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Sample records for gamma dose distribution

  1. Dose Distribution of Gamma Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Sang Hun; Son, Ki Hong; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Kum Bae; Jung, Hai Jo; Ji, Young Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Gamma irradiator using Cs-137 have been widely utilized to the irradiation of cell, blood, and animal, and the dose measurement and education. The Gamma cell 3000 Elan (Nordion International, Kanata, Ontario, Canada) irradiator was installed in 2003 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.2 Gy/min. And the BioBeam 8000 (Gamma-Service Medical GmbH, Leipzig, Germany) irradiator was installed in 2008 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. Our purpose was to evaluate the practical dosimetric problems associated with inhomogeneous dose distribution within the irradiated volume in open air state using glass dosimeter and Gafchromic EBT film dosimeter for routine Gamma irradiator dosimetry applications at the KIRAMS and the measurements were compared with each other. In addition, an user guideline for useful utilization of the device based on practical dosimetry will be prepared. The measurement results of uniformity of delivered dose within the device showed variation more than 14% between middle point and the lowest position at central axis. Therefore, to maintain dose variation within 10%, the criteria of useful dose distribution, for research radiation effects, the irradiated specimen located at central axis of the container should be placed within 30 mm from top and bottom surface, respectively. In addition, for measurements using the film, the variations of dose distribution were more then 50% for the case of less than 10 second irradiation, mostly within 20% for the case of more than 20 second irradiation, respectively. Therefore, the irradiation experiments using the BioBeam 8000 irradiator are recommended to be used for specimen required at least more than 20 second irradiation time.

  2. Evaluation of dose distributions in gamma chamber using glass plate detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Pradeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial glass plate of thickness 1.75 mm has been utilized for evaluation of dose distributions inside the irradiation volume of gamma chamber using optical densitometry technique. The glass plate showed linear response in the dose range 0.10 Kilo Gray (kGy to 10 kGy of cobalt-60 gamma radiation with optical sensitivity 0.04 Optical Density (OD /kGy. The change in the optical density at each identified spatial dose matrix on the glass plate in relation to the position in the irradiation volume has been presented as dose distributions inside the gamma chamber. The optical density changes have been graphically plotted in the form of surface diagram of color washes for different percentage dose rate levels as isodose distributions in gamma chamber. The variation in dose distribution inside the gamma chamber unit, GC 900, BRIT India make, using this technique has been observed within ± 15%. This technique can be used for routine quality assurances and dose distribution validation of any gamma chamber during commissioning and source replacement. The application of commercial glass plate for dose mapping in gamma chambers has been found very promising due to its wider dose linearity, quick measurement, and lesser expertise requirement in application of the technique.

  3. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Iori, E-mail: sumida@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  4. Study on dose distribution of therapeutic proton beams with prompt gamma measurement

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    Kim, J. W. [National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, C. H.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, D. K.; Yoon, M. Y. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The proton beam has an advantage of the sharp dose falloff in dose distribution called Bragg peak while conventional radiation therapy modalities such as photons exhibit considerable amount of exit dose. To take advantage of this property it is important to know the exact location of the distal dose falloff. An error can cause overdose to the normal tissue or underdose to the tumor volume. The only way of finding out the dose distribution in-situ in particle therapy is to measure the gammas produced by nuclear reactions with tissue materials. Two kinds of gammas can be used: one is prompt gamma and the other is coincident gamma from the positron-emission isotopes. We chose to detect prompt gammas, and developed a prompt gamma scanning system (PGS). The proton beams of the proton therapy facility at National Cancer Center were used. The gamma distribution was compared to the dose distribution measured by an ionization chamber at three different energies of 100, 150, 200 MeV's. The two distributions were well correlated within 1-2 mm. The effect of high-energy neutron appeared as blurred distribution near the distal dose falloff at the energy of 200 MeV. We then tested the PGS shielding design by adding additional layer of paraffin plates outside of the PGS, and found that fast neutrons significantly affect the background level. But the location of the dose fall-off was nearly coincident. The analysis of gamma energy spectrum showed that cut-off energy in gamma counting can be adjusted to enhance the signal to noise ratio. Further the ATOM phantom, which has similar tissue structure to human, was used to investigate the gamma distribution for the case of inhomogeneous matter. The location of dose falloff region was found to be well defined as for water phantom. Next an actual therapy beam, which was produced by the double scattering method, was used, for which the dose falloff by the gamma distribution was completely wiped out by background neutrons. It is not

  5. A simulation study on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chin-cheng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Lee, Chung-chi; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of the tissue heterogeneity on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate both depth and radial profiles of the radiation dose in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms, respectively. The results are compared with the dose distribution calculated using the mathematical model of Gamma Plan, the treatment planning system of the gamma knife. The skull and sinus heterogeneity were simulated by a Teflon shell and an air shell, respectively. It was found that the tissue heterogeneity caused significant perturbation on the absolute depth dose at the focus as well as on the depth-dose distribution near the phantom surface and/or at the interface but little effect on the radial dose distribution. The effect of the beam aperture on the depth-dose distribution was also investigated in this study. (author)

  6. Distribution and characteristics of gamma and cosmic ray dose rate in living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    A series of environmental radiation surveys was carried out from the viewpoint of characterizing the natural radiation dose rate distribution in the living environment, including natural and artificial ones. Through the analysis of the data obtained at numbers of places, several aspects of the radiation field in living environments were clarified. That is the gamma ray dose rate varies due to the following three dominant causes: 1) the radionuclide concentration of surrounding materials acting as gamma ray sources, 2) the spatial distribution of surrounding materials, and 3) the geometrical and shielding conditions between the natural gamma ray sources and the measured point; whereas, the cosmic ray dose rate varies due to the thickness of upper shielding materials. It was also suggested that the gamma ray dose rate generally shows an upward tendency, and the cosmic ray dose rate a downward one in artificial environment. This kind of knowledge is expected to serve as fundamental information for accurate and realistic evaluation of the collective dose in the living environment. (author)

  7. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  8. Dose Distribution Calculation Using MCNPX Code in the Gamma-ray Irradiation Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    1991-02-01

    60 Co-gamma irradiators have long been used for foods sterilization, plant mutation and development of radio-protective agents, radio-sensitizers and other purposes. The Applied Radiological Science Research Institute of Cheju National University has a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility loaded with a MDS Nordin standard 60 Co source (C188), of which the initial activity was 400 TBq (10,800 Ci) on February 19, 2004. This panoramic gamma irradiator is designed to irradiate in all directions various samples such as plants, cultured cells and mice to administer given radiation doses. In order to give accurate doses to irradiation samples, appropriate methods of evaluating, both by calculation and measurement, the radiation doses delivered to the samples should be set up. Computational models have been developed to evaluate the radiation dose distributions inside the irradiation chamber and the radiation doses delivered to typical biolological samples which are frequently irradiated in the facility. The computational models are based on using the MCNPX code. The horizontal and vertical dose distributions has been calculated inside the irradiation chamber and compared the calculated results with measured data obtained with radiation dosimeters to verify the computational models. The radiation dosimeters employed are a Famer's type ion chamber and MOSFET dosimeters. Radiation doses were calculated by computational models, which were delivered to cultured cell samples contained in test tubes and to a mouse fixed in a irradiation cage, and compared the calculated results with the measured data. The computation models are also tested to see if they can accurately simulate the case where a thick lead shield is placed between the source and detector. Three tally options of the MCNPX code, F4, F5 and F6, are alternately used to see which option produces optimum results. The computation models are also used to calculate gamma ray energy spectra of a BGO scintillator at

  9. Distributions of neutron and gamma doses in phantom under a mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.

    1982-06-01

    A calculation program, based on Monte Carlo method, allowed to estimate the absorbed doses relatives to the reactor primary radiation, in a water cubic phantom and in cylindrical phantoms modelized from tissue compositions. This calculation is a theoretical approach of gamma and neutron dose gradient study in an animal phantom. PIN junction dosimetric characteristics have been studied experimentally. Air and water phantom radiation doses measured by PIN junction and lithium 7 fluoride, in reactor field have been compared to doses given by dosimetry classical techniques as tissue equivalent plastic and aluminium ionization chambers. Dosimeter responses have been employed to evaluate neutron and gamma doses in plastinaut (tissue equivalent plastic) and animal (piglet). Dose repartition in the piglet bone medulla has been also determined. This work has been completed by comparisons with Doerschell, Dousset and Brown results and by neutron dose calculations; the dose distribution related to lineic energy transfer in Auxier phantom has been also calculated [fr

  10. Determination of the distal dose edge in a human phantom by measuring the prompt gamma distribution: a Monte Carlo study

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    Min, Chul Hee; Lee, Han Rim; Yeom, Yeon Su; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The close relationship between the proton dose distribution and the distribution of prompt gammas generated by proton-induced nuclear interactions along the path of protons in a water phantom was demonstrated by means of both Monte Carlo simulations and limited experiments. In order to test the clinical applicability of the method for determining the distal dose edge in a human body, a human voxel model, constructed based on a body-composition-approximated physical phantom, was used, after which the MCNPX code was used to analyze the energy spectra and the prompt gamma yields from the major elements composing the human voxel model; finally, the prompt gamma distribution, generated from the voxel model and measured by using an array-type prompt gamma detection system, was calculated and compared with the proton dose distribution. According to the results, effective prompt gammas were produced mainly by oxygen, and the specific energy of the prompt gammas, allowing for selective measurement, was found to be 4.44 MeV. The results also show that the distal dose edge in the human phantom, despite the heterogeneous composition and the complicated shape, can be determined by measuring the prompt gamma distribution with an array-type detection system.

  11. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry

  12. Dose rate distribution of the GammaBeam: 127 irradiator using MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gual, Maritza Rodriguez; Batista, Adriana de Souza Medeiros; Pereira, Claubia; Faria, Luiz O. de; Grossi, Pablo Andrade

    2013-01-01

    The GammaBeam - 127 Irradiator is widely used for biological, chemical and medical applications of the gamma irradiation technology using Cobalt 60 radioactive at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The source has maximum activity of 60.000Ci, which is composed by 16 double encapsulated radioactive pencils placed in a rack. The facility is classified by the IAEA as Category II (dry storage facility). The aim of this work is to present a modelling developed to evaluate the dose rates at the irradiation room and the dose distribution at the irradiated products. In addition, the simulations could be used as a predictive tool of dose evaluation in the irradiation facility helping benchmark experiments in new similar facilities. The MCNPX simulated results were compared and validated with radiometric measurements using Fricke and TLDs dosimeters along several positions inside the irradiation room. (author)

  13. Isodose distributions and dose uniformity in the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility calculated using the MCNP code

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, C

    2001-01-01

    A systematic study of isodose distributions and dose uniformity in sample carriers of the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility was carried out using the MCNP code. The absorbed dose rate, gamma flux per energy interval and average gamma energy were calculated. For comparison purposes, boxes filled with air and 'dummy' boxes loaded with layers of folded and crumpled newspapers to achieve a given value of density were used. The magnitude of various contributions to the total photon spectra, including source-dependent factors, irradiator structures, sample material and other origins were also calculated.

  14. Characteristics of environmental gamma-rays and dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1986-01-01

    Environmental radioactivity has attracted much attention in terms of exposure to the population, although its exposure doses are minimal. This paper presents problems encountered in the assessment of exposure doses using model and monitoring systems, focusing on the characteristics, such as energy distribution, direction distribution, and site, of environmental gamma-rays. The assessment of outdoor and indoor exposure doses of natural gamma-rays is discussed in relation to the shielding effect of the human body. In the assessment of artificial gamma-rays, calculation of exposure doses using build-up factor, the shielding effect of the human body, and energy dependency of the measuring instrument are covered. A continuing elucidation about uncertainties in dose assessment is emphasized. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma knife. Possibilities of dose distribution optimizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuecklschweiger, G.

    1995-01-01

    On April 1992, the first stereotactic radiosurgical procedure using the gamma knife was performed at the University Medical School Graz, Department of Neurosurgery. Accurate dose optimization is the foundation of a convenient and responsible utilization of this modality. But there are limits, because the final collimation is only achieved by 1 of the 4 special helm collimators. The possibilities of dose optimization and its influence on the dose distributions were investigated and partly compared with results of film densitometry measurements. In detail, the technique, which uses the same isocenter, but different sized collimators was studied. The influence of these optimization techniques on the resulting dose distributions and the dose gradient at the edge of the treatment planning volume was analyzed. Also the visions for an effective dose optimization are discussed. With 2 shots of different diameters, located at the same target coordinates and different weighting of time any collimator size between the 4 mm and 18 mm can be achieved. Because of that, a combination of more than 2 collimators is not meaningful. With the combined shots the dose fall gradient was less than that of either of the single shots involved in the combination. With the available physical and technical possibilities only a limited, very time consuming optimization is practicable. The quality control of isodose distributions requires optimizations in hard-and software, that enable CT- or MRT-based 3-dimensional visualization and dose volume analysis. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Measurement of gamma radiation doses in nuclear power plant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochvar, I.A.; Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Sergeeva, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the problems of measuring gamma radiation dose values and the dose distribution in the nuclear power plant area with the aim of estimating the extent of their effect on the population. Presented are the dosimeters applied, their distribution throughout the controlled area, time of measurement. The distribution of gamma radiation doses over the controlled area and the dose alteration with the increase of the distance from the release source are shown. The results of measurements are investigated. The conclusion is made that operating nuclear power plants do not cause any increase in the gamma radiation dose over the area. Recommendations for clarifying the techniques for using dose-meters and decreasing measurement errors are given [ru

  17. Two Dimensional Verification of the Dose Distribution of Gamma Knife Model C using Monte Carlo Simulation with a Virtual Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Dong Geon; Choi, Joonbum; Jang, Jae Yeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Gamma Knife model C contains 201 {sup 60}Co sources located on a spherical surface, so that each beam is concentrated on the center of the sphere. In the last work, we simulated the Gamma Knife model C through Monte Carlo simulation code using Geant4. Instead of 201 multi-collimation system, we made one single collimation system that collects source parameter passing through the collimator helmet. Using the virtual source, we drastically reduced the simulation time to transport 201 gamma circle beams to the target. Gamma index has been widely used to compare two dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. Gamma index pass rates were compared in two calculated results using the virtual source method and the original method and measured results obtained using radiocrhomic films. A virtual source method significantly reduces simulation time of a Gamma Knife Model C and provides equivalent absorbed dose distributions as that of the original method showing Gamma Index pass rate close to 100% under 1mm/3% criteria. On the other hand, it gives a little narrow dose distribution compared to the film measurement showing Gamma Index pass rate of 94%. More accurate and sophisticated examination on the accuracy of the simulation and film measurement is necessary.

  18. Dose mapping role in gamma irradiation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali; John Konsoh Sangau; Mazni Abd Latif

    2002-01-01

    In this studies, the role of dosimetry activity in gamma irradiator was discussed. Dose distribution in the irradiator, which is a main needs in irradiator or chamber commissioning. This distribution data were used to confirm the dosimetry parameters i.e. exposure time, maximum and minimum dose map/points, and dose distribution - in which were used as guidelines for optimum product irradiation. (Author)

  19. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas CGG; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors. The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation

  20. Investigation of dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy using N isopropylacrylamide gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarmegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser [Dept. of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeali, Azim [Medical Education Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  1. Evaluation of absorbed dose-distribution in the X-ray or gamma-irradiator for blood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Satoshi; Kurihara, Katsuhiko; Yokokawa, Nobuhiko; Satake, Masahiro; Juji, Takeo

    2001-01-01

    Irradiation of blood products abrogates the proliferation of lymphocytes present in cellular component, which is currently the only accepted methodology to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). A range of irradiation dose levels between 15 Gy and 50 Gy is being used, but the majority of facilities are employing 15 Gy. It should, however, be recognized that the delivered dose in the instrument canister might differ from the actual dose absorbed by the blood bag. This study have evaluated the actual dose distribution under practical conditions where a container was loaded with blood products or water bags, or filled with distilled water. This approach provides data that the maximum attenuation occurred when the container was completely filled with a blood-compatible material. Thus, an error of approximately 20 percent should be considered in the dose measured in the in-air condition. A dose calibration in an in-air condition may lead to substantial underexposure of the blood products. A dose distribution study using adequately prearranged exposure period verified that the absorbed dose of 15 Gy was attained at any point in the container for both linear accelerator and gamma-irradiator. The maximal difference in the absorbed dose between measured points was 1.5- and 1.6-fold for linear accelerator and gamma-irradiator, respectively. In conclusion, using blood-compatible materials, a careful dose calibration study should be employed in which the absorbed dose of 15 Gy is obtained at the point where the lowest dose could be expected. (author)

  2. Studying and measuring the gamma radiation doses in Homs city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofaan, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    The gamma radiation dose was measured in Homs city by using many portable dosimeters (electronic dosimeter and Geiger-Muller). The measurements were carried out in the indoor and outdoor buildings, for different time period, through one year (1999-2000). High purity germanium detector with low back ground radiation (HpGe) was used to determine radiation element contained in some building and the surrounding soil. The statistical analysis laws were applied to make sure that the measured dose distribution around average value is normal distribution. The measurement indicates that the gamma indoor dose varies from 312μSv/y to 511μSv/y, with the average annual dose of 385μSv/y. However the gamma outdoor dose rate varies from 307μSv/y to 366μSv/y with an average annual dose 385μSv/y. The annual outdoor gamma radiation dose is about %16 lower than the outdoor dose in Homs City. These measurements have indicated that environmental gamma doses in Homs City are relatively low. This is because that most of the soils and rocks in the area are limestone. (author)

  3. Analysis on the gamma dose distribution by major corrosion products during preventive maintenance period in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Wi Ho

    2006-02-01

    The information on dose distribution inside the containment building is an essential requirement to make a reduction of radiation exposure as well as effective operation and design of nuclear power plant. After reactor shutdown, radiation exposure to workers mainly occurs during preventive maintenance period due to inspection or repair works of major components. During that period, gamma doses are induced by major corrosion products in the primary coolant system. The radiation exposure to workers has been assessed by using the measurements. The measurements are, of course, a basic and reliable assessment. But the measurement has defect such as limitation of detecting area. In order to improve the defect of the measurements, system for assessment of gamma dose distribution during preventive maintenance period by using computational code was suggested in this study. First, activity of major corrosion products was calculated by using modified CRUDSIM code. Original CRUDSIM code was modified to add evaluation of other major corrosion products besides cobalt isotopes. Modeling of containment building for YGN Unit 3 was then performed. Gamma dose distribution by major corrosion products inside the containment building was calculated by using MCNPX code. Finally, the calculations were mapped for whole space inside the containment building and were compared with the measurements. As a result of this study, the defect of the measurement are supplemented by using computational calculation system, and it is expected that workers can make an effective work plan through providing dose distribution inside the containment building in advance. In addition, this study can be applied to technology development to make an effective containment shielding design of the next generation reactor as well as an improvement of the safety for workers in nuclear power plant

  4. EGSnrc calculated and MRI-polymer gel dosimeter measured dose distribution of gamma knife in presence of inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahverdi Pourfallah, T.; Allahverdi, M.; Riahi Alam, N.; Ay, M.; Zahmatkesh, M.; Ibbott, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic gamma-knife radiosurgery plays an important role in managing small intracranial brain lesions. Currently, polymer gel dosimetry is still the only dosimetry method for directly measuring three-dimensional dose distributions. polymer gel dosimeters are tissue equivalent and can act as a phantom material. In this study effects of inhomogeneities on those distributions have been investigated using both EGSnrc calculation and PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter. (author)

  5. Calculation of neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.G.; Lee, S.Y.; Yook, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for neutrons and gamma rays based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) N666. These data are used to calculate the dose rate distribution of neutron and gamma ray in radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are presented; the corresponding energy range for gamma rays is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors were calculated, under the assumption that radiation energy distribution has nonlinearity in the phantom, have different meaning from those values obtained by monoenergetic radiation. Especially, these values were determined with the cross section library. The flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors obtained in this work were in a good agreement to the values presented by ANSI. Those data will be useful for the radiation shielding analysis and the radiation dosimetry in the case of continuous energy distributions. (author)

  6. Effects of bone- and air-tissue inhomogeneities on the dose distributions of the Leksell Gamma Knife (registered) calculated with PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Rojas, E Leticia; Lallena, Antonio M

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE (version 2003) is applied to calculate Leksell Gamma Knife (registered) dose distributions for heterogeneous phantoms. The usual spherical water phantom is modified with a spherical bone shell simulating the skull and an air-filled cube simulating the frontal or maxillary sinuses. Different simulations of the 201 source configuration of the Gamma Knife have been carried out with a simplified model of the geometry of the source channel of the Gamma Knife recently tested for both single source and multisource configurations. The dose distributions determined for heterogeneous phantoms including the bone- and/or air-tissue interfaces show non-negligible differences with respect to those calculated for a homogeneous one, mainly when the Gamma Knife isocentre approaches the separation surfaces. Our findings confirm an important underdosage (∼10%) nearby the air-tissue interface, in accordance with previous results obtained with the PENELOPE code with a procedure different from ours. On the other hand, the presence of the spherical shell simulating the skull produces a few per cent underdosage at the isocentre wherever it is situated

  7. SOILD: A computer model for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.; Yu, C.; Schafetz, S.; Mehta, P.

    1991-01-01

    The SOLID computer model was developed for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil. It is designed to assess external doses under various exposure scenarios that may be encountered in environmental restoration programs. The models four major functional features address (1) dose versus source depth in soil, (2) shielding of clean cover soil, (3) area of contamination, and (4) nonuniform distribution of sources. The model is also capable of adjusting doses when there are variations in soil densities for both source and cover soils. The model is supported by a data base of approximately 500 radionuclides. 4 refs

  8. Retrospective analysis of 'gamma distribution' based IMRT QA criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, C.; Chappell, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: IMRT has been implemented into clinical practice at Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH) since mid 2006 for treating patients with Head and Neck (H and N) or prostate tumours. A local quality assurance (QA) acceptance criteria based on 'gamma distribution' for approving IMRT plan was developed and implemented in early 2007. A retrospective analysis of such criteria over 194 clinical cases will be presented. The RHH IMRT criteria was established with assumption that gamma distribution obtained through inter-comparison of 2 D dose maps between planned and delivered was governed by a positive-hail' normal distribution. A commercial system-MapCheck was used for 2 D dose map comparison with a built-in gamma analysis tool. Gamma distribution histogram was generated and recorded for all cases. By retrospectively analysing those distributions using curve fitting technique, a statistical gamma distribution can be obtained and evaluated. This analytical result can be used for future IMRT planing and treatment delivery. The analyses indicate that gamma distribution obtained through MapCheckTM is well under the normal distribution, particularly for prostate cases. The applied pass/fail criteria is not overly sensitive to identify 'false fails' but can be further tighten-up for smaller field while for larger field found in both H and N and prostate cases, the criteria was correctly applied. Non-uniform distribution of detectors in MapCheck and experience level of planners are two major factors to variation in gamma distribution among clinical cases. This criteria derived from clinical statistics is superior and more accurate than single-valued criteria for lMRT QA acceptance procedure. (author)

  9. In situ measurements of dose rates from terrestrial gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, M.C.; Jiang, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was employed for the performance of in situ measurements of radionuclide activity concentrations in the ground in Taiwan, at altitudes ranging from sea level to 3900 m. The absolute peak efficiency of the HPGe detector for a gamma-ray source uniformly distributed in the semi-infinite ground was determined using a semi-empirical method. The gamma-ray dose rates from terrestrial radionuclides were calculated from the measured activity levels using recently published dose rate conversion factors. The absorbed dose rate in air due to cosmic rays was derived by subtracting the terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate from the overall absorbed dose rate in air measured using a high-pressure ionization chamber. The cosmic-ray dose rate calculated as a function of altitude, was found to be in good agreement with the data reported by UNSCEAR. (orig.)

  10. Committed dose assessment based on background outdoor gamma exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luevano G, S.; Perez T, A.; Pinedo A, C.; Renteria V, M.; Carrillo F, J.; Montero C, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on populations health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the committed dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, annual effective dose, and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected along the Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Muller counter. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 n Gy h -1 . Results indicated that lifetime effective dose to inhabitants of Chihuahua City is in average of 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of activity concentrations in soil were 51.8, 73.1, and 1096.5 Bq kg -1 , of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K, respectively. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of 232 Th, 226 Ra, and 40 K is to north, to north-center, and to south of city, respectively. In conclusion, natural background gamma dose received by inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to geological characteristics of the zone. (Author)

  11. Dosimetric and Clinical Analysis of Spatial Distribution of the Radiation Dose in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massager, Nicolas; Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Benmebarek, Nadir; Desmedt, Françoise; Devriendt, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated variations in the distribution of radiation dose inside (dose inhomogeneity) and outside (dose falloff) the target volume during Gamma Knife (GK) irradiation of vestibular schwannoma (VS). We analyzed the relationship between some parameters of dose distribution and the clinical and radiological outcome of patients. Methods and Materials: Data from dose plans of 203 patients treated for a vestibular schwannoma by GK C using same prescription dose (12 Gy at the 50% isodose) were collected. Four different dosimetric indexes were defined and calculated retrospectively in all plannings on the basis of dose–volume histograms: Paddick conformity index (PI), gradient index (GI), homogeneity index (HI), and unit isocenter (UI). The different measures related to distribution of the radiation dose were compared with hearing and tumor outcome of 203 patients with clinical and radiological follow-up of minimum 2 years. Results: Mean, median, SD, and ranges of the four indexes of dose distribution analyzed were calculated; large variations were found between dose plans. We found a high correlation between the target volume and PI, GI, and UI. No significant association was found between the indexes of dose distribution calculated in this study and tumor control, tumor volume shrinkage, hearing worsening, loss of functional hearing, or complete hearing loss at last follow-up. Conclusions: Parameters of distribution of the radiation dose during GK radiosurgery for VS can be highly variable between dose plans. The tumor and hearing outcome of patients treated is not significantly related to these global indexes of dose distribution inside and around target volume. In GK radiosurgery for VS, the outcome seems more to be influenced by local radiation dose delivered to specific structures or volumes than by global dose gradients.

  12. Phantom experiment of depth-dose distributions for gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Kato, K.; Sakuma, Y.; Tsuruno, A.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Depth-dose distributions in a tumor simulated phantom were measured for thermal neutron flux, capture gamma-ray and internal conversion electron dose rates for gadolinium neutron capture therapy. The results show that (i) a significant dose enhancement can be achieved in the tumor by capture gamma-rays and internal conversion electrons but the dose is mainly due to capture gamma-rays from the Gd(n, γ) reactions, therefore, is not selective at the cellular level, (ii) the dose distribution was a function of strongly interrelated parameters such as gadolinium concentrations, tumor site and neutron beam size (collimator aperture size), and (iii) the Gd-NCT by thermal neutrons appears to be a potential for treatment of superficial tumor. (author)

  13. Committed dose assessment based on background outdoor gamma exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luevano G, S.; Perez T, A.; Pinedo A, C.; Renteria V, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecologia, Perif. Francisco R. Almada Km 1, 31415 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Carrillo F, J.; Montero C, M. E., E-mail: mrenteria@uach.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31136 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on populations health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the committed dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, annual effective dose, and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected along the Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Muller counter. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 n Gy h{sup -1}. Results indicated that lifetime effective dose to inhabitants of Chihuahua City is in average of 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of activity concentrations in soil were 51.8, 73.1, and 1096.5 Bq kg{sup -1}, of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K, respectively. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 40}K is to north, to north-center, and to south of city, respectively. In conclusion, natural background gamma dose received by inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to geological characteristics of the zone. (Author)

  14. Dose mapping simulation using the MCNP code for the Syrian gamma irradiation facility and benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Boush, M.; Alkassiri, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The MCNP4C was used to calculate the gamma ray dose rate spatial distribution in for the SGIF. • Measurement of the gamma ray dose rate spatial distribution using the Chlorobenzene dosimeter was conducted as well. • Good agreements were noticed between the calculated and measured results. • The maximum relative differences were less than 7%, 4% and 4% in the x, y and z directions respectively. - Abstract: A three dimensional model for the Syrian gamma irradiation facility (SGIF) is developed in this paper to calculate the gamma ray dose rate spatial distribution in the irradiation room at the 60 Co source board using the MCNP-4C code. Measurement of the gamma ray dose rate spatial distribution using the Chlorobenzene dosimeter is conducted as well to compare the calculated and measured results. Good agreements are noticed between the calculated and measured results with maximum relative differences less than 7%, 4% and 4% in the x, y and z directions respectively. This agreement indicates that the established model is an accurate representation of the SGIF and can be used in the future to make the calculation design for a new irradiation facility

  15. On dose distribution comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross I; Flampouri, Stella; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy practice, one often needs to compare two dose distributions. Especially with the wide clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, software tools for quantitative dose (or fluence) distribution comparison are required for patient-specific quality assurance. Dose distribution comparison is not a trivial task since it has to be performed in both dose and spatial domains in order to be clinically relevant. Each of the existing comparison methods has its own strengths and weaknesses and there is room for improvement. In this work, we developed a general framework for comparing dose distributions. Using a new concept called maximum allowed dose difference (MADD), the comparison in both dose and spatial domains can be performed entirely in the dose domain. Formulae for calculating MADD values for various comparison methods, such as composite analysis and gamma index, have been derived. For convenience in clinical practice, a new measure called normalized dose difference (NDD) has also been proposed, which is the dose difference at a point scaled by the ratio of MADD to the predetermined dose acceptance tolerance. Unlike the simple dose difference test, NDD works in both low and high dose gradient regions because it considers both dose and spatial acceptance tolerances through MADD. The new method has been applied to a test case and a clinical example. It was found that the new method combines the merits of the existing methods (accurate, simple, clinically intuitive and insensitive to dose grid size) and can easily be implemented into any dose/intensity comparison tool

  16. Distribution of gamma-ray dose rate in Fukushima prefecture by a car-borne survey method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Shinji; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Maekawa, Akihiro; Ichikawa, Ryohei; Kawamura, Hidehisa

    2013-01-01

    The Tohoku Pacific Earthquake and Tsunami on March 11, 2011, caused severe damage to the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP. This was followed by a nuclear accident at an unprecedented scale, and huge amounts of radioactive material were released into the environment. The distributions of the gamma-ray dose rate in Fukushima prefecture were measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillation survey meter as part of a car-borne survey method on April 18-21, June 20-22, October 18-21, 2011, and on April 9-11 and July 30 - August 1, 2012. The dose rate near TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP and at Iitate-mura, Fukushima-city was high (1 to >30 μSv/h). (author)

  17. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luevano-Gurrola

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  18. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-09-30

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  19. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-01-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  20. TLD-300 detectors for separate measurement of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions of single, multiple, and moving-field neutron treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassow, J.

    1984-01-01

    Fast neutron therapy requirements, because of the poor depth dose characteristic of present therapeutical sources, are at least as complex in treatment plans as photon therapy. The physical part of the treatment planning is very important; however, it is much more complicated than for photons or electrons owing to the need for: Separation of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions (Dsub(T) and Dsub(G)); and more stringent tissue-equivalence conditions of phantoms than in photon therapy. Therefore, methods of clinical dosimetry for the separate determination of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions in irregularly shaped (inhomogeneous) phantoms are needed. A method using TLD-300 (CaF 2 :Tm) detectors is described, which is able to give an approximate solution of the above-mentioned dosimetric requirements. The two independent doses, Dsub(T) and Dsub(G), can be calculated by an on-line computer analysis of the digitalized glow curve of TLD-300 detectors, irradiated with d(14)+Be neutrons of the cyclotron isocentric neutron therapy facility CIRCE in Essen. Results are presented for depth and lateral absorbed dose distributions (Dsub(T) and Dsub(G)) for fixed neutron beams of different field sizes compared with measurements by standard procedures (TE-TE ionization chamber, GM counter) in an A-150 phantom. The TLD-300 results for multiple and moving-field treatments (with and without wedge filters) in a patient simulating irregularly shaped (inhomogeneous) phantoms, are shown together with computer calculations of these dose distributions. The probable causes for some systematic deviations are discussed, which lead to open problems for further investigations owing to features of the detector material and the evaluation method, but mainly to differences in the composition of phantom materials used for the calculations (standard dose distributions) and TLD-300 measurements. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Yuichiro, E-mail: yuichiro.ueno.bv@hitachi.com [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuhiko [Measuring Systems Engineering Dept., Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd., Ome-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-21

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  2. Dose mapping of the multi-purpose gamma irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabalfin, E G; Lanuza, L G; Villamater, D T [Irradiation Services, Nuclear Services and Training Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines)

    1989-12-01

    In radiation processing, reliable dosimetry constitutes a very important part of process control and quality assurance. Radiation dosimetry is the only acceptable method to guarantee that the irradiated product has undergone the correct radiation treatment. In preparation therefore, for the routine operation of the newly installed multi-purpose gamma irradiation facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), dose mapping distribution studies were undertaken. Results of dose distribution in air as well as in dummy product are presented. The effects of product bulk density, product geometry and product to source distance on minimum absorbed dose and uniformity ratio have been determined. (Author).

