande, Southern Brazil. A cross-sectional survey was carried out between April/2007 and March/2008 in two hospitals. Family members answered a standardized questionnaire that collected data on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, household conditions, use of healthcare services and current clinical conditions. Among the 213 elderly people included in the study, about 90% came from Rio Grande, were married, aged 70 years or more, had at least five years of schooling, earned two or more minimum wages

  17. Nuclear structure calculations in $^{20}$Ne with No-Core Configuration-Interaction model

    OpenAIRE

    Konieczka, Maciej; Satuła, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Negative parity states in $^{20}$Ne and Gamow-Teller strength distribution for the ground-state beta-decay of $^{20}$Na are calculated for the very first time using recently developed No-Core Configuration-Interaction model. The approach is based on multi-reference density functional theory involving isospin and angular-momentum projections. Advantages and shortcomings of the method are briefly discussed.

  18. Quark-spin isospin sum rules and the Adler-Weisberger relation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, J.; Ericson, M.

    1982-01-01

    We use a quark model to extend the classical Gamow-Teller sum rule for the difference of the β - and β + strengths to excitations of the nucleon (mainly the Δ isobar). A schematic model illustrates the realization of the new sum rule when a particle-hole force is introduced. We discuss the connection of our result with the model-independent Adler-Weisberger sum rule. (orig.)

  19. Theoretical studies of intermediate-energy nuclear physics: Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, C.J.; Macfarlane, M.H.; Serot, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    In this period covered by this report (April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1989), work focused on six main areas: Relativistic Theories of Nuclear Structure and Saturation; Relativistic Descriptions of Proton- Nucleus and Electron-Nucleus Scattering; Nonrelativistic Theory of Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions; Gamow-Teller Excitations in Nuclear Charge- Exchange Reactions; Relativistic Many-Body Theory at Finite Temperature and Density and Relativistic Atomic Physics of High Z Atoms. Results and publications in these areas are summarized in this report

  20. Theoretical studies of intermediate-energy nuclear physics: Annual technical progress report for April 1, 1987 to March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, C.J.; Macfarlane, M.H.; Serot, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    In the period covered by this report (April 1, 1987 to March 31, 1988), work focused on five main areas: Relativistic Theories of Nuclear Structure and Saturation; Relativistic Descriptions of Proton-Nucleus Scattering; Multipole Sum Rules and Ground-State Correlations; Gamow-Teller Excitations in Nuclear Charge-Exchange Reactions; Relativistic Many-Body Theory at Finite Temperature and Density. Results and publications in these areas are summarized in this report. 32 refs., 1 fig

  1. Charge exchange reactions and solar neutrino detection in 81Br

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.; Gabbard, F.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of 81 Br as the detector of the solar neutrino flux hinges upon the knowledge of the Gamow-Teller matrix element from the ground state of 81 Br to the (5/2) - state at 0.457 MeV in 81 Kr. The possibility of obtaining this matrix element is discussed in terms of the (p,n) and ( 3 He, t) charge exchange reactions. .ID CR2009 .PG 98 112

  2. Measurement of Angular Correlations in the Decay of Polarized Neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carl Jørgen; Krohn, V.E.; Ringo, G.R.

    1970-01-01

    The electron-momentum-neutron-spin correlation coefficient was found to be A=-0.115±0.008, and the antineutrino-momentum-neutron-spin correlation coefficient was found to be B=1.00±0.05. The value of A leads to |GA/GV|=1.26±0.02 for the ratio of Gamow-Teller-to-Fermi coupling constants in β decay...

  3. Selecting the Best of Portfolio Using OWA Operator Weights in Cross Efficiency-Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Sanei, Masoud; Banihashemi, Shokoofeh

    2014-01-01

    The present study is an attempt toward evaluating the performance of portfolios and asset selection using cross-efficiency evaluation. Cross-efficiency evaluation is an effective way of ranking decision making units (DMUs) in data envelopment analysis (DEA). The most widely used approach is to evaluate the efficiencies in each row or column in the cross-efficiency matrix with equal weights into an average cross-efficiency score for each DMU and consider it as the overall performance measureme...

  4. A subspecies of region crossing change, region freeze crossing change

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Ayumu; Shimizu, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a local move on a link diagram named a region freeze crossing change which is close to a region crossing change, but not the same. We study similarity and difference between region crossing change and region freeze crossing change.

  5. Crossed molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.T.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities with crossed molecular beams at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: scattering of Ar*, Kr*, with Xe; metastable rare gas interactions, He* + H 2 ; an atomic and molecular halogen beam source; a crossed molecular beam study of the Cl + Br 2 → BrCl + Br reaction; O( 3 P) reaction dynamics, development of the high pressure plasma beam source; energy randomization in the Cl + C 2 H 3 Br → Br + C 2 H 3 Cl reaction; high resolution photoionization studies of NO and ICl; photoionization of (H 2 O)/sub n/ and (NH 3 ) 2 ; photoionization mass spectroscopy of NH 3 + and O 3 + ; photo fragmentation of bromine; and construction of chemiluminescence-laser fluorescence crossed molecular beam machine

  6. Unit Cost Compendium Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Unit Cost Compendium (UCC) Calculations raw data set was designed to provide for greater accuracy and consistency in the use of unit costs across the USEPA...

  7. United States housing, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2013-01-01

    Provides current and historical information on housing market in the United States. Information includes trends for housing permits and starts, housing completions for single and multifamily units, and sales and construction. This report will be updated annually.

  8. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  9. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Providers, Emergency Consultations, and General Public. Contact Us Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version ...

  10. Thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; Saíz-Jabardo, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a numerical computational methodology for thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers, with applications in chemical, refrigeration and automobile industries. This methodology allows obtaining effectiveness-number of transfer units (e-NTU) data and has been used for simulating several standard and complex flow arrangements configurations of cross-flow heat exchangers. Simulated results have been validated through comparisons with results from available exact and approximate analytical solutions. Very accurate results have been obtained over wide ranges

  11. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In the 14 MeV Neutron Laboratory, we have continued the development of a facility that is now the only one of its kind in operation in the United States. We have refined the klystron bunching system described in last year's report to the point that 1.2 nanosecond pulses have been directly measured. We have tested the pulse shape discrimination capability of our primary NE 213 neutron detector. We have converted the RF sweeper section of the beamline to a frequency of 1 MHz to replace the function of the high voltage pulser described in last year's report which proved to be difficult to maintain and unreliable in its operation. We have also overcome several other significant experimental difficulties, including a major problem with a vacuum leak in the main accelerator column. We have completed additional testing to prove the remainder of the generation and measurement systems, but overcoming some of these experimental difficulties has delayed the start of actual data taking. We are now in a position to begin our first series of ring geometry elastic scattering measurements, and these will be underway before the end of the current contract year. As part of our longer term planning, we are continuing the conceptual analysis of several schemes to improve the intensity of our current pulsed beam. These include the provision of a duoplasmatron ion source and/or the provision of preacceleration bunching. Additional details are given later in this report. A series of measurements were carried out at the Tandem Dynamatron Facility involving the irradiation of a series of yttrium foils and the determination of activation cross sections using absolute counting techniques. The experimental work has been completed, and final analysis of the cross section data will be completed within several months

  12. Pullback and pushout crossed polymodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Crossed module; polygroup; crossed polymodule; action; pullback; pushout; fundamental relation. Mathematics Subject Classification. 13D99, 20N20, 18D35. 1. Introduction. Crossed module was defined by Whitehad in [21] and many have worked on this sub- ject. There are many examples of crossed module such as ...