  3. Dose mapping of the multi-purpose gamma irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalfin, E.G.; Lanuza, L.G.; Villamater, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    In radiation processing, reliable dosimetry constitutes a very important part of process control and quality assurance. Radiation dosimetry is the only acceptable method to guarantee that the irradiated product has undergone the correct radiation treatment. In preparation therefore, for the routine operation of the newly installed multi-purpose gamma irradiation facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), dose mapping distribution studies were undertaken. Results of dose distribution in air as well as in dummy product are presented. The effects of product bulk density, product geometry and product to source distance on minimum absorbed dose and uniformity ratio have been determined. (Author)

  4. Dose Rate and Mass Attenuation Coefficients of Gamma Ray for Concretes

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Latif, A A; Kansouh, W A; El-Sayed, F H

    2003-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the leakage gamma ray dose and mass attenuation coefficients for ordinary, basalt and dolomite concretes made from local ores. Concretes under investigation were constructed from gravel, basalt and dolomite ores, and then reconstructed with the addition of 3% steel fibers by weight. Measurements were carried out using a collimated beam from sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma ray source and sodium iodide (3x3) crystal with the genie 2000 gamma spectrometer. The obtained fluxes were transformed to gamma ray doses and displayed in the form of gamma ray dose rates distribution. The displayed curves were used to estimate the linear attenuation coefficients (mu), the relaxation lengths (lambda), half value layer (t sub 1 /2) and tenth value layer (t sub 1 /10). Also, The total mass attenuation coefficients of gamma ray have been calculated to the concerned concretes using XCOM (version 3.1) program and database elements cross sections from Z=1 to 100 at energies from 10 keV to 100 MeV. In...

  5. Level of terrestrial gamma radiation and doses to population in Jiangsu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of terrestrial gamma radiation level in Jiangsu Province are reported and the population doses due to this radiation are estimated. The sketch map of the geographical distribution of the terrestrial gamma radiation level is given. In this investigation FD-71 portable scintillation counters and RSS-111 high pressure ionization chambers were used. The results showed that the terrestrial gamma absorbed dose rates in air for indoors and outdoors were 10.7 x 10 -8 Gy/h and 6.5 x 10 -8 Gy/h (weighted values) respectively. The indoors-to-outdoors ratio was 1.65. The total (indoor plus outdoor) annual effective dose equivalent from terrestrial gamma radiation, averaged over the population in this province, was 6.0 x 10 -4 Sv. The collective annual effective dose equivalent was 3.6 x 10 4 man.Sv. Therefore, the absorbed dose to population in Jiangsu Province is in the range of the normal background

  6. Dose distribution close to metal implants in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Yu, K.N.; Chan, Josie F.K.; Ho, Robert T.K.; Yu, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    Materials with high atomic numbers favor the occurrence of the photoelectric effect when they are irradiated with gamma rays. Therefore, the photoelectric effects of metal implants within the target regions in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery are worth studying. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements. A dose enhancement as high as 10% was observed close to a platinum implant along the x and y axes, while no significant dose enhancements were observed for silver, stainless steel 301, and titanium ones. A dose enhancement as high as 20% was observed close to the platinum implant along the z axis at the superior position of the metal-phantom interface and was 10% higher for other metal implants

  7. A study on gamma dose rate in Seoul (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Hyun; Kim, Chang Kyun; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Jeong Min

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to find out gamma dose rate in Seoul, from January to December in 2000, and the following results were achieved : The annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was 17.24 μR/hr as average. The annual gamma dose rate in subway of Seoul was 14.96 μR/hr as average. The highest annual gamma dose rate was Dong-daemon ku. Annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was higher autumn than winter

  8. Measurement of spatial dose-rate distribution using a position sensitive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, T.; Torii, T.; Nozaki, T.; Ando, H.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the radiation detectors using plastic scintillation fibers (PSF) have been developed to measure the positions exposed to radiation such as neutrons and high energy charged particles. In particular, the time of flight (TOF) method for measuring the difference of time that two directional signals of scintillation light reach both ends of a PSF is a rather simple method for the measurement of the spatial distribution of fast neutron fluence rate. It is possible to use the PSF in nuclear facility working areas because of its flexibility, small diameter and long length. In order to apply TOF method to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution, the characteristic tests of a detector using PSFs were carried out. First, the resolution of irradiated positions and the counting efficiency were measured with collimated gamma ray. The sensitivity to unit dose rate was also obtained. The measurement of spatial dose rate distribution was also carried out. The sensor is made of ten bundled PSFs, and the experimental setup is described. The experiment and the results are reported. It was found that the PSF detector has the good performance to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution. (K.I.)

  9. DOSKMF2, Dose Rate Distribution in Co60 Gamma Irradiation Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remer, M.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The DOSKMF2 code calculates dose rate distributions in gamma irradiation facilities with 60 Co sources. It has been developed as a tool for the evaluation of research units for the characterization, modification and optimization as well as for the simulation, planning design and evaluation of pilot and industrial facilities. 2 - Method of solution: The basic model of DOSKMF2 contains the computation of the exposure rate, which is dependent on a system of radiation sources (line and/or point sources) at one point of the radiation field. The geometric conditions are described by two coordinate systems. The first is used to arrange the radiation sources and tubes; the second is used to describe the shielding layers in the form of concentric circles. The build-up factor is approximated by Taylor coefficients, also in the case of multi-layer configurations. Calculations of radiation fields in complex irradiation facilities are made by many organizational variants based on the basic model. The interpretation of the results is supported by some statistical calculations. It is possible to store the calculated dose rate values for further processing. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The DOSKMF2 code is presently limited to 40 irradiation tubes and 10 crossed shielding layers. This can be increased by changing dimension statements and input organization

  10. Calculating gamma dose factors for hot particle exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.

    1990-01-01

    For hot particle exposures to the skin, the beta component of radiation delivers the majority of the dose. However, in order to fully demonstrate regulatory compliance, licenses must ordinarily provide reasonable bases for assuming that both the gamma component of the skin dose and the whole body doses are negligible. While beta dose factors are commonly available in the literature, gamma dose factors are not. This paper describes in detail a method by which gamma skin dose factors may be calculated using the Specific Gamma-ray Constant, even if the particle is not located directly on the skin. Two common hot particle exposure geometries are considered: first, a single square centimeter of skin lying at density thickness of 7 mg/cm 2 and then at 1000 mg/cm 2 . A table provides example gamma dose factors for a number of isotopes encountered at power reactors

  11. Gamma irradiator dose mapping simulation using the MCNP code and benchmarking with dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabpour, M.; Hassanzadeh, M.; Shahriari, M.; Sharifzadeh, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP, has been applied in simulating dose rate distribution in the IR-136 gamma irradiator system. Isodose curves, cumulative dose values, and system design data such as throughputs, over-dose-ratios, and efficiencies have been simulated as functions of product density. Simulated isodose curves, and cumulative dose values were compared with dosimetry values obtained using polymethyle-methacrylate, Fricke, ethanol-chlorobenzene, and potassium dichromate dosimeters. The produced system design data were also found to agree quite favorably with those of the system manufacturer's data. MCNP has thus been found to be an effective transport code for handling of various dose mapping excercises for gamma irradiators

  12. Radon-222 related influence on ambient gamma dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melintescu, A; Chambers, S D; Crawford, J; Williams, A G; Zorila, B; Galeriu, D

    2018-04-03

    Ambient gamma dose, radon, and rainfall have been monitored in southern Bucharest, Romania, from 2010 to 2016. The seasonal cycle of background ambient gamma dose peaked between July and October (100-105 nSv h -1 ), with minimum values in February (75-80 nSv h -1 ), the time of maximum snow cover. Based on 10 m a.g.l. radon concentrations, the ambient gamma dose increased by around 1 nSv h -1 for every 5 Bq m -3 increase in radon. Radon variability attributable to diurnal changes in atmospheric mixing contributed less than 15 nSv h -1 to the overall variability in ambient gamma dose, a factor of 4 more than synoptic timescale changes in air mass fetch. By contrast, precipitation-related enhancements of the ambient gamma dose were 15-80 nSv h -1 . To facilitate routine analysis, and account in part for occasional equipment failure, an automated method for identifying precipitation spikes in the ambient gamma dose was developed. Lastly, a simple model for predicting rainfall-related enhancement of the ambient gamma dose is tested against rainfall observations from events of contrasting duration and intensity. Results are also compared with those from previously published models of simple and complex formulation. Generally, the model performed very well. When simulations underestimated observations the absolute difference was typically less than the natural variability in ambient gamma dose arising from atmospheric mixing influences. Consequently, combined use of the automated event detection method and the simple model of this study could enable the ambient gamma dose "attention limit" (which indicates a potential radiological emergency) to be reduced from 200 to 400% above background to 25-50%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of dose distribution in water around {sup 57}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetite nanoparticle in the nuclear gamma resonance condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbasov, R.; Polikarpov, M. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Safronov, V. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Research Center Space Materials Science (Russian Federation); Sozontov, E.; Yurenya, A., E-mail: antonyurenya@gmail.com; Panchenko, V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    In this work was proposed a new radiotherapy enhancement method consisting of the administration of magnetic nanoparticles into the cells with further irradiation with a gamma-ray beam. As a result, adjusting the energy distribution of a gamma-ray beam and {sup 57}Fe abundance it is possible to achieve an extremely intensive electron emission because of a nuclear resonance. The produced conversion and Auger electrons can be used as an effective tool for DNA lesions production. We developed a Monte Carlo model for an electron and gamma emission by {sup 57}Fe nucleus using the Geant4 program package. The parameters of a resonant absorption were taken from Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles synthesized for the administration into live cells. The space distribution of the radiation dose showed an increase in the dose of 2–2.5 times in the case of the natural abundance and more than 50 times in the case of the 66 % enrichment of the nanoparticles.

  14. Application of airborne gamma spectrometric survey data to estimating terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates: An example in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Revzan, K.L.; Smith, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors examine the applicability of radioelement data from the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance (NARR) to estimate terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates, by comparing dose rates calculated from aeroradiometric surveys of U, Th, and K concentrations in 1 x 2 degree quadrangles with dose rates calculated from a radiogeologic data base and the distribution of lithologies in California. Gamma-ray dose rates increase generally from north to south following lithological trends. Low values of 25--30 nG/h occur in the northernmost quadrangles where low-radioactivity basaltic and ultramafic rocks predominate. Dose rates then increase southward due to the preponderance of clastic sediments and basic volcanics of the Franciscan Formation and Sierran metamorphics in north central and central California, and to increasing exposure southward of the Sierra Nevada batholith, Tertiary marine sedimentary rocks, intermediate to acidic volcanics, and granitic rocks of the Coast Ranges. High values, to 100 nGy/h occur in southeastern California, due primarily to the presence of high-radioactivity Precambrian and pre Cenozoic metamorphic rocks. Lithologic-based estimates of mean dose rates in the quadrangles generally match those from aeroradiometric data, with statewide means of 63 and 60 nGy/h, respectively. These are intermediate between a population-weighted global average of 51 nGy/h and a weighted continental average of 70 nGy/h, based on the global distribution of rock types. The concurrence of lithologically- and aeroradiometrically- determined dose rates in California, with its varied geology and topography encompassing settings representative of the continents, indicates that the NARR data are applicable to estimates of terrestrial absorbed dose rates from natural gamma emitters

  15. Airborne and total gamma absorbed dose rates at Patiala - India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesfaye, Tilahun; Sahota, H.S.; Singh, K.

    1999-01-01

    The external gamma absorbed dose rate due to gamma rays originating from gamma emitting aerosols in air, is compared with the total external gamma absorbed dose rate at the Physics Department of Punjabi University, Patiala. It has been found out that the contribution, to the total external gamma absorbed dose rate, of radionuclides on particulate matter suspended in air is about 20% of the overall gamma absorbed dose rate. (author)

  16. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates and radiological mapping of Terengganu state, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garba, N.N.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of terrestrial gamma radiation dose (TGRD) rates in Terengganu state, Malaysia was carried out from 145 different locations using NaI[Tl] micro roentgen survey meter. The measured TGRD rates ranged from 35 to 340 nGy h -1 with mean value of 150 nGy h -1 . The annual effective dose to population was found to be 0.92 mSv y -1 . The data obtained were used in constructing the gamma isodose map using ArcGis 9.3 which shows the distribution of TGRD rates across the state. (author)

  17. Evaluation of skyshine dose due to gamma-rays from a cobalt-60 irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Okamoto, Shinichi; Ohnishi, Tokuhiro; Tsujii, Yukio

    1991-01-01

    We attempted to evaluate skyshine dose due to gamma-rays from a cobalt-60 irradiation facility. As the first step, the results of measurements and calculations were compared of the skyshine dose due to gamma-rays from the cobalt-60 source of 1.45 PBq set in the No.4 irradiation room of our laboratory. Distances of measuring points from the cobalt source were in the range from 17 m to about 100 m in the site of our office. Calculation was carried out with simplified single scattering method. The calculated values of the skyshine dose were higher than the measured values. For more precise evaluation of the skyshine dose, the following factors are to be considered; the dose rate distribution on the roof above the source and the attenuation of gamma-rays by air. (author)

  18. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096±0.019(1 SD) and 0.092±0.016(1 SD)μSv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11±0.042(1 SD) and 0.091±0.026(1 SD)μSv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, 222 Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings

  19. High dose gamma-ray standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrin, R.; Moraru, R.

    1999-01-01

    The high gamma-ray doses produced in a gamma irradiator are used, mainly, for radiation processing, i.e. sterilization of medical products, processing of food, modifications of polymers, irradiation of electronic devices, a.s.o. The used absorbed doses depend on the application and cover the range 10 Gy to 100 MGy. The regulations in our country require that the response of the dosimetry systems, used for the irradiation of food and medical products, be calibrated and traceable to the national standards. In order to be sure that the products receive the desired absorbed dose, appropriate dosimetric measurements must be performed, including the calibration of the dosemeters and their traceability to the national standards. The high dose gamma-ray measurements are predominantly based on the use of reference radiochemical dosemeters. Among them the ferrous sulfate can be used as reference dosemeter for low doses (up to 400 Gy) but due to its characteristics it deserves to be considered a standard dosemeter and to be used for transferring the conventional absorbed dose to other chemical dosemeters used for absorbed doses up to 100 MGy. The study of the ferrous sulfate dosemeter consisted in preparing many batches of solution by different operators in quality assurance conditions and in determining for all batches the linearity, the relative intrinsic error, the repeatability and the reproducibility. The principal results are the following: the linear regression coefficient: 0.999, the relative intrinsic error: max.6 %, the repeatability (for P* = 95 %): max.3 %, the reproducibility (P* = 95%): max.5 %. (authors)

  20. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, Caio H.

    2017-01-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  1. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C., E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: villavic@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia

    2017-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  2. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Tsutsumi, M.; Moriuchi, S.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1991-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  3. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Yan, X.K.; Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of 60 Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of 60 Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0 -3 D 2 . Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy γ-irradiation from a supra-high dose 60 Co gamma-ray accident.

  4. Cellular response to low Gamma-ray doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares A, E; Vega C, H R; Leon, L.C. de . [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rebolledo D, O; Radillo J, F [Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas y Agropecuarias de la Universidad de Colima, Colima (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    Lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp70 and Hsc70.Hsp70 protein was detected after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 1.25 c Gy gamma-ray dose, lymphocytes expressed Hsp70 protein, indicating a threshold response to gamma rays. (Author)

  5. Cellular response to low Gamma-ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanares A, E.; Vega C, H.R.; Leon, L.C. de; Rebolledo D, O.; Radillo J, F.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp70 and Hsc70.Hsp70 protein was detected after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 1.25 c Gy gamma-ray dose, lymphocytes expressed Hsp70 protein, indicating a threshold response to gamma rays. (Author)

  6. Effect of gamma irradiation dose on the fabrication of α-elastin nanoparticles by gamma-ray crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Mari; Takeda, Mayuko; Okamoto, Kouji; Furuta, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles were prepared utilizing the thermosensitive aggregation of α-elastin and gamma-ray crosslinking. We investigated the effect of the α-elastin irradiation doses to verify the yield of crosslinked nanoparticles. Aqueous solution of α-elastin (10 mg/ml) was used for the aggregation on raising temperature above its cloudy point (CP), followed by gamma-ray crosslinking. A slow heating process (1.9 o C/min) effectively led to aggregation of polypeptide and irradiation with more than 15 kGy yielded stable crosslinked nanoparticles with diameters less than ca. 200 nm and a narrow size distribution.

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation dose on the fabrication of {alpha}-elastin nanoparticles by gamma-ray crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Mari; Takeda, Mayuko [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Okamoto, Kouji [Department of Bioscience and Bioinformatics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Furuta, Masakazu, E-mail: mfuruta@b.s.osakafu-u.ac.j [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Nanoparticles were prepared utilizing the thermosensitive aggregation of {alpha}-elastin and gamma-ray crosslinking. We investigated the effect of the {alpha}-elastin irradiation doses to verify the yield of crosslinked nanoparticles. Aqueous solution of {alpha}-elastin (10 mg/ml) was used for the aggregation on raising temperature above its cloudy point (CP), followed by gamma-ray crosslinking. A slow heating process (1.9 {sup o}C/min) effectively led to aggregation of polypeptide and irradiation with more than 15 kGy yielded stable crosslinked nanoparticles with diameters less than ca. 200 nm and a narrow size distribution.

  8. Exposure of luminous marine bacteria to low-dose gamma-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryasheva, N S; Petrova, A S; Dementyev, D V; Bondar, A A

    2017-04-01

    The study addresses biological effects of low-dose gamma-radiation. Radioactive 137 Cs-containing particles were used as model sources of gamma-radiation. Luminous marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was used as a bioassay with the bioluminescent intensity as the physiological parameter tested. To investigate the sensitivity of the bacteria to the low-dose gamma-radiation exposure (≤250 mGy), the irradiation conditions were varied as follows: bioluminescence intensity was measured at 5, 10, and 20°С for 175, 100, and 47 h, respectively, at different dose rates (up to 4100 μGy/h). There was no noticeable effect of gamma-radiation at 5 and 10°С, while the 20°С exposure revealed authentic bioluminescence inhibition. The 20°С results of gamma-radiation exposure were compared to those for low-dose alpha- and beta-radiation exposures studied previously under comparable experimental conditions. In contrast to ionizing radiation of alpha and beta types, gamma-emission did not initiate bacterial bioluminescence activation (adaptive response). As with alpha- and beta-radiation, gamma-emission did not demonstrate monotonic dose-effect dependencies; the bioluminescence inhibition efficiency was found to be related to the exposure time, while no dose rate dependence was found. The sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose gamma radiation. The exposure time that caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition was suggested as a test parameter for radiotoxicity evaluation under conditions of chronic low-dose gamma irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Calculation of the gamma-dose rate from a continuously emitted plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebschmann, W.; Papadopoulos, D.

    1975-06-01

    A computer model is presented which calculates the long term gamma dose rate caused by the radioactive off-gas continuously emitted from a stack. The statistical distribution of the wind direction and velocity and of the stability categories is taken into account. The emitted activity, distributed in the atmosphere according to this statistics, is assumed to be concentrated at the mesh points of a three-dimensional grid. The grid spacing and the integration limits determine the accuracy as well as the computer time needed. When calculating the dose rate in a given wind direction, the contribution of the activity emitted into the neighbouring sectors is evaluated. This influence is demonstrated in the results, which are calculated with a error below 3% and compared to the dose rate distribution curves of the submersion model and the model developed by K.J. Vogt. (orig.) [de

  10. Terrestrial gamma dose rate in Pahang state Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabdo, H.T.; Federal College of Education, Yola; Ramli, A.T.; Sanusi, M.S.; Saleh, M.A.; Garba, N.N.; Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria

    2014-01-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiations (TGR) were measured in Pahang state Malaysia between January and April 2013. The TGR dose rates ranged from 26 to 750 nGy h -1 . The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGR dose rate was found to be 176 ± 5 nGy h -1 . Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were located in Raub, Temerloh, Bentong and Rompin districts. These areas have external gamma dose rates of between 500 and 750 nGy h -1 . An Isodose map of the state was produced using ArcGIS9 software version 9.3. To evaluate the radiological hazard due to terrestrial gamma dose, the annual effective dose equivalent and the mean population weighted dose rate were calculated and found to be 0.22 mSv year -1 and 168 nGy h -1 respectively. (author)

  11. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  12. Gamma irradiator dose mapping: a Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Rogerio R.; Ribeiro, Mariana A.; Grynberg, Suely E.; Ferreira, Andrea V.; Meira-Belo, Luiz Claudio; Sousa, Romulo V.; Sebastiao, Rita de C.O.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma irradiator facilities can be used in a wide range of applications such as biological and chemical researches, food treatment and sterilization of medical devices and products. Dose mapping must be performed in these equipment in order to establish plant operational parameters, as dose uniformity, source utilization efficiency and maximum and minimum dose positions. The isodoses curves are generally measured using dosimeters distributed throughout the device, and this procedure often consume a large amount of dosimeters, irradiation time and manpower. However, a detailed curve doses identification of the irradiation facility can be performed using Monte Carlo simulation, which reduces significantly the monitoring with dosimeters. The present work evaluates the absorbed dose in the CDTN/CNEN Gammacell Irradiation Facility, using the Monte Carlo N-particles (MCNP) code. The Gammacell 220, serial number 39, was produced by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and was loaded with sources of 60 Co. Dose measurements using TLD and Fricke dosimeters were also performed to validate the calculations. The good agreement of the results shows that Monte Carlo simulations can be used as a predictive tool of irradiation planning for the CDTN/CNEN Gamma Cell Irradiator. (author)

  13. Determination of Proton dose distal fall-off location by detecting right-angled prompt gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyu Seok

    2006-02-01

    The proton beam has a unique advantage over the electron and photon beams in that it can give very high radiation dose to the tumor volume while effectively sparing the neighboring healthy tissue and organs. The number of proton therapy facility is very rapidly increasing in the world. And now the 230 MeV cyclotron facility for proton therapy is constructing at National Cancer Center, this facility until 2006. The distal fall-off location of proton beam is simply calculated by analytical method, but this method has many uncertain when anatomical structure is very complicated. It is very important to know the exact position of the proton beam distal fall-off, or beam range, in the patient's body for both the safety of the patient and the effectiveness of the treatment itself. In 2003, Stichelbaut and Jongen reported the possibility of using the right-angled prompt gamma rays, which are emitted at 90 .deg. from the incident proton beam direction, to determine the position of the proton beam distal fall-off. They studied the interactions of the protons and other secondary particles in a water phantom and concluded that there is a correlation between the position of the distal fall-off and the distribution of the right-angled prompt gamma rays. We have recently designed a prompt gamma scanning system to measure the proton range in situ by using Monte Carlo technique employing MCNPX, FLUKA, and Sabrina TM . The prompt gamma scanning system was designed to measure only the right-angled prompt gamma rays passing through a narrow collimation hole in order to correlate the position with the dose distribution. The collimation part of the scanning system, which has been constructed to measure the gamma rays at 70 MeV of proton energy, is made of a set of paraffin, boron carbide, and lead layers to shield the high-energy neutrons and secondary photons. After the different proton energies and SOBP beam widths are irradiated at the water phantom. we detected prompt gamma at 5 cm

  14. RSAC, Gamma Doses, Inhalation and Ingestion Doses, Fission Products Inventory after Fission Products Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: RSAC generates a fission product inventory from a given set of reactor operating conditions and then computes the external gamma dose, the deposition gamma dose, and the inhalation-ingestion dose to critical body organs as a result of exposure to these fission products. Program output includes reactor operating history, fission product inventory, dosages, and ingestion parameters. 2 - Method of solution: The fission product inventory generated by the reactor operating conditions and the inventory remaining at various times after release are computed using the equations of W. Rubinson in Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 17, pages 542-547, June 1949. The external gamma dose and the deposition gamma dose are calculated by determining disintegration rates as a function of space and time, then integrating using Hermite's numerical techniques for the spatial dependence. The inhalation-ingestion dose is determined by the type and quantity of activity inhaled and the biological rate of decay following inhalation. These quantities are integrated with respect to time to obtain the dosage. The ingestion dose is related to the inhalation dose by an input constant

  15. Dose Rate of Environmental Gamma Radiation in Java Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatot Suhariyono; Buchori; Dadong Iskandar

    2007-01-01

    The dose rate Monitoring of environmental gamma radiation at some locations in Java Island in the year 2005 / 2006 has been carried out. The dose rate measurement of gamma radiation is carried out by using the peripheral of Portable Gamma of Ray Spectrometer with detector of NaI(Tl), Merck Exploranium, Model GR-130- MINISPEC, while to determine its geographic position is used by the GPS (Global Positioning System), made in German corporation of GPS III Plus type. The division of measurement region was conducted by dividing Java Island become 66 parts with same distance, except in Jepara area that will built PLTN (Nuclear Energy Power), distance between measurement points is more closed. The results of dose rate measurement are in 66 locations in Java Island the range of (19.24 ± 4.05) nSv/hour until (150.78 ± 12.26) nSv/hour with mean (51.93 ± 36.53) nSv/h. The lowest dose rate was in location of Garut, while highest dose rate was in Ujung Lemah Abang, Jepara location. The data can be used for base line data of dose rate of environmental gamma radiation in Indonesia, specially in Java Island. The mean level of gamma radiation in Java monitoring area (0.46 mSv / year) was still lower than worldwide average effective dose rate of terrestrial gamma rays 0.5 mSv / year (report of UNSCEAR, 2000). (author)

  16. Simple approximation for estimating centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overcamp, T.J.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A simple approximation for estimating the centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume was developed. To simplify the integration of the dose integral, this approach makes use of the Gaussian cloud concentration distribution. The solution is expressed in terms of the I1 and I2 integrals which were developed for estimating long-term dose due to a sector-averaged Gaussian plume. Estimates of tissue absorbed dose rates for the new approach and for the uniform cloud model were compared to numerical integration of the dose integral over a Gaussian plume distribution

  17. Measurement of neutron and gamma absorbed doses in phantoms exposed to mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.; Lemaire, G.; Maas, J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the dosimetric characteristics of PIN junctions, the absorbed doses measured by junctions and FLi7 in air and water phantoms were compared with the doses measured by classical neutron dosimetry in mixed fields. The validity of the experimental responses of PIN junctions being thus checked and established, neutron and gamma dose distributions in tissue equivalent plastic phantoms (plastinaut) and mammals (piglets) were evaluated as well as the absorbed dose distributions in the pig bone-marrow producing areas. By using correlatively a Monte-Carlo calculation method and applying some simplifying assumptions, the absorbed doses were derived from the spectrum of SILENE's neutrons at various depths inside a cubic water phantom and the results were compared with some from the literature [fr

  18. beta. and. gamma. -comparative dose estimates on Enewetak Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crase, K.W.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Robison, W.L. (California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore National Lab.)

    1982-05-01

    Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific is used for atmospheric testing of U.S. nuclear weapons. Beta dose and ..gamma..-ray exposure measurements were made on two islands of the Enewetak Atoll during July-August 1976 to determine the ..beta.. and low energy ..gamma..-contribution to the total external radiation doses to the returning Marshallese. Measurements were made at numerous locations with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), pressurized ionization chambers, portable NaI detectors, and thin-window pancake GM probes. Results of the TLD measurements with and without a ..beta..-attenuator indicate that approx. 29% of the total dose rate at 1 m in air is due to ..beta..- or low energy ..gamma..-contribution. The contribution at any particular site, however, is reduced by vegetation. Integral 30-yr external shallow dose estimates for future inhabitants were made and compared with external dose estimates of a previous large scale radiological survey. Integral 30-yr shallow external dose estimates are 25-50% higher than whole body estimates. Due to the low penetrating ability of the ..beta..'s or low energy ..gamma..'s, however, several remedial actions can be taken to reduce the shallow dose contribution to the total external dose.

  19. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlerman, D A.E. [Institute of Process Engineering, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  20. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlerman, D.A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  1. Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

  2. Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O. [Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Medical Radiation Research Center, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, B1002 WIMR, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2275 (United States); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

  3. Gamma dosimetry of high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, T.; Galvan G, A.; Canizal, G.

    1991-01-01

    The gamma dosimetry of high doses is problematic in almost all the classic dosemeters either based on the thermoluminescence, electric, chemical properties, etc., because they are saturated to very high dose and they are no longer useful. This work carries out an investigation in the interval of high doses. The solid system of heptahydrate ferrous sulfate, can be used as solid dosemeter of routine for high doses of radiation. The proposed method is simple, cheap and it doesn't require sophisticated spectrophotometers or spectrometers but expensive and not common in some laboratories

  4. Dose conformity of gamma knife radiosurgery and risk factors for complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Jean L.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Smith, Vernon; Petti, Paula L.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Larson, David A.; Wara, William M.; McDermott, Michael W.; Sneed, Penny K.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate dose conformity achieved using Gamma Knife radiosurgery, compare results with those reported in the literature, and evaluate risk factors for complications. Methods and Materials: All lesions treated at our institution with Gamma Knife radiosurgery from May 1993 (when volume criteria were routinely recorded) through December 1998 were reviewed. Lesions were excluded from analysis for reasons listed below. Conformity index (the ratio of prescription volume to target volume) was calculated for all evaluable lesions and for lesions comparable to those reported in the literature on conformity of linac radiosurgery. Univariate Cox regression models were used to test for associations between treatment parameters and toxicity. Results: Of 1612 targets treated in 874 patients, 274 were excluded, most commonly for unavailability of individual prescription volume data because two or more lesions were included within the same dose matrix (176 lesions), intentional partial coverage for staged treatment of large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) (33 lesions), and missing target volume data (26 lesions). The median conformity indices were 1.67 for all 1338 evaluable lesions and 1.40-1.43 for lesions comparable to two linac radiosurgery series that reported conformity indices of 1.8 and 2.7, respectively. Among all 651 patients evaluable for complications, there were one Grade 5, eight Grade 4, and 27 Grade 3 complications. Increased risk of toxicity was associated with larger target volume, maximum lesion diameter, prescription volume, or volume of nontarget tissue within the prescription volume. Conclusions: Gamma Knife radiosurgery achieves much more conformal dose distributions than those reported for conventional linac radiosurgery and somewhat more conformal dose distributions than sophisticated linac radiosurgery techniques. Larger target, nontarget, or prescription volumes are associated with increased risk of toxicity

  5. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandar, Dadong; Syarbaini, Sutarman; Bunawas, Kusdiana

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Indonesia is the largest archipelago in the world, comprising five main islands - Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua - as well as 30 archipelagoes totaling 17,508 islands with about 6000 of those inhabited. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is a research project conducted by National Nuclear Energy Agency since 2005 aiming to produce a baseline data map as an overview for planning purposes. In these three years 4 main islands has been measured. The grid system has been used in the research. In Sumatra Island the grid is 50 x 50 km 2 , while in Java 40 x 40 km 2 , in Kalimantan 60 x 60 km 2 , and in Sulawesi 40 x 40 km 2 . The gamma dose rates have been measured by Mini Gamma Ray Spectrometer Model GR-130 made by Exploranium-Canada. Figure 1 shows the map of outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia. Range of dose rate are in Sumatra from 22,96 ± 0,46 n Sv/h to 186,08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h, in Java 11,32 ± 0,72 n Sv/h to 127,54 ± 6,14 n Sv/h, in Kalimantan 10.72 ± 8.32 n Sv/h to 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h, and in Sulawesi 17.7 ± 11,5 n Sv/h to 467 ± 102 n Sv/h. The arithmetic and geometric mean of dose rate in Indonesia are 68 n Sv/h and 53 n Sv/h, respectively. In general, outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is in a normal range. There are some regions have anomaly of gamma dose rate, for examples at North Sumatra 186.08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h (N 2.12727, E 99.80909), at West Kalimantan 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h (S 1.39507, E 110.57584), at West Sulawesi 487 ± 103 n Sv/h (S 2.95781, E 118.86995), etc. These data is very useful as a radiation baseline in Indonesia. (author)

  6. Inactive Doses and Protein Concentration of Gamma Irradiated Yersinia Enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irawan Sugoro; Sandra Hermanto

    2009-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is one of bacteria which cause coliform mastitis in dairy cows. The bacteria could be inactivated by gamma irradiation as inactivated vaccine candidate. The experiment has been conducted to determine the inactive doses and the protein concentration of Yersinia enterocolitica Y3 which has been irradiated by gamma rays. The cells cultures were irradiated by gamma rays with doses of 0, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1.000 and 1.500 Gy (doses rate was 1089,59 Gy/hours). The inactive dose was determined by the drop test method and the protein concentration of cells were determined by Lowry method. The results showed that the inactive doses occurred on 800 – 1500 Gy. The different irradiation doses of cell cultures showed the effect of gamma irradiation on the protein concentration that was random and has a significant effect on the protein concentration. (author)

  7. Population doses from terrestrial gamma exposure in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhu, C.

    1992-01-01

    In order to estimate terrestrial gamma radiation exposure three nationwide surveys have been completed since 1981. The population-weighted outdoor and indoor arithmetic means of gamma dose rate based on momentary dose rate measurements using a NaI(Tl) environmental radiation meter and high-pressure ionisation chamber are, respectively, 80.3 nGy.h -1 and 120 nGy.h -1 . Based on integrating dose measurement using TLD CaSO 4 /Dy they are 67 nGy.h -1 and 89 nGy.h -1 respectively, and based on natural radionuclides concentrations in soil, determined by gamma spectroscopy analyses, they are 72.8 nGy.h -1 and 102 nGy.h -1 , respectively. These surveys were conducted independently by different groups. The best estimations of population-weighted gamma dose rates in China, based on all these surveys, would be 70 nGy.h -1 and 98 nGy.h -1 for outdoors and indoors, respectively. The annual average of effective dose equivalent is 0.56 mSv. These values are higher than the world averages estimated by UNSCEAR. The main reason is that the concentrations of 232 Th and 40 K in the soil of China are much higher than the world average estimated. (author)

  8. Calculation method for gamma dose rates from Gaussian puffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S; Deme, S; Lang, E

    1995-06-01

    The Lagrangian puff models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of releases to the atmosphere. Basic output from such models is concentration of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on the semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for puffs with large dispersion parameters, i.e. for receptors far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using volume integral requires large computer time usually exceeding what is available for real time calculations. The volume integral for gamma doses could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor because only a few of the relevant parameters are considered. A multi-parameter method for calculation of gamma doses is described here. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma dose rates as a function of E{sub {gamma}}, {sigma}{sub y}, the asymmetry factor - {sigma}{sub y}/{sigma}{sub z}, the height of puff center - H and the distance from puff center R{sub xy}. To accelerate the calculations the release energy, for each significant radionuclide in each energy group, has been calculated and tabulated. Based on the precalculated values and suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses needs only short computing time and it is almost independent of the number of radionuclides considered. (au) 2 tabs., 15 ills., 12 refs.