  13. Nucleon charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alford, W.P. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics]|[TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Spicer, B.M. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    An historical review of the development of ideas pertaining to Gamow-Teller giant resonances is given, and a description of the emergence of techniques for the study of charge exchange reactions - particularly the technical advances which yielded the recent volume of new date. The present status of charge exchange reactions is reviewed and assessed. Evidence is presented from the {sup 14}C(p,n) reaction for the dominance of the spin-isospin component of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in intermediate energy reactions. In (p,n) reactions the Gamow-Teller giant resonance dominates the spectra, with higher multipoles contributing. By contrast, in (n,p) reactions in the heavier nuclei, the Gamow-Teller transitions are substantially Pauli-blocked and the spin dipole resonance dominates, with contributions from higher multipoles. Discussions of the multipole decomposition process, used to obtain from the data the contributions of the different multipoles, and the contributions of the multipoles, are given. 226 refs., 19 figs.

  14. Cross-language psycholinguistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.

    1985-01-01

    Cross-linguistic research can be of valaue to psycholinguistics by allowing tests of hypotheses the testing of which would be severely confounded in a single language, and by providing simple and readily available control conditions. For a long time the resources of this kind of research were

  15. Cross-Cultural Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandis, Harry C.; Brislin, Richard W.

    Cross-Cultural psychology refers to the collective efforts of researchers who work among people who live in different societies, with different languages and different forms of government. There are a number of benefits to the study of human behavior which can be accrued by carrying out research in various cultures, largely concerned with better…

  16. Cross-Cultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah

    A two-part presentation on cross-cultural communication consists of a discussion of cultural differences in interpersonal communication and an article from a Greek English-language publication concerning telephone use skills in a foreign country. Cultural differences in communication are divided into eight types and illustrated: (1) when to talk;…

  17. Cross-Cultural Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Minelgaite Snaebjornsson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing low participation of women in global leadership calls for more research in this field. In this article, we set out to include gendered expectations toward leader behavior as part of cross-cultural leadership theory. Building on an existing body of research, we focus on propositions about the effects of gendered expectations on the leader, from the followers’ standpoint. The consideration of gendered effects from the follower standpoint is an under-researched area in leadership literature, and it is even more rarely to be found in empirical data. In every culture, there are certain expectations toward leaders of the two genders that influence their behavior. In this article, we will attempt to answer the following question: How does perceived leader behavior and gendered behavior relate to national culture and actual leader behavior? We present a conceptual model that seeks to incorporate gendered expectations into cross-cultural leadership as an answer. Moreover, we provide a conceptual guideline toward operationalization of the model. The model includes the potential of dissonance between male expectations as a dominating leadership role and female leadership. This might serve as an explanation as to why in some cases women are not seen as successful as men when they adopt a masculine leadership style. The article seeks to advance cross-cultural leadership theory by focusing on expected gendered leadership behavior. Our ideas and model could eventually contribute to the advancement of leadership theory, as well as contributing to gender studies, cross-cultural leadership, and business communication.

  18. Crossed products for interactions and graph algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasniewski, Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    We consider Exel’s interaction (V,H) over a unital C*-algebra A, such that V(A) and H(A) are hereditary subalgebras of A. For the associated crossed product, we obtain a uniqueness theorem, ideal lattice description, simplicity criterion and a version of Pimsner–Voiculescu exact sequence. These r......We consider Exel’s interaction (V,H) over a unital C*-algebra A, such that V(A) and H(A) are hereditary subalgebras of A. For the associated crossed product, we obtain a uniqueness theorem, ideal lattice description, simplicity criterion and a version of Pimsner–Voiculescu exact sequence....... These results cover the case of crossed products by endomorphisms with hereditary ranges and complemented kernels. As model examples of interactions not coming from endomorphisms we introduce and study in detail interactions arising from finite graphs. The interaction (V,H) associated to a graph E acts...... on the core F_E of the graph algebra C*(E). By describing a partial homeomorphism dual to (V,H) we find the fundamental structure theorems for C*(E), such as Cuntz–Krieger uniqueness theorem, as results concerning reversible noncommutative dynamics on F_E . We also provide a new approach to calculation of K...

  19. Structured ion impact: Doubly differential cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBois, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The electron emission in coincidence with a projectile that has been ionized has been measured, thus making it possible to separate and identify electrons resulting from these various mechanisms. In 1985, coincidence doubly differential cross sections were measured for 400 to 750 keV/atomic mass unit (amu) He + impact on He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and H 2 O. Cross sections were measured for selected angles and for electron energies ranging from 10 to 1000 eV. Because of the coincidence mode of measurement, the total electron emission was subdivided into its target emission and its projectile emission components. The most interesting findings were that target ionization does not account for the electron emission spectrum at lower electron energies. A sizable percentage of these low-energy electrons were shown to originate as a result of simultaneous projectile/target ionizations. Similar features were observed for all targets and impact energies that were studied

  20. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-01-01

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are ''clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its ''data production'' phase

  1. Cross-sector Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz Jessen, Søren; Linnet, Andreas; Tscherning, Rasmus Wiinstedt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this handbook is to help improve your opportunities for getting started on innovative and business development projects that reach beyond your own sector, commonly known as ’Cross-sector innovation’, or ’Cross innovation’ for short. We believe that there is a need for an easily read...... innovation handbook that can reach out to all sectors and potential partners whose point of departure, language use and understanding of customers is often very different to that of businesses. These differences constitute a resource for business development. If exploited they can lead to new ways of doing...... things and help us breakaway from the lull of the modes of expression and methods ‘customarily’ employed in business development. The handbook focuses on the interaction of “traditional’ businesses and sectors that belong to those known as the creative and the experience industries, i.e. designers...

  2. Cross-commodity hedges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, T.

    1999-01-01

    Energy risk management is the principal topic of this paper. Four major subjects are examined: cross-commodity trading objectives (reduce the risk of an underlying exposure in another commodity); portfolio risk reduction (an Alberta power distributor exposed to high pool prices could protect against high pool prices through a fixed price purchase of Alberta natural gas); tailoring pricing to customer needs (sell power to the gas producer indexed to the price of gas); and (4) reducing insurance costs (rather than purchasing downside protection (puts) individually against oil and gas prices, a producer could purchase a basket option). Since the key issue in cross-commodity transactions is the estimation of correlation, it is important to be prepared to alter correlation assumptions. 1 tab., 2 figs

  3. Cross Disciplinary Biometric Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chengjun

    2012-01-01

    Cross disciplinary biometric systems help boost the performance of the conventional systems. Not only is the recognition accuracy significantly improved, but also the robustness of the systems is greatly enhanced in the challenging environments, such as varying illumination conditions. By leveraging the cross disciplinary technologies, face recognition systems, fingerprint recognition systems, iris recognition systems, as well as image search systems all benefit in terms of recognition performance.  Take face recognition for an example, which is not only the most natural way human beings recognize the identity of each other, but also the least privacy-intrusive means because people show their face publicly every day. Face recognition systems display superb performance when they capitalize on the innovative ideas across color science, mathematics, and computer science (e.g., pattern recognition, machine learning, and image processing). The novel ideas lead to the development of new color models and effective ...

  4. Cross cultural usability testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Goyal, Shivam

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a pilot study in Denmark of cross cultural effects on Think Aloud usability testing. We provide an overview of previous research on cross cultural usability evaluation with a special focus on the relationship between the evaluator and the test user....... This relation was studied in an experiment with usability testing of a localized clipart application in which eight participants from Denmark and India formed pairs of evaluator-test user. The test users were asked to think aloud and the evaluators' role were to facilitate the test users thinking aloud...... and hereby identify usability problems with the clipart application. Data on the evaluators' and test users' behaviour were recorded and analyzed by coding and summarizing statistics on these behavioural events. The results show that Think Aloud Usability Test of a localized application is most effectively...

  5. Distortion dependent intersystem crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Anne Boutrup; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2017-01-01

    . The effect is observed to increase in the presence of methyl-groups on the pinnacle carbon-atoms, where largest extents of r and p orbital-mixing are observed. This is fully consistent with the time-resolved spectroscopy data: Toluene and p-xylene show evidence for ultrafast triplet formation competing......The competition between ultrafast intersystem crossing and internal conversion in benzene, toluene, and p-xylene is investigated with time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. By exciting to S2 out-of-plane symmetry breaking, distortions are activated at early...... times whereupon spin-forbidden intersystem crossing becomes (partly) allowed. Natural bond orbital analysis suggests that the pinnacle carbon atoms distorting from the aromatic plane change hybridization between the planar Franck-Condon geometry and the deformed (boat-shaped) S2 equilibrium geometry...

  6. Enhancing the ABC Cross

    OpenAIRE

    Euske, K.J.; Vercio, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the ABC Cross was to portray both a cost and process view of an organization as simply as possible. Unfortunately, the model’s simplified form does not capture the real value of activity-based costing (ABC) for cost accounting that emerged in the mid-1980s. Here we present several ABC models that can help functional and process managers make better decisions.

  7. Crossed beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can only be properly understood if one has a detailed knowledge of interactions involving atoms, molecules, ions, electrons or photons. In the laboratory these processes are often studied by preparing beams of two types of particle and observing the reactions which occur when the beams intersect. Some of the more interesting of these crossed beam experiments and their results are discussed. Proposals to extend colliding beam techniques to high energy particle physics are also outlined. (author)

  8. Cross-cultural advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Пурчельянова, Н. Ю.

    2011-01-01

    The essence of successful advertising is to convince people that a product is meant for them. By purchasing it, they will receive some benefit (lifestyle, status, convenience, etc.). However, when an advertising campaign is taken abroad different values as to what enhances status or gives convenience exist. These differences make the original advertising campaign defunct. It is therefore critical to any cross cultural advertising campaign that an understanding of a particular culture is acqui...

  9. Cross plane scattering correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, L.; Karp, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous scattering correction techniques for PET are based on assumptions made for a single transaxial plane and are independent of axial variations. These techniques will incorrectly estimate the scattering fraction for volumetric PET imaging systems since they do not take the cross-plane scattering into account. In this paper, the authors propose a new point source scattering deconvolution method (2-D). The cross-plane scattering is incorporated into the algorithm by modeling a scattering point source function. In the model, the scattering dependence both on axial and transaxial directions is reflected in the exponential fitting parameters and these parameters are directly estimated from a limited number of measured point response functions. The authors' results comparing the standard in-plane point source deconvolution to the authors' cross-plane source deconvolution show that for a small source, the former technique overestimates the scatter fraction in the plane of the source and underestimate the scatter fraction in adjacent planes. In addition, the authors also propose a simple approximation technique for deconvolution

  10. The crossed phrenic phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2017-01-01

    The cervical spine is the most common site of traumatic vertebral column injuries. Respiratory insufficiency constitutes a significant proportion of the morbidity burden and is the most common cause of mortality in these patients. In seeking to enhance our capacity to treat specifically the respiratory dysfunction following spinal cord injury, investigators have studied the “crossed phrenic phenomenon”, wherein contraction of a hemidiaphragm paralyzed by a complete hemisection of the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord above the phrenic nucleus can be induced by respiratory stressors and recovers spontaneously over time. Strengthening of latent contralateral projections to the phrenic nucleus and sprouting of new descending axons have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the observed recovery. We have recently demonstrated recovery of spontaneous crossed phrenic activity occurring over minutes to hours in C1-hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rats. The specific neurochemical and molecular pathways underlying crossed phrenic activity following injury require further clarification. A thorough understanding of these is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation following spinal trauma. Animal studies provide preliminary evidence for the utility of neuropharmacological manipulation of serotonergic and adenosinergic pathways, nerve grafts, olfactory ensheathing cells, intraspinal microstimulation and a possible role for dorsal rhizotomy in recovering phrenic activity following spinal cord injury PMID:28761411

  11. The crossed phrenic phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael George Zaki Ghali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cervical spine is the most common site of traumatic vertebral column injuries. Respiratory insufficiency constitutes a significant proportion of the morbidity burden and is the most common cause of mortality in these patients. In seeking to enhance our capacity to treat specifically the respiratory dysfunction following spinal cord injury, investigators have studied the “crossed phrenic phenomenon”, wherein contraction of a hemidiaphragm paralyzed by a complete hemisection of the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord above the phrenic nucleus can be induced by respiratory stressors and recovers spontaneously over time. Strengthening of latent contralateral projections to the phrenic nucleus and sprouting of new descending axons have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the observed recovery. We have recently demonstrated recovery of spontaneous crossed phrenic activity occurring over minutes to hours in C1-hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rats. The specific neurochemical and molecular pathways underlying crossed phrenic activity following injury require further clarification. A thorough understanding of these is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation following spinal trauma. Animal studies provide preliminary evidence for the utility of neuropharmacological manipulation of serotonergic and adenosinergic pathways, nerve grafts, olfactory ensheathing cells, intraspinal microstimulation and a possible role for dorsal rhizotomy in recovering phrenic activity following spinal cord injury

  12. The crossed phrenic phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2017-06-01

    The cervical spine is the most common site of traumatic vertebral column injuries. Respiratory insufficiency constitutes a significant proportion of the morbidity burden and is the most common cause of mortality in these patients. In seeking to enhance our capacity to treat specifically the respiratory dysfunction following spinal cord injury, investigators have studied the "crossed phrenic phenomenon", wherein contraction of a hemidiaphragm paralyzed by a complete hemisection of the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord above the phrenic nucleus can be induced by respiratory stressors and recovers spontaneously over time. Strengthening of latent contralateral projections to the phrenic nucleus and sprouting of new descending axons have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the observed recovery. We have recently demonstrated recovery of spontaneous crossed phrenic activity occurring over minutes to hours in C 1 -hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rats. The specific neurochemical and molecular pathways underlying crossed phrenic activity following injury require further clarification. A thorough understanding of these is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation following spinal trauma. Animal studies provide preliminary evidence for the utility of neuropharmacological manipulation of serotonergic and adenosinergic pathways, nerve grafts, olfactory ensheathing cells, intraspinal microstimulation and a possible role for dorsal rhizotomy in recovering phrenic activity following spinal cord injury.