  9. Cellular Stress to Low Gamma-ray Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Letechipia de Leon, C.; Guzman Enriquez, L. J.; Garcia-Talavera, M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low gamma ray intensity upon Hsp 70 expression in human lymphocytes. the heat shock proteins (Hsp) family, are a group of proteins present in all living organism, therefore there are highly conserved and are related to adaptation and evolution. At cellular level these proteins acts as chaperones correcting denatured proteins. when a stress agent, such heavy metals, UV, heat, etc. is affecting a cell a response to this aggression is triggered through overexpression of Hsp. Several studies has been carried out in which the cellular effect are observed, mostly of these studies uses large doses, but very few studies are related with low doses. Blood of healthy volunteers was obtained and the lymphocytes were isolated by ficoll-histopaque gradient. Experimental lots were irradiated in a ''137Cs gamma-ray. Hsp70 expression was found since 0.5 cGy, indicating a threshold to very low doses of gamma rays. (Author) 27 refs

  10. Gamma dose rate estimation and operation management suggestions for decommissioning the reactor pressure vessel of HTR-PM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Fang; Hong Li; Jianzhu Cao; Wenqian Li; Feng Xie; Jiejuan Tong [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua, University, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-01

    China is now designing and constructing a high temperature gas cooled reactor-pebble bed module (HTR-PM). In order to investigate the future decommissioning approach and evaluate possible radiation dose, gamma dose rate near the reactor pressure vessel was calculated for different cooling durations using QAD-CGA program. The source term of this calculation was provided by KORIGEN program. Based on the calculated results, the spatial distribution and temporal changes of gamma dose rate near reactor pressure vessel was systematically analyzed. A suggestion on planning decommissioning operation of reactor pressure vessel of HTRPM was given based on calculated dose rate and the Chinese Standard GB18871-2002. (authors)

  11. beta- and gamma-Comparative dose estimates on Eniwetok Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crase, K.W.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Robison, W.L.

    1982-05-01

    Eniwetok Atoll is one of the Pacific atolls used for atmospheric testing of U.S. nuclear weapons. Beta dose and gamma-ray exposure measurements were made on two islands of the Eniwetok Atoll during July-August 1976 to determine the beta and low energy gamma-contribution to the total external radiation doses to the returning Marshallese. Measurements were made at numerous locations with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), pressurized ionization chambers, portable NaI detectors, and thin-window pancake GM probes. Results of the TLD measurements with and without a beta-attenuator indicate that approx. 29% of the total dose rate at 1 m in air is due to beta- or low energy gamma-contribution. The contribution at any particular site, however, is somewhat dependent on ground cover, since a minimal amount of vegetation will reduce it significantly from that over bare soil, but thick stands of vegetation have little effect on any further reductions. Integral 30-yr external shallow dose estimates for future inhabitants were made and compared with external dose estimates of a previous large scale radiological survey (En73). Integral 30-yr shallow external dose estimates are 25-50% higher than whole body estimates. Due to the low penetrating ability of the beta's or low energy gamma's, however, several remedial actions can be taken to reduce the shallow dose contribution to the total external dose.

  12. Influence of dose on particle size of colloidal silver nanoparticles synthesized by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghavi, Kazem, E-mail: Kazem.naghavi@gmail.co [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Physics Department, 43400 UPM SERDANG, Selangor (Malaysia); Saion, Elias [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Physics Department, 43400 UPM SERDANG, Selangor (Malaysia); Rezaee, Khadijeh [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Modern Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Physics Department, 43400 UPM SERDANG, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by {gamma}-irradiation-induced reduction method of an aqueous solution containing silver nitrate as a precursor in various concentrations between 7.40x10{sup -4} and 1.84x10{sup -3} M, polyvinyl pyrrolidone for capping colloidal nanoparticles, isopropanol as radical scavenger of hydroxyl radicals and deionised water as a solvent. The irradiations were carried out in a {sup 60}Co {gamma} source chamber at doses up to 70 kGy. The optical absorption spectra were measured using UV-vis spectrophotometer and used to study the particle distribution and electronic structure of silver nanoparticles. As the radiation dose increases from 10 to 70 kGy, the absorption intensity increases with increasing dose. The absorption peak {lambda}{sub max} blue shifted from 410 to 403 nm correspond to the increase of absorption conduction electron energy from 3.02 to 3.08 eV, indicating the particle size decreases with increasing dose. The particle size was determined by photon cross correlation spectroscopy and the results showed that the particle diameter decreases exponentially with the increase of dose. The transmission electron microscopy images were taken at doses of 20 and 60 kGy and the results confirmed that as the dose increases the diameter of colloidal silver nanoparticle decreases and the particle distribution increases.

  13. Measurement of high dose rates of 60Co by gamma activation of115In and 111Cd foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Kh; Qattan, M.; Taleb, A.

    2009-12-01

    The high gamma dose rate measurement technique using nuclear reaction (γ,(γ ' ') was introduced in this work. This technique is cheap, easy, reliable, and independent of chemical and physical factors, which affect other techniques. The response to the absorbed dose in this technique is linear and can be used for high dose. Cd and In foils were irradiated using 60 Co source and the resulted isomer activities were measured using gamma spectrometer. These foils were calibrated to be used as dosemeter and its results were compared with conventional one. The dose distribution in the irradiation field was determined using In foils. (authors)

  14. Population doses from terrestrial gamma exposure in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhu, C. (Ministry of Public Health, Beijing, BJ (China))

    1992-01-01

    In order to estimate terrestrial gamma radiation exposure three nationwide surveys have been completed since 1981. The population-weighted outdoor and indoor arithmetic means of gamma dose rate based on momentary dose rate measurements using a NaI(Tl) environmental radiation meter and high-pressure ionisation chamber are, respectively, 80.3 nGy.h[sup -1] and 120 nGy.h[sup -1]. Based on integrating dose measurement using TLD CaSO[sub 4]/Dy they are 67 nGy.h[sup -1] and 89 nGy.h[sup -1] respectively, and based on natural radionuclides concentrations in soil, determined by gamma spectroscopy analyses, they are 72.8 nGy.h[sup -1] and 102 nGy.h[sup -1], respectively. These surveys were conducted independently by different groups. The best estimations of population-weighted gamma dose rates in China, based on all these surveys, would be 70 nGy.h[sup -1] and 98 nGy.h[sup -1] for outdoors and indoors, respectively. The annual average of effective dose equivalent is 0.56 mSv. These values are higher than the world averages estimated by UNSCEAR. The main reason is that the concentrations of [sup 232]Th and [sup 40]K in the soil of China are much higher than the world average estimated. (author).

  15. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    CERN Document Server

    Jamal, M H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear.

  16. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, M. H.; Khamis, I.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear. (author)

  17. Population doses from terrestrial gamma exposure in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhu, C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to estimate terrestrial gamma radiation exposures, three nationwide surveys have been completed since 1981. The population weighted outdoor and indoor arithmetic means of gamma dose rates based on momentary measurements using a NaI(T1) environmental radiation meter and a high pressured ionization chamber are 80.3 and 120 nGy.h -1 . The means based on integrating measurements using TLD natural radionuclides concentrations in soil, determined by gamma spectrometry analyses, are 72.8 and 102 nGy.h -1 , respectively. These surveys were conducted independently and equally representative. The best estimation of site-averaged and population weighted gamma dose rates in China, based on all these surveys, would be 70 and 98 nGy.h -1 for indoor and outdoor, respectively. The annual average of effective dose equivalent is 0.56 mSv. These values are higher than the world averages estimated by UNSCEAR. The main reason is that the concentrations of 232 Th and 40 K in soil of China are much higher than the world average estimated. (author). 4 refs, 2 tabs

  18. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: you.song@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Tollefsen, Knut Erik [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • First study on early stress responses in salmon exposed to low-dose gamma radiation. • Dramatic dose-dependent transcriptional responses characterized. • Multiple modes of action proposed for gamma radiation. - Abstract: Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48 h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280 mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15 mGy radiation

  19. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A.I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. - Highlights: • Elemental composition and density of nails were determined. • MIRD-type mathematical human phantom with arms and hands was created. • Organ doses and doses to nails were calculated for external photon exposure in air. • Effective dose and nail doses values are close for rotational and soil surface exposures.

  20. Calculation method for gamma dose rates from Gaussian puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1995-06-01

    The Lagrangian puff models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of releases to the atmosphere. Basic output from such models is concentration of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on the semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for puffs with large dispersion parameters, i.e. for receptors far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using volume integral requires large computer time usually exceeding what is available for real time calculations. The volume integral for gamma doses could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor because only a few of the relevant parameters are considered. A multi-parameter method for calculation of gamma doses is described here. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma dose rates as a function of E γ , σ y , the asymmetry factor - σ y /σ z , the height of puff center - H and the distance from puff center R xy . To accelerate the calculations the release energy, for each significant radionuclide in each energy group, has been calculated and tabulated. Based on the precalculated values and suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses needs only short computing time and it is almost independent of the number of radionuclides considered. (au) 2 tabs., 15 ills., 12 refs

  1. A method to describe inelastic gamma field distribution in neutron gamma density logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Quanying; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Xinguang; Wu, He; Jia, Wenbao; Ti, Yongzhou; Qiu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2017-11-01

    Pulsed neutron gamma density logging (NGD) is of great significance for radioprotection and density measurement in LWD, however, the current methods have difficulty in quantitative calculation and single factor analysis for the inelastic gamma field distribution. In order to clarify the NGD mechanism, a new method is developed to describe the inelastic gamma field distribution. Based on the fast-neutron scattering and gamma attenuation, the inelastic gamma field distribution is characterized by the inelastic scattering cross section, fast-neutron scattering free path, formation density and other parameters. And the contribution of formation parameters on the field distribution is quantitatively analyzed. The results shows the contribution of density attenuation is opposite to that of inelastic scattering cross section and fast-neutron scattering free path. And as the detector-spacing increases, the density attenuation gradually plays a dominant role in the gamma field distribution, which means large detector-spacing is more favorable for the density measurement. Besides, the relationship of density sensitivity and detector spacing was studied according to this gamma field distribution, therefore, the spacing of near and far gamma ray detector is determined. The research provides theoretical guidance for the tool parameter design and density determination of pulsed neutron gamma density logging technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved estimates of external gamma dose rates in the environs of Hinkley Point Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, H.F.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1988-07-01

    The dominant source of external gamma dose rates at centres of population within a few kilometres of Hinkley Point Power Station is the routine discharge of 41-Ar from the 'A' station magnox reactors. Earlier estimates of the 41-Ar radiation dose rates were based upon measured discharge rates, combined with calculations using standard plume dispersion and cloud-gamma integration models. This report presents improved dose estimates derived from environmental gamma dose rate measurements made at distances up to about 1 km from the site, thus minimising the degree of extrapolation introduced in estimating dose rates at locations up to a few kilometres from the site. In addition, results from associated chemical tracer measurements and wind tunnel simulations covering distances up to about 4 km from the station are outlined. These provide information on the spatial distribution of the 41-Ar plume during the initial stages of its dispersion, including effects due to plume buoyancy and momentum and behaviour under light wind conditions. In addition to supporting the methodology used for the 41-Ar dose calculations, this information is also of generic interest in the treatment of a range of operational and accidental releases from nuclear power station sites and will assist in the development and validation of existing environmental models. (author)

  3. Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10 13 fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  4. Contributions to indoor gamma dose rate from building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xionghua; Li Guangming; Yang Xiangdong

    1990-01-01

    In the coures of construction of a building structured with bricks and concrets, the indoor gamma air absorbed dose rates were seperately measured from the floors, brick walls and prefabricated plates of concrets, etc.. It suggested that the indoor gamma dose rates from building materials are mainly attributed to the brick walls and the floors. A little contribution comes from other brilding materials. The dose rates can be calculated through a 4π-infinite thick model with a correction factor of 0.52

  5. Response of human lymphocytes to low gamma ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Carrillo, HR; Banuelos Valenzuela, R; Manzanares Acuna, E; Sanchez-Rodriguez, S.H

    2001-01-01

    Radiation and non-radiation workers lymphocytes were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90; from these, only Hsp70 protein was detected before and after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 70.5 mGy gamma-ray dose, radiation worker's lymphocytes expressed more Hsp70 protein, than non-radiation workers' lymphocytes, indicating a larger tolerance to gamma rays (gamma tolerance), due to an adaptation process developed by their labor condition (Au)

  6. Development of air equivalent gamma dose monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, Mary; Bhattacharya, Sadhana; Karpagam, R.; Prasad, D.N.; Jakati, R.K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes design and development of air equivalent gamma absorbed dose monitor. The monitor has gamma sensitivity of 84 pA/R/h for 60 Co source. The characterization of the monitor has been done to get energy dependence on gamma sensitivity and response to gamma radiation field from 1 R/hr to 5000 R/hr. The gamma sensitivity in the energy range of 0.06 to 1.25MeV relative to 137 Cs nuclide was within 2.5%. The linearity of the monitor response as a function of gamma field from 10 R/h to 3.8 kR/h was within 6%. The monitor has been designed for its application in harsh environment. It has been successfully qualified to meet environmental requirements of shock. (author)

  7. Thyroid doses from external gamma-exposure following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tretyakevich, Sergey; Kukhta, Tatyana; Minenko, Victor; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Gavrilin, Yury; Khrouch, Valeri; Shinkarev, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Full text: An increase of thyroid cancer incidence among children in Belarus has been observed after the Chernobyl accident. The main contributor to the thyroid dose was caused by 131 I intake with fresh milk in 1986. Other contributions to the thyroid dose (external gamma-exposure, short-lived iodine isotopes, internal radiocesium) were small in comparison to the dose from 131 I intakes soon after the accident. However, exposures to external radiation continued for a number of years after the accident. Thyroid doses from external gamma-exposure following the Chernobyl accident were mainly caused by gamma-exposure to 24 nuclides: 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 99 Mo, 99 mTc, 103 Ru, 103m Rh, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 125m Te, 131m Te, 131 I, 132 Te, 132 I, 133 I, 135 I, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 140 La, 141 Ce, 144 Ce, 144 Pr, 239 Np. Data of personal interview were used to take into account the personal residence history for the time elapsed from the Chernobyl accident until the interview (10 to 15 years later). Cumulative thyroid doses caused by external gamma-exposure during the passage of the radioactive cloud and from the ground contamination following the Chernobyl accident have been reconstructed. The median thyroid dose from external gamma-exposure to ∼11,770 cohort members of an epidemiological study was estimated to be ∼6 mGy. There are ∼3,400 persons with external dose estimates that exceed 20 mGy. Exposure from radionuclides deposited on the ground was the main source of external dose. The contribution from the passing radioactive cloud to external dose was found to be negligible. (author)

  8. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusumano, Davide, E-mail: davide.cusumano@unimi.it [School of Medical Physics, University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Fumagalli, Maria L. [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura [Department of Neurosurgery, Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); De Martin, Elena [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  9. Calculation method for gamma-dose rates from spherical puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1993-05-01

    The Lagrangian puff-models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of atmospheric releases. Basic output from such models are concentrations of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for points far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using the volume integral requires significant computer time. The volume integral for the gamma dose could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor due to the fact that the same correction factors are used for all isotopes. The authors describe a more elaborate correction method. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma-dose rate as a function of the puff dispersion parameter (δ p ) and the distance from the puff centre for four energy groups. The release of energy for each radionuclide in each energy group has been calculated and tabulated. Based on these tables and a suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses takes very short time and is almost independent of the number of radionuclides. (au) (7 tabs., 7 ills., 12 refs.)

  10. Characterization by Monte Carlo of the dose after a glass shield lead for gamma ray; Caracterizacion por Monte Carlo de la dosis tras un blindaje de vidrio de plomo para rayos gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve Sanchez, S.; Gil Conde, M.; Contreras Gonzalez, J. L.; Rosado, J.; Pazyi, V.

    2013-07-01

    When a gamma-ray beam crosses the border between two media characterized by atomic number very different is they produce effects on the distribution of doses near the border difficult to predict with simple models. The case of rays gamma affecting a lead glass is particularly interesting for its application to shielding of common use. interested in studying the importance of the residual dose after the shield. (Author)

  11. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Hamzah, Khaidzir bin; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h −1 to 1237 nGy h −1 with a mean value of 151 nGy h −1 . The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D G,S ) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D G ) or soil type (D s ). A very good correlation was found between D G,S and D G or D G,S and D s . A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information. - Highlights: • A very good correlation coefficient was found between D G,S and D G or D G,S and D s . • The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation (GDR) is 0.594. • The contribution of the GDR from soil type was found to be 0.399. • A 83% of examined data were accepted the null hypotheses. • The model

  13. SU-E-T-647: Quality Assurance of VMAT by Gamma Analysis Dependence On Low-Dose Threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J; Kim, M; Lee, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Park, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The AAPM TG-119 instructed institutions to use low-dose threshold (LDT) of 10% or a ROI determined by the jaw when they collected gamma analysis QA data of planar dose distribution. Also, based on a survey by Nelms and Simon, more than 70% of institutions use a LDT between 0% and 10% for gamma analysis. However, there are no clinical data to quantitatively demonstrate the impact of the LDT on the gamma index. Therefore, we performed a gamma analysis with LDTs of 0% to 15% according to both global and local normalization and different acceptance criteria: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm. Methods: A total of 30 treatment plans—10 head and neck, 10 brain, and 10 prostate cancer cases—were randomly selected from the Varian Eclipse TPS, retrospectively. For the gamma analysis, a predicted portal image was acquired through a portal dose calculation algorithm in the Eclipse TPS, and a measured portal image was obtained using a Varian Clinac iX and an EPID. Then, the gamma analysis was performed using the Portal Dosimetry software. Results: For the global normalization, the gamma passing rate (%GP) decreased as the LDT increased, and all cases of low-dose thresholds exhibited a %GP above 95% for both the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. However, for local normalization, the %GP increased as LDT increased. The gamma passing rate with LDT of 10% increased by 6.86%, 9.22% and 6.14% compared with the 0% in the case of the head and neck, brain and prostate for 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusion: Applying the LDT in the global normalization does not have critical impact to judge patient-specific QA results. However, LDT for the local normalization should be carefully selected because applying the LDT could affect the average of the %GP to increase rapidly

  14. SU-E-T-647: Quality Assurance of VMAT by Gamma Analysis Dependence On Low-Dose Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J; Kim, M; Lee, S; Lee, M; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Reasearch Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, S [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Reasearch Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Uijeongbu St. Mary’s Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AAPM TG-119 instructed institutions to use low-dose threshold (LDT) of 10% or a ROI determined by the jaw when they collected gamma analysis QA data of planar dose distribution. Also, based on a survey by Nelms and Simon, more than 70% of institutions use a LDT between 0% and 10% for gamma analysis. However, there are no clinical data to quantitatively demonstrate the impact of the LDT on the gamma index. Therefore, we performed a gamma analysis with LDTs of 0% to 15% according to both global and local normalization and different acceptance criteria: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm. Methods: A total of 30 treatment plans—10 head and neck, 10 brain, and 10 prostate cancer cases—were randomly selected from the Varian Eclipse TPS, retrospectively. For the gamma analysis, a predicted portal image was acquired through a portal dose calculation algorithm in the Eclipse TPS, and a measured portal image was obtained using a Varian Clinac iX and an EPID. Then, the gamma analysis was performed using the Portal Dosimetry software. Results: For the global normalization, the gamma passing rate (%GP) decreased as the LDT increased, and all cases of low-dose thresholds exhibited a %GP above 95% for both the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. However, for local normalization, the %GP increased as LDT increased. The gamma passing rate with LDT of 10% increased by 6.86%, 9.22% and 6.14% compared with the 0% in the case of the head and neck, brain and prostate for 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusion: Applying the LDT in the global normalization does not have critical impact to judge patient-specific QA results. However, LDT for the local normalization should be carefully selected because applying the LDT could affect the average of the %GP to increase rapidly.

  15. Gamma dose rate changes in buildings in the region of Southeastern Iran using thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jomehzadeh Mahani, A.; Bahreyni Toosi, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: It is important to measure background radiation, because human beings are always exposed to environmental radiation. The terrestrial component of the natural background depends on the compositions of soils and rocks in which are contained. A significant contribution to total dose from natural sources comes from terrestrial radionuclides such as U- 238, Th- 232 and K- 40. The level of gamma dose rate in buildings depends on the climate / weather, ventilation of living environment, local geology, drainage patterns and other factors. The objective of this study was to establishing the distribution of environmental gamma dose rates in the type of building sampled included cement-sand and soil brick buildings. Materials and Methods: Equipments used in this study include: 1-TLD-100 H (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) dosimeters. 2- TLD-Reader 3500 made by Harshaw, USA. In order to determine indoor gamma dose rate, the dosimeters were calibrated at room temperature with Co-60 source. Before using the dosimeters to measure environmental dose they were subjected to the thermal treatment in a normal oven. Two TLDs, were embedded in a 5 mm PMMA mini-phantom to register only gamma ray. 20 buildings for this study chosen randomly throughout Kerman town, southeastern Iran. Inside each building a holder was hung at a height of above 3 m. The period of monitoring of TLDs was 15 days. The TLDs were retrieved from the buildings and taken to the Mashhad university of medical sciences where they were read with a Harshaw TLD reader model 3500. Results: Our results indicate that indoor gamma dose rate ranged from 106 n Sv/h to 133 n Sv/h for cement-sand buildings with an average of 114.72 n Sv/h. For soil buildings the indoor gamma dose rate varied from 86 n Sv/h to 116 n Sv/h with an average of 100.50 n Sv/h. While the average gamma dose rate in cement-sand buildings is highest (114.72 n Sv/h), that of soil buildings is lowest (100.50 n Sv/h). Discussion: Average values vary from building

  16. Simulated and measured neutron/gamma light output distribution for poly-energetic neutron/gamma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. A.; Zangian, M.; Aghabozorgi, S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present paper, the light output distribution due to poly-energetic neutron/gamma (neutron or gamma) source was calculated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT-PE (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology-Poly Energetic version) computational code. The simulation of light output distribution includes the modeling of the particle transport, the calculation of scintillation photons induced by charged particles, simulation of the scintillation photon transport and considering the light resolution obtained from the experiment. The developed computational code is able to simulate the light output distribution due to any neutron/gamma source. In the experimental step of the present study, the neutron-gamma discrimination based on the light output distribution was performed using the zero crossing method. As a case study, 241Am-9Be source was considered and the simulated and measured neutron/gamma light output distributions were compared. There is an acceptable agreement between the discriminated neutron/gamma light output distributions obtained from the simulation and experiment.

  17. Dose-response of photographic emulsions under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dai Nghiep; Do Thi Nguyet Minh; Le Van Vinh

    2003-01-01

    Photographic emulsion is irradiated under gamma rays irradiation of 137 Cs in the IAEA/WHO secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. Dose-response of the film is established. The sensitivity of the film is determined. The dose-rate effect is studied. (author)

  18. Measurement of gamma radiation doses at the RA reactor by thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and gamma radiation doses measured at the exit from the horizontal experimental channel HK-5, vertical experimental channel VK-5 and in the thermal column of the RA reactor in Vinca. Measurement of gamma radiation dose in the mixed intense gamma and neutron radiation field was done by two types of thermoluminescent dosemeters, LiF (TLD-700) and CaF 2 (TLD-08). Gamma dose in the VK-5 was measured in the air and on the bottle filled with tissue-equivalent solution. Increase of the dose on the surface of the bottle was 2.3 compared to the gamma dose value in the air. Correction for the influence of neutrons having different energies was done by using the known sensitivity values of both TL dosemeter types for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons. Results showed that the TLD-700 dosemeter contains 5 time more Li-6 isotopes (0.035%) than the declared value causing increased neutron sensitivity of this dosemeter. This paper includes numerical sensitivity data for neutrons of different energies for both types of TL dosemeters. Neutron sensitivity values for TLD-700 are related to LiF with 0.035% of Li-6 isotope. Result of measurement have also shown that the CaF 2 :Mn (TLD-08) thermoluminescent dosemeter is more suitable for gamma radiation dose measurements in mixed n-gamma fields with intensive neutron fluxes due to lower neutron sensitivity compared to TLD-700 [sr

  19. Gamma ray doses proceeding from natural occurring radionuclides in closed environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Vitor Angelo P. de; Medina, Nilberto H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. Guazzelli da; Moreira, Ramon H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the application of gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from terrestrial natural elements present in building materials such as sand, cement, lime (CaO) and milled granitic stones. The major contribution to annual gamma-ray radiation effective dose is due to the natural occurring radionuclides 40 K, 232 Th and 238 U. Two spectrometry systems were employed to measure the gamma radiation: one with a 60% efficient GeHP detector and the second one with a 2''x2'' NaI(Tl) scintillator. The estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms assumed is 0.63 mSv/yr, proceeding from terrestrial natural elements. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks. (author)

  20. High gamma dose response of the electrical properties of polyethylene terephthalate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrical properties of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with gamma rays, have been investigated. The PET films were irradiated with high gamma dose levels in the range from 100 to 2000 kGy. The changes in the DC (σ DC ) and the ac (σ ac ) conductivities, with the dose, have been performed. The effect of gamma irradiation on the dielectric constant (ε') and loss (ε'') has been determined. Also, the dose dependence of the frequency exponent index (S), the resonance frequency (Fc) and the hopping frequency (ω P ) have been obtained. The obtained results show that increasing gamma dose leads to slight increase in σ DC , σ ac and ε', while no change was observed in ε'' value. Meanwhile, S, Fc and ω P are inversely proportional to the dose. Accordingly, the study suggests the possibility of using PET films in electronic components (capacitors, resistors, etc.), especially that operate at high gamma dose environments for the frequency independent applications

  1. Car-borne survey of natural background gamma dose rate in Canakkale region (Turkey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turhan, S.; Arikan, I. H.; Oquz, F.; Aezdemir, T.; Yuecel, B.; Varinlioqlu, A.; Koese, A.

    2012-01-01

    Natural background gamma radiation was measured along roads in the environs of Canakkale region by using a car-borne spectrometer system with a plastic gamma radiation detector. In addition, activity concentrations of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in soil samples from the Canakkale region were determined by using a gamma spectrometer with an HPGe detector. A total of 92 856 data of the background gamma dose rate were collected for the Canakkale region. The background gamma dose rate of the Canakkale region was mapped using ArcGIS software, applying the geostatistical inverse distance-weighted method. The average and population-weighted average of the gamma dose are 55.4 and 40.6 nGy h -1 , respectively. The corresponding average annual effective dose to the public ranged from 26.6 to 96.8 μSv. (authors)

  2. Gamma dose rate changes in buildings in the region of Southeastern Iran using thermoluminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jomehzadeh Mahani, A. [Hormozgan un Univ. of medical sciences, Paramedical School, Bandarabbas (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahreyni Toosi, M.T. [Mashhad Univ. of medical sciences, Medical school (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    oduction: It is important to measure background radiation, because human beings are always exposed to environmental radiation. The terrestrial component of the natural background depends on the compositions of soils and rocks in which are contained. A significant contribution to total dose from natural sources comes from terrestrial radionuclides such as U- 238, Th- 232 and K- 40. The level of gamma dose rate in buildings depends on the climate / weather, ventilation of living environment, local geology, drainage patterns and other factors. The objective of this study was to establishing the distribution of environmental gamma dose rates in the type of building sampled included cement-sand and soil brick buildings. Materials and Methods: Equipments used in this study include: 1-TLD-100 H (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) dosimeters. 2- TLD-Reader 3500 made by Harshaw, USA. In order to determine indoor gamma dose rate, the dosimeters were calibrated at room temperature with Co-60 source. Before using the dosimeters to measure environmental dose they were subjected to the thermal treatment in a normal oven. Two TLDs, were embedded in a 5 mm PMMA mini-phantom to register only gamma ray. 20 buildings for this study chosen randomly throughout Kerman town, southeastern Iran. Inside each building a holder was hung at a height of above 3 m. The period of monitoring of TLDs was 15 days. The TLDs were retrieved from the buildings and taken to the Mashhad university of medical sciences where they were read with a Harshaw TLD reader model 3500. Results: Our results indicate that indoor gamma dose rate ranged from 106 n Sv/h to 133 n Sv/h for cement-sand buildings with an average of 114.72 n Sv/h. For soil buildings the indoor gamma dose rate varied from 86 n Sv/h to 116 n Sv/h with an average of 100.50 n Sv/h. While the average gamma drate in cement-sand buildings is highest (114.72 n Sv/h), that of soil buildings is lowest (100.50 n Sv/h). Discussion: Average values vary from building to

  3. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated 252 Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D 2 O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%

  4. Determination the lethal dose of ascaris lumbricoides ova by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2002-11-01

    The lethal gamma irradiation dose of ascaris lumbricoides which collected from Damascus Sewage water Plant was determined. Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated with several gamma irradiation doses with (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4,...and 1.5 KGy). No morphological changes were observed on the eggs when directly examined microscopically after irradiation. However after two weeks of incubation at 37 degree centigrade the cell contents of the eggs which irradiated with 0.5 KGy and beyond were fragmented and scattered in the whole eggs and no larvae were observed after eight weeks of incubation. It is concluded that the dose 0.5 my be considered as the dose of choice if sewage water is to be treated by gamma rays. (author)

  5. Determination the lethal dose of ascaris lumbricoides ova by gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shamma, M A; Sharabi, N

    2002-01-01

    The lethal gamma irradiation dose of ascaris lumbricoides which collected from Damascus Sewage water Plant was determined. Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated with several gamma irradiation doses with (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4,...and 1.5 KGy). No morphological changes were observed on the eggs when directly examined microscopically after irradiation. However after two weeks of incubation at 37 degree centigrade the cell contents of the eggs which irradiated with 0.5 KGy and beyond were fragmented and scattered in the whole eggs and no larvae were observed after eight weeks of incubation. It is concluded that the dose 0.5 my be considered as the dose of choice if sewage water is to be treated by gamma rays.

  6. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations for feasibility study of DISCOMS instrumentation in case of severe accident in a GEN 3 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Duhamel, Isabelle; Dechenaux, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    The present paper presents the study carried out in the frame of the DISCOMS project, which stands for "DIstributed Sensing for COrium Monitoring and Safety". This study concerns the calculation of the neutron and gamma radiations received by the considered instrumentation during the normal reactor operation as well as in case of a severe accident for the EPR reactor, outside the reactor pressure vessel and in the containment basemat. This paper summarizes the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation outside the vessel during normal reactor operation. The results of the simulations are then presented including the responses for distributed Optical Fiber Sensors (OFS), such as the gamma dose and the fast neutron fluence, and for Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs), namely the neutron and gamma spectra. Same responses are also evaluated for severe accident situations in order to design the SPNDs being sensitive to the both types of received neutron-gamma radiation. By contrast, fibers, involved as transducers in distributed OFS have to resist to the total radiation gamma dose and neutron fluence received during normal operation and the severe accident.