  13. A multiplicity logic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialkowski, J.; Moszynski, M.; Zagorski, A.

    1981-01-01

    The logic diagram principle of operation and some details of the design of the multiplicity logic unit are presented. This unit was specially designed to fulfil the requirements of a multidetector arrangement for gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The unit is equipped with 16 inputs controlled by a common coincidence gate. It delivers a linear output pulse with the height proportional to the multiplicity of coincidences and logic pulses corresponding to 0, 1, ... up to >= 5-fold coincidences. These last outputs are used to steer the routing unit working with the multichannel analyser. (orig.)

  14. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  15. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory of...

  16. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust territories...

  17. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory of...

  18. Using safety crosses for patient self-reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverton, Sarah

    The Productive Mental Health Ward programme has been developed to improve efficiency and safety in the NHS. Patients in a medium-secure mental health unit used patient safety crosses as a tool for self-reflection as part of their recovery journey. This article describes how the project was set up as well as initial findings.

  19. A Cross-Cultural Examination of Semantic Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybeck, Douglas; Herrmann, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    Reports on a cross-cultural investigation of semantic relations, including antonyms, synonyms, and class inclusion, among bilingual adult subjects in the United States, England, Italy, Greece, Yugoslavia, Pakistan, and Hong Kong. Found significant agreement across cultures, especially for antinomy. Results in general support theories of linguistic…

  20. Cross sectional evaluation of awareness of prevention of dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cross sectional evaluation of awareness of prevention of dental caries among general paediatricians in Ghaziabad district, India. ... Pre‑tested, structured and self administered questionnaire was used in the survey and data analysis was done by using 'SPSS' software version 16.0 (IBM, United States). Results: Our study ...

  1. 75 FR 9323 - American Red Cross Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... rebuilding former adversaries after World War II, to combating HIV/AIDS in Africa, to saving lives after the... Nation's leadership relies upon our citizens who are motivated to act by our common humanity. This month... Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2010 as American Red Cross Month. I...

  2. A Cross-Cultural Study of Role Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandis, Harry C.; And Others

    Survey responses from 1,620 subjects in the United States, Greece, India, Peru, and Taiwan provide information on cross-cultural role perceptions. Study data reveal (1) the principal factors accounting for the variance in role perception in each culture, (2) those factors that are the same in all cultures, (3) the equivalent factor scores that…

  3. Optimization of Placement Driven by the Cost of Wire Crossing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kapur, Nevin

    1997-01-01

    .... We implemented a prototype placement algorithm TOCO that minimizes the cost of wire crossing, and a universal unit-grid based placement evaluator place_eval. We have designed a number of statistical experiments to demonstrate the feasibility and the promise of the proposed approach.

  4. Our Own Stories: Cross-Cultural Communication Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Norine

    The textbook for students of intermediate English as a Second Language (ESL) is based on cross-cultural communication misunderstandings described in essays written by university students. It consists of 20 instructional units, each beginning with a real student's dilemma caused by cultural differences and each dealing with one particular custom.…

  5. Border Crossing/Entry Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The dataset is known as “Border Crossing/Entry Data.” The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) Border Crossing/Entry Data provides summary statistics to the...

  6. Neighbors United for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  7. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to

  8. German cross-cultural psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Trommsdorff, Gisela

    1986-01-01

    The present study deals with German-language cross-cultural research in different fields of psychology which attempts to achieve one Or more goals of cross-cultural psychology. First, methodological problems are discussed, followed by a selective presentation of cross-cultural research in personality, clinical, ethological, developmental, and social psychology. The theoretical and methodological advancement of these studies is investigated with respect to four approaches - universals in cross...

  9. METRIC context unit architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    METRIC is an architecture for a simple but powerful Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC). Its speed comes from the simultaneous processing of several instruction streams, with instructions from the various streams being dispatched into METRIC's execution pipeline as they become available for execution. The pipeline is thus kept full, with a mix of instructions for several contexts in execution at the same time. True parallel programming is supported within a single execution unit, the METRIC Context Unit. METRIC's architecture provides for expansion through the addition of multiple Context Units and of specialized Functional Units. The architecture thus spans a range of size and performance from a single-chip microcomputer up through large and powerful multiprocessors. This research concentrates on the specification of the METRIC Context Unit at the architectural level. Performance tradeoffs made during METRIC's design are discussed, and projections of METRIC's performance are made based on simulation studies.

  10. Preparation of higher-actinide burnup and cross section samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Thomas, D.K.; Dailey, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was instigated about four years ago for the purpose of studying burnup of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the burnup and cross section samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the burnup study were 241 Am and 244 Cm in the forms of Am 2 O 3 , Cm 2 O 3 , and Am 6 Cm(RE) 7 O 21 , where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanide sesquioxides. It is the purpose of this paper to describe technology development and its application in the preparation of the fuel specimens and the cross section specimens that are being used in this cooperative program

  11. Mine cross piece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belik, I P; Gorbatenko, A Ye

    1982-01-01

    The mine cross piece includes main and supplementary parachute-formed cupolas made of air-impermeable fabric, resources for attachment made in the form of shroud lines. In order to improve its reliability with prolonged localization of an underground fire, the cavity between the cupolas connects to the source of fast-hardening material. In this case the cupolas are arranged co-directionally in relation to each other, while the shroud lines of the main are attached to the cupola of the supplemental which is made with perforations.

  12. Radar cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Knott, Gene; Tuley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the second edition of the first and foremost book on this subject for self-study, training, and course work. Radar cross section (RCS) is a comparison of two radar signal strengths. One is the strength of the radar beam sweeping over a target, the other is the strength of the reflected echo sensed by the receiver. This book shows how the RCS ?gauge? can be predicted for theoretical objects and how it can be measured for real targets. Predicting RCS is not easy, even for simple objects like spheres or cylinders, but this book explains the two ?exact? forms of theory so well that even a

  13. Cross-cultural Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Simona Hudea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is meant to outline the positive effects that diversity may have on any organisation, subject to the condition that the said diversity be appropriately managed. As the leader is a person who, by power of example, makes other people adopting a similar attitude, the actions of the same oriented towards the fructification of the advantages of a cross-cultural environment, which are depicted in this study, are not only directly, but also indirectly, by synergy, impacting, in a positive way, on the organisation.Innovation, performance, competitive advantage and reputation are just some of the outcomes of finding unity in diversity.

  14. Standard cross-section data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of neutron cross-section measurement is limited by the uncertainty in the standard cross-section and the errors associated with using it. Any improvement in the standard immediately improves all cross-section measurements which have been made relative to that standard. Light element, capture and fission standards are discussed. (U.K.)

  15. Differential bremsstrahlung and pair production cross sections at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Haakon A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed differential cross sections for high energy bremsstrahlung and pair production are derived with specific attention to the differences between the two processes, which are considerable. For the integrated cross sections, which are the only cross sections specifically known until now, the final state integration theorem guarantees that the exact cross section formulas can be exchanged between bremsstrahlung and pair production by the same substitution rules as for the Born-approximation Bethe-Heitler cross sections, for any amount of atomic screening. In fact the theorem states that the Coulomb corrections to the integrated bremsstrahlung and pair production cross sections are identical for any amount of screening. The analysis of the basic differential cross sections leads to fundamental physical differences between bremsstrahlung and pair production. Coulomb corrections occur for pair production in the strong electric field of the atom for 'large' momentum transfer of the order of mc. For bremsstrahlung, on the other hand, the Coulomb corrections take place at a 'large' distance from the atom of the order of ((ℎ/2π)/mc)ε, with a 'small' momentum transfer mc/ε, where ε is the initial electron energy in units of mc 2 . And the Coulomb corrections can be large, of the order of larger than (Z/137) 2 , which is considerably larger than the integrated cross section corrections

  16. Cross-Cultural Communication in Oncology: Challenges and Training Interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Orest; Sulstarova, Brikela; Singy, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    To survey oncology nurses and oncologists about difficulties in taking care of culturally and linguistically diverse patients and about interests in cross-cultural training.
. Descriptive, cross-sectional.
. Web-based survey.
. 108 oncology nurses and 44 oncologists. 
. 31-item questionnaire derived from preexisting surveys in the United States and Switzerland.
. Self-rated difficulties in taking care of culturally and linguistically diverse patients and self-rated interests in cross-cultural training.
. All respondents reported communication difficulties in encounters with culturally and linguistically diverse patients. Respondents considered the absence of written materials in other languages, absence of a shared common language with patients, and sensitive subjects (e.g., end of life, sexuality) to be particularly problematic. Respondents also expressed a high level of interest in all aspects of cross-cultural training (task-oriented skills, background knowledge, reflexivity, and attitudes). Nurses perceived several difficulties related to care of migrants as more problematic than physicians did and were more interested in all aspects of cross-cultural training. 
. The need for cross-cultural training is high among oncology clinicians, particularly among nurses.
. The results reported in the current study may help nurses in decision-making positions and educators in introducing elements of cross-cultural education into oncology curricula for nurses. Cross-cultural training should be offered to oncology nurses.

  17. Spin-flip (p,n) reactions on 26Mg, 54Fe, and 56Fe at selected proton bombarding energies in the range of 17 to 25 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aron, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    New data are presented for the 26 Mg(p,n) 26 Al reaction at E/sub p/ = 19.12 and 24.97 MeV, for the 54 Fe(p,n) 54 Co reaction at E/sub p/ = 17.20, 18.60, and 24.60 MeV, and for the 56 Fe(p,n) 56 Co reaction at E/sub p/ = 19.12 and 24.59 MeV. Data were taken with the LLNL Cyclograaff at 16 angles from 3.5 0 to 159.0 0 . A large detector at 23.8 0 with a long neutron flight path collected high resolution spectra. This large detector also collected separate 0 0 high resolution data on the 26 Mg and 56 Fe(p,n) reactions at E/sub p/ = 19 MeV. Absolute differential (p,n) cross sections were extracted for 1 + states in 26 Al, 54 Co, and 56 Co, for the 0 + isobaric analong state (IAS) in 54 Co and 56 Co, for a 2 + state in each residual nucleus, and for the 0.199 MeV 7 + state of 54 Co. No new experimental states were identified. Only relative cross sections were extracted at 0 0 . Experimental angle-integrated cross sections were obtained for all but one state. DWBA79 was used, with the G-matrix effective nucleon-nucleon interaction of Bertsch et al. (with the central triplet-odd component V/sub to/ = O) and the Livermore shell model wave functions to calculate differential (p,n) cross sections to 1 + states and to the 54 Co and 56 Co IAS. Normalization of the DWBA angle-integrated cross sections to measurements for the 54 Co and 56 Co IAS (at E/sub p/ = 24.6 MeV) yielded the renormalized V/sub tau/ = 21.4 +- 2.1 MeV. Normalization of the DWBA angle-integrated cross sections to measurements for the 24.6 MeV 54 Co and 56 Co 1 + states, coupled with the normalization of the wave functions to previously experimentally determined GT strength, yield the renormalized V/sub sigmatau/ = 12.3 +- 1.2 MeV. The experimental Gamow-Teller strength B(GT)/sub exp./ of the T = 1 26 Al state at 9.44 MeV was found to be 0.69; B(GT)/sub exp/ of the T = 1 26 Al state at 10.47 MeV was found to be 0.39

  18. Injury Rate and Patterns Among CrossFit Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenthal, Benjamin M; Beck, Christopher A; Maloney, Michael D; DeHaven, Kenneth E; Giordano, Brian D

    2014-04-01

    CrossFit is a type of competitive exercise program that has gained widespread recognition. To date, there have been no studies that have formally examined injury rates among CrossFit participants or factors that may contribute to injury rates. To establish an injury rate among CrossFit participants and to identify trends and associations between injury rates and demographic categories, gym characteristics, and athletic abilities among CrossFit participants. Descriptive epidemiology study. A survey was conducted, based on validated epidemiologic injury surveillance methods, to identify patterns of injury among CrossFit participants. It was sent to CrossFit gyms in Rochester, New York; New York City, New York; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and made available via a posting on the main CrossFit website. Participants were encouraged to distribute it further, and as such, there were responses from a wide geographical location. Inclusion criteria included participating in CrossFit training at a CrossFit gym in the United States. Data were collected from October 2012 to February 2013. Data analysis was performed using Fisher exact tests and chi-square tests. A total of 486 CrossFit participants completed the survey, and 386 met the inclusion criteria. The overall injury rate was determined to be 19.4% (75/386). Males (53/231) were injured more frequently than females (21/150; P = .03). Across all exercises, injury rates were significantly different (P CrossFit was approximately 20%. Males were more likely to sustain an injury than females. The involvement of trainers in coaching participants on their form and guiding them through the workout correlates with a decreased injury rate. The shoulder and lower back were the most commonly injured in gymnastic and power lifting movements, respectively. Participants reported primarily acute and fairly mild injuries.

  19. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glucose: cross-sectional study of multiethnic adult population at the United States-Mexico border Prevalencia de diabetes tipo 2 y de alteración de la glucosa en ayunas: estudio transversal de una población adulta multiétnica en la frontera México-Estados Unidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz A. Díaz-Apodaca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: To estimate prevalence of type 2 diabetes (diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG in the border region between the United States of America and Mexico, by ethnic origin and country of residence; identify risk factors associated with both conditions; and explore the extent to which these factors account for cross-border or ethnic disparities in prevalence. METHODS: From April 2001 to November 2002, Phase I of the U.S.-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project, a prevalence study of diabetes and its risk factors, was conducted at the U.S.-Mexico border using multistage cluster sampling. A questionnaire was administered on diabetes (self-reported and lifestyle and a physical examination and blood sample were obtained. A total of 4 027 adults participated in the study: 2 120 Hispanics from the Mexican side of the border and 1 437 Hispanics and 470 non-Hispanics (of whom 385 were classified as "white" from the U.S. side of the border. RESULTS: The age-adjusted prevalence of self-reported and unrecognized diabetes in Hispanics was 15.4% (16.6% on the Mexican side of the border and 14.7% on the U.S. side. The age-adjusted prevalence of IFG was similar on both sides of the border (14.1% on the Mexican side and 13.6% on the U.S. side. CONCLUSIONS: Established risk factors for diabetes (e.g., age, obesity, and family history were relevant and there was an inverse relationship between diabetes and education and socioeconomic level. While diabetes prevalence is high on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, one-fourth of the cases remain undiagnosed, suggesting a need for development and implementation of a public health program for prevention, diagnosis, and control of diabetes in the region.OBJETIVO: Calcular la prevalencia de la diabetes de tipo 2 (diabetes y de la alteración de la glucosa en ayunas en la zona fronteriza entre México y los Estados Unidos, por origen étnico y país de residencia; identificar los factores de

  20. Cross sections for atmospheric corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.P.; Casse, M.; Westergaard, N.