  7. Dose Rate Determination from Airborne Gamma-ray Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The standard method for determination of ground level dose rates from airborne gamma-ray is the integral count rate which for a constant flying altitude is assumed proportional to the dose rate. The method gives reasonably results for natural radioactivity which almost always has the same energy...

  8. Inherent calibration of microdosemeters for dose distributions in lineal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossman, J.S.P.; Watt, D.E. [Saint Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1994-12-31

    A method, utilising the inherent electron event spectra, is described for the absolute calibration of microdosemeters in the presence of a photon field. The method, which avoids the problems and uncertainties present in conventional calibration techniques, involves simple extrapolation of the dose distribution in lineal energy associated with `exact stopper` electrons. Validation of the method is made using the published experimental distributions of Rossi, of Kliauga, and of Dvorak and by direct theoretical calculation of the components of the microdose distributions for gamma rays. Further experimental data from a cylindrical TEPC in a photon field generated by an external source of {sup 137}Cs are obtained for comparison. A `universal` calibration curve for the dose-weighted lineal energy as a function of the simulated mean diameter of the microdosemeter, is presented for use in practical applications. (author).

  9. Inherent calibration of microdosemeters for dose distributions in lineal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossman, J.S.P.; Watt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    A method, utilising the inherent electron event spectra, is described for the absolute calibration of microdosemeters in the presence of a photon field. The method, which avoids the problems and uncertainties present in conventional calibration techniques, involves simple extrapolation of the dose distribution in lineal energy associated with 'exact stopper' electrons. Validation of the method is made using the published experimental distributions of Rossi, of Kliauga, and of Dvorak and by direct theoretical calculation of the components of the microdose distributions for gamma rays. Further experimental data from a cylindrical TEPC in a photon field generated by an external source of 137 Cs are obtained for comparison. A 'universal' calibration curve for the dose-weighted lineal energy as a function of the simulated mean diameter of the microdosemeter, is presented for use in practical applications. (author)

  10. The effect of gamma dose on the PADC detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaky, M.F.; Youssef, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of irradiation by 6 0C O gamma rays in the range 0-60 K gray has been examined on CR-39 SSNTDs. The fission fragment tracks diameter were measured using an optical microscope, the bulk etching rate was calculated using the equation V B = D/2 t. The results indicate that, the track diameter is seen increase slowly in the range 0-60 K gray. The bulk etching rate increases almost linearly as the given gamma dose increases up to (22.5 K Gray), at higher doses the bulk etching rate increases exponentially. The exposure of the CR-39 to gamma rays could sensitize the CR-39 plastic and thus improve the Z/P threshold for track registration

  11. Efficient gamma index calculation using fast Euclidean distance transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Mingli; Lu Weiguo; Chen Quan; Ruchala, Kenneth; Olivera, Gustavo [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)], E-mail: wlu@tomotherapy.com

    2009-04-07

    The gamma index is a tool for dose distribution comparison. It combines both dose difference (DD) and distance to agreement (DTA) into a single quantity. Though it is an effective measure, making up for the inadequacy of DD or DTA alone, its calculation can be very time-consuming. For a k-D space with N quantization levels in each dimension, the complexity of the exhaustive search is O(N{sup 2k}). In this work, we proposed an efficient method that reduces the complexity from O(N{sup 2k}) to O(N{sup k}M), where M is the number of discretized dose values and is comparable to N. More precisely, by embedding the reference dose distribution in a (k+1)-D spatial-dose space, we can use fast Euclidean distance transform with linear complexity to obtain a table of gamma indices evaluated over a range of the (k+1)-D spatial-dose space. Then, to obtain gamma indices for the test dose distribution, it requires only table lookup with complexity O(N{sup k}). Such a table can also be used for other test dose distributions as long as the reference dose distribution is the same. Simulations demonstrated the efficiency of our proposed method. The speedup for 3D gamma index calculation is expected to be on the order of tens of thousands (from O(N{sup 6}) to O(N{sup 3}M)) if N is a few hundreds, which makes clinical usage of the 3D gamma index feasible. A byproduct of the gamma index table is that the gradient of the gamma index with respect to either the spatial or dose dimension can be easily derived. The gradient can be used to identify the main causes of the discrepancy from the reference distribution at any dose point in the test distribution or incorporated in treatment planning and machine parameter optimization.

  12. The effect of Low-dose Gamma Radiation on the Bio-chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-dose gamma radiation has been applied to intravenous fluids to enhance the sterility assurance levels. This study was undertaken to determine the stability of gamma irradiated 2.5 % dextrose, 2.5 % dextrose in saline, Ringers lactate and Gastrointestinal replacement fluid at doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 20 kGy.

  13. The dose dependency of the over-dispersion of quartz OSL single grain dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, Kristina J.; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    The use of single grain quartz OSL dating has become widespread over the past decade, particularly with application to samples likely to have been incompletely bleached before burial. By reducing the aliquot size to a single grain the probability of identifying the grain population most likely to have been well-bleached at deposition is maximised and thus the accuracy with which the equivalent dose can be determined is – at least in principle – improved. However, analysis of single grain dose distributions requires knowledge of the dispersion of the well-bleached part of the dose distribution. This can be estimated by measurement of a suitable analogue, e.g. a well-bleached aeolian sample, but this requires such an analogue to be available, and in addition the assumptions that the sample is in fact a) well-bleached, and b) has a similar dose rate heterogeneity to the fossil deposit. Finally, it is an implicit assumption in such analysis that any over-dispersion is not significantly dose dependent. In this study we have undertaken laboratory investigations of the dose dependency of over-dispersion using a well-bleached modern sample with an average measured dose of 36 ± 3 mGy. This sample was prepared as heated (750 °C for 1 h), bleached and untreated portions which were then given uniform gamma doses ranging from 100 mGy to 208 Gy. We show that for these samples the relative laboratory over-dispersion is not constant as a function of dose and that the over-dispersion is smaller in heated samples. We also show that the dim grains in the distributions have a greater over-dispersion than the bright grains, implying that insensitive samples will have greater values of over-dispersion than sensitive samples.

  14. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30 0 close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables

  15. Transport calculations of. gamma. -ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I [Cincinnati Univ., Ohio (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    ..gamma.. flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  16. Effect of low gamma ray doses on sugar beet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effect of presowing irradiation simulation on sugar beet seeds in two regions (Deir Elzour and Damascus) and for three successive cropping seasons (1986-1989). Those seeds were irradiated with gamma radiation doses varying from 0.005 to 0.050 kGy in the first region, and from 0.005 to 0.025 kGy in the second region. Results showed that doses varying from 0.005 to 0.05 kGy in Deir Elzour gave a mean yield increase varying from 17.4% to 22.6%. However, doses varying from 0.005 to 0.025 in Damascus gave an increase of the same parameter between 19.5% and 23.8%. The best results for pure sugar yield increase obtained for a dose of 0.015 kGy (27.1% in Deir Elzour and 31.9% in Damascus). Yields on the farm level obtained from presowing irradiated seeds showed an increase in sugar beets when using 0.015 kGy gamma radiation dose. (author)

  17. Determination of dose factors for external gamma radiation in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maduar, M.F.; Hiromoto, G.

    2000-01-01

    A significant contribution to the global population exposure to ionizing radiation arises from natural sources, especially from radionuclides present in terrestrial crust. Human activities can eventually increase that exposure to significant levels, from the point of view of radiological protection. The presence of natural radionuclides in building materials may lead to an increment of both external and internal radiation exposure of the population. External exposure in dwellings arises from gamma-emitter radionuclides existing in the walls, floor and ceiling of their rooms. Mathematical models can be used to predict external dose rates inside the room, known the radionuclide concentration activities in dwelling constituents. This paper presents a methodology for theoretical evaluation of external gamma doses due to radionuclides present in the walls of an hypothetical standard room. The room is modeled as three pairs of rectangular sheets with finite thickness. Assessment of doses was performed through the application of photon transport model, taking in account self-absorption and radiation buildup. As the external dose due to a particular radionuclide is proportional to its activity concentration, results are presented as dose factors, defined as a ratio of absorbed dose (nGy.h -1 ) to the activity concentration (Bq.kg -1 ), for each radionuclide. The radionuclides were assumed to be uniformly distributed in the building materials. Calculations were performed for concrete walls and results are presented for 40 K, 226 Ra, and 232 Th, taking in account, for dose calculations, all gamma emitters from 226 Ra and 232 Th decay chains. Sensitivity of the model was estimated by varying four of its input parameters within a reasonable range of applicability, while leaving all other parameters at fixed selected values. The parameters studied and respective ranges of variation were: for thickness, 5 to 60 cm; for density, 0.5 to 4 g.cm -3 ; for the room length, 1.5 to 10 m

  18. Investigation of PBAT dosimetric properties for high gamma dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Elisete L.; Schimitberger, Thiago

    2017-01-01

    Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) is an aliphatic-aromatic copolyester which is biodegradable. It is a non-photoluminescent copolyester that becomes photoluminescent after previous exposure to gamma doses higher than 100 kGy. After the previous high energy irradiation, the material shows the highest photo-stimulated luminescence emission when excited with a LED source at wavelengths ranging from 370 to 405 nm. In this work we investigated the enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) and dosimetric properties of PBAT, after exposure to high doses of gamma radiation ranging from 50 to 4,000 kGy. In this investigation we demonstrate that increasing the PBAT film thickness by 100 μm enhances the PL output by 3.5 times, when irradiated with 500 kGy. Also, besides the already known color green brightness, the PL intensity can also be used for high dose dosimetry purposes for doses ranging from 50 to 750 kGy. The FTIR analysis has demonstrated that the there is a linear relationship between peak intensity and dose for doses ranging from 100 and 2,000 kGy for the absorbance peaks at 3,241 cm -1 and 3271 cm -1 , with linear correlation coefficients of 0.9981 and 0.9992, respectively. The results indicate that PBAT has great potential for applications in bio-imaging devices and high gamma dose dosimetry. (author)

  19. Investigation of PBAT dosimetric properties for high gamma dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Elisete L.; Schimitberger, Thiago, E-mail: elisete.cunha@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Oliveira, Cristiana M.; Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) is an aliphatic-aromatic copolyester which is biodegradable. It is a non-photoluminescent copolyester that becomes photoluminescent after previous exposure to gamma doses higher than 100 kGy. After the previous high energy irradiation, the material shows the highest photo-stimulated luminescence emission when excited with a LED source at wavelengths ranging from 370 to 405 nm. In this work we investigated the enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) and dosimetric properties of PBAT, after exposure to high doses of gamma radiation ranging from 50 to 4,000 kGy. In this investigation we demonstrate that increasing the PBAT film thickness by 100 μm enhances the PL output by 3.5 times, when irradiated with 500 kGy. Also, besides the already known color green brightness, the PL intensity can also be used for high dose dosimetry purposes for doses ranging from 50 to 750 kGy. The FTIR analysis has demonstrated that the there is a linear relationship between peak intensity and dose for doses ranging from 100 and 2,000 kGy for the absorbance peaks at 3,241 cm{sup -1} and 3271 cm{sup -1}, with linear correlation coefficients of 0.9981 and 0.9992, respectively. The results indicate that PBAT has great potential for applications in bio-imaging devices and high gamma dose dosimetry. (author)

  20. Gamma Radiation Dose from Radionuclides in Soil Samples of Udagamandalam (Ooty) in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvasekarapandian, S.; Muguntha Manikandan, N.; Sivakumar, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Meenakshisundram, V.; Ragunath, V.M.; Gajendran, V.

    1999-01-01

    The systematic study of background radiation and the distribution of radionuclides in the environment of Udagamandalam in Nilgiri District of Tamil Nadu has been made. Gamma spectrometric analysis of the soil samples of this area has been carried out. The measured gamma dose in air is in the range 31.6 nGy.h -1 - 221.1 nGy.h -1 with a mean value 121.8 nGy.h -1 . The average activities of the 232 Th series, 238 U series and 40 K in soil samples are 114.6 ± 52.5 Bq.kg -1 , 43.2 ± 23.2 Bq.kg -1 and 274.6 ± 86.7 Bq.kg -1 respectively. (author)

  1. SU-F-J-133: Adaptive Radiation Therapy with a Four-Dimensional Dose Calculation Algorithm That Optimizes Dose Distribution Considering Breathing Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Algan, O; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To model patient motion and produce four-dimensional (4D) optimized dose distributions that consider motion-artifacts in the dose calculation during the treatment planning process. Methods: An algorithm for dose calculation is developed where patient motion is considered in dose calculation at the stage of the treatment planning. First, optimal dose distributions are calculated for the stationary target volume where the dose distributions are optimized considering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Second, a convolution-kernel is produced from the best-fitting curve which matches the motion trajectory of the patient. Third, the motion kernel is deconvolved with the initial dose distribution optimized for the stationary target to produce a dose distribution that is optimized in four-dimensions. This algorithm is tested with measured doses using a mobile phantom that moves with controlled motion patterns. Results: A motion-optimized dose distribution is obtained from the initial dose distribution of the stationary target by deconvolution with the motion-kernel of the mobile target. This motion-optimized dose distribution is equivalent to that optimized for the stationary target using IMRT. The motion-optimized and measured dose distributions are tested with the gamma index with a passing rate of >95% considering 3% dose-difference and 3mm distance-to-agreement. If the dose delivery per beam takes place over several respiratory cycles, then the spread-out of the dose distributions is only dependent on the motion amplitude and not affected by motion frequency and phase. This algorithm is limited to motion amplitudes that are smaller than the length of the target along the direction of motion. Conclusion: An algorithm is developed to optimize dose in 4D. Besides IMRT that provides optimal dose coverage for a stationary target, it extends dose optimization to 4D considering target motion. This algorithm provides alternative to motion management

  2. Gamma dose rate effect on JFET transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of Gamma dose rate on JFET transistors is presented. The irradiation was accomplished at the following available dose rates: 1, 2.38, 5, 10 , 17 and 19 kGy/h at a constant dose of 600 kGy. A non proportional relationship between the noise and dose rate in the medium range (between 2.38 and 5 kGy/h) was observed. While in the low and high ranges, the noise was proportional to the dose rate as the case of the dose effect. This may be explained as follows: the obtained result is considered as the yield of a competition between many reactions and events which are dependent on the dose rate. At a given values of that events parameters, a proportional or a non proportional dose rate effects are generated. No dependence effects between the dose rate and thermal annealing recovery after irradiation was observed . (author)

  3. COSANI-2, Gamma Doses from SABINE Calculation, Activity from ANISN Flux Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, C.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: Retrieval of SABINE and/or ANISN results. Calculates in case of SABINE results the individual contributions of capture gamma rays in each region to the total gamma dose and to the total gamma heating may calculate in case of ANISN new activity rates starting from ANISN flux saved on tape and activity cross sections taken on an ANISN binary library tape. The program can draw on a BENSON plotter any of the following quantities: - group flux; - activity rates; - dose rates; - neutron spectra for SABINE; - neutron or gamma direct or adjoint spectra for ANISN; - gamma heating and dose rate for SABINE including individual contributions from each region. Several ANISN and/or SABINE cases can be drawn on the same graph for comparison purposes. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum number of: - tapes containing ANISN and/or SABINE results: 5; - curves per graph: 3; - regions: 40; - points per curve: 500; - energy groups: 200

  4. Gamma-Ray Doses Affected on Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, E.M; Tarrad, M.M.; Abd El-Daem, G.A.N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted at the experimental from, Nuclear Research Center at Inshas. Atomic Energy Authority (AEA) at Egypt during 2011– 2012 growing seasons on alfalfa genotype. The aim of this investigation to evaluate the effect of different gamma ray doses (100-300 Gy) on the alfalfa yield and related traits. Seeds lots of alfalfa genotype were subjected to five gamma ray treatments (100,150,200,250 and 300 Gray). Over all cuts, the dose treatment 300 Gy increased the majority of studied traits i.e., plant height, No. of shoots/plant, fresh weight/plant, fresh yield/Fadden and dry weight yield/fed. The results observed indicated that. In addition, dose of 200 and 250 Gy increased No. of leaves /plant, No. of shoots/plant, stem diameter and fresh weight /plant. However, the plant dry weight was decreased by all doses used and over all cuts, but the dose of 100 and 150 Gy increased leaves /stem ratio. Meanwhile, the later cuts were more affected by irradiation treatments than the earlier ones. In general, the low doses had negative effects on yield traits, but, the relatively high doses exhibited an increase in yield traits

  5. A formalism for independent checking of Gamma Knife dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai Jensan; Engler, Mark J.; Rivard, Mark J.; Mahajan, Anita; Borden, Jonathan A.; Zheng Zhen

    2001-01-01

    For stereotactic radiosurgery using the Leksell Gamma Knife system, it is important to perform a pre-treatment verification of the maximum dose calculated with the Leksell GammaPlan[reg] (D LGP ) stereotactic radiosurgery system. This verification can be incorporated as part of a routine quality assurance (QA) procedure to minimize the chance of a hazardous overdose. To implement this procedure, a formalism has been developed to calculate the dose D CAL (X,Y,Z,d av ,t) using the following parameters: average target depth (d av ), coordinates (X,Y,Z) of the maximum dose location or any other dose point(s) to be verified, 3-dimensional (3-dim) beam profiles or off-center-ratios (OCR) of the four helmets, helmet size i, output factor O i , plug factor P i , each shot j coordinates (x,y,z) i,j , and shot treatment time (t i,j ). The average depth of the target d av was obtained either from MRI/CT images or ruler measurements of the Gamma Knife Bubble Head Frame. D CAL and D LGP were then compared to evaluate the accuracy of this independent calculation. The proposed calculation for an independent check of D LGP has been demonstrated to be accurate and reliable, and thus serves as a QA tool for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

  6. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  7. Specific gamma-ray dose constants for nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, L.M.; Trubey, D.K.

    1982-05-01

    Tables of specific gamma-ray dose constants (the unshielded gamma-ray dose equivalent rate at 1 m from a point source) have been computed for approximately 500 nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment. The half life, the mean attenuation coefficient, and thickness for a lead shield providing 95% dose equivalent attenuation are also listed

  8. Skin dose assessment in routine personnel beta/gamma dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, P.

    1980-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (Publication 26) has recommended a tissue depth of 5 to 10 mg.cm -2 for skin dose assessments. This requirement is generally not fulfilled by routine monitoring procedures because of practical difficulties in using very thin dosemeters with low sensitivity and therefore a high minimum detectable dose. Especially for low-energy beta-ray exposures underestimations of the skin dose by a factor of more than ten may occur. Low-transparent graphite-mixed sintered LiF and Li 2 B 4 0 7 : Mn dosemeters were produced which show a skin-equivalent response to beta and gamma exposures over a wide range of energies. These have found wide-spread application for extremity dosimetry but have not yet been generally introduced in routine personnel beta/gamma monitoring. The following adaptations of existing routine monitoring systems for improved skin dose assessments have been investigated: 1) Placement of a supplementary, thin, skin-dose equivalent dosemeter in the TLD badge to give additional information on low-energy exposures. 2) Introduction of a second photomultiplier in the read-out chamber which enables a simultaneous determination of emitted TL from both sides of the dosemeter separately. This method makes use of the selfshielding of the dosemeter to give information on the low-energy dose contribution. 3) By diffusion of Li 2 B 4 0 7 into solid LiF-dosemeters it was possible to produce a surface layer with a new distinct glow-peak at about 340 deg C which is not present in the undiffused part of the LiF chip, and which can be utilized for the assessment of the skin-dose. Data on energy response and accuracy of dose measurement for beta/gamma exposures are given for the three methods and advantages and disadvantages are discussed (H.K.)

  9. Linear optical absorption response of poly(vinylidene fluoride - trifluoroethylene) copolymers to high gamma dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Adriana S.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] is a semicrystalline linear homopolymer composed by the repetition of CH 2 - CF 2 monomers. The Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] is a copolymer which is obtained with the random introduction of fluorinated CHF-CF 2 monomers in the PVDF main chain. PVDF, and also its copolymers with TrFE contents ranging from 18 to 63 wt. %, have long been studied for their striking ferroelectric properties and their applications in actuators, transducers and ferroelectric memory. Recent research work around the world have demonstrated that, for TrFE contents ranging from with 30 to 50 wt. %, the copolymer can have its ferroelectric properties modified by high doses of ionizing radiation, with the appearing of radio-induced relaxor ferroelectric features. These studies have lead us to investigate the possible use of these copolymers as high dose dosemeters, once the reported amount of induced C=C conjugated bonds after X-ray, UV and gamma irradiation seems to be a function of the delivered radiation dose. In a first investigation for doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 kGy we found out a linear relation between the gamma radiation dose and the absorption peak intensities in the UV region of the spectrum, i.e., at 223 and 274 nm. The absorption peak at 223 nm is the most sensitive to gamma rays and can be used for detecting gamma doses ranging from 0.3 to 75 kGy. Simultaneously, the absorption peak at 274 nm can be used for doses ranging from 1 to 100 kGy. Now, in the present work, we extended the investigation to gamma doses up to 3 MGy. Particularly, this study is focused in the optical absorption peak at 274 nm, corresponding to the radio-induction of triplets of conjugated C=C double bonds. The investigation revealed a linear correlation between the gamma dose and peak intensity at 274 nm for gamma doses ranging from 0.1 to more than 750 KGy, with a huge extension of the original usable dose range. Calorimetric data revealed a

  10. Analysis of gamma irradiator dose rate using spent fuel elements with parallel configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto; Pudjijanto MS; Ardani

    2006-01-01

    To enhance the utilization of the RSG-GAS reactor spent fuel, the gamma irradiator using spent fuel elements as a gamma source is a suitable choice. This irradiator can be used for food sterilization and preservation. The first step before realization, it is necessary to determine the gamma dose rate theoretically. The assessment was realized for parallel configuration fuel elements with the irradiation space can be placed between fuel element series. This analysis of parallel model was choice to compare with the circle model and as long as possible to get more space for irradiation and to do manipulation of irradiation target. Dose rate calculation were done with MCNP, while the estimation of gamma activities of fuel element was realized by OREGEN code with 1 year of average delay time. The calculation result show that the gamma dose rate of parallel model decreased up to 50% relatively compared with the circle model, but the value still enough for sterilization and preservation. Especially for food preservation, this parallel model give more flexible, while the gamma dose rate can be adjusted to the irradiation needed. The conclusion of this assessment showed that the utilization of reactor spent fuels for gamma irradiator with parallel model give more advantage the circle model. (author)

  11. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J.; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  12. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Antony L; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J

    2013-01-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit. (paper)

  13. Measurement of two-dimensional thermal neutron flux in a water phantom and evaluation of dose distribution characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Torii, Yoshiya; Horiguchi, Yoji

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate nitrogen dose, boron dose and gamma-ray dose occurred by neutron capture reaction of the hydrogen at the medical irradiation, two-dimensional distribution of the thermal neutron flux is very important because these doses are proportional to the thermal neutron distribution. This report describes the measurement of the two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution in a head water phantom by neutron beams of the JRR-4 and evaluation of the dose distribution characteristic. Thermal neutron flux in the phantom was measured by gold wire placed in the spokewise of every 30 degrees in order to avoid the interaction. Distribution of the thermal neutron flux was also calculated using two-dimensional Lagrange's interpolation program (radius, angle direction) developed this time. As a result of the analysis, it was confirmed to become distorted distribution which has annular peak at outside of the void, though improved dose profile of the deep direction was confirmed in the case which the radiation field in the phantom contains void. (author)

  14. Characteristics of 3D gamma evaluation according to phantom rotation error and dose gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Hyun; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Shin, Dong Seok; Noh, Yu Yoon; Suh, Tae Seok [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) using dosimetric phantom, a spatial uncertainty induced from phantom set-up inevitably occurs and gamma index that is used to evaluate IMRT plan quality can be affected differently by a combination of the spatial uncertainty and magnitude of dose gradient. In this study, we investigated the impacts of dose gradient and the phantom set-up error on 3D gamma evaluation. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of gamma evaluation according to dose gradient and phantom rotation axis. As a result, 3D gamma had better performance than 2D gamma. Therefore, it can be useful for IMRT QA analysis at clinical field.

  15. Dose mapping in category I irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Sandip; Shinde, S.H.; Mhatre, S.G.V.

    2012-01-01

    Category I irradiators such as Gamma Chambers and Blood Irradiators are compact self shielded, dry source storage gamma irradiators offering irradiation volume of few hundred cubic centimeters. In the present work, dose distribution profiles along the central vertical plane of the irradiation volume of Gamma Chamber 900 and Blood Irradiator 2000 were measured using Fricke, FBX, and alanine dosimeters. Measured dose distribution profiles in Gamma Chamber 900 differed from the typical generic dose distribution pattern whereas that in Blood Irradiator 2000 was in agreement with the typical pattern. All reagents used were of analytical reagent grade and were used without further purification. Preparation and dose estimations of Fricke and FBX were carried out as recommended. Alanine pellets were directly placed in precleaned polystyrene container having dimensions 6.5 mm o.d., 32 mm height and 3 mm wall thickness. For these dosimeters, dose measurements were made using e-scan Bruker BioSpin alanine dedicated ESR spectrometer. Specially designed perspex jigs were used during irradiation in Gamma Chamber 900 and Blood Irradiator 2000. These jigs provided the reproducible geometry during irradiation, Absorbance measurements were made using a spectrophotometer calibrated as per the recommended procedure. In Gamma Chamber 900, there is a dose distribution variation of about 34% from top to the center, 18% from center to the bottom, and 15% from center to the periphery. Such a dose distribution profile is largely deviating from the typical profile wherein 15% variation is observed from center to the periphery on all sides. Further investigation showed that there was a nonalignment in the source and sample chamber. However, in Blood Irradiator 2000, there is a dose distribution variation of about 20% from top to the center, 15% from center to the bottom, and 12% from center to the periphery. This pattern is very much similar to the typical profile. Hence it is recommended

  16. Population dose due to natural radiation in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, M.Y.W.; Leung, J.K.C.

    2000-01-01

    In densely populated cities such as Hong Kong where people live and work in high-rise buildings that are all built with concrete, the indoor gamma dose rate and indoor radon concentration are not wide ranging. Indoor gamma dose rates (including cosmic rays) follow a normal distribution with an arithmetic mean of 0.22 ± 0.04 (micro)Gy h -1 , whereas indoor radon concentrations follow a log-normal distribution with geometric means of 48 ± 1 Bq m -3 and 90 ± 2 Bq m -3 for the two main categories of buildings: residential and non-residential. Since different occupations result in different occupancy in different categories of buildings, the annual total dose [indoor and outdoor radon effective dose + indoor and outdoor gamma absorbed dose (including cosmic ray)] to the population in Hong Kong was estimated based on the number of people for each occupation; the occupancy of each occupation; indoor radon concentration distribution and indoor gamma dose rate distribution for each category of buildings; outdoor radon concentration and gamma dose rate; and indoor and outdoor cosmic ray dose rates. The result shows that the annual doses for every occupation follow a log-normal distribution. This is expected since the total dose is dominated by radon effective dose, which has a log-normal distribution. The annual dose to the population of Hong Kong is characterized by a log-normal distribution with a geometric mean of 2.4 mSv and a geometric standard deviation of 1.3 mSv

  17. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Burn, Kenneth W.; Console Camprini, Patrizio; Duhamel, Isabelle; Peron, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  18. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovchenko Mariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR. The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  19. Calculational methods for estimating skin dose from electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, C.H.; Attix, F.H.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to calculate the relative contribution to skin dose due to scattered electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams. Either the Klein-Nishina differential scattering probability is employed to determine the number and initial energy of electrons scattered into the direction of a detector, or a Gaussian approximation is used to specify the surface distribution of initial pencil electron beams created by parallel or diverging photon fields. Results of these calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, that fraction of relative surface dose resulting from photon interactions in air alone is estimated and compared with data extrapolated from measurements at large source-surface distance (SSD). The contribution to surface dose from electrons generated in air is 50% or more of the total skin dose for SSDs greater than 80 cm

  20. Effects of target size on the comparison of photon and charged particle dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Tjoa, T.; Lyman, J.T.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.

    1989-12-01

    The work presented here is part of an ongoing project to quantify and evaluate the differences in the use of different radiation types and irradiation geometries in radiosurgery. We are examining dose distributions for photons using the ''Gamma Knife'' and the linear accelerator arc methods, as well as different species of charged particles from protons to neon ions. A number of different factors need to be studied to accurately compare the different modalities such as target size, shape and location, the irradiation geometry, and biological response. This presentation focuses on target size, which has a large effect on the dose distributions in normal tissue surrounding the lesion. This work concentrates on dose distributions found in radiosurgery, as opposed to those usually found in radiotherapy. 5 refs., 2 figs

  1. Effects of physics change in Monte Carlo code on electron pencil beam dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2012-01-01

    Pencil beam algorithms used in computerized electron beam dose planning are usually described using the small angle multiple scattering theory. Alternatively, the pencil beams can be generated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. In a previous work, the 4th version of the Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code was used to obtain dose distributions from monoenergetic electron pencil beam, with incident energy between 1 MeV and 50 MeV, interacting at the surface of a large cylindrical homogeneous water phantom. In 2000, a new version of this Monte Carlo code has been made available by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), which includes various improvements in its electron-transport algorithms. In the present work, we were interested to see if the new physics in this version produces pencil beam dose distributions very different from those calculated with oldest one. The purpose of this study is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of pencil beam dose distributions scored in cylindrical geometry, for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV calculated with two versions of the Electron Gamma Shower Monte Carlo Code. Data calculated and compared include isodose distributions, radial dose distributions and fractions of energy deposition. Our results for radial dose distributions show agreement within 10% between doses calculated by the two codes for voxels closer to the pencil beam central axis, while the differences are up to 30% for longer distances. For fractions of energy deposition, the results of the EGS4 are in good agreement (within 2%) with those calculated by EGSnrc at shallow depths for all energies, whereas a slightly worse agreement (15%) is observed at deeper distances. These differences may be mainly attributed to the different multiple scattering for electron transport adopted in these two codes and the inclusion of spin effect, which produces an increase of the effective range of

  2. Influence of boundary effects on electron beam dose distribution formation in multilayer targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaluska, I.; Zimek, Z.; Lazurik, V.T.; Lazurik, V.M.; Popov, G.F.; Rogov, Y.V.

    2010-01-01

    Computational dosimetry play a significant role in an industrial radiation processing at dose measurements in the product irradiated with electron beams (EB), X-ray and gamma ray from radionuclide sources. Accurate and validated programs for absorbed dose calculations are required for computational dosimetry. The program ModeStEB (modelling of EB processing in a three-dimensional (3D) multilayer flat targets) was designed specially for simulation and optimization of industrial radiation processing, calculation of the 3D absorbed dose distribution within multilayer packages. The package is irradiated with scanned EB on an industrial radiation facility that is based on the pulsed or continuous type of electron accelerators in the electron energy range from 0.1 to 25 MeV. Simulation of EB dose distributions in the multilayer targets was accomplished using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. Experimental verification of MC simulation prediction for EB dose distribution formation in a stack of plates interleaved with polyvinylchloride (PVC) dosimetric films (DF), within a packing box, and irradiated with a scanned 10 MeV EB on a moving conveyer is discussed. (authors)

  3. Physical changes associated with gamma doses of PM-555 solid-state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the electrical, molecular and structural properties of copolymers of methacrylic esters and olefins, PM-555 solid-state nuclear track detector was investigated. DC conductivity measurements were studied in the temperature range 293-417 K using solid-state samples of the PM-555 polymer. These samples were irradiated with gamma doses in the range 5-63 kGy. Furthermore, the activation energy was measured, at various temperatures, as a function of the gamma dose. It was found that many changes in electrical resistance of PM-555 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via the degradation mechanism. Also, the gamma dose gives an advantage for the increasing correlation between the DC conductivity and the number and mobility of the charge carriers created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation. Moreover, solutions of different loadings (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6% and 0.8%) were prepared from the irradiated and non irradiated sheets using pure chloroform as a solvent. The effect of both temperature and gamma dose on the intrinsic viscosity of the liquid samples, as a measure of the mean molecular mass of the PM-555 polymer, were studied. In addition, structural and optical property studies using X-ray diffraction and refractive index measurements were performed on all irradiated and non irradiated PM-555 samples. The results indicate that both the degree of ordering or disordering and the anisotropic character of the PM-555 polymer are dependent on the gamma dose

  4. Calculation of dose distribution above contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junya; Tenzou, Hideki; Manabe, Seiya; Iwakura, Yukiko

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between altitude and the distribution of the ambient dose rate in the air over soil decontamination area by using PHITS simulation code. The geometry configuration was 1000 m ×1000 m area and 1m in soil depth and 100m in altitude from the ground to simulate the area of residences or a school grounds. The contaminated region is supposed to be uniformly contaminated by Cs-137 γ radiation sources. The air dose distribution and space resolution was evaluated for flux of the gamma rays at each altitude, 1, 5, 10, and 20m. The effect of decontamination was calculated by defining sharpness S. S was the ratio of an average flux and a flux at the center of denomination area in each altitude. The suitable flight altitude of the drone is found to be less than 15m above a residence and 31m above a school grounds to confirm the decontamination effect. The calculation results can be a help to determine a flight planning of a drone to minimize the clash risk.

  5. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Zorko, B.; Gregori, B.; Knezevic, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron + gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Boskovic Inst. (RBI), Croatia, Jozef Stefan Inst. (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7 LiF (TLD-700), CaF 2 :Mn and Al2 O3 :Mg,Y - all from RBI; CaF 2 :Mn from JSI and 7 LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed. (authors)

  6. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  7. American National Standard: neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose rate factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This Standard presents data recommended for computing biological dose rates due to neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are given; the energy range for the gamma-ray conversion factors is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Specifically, this Standard is intended for use by shield designers to calculate wholebody dose rates to radiation workers and the general public. Establishing dose-rate limits is outside the scope of this Standard. Use of this Standard in cases where the dose equivalents are far in excess of occupational exposure guidelines is not recommended

  8. Gamma regularization based reconstruction for low dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Bicao; Liu, Jin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the radiation in computerized tomography is today a major concern in radiology. Low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) offers a sound way to deal with this problem. However, more severe noise in the reconstructed CT images is observed under low dose scan protocols (e.g. lowered tube current or voltage values). In this paper we propose a Gamma regularization based algorithm for LDCT image reconstruction. This solution is flexible and provides a good balance between the regularizations based on l 0 -norm and l 1 -norm. We evaluate the proposed approach using the projection data from simulated phantoms and scanned Catphan phantoms. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the Gamma regularization based reconstruction can perform better in both edge-preserving and noise suppression when compared with other norms. (paper)

  9. Aging of magnesium stearate under high doses gamma irradiation and oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebeau, D.; Beuvier, L.; Cornaton, M. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miserque, F. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, LECA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tabarant, M. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LISL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Esnouf, S. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferry, M., E-mail: muriel.ferry@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Magnesium stearate was radio-oxidized at very high doses using gamma-rays. • H{sub 2} emission was estimated as a function of the integrated dose. • Modifications in the organic solid were followed as a function of the integrated dose. • A non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate was proposed. - Abstract: In nuclear waste packages conditioning processes, magnesium stearate is widely used because of its high lubricating properties. For safety purposes, the radiolytic degradation of these organic materials has to be better understood to be able to predict their aging in repository conditions. This study reports the radiolytic degradation of magnesium stearate, using gamma-rays at room temperature and under air. Modifications were followed using different analytical tools (XPS, ATR-FTIR, ICP-AES, ATG and mass spectrometry). It has been observed that molecules mainly formed up to 1000 kGy of gamma irradiation dose under radio-oxidation are alkanes, hydroperoxides, double bonds in the aliphatic chain, carboxylates with aliphatic chain shorter than the one of stearate and ketones. At a dose of 4000 kGy, dicarboxylic acids are observed: the formation of these molecules needs a dose of at least 1000 kGy to be created under radio-oxidation. These observations allow us to propose a non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate under gamma-irradiation at room temperature and under air.

  10. TL detectors for gamma-ray dose measurements in critically accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Zorko, B.; Gregori, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Determination of gamma-ray dose in mixed neutron + gamma-ray fields is still a challenging task. Dosemeters used for gamma-ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e. on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosimeter responses to gamma-rays. To reduce all these influences, design of dosemeter holders is of special importance. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma-ray dose determination in mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Boscovic Institute (RBI), Croatia, Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. At that exercise three accidental scenarios were reproduced: bare reactor, free evolution; lead shielded reactor, steady state; and lead shielded reactor, free evolution. In each irradiation dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free-in-air'. Also, dosemeters were irradiated in a pure gamma ray field of 60 Co source. Following types of TLDs were used: 7 LiF (TLD-700), CaF 2 :Mn and AI 2 O 3 :Mg,Y - all from RBI; CaF 2 :Mn from JSI and 7 LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the mean participants' values. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed. (author)

  11. Dose rate determinations in the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility: Monte Carlo simulations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.; Salgado, J.; Ferro de Carvalho, A.

    2000-01-01

    A simulation study of the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility, UTR, has been carried out using the MCNP code. The work focused on the optimisation of the dose distribution inside the irradiation cell, dose calculations inside irradiated samples and dose calculations in critical points for protection purposes. Calculations were carried out at points inside and outside the irradiation cell, where different behaviour was expected (distance from the source, radiation absorption and scattering in irradiator structure and walls). The contributions from source, irradiator structure, sample material, carriers, walls, ceiling and floor to the photon spectra and air kerma at those points are reported and discussed. Air kerma measurements were also carried out using an ionisation chamber. Good agreement was found between experimental and calculated air kermas. (author)

  12. SU-E-T-453: Optimization of Dose Gradient for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, N; Chen, Y; Yang, J

    2012-06-01

    The goals of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are the ablation of target tissue and sparing of critical normal tissue. We develop tools to aid in the selection of collimation and prescription (Rx) isodose line to optimize the dose gradient for single isocenter intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with GammaKnife 4C utilizing the updated physics data in GammaPlan v10.1. Single isocenter intracranial SRS plans were created to treat the center of a solid water anthropomorphism head phantom for each GammaKnife collimator (4 mm, 8 mm, 14 mm, and 18 mm). The dose gradient, defined as the difference of effective radii of spheres equal to half and full Rx volumes, and Rx treatment volume was analyzed for isodoses from 99% to 20% of Rx. The dosimetric data on Rx volume and dose gradient vs. Rx isodose for each collimator was compiled into an easy to read nomogram as well as plotted graphically. The 4, 8, 14, and 18 mm collimators have the sharpest dose gradient at the 64%, 70%, 76%, and 77% Rx isodose lines, respectively. This corresponds to treating 4.77 mm, 8.86 mm, 14.78 mm, and 18.77 mm diameter targets with dose gradients radii of 1.06 mm, 1.63 mm, 2.54 mm, and 3.17 mm, respectively. We analyzed the dosimetric data for the most recent version of GammaPlan treatment planning software to develop tools that when applied clinically will aid in the selection of a collimator and Rx isodose line for optimal dose gradient and target coverage for single isocenter intracranial SRS with GammaKnife 4C. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of Kelantan State, Malaysia. Relationship between the geological formation and soil type to radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garba, N.N.; Gabdo, H.T.; Federal College of Education, Yola

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (TGRD) of Kelantan State were measured in situ using a portable [NaI(TI)] micro roentgen (μR) survey meter. The TGRD rates ranged between 44 and 500 nGy h -1 with a mean value of 209 ± 8 nGy h -1 . The distribution of these measurements in various districts of the state shows the statistically the influence of geology and soil types on the dose rate values. The data obtained could be used in formulating safety standard and radiological guidelines. (author)

  14. Neurogenic Effects of Low-Dose Whole-Body HZE (Fe) Ion and Gamma Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Tara B; Hurley, Sean D; Wu, Michael D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the dose-toxicity profile of radiation is critical when evaluating potential health risks associated with natural and man-made sources in our environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose whole-body high-energy charged (HZE) iron (Fe) ions and low-energy gamma exposure on proliferation and differentiation of adult-born neurons within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, cells deemed to play a critical role in memory regulation. To determine the dose-response characteristics of the brain to whole-body Fe-ion vs. gamma-radiation exposure, C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 1 GeV/n Fe ions or a static 137 Cs source (0.662 MeV) at doses ranging from 0 to 300 cGy. The neurogenesis was analyzed at 48 h and one month postirradiation. These experiments revealed that whole-body exposure to either Fe ions or gamma radiation leads to: 1. An acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, detected at doses as low as 30 and 100 cGy for Fe ions and gamma radiation, respectively; and 2. A reduction in newly differentiated neurons (DCX immunoreactivity) at one month postirradiation, with significant decreases detected at doses as low as 100 cGy for both Fe ions and gamma rays. The data presented here contribute to our understanding of brain responses to whole-body Fe ions and gamma rays and may help inform health-risk evaluations related to systemic exposure during a medical or radiologic/nuclear event or as a result of prolonged space travel.

  15. Homogeneity and scale testing of generalized gamma distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehlik, Milan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to derive the exact distributions of the likelihood ratio tests of homogeneity and scale hypothesis when the observations are generalized gamma distributed. The special cases of exponential, Rayleigh, Weibull or gamma distributed observations are discussed exclusively. The photoemulsion experiment analysis and scale test with missing time-to-failure observations are present to illustrate the applications of methods discussed

  16. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, A.; Tanigawa, N.; Kariya, Sh.; Yagi, R.; Nakatani, M.; Suzuki, S.; Sano, A.; Ikeda, K.; Utsunomiya, K.; Harima, Y.; Sawada, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution

  17. Gamma dose effects valuation on micro computing components; Evaluation des effets de la dose gamma sur les composants micro-informatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joffre, F

    1996-12-31

    Robotics in hostile environment raises the problem of micro computing components resistance with gamma radiation cumulated dose. The current aim is to reach a dose of 3000 grays with industrial components. A methodology and an instrumentation adapted to test this type of components have been developed. The aim of this work is to present the advantages and disadvantages bound to the use of industrial components in the presence of gamma radiation. After an analysis of the criteria allowing to justify the technological choices, the different steps which characterize the selection and the assessment methodology used are explained. The irradiation and measures means now operational are mentioned. Moreover, the supply aspects of the chosen components for the design of an industrialized system is taken into account. These selection and assessment components contribute to the development and design of computers for civil nuclear robotics. (O.M.). 7 refs.

  18. Determination of gamma ray doses suitable for mutation induction in garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Safadi, Bassam; Ayyoubi, Zouhair

    1993-04-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) cloves were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation (Control, 100, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 rads). The cloves were planted in 4 replicates at Deer Alhajar station of the Dept. of Radiation Agriculture. Number of surviving plants was recorded at 2 months after planting and at harvest. Length of foliage was measured at harvest time and weight of cloves was taken two weeks after harvest. Visual readings in the field on plant shape and leaf color were also taken. The results indicated a negative effect of gamma radiation on plant survival especially at doses of 750 and 1000 rads where no plants survived until harvest. Plant length and clove weight were reduced even at 500 rad dose. Percentage of yellow and necrotic plants increased with increasing gamma ray dosage. No stimulation of plant growth was noticed as a result of irradiation with low doses of gamma rays. Treatment with 500 rads of gamma radiation was considered the best among tested doses for garlic mutagenesis (Using cloves) since it gave acceptable rate of survival and morphologic variation. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs

  19. Effect of low doses gamma irradiation of cotton seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Khalifa, Kh.

    1996-01-01

    Field experiments and then large scale application of irradiated cotton seeds (C.V. Aleppo-40) were carried out during three seasons (1986, 1987 and 1988) for field experiment at ACSAD Station in Dier-Ezzor and 1988, 1989 and 1990 for large scale application at Euphrate's Basin, Al-Ghab and Salamia, farmers farms. The above areas were selected as they represent major cotton production areas in Syria. The aims of the experiments were to study the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy on cotton yield and to look for the optimum dose of gamma irradiation to obtain best results. The results show that, there were positive effect (P<0.95) for doses 5-30 Gy in increasing cotton yield. The highest increase was at dose of 10 Gy. which as 19.5% higher than control. For the large scale application using 10 Gy the increase in cotton yield varied from 10-39% compared to control. (author). 11 refs., 6 figs

  20. Permitting of the accuracy in location of tumours and the accuracy in applying a precise dose covering in stereotactic gamma-knife treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    The gamma-knife is a Co-60 irradiation device, permitting the location of a lesion with an accuracy of millimeters. Moreover, with the Gamma Knife it is possible to apply a precise dose covering the entire area inside the head. In order to visualize a lesion, we mostly have to resort to imaging techniques such as the MR tomography. The accuracy of locating the specific area for the stereotactic treatment was achieved with the help of a special screen plate which we designed ourselves. For determining the precise dose to be applied at the Gamma Knife, the central dose for all four collimator helmets as well as the dose distribution of the combined collimators had to be measured. In case of irradiations in prone position there may be considerable deviations compared to the dose-planning program; this we were able to demonstrate by a TLD array designed by ourselves. A more sophisticated evaluation of new dosimetry techniques - GafChromic films and BANG polymer gel - enabled us to investigate more complex irradiation patterns. (author)

  1. Monitoring and Analysis of Environmental Gamma Dose Rate around Serpong Nuclear Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Susila

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An environmental radiation monitoring system that continuously measures gamma dose rate around nuclear facilities is an important tool to present dose rate information to the public or authorities for radiological protection during both normal operation and radiological accidents. We have developed such a system that consists of six GM-based device for monitoring the environmental dose rate around Serpong Nuclear Complex. It has operated since 2010. In this study, a description of the system and analysis of measured data are presented. Analysis of the data for the last five years shows that the average dose rate levels were between 84-99 nSv/h which are still lower than terrestrial gamma radiation levels at several other locations in Indonesia. Time series analysis of the monitoring data demonstrates a good agreement between an increase in environmental gamma dose rate and the presence of iodine and argon in the air by in situ measurement. This result indicates that system is also effective for an early warning system in the case of radiological emergency.

  2. Organ doses for foetuses, babies, children and adults from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petoussi, N.; Jacob, P.; Zankl, M.; Saito, K.

    1991-01-01

    Organ doses for babies, children and adults and doses to foetuses from environmental gamma rays were calculated using Monte Carlo codes. Firstly, gamma ray fields in the air-over-ground geometry were simulated, neglecting the disturbances of the radiation field by the human body. The exposure modes considered were semi-infinite homogeneous volume sources in the air, infinite plane sources at a depth of 0.5 g.cm -2 in the ground and homogeneous volume sources of natural radionuclides in the ground. The results of the simulation of the gamma ray transport in the air-over-ground geometry were used as sources irradiating the anthropomorphic phantoms: an 8 week old baby, a seven year old child and two 'reference' adult phantoms of a male and a female. The dose to foetuses were estimated from the dose to the uterus of the adult female. Dose conversion factors normalised to source intensity and air kerma were calculated for monoenergetic sources (15 keV to 10 MeV) and natural and artificial radionuclides. (author)

  3. MCNPX calculations of dose rate distribution inside samples treated in the research gamma irradiating facility at CTEx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusin, Tiago; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Gomes, Renato G., E-mail: tiagorusin@ime.eb.b, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.b, E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.b, E-mail: renatoguedes@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Vital, Helio C., E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.b [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    A cavity-type cesium-137 research irradiating facility at CTEx has been modeled by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The irradiator has been daily used in experiments to optimize the use of ionizing radiation for conservation of many kinds of food and to improve materials properties. In order to correlate the effects of the treatment, average doses have been calculated for each irradiated sample, accounting for the measured dose rate distribution in the irradiating chambers. However that approach is only approximate, being subject to significant systematic errors due to the heterogeneous internal structure of most samples that can lead to large anisotropy in attenuation and Compton scattering properties across the media. Thus this work is aimed at further investigating such uncertainties by calculating the dose rate distribution inside the items treated such that a more accurate and representative estimate of the total absorbed dose can be determined for later use in the effects-versus-dose correlation curves. Samples of different simplified geometries and densities (spheres, cylinders, and parallelepipeds), have been modeled to evaluate internal dose rate distributions within the volume of the samples and the overall effect on the average dose. (author)

  4. MCNPX calculations of dose rate distribution inside samples treated in the research gamma irradiating facility at CTEx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, Tiago; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Gomes, Renato G.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2011-01-01

    A cavity-type cesium-137 research irradiating facility at CTEx has been modeled by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The irradiator has been daily used in experiments to optimize the use of ionizing radiation for conservation of many kinds of food and to improve materials properties. In order to correlate the effects of the treatment, average doses have been calculated for each irradiated sample, accounting for the measured dose rate distribution in the irradiating chambers. However that approach is only approximate, being subject to significant systematic errors due to the heterogeneous internal structure of most samples that can lead to large anisotropy in attenuation and Compton scattering properties across the media. Thus this work is aimed at further investigating such uncertainties by calculating the dose rate distribution inside the items treated such that a more accurate and representative estimate of the total absorbed dose can be determined for later use in the effects-versus-dose correlation curves. Samples of different simplified geometries and densities (spheres, cylinders, and parallelepipeds), have been modeled to evaluate internal dose rate distributions within the volume of the samples and the overall effect on the average dose. (author)

  5. Assessment of background gamma radiation levels using airborne gamma ray spectrometer data over uranium deposits, Cuddapah Basin, India - A comparative study of dose rates estimated by AGRS and PGRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, D; Ramesh Babu, V; Patra, I; Tripathi, Shailesh; Ramayya, M S; Chaturvedi, A K

    2017-02-01

    The Atomic Minerals Directorate for Exploration and Research (AMD) has conducted high-resolution airborne gamma ray spectrometer (AGRS), magnetometer and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) surveys for uranium exploration, along the northern margins of Cuddapah Basin. The survey area includes well known uranium deposits such as Lambapur-Peddagattu, Chitrial and Koppunuru. The AGRS data collected for uranium exploration is utilised for estimating the average absorbed rates in air due to radio-elemental (potassium in %, uranium and thorium in ppm) distribution over these known deposit areas. Further, portable gamma ray spectrometer (PGRS) was used to acquire data over two nearby locations one from Lambapur deposit, and the other from known anomalous zone and subsequently average gamma dose rates were estimated. Representative in-situ rock samples were also collected from these two areas and subjected to radio-elemental concentration analysis by gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) in the laboratory and then dose rates were estimated. Analyses of these three sets of results complement one another, thereby providing a comprehensive picture of the radiation environment over these deposits. The average absorbed area wise dose rate level is estimated to be 130 ± 47 nGy h -1 in Lambapur-Peddagattu, 186 ± 77 nGy h -1 in Chitrial and 63 ± 22 nGy h -1 in Koppunuru. The obtained average dose levels are found to be higher than the world average value of 54 nGy h -1 . The gamma absorbed dose rates in nGy h -1 were converted to annual effective dose rates in mSv y -1 as proposed by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual average effective dose rates for the entire surveyed area is 0.12 mSv y -1 , which is much lower than the recommended limit of 1 mSv y -1 by International Commission on Radiation protection (ICRP). It may be ascertained here that the present study establishes a reference data set (baseline) in these areas

  6. Radiation mutagenesis in lavender. I.Dose and emissive power as affecting the radiosensitivity of lavender seeds in gamma-ray treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkov, R.

    1977-01-01

    The radiosensitivity has been investigated of dormant seeds of the widely distributed aboriginal Hemus and Karlovo varieties and of the Soviet Stepnaya lavender variety in treatment with gamma rays using 60 Co. Doses within 1 to 100 kRad are applied at different emissive power of the emitter. Both irradiated and nonirradiated control seeds are gibberellic acid treated. The dynamics of seed sprouting is followed up. The number of survived plants and peculiarities of their growth are registered. The radiosensitivity of Lavandula vera D.C. seeds is modified by the emissive power in equal doses applied. Stepnaya variety showed highest resistance, followed by Karlovo and Hemus varieties. Doses are ascertained with a stimulating, inhibiting, semilethal and lethal effect in regard to the separate varietoes. Both stimulation and injuring prove to be of saltatory character. The radiation injuring of doses with an inhibitory, semilethal and lethal effect positively correlate with the dose of all tested emissive powers of the gamma-emitter. (author)

  7. Mathematical simulation of gamma-radiation angle distribution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batij, V.G.; Batij, E.V.; Egorov, V.V.; Fedorchenko, D.V.; Kochnev, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed mathematical model of the facility for gamma-radiation angle distribution measurement and calculated response functions for gamma-radiation intensities. We developed special software for experimental data processing, the 'Shelter' object radiation spectra unfolding and Sphere detector (ShD) angle resolution estimation. Neuronet method using for detection of the radiation directions is given. We developed software based on the neuronet algorithm, that allows obtaining reliable distribution of gamma-sources that make impact on the facility detectors at the measurement point. 10 refs.; 15 figs.; 4 tab

  8. Aerial gamma spectrometry of the uranium province of Lagoa Real (Caetite, BA, Brazil): go environmental aspects and distribution of the absorbed dose in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Esau Francisco Sena

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, it was analyzed the surface concentrations of the natural radioelements K, U and Th, as well as the absorbed dose rate in air caused by gamma radiation from the Lagoa Real uranium province, which is located at the center southern portion of Bahia State and comprises an area of approximately 4.600 Km 2 . Data from the airborne gamma ray spectrometric survey of the region (Sao Timoeo Project) carried out in 1979, was used in this study. Besides, recent data of U, Th and absorbed dose rates from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the uranium concentration plant (URA), operated in the region by the Brazilian Nuclear Industries (INB), were used with the aim of inter compare the sampling points in the same geo referenced area. Imaging geo processing software's give support to frame maps of surface concentrations and ternary maps, as well as allow the integration of these with other themes (e.g. hydrology, geology, pedology) favouring the interpretation of geo environmental process from the radioactive cartography. Considering the whole study area, it was obtained the following mean values: absorbed dose rate in air (61,08 nGy.h -1 ), Potassium (1,65 % K) , Uranium (3,02 ppm eU) and thorium (18,26 ppm eTh). The geological unities bounding the uranium anomalies were placed in the areas characterized by the highest values of radioelements and, as expected, the major dose levels. The use of ternary maps coupled with the geology and hydrology allowed distinguishing the relationship between the surface distribution of natural radioelements and the geo environmental aspects, including the influence of the catchment in their transport and migration. (author)

  9. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanusi, M.S.M.; Ramli, A.T.; Gabdo, H.T.; Garba, N.N.; Heryanshah, A.; Wagiran, H.; Said, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h −1 to 500 nGy h −1 . The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h −1 . This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h −1 (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. - Highlights: • A methodology is presented to reduce terrestrial gamma dose rate field survey. • Geological background of acid intrusive of granitic type has the highest dose rates. • The mean dose rate is 2 times higher than the world average. • Isodose map of terrestrial gamma radiation for Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was produced

  10. In-situ gamma spectrometry method for determination of environmental gamma dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Claudio de Carvalho

    1995-07-01

    This work tries to establish a methodology for germanium detectors calibration, normally used for in situ gamma ray spectrometry, for determining the environmental exposure rate in function of the energy of the incident photons. For this purpose a computer code has been developed, based on the stripping method, for the computational spectra analysis to calculate the contribution of the partial absorption of the gamma rays (Compton effect) in the active and nonactive parts of the detector. The resulting total absorption spectrum is then converted to fluence distribution in function of the energy for the photons reaching the detector, which is then used to calculate the exposure rate or kerma in air. The unfolding and fluency convention parameters are determined by detector calibration using point gamma sources. The method is validated by comparison of the results against the calculated exposure rate at a point of interest for the standards. This method is used for the direct measurement of the exposure rate distribution in function of the energy at the site, in situ measurement technic, leading to rapid results during an emergency situation and also used for indoor measurements. (author)

  11. Ionizing radiation population doses at Sao Paulo city, Brazil: open-pit gamma dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Raimundo Enoch Rodrigues

    2001-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation to the human beings are well known for high and intermediate doses. As far as low level) radiation doses are concerned, there is no consensus. In order to get a better understanding of such effects it is necessary to assess the low doses with better accuracy. In this work, it was made an estimate of the annual ambient dose equivalent (H * (10)) to which the people are exposed in the city of Sao Paulo. Until now there are no data about it available in the literature. For the purpose of this evaluation, a map with various routes covering the largest and more representative area of the city was designed. The choice of points for data collection was made taking into account mainly the occupancy of the region. A portable gamma spectrometry system was used. It furnishes the rate of H * (10) and the measured gamma spectrum (in the range from 50 to 1670 keV) in the place of interest. The measurements were performed in a short time interval, since the gamma radiation arrives from a great extent of soil. Each measurement was done 1 m above the soil during 300 s. The rates of H * (10) varied from 33.1 to 152.3 nSv.h -1 , net values, obtained after subtraction of the cosmic rays contribution. The standard deviation was 22 n Sv.h -1 for an average for the city of Sao Paulo of 96.1(24) nSv.h -1 . In addition, average values of H * (10) rates for the city Health Divisions were calculated. Those values are not statistically equivalent and the whole set of data could not be treated as one, as the statistical Student test indicated a non homogeneity of the group of data. Hence it is necessary the accomplishment of a more detailed survey in order to verify the origin of the discrepancy. The mean value of H * (10) rate obtained for the city of Sao Paulo as converted to effective dose. in order to be compared with other places results It could be noticed that the annual average of effective dose for the city of Sao Paulo, 0.522(13) mSv, is superior to

  12. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyada, P.; Sarkar, P.K., E-mail: pradip.sarkar@manipal.edu

    2015-06-11

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am–Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies. - Highlights: • A new method for estimating H{sup ⁎}(10) using prompt gamma emissions from HDPE. • Linear combination of 2.2 MeV and 4.4 MeV gamma intensities approximates DCC (ICRP). • Feasibility of the method was established theoretically and experimentally. • The response of the present technique is very similar to that of the rem meters.

  13. Approach to 3D dose verification by utilizing autoactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yasunori, E-mail: yasunori.nkjm@gmail.com [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama-shi (Japan); Kohno, Toshiyuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama-shi (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku; Sato, Shinji; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-shi (Japan); Tsuruta, Yuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama-shi (Japan); Sihver, Lembit [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-08-21

    To evaluate the deposited dose distribution in a target, we have proposed to utilize the annihilation gamma-rays emitted from the positron emitters distributed in the target irradiated with stable heavy-ion beams. Verification of the one dimensional (1-D) dose distributions along and perpendicular to a beam axis was achieved through our previous works. The purpose of this work is to verify 3-D dose distributions. As the first attempt uniform PMMA targets were irradiated in simple rectangular parallelepiped shapes, and the annihilation gamma-rays were detected with a PET scanner. By comparing the detected annihilation gamma-ray distributions with the calculated ones the dose distributions were estimated. As a result the estimated positions of the distal edges of the dose distributions were in agreement with the measured ones within 1 mm. However, the estimated positions of the proximal edges were different from the measured ones by 5-9 mm depending on the thickness of the irradiation filed.

  14. Neutron and gamma-ray dose-rates from the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We report dose-rate information obtained at many locations in the near vicinity of, and at distances out to 0.64 km from, the Little Boy replica while it was operated as a critical assembly. The measurements were made with modified conventional dosimetry instruments that used an Anderson-Braun detector for neutrons and a Geiger-Mueller tube for gamma rays with suitable electronic modules to count particle-induced pulses. Thermoluminescent dosimetry methods provide corroborative data. Our analysis gives estimates of both neutron and gamma-ray relaxation lengths in air for comparison with earlier calculations. We also show the neutron-to-gamma-ray dose ratio as a function of distance from the replica. Current experiments and further data analysis will refine these results. 7 references, 8 figures

  15. Gamma dose effects valuation on micro computing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffre, F.

    1995-01-01

    Robotics in hostile environment raises the problem of micro computing components resistance with gamma radiation cumulated dose. The current aim is to reach a dose of 3000 grays with industrial components. A methodology and an instrumentation adapted to test this type of components have been developed. The aim of this work is to present the advantages and disadvantages bound to the use of industrial components in the presence of gamma radiation. After an analysis of the criteria allowing to justify the technological choices, the different steps which characterize the selection and the assessment methodology used are explained. The irradiation and measures means now operational are mentioned. Moreover, the supply aspects of the chosen components for the design of an industrialized system is taken into account. These selection and assessment components contribute to the development and design of computers for civil nuclear robotics. (O.M.)

  16. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  17. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-03: Continuous Dose Delivery with Gamma Knife Perfexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghobadi,; Li, W; Chung, C; Jaffray, D; Aleman, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We propose continuous dose delivery techniques for stereotactic treatments delivered by Gamma Knife Perfexion using inverse treatment planning system that can be applied to various tumour sites in the brain. We test the accuracy of the plans on Perfexion’s planning system (GammaPlan) to ensure the obtained plans are viable. This approach introduces continuous dose delivery for Perefxion, as opposed to the currently employed step-and-shoot approaches, for different tumour sites. Additionally, this is the first realization of automated inverse planning on GammaPlan. Methods: The inverse planning approach is divided into two steps of identifying a quality path inside the target, and finding the best collimator composition for the path. To find a path, we select strategic regions inside the target volume and find a path that visits each region exactly once. This path is then passed to a mathematical model which finds the best combination of collimators and their durations. The mathematical model minimizes the dose spillage to the surrounding tissues while ensuring the prescribed dose is delivered to the target(s). Organs-at-risk and their corresponding allowable doses can also be added to the model to protect adjacent organs. Results: We test this approach on various tumour sizes and sites. The quality of the obtained treatment plans are comparable or better than forward plans and inverse plans that use step- and-shoot technique. The conformity indices in the obtained continuous dose delivery plans are similar to those of forward plans while the beam-on time is improved on average (see Table 1 in supporting document). Conclusion: We employ inverse planning for continuous dose delivery in Perfexion for brain tumours. The quality of the obtained plans is similar to forward and inverse plans that use conventional step-and-shoot technique. We tested the inverse plans on GammaPlan to verify clinical relevance. This research was partially supported by Elekta

  18. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-03: Continuous Dose Delivery with Gamma Knife Perfexion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghobadi,; Li, W; Chung, C; Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Aleman, D [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose continuous dose delivery techniques for stereotactic treatments delivered by Gamma Knife Perfexion using inverse treatment planning system that can be applied to various tumour sites in the brain. We test the accuracy of the plans on Perfexion’s planning system (GammaPlan) to ensure the obtained plans are viable. This approach introduces continuous dose delivery for Perefxion, as opposed to the currently employed step-and-shoot approaches, for different tumour sites. Additionally, this is the first realization of automated inverse planning on GammaPlan. Methods: The inverse planning approach is divided into two steps of identifying a quality path inside the target, and finding the best collimator composition for the path. To find a path, we select strategic regions inside the target volume and find a path that visits each region exactly once. This path is then passed to a mathematical model which finds the best combination of collimators and their durations. The mathematical model minimizes the dose spillage to the surrounding tissues while ensuring the prescribed dose is delivered to the target(s). Organs-at-risk and their corresponding allowable doses can also be added to the model to protect adjacent organs. Results: We test this approach on various tumour sizes and sites. The quality of the obtained treatment plans are comparable or better than forward plans and inverse plans that use step- and-shoot technique. The conformity indices in the obtained continuous dose delivery plans are similar to those of forward plans while the beam-on time is improved on average (see Table 1 in supporting document). Conclusion: We employ inverse planning for continuous dose delivery in Perfexion for brain tumours. The quality of the obtained plans is similar to forward and inverse plans that use conventional step-and-shoot technique. We tested the inverse plans on GammaPlan to verify clinical relevance. This research was partially supported by Elekta

  19. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  20. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  1. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that 60 Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  2. Automatic optimisation of gamma dose rate sensor networks: The DETECT Optimisation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, K.B.; Müller, T.O.; Astrup, Poul

    2014-01-01

    of the EU FP 7 project DETECT. It evaluates the gamma dose rates that a proposed set of sensors might measure in an emergency and uses this information to optimise the sensor locations. The gamma dose rates are taken from a comprehensive library of simulations of atmospheric radioactive plumes from 64......Fast delivery of comprehensive information on the radiological situation is essential for decision-making in nuclear emergencies. Most national radiological agencies in Europe employ gamma dose rate sensor networks to monitor radioactive pollution of the atmosphere. Sensor locations were often...... source locations. These simulations cover the whole European Union, so the DOT allows evaluation and optimisation of sensor networks for all EU countries, as well as evaluation of fencing sensors around possible sources. Users can choose from seven cost functions to evaluate the capability of a given...

  3. In-situ gamma spectrometry method for determination of environmental gamma dose; Metodo de espectrometria gamma in situ para determinacao de dose gama ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, Claudio de Carvalho

    1995-07-15

    This work tries to establish a methodology for germanium detectors calibration, normally used for in situ gamma ray spectrometry, for determining the environmental exposure rate in function of the energy of the incident photons. For this purpose a computer code has been developed, based on the stripping method, for the computational spectra analysis to calculate the contribution of the partial absorption of the gamma rays (Compton effect) in the active and nonactive parts of the detector. The resulting total absorption spectrum is then converted to fluence distribution in function of the energy for the photons reaching the detector, which is then used to calculate the exposure rate or kerma in air. The unfolding and fluency convention parameters are determined by detector calibration using point gamma sources. The method is validated by comparison of the results against the calculated exposure rate at a point of interest for the standards. This method is used for the direct measurement of the exposure rate distribution in function of the energy at the site, in situ measurement technic, leading to rapid results during an emergency situation and also used for indoor measurements. (author)

  4. The McDonald exponentiated gamma distribution and its statistical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Babtain, Abdulhakim A; Merovci, Faton; Elbatal, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we propose a five-parameter lifetime model called the McDonald exponentiated gamma distribution to extend beta exponentiated gamma, Kumaraswamy exponentiated gamma and exponentiated gamma, among several other models. We provide a comprehensive mathematical treatment of this distribution. We derive the moment generating function and the rth moment. We discuss estimation of the parameters by maximum likelihood and provide the information matrix. AMS Subject Classificatio...