    1975-01-01

    A set of cross sections for spallation of relativistic nuclei is proposed based on (i) the best available proton cross sections, (ii) an extrapolation to heavier nuclei of the dependence on the number of nucleons lost of the 'target factor' observed for C 12 and O 16 by Lindstrom et al. (1975), in analogy with Rudstam's formalism, and (iii) on a normalization of all cross sections to the total cross sections for production of fragments with Asub(f) >= 6. The obtained cross sections for peripheral interactions are not inconsistent with simple geometrical considerations. (orig.) [de

  1. Decision unit program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjar, N.; Pastor, C.; Chambon, B.; Drain, D.; Giorni, A.; Dauchy, A.

    1981-01-01

    A decision unit has been built to simplify the electronic logic set-up in multi-detectors experiments. This unit, designed with fast memories used as decision making tables, replaces conventional logic modules. Nine inputs are provided for receiving the fast detector signals (charged particles, gammas, neutrons, ...). Fifteen independent outputs allow the identification of the choosen events among the 2 9 possible events. A CAMAC interface between the unit and the computer, or a manual control auxiliary module, is used to load, in the memory, the pattern of the choosen events [fr

  2. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    OpenAIRE

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to double-layer units in order to compare the results to the existing knowledge for this type of armour layers. In contrast to previous research, the gyroscope reading is used to determine the (rocking)...

  3. Allocating multiple units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranæs, Torben; Krishna, Kala

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the allocation and rent distribution in multi-unit, combinatorial-bid auctions under complete information. We focus on the natural multi-unit analogue of the first-price auction, where buyers bid total payments, pay their bids, and where the seller allocates goods to maximize his...... auction, which is the multi unit analogue of a second-price auction. Furthermore, we characterize these equilibria when valuations take a number of different forms: diminishing marginal valuations, increasing average valuations, and marginal valuations with single turning points...

  4. The United States Air Force in Southeast Asia: Tactical Airlift

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    absent, but on balance the airlift effort was managed and executed intelligently. Probably the most serious failing was the Air Force’s tardiness in...Clark Air Base, Philippines receives a red cross; Maj. James E. Marrott at the controls of the first C-141 flown into Hanoi; a jubilant ex-POW deplanes...parachutes and rigging for airdrops.t Surface and air shipments from the United States similarly converged at the Philippines . * The unit was first

  5. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  6. Using Facebook for Cross-Cultural Collaboration: The Experience of Students from Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Min

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Facebook among college students in a cross-cultural collaboration project between Taiwan and the United States, and focuses specifically on Taiwanese students' perceptions. Questions explored are: (1) Is Facebook a feasible platform for cross-cultural collaboration? (2) How does this…

  7. Tax Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  8. Insects: An Interdisciplinary Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The author talks about an interdisciplinary unit on insects, and presents activities that can help students practice communication skills (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and learn about insects with hands-on activities.

  9. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  10. Operable Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of operable unit data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  11. Flywheel and power unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, R.W.

    1992-10-28

    A power unit, e.g. for an electrically driven vehicle, incorporates a flywheel for storing kinetic energy and a battery for storing electrical energy. The battery is incorporated as a substantial part of the rotating mass of the flywheel. Preferably the unit further includes an electrical machine being a motor or generator or machine operable either as a motor or a generator for transferring energy between the battery and the flywheel and/or for the input or output of rotary energy therefrom or thereto. The motor may be used for powering the flywheel and may also operate in a regenerative mode for recharging the unit on de-acceleration of the vehicle. The unit of the invention may also be utilized as an electrical stored power source, e.g. wind or water driven. (author)

  12. Cross border relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Sriram, Sujata

    2010-01-01

    in which they were born. These movements also imply human relationships across the borders in different contexts with various cultural, psychological consequences. Relationships of members of migrant groups with each other, and also with the host community have important implications on the health and well......-being of not just the migrant population, but also the host communities. These relationships represent the microcosm of societal and cultural integration and cohesion at the broader levels. Studies of how and how well migrants, especially youth handle migration indicate transformations in paradigms as both...... acculturative stress and developmental possibilities are realities experienced in the search of new worlds and new opportunities. The symposia will include such changes from Denmark, India, UK and the USA, covering theoretical, methodological issues including the ethical aspects. Themes involved in crossing...

  13. Crossing the Petawatt threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, M.

    1996-01-01

    A revolutionary new laser called the Petawatt, developed by Lawrence Livermore researchers after an intensive three-year development effort, has produced more than 1,000 trillion (open-quotes petaclose quotes) watts of power, a world record. By crossing the petawatt threshold, the extraordinarily powerful laser heralds a new age in laser research. Lasers that provide a petawatt of power or more in a picosecond may make it possible to achieve fusion using significantly less energy than currently envisioned, through a novel Livermore concept called open-quotes fast ignition.close quotes The petawatt laser will also enable researchers to study the fundamental properties of matter, thereby aiding the Department of Energy's Stockpile Stewardship efforts and opening entirely new physical regimes to study. The technology developed for the Petawatt has also provided several spinoff technologies, including a new approach to laser material processing

  14. Does size matter? Animal units and animal unit months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar Smith; Joe Hicks; Scott Lusk; Mike Hemmovich; Shane Green; Sarah McCord; Mike Pellant; John Mitchell; Judith Dyess; Jim Sprinkle; Amanda Gearhart; Sherm Karl; Mike Hannemann; Ken Spaeth; Jason Karl; Matt Reeves; Dave Pyke; Jordan Spaak; Andrew Brischke; Del Despain; Matt Phillippi; Dave Weixelmann; Alan Bass; Jessie Page; Lori Metz; David Toledo; Emily Kachergis

    2017-01-01

    The concepts of animal units, animal unit months, and animal unit equivalents have long been used as standards for range management planning, estimating stocking rates, reporting actual use, assessing grazing fees, ranch appraisal, and other purposes. Increasing size of cattle on rangelands has led some to suggest that the definition of animal units and animal unit...

  15. UniTed

    OpenAIRE

    Harma, Eero

    2010-01-01

    UniTed on Teddy boy- tyylistä inspiroitunut kevät/kesä mallisto naisille.Mallistossa yhdistyy perinteinen teddy boy- vaatetus ja klassinen feminiinisyys, sekä menneisyys ja nykyisyys. Suunnittelun lähtökohtia olivat naisellisuus, tyylikkyys ja pyrkimys luoda nykyaikaista suunnittelua menneisyydestä lainaillen. United is a teddy boy- style inspired spring/summer collection for women. The collection combines traditional Teddy boy style with classical feminity and past with the present. The b...