  5. Primordial Radionuclides Distribution and dose Evaluation in Udagamandalam Region of Nilgiris in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, N. Muguntha; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Raghunath, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    The activity concentration of primordial radionuclides i.e., 238 U series, 232 Th series and 40 K, in soil samples collected from Udagamandalam environment, have been measured by employing NaI (TI) Gamma ray Spectrometer. The absorbed gamma dose rate has also been simultaneously measured by using both environmental radiation dosimeter at each soil sampling location (ambient gamma dose) as well as from the gamma dose derived from the activity concentration of the primordial radionuclides. The results of activity concentration of each radionuclides in soil, absorbed dose rate in air due to soil activity and possible cosmic radiation at each location along with human effective dose equivalent for Udagamandalam environment are presented and discussed

  6. Primordial Radionuclides Distribution and dose Evaluation in Udagamandalam Region of Nilgiris in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, N. Muguntha; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Meenakshisundaram, V. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India); Raghunath, V. M. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2001-09-15

    The activity concentration of primordial radionuclides i.e., {sup 238}U series, {sup 232}Th series and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from Udagamandalam environment, have been measured by employing NaI (TI) Gamma ray Spectrometer. The absorbed gamma dose rate has also been simultaneously measured by using both environmental radiation dosimeter at each soil sampling location (ambient gamma dose) as well as from the gamma dose derived from the activity concentration of the primordial radionuclides. The results of activity concentration of each radionuclides in soil, absorbed dose rate in air due to soil activity and possible cosmic radiation at each location along with human effective dose equivalent for Udagamandalam environment are presented and discussed.

  7. Estimation of neutron energy distributions from prompt gamma emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Udupi, Ashwini; Sarkar, P. K.

    2017-11-01

    A technique of estimating the incident neutron energy distribution from emitted prompt gamma intensities from a system exposed to neutrons is presented. The emitted prompt gamma intensities or the measured photo peaks in a gamma detector are related to the incident neutron energy distribution through a convolution of the response of the system generating the prompt gammas to mono-energetic neutrons. Presently, the system studied is a cylinder of high density polyethylene (HDPE) placed inside another cylinder of borated HDPE (BHDPE) having an outer Pb-cover and exposed to neutrons. The emitted five prompt gamma peaks from hydrogen, boron, carbon and lead can be utilized to unfold the incident neutron energy distribution as an under-determined deconvolution problem. Such an under-determined set of equations are solved using the genetic algorithm based Monte Carlo de-convolution code GAMCD. Feasibility of the proposed technique is demonstrated theoretically using the Monte Carlo calculated response matrix and intensities of emitted prompt gammas from the Pb-covered BHDPE-HDPE system in the case of several incident neutron spectra spanning different energy ranges.

  8. Effect of gamma background on the dose absorbed by human embryon and foetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miloslavov, V.; Doncheva, B.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed for calculation of absorbed radiation dose in different stages of human foetus development under normal or increased gamma background. On the base of ICRP-data for critical organ's mass (foetus, placenta, blood, uterus) a formula is given for absorbed dose evaluation of gonads. It is concluded that increased gamma background is insignificant compared to internal irradiation from absorbed radionuclides

  9. Dose and dose rate extrapolation factors for malignant and non-malignant health endpoints after exposure to gamma and neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Van; Little, Mark P. [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Murine experiments were conducted at the JANUS reactor in Argonne National Laboratory from 1970 to 1992 to study the effect of acute and protracted radiation dose from gamma rays and fission neutron whole body exposure. The present study reports the reanalysis of the JANUS data on 36,718 mice, of which 16,973 mice were irradiated with neutrons, 13,638 were irradiated with gamma rays, and 6107 were controls. Mice were mostly Mus musculus, but one experiment used Peromyscus leucopus. For both types of radiation exposure, a Cox proportional hazards model was used, using age as timescale, and stratifying on sex and experiment. The optimal model was one with linear and quadratic terms in cumulative lagged dose, with adjustments to both linear and quadratic dose terms for low-dose rate irradiation (<5 mGy/h) and with adjustments to the dose for age at exposure and sex. After gamma ray exposure there is significant non-linearity (generally with upward curvature) for all tumours, lymphoreticular, respiratory, connective tissue and gastrointestinal tumours, also for all non-tumour, other non-tumour, non-malignant pulmonary and non-malignant renal diseases (p < 0.001). Associated with this the low-dose extrapolation factor, measuring the overestimation in low-dose risk resulting from linear extrapolation is significantly elevated for lymphoreticular tumours 1.16 (95% CI 1.06, 1.31), elevated also for a number of non-malignant endpoints, specifically all non-tumour diseases, 1.63 (95% CI 1.43, 2.00), non-malignant pulmonary disease, 1.70 (95% CI 1.17, 2.76) and other non-tumour diseases, 1.47 (95% CI 1.29, 1.82). However, for a rather larger group of malignant endpoints the low-dose extrapolation factor is significantly less than 1 (implying downward curvature), with central estimates generally ranging from 0.2 to 0.8, in particular for tumours of the respiratory system, vasculature, ovary, kidney/urinary bladder and testis. For neutron exposure most endpoints, malignant and

  10. Dose calculation method with 60-cobalt gamma rays in total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaff, Luiz Alberto Malaguti

    2001-01-01

    Physical factors associated to total body irradiation using 60 Co gamma rays beams, were studied in order to develop a calculation method of the dose distribution that could be reproduced in any radiotherapy center with good precision. The method is based on considering total body irradiation as a large and irregular field with heterogeneities. To calculate doses, or doses rates, of each area of interest (head, thorax, thigh, etc.), scattered radiation is determined. It was observed that if dismagnified fields were considered to calculate the scattered radiation, the resulting values could be applied on a projection to the real size to obtain the values for dose rate calculations. In a parallel work it was determined the variation of the dose rate in the air, for the distance of treatment, and for points out of the central axis. This confirm that the use of the inverse square law is not valid. An attenuation curve for a broad beam was also determined in order to allow the use of absorbers. In this work all the adapted formulas for dose rate calculations in several areas of the body are described, as well time/dose templates sheets for total body irradiation. The in vivo dosimetry, proved that either experimental or calculated dose rate values (achieved by the proposed method), did not have significant discrepancies. (author)

  11. Estimation of expected value for lognormal and gamma distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Concentrations of environmental pollutants tend to follow positively skewed frequency distributions. Two such density functions are the gamma and lognormal. Minimum variance unbiased estimators of the expected value for both densities are available. The small sample statistical properties of each of these estimators were compared for its own distribution, as well as the other distribution to check the robustness of the estimator. Results indicated that the arithmetic mean provides an unbiased estimator when the underlying density function of the sample is either lognormal or gamma, and that the achieved coverage of the confidence interval is greater than 75 percent for coefficients of variation less than two. Further Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to study the robustness of the above estimators by simulating a lognormal or gamma distribution with the expected value of a particular observation selected from a uniform distribution before the lognormal or gamma observation is generated. Again, the arithmetic mean provides an unbiased estimate of expected value, and the coverage of the confidence interval is greater than 75 percent for coefficients of variation less than two

  12. Gamma-ray angular distribution and correlation measurement. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twin, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Angular correlations of γ-rays following nuclear reactions depend, in general, on some alignment of the γ-emitting initial state. The methods of alignment are briefly discussed and then the techniques and experimental methods associated with direct angular distributions, particle-gamma correlations, gamma-gamma correlations and linear polarization correlations are dealt with. Finally the inherent ambiguities which arise when different spin and delta values give identical correlations are discussed for the simple direct and particle-gamma correlations together with the question whether the larger information content of gamma-gamma and linear polarization correlations can resolve these ambiguities. (Auth.)

  13. Development of prompt gamma measurement system for in vivo proton beam range verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Chul Hee

    2011-02-01

    In radiation therapy, most research has focused on reducing unnecessary radiation dose to normal tissues and critical organs around the target tumor volume. Proton therapy is considered to be one of the most promising radiation therapy methods with its physical characteristics in the dose distribution, delivering most of the dose just before protons come to rest at the so-named Bragg peak; that is, proton therapy allows for a very high radiation dose to the tumor volume, effectively sparing adjacent critical organs. However, the uncertainty in the location of the Bragg peak, coming from not only the uncertainty in the beam delivery system and the treatment planning method but also anatomical changes and organ motions of a patient, could be a critical problem in proton therapy. In spite of the importance of the in vivo dose verification to prevent the misapplication of the Bragg peak and to guarantee both successful treatment and patient safety, there is no practical methodology to monitor the in vivo dose distribution, only a few attempts have been made so far. The present dissertation suggests the prompt gamma measurement method for monitoring of the in vivo proton dose distribution during treatment. As a key part of the process of establishing the utility of this method, the verification of the clear relationship between the prompt gamma distribution and the proton dose distribution was accomplished by means of Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements. First, the physical properties of prompt gammas were investigated on the basis of cross-section data and Monte Carlo simulations. Prompt gammas are generated mainly from proton-induced nuclear interactions, and then emitted isotropically in less than 10 -9 sec at energies up to 10 MeV. Simulation results for the prompt gamma yield of the major elements of a human body show that within the optimal energy range of 4-10 MeV the highest number of prompt gammas is generated from oxygen, whereas over the

  14. Inhibitory mechanism of low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays against tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhiro Ohsima; Mitsutoshi Tukimoto; Shuji Kojima

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A lot of beneficial effects of low-dose irradiation are well known. Of them, an inhibitory effect of the radiation on lung metastasis is reported so far. It has been reported that low-dose whole-body irradiation with gamma rays enhanced cytotoxic immune response as one of the mechanisms. In our laboratory, it has been confirmed an enhancement of natural killer activity in mice irradiated with whole-body 0.5Gy gamma-rays. Metastasis is accomplished by multistep process, involving basement membrane destruction, local invasion, intravasation, survival in the bloodstream, extravasation into distant organs, and proliferation at the target site. Besides, a lot of growth factors and proteases are involved in these steps. As to mechanism of inhibition of tumor metastasis induced by low-dose whole-body irradiation, studies from the standpoint of tumor invasion have not been reported. Here, inhibitory effect of 0.5Gy whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on tumor metastasis and its mechanism were examined in pulmonary metastasis model mice injected with B16 melanoma cells. Consequently, 0.5Gy whole-body gamma ray irradiation significantly suppressed colony formation in the lungs. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase- 2 (MMP- 2), a proteinase related to metastasis, in lung tissues was suppressed by the radiation. Alteration of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) after the gamma-ray irradiation was examined. Expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 mRNA in the lungs were significantly increased. In order to clarify the inhibitory effect obtained in the in vivo metastatic lung cancer model mice, we studied effects of gamma-rays on cell proliferation, alterations of mRNA and proteins related to tumor metastasis in cultured B16 melanoma cells. Proliferation of B16 melanoma cells was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. MMP-2 mRNA expression was not altered in any doses of gamma-rays. Thought expression of the protein was slightly

  15. Public effective doses from environmental natural gamma exposures indoors and outdoors in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Roositalab, Jalil; Mohammadi, Jahangir

    2015-01-01

    The effective doses of public in Iran due to external gamma exposures from terrestrial radionuclides and from cosmic radiation indoors and outdoors of normal natural background radiation areas were determined by measurements and by calculations. For direct measurements, three measurement methods were used including a NaI(TI) scintillation survey meter for preliminary screening, a pressurised ionising chamber for more precise measurements and early warning measurement equipment systems. Measurements were carried out in a large number of locations indoors and outdoors ∼1000 houses selected randomly in 36 large cities of Iran. The external gamma doses of public from living indoors and outdoors were also calculated based on the radioactivity measurements of samples taken from soil and building materials by gamma spectrometry using a high-resolution HPGe system. The national mean background gamma dose rates in air indoors and outdoors based on measurements are 126.9±24.3 and 111.7±17.72 nGy h -1 , respectively. When the contribution from cosmic rays was excluded, the values indoors and outdoors are 109.2±20.2 and 70.2±20.59.4 nGy h -1 , respectively. The dose rates determined for indoors and outdoors by calculations are 101.5±9.2 and 72.2±9.4 nGy h -1 , respectively, which are in good agreement with directly measured dose rates within statistical variations. By considering a population-weighted mean for terrestrial radiation, the ratio of indoor to outdoor dose rates is 1.55. The mean annual effective dose of each individual member of the public from terrestrial radionuclides and cosmic radiation, indoors and outdoors, is 0.86±0.16 mSv y -1 by measurements and 0.8±0.2 mSv y -1 by calculations. The results of this national survey of public annual effective doses from national natural background external gamma radiation determined by measurements and calculations indoors and outdoors of 1000 houses in 36 cities of Iran are presented and discussed. (authors)

  16. Moving from gamma passing rates to patient DVH-based QA metrics in pretreatment dose QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, Heming; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of the gamma passing rate metric for per-patient, pretreatment dose QA and to validate a novel patient-dose/DVH-based method and its accuracy and correlation. Specifically, correlations between: (1) gamma passing rates for three 3D dosimeter detector geometries vs clinically relevant patient DVH-based metrics; (2) Gamma passing rates of whole patient dose grids vs DVH-based metrics, (3) gamma passing rates filtered by region of interest (ROI) vs DVH-based metrics, and (4) the capability of a novel software algorithm that estimates corrected patient Dose-DVH based on conventional phan-tom QA data are analyzed. Methods: Ninety six unique ''imperfect'' step-and-shoot IMRT plans were generated by applying four different types of errors on 24 clinical Head/Neck patients. The 3D patient doses as well as the dose to a cylindrical QA phantom were then recalculated using an error-free beam model to serve as a simulated measurement for comparison. Resulting deviations to the planned vs simulated measured DVH-based metrics were generated, as were gamma passing rates for a variety of difference/distance criteria covering: dose-in-phantom comparisons and dose-in-patient comparisons, with the in-patient results calculated both over the whole grid and per-ROI volume. Finally, patient dose and DVH were predicted using the conventional per-beam planar data as input into a commercial ''planned dose perturbation'' (PDP) algorithm, and the results of these predicted DVH-based metrics were compared to the known values. Results: A range of weak to moderate correlations were found between clinically relevant patient DVH metrics (CTV-D95, parotid D{sub mean}, spinal cord D1cc, and larynx D{sub mean}) and both 3D detector and 3D patient gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) for dose-in-phantom along with dose-in-patient for both whole patient volume and filtered per-ROI. There was

  17. New model for assessing dose and dose rate sensitivity of Gamma ray radiation loss in polarization maintaining optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongchen; Liu Hai; Qiao Wenqiang; Xue Huijie; He Shiyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Building a new phenomenological theory model to investigate the relation about the irradiation induced loss with irradiation dose and dose rate. ► The Gamma ray irradiation induced loss of the “Capsule” type and “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fibers at 1310 nm wavelength are investigated. ► The anti irradiation performance of the “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fiber is better than that of the “Capsule” type polarization maintaining optical fiber, the reason is that the stress region doped by GeO 2 . - Abstract: The Gamma ray irradiation induced loss of the “Capsule” type and “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fibers at 1310 nm wavelength are investigated. A phenomenological theory model is introduced and the influence of irradiation dose and dose rate on the irradiation induced loss is discussed. The phenomenological theoretical results are consistent with the experimental results of the irradiation induced loss for the two types of polarization maintaining optical fibers. The anti irradiation performance of the “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fiber is better than that of the “Capsule” type polarization maintaining optical fiber, the reason is that the stress region dope with GeO 2 . Meanwhile, both of the polarization maintaining optical fiber irradiation induced loss increase with increasing the irradiation dose. In the case of same dose, the high dose rate Gamma ray irradiation induced optical fiber losses are higher than that of the low dose rate.

  18. Development of a high sensitivity pinhole type gamma camera using semiconductors for low dose rate fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Yoshida, Akira; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2018-06-01

    We developed a pinhole type gamma camera, using a compact detector module of a pixelated CdTe semiconductor, which has suitable sensitivity and quantitative accuracy for low dose rate fields. In order to improve the sensitivity of the pinhole type semiconductor gamma camera, we adopted three methods: a signal processing method to set the discriminating level lower, a high sensitivity pinhole collimator and a smoothing image filter that improves the efficiency of the source identification. We tested basic performances of the developed gamma camera and carefully examined effects of the three methods. From the sensitivity test, we found that the effective sensitivity was about 21 times higher than that of the gamma camera for high dose rate fields which we had previously developed. We confirmed that the gamma camera had sufficient sensitivity and high quantitative accuracy; for example, a weak hot spot (0.9 μSv/h) around a tree root could be detected within 45 min in a low dose rate field test, and errors of measured dose rates with point sources were less than 7% in a dose rate accuracy test.

  19. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen Zhe; Ma Lijun

    2009-01-01

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C(TM) and Perfexion(TM) units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can obtain a family of plans representing a tradeoff between the delivery time and

  20. Radon survey and soil gamma doses in primary schools of Batman, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damla, Nevzat; Aldemir, Kamuran

    2014-06-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate levels of indoor radon and gamma doses in 42 primary schools located in Batman, southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. Indoor radon measurements were carried out using CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector-based radon dosimeters. The overall mean annual (222)Rn activity in the surveyed area was found to be 49 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 0.25 mSv). However, in one of the districts (Besiri) the maximum radon value turned out to be 307 Bq m(-3). The estimated annual effective doses are less than the recommended action level (3-10 mSv). It is found that the radon concentration decreases with increasing floor number. The concentrations of natural and artificial radioisotopes were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy for soil samples collected in close vicinity of the studied schools. The mean gamma activity concentrations in the soil samples were 31, 25, 329 and 12 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The radiological parameters such as the absorbed dose rate in air and the annual effective dose equivalent were calculated. These radiological parameters were evaluated and compared with the internationally recommended values.

  1. Estimation of photon energy distribution in gamma calibration field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shimizu, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1997-03-01

    Photon survey instruments used for radiation protection are usually calibrated at gamma radiation fields, which are traceable to the national standard with regard to exposure. Whereas scattered radiations as well as primary gamma-rays exit in the calibration field, no consideration for the effect of the scattered radiations on energy distribution is given in routine calibration works. The scattered radiations can change photon energy spectra in the field, and this can result in misinterpretations of energy-dependent instrument responses. Construction materials in the field affect the energy distribution and magnitude of the scattered radiations. The geometric relationship between a gamma source and an instrument can determine the energy distribution at the calibration point. Therefore, it is essential for the assurance of quality calibration to estimate the energy spectra at the gamma calibration fields. Then, photon energy distributions at some fields in the Facility of Radiation Standard of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were estimated by measurements using a NaI(Tl) detector and Monte Carlo calculations. It was found that the use of collimator gives a different feature in photon energy distribution. The origin of scattered radiations and the ratio of the scattered radiations to the primary gamma-rays were obtained. The results can help to improve the calibration of photon survey instruments in the JAERI. (author)

  2. Dose equivalent distribution during occupational exposure in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco H, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this work are presented the results of the radiological surveillance of occupationally exposed workers at the National Institute of Oncology and Radiology during 26 years. The incidence of the equivalent dose in the personal working with radiant sources and radioactive substances in areas of x rays diagnostic, teletherapy, brachytherapy, nuclear medicine and biomedical research was showed. The employed dosimetric system makes use of ORWO RD3/RD4 monitoring film with copper and lead filters inside a plastic cassette manufactured in Cuba. The experimental method is supported by the optical densitometric analysis of films together with a set of standard film calibrated in standard X and gamma photon beams by means of a secondary standard dosimeter, type NPL. Statistics show that except those workings with radium-226, manual brachytherapy or Mo-99/Tc-99 generator elution, the equivalent dose distribution in our workers has been kept in regions well down the annual permissible limit. (authors). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Dose profile monitoring with carbon ions by means of prompt-gamma measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1 and IN2P3/CNRS, UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: e.testa@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Bajard, M.; Chevallier, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Le Foulher, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1 and IN2P3/CNRS, UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Freud, N.; Letang, J.M. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Laboratoire de Controle Non-Destructif par Rayonnements Ionisants (France); Poizat, J.C.; Ray, C.; Testa, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1 and IN2P3/CNRS, UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-03-15

    A key point in the quality control of ion therapy is real-time monitoring and imaging of the dose delivered to the patient. Among the possible signals that can be used to make such a monitoring, prompt gamma-rays issued from nuclear fragmentation are possible candidates, provided the correlation between the emission profile and the primary beam range can be established. By means of simultaneous energy and time-of-flight discrimination, we could measure the longitudinal profile of the prompt gamma-rays emitted by 73 MeV/u carbon ions stopping inside a PMMA target. This technique allowed us to minimize the shielding against neutrons and scattered gamma rays, and to find a good correlation between the prompt-gamma profile and the ion range. This profile was studied as a function of the observation angle. By extrapolating our results to higher energies and realistic detection efficiencies, we showed that prompt gamma-ray measurements make it feasible to control in real time the longitudinal dose during ion therapy treatments.

  4. Effects of high dose gamma irradiation on ITO thin film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyamani, A. [National Nanotechnology Center, King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mustapha, N., E-mail: nazirmustapha@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physics, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, P.O. Box 90950, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-07-29

    Transparent thin-film Indium Tin Oxides (ITO) were prepared on 0.7 mm thick glass substrates using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process with average thickness of 150 nm. The samples were then exposed to high gamma γ radiation doses by {sup 60}Co radioisotope. The films have been irradiated by performing exposure cycles up to 250 kGy total doses at room temperature. The surface structures before and after irradiation were analysed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was performed on all samples before and after irradiation to investigate any change in the grain sizes, and also in the roughness of the ITO surface. We investigated the influence of γ irradiation on the spectra of transmittance T, in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrum using spectrophotometer measurements. Energy band gap E{sub g} was then calculated from the optical spectra for all ITO films. It was found that the optical band gap values decreased as the radiation dose was increased. To compare the effect of the irradiation on refractive index n and extinction coefficient k properties, additional measurements were done on the ITO samples before and after gamma irradiation using an ellipsometer. The optical constants n and k increased by increasing the irradiation doses. Electrical properties such as resistivity and sheet resistance were measured using the four-point probe method. The good optical, electrical and morphological properties maintained by the ITO films even after being exposed to high gamma irradiation doses, made them very favourable to be used as anodes for solar cells and as protective coatings in space windows. - Highlights: • Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • Effects of Gamma irradiation were investigated. • Changes of optical transmission and electrical properties of ITO films were studied. • Intensity of the diffraction peaks and the film's structure changed with increasing irradiation doses.

  5. Indoor gamma dose measurements in Gudalore (India) using TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, R.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Mugunthamanikandan, N.; Raghunath, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    Indoor gamma radiation dose rates were measured inside residential buildings in Gudalore using a CaSO 4 : Dy thermoluminescent dosimeter for 1 year . Significant seasonal variations are observed. The highest dose rate is observed during summer and the lowest in winter. The dose rates observed are between 77.9 and 229.3 nGy h -1 and may be attributed to the type of building materials used in the dwellings monitored. The calculated mean annual effective dose equivalent rates range between 477.6 μSv y -1 , for the inhabitants of mud houses to 1406.3 μSv y -1 , for those living in terrace houses made of cement and brick

  6. Effect of large dose gamma-ray irradiation on polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yohsuke; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Yagyu, Hideki.

    1988-01-01

    In the radiation environment of atomic energy, space and so on, with the heightening of the performance of equipment, the organic materials having the radiation resistance up to several hundreds MGy have been demanded. Polyimide is one of a small number of the polymers which are considered to be applicable to such environment. However, actually the characteristics as the insulator for such large dose radiation environment have not been sufficiently verified. In this study, the gamma-ray of as large dose as 100 MGy was irradiated on the polyimides having different chemical structure in the air and in nitrogen, and the change of their mechanical and electrical characteristics was elucidated, at the same time, the structural change was examined. The four kinds of polyimides used for the experiment were three kinds of thermosetting type and thermoplastic polyether imide. Co-60 gamma-ray was irradiated at the dose rate of 17 kGy/h at room temperature. The tensile properties, volume resistivity, dielectric tangent, gel fraction, glass transition temperature and IR spectra were examined. In the air, the characteristics lowered by large dose irradiation due to the severance of main chains. In nitrogen, the deterioration was extremely slight, and cross-linking occurred. (K.I.)

  7. The annual terrestrial gamma radiation dose to the population of the urban Christchurch area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Natural terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured with a high pressure ionization chamber at 70 indoor (195 site measurements) and 58 outdoor locations in the metropolitan Christchurch area. Based on these site measurements, the average gonad dose rate to the population from natural terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 273+-56 microgray per annum. (auth)

  8. Spectral distribution of the radiochemiluminescence from gamma-irradiated humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goraczko, W.; Slawinski, J.; Staninski, K.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate radiochemiluminescence (RCL) spectra (340-650 nm), kinetics and absorption spectra of humic acids (HA) after their exposure of gamma-radiation (absorbed doses of 1-10 kGy, 60 Co) in model systems. The kinetics and spectral distribution of RCL were measured using the single photon counting method (SPC) and cut-off filters. Absorption spectra (range 240-800 nm) of irradiated solutions indicated that post-radiative degradation/polymerization processes take place in the HA changing their macromolecule or properties. The intensity of the delayed RCL was nonlinearly and suggested that complex radical formation mechanisms were still involved in the post-radiative reactions. (author)

  9. Spectral distribution of the radiochemiluminescence from gamma-irradiated humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goraczko, W [Poznan University of Technology, Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Chemical Technology, Radio- and Photochemistry Department; Slawinski, J [Institute of Ecotechnology, Gniezno (Poland). State High Vocational School; Staninski, K [Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Rare Earths

    2008-09-15

    This study was conducted to investigate radiochemiluminescence (RCL) spectra (340-650 nm), kinetics and absorption spectra of humic acids (HA) after their exposure of gamma-radiation (absorbed doses of 1-10 kGy, {sup 60}Co) in model systems. The kinetics and spectral distribution of RCL were measured using the single photon counting method (SPC) and cut-off filters. Absorption spectra (range 240-800 nm) of irradiated solutions indicated that post-radiative degradation/polymerization processes take place in the HA changing their macromolecule or properties. The intensity of the delayed RCL was nonlinearly and suggested that complex radical formation mechanisms were still involved in the post-radiative reactions. (author)

  10. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Ryukyu Islands, subtropical region of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, M.; Shiroma, M.; Motomura, D.; Fujioka, S.; Kawakami, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Arakawa, K.; Fukahori, K.; Jyunicho, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Ohomoto, T.; Kina, S.; Shiroma, Y.; Masuda, N.; Hiraoka, H.; Shingaki, R.; Akata, N.; Zhuo, W.; Tokonami, S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to explain the distribution of natural radiation level in the Asia, in situ measurements of dose rate in air due to terrestrial gamma radiation have been conducted in a total of 21 islands that belong to Ryukyu Islands (Ryukyu Archipelago), subtropical rejoin of southwest Japan. Car-borne surveys have also been carried out in Okinawa-jima, the biggest island of the archipelago. Based on the results for these measurements, arithmetic mean, the maximum and the minimum of the dose rates at 1 m in height from the unpaved soil ground in the archipelago were estimated to be 47, 165 and 8 nGy h -1 , respectively. A comparative study of car-borne data obtained prior to and subsequent to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, as for Okinawa-jima, indicated that the nuclear accident has no impact on the environmental radiation at the present time. (authors)

  11. Spatial variation of natural terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates in Brunei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.J.; Lai, K.K.; Manato, S.; Kodaira, K.

    1998-01-01

    A carbon survey of natural terrestrial gamma-rat dose rates along the main roads of the western part of Brunei Darussalam was carried out using two portable type 1.5 φ x 4 NaI(TI) and 1 φ x 2 NaI(TI) scintillation counters. A series of semicontinuous count rates measurements were performed inside a moving vehicle. This yielded equal-distance data which were analysed statistically to obtain the spatial variation of the natural terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates. The equal-distance data of dose rates were obtained by correcting for shielding effect of the car. The thickness of the pavement and the contribution from the pavement material were estimated from a correlation curve between the dose rates measured on pavements and on the nearby soils. A spectral analysis of the equal-distance data enabled us to clarify the structure of the spatial variation in dose rates. The data could be reasonably smoothened by removing the random noise components in a higher wave number region. (author). 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  12. Gamma and electron high dose dosimetry with rad-hard Si diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascoalino, Kelly Cristina da Silva

    2014-01-01

    In this work the main dosimetric characteristics of rad-hard Float Zone (FZ) and magnetic Czochralski (MCz) diodes to electrons (1.5 MeV) and gamma ( 60 Co) radiation are evaluated. The dosimetric system proposed is based on electrical current measurements due to radiation interactions on the devices. The batch response uniformity was studied for the n-type FZ diodes irradiated with gamma rays. The coefficient of variation of the current measurement was about 1.25% at 5 kGy of accumulated dose. A sensitivity decrease with the increase of the accumulated dose (Total Ionizing Dose - TID) was observed for both FZ and MCz diodes. For gamma irradiation, these effect is more pronounced for n-type or smaller resistivity diodes. Two types of dosimetric probe were used on the electron irradiation procedures, one of them specially designed to avoid the deterioration of the electrical contacts and the diodes metallization. The sensitivity of the preirradiated FZ and MCz diodes fell about 10% and 40%, respectively, during electron irradiation at 1.25 MGy of accumulated dose. The effect of electron radiation damage on the electrical properties of the diodes was studied by the means of leakage current and capacitance measurements as a function of bias voltage. The leakage current increases with the accumulated dose but does not contributes significantly to the current signal, since the diodes are operated in photovoltaic mode, without bias voltage. For the MCz diode no change in the full depletion voltage was observed, which indicates its higher tolerance to radiation-induced damage, as expected. During electron irradiation the temperature increases and in order to determine its influence for the current signals, the leakage current values were extrapolated up to 35 °C. The contribution does not exceed 0.1% for FZ and MCz diodes. The effect of the radiation type, electrons or gamma rays, on the pre dose procedures was analyzed for the FZ n-type device and was observed that the

  13. The log S -log N distribution of gamma ray brust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takamasa; Nishimura, Jun; Fujii, Masami

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the size S and the frequency N of gamma ray burst has been studied. This relation may be determined from the celestial distribution of gamma ray burst sources. The present analysis gives that the log S - log N relation for any direction is determined by the celestial distribution of gamma ray burst sources. The observed bursts were analyzed. The celestial distribution of gamma ray burst sources was observed by the satellites of USSR. The results showed that the distribution seemed to be isotropic. However, the calculated log S - log N relation based on the isotropic distribution wasF in disagreement with the observed ones. As the result of analysis, it was found that the observed bursts missed low energy part because of the threshold of detectors. The levels of discrimination of detection were not clear. When a proper threshold level is set for each type of burst, and the size of bursts is determined, the above mentioned discrepancy will be deleted regardless of luminosity and the spatial distribution of bursts. (Kato, T.)