  16. Freestanding midwifery unit versus obstetric unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Charlotte; Møller, Anna Margrethe; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2011-01-01

    low-risk women intending FMU birth and a matched control group of 839 low-risk women intending OU birth were included at the start of care in labour. OU women were individually chosen to match selected obstetric/socio-economic characteristics of FMU women. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main......Objective To compare perinatal and maternal morbidity and birth interventions in low-risk women giving birth in two freestanding midwifery units (FMUs) and two obstetric units (OUs). Design A cohort study with a matched control group. Setting The region of North Jutland, Denmark. Participants 839...... women were significantly less likely to experience an abnormal fetal heart rate (RR: 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.5), fetal–pelvic complications (0.2, 0.05 to 0.6), shoulder dystocia (0.3, 0.1 to 0.9), occipital–posterior presentation (0.5, 0.3 to 0.9) and postpartum haemorrhage >500 ml (0.4, 0.3 to 0...

  17. Rapanos v. United States & Carabell v. United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents associated with guidance for implementing the definition of waters of the United States under the Clean Water Act following the Rapanos v. United States, and Carabell v. United States Supreme Court decision.

  18. Cross-Cultural Service Learning with Native Americans: Pedagogy for Building Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Patricia S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper articulates a curricular approach that centers on a Native American service learning course. Social work students engaged in cross-cultural immersion on a reservation in the United States. By examination of historical United States policy impacting Indian tribes and contemporary experiences that challenge basic instruction in public…

  19. 76 FR 62074 - Proposed Revision of Performance Standards for State Medicaid Fraud Control Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... familiar with, and adhere to, policies and procedures. In meeting this standard, the following performance... funding permits. E. Through cross-training or by other means, Unit staff receive training on the role and...

  20. International boundary experiences by the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades, the United Nations (UN) has been approached by Security Council and Member States on international boundary issues. The United Nations regards the adequate delimitation and demarcation of international boundaries as a very important element for the maintenance of peace and security in fragile post-conflict situations, establishment of friendly relationships and cross-border cooperation between States. This paper will present the main principles and framework the United Nations applies to support the process of international boundary delimitation and demarcation activities. The United Nations is involved in international boundary issues following the principle of impartiality and neutrality and its role as mediator. Since international boundary issues are multi-faceted, a range of expertise is required and the United Nations Secretariat is in a good position to provide diverse expertise within the multiple departments. Expertise in different departments ranging from legal, political, technical, administrative and logistical are mobilised in different ways to provide support to Member States depending on their specific needs. This presentation aims to highlight some of the international boundary projects that the United Nations Cartographic Section has been involved in order to provide the technical support to different boundary requirements as each international boundary issue requires specific focus and attention whether it be in preparation, delimitation, demarcation or management. Increasingly, the United Nations is leveraging geospatial technology to facilitate boundary delimitation and demarcation process between Member States. Through the presentation of the various case studies ranging from Iraq - Kuwait, Israel - Lebanon (Blue Line), Eritrea - Ethiopia, Cyprus (Green Line), Cameroon - Nigeria, Sudan - South Sudan, it will illustrate how geospatial technology is increasingly used to carry out the support. In having applied a range

  1. Dynamic Cross-Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aur, Dorian; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel

    2017-01-01

    Complexity measures for time series have been used in many applications to quantify the regularity of one dimensional time series, however many dynamical systems are spatially distributed multidimensional systems. We introduced Dynamic Cross-Entropy (DCE) a novel multidimensional complexity measure that quantifies the degree of regularity of EEG signals in selected frequency bands. Time series generated by discrete logistic equations with varying control parameter r are used to test DCE measures. Sliding window DCE analyses are able to reveal specific period doubling bifurcations that lead to chaos. A similar behavior can be observed in seizures triggered by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Sample entropy data show the level of signal complexity in different phases of the ictal ECT. The transition to irregular activity is preceded by the occurrence of cyclic regular behavior. A significant increase of DCE values in successive order from high frequencies in gamma to low frequencies in delta band reveals several phase transitions into less ordered states, possible chaos in the human brain. To our knowledge there are no reliable techniques able to reveal the transition to chaos in case of multidimensional times series. In addition, DCE based on sample entropy appears to be robust to EEG artifacts compared to DCE based on Shannon entropy. The applied technique may offer new approaches to better understand nonlinear brain activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Crossing the threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John; Tambasco, Lucas

    2017-11-01

    First, we summarize the circumstances in which chaotic pilot-wave dynamics gives rise to quantum-like statistical behavior. For ``closed'' systems, in which the droplet is confined to a finite domain either by boundaries or applied forces, quantum-like features arise when the persistence time of the waves exceeds the time required for the droplet to cross its domain. Second, motivated by the similarities between this hydrodynamic system and stochastic electrodynamics, we examine the behavior of a bouncing droplet above the Faraday threshold, where a stochastic element is introduced into the drop dynamics by virtue of its interaction with a background Faraday wave field. With a view to extending the dynamical range of pilot-wave systems to capture more quantum-like features, we consider a generalized theoretical framework for stochastic pilot-wave dynamics in which the relative magnitudes of the drop-generated pilot-wave field and a stochastic background field may be varied continuously. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through their CMMI and DMS divisions.

  3. Seasonal and recurrent intensive care unit admissions for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life-threatening attacks of asthma requiring intensive care unit (ICU) management at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town were noted to occur in some patients in the same or adjacent months of different years. A retrospective case-controlled study was performed of 21 such 'seasonal' patients who ...

  4. Gas-centrifuge unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope-enrichment unit is described for separating a gaseous mixture feedstock including a compound of a light nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration and a compound of a heavy nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration into at least two unit-output fractions including a waste fraction depleted in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration and a product fraction enriched in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration. The unit comprises a first group of cascades of gas centrifuges, each cascade having an enriching stage, a stripping stage, an input, a light-fraction output, and a heavy-fraction output for separating the gaseous-mixture feed stock into light and heavy gaseous-mixture fractions; and an auxillary cascade

  5. Mechanical strainer unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraeling, J.B.; Netkowicz, R.J.; Schnall, I.H.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanical strainer unit is connected to a flanged conduit which originates in and extends out of a suppression chamber in a nuclear reactor. The strainer includes a plurality of centrally apertured plates positioned along a common central axis and in parallel and spaced relationship. The plates have a plurality of bores radially spaced about the central axis. Spacer means such as washers are positioned between adjacent plates to maintain the plates is spaced relationship and form communicating passages of a predetermined size to the central apertures. Connecting means such as bolts or studs extend through the aligned bores to maintain the unit in assembled relationship and secure the unit to the pipe. By employing perforated plates and blocking off certain of the communicating passages, a dual straining effect can be achieved

  6. New SCALE-4 features related to cross-section processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Greene, N.M.; Parks, C.V.