  14. Extended gamma sources modelling using multipole expansion: Application to the Tunisian gamma source load planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loussaief, Abdelkader

    2007-01-01

    In this work we extend the use of multipole moments expansion to the case of inner radiation fields. A series expansion of the photon flux was established. The main advantage of this approach is that it offers the opportunity to treat both inner and external radiation field cases. We determined the expression of the inner multipole moments in both spherical harmonics and in cartesian coordinates. As an application we applied the analytical model to a radiation facility used for small target irradiation. Theoretical, experimental and simulation studies were performed, in air and in a product, and good agreement was reached.Conventional dose distribution study for gamma irradiation facility involves the use of isodose maps. The establishment of these maps requires the measurement of the absorbed dose in many points, which makes the task expensive experimentally and very long by simulation. However, a lack of points of measurement can distort the dose distribution cartography. To overcome these problems, we present in this paper a mathematical method to describe the dose distribution in air. This method is based on the multipole expansion in spherical harmonics of the photon flux emitted by the gamma source. The determination of the multipole coefficients of this development allows the modeling of the radiation field around the gamma source. (Author)

  15. Gamma histograms for radiotherapy plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Lewis, D. Geraint

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: The technique known as the 'γ evaluation method' incorporates pass-fail criteria for both distance-to-agreement and dose difference analysis of 3D dose distributions and provides a numerical index (γ) as a measure of the agreement between two datasets. As the γ evaluation index is being adopted in more centres as part of treatment plan verification procedures for 2D and 3D dose maps, the development of methods capable of encapsulating the information provided by this technique is recommended. Patients and methods: In this work the concept of γ index was extended to create gamma histograms (GH) in order to provide a measure of the agreement between two datasets in two or three dimensions. Gamma area histogram (GAH) and gamma volume histogram (GVH) graphs were produced using one or more 2D γ maps generated for each slice of the irradiated volume. GHs were calculated for IMRT plans, evaluating the 3D dose distribution from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) compared to a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation used as reference dataset. Results: The extent of local anatomical inhomogenities in the plans under consideration was strongly correlated with the level of difference between reference and evaluated calculations. GHs provided an immediate visual representation of the proportion of the treated volume that fulfilled the γ criterion and offered a concise method for comparative numerical evaluation of dose distributions. Conclusions: We have introduced the concept of GHs and investigated its applications to the evaluation and verification of IMRT plans. The gamma histogram concept set out in this paper can provide a valuable technique for quantitative comparison of dose distributions and could be applied as a tool for the quality assurance of treatment planning systems

  16. Measurement of the reduction of terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates by the snow cover using TL-dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Saito, Kimiaki; Nagaoka, Toshi; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1990-12-01

    The objective of the investigation is to make clear the effect of the snow cover on environmental gamma-ray field. The reduction in the natural terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate due to snow cover was measured by TL-dosimeters. The measurements were performed in autumn before snowfall and in winter from September 1987 through March 1988 in Nagaoka city, Niigata prefecture. The dosimeters were set at four points, both outside and inside of the houses, for three months. The penetration factors (ratios of terrestrial gamma-ray dose accumulated during snow covered period to those during snow free period) were 0.54-0.67 in the open field, and 0.73-0.95 in the houses. According to theoretical calculation by the Monte Carlo method and the published snowfall data, the corresponding penetration factor was estimated at 0.54 in an ideal open field. As a result, the measured penetration factors were larger than calculated one by 24 % at maximum. The variation of dose rate inside houses by the difference of the amount of snow fall has been investigated. In general, though the amount of snow fall changes every year, dose rates inside the house were proved to be affected little by them. And, the optimum value of snow density which adapted for inference of penetration factor was found to be 0.3 g/cm 3 . The penetration factors inferred from snowdepth data for the year distributed between 0.6 and 1.0 in winter from November 1985 through April 1986 in Niigata prefecture. (author)

  17. Neutron/gamma dose separation by the multiple-ion-chamber technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Many mixed n/γ dosimetry systems rely on two dosimeters, one composed of a tissue-equivalent material and the other made from a non-hydrogenous material. The paired chamber technique works well in fields of neutron radiation nearly identical in spectral composition to that in which the dosimeters were calibrated. However, this technique is drastically compromised in phantom due to the degradation of the neutron spectrum. The three-dosimeter technique allows for the fall-off in neutron sensitivity of the two non-hydrogenous dosimeters. Precise and physically meaningful results were obtained with this technique with a D-T source in air and in phantom and with simultaneous D-T neutron and 60 Co gamma ray irradiation in air. The MORSE-CG coupled n/γ three-dimensional Monte Carlo code was employed to calculate neutron and gamma doses in a water phantom. Gamma doses calculated in phantom with this code were generally lower than corresponding ion chamber measurements. This can be explained by the departure of irradiation conditions from ideal narrow-beam geometry. 97 references

  18. Effect of low doses of gamma radiation on alfalfa (Lucerne) yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Odat, M; Khalifa, Kh [Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic). Dept. of Radiation Agriculture

    1994-11-01

    Presowing seed irradiation has been reported frequently as a useful application of radiation in agriculture to stimulate growth and increase the yield of field and horticulture crops. Lucerne seeds of previous season (local variety) were irradiated by gamma rays Cs sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 source using doses of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 Gy at dose rate of 9.2 Gy/min. Then were planted after 7 days from irradiation with unirradiated control in complete randomized block design and 5 replicates for three seasons (1986, 1987, 1988), the field experiment was carried out at ACSAD research station in Der-Ezzor. Also pot experiments were carried out to study the effect of low doses gamma irradiation on seed germination and growth of shoot and root systems of seedlings. The following observation were made on plants grown in the field:- fresh weight and dry weight of shoot system, - seed yield at the end of the experiment. The results show that there is a positive effect of seed irradiation on percentage of germination and root systems of seedling compared with the control. the highest increase in dry weight of shoot and root systems was at doses of 10 and 15 Gy. specially when sowing was 10 days after irradiation. Gamma irradiation doses of 10 and 15 Gy led to significant increases in fresh and dry weight at shoot system in the three seasons. The increases were 17.5% and 14.6% for the doses of 10 and 15 Gy respectively. A considerable increase in seed yield obtained at doses from 10 to 40 Gy, and the seed yield varied from 13.3% to 17.9% Compared with the control. (author). 20 refs., 18 tabs.

  19. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, Stefano; Cammi, Antonio; Garlati, Luisella; Lombardi, Carlo; Padovani, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressuriser and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield.

  20. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Cammi, A.; Garlati, L.; Lombardi, C.; Padovani, E.

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressurizer and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60 Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield. (authors)

  1. Calculation of dose distribution for 252Cf fission neutron source in tissue equivalent phantoms using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Gang; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Zhang Wenzhong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide useful parameters for neutron radiotherapy, the author presents results of a Monte Carlo simulation study investigating the dosimetric characteristics of linear 252 Cf fission neutron sources. Methods: A 252 Cf fission source and tissue equivalent phantom were modeled. The dose of neutron and gamma radiations were calculated using Monte Carlo Code. Results: The dose of neutron and gamma at several positions for 252 Cf in the phantom made of equivalent materials to water, blood, muscle, skin, bone and lung were calculated. Conclusion: The results by Monte Carlo methods were compared with the data by measurement and references. According to the calculation, the method using water phantom to simulate local tissues such as muscle, blood and skin is reasonable for the calculation and measurements of dose distribution for 252 Cf

  2. Indoor gamma dose measurements in Gudalore (India) using TLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, R.; Selvasekarapandian, S. E-mail: spandian@bharathi.ernet.in; Mugunthamanikandan, N.; Raghunath, V.M

    2002-06-01

    Indoor gamma radiation dose rates were measured inside residential buildings in Gudalore using a CaSO{sub 4} : Dy thermoluminescent dosimeter for 1 year . Significant seasonal variations are observed. The highest dose rate is observed during summer and the lowest in winter. The dose rates observed are between 77.9 and 229.3 nGy h{sup -1} and may be attributed to the type of building materials used in the dwellings monitored. The calculated mean annual effective dose equivalent rates range between 477.6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}, for the inhabitants of mud houses to 1406.3 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}, for those living in terrace houses made of cement and brick.

  3. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jisha, N V; Krishnakumar, D N; Surya Prakash, G; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2012-03-01

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify (41)Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) as a dosemeter for gamma-radiation dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoca, R; Ureña-Núñez, F

    2009-06-01

    This work reports the possibility of using lithium carbonate as a dosimetric material for gamma-radiation measurements. Carboxi-radical ions, CO(2)(-) and CO(3)(-), arise from the gamma irradiation of Li(2)CO(3), and these radical ions can be quantified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. The EPR-signal response of gamma-irradiated lithium carbonate has been investigated to determine some dosimetric characteristics such as: peak-to-peak signal intensity versus gamma dose received, zero-dose response, signal fading, signal repeatability, batch homogeneity, dose rate effect and stability at different environmental conditions. Using the conventional peak-to-peak method of stable ion radicals, it is concluded that lithium carbonate could be used as a gamma dosemeter in the range of 3-100 Gy.

  5. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr2(PO4)3 at high gamma radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez-Regil, E.; Contreras-Ramírez, A.; Fernández-Valverde, S.M.; González-Martínez, P.R.; Carrasco-Ábrego, H.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 exposed to gamma doses of 10, 30 and 50 MGy. •Gamma radiation produced growth of the crystal size of the NZP. •Morphology changes were reversible by heating. •Linear relationship between the thermoluminescence and the applied gamma dose. •This property could be useful for high-level gamma dosimetry. -- Abstract: This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10–50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported

  6. Evaluation of gamma dose effect on PIN photodiode using analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Boorboor, S.

    2018-03-01

    The PIN silicon photodiodes are widely used in the applications which may be found in radiation environment such as space mission, medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Radiation-induced damage in these devices causes to degrade the photodiode parameters. In this work, we have used new approach to evaluate gamma dose effects on a commercial PIN photodiode (BPX65) based on an analytical model. In this approach, the NIEL parameter has been calculated for gamma rays from a 60Co source by GEANT4. The radiation damage mechanisms have been considered by solving numerically the Poisson and continuity equations with the appropriate boundary conditions, parameters and physical models. Defects caused by radiation in silicon have been formulated in terms of the damage coefficient for the minority carriers' lifetime. The gamma induced degradation parameters of the silicon PIN photodiode have been analyzed in detail and the results were compared with experimental measurements and as well as the results of ATLAS semiconductor simulator to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. The results showed reasonable agreement between them for BPX65 silicon photodiode irradiated by 60Co gamma source at total doses up to 5 kGy under different reverse voltages.

  7. Effect of low-dose gamma-radiation upon hatchability and weight of chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Kraljevic, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljanic, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Although any dose of ionizing radiation has generally been recognized to be detrimental to living being, low dose ionizing radiation seems to invoke primary stimulative effects. Stimulatory effects of low dose ionizing radiation include many aspects such as growth, fecundity and longevity stimulation, accelerated development, enhance biological responses for immune systems, enzymatic repair, physiological functions, and the removal of cellular damage, including prevention and removal of cancers and other diseases. Low dose ionizing radiation might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation before incubation and on the seventh day of incubation on hatchability of eggs and body weight of chickens. This study includes three independent experiments. In the first experiment, six-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Avian-line 34, were irradiated by a dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (60 Co) before incubation. In the second experiments also involving six-hundred-line 34 eggs were irradiated by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation on the seventh day of incubation. In the third experiment three-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Ross 308 were irradiated by dose 0.30 Gy gamma irradiation before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups. Hatchability was calculated in terms of all eggs divided with fertile eggs which hatched. The individual weights of the chickens were determined on the first and on the forty second day. Growth data were analyzed statistically by t-test. Irradiation of chicken eggs and embryos at rates o f 0.15 Gy increases

  8. Optimized dose distribution of a high dose rate vaginal cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuofeng; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present a comparison of optimized dose distributions for a set of high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cylinders calculated by a commercial treatment-planning system with benchmark calculations using Monte-Carlo-calculated dosimetry data. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions using both an isotropic and an anisotropic dose calculation model were obtained for a set of HDR vaginal cylinders. Mathematical optimization techniques available in the computer treatment-planning system were used to calculate dwell times and positions. These dose distributions were compared with benchmark calculations with TG43 formalism and using Monte-Carlo-calculated data. The same dwell times and positions were used for a quantitative comparison of dose calculated with three dose models. Results: The isotropic dose calculation model can result in discrepancies as high as 50%. The anisotropic dose calculation model compared better with benchmark calculations. The differences were more significant at the apex of the vaginal cylinder, which is typically used as the prescription point. Conclusion: Dose calculation models available in a computer treatment-planning system must be evaluated carefully to ensure their correct application. It should also be noted that when optimized dose distribution at a distance from the cylinder surface is calculated using an accurate dose calculation model, the vaginal mucosa dose becomes significantly higher, and therefore should be carefully monitored

  9. Effect of gamma radiation dose and sensitizer on the physical properties of irradiated natural rubber latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komgrit, R.; Thawat, C.; B, Tripob; Wirach, T.

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The vulcanization of natural rubber latex can be induced by gamma radiation, which enhances cross-linking within the rubber matrix. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of gamma radiation dose and sensitizers on the physical properties of irradiated natural rubber. Three sensitizers n-butyl acrylate (n-B A), tetrachloroethylene (C 2 Cl 4 ) and trichloromethane (CHCl 3 ) were mixed with natural rubber latex before irradiation with gamma ray dose varied from 14 to 22 kGy. Results showed that the mixture of three sensitizers with specific ratios effectively induced the cross-linking of natural rubber latex. The cross-linking ratio and improved physical properties increased with increasing gamma dose. Therefore, the mixture ratios of n-B A, C 2 Cl 4 and CHCl 3 have shown to be a critical parameter in the vulcanization of natural rubber latex by gamma radiation

  10. Dose-response relationship of {gamma}-H2AX foci induction in human lymphocytes after X-rays exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandina, Tania [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Roch-Lefevre, Sandrine H.; Voisin, Pascale [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DRPH, SRBE, LDB, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Lamadrid, Ana I.; Romero, Ivonne [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Garcia, Omar, E-mail: omar@cphr.edu.cu [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Voisin, Philippe; Roy, Laurence [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DRPH, SRBE, LDB, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-09-15

    Biological dosimeters are recommended for dose estimation in case of human overexposure to ionising radiation. Rapid measurement of {gamma}-H2AX foci as a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induction has been recently tested with this purpose. Here we reported a dose-response relationship after X-ray irradiation at different times post-exposure. Blood samples were obtained from several healthy donors and exposed to doses between 0 and 2 Gy. After irradiation, blood samples were incubated at 37 deg. C during 0.5 h, 5 h, and 8 h. Scoring of cells and {gamma}-H2AX foci was performed by software. The dose-response curves for different incubation times were as follows: Y{sub (0.5h)} = 11.66D + 0.15 (R{sup 2} = 0.99), Y{sub (5h)} = 2.44D + 0.15 (R{sup 2} = 0.99), Y{sub (8h)} = 1.57D + 0.22 (R{sup 2} = 0.99). At 0.5 h post-exposure, the dose-response relationship for X-irradiated lymphocytes was similar to the one obtained after gamma-irradiation using the same protocol. On the other hand, the results were not similar after 8 h due to different kinetics after gamma- and X-irradiation. Our results confirm the possibilities of using {gamma}-H2AX foci method for dose estimation in a period from 0.5 h up to 8 h post X-irradiation and support the hypothesis of differences in {gamma}-H2AX foci kinetics after gamma- and X-irradiation in vitro.

  11. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen Zhe [Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: sluan@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: nate@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: zchen@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: lijunma@radonc.ucsf.edu

    2009-03-21

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C(TM) and Perfexion(TM) units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can

  12. Comparison of X-ray and gamma-ray dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia clone 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underbrink, A.G.; Kellerer, A.M.; Mills, R.E.; Sparrow, A.H.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, N.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Microdosimetric data indicate that the mean specific energy, xi, produced by individual charged particles from X rays and gamma rays is different for the two radiation qualities by nearly a factor of two. In order to test whether this influences the initial, linear component in the dose-effect relations, a comparison was made between dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia clone 02 stamen hairs following X and gamma irradiations. Absorbed doses ranged from 2.66 to 300 rad. The results are in agreement with predictions made on the basis of microdosimetric data. At low doses gamma rays are substantially less effective than X rays. The RBE of gamma rays vs. X rays at low doses was approximately 0.6, a value lower than those usually reported in other experimental systems. (orig.) [de

  13. Radioactivity Risk Assessment of Radon and Gamma Dose at One Uranium Tailings Pond in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yalong; Liu, Yong; Peng, Guowen; Zhao, Guodong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhu

    2018-01-01

    A year-long monitoring of gamma radiation effective dose rate and radon concentration had been done in the reservoir area of one uranium tailings pond in Hunan province (The monitoring area included indoor and outdoor area of residential buildings and workshops, tailings dam slope). Afterwards, the annual effective radiation dose of the people in that radiation environment had been calculated based on the results of monitoring, as well as a radiation risk assessment. According to the assessment, gamma radiation effective dose rate and radon concentration in the monitoring area were low, and the annual effective radiation dose was far below the international standard (30mSv), which showed that the radiation would not put the people’s health at risk. However, the annual effective radiation dose of gamma was far above that of radon in the area of uranium tailings pond; therefore, it’s advisable to take quarantine measures in in the area of uranium tailings pond to keep the surrounding residents away from unnecessary ionizing radiation.

  14. Effect of Gamma Irradiation Doses on Some Chemical Characteristics of Cotton Seed Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, O.I.

    2011-01-01

    Cotton Seeds c.v. Giza 85 (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were exposed to gamma irradiation doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy to improve some chemical characteristics of cotton seed oil i.e. saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, gossypol and βsitosterol that were bound oil. The presented study showed that, the saturated fatty acids; lauric, palmitic and stearic increased when the cotton seeds were exposed to gamma irradiation doses of 0.5 up to 1.5 kGy, On the other hand, arachidic acid content decreased in all the irradiated treatments compared with untreated cotton seed. The unsaturated fatty acid oleic was increased in irradiated cotton seed samples compared with untreated one, while linoleic, the major unsaturated fatty acid decreased in irradiated cotton seed oil than untreated seeds. Gossypol and βsitosterol, bound oil, in irradiated cotton seeds increased gradually with gamma irradiated doses compared with untreated control samples

  15. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  16. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  17. Relationship between accuracy and number of samples on statistical quantity and contour map of environmental gamma-ray dose rate. Example of random sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hideharu; Minato, Susumu

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy of statistical quantity like the mean value and contour map obtained by measurement of the environmental gamma-ray dose rate was evaluated by random sampling of 5 different model distribution maps made by the mean slope, -1.3, of power spectra calculated from the actually measured values. The values were derived from 58 natural gamma dose rate data reported worldwide ranging in the means of 10-100 Gy/h rates and 10 -3 -10 7 km 2 areas. The accuracy of the mean value was found around ±7% even for 60 or 80 samplings (the most frequent number) and the standard deviation had the accuracy less than 1/4-1/3 of the means. The correlation coefficient of the frequency distribution was found 0.860 or more for 200-400 samplings (the most frequent number) but of the contour map, 0.502-0.770. (K.H.)

  18. Gamma factors of an ambulatory source; Factores gamma de una fuente ambulatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos P, A; Vega C, H R; Manzanares A, E; Salas L, M A; Hernandez D, V M [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Barquero, R [Hospital Universitario del Rio Hortega, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Some of the procedures for diagnostic or treatment used in the medicine use radioactive materials as the I{sup 131}. By means of Monte Carlo methods were calculated the doses in the internal organs of a woman, with three months of pregnancy, due to the radioiodine captured by her thyroid, as well as to 1 meter of the gland. A three-dimensional mathematical model of the body of a woman was used and by means of Monte Carlo, the radioiodine photons were transported isotropically from the thyroid toward the whole body and was calculated the absorbed dose by their internal organs, also the Kerma in air (K) was determined and the environmental equivalent dose (H{sup *}(10)) at 1 m of the gland. Two activity factors at dose were determined, Gamma Factors that it allows to estimate the dose that the patient produces to people to its around. Of the gamma radiation that emits the I{sup 131} in the thyroid was found that the thymus receives the biggest dose while the uterus is the organ that smaller dose receives. The determined gamma factors were: {gamma}{sub KAire} = 56 {mu}Gy-m{sup 2}-h{sup -1}-GBq{sup -1}, and {gamma}{sub H}{sup *}{sub (10)} = 73 {mu}Sv-m{sup 2}-h{sup -1}-GBq{sup -1}. The distribution of the absorbed dose by the internal organs is attributed to the relative distance among the thyroid and the other organs, to the inter-organs shielding, its size and to its elementary composition. The {gamma}{sub KAire} and {gamma}{sub H}{sup *}{sub (10)} factors allow to estimate the exposure that the patient produces on the personnel to its around. With this, the nuclear medicus, the medical physicist or the one responsible of the radiological safety in the hospital can give more precise indications on the behavior of people around the patient. (Author)

  19. Suitable gamma ray dose determination in order to induce genetic variation in kaboli chickpea (Cicer Arietinum L)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naserian Khiabani, B.; Ahari Mostafavi, H.; Fathollahi, H.; Vedadi, S.; Mosavi Shalmani, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    In spite of chickpea's use in Iran and its ability of being replaced to adjust the shortage of protein in dietary habits, yield production is very low. One of the main reasons for chickpea's low yield production is its sensitiveness to some diseases, pest and environmental stresses. Genetic variation in chickpea is very low, because of its self pollination. In breeding programs, genetic variation plays an essential role so that the induction of genetic variation in plant population is very important for the plant breeders. The induced mutation through different kinds of mutagens is one of the important ways of genetic variation. In this research, first the sensitiveness of four cultivars (ILC.486, Philip86, Bivinich, Jam) were assessed to different gamma ray doses (100, 200, 300, 400 Gy). The results showed that with an increase in gamma ray dose, the growth rate of chickpea's genotypes decreases. In this respect, the decrease of growth rate has a linear relationship with the gamma ray dose and it is independent from the genotypes. The root length is more sensitive to gamma ray doses than its shoot, and it was observed that at the low doses the root growth decreases, comparing to the shoot growth. On the other hand, in high doses of gamma ray growth abrasion (Ageotropism, Albinism and etc.) were observed. Some traits variation (such as leaf shape, leaf size, leaf color, Albinism, etc.) were seen in M 2 generation, and finally to continue the project, three doses of gamma ray (150,200,250) were selected for the next year

  20. Yield and Chemical Composition of Cucumber Treated by Nitrogen Levels and Doses of Gamma Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fath El-Bab, T.Sh.; Abo El-Khier, Om.M.; Abdallah, A.A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Two field experiments were performed at the Atomic Energy Authority, Experimental farm, Inshas, Egypt during 2010 and 2011 summer growing seasons in sandy soil. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of pre-sowing seeds which treated by gamma irradiation with different doses of 0, 2, 4 and 6 Gy. This was in combination with three rates of nitrogen, fertilizer i.e., 30, 60 and 90 Kg N/fed. The experiments were laid out using drip irrigation system. The obtained results indicated that gamma rays doses showed significant differences on cucumber yield per plot or per Fed., increasing doses of gamma rays gradually increased cucumber yield per plot up to highest dose, i.e., (6 Gy). The highest value of total yield was obtained with the highest nitrogen rate (90 Kg N/fed.). Doses of gamma rays significantly increased total soluble solids (T.S.S.), total Carbohydrates, fats, total protein, NPK and Ca of cucumber fruits. Application of 60 Kg N/fed. recorded the highest values of all above mentioned chemical characters except of total protein with 90 kg N/fed. every all dose treatments. The effect of interaction between doses and fertilizer levels on chemical characters were significant therefore, the highest values was found at 4 Gy and 60 Kg N/fed. treatment for protein, fat, nitrogen and potassium contents while the carbohydrate and calcium contents had the highest value with the treatment of 6 Gy and 60 Kg N/fed

  1. Hard beta and gamma emissions of 124I. Impact on occupational dose in PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerink, G J; Franssen, R; Visser, M G W; Urbach, C J A; Halders, S G E A; Frantzen, M J; Brans, B; Teule, G J J; Mottaghy, F M

    2011-01-01

    The hard beta and gamma radiation of 124I can cause high doses to PET/CT workers. In this study we tried to quantify this occupational exposure and to optimize radioprotection. Thin MCP-Ns thermoluminescent dosimeters suitable for measuring beta and gamma radiation were used for extremity dosimetry, active personal dosimeters for whole-body dosimetry. Extremity doses were determined during dispensing of 124I and oral administration of the activity to the patient, the body dose during all phases of the PET/CT procedure. In addition, dose rates of vials and syringes as used in clinical practice were measured. The procedure for dispensing 124I was optimized using newly developed shielding. Skin dose rates up to 100 mSv/min were measured when in contact with the manufacturer's vial containing 370 MBq of 124I. For an unshielded 5 ml syringe the positron skin dose was about seven times the gamma dose. Before optimization of the preparation of 124I, using an already reasonably safe technique, the highest mean skin dose caused by handling 370 MBq was 1.9 mSv (max. 4.4 mSv). After optimization the skin dose was below 0.2 mSv. The highly energetic positrons emitted by 124I can cause high skin doses if radioprotection is poor. Under optimized conditions occupational doses are acceptable. Education of workers is of paramount importance.

  2. A Performance Evaluation of a Notebook PC under a High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Wan Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the performance of a notebook PC under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation test. A notebook PC, which is small and light weight, is generally used as the control unit of a robot system and loaded onto the robot body. Using TEPCO’s CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system data, the gamma ray dose rate before and after a hydrogen explosion in reactor units 1–3 of the Fukushima nuclear power plant was more than 150 Gy/h. To use a notebook PC as the control unit of a robot system entering a reactor building to mitigate the severe accident situation of a nuclear power plant, the performance of the notebook PC under such intense gamma-irradiation fields should be evaluated. Under a similar dose-rate (150 Gy/h gamma ray environment, the performances of different notebook PCs were evaluated. In addition, a simple method for a performance evaluation of a notebook PC under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation test is proposed. Three notebook PCs were tested to verify the method proposed in this paper.

  3. Validation of a model for calculating environmental doses caused by gamma emitters in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, X.; Rosell, J.R.; Dies, X.

    1991-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the absorbed dose rates caused by gamma emitters of both natural and artificial origin distributed in the soil. The model divides the soil into five compartments corresponding to layers situated at different depths, and assumes that the concentration of radionuclides is constant in each one of them. The calculations, following the model developed, are undertaken through a program which, based on the concentrations of the radionuclides in the different compartments, gives as a result the dose rate at a height of one metre above the ground caused by each radionuclide and the percentage this represents with respect to the total absorbed dose rate originating from this soil. The validity of the model has been checked in the case of sandy soils by comparing the exposure rates calculated for five sites with the experimental values obtained with an ionisation chamber. (author)

  4. Study of the heterogeneities effect in the dose distributions of Leksell Gamma Knife (R), through Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Al-Dweri, F.M.O.; Lallena R, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work they are studied, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the effects that take place in the dose profiles that are obtained with the Leksell Gamma Knife (R), when they are kept in account heterogeneities. The considered heterogeneities simulate the skull and the spaces of air that are in the head, like they can be the nasal breasts or the auditory conduits. The calculations were made using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code (v. 2003). The geometry of each one of the 201 sources that this instrument is composed, as well as of the corresponding channels of collimation of the Gamma Knife (R), it was described by means of a simplified model of geometry that has been recently studied. The obtained results when they are kept in mind the heterogeneities they present non worthless differences regarding those obtained when those are not considered. These differences are maximum in the proximities of the interfaces among different materials. (Author)

  5. Dose response of alanine and methyl alanine towards gamma and in-situ alpha irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Rajeswari, B.; Bhide, M.K.; Rane, Vinayak; Kadam, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    In situ alpha and external gamma dose response of two ESR (electron spin resonance) dosimetric materials namely alanine and methyl alanine were investigated. It was observed that alanine dosimeter had a better dose response in comparison to methyl alanine for the in-situ alpha irradiation by using 239 Pu powder. On the other hand, in case of gamma radiation, methyl alanine was found to have the sensitivity as twice that of alanine. (author)

  6. Evaluation of gafchromic EBT film for intensity modulated radiation therapy dose distribution verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, A.; Gopalkrishna Kurup, P.G.; Murali, V.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Mothilal Nehru, R.; Velmurugan, J.

    2006-01-01

    This work was undertaken with the intention of investigating the possibility of clinical use of commercially available self-developing radiochromic film - Gafchromic EBT film - for IMRT dose verification. The dose response curves were generated for the films using VXR-16 film scanner. The results obtained with EBT films were compared with the results of Kodak EDR2 films. It was found that the EBT film has a linear response between the dose ranges of 0 and 600 cGy. The dose-related characteristics of the EBT film, like post-irradiation color growth with time, film uniformity and effect of scanning orientation, were studied. There is up to 8.6% increase in the color density between 2 and 40 h after irradiation. There was a considerable variation, up to 8.5%, in the film uniformity over its sensitive region. The quantitative difference between calculated and measured dose distributions was analyzed using Gamma index with the tolerance of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance agreement. EDR2 films showed good and consistent results with the calculated dose distribution, whereas the results obtained using EBT were inconsistent. The variation in the film uniformity limits the use of EBT film for conventional large field IMRT verification. For IMRT of smaller field size (4.5 x 4.5 cm), the results obtained with EBT were comparable with results of EDR2 films. (author)

  7. An Assessment of the Effects of Different Dose Levels of Gamma Rays on HPRT Gene of T-Cells from Human Peripheral Blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni, M. T.; Rezaee, M.

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce a broad range of genetic aberrations in human and other species. Most of the genetic aberrations are deletions. To study genetic alterations, an assessment of somatic ell gene mutations induced by ionizing radiation is proper method. In this study, the intragenic and total gene deletions of 18 HPRT-mutants derived from T-lymphocytes and induced by gamma rays were analyzed. PCR amplification of individual HPRT exons and multiplex PCR. HPRT-mutants were isolated by treatment of irradiated samples with 6-thioguanine. MPCR and PCR of individual exons of HPRT demonstrated that the intragenic and total gene deletions were not significantly different. The samples including more than one deletion had non-random significantly higher frequency. Mapping of all intragenic deleltion exhibited a nonrandom distribution. Middle part of HPRT gene was more sensitive to gamma rays. The sensitivity was increased with radiation dose. This study showed that the size of deletions are dose dependent. Our results suggest that alterations in T- lymphocytes mutant genes, induced deletions, size of deletions and distribution of DNA breakpoints appeared to be dependent on low LET radiation dose. (Author) 11 refs

  8. Isotropic gates in large gamma detector arrays versus angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, V.E.; Duchene, G.

    1997-01-01

    The quality of the angular distribution information extracted from high-fold gamma-gamma coincidence events is analyzed. It is shown that a correct quasi-isotropic gate setting, available at the modern large gamma-ray detector arrays, essentially preserves the quality of the angular information. (orig.)

  9. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jisha, N. V.; Krishnakumar, D. N.; Surya Prakash, G.; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2012-03-15

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify {sup 41}Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

  10. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  11. Effects of low-dose gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, N.; McFarlane, N.M.; Lemon, J.; Boreham, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Using a successful new automation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) scoring, the effects of low-dose (< 1.0 Gy) gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes (RET) in a mouse model were investigated. Gamma and neutron irradiation induced significant (p<0.001) increases in the levels of %MN-RET and decreases in the levels of %RET (p<0.001) as the dose level increased. Increasing dose levels showed that gamma radiation induced significantly (p<0.05) more %MN-RET and more %RET than neutron radiation. The results suggest that neutron irradiation may be more cytotoxic (less %RET) than gamma irradiation; however, gamma irradiation may be producing cells with more chromosomal aberrations (more %MN-RET) than neutron irradiation. (author)

  12. Effects of low-dose gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan, N.; McFarlane, N.M.; Lemon, J.; Boreham, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Using a successful new automation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) scoring, the effects of low-dose (< 1.0 Gy) gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes (RET) in a mouse model were investigated. Gamma and neutron irradiation induced significant (p<0.001) increases in the levels of %MN-RET and decreases in the levels of %RET (p<0.001) as the dose level increased. Increasing dose levels showed that gamma radiation induced significantly (p<0.05) more %MN-RET and more %RET than neutron radiation. The results suggest that neutron irradiation may be more cytotoxic (less %RET) than gamma irradiation; however, gamma irradiation may be producing cells with more chromosomal aberrations (more %MN-RET) than neutron irradiation. (author)

  13. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  14. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana; Silva, Luanna R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of 60 Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD 50 obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  15. Development of Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Kawasaki, Nobuo [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kume, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In the DT fusion reactor, it is critical concern to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates after the reactor shutdown exactly. In order to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates exactly, three dimensional Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system have been developed by connecting the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code and the induced activity calculation code. The developed calculation system consists of the following four functions. (1) The operational neutron flux distribution is calculated by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. (2) The induced activities are calculated by the induced activity calculation code. (3) The decay gamma-ray source distribution is obtained from the induced activities. (4) The decay gamma-rays are generated by using the decay gamma-ray source distribution, and the decay gamma-ray transport calculation is conducted by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. In order to reduce the calculation time drastically, a biasing system for the decay gamma-ray source distribution has been developed, and the function is also included in the present system. In this paper, the outline and the detail of the system, and the execution example are reported. The evaluation for the effect of the biasing system is also reported. (author)

  16. On-Line High Dose-rate Gamma Irradiation Test of the Profibus/DP module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Koo, In Soo; Hong, Seok Boong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The field bus data communication is considered for application in nuclear environments. The nuclear facilities, including nuclear power plants, high radioactivity waste disposals, reprocessing plants and thermonuclear fusion installations can benefit from the unique advantages of the field bus communication network for the smart field instruments and controls. A major problem which arises when dealing with one in these nuclear environments, in special circumstances such as the RCS (reactor coolant system) area, is the presence of high gamma-ray irradiation fields. Radioactive constraints for the DBA(design basis accident) qualification of the RTD transmitter installed in the inside of the RCS pump are typically on the order of 4kGy/h with total doses up to 10kGy. In order to use an industrial field bus communication network as an ad-hoc sensor data link in the vicinity of the RCS area of the nuclear power plant, the robust survivability of these system in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore needs to be verified. We have conducted high dose-rate (up to 4kGy) gamma irradiation experiments on a profibus/DP communication module. In this paper we describe the evolution of its basic characteristics with high dose-rate gamma irradiation and shortly explain the observed phenomena.