    1991-01-01

    The SCALE code system has a standardized scheme for processing problem-dependent cross section from problem-independent waste libraries. Some improvements and new capabilities in the processing scheme have been incorporated into the new Version 4 release of the SCALE system. The new features include the capability to consider annular cylindrical and spherical unit cells, and improved Dancoff factor formulation, and changes to the NITAWL-II module to perform resonance self-shielding with reference to infinite dilute values. A review of these major changes in the cross-section processing scheme for SCALE-4 is presented in this paper

  7. Study of nuclear isovector spin responses from polarization transfer in (p,n) reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Tomotsugu

    1997-01-01

    We have measured a complete set of polarization transfer observables has been measured for quasi-free (p vector, n vector) reactions on 2 H, 6 Li, 12 C, 40 Ca, and 208 Pb at a bombarding energy of 346MeV and a laboratory scattering angle of 22deg (q=1.7 fm -1 ). The polarization transfer observables for all five targets are remarkably similar. These polarization observables yield separated spin-longitudinal (σ·q) and spin-transverse (σxq) nuclear responses. These results are compared to the spin-transverse responses measured in deep-inelastic electron scattering as well as to nuclear responses based on the random phase approximation. Such a comparison reveals an enhancement in the (p vector, n vector) spin-transverse channel, which masks the effect of pionic correlations in the response ratio. Second, the double differential cross sections at θ lab between 0deg and 12.3deg and the polarization transfer D NN at 0deg for the 90 Zr(p,n) reaction are measured at a bombarding energy of 295MeV. The Gamow-Teller(GT) strength B(GT) in the continuum deduced from the L=0 cross section is compared both with the perturbative calculation by Bertsch and Hamamoto and with the second-order random phase approximation calculation by Drozdz et al. The sum of B(GT) values up to 50MeV excitation becomes S β- =28.0±1.6 after subtracting the contribution of the isovector spin-monopole strength. This S β- value of 28.0±1.6 corresponds to about (93±5)% of the minimum value of the sum-rule 3(N-Z)=30. Last, first measurements of D NN (0deg) for (p vector, n vector) reactions at 295MeV yield large negative values up to 50MeV excitation for the 6 Li, 11 B, 12 C, 13 C(p vector, n vector) reactions. DWIA calculations using the Franey and Love (FL) 270MeV interaction reproduce differential cross sections and D NN (0deg) values, while the FL 325MeV interaction yield D NN (0deg) values less negative than the experimental values. (J.P.N.)

  8. Mobile emergency response unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadi, W.J.; Trolan, R.T.; Becker, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The Hotspot quick-response unit was the solution to a requirement to find, identify, and control areas of radioactive contamination at the scene of a nuclear weapons accident. The unit consists of two trucks and two trailers, and is designed to be transported by one U.S. Air Force C-141. One truck (generator truck) carries a 40 kW generator-heater-air conditioner combination, spare tires, and accessories. The other (water truck) carries supplies and a 250-gal water tank. One trailer (counting trailer) contains detecting, counting, and recording equipment. The other (decontaminating trailer) contains a shower, sink, 30-gal hot water tank, and supplies

  9. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  10. The safety of pedestrian crossing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, M. de; Groenewoud, C.; Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2010-01-01

    More than half of all severe traffic accidents in which pedestrians or cyclists are involved, occur during road crossing. In this chapter insights, based on previous studies and literature, concerning requirements for safe and comfortable crossing facilities are discussed. In order to develop

  11. Collective states and crossing symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Collective states are usually described in simple terms but with the use of effective interactions which are supposed to contain more or less complicated contributions. The significance of crossing symmetry is discussed in this connection. Formal problems encountered in the attempts to implement crossing symmetry are pointed out

  12. Doppler broadening of cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckler, P.A.C.; Pull, I.C.

    1962-12-01

    Expressions for temperature dependent cross-sections in terms of resonance parameters are obtained, involving generalisations of the conventional Doppler functions, ψ and φ. Descriptions of Fortran sub-routines, which calculate broadened cross-sections in accordance with the derived formulae, are included. (author)

  13. Procedural pain in neonatal units in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyololo, O'Brien Munyao; Stevens, Bonnie; Gastaldo, Denise; Gisore, Peter

    2014-11-01

    To determine the nature and frequency of painful procedures and procedural pain management practices in neonatal units in Kenya. Cross-sectional survey. Level I and level II neonatal units in Kenya. Ninety-five term and preterm neonates from seven neonatal units. Medical records of neonates admitted for at least 24 h were reviewed to determine the nature and frequency of painful procedures performed in the 24 h period preceding data collection (6:00 to 6:00) as well as the pain management interventions (eg, morphine, breastfeeding, skin-to-skin contact, containment, non-nutritive sucking) that accompanied each procedure. Neonates experienced a total of 404 painful procedures over a 24 h period (mean=4.3, SD 2.0; range 1-12); 270 tissue-damaging (mean=2.85, SD 1.1; range 1-6) and 134 non-tissue-damaging procedures (mean=1.41, SD 1.2; range 0-6). Peripheral cannula insertion (27%) and intramuscular injections (22%) were the most common painful procedures. Ventilated neonates and neonates admitted in level II neonatal units had a higher number of painful procedures than those admitted in level I units (mean 4.76 vs 2.96). Only one procedure had a pain intensity score documented; and none had been performed with any form of analgesia. Neonates in Kenya were exposed to numerous tissue-damaging and non-tissue-damaging procedures without any form of analgesia. Our findings suggest that education is needed on how to assess and manage procedural pain in neonatal units in Kenya. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Internet and Cross Media Productions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anja Bechmann

    2006-01-01

    , the Internet continues to play a minor role when compared to older media. The content of the cross media concepts and organizations' history are crucial elements in deciding the priority and use of platforms. Methodologically, the article approaches cross media and the roles of the Internet on a micro......Convergence is one of the hot topics in Internet studies. Recently, however, media organizations have turned their focus to cross media communication. Media organizations are interested in optimizing communication across platforms such as TV, radio, websites, mobile telephones and newspapers....... The aim of this article is to examine the roles of the Internet when emphasis is put on cross media rather than convergence. This article proposes not one unidirectional convergent tendency but manifold roles of the Internet in cross media communication. Inside the media organizations, however...

  15. Transfer of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing and unfolding relocation of activities is one of the major trends, that calls for attention in the domain of operations management. In particular, prescriptive models outlining: stages of the process, where to locate, and how to establish the new facilities have been studied, while...... and dilemmas to be addressed when transferring manufacturing units....

  16. United States Attorney Prosecutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    property of CocaCola Bottling Company, Fayetteville, North Carolina, of a value in excess of $100.00, in violation of Title 18 United States Code, Section...another, to-wit: a Cocacola soft drink machine, the amount of damage to said personal property being more than $200.00, in violation of North Carolina

  17. Planter unit test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    A planter test stand was developed to evaluate individual row-crop metering units in early 2013. This test stand provided the ability to quantify actual seed metering in terms of population, seed spacing, skips, and multiples over a range of meter RPMs and vacuum pressures. Preliminary data has been...

  18. United Kingdom's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    This is a presentation of the United Kingdom's experience with power transmission open access. The topics of the presentation include the objectives of changing, commercial arrangements and economic drivers, long term effects, the effects of moving to a more competitive environment, and factors affecting open access such as political climate and market regulation

  19. Whale Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Materials in this teaching unit are designed to foster an interest in whale preservation among intermediate grade and junior high school students. Several readings provide background information on various types of whales and the economic value of whales. Student activities include a true and false game, a crossword, and a mobile. A resource list…

  20. Multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevostyanov, V. S.; Uralskij, V. I.; Uralskij, A. V.; Sinitsa, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents scientific and engineering developments of multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit in which the selective effect of grinding bodies on the crushing material is realized, depending on its physical and mechanical characteristics and various schemes for organizing the technological process