  17. Reaction of the hematopoietic system under long-term emotional stress developed after preliminary gamma-irradiation with low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Deshevoj, Yu.B.; Lebedev, V.G.; Lyrshchikova, A.V.; Vorotnikova, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    In experiments on rats and mice it was shown that the preliminary protected gamma-irradiation with cumulative dose of 0.9 Gy (dose rate - 0.03 Gy/day) or single short-term gamma-irradiation with dose of 0.9 Gy (dose rate - 1.61 Gy/min) inhibited development of adaptive reactions and compensatory abilities of the hematopoietic system under long-term emotional stress

  18. Two gamma dose evaluation methods for silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Faguo; Jin Gen; Yang Yapeng; Xu Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Silicon PIN diodes have been widely used as personal and areal dosimeters because of their small volume, simplicity and real-time operation. However, because silicon is neither a tissue-equivalent nor an air-equivalent material, an intrinsic disadvantage for silicon dosimeters is that a significant over-response occurs at low-energy region, especially below 200 keV. Using a energy compensation filter to flatten the energy response is one method overcoming this disadvantage. But for dose compensation method, the estimated dose depends only on the number of the detector pulses. So a weight function method was introduced to evaluate gamma dose, which depends on pulse number as well as its amplitude. (authors)

  19. Effects of low dose gamma radiation on the early growth of red pepper and the resistance to subsquent high dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Red pepper (capsicum annuum L. cv. Jokwang and cv. Johong) seeds were irradiated with the dose of 0{approx}50 Gy to investigated the effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation. The effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequenct high dose of radiation were enhanced in Johong cultivar but not in Jokwang cultivar. Germination rate and early growth of Johong cultivar were noticeably increased at 4 Gy-, 8 Gy- and 20 Gy irradiation group. Resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at almost all of the low dose irradiation group. Especially it was highest at 4 Gy irradiation group. The carotenoid contents and enzyme activity on the resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at the 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group.

  20. Cosmic-ray contribution in measurement of environmental gamma-ray dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Kazunori; Honda, Kouichirou; Miyano, Keiji

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays several kinds of dosimeters are being used for environmental gamma-ray monitoring. However the results measured by those instruments are not always in good agreement. It may be caused from the different characteristics of dosimeters. In particular the different responses of the instruments to cosmic-rays give significant influence on the results. Environmental radiation measurements at various altitudes on Mt. Fuji were carried out using a scintillation spectrometer with 3''φ spherical NaI(Tl), a pressurized ionization chamber (PIC), an air-equivalent ionization chamber (IC), thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD), radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLD) and NaI(Tl) scintillation survey meters so that the response characteristics of these instruments to cosmic-rays could be clarified. Cosmic-ray contributions for all instruments were correlated with counting rate over 3 MeV by the spectrometer. Each contribution can be estimated by measurement of the counting rate. Conversion factors (nGy/h/cpm) for IC, PIC, TLD, RPLD and NaI survey meters (TCS166 and TCS121C) were 0.33, 0.32, 0.25, 0.24, 0.06 and -0.01, respectively. Self-doses of these instruments were estimated by measurements at Nokogiriyama facilities of the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo. Self-doses for TLD and RPLD were approximately 6 nGy/h. The self dose effect should be taken into consideration in environmental dose measurements. These data are expected to be useful in estimating the cosmic-ray contribution and self-dose in the measurement of environmental gamma-ray dose. (author)

  1. Effects of low dose gamma irradiation on PVC blood bags containing anticoagulant CPDA solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, D.; Varshney, Lalit; Arjun, Chanda

    2006-01-01

    PVC blood bags were exposed to 20Gy and 60Gy low gamma radiation dose to investigate possibility of change in leaching behavior of the plasticizer into CPDA solution and the blood. Reversed phase HPLC was used for the investigations on anti coagulant solution CPDA(citrate, phosphate, dextrose and adenine) contained in PVC bag before and after gamma irradiation. The studies were repeated using methanol as an extractant instead of CPDA solution, considering higher extractability of plasticizer by blood. Irradiation of PVC bags by gamma radiation for a dose up to 60Gy does not lead to change in leaching behavior of the plasticizer in CPDA solution and methanol indicating similar expected behavior in blood. (author)

  2. Facility for gamma irradiations of cultured cells at low dose rates: design, physical characteristics and functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Anello, Pasquale; Pecchia, Ilaria; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Campa, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a low dose/dose rate gamma irradiation facility (called LIBIS) for in vitro biological systems, for the exposure, inside a CO_2 cell culture incubator, of cells at a dose rate ranging from few μGy/h to some tens of mGy/h. Three different "1"3"7Cs sources are used, depending on the desired dose rate. The sample is irradiated with a gamma ray beam with a dose rate uniformity of at least 92% and a percentage of primary 662 keV photons greater than 80%. LIBIS complies with high safety standards. - Highlights: • A gamma irradiation facility for chronic exposures of cells was set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. • The dose rate uniformity and the percentage of primary 662 keV photons on the sample are greater than 92% and 80%, respectively. • The GEANT4 code was used to design the facility. • Good agreement between simulation and experimental dose rate measurements has been obtained. • The facility will allow to safely investigate different issues about low dose rate effects on cultured cells.

  3. Statistical approaches to forecast gamma dose rates by using measurements from the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H.J.; Hwang, W. T.; Kim, E.H.; Han, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the results obtained by inter-comparing several statistical techniques for estimating gamma dose rates, such as an exponential moving average model, a seasonal exponential smoothing model and an artificial neural networks model, are reported. Seven years of gamma dose rates data measured in Daejeon City, Korea, were divided into two parts to develop the models and validate the effectiveness of the generated predictions by the techniques mentioned above. Artificial neural networks model shows the best forecasting capability among the three statistical models. The reason why the artificial neural networks model provides a superior prediction to the other models would be its ability for a non-linear approximation. To replace the gamma dose rates when missing data for an environmental monitoring system occurs, the moving average model and the seasonal exponential smoothing model can be better because they are faster and easier for applicability than the artificial neural networks model. These kinds of statistical approaches will be helpful for a real-time control of radio emissions or for an environmental quality assessment. (authors)

  4. SU-E-T-231: Cross-Validation of 3D Gamma Comparison Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, KM; Jechel, C; Pinter, C; Lasso, A; Fichtinger, G; Salomons, G; Schreiner, LJ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Moving the computational analysis for 3D gel dosimetry into the 3D Slicer (www.slicer.org) environment has made gel dosimetry more clinically accessible. To ensure accuracy, we cross-validate the 3D gamma comparison module in 3D Slicer with an independently developed algorithm using simulated and measured dose distributions. Methods: Two reference dose distributions were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. The first distribution consisted of a four-field box irradiation delivered to a plastic water phantom and the second, a VMAT plan delivered to a gel dosimeter phantom. The first reference distribution was modified within Eclipse to create an evaluated dose distribution by spatially shifting one field by 3mm, increasing the monitor units of the second field, applying a dynamic wedge for the third field, and leaving the fourth field unchanged. The VMAT plan was delivered to a gel dosimeter and the evaluated dose in the gel was calculated from optical CT measurements. Results from the gamma comparison tool built into the SlicerRT toolbox were compared to results from our in-house gamma algorithm implemented in Matlab (via MatlabBridge in 3D Slicer). The effects of noise, resolution and the exchange of reference and evaluated designations on the gamma comparison were also examined. Results: Perfect agreement was found between the gamma results obtained using the SlicerRT tool and our Matlab implementation for both the four-field box and gel datasets. The behaviour of the SlicerRT comparison with respect to changes in noise, resolution and the role of the reference and evaluated dose distributions was consistent with previous findings. Conclusion: Two independently developed gamma comparison tools have been cross-validated and found to be identical. As we transition our gel dosimetry analysis from Matlab to 3D Slicer, this validation serves as an important test towards ensuring the consistency of dose comparisons using the 3D Slicer

  5. Environmental radiation monitoring: mobile gamma dose rate measurements along Mumbai-Hyderabad rail route and Hyderabad city roads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divkar, J.K.; Padmanabhan, N.; Chaudhury, Probal; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Pujari, R.N.; Dogra, Santosh; Sharma, D.N.; Rajagopalan, S.; Srivastava, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental Radiation monitoring based on gamma dose rate logging on a mobile platform integrated with real time position from a Global Positioning System is an effective tool to acquire dose rate profile and generate radiological map of any geographical region. The microcontroller based dose rate data acquisition system capable of storing the acquired data and transferring to an attached laptop/PC and providing a graphical illustration of relative variations in gamma background can also be used for quick assessment of environmental radiological impact assessment. This paper describes the methodology and results of the environmental gamma dose rate monitoring surveys carried out: (i) on Mumbai-Hyderabad rail route with the systems installed in the trains guard's room and (ii) Hyderabad city roads with systems installed in a monitoring van. The results indicate significant difference in the gamma background measured along the rail route between Mumbai-Hyderabad and in the radiological map generated after the Hyderabad city survey. (author)

  6. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution

  7. A study on the effect of low doses gamma radiation on mushroom spawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajlouni, Said

    1993-03-01

    Mushroom spawn (Hybrid-521) was irradiated at room temperature using low doses of gamma radiation (50-600 rad). The spawn was then planted at two stages; first, after 24 hours of irradiation, and second after storage for three weeks at refrigeration temperature. Results of this study showed that the applied doses of gamma radiation did not have any stimulatory effect on mushroom growth or productivity. It was also noticed that mushroom production rate decreased when irradiated spawn was stored for three weeks prior to planting, as compared with spawn planted 24 hours after irradiation. (author). 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  8. An energy-independent dose rate meter for beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzelmann, M.; Keller, M.

    1986-01-01

    An easy to handle dose rate meter has been developed at the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre with a small probe for the energy-independent determination of the dose rate in mixed radiation fields. The dose rate meter contains a small ionisation chamber with a volume of 15.5 cm 3 . The window of the ionisation chamber consists of an aluminised plastic foil of 7 mg.cm -2 . The dose rate meter is suitable for determining the dose rate in skin. With a supplementary depth dose cap, the dose rate can be determined in tissue at a depth of 1 cm. The dose rate meter is energy-independent within +-20% for 147 Pm, 204 Tl and 90 Sr/ 90 Y beta radiation and for gamma radiation in the energy range above 35 keV. (author)

  9. High dose effect of gamma and neutrons on the N-JFET electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, Jamal-Eddin

    2006-11-01

    Two types of N-JFET components have been irradiated by high doses of thermal neutrons and gamma rays up to 2000x10 12 n/cm 2 and 1000 kGy, respectively. The static tests show a decrease of the g m and I d s parameters. The behaviour of electronic noise on the output was the principal dynamic test after irradiation. The result of this test gives an increase of the noise with radiation dose increasing. The noise was described as the Equivalent Noise of Charge (ENC) at the output of the measurements set-up. The quantities and the qualities of the noise depend on the N-JEET type and the type of radiation (neutrons or gamma). Other tests were carried out like the relaxation or recovery phenomena after radiation, and the superposed effects of gamma and neutrons.(author)

  10. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehouani, A.; Merzouki, A.; Boutadghart, F.; Ghassoun, J.

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511 * MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinsetique a Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique.

  11. Anomalous dose rate effects in gamma irradiated SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, G.; Niu, G.; Cressler, J.D.; Clark, S.D.; Palmer, M.J.; Ahlgren, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Low dose rate (LDR) cobalt-60 (0.1 rad(Si)/s) gamma irradiated Silicon Germanium (SiGe) Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBTs) were studied. Comparisons were made with devices irradiated with 300 rad(Si)/s gamma radiation to verify if LDR radiation is a serious radiation hardness assurance (RHA) issue. Almost no LDR degradation was observed in this technology up to 50 krad(Si). The assumption of the presence of two competing mechanisms is justified by experimental results. At low total dose (le20 krad), an anomalous base current decrease was observed which is attributed to self-annealing of deep-level traps to shallower levels. An increase in base current at larger total doses is attributed to radiation induced generation-recombination (G/R) center generation. Experiments on gate-assisted lateral PNP transistors and 2D numerical simulations using MEDICI were used to confirm these assertions

  12. Effect of Low Gamma Irradiation Doses on Growth and Productivity of Green Bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.M.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The field experiment was conducted within the two successive growing seasons of 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 to study the effect of low gamma irradiation doses (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 Gy) on growth and productivity of green bean cv. Bronco with 3 sowing dates 8, 18 and 28th of October in the first season and 30th of September, 10 and 20th of October in the second season. The results of laboratory determinations showed that gamma irradiation doses did not affect the germination percent but slightly affected germination rate and electrical conductivity. Concerning field experiment, data revealed that green bean plant vegetative growth, i.e., plant height, fresh and dry weight, leaf number and leaf area, at 45 days after planting (DAP) and shoot number at 30, 45 DAP recorded significantly the highest values at the first sowing date in both seasons. With respect of gamma irradiation doses, all the previously mentioned parameters of plant vegetative growth recorded the highest values with 40 Gy at 15, 30, and 45 DAP except number of leaves which recorded the highest value with 30 Gy at 15, 30 and 45 DAP. Concerning shoot number there was no significant difference among several doses at 30 DAP in the first season but in the second season it was 20 Gy and at 45 DAP compared with the control. Also the first sowing date in both seasons gave the highest pod length, fresh and dry weight, plant yield, number of pods per plant, marketable yield per plot and total yield per feddan. Whereas ,the second sowing date led to the lowest pod thickness. In addition, 20 Gy of gamma irradiation doses recorded the highest value of pod length .The 30 Gy dose showed the highest value of pod fresh and dry weight, plant yield and total yield per feddan. In addition ,the 20 and 30 Gy doses led to the highest pod number per plant and marketable yield, concerning pod thickness there was slight difference only in the second season between several doses. The second sowing date in the first season

  13. Gamma-irradiated onions as a biological indicator of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaijapurkar, S.G.; Agarwal, Deepshikha; Chaudhuri, S.K.; Ram Senwar, Kana; Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Post-irradiation identification and dose estimation are required to assess the radiation-induced effects on living things in any nuclear emergency. In this study, radiation-induced morphological/cytological changes i.e., number of root formation and its length, shooting length, reduction in mitotic index, micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberrations in the root tip cells of gamma-irradiated onions at lower doses (50-2000 cGy) are reported. The capabilities of this biological species to store the radiation-induced information are also studied

  14. Dose Response for Monokaryon mycelium of Pleurotus pulmonarius After Acute Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Safina Wan Abdul Razak; Azhar Mohamad; Nie, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Pleurotus pulmonarius is locally known as Grey oyster. The species is popular and widely cultivated throughout the world mostly in Asia Europe as their simple and low cost production technology and higher biological efficiency. Mutation induction is an alternative ways for improving available commercial strain for better quality traits. Dose response is important in evaluating effects of mutagenesis via acute gamma radiation. Monokaryon mycelium of Pleurotus pulmonarius was exposed to acute gamma radiation ranged from 0 Gy, 0.1 kGy, 0.2 kGy, 0.3 kGy, 0.4 kGy, 0.5 kGy, 0.6 kGy, 0.7 kGy, 0.8 kGy, 0.9 kGy, 1.0 kGy, 1.5 Gy, 2.0 kGy, 3.0 kGy and 4.0 kGy at dose rate 0.013 kGy/ min. growth performance was measured at 2 days interval to get the LD_5_0. Increasing of the irradiation dose found to decrease the growth performance of the monokaryon mycelium. LD_5_0 was revealed at 1.56 kGy for mono karyon mycelium. Discoveries of the works are important for the improvement of Pleurotus species via acute gamma radiation and benefiting to growers and mushroom industries. (author)

  15. Aspartame tablets-gamma dose response and usability for routine radiation processing dosimetry using spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, S.H. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: shs_barc@yahoo.com; Mukherjee, T. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2007-02-15

    Aspartame tablets were studied for gamma dose response, using spectrophotometric read-out method. The optimum concentration for ferrous ions was 2x10{sup -4}moldm{sup -3} and xylenol orange with 2.5x10{sup -1}moldm{sup -3} of sulphuric acid for the optimum acidity in FX solution. Wavelength of maximum absorbance is 548nm. Post-irradiation stability is appreciable i.e. for not less than one month. Dose response is non-linear with third order polynomial fit, in the dose range of 1000-10000Gy. This system of aspartame was further used for carrying out relative percentage dose profile measurement in Gamma Cell-220. Results obtained were inter-compared with that of a glutamine dosimeter, which showed that maximum difference between the values of aspartame and glutamine systems is within +/-10%.

  16. Aspartame tablets-gamma dose response and usability for routine radiation processing dosimetry using spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, S.H.; Mukherjee, T.

    2007-01-01

    Aspartame tablets were studied for gamma dose response, using spectrophotometric read-out method. The optimum concentration for ferrous ions was 2x10 -4 moldm -3 and xylenol orange with 2.5x10 -1 moldm -3 of sulphuric acid for the optimum acidity in FX solution. Wavelength of maximum absorbance is 548nm. Post-irradiation stability is appreciable i.e. for not less than one month. Dose response is non-linear with third order polynomial fit, in the dose range of 1000-10000Gy. This system of aspartame was further used for carrying out relative percentage dose profile measurement in Gamma Cell-220. Results obtained were inter-compared with that of a glutamine dosimeter, which showed that maximum difference between the values of aspartame and glutamine systems is within +/-10%

  17. Poker-camp: a program for calculating detector responses and phantom organ doses in environmental gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblinger, L.

    1981-09-01

    A general description, user's manual and a sample problem are given in this report on the POKER-CAMP adjoint Monte Carlo photon transport program. Gamma fields of different environmental sources which are uniformly or exponentially distributed sources or plane sources in the air, in the soil or in an intermediate layer placed between them are simulated in the code. Calculations can be made on flux, kerma and spectra of photons at any point; and on responses of point-like, cylindrical, or spherical detectors; and on doses absorbed in anthropomorphic phantoms. (author)

  18. On-Line High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test of the CCD/CMOS Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, test results of gamma ray irradiation to CCD/CMOS cameras are described. From the CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system) data of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant station, we found out that the gamma ray dose-rate when the hydrogen explosion occurred in nuclear reactors 1{approx}3 is about 160 Gy/h. If assumed that the emergency response robot for the management of severe accident of the nuclear power plant has been sent into the reactor area to grasp the inside situation of reactor building and to take precautionary measures against releasing radioactive materials, the CCD/CMOS cameras, which are loaded with the robot, serve as eye of the emergency response robot. In the case of the Japanese Quince robot system, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras are used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. In the preceding assumptions, a major problem which arises when dealing with CCD/CMOS cameras in the severe accident situations of the nuclear power plant is the presence of high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. In the case of the DBA (design basis accident) situations of the nuclear power plant, in order to use a CCD/CMOS camera as an ad-hoc monitoring unit in the vicinity of high radioactivity structures and components of the nuclear reactor area, a robust survivability of this camera in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore should be verified. The CCD/CMOS cameras of various types were gamma irradiated at a

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation at doses of 5-15 kGy on the quality properties of durum wheat semolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Semolina purified from four durum wheat varieties were gamma-irradiated with doses of 0, 5, 10 and 15 kGy, i.e., dose levels expected to improve the colour of pasta products, suitable for reduction of microbial contamination, and high doses required for insect disinfestation. The irradiation resulted in significant losses in carotenoid content and oxidative enzyme activities. Gamma irradiation slightly affected the mixing properties, greatly reduced the gluten strength and adversely affected firmness of cooked pasta. Consequently, preservative gamma irradiation of durum wheat semolina should be limited to a maximum dose of 5 kGy. (author) 39 refs.; 3 tabs

  20. Estimate on external effective doses received by the Iranian population from environmental gamma radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roozitalab, J.; Reza deevband, M.; Rastkhah, N. [National Radiation Protection Dept. Atomic Energy Organization (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, M. [Intenatinal atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Concentration of natural radioactive materials, especially available U 238, Ra 226, Th 232, and K 40 in construction materials and soil, as well as absorb dose from cosmic rays, is the most important source of the people for effective doses from the environment radiation. In order to evaluate external effective dose, it has been carried out more than 1000 measurements in 36 cities by sensitive dosimeters to environmental gamma radiation for indoor and outdoor conditions in residential areas; which its results show that range of gamma exposure for inside of buildings in Iran is 8.7-20.5 {mu}R/h, and outdoor environments of different cities is 7.9-20.6 {mu}R/h, which their mean value are 14.33 and 12.62 {mu}R/h respectively. Meanwhile, it has been estimated that beam-absorbing ratio between indoor and outdoor in measured environments is 1.55, except contribution of cosmic rays. This studies show that average effective dose for each Iranian person from environmental gamma is 96.9 n Sv/h, and annually effective dose for every person is 0.848 mSv. (authors)

  1. Estimate on external effective doses received by the Iranian population from environmental gamma radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roozitalab, J.; Reza deevband, M.; Rastkhah, N.; Sohrabi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Concentration of natural radioactive materials, especially available U 238, Ra 226, Th 232, and K 40 in construction materials and soil, as well as absorb dose from cosmic rays, is the most important source of the people for effective doses from the environment radiation. In order to evaluate external effective dose, it has been carried out more than 1000 measurements in 36 cities by sensitive dosimeters to environmental gamma radiation for indoor and outdoor conditions in residential areas; which its results show that range of gamma exposure for inside of buildings in Iran is 8.7-20.5 μR/h, and outdoor environments of different cities is 7.9-20.6 μR/h, which their mean value are 14.33 and 12.62 μR/h respectively. Meanwhile, it has been estimated that beam-absorbing ratio between indoor and outdoor in measured environments is 1.55, except contribution of cosmic rays. This studies show that average effective dose for each Iranian person from environmental gamma is 96.9 n Sv/h, and annually effective dose for every person is 0.848 mSv. (authors)

  2. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  3. Repeat Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery for Refractory or Recurrent Trigeminal Neuralgia with Consideration About the Optimal Second Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Kwon, Do Hoon; Lee, Do Hee; Lee, Jung Kyo

    2016-02-01

    To investigate adequate radiation doses for repeat Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) for trigeminal neuralgia in our series and meta-analysis. Fourteen patients treated by ipsilateral repeat GKS for trigeminal neuralgia were included. Median age of patients was 65 years (range, 28-78), the median target dose, 140-180). Patients were followed a median of 10.8 months (range, 1-151) after the second gamma-knife surgery. Brainstem dose analysis and vote-counting meta-analysis of 19 studies were performed. After the second gamma-knife radiosurgeries, pain was relieved effectively in 12 patients (86%; Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score I-III). Post-gamma-knife radiosurgery trigeminal nerve deficits were mild in 5 patients. No serious anesthesia dolorosa was occurred. The second GKS radiation dose ≤ 60 Gy was significantly associated with worse pain control outcome (P = 0.018 in our series, permutation analysis of variance, and P = 0.009 in the meta-analysis, 2-tailed Fisher's exact test). Cumulative dose ≤ 140-150 Gy was significantly associated with poor pain control outcome (P = 0.033 in our series and P = 0.013 in the meta-analysis, 2-tailed Fisher's exact test). A cumulative brainstem edge dose >12 Gy tended to be associated with trigeminal nerve deficit (P = 0.077). Our study suggests that the second GKS dose is a potentially important factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. LiF thermoluminescence dosimetry for mapping absorbed dose distributions in the gamma ray disinfection of machine-baled sheep wool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexi Jiang

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of absorbed dose distributions of 60 Co γ-rays in machine-baled sheep wool, which is disinfected of certain parasitic bacteria (e.g. Brucella bacilli) by γ-ray treatment, is summarized. The preparation and main physical properties of the LiF-TLD are described, as well as the shape, structure and the activity of the 60 Co source and typical dose distributions measured around the source in free air. The results of dose distributions measured by the LiF-TLD agreed within +-5% with those given by a calibrated ionization chamber. The exposure rates (units R/min) at three typical measurement points inside a bale of sheep's wool were found to be quite uniform: centre 3.8x10 3 (+-2.1%); upper region 3.9x10 3 (+-2.4%); lower region 3.9x10 3 (+-1.9%). (author)

  5. Effect of sub-sterilizing doses of gamma radiation on Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) pupae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Aguilar, J.A.; Arthur, Valter

    1998-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to verify the effects of sub-sterilizing doses of gamma radiations on pupae of Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) and transfer of genetic heredity on the first and second generations. Statistical analysis showed difference in the ageing effect of gamma radiations on the larval phase and larval viability ranged between 72 and 94 percent, when irradiated (50 Gy) males or females were crossed with non-irradiated adults. With doses of 100, 125, 150 and 175 Gy the crossing of irradiated males x non irradiated females the larval viability was between 64 and 94 per cent in F-1 and F-2 generations. The duration and other life parameters of the pupae and adults did not differ from the controls. The egg laying ability was not affected by doses up to 150 Gy on both the sexes. If irradiated females with doses of 175 and 200 Gy were crossed with non-irradiated males, the egg laying was inhibited when males were irradiated with one of these doses, the offspring females did not lay eggs or laid non-fertile eggs. (author)

  6. Modeling the irradiation facility in the Deir Al-Hajar area to calculate the spatial gamma dose distribution using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Bush, M; Kassery, H.

    2009-03-01

    A 3-D model for the irradiation plant which belongs to the Atomic Energy Commission, Department of Radiation Technology in the Deir Al-Hajar area near Damascus, is presented in this work using the MCNP-4C code. This model is used to calculate the spatial gamma ray dose in the (x, y, z) coordinate. Good agreements are noticed between the measured and the calculated results. (author)

  7. Gamma-ray multiplicity distribution in ternary fission of {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandel, M [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kliman, J [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Krupa, L [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Morhac, M [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Hamilton, J H [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Kormicki, J [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Ramayya, A V [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Hwang, J K [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Luo, Y X [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Fong, D [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Gore, P [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Akopian, G M Ter; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Rodin, A M; Fomichev, A S; Popeko, G S; Daniel, A V [Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Rasmussen, J O; Macchiavelli, A O [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stoyer, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Donangelo, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cole, J D [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2002-12-01

    From multiparameter data obtained at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the integral characteristics of the prompt {gamma}-ray emission were extracted for tripartition of {sup 252}Cf with He, Be and C being the third light charged particle. We used multifold {gamma}-ray coincidence spectra for the determination of {gamma}-ray multiplicities assuming a Gaussian distribution for {gamma}-ray multiplicity. The multiplicity distribution characteristics, i.e. mean multiplicity and its dispersion were obtained by minimizing with respect to the calculated values of probabilities of multifold {gamma}-ray coincidences using a combinatoric method. Comparison with the known experimental data from binary fission was made. Further, we investigated dependencies of the mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity on the kinetic energy of the light charged particle. The mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity for He ternary fission is found to increase rapidly with increasing kinetic energy of He in the region less than 11 MeV and then decrease slowly with increasing kinetic energy of He. The anomalous behaviour of {gamma}-ray emission is discussed. The mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity was determined for the first time for Be and C ternary fission. For Be, the {gamma}-ray multiplicity as a function of kinetic energy was obtained as well.

  8. Spatial interpolation and radiological mapping of ambient gamma dose rate by using artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilkanat, Cafer Mert; Kobya, Yaşar; Taşkın, Halim; Çevik, Uğur

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine spatial risk dispersion of ambient gamma dose rate (AGDR) by using both artificial neural network (ANN) and fuzzy logic (FL) methods, compare the performances of methods, make dose estimations for intermediate stations with no previous measurements and create dose rate risk maps of the study area. In order to determine the dose distribution by using artificial neural networks, two main networks and five different network structures were used; feed forward ANN; Multi-layer perceptron (MLP), Radial basis functional neural network (RBFNN), Quantile regression neural network (QRNN) and recurrent ANN; Jordan networks (JN), Elman networks (EN). In the evaluation of estimation performance obtained for the test data, all models appear to give similar results. According to the cross-validation results obtained for explaining AGDR distribution, Pearson's r coefficients were calculated as 0.94, 0.91, 0.89, 0.91, 0.91 and 0.92 and RMSE values were calculated as 34.78, 43.28, 63.92, 44.86, 46.77 and 37.92 for MLP, RBFNN, QRNN, JN, EN and FL, respectively. In addition, spatial risk maps showing distributions of AGDR of the study area were created by all models and results were compared with geological, topological and soil structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Calibration curve to establish the exposure dose at Co60 gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M.

    2000-01-01

    The biological dosimetry is an adequate method for the dose determination in cases of overexposure to ionizing radiation or doubt of the dose obtained by physical methods. It is based in the aberrations analysis produced in the chromosomes. The behavior of leisure in chromosomes is of dose-response type and it has been generated curves in distinct laboratories. Next is presented the curve for gamma radiation produced in the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) laboratory. (Author)

  10. Effect of Low Dose gamma-ray Irradiation on the Germination and Growth in Red Pepper (Capcicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Eun-Kyung; Kim Jae-Sung

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of low dose gamma-ray irradiation in red pepper. The germination percentage, plant, the number of flower, chlorophyll contents, leaf length and width were observed from plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with various low dose of gamma-ray. The germination percentage of irradiation group treatmented gamma-ray was much higher than that of the control. Specially the germination percentage after sowing red pepper seeds on paper towel was higher than 1,000 and 2,000 rad irradiation group. The height of plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with gamma-ray was increased in 100, 200 and 400 rad irradiation group compared to that of the control. The height of plant from 2,400 rad irradiation group, however, was shorter than that of the control. Nutrient contents of leaves of plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with various dose of gamma-ray were significantly increased in 800 and 1,200 rad irradiation group. Electric conductivity (EC) of the water used for seed germination was lower irradiation group than control group. Therefore, there was the possibility to increase the germination and plant growth with gamma-ray of adequate low dose

  11. Effect of low doses of gamma radiation on barley tolerance grown under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbaji, T.; Khalifa, Kh; Al-Ain, F.

    2003-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at Al-Hijanah, an area located at about 35 km south east of Damascus. Seeds of two barley varieties [White Arabi (WA) and Pakistani 30163 (PK) were irradiated with 2 doses 0 and 15 Gy of gamma irradiation. Then, they were shown on salty soil (17.6-18,9 m mos/cm) and irrigated with salty water (5.12-5.75 m mos/cm). A dose of 15 Gy of gamma irradiation was shown to positively affect the percent germination of PK but had no similar effect on WA. The results were obtained at 3 different growth stages: first, the heading stage, 15 Gy dose increased shoots dry weight, Mg ++ , P content and percent of WA, whereas N percent of PK was decreased. When the seeds were irradiated by the same dose. K + content in WA was significantly higher than that in PK. Second, physiological maturity stage, the same dose (15 Gy) increased shoot dry, but affected negatively K + and Na + contents in PK variety. As for WA variety, Mg ++ and P contents were increased, whereas Na + and Cl - were slightly decreased. Third, harvest stage, gamma irradiation had a positive effect on total yield, grain yield, nitrogen yield and harvest index of PK variety. A positive effect was produced on straw yield, 1000-grain weight, and nitrogen yield of WA variety. (author)

  12. Dose rate modelled for the outdoors of a gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J

    2012-01-01

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach's the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation as far as 200 m is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on graphics (author)

  13. The effect of low dose gamma irradiation on maize production (1985-1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Khalifa, K.

    1990-06-01

    Presowing seed irradiation has been reported as a useful application of radiation in agriculture to stimulate growth and increase the yield of certain field crops. To the best of our knowledge the feasibility of this treatment has not yet been tested on maize in Syria. Our experiments were carried out in controlled, in field conditions, and in a large scale application. Samples of air dried seeds of maize (Var. Gota-82 and LG-11) of previous season were irradiated by gamma-rays from a 137 Cs sourse using doses of 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy. at dose rate of 9.8 - 9.2 Gy/min. Then were planted after 2 days from irradiation with unirradiated control, in complete randomized block design and replicated 4 times for four seasons (1985-1988). The date revealed that gamma irradiation, at interval doses of 5 - 10 Gy led to, first: Acceleration of seed germination, faster development, intensive development of root system, increase plant hieght (12 - 19%) and significant increase in ear size and number, and second: Increase both green mass (15 - 35%) and seed yield (10 - 31%), and percentage of seed protein (2 - 17%). Large scale applications were performed in 1987 and 1988 using a transportable irradiation unit POC-1 137 Cs and dose of 7.5 Gy. A significant yield increase was obtained from all fields. The average percentage increment varied from 13 - 30% which is approximately 382-765 Kg/h. Therefore, presowing seed irradiation with low doses gamma irradiation ranging from 5 to 10 Gy, was found to be feasible for application in qualitative and quantitative improvement of maize yield. (author). 38 refs., 12 figs., 44 tabs

  14. Ambient radiation dose to the population of the city of Sao Paulo-Brazil: indoor gamma distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsubo, Sergio M.; Yoshimura, Elizabeth M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present results of indoor ambient dose equivalent rate (H * (10)) in the city of Sao Paulo. Studies show that people of industrialized cities spend indoor approximately 80% of their time, and that there are great variations of the rate of H * (10) all over the world. Values of environmental radiation are important base to epidemiological studies, or analyses of consequences and effects of radioactive or nuclear accidents and also to assist research on biological effects of low doses, a very controversial subject in the literature. There are no reports in the literature about environmental radiation in the city of Sao Paulo, showing the important of this study. Environmental radiation exists everywhere in the planet, so the human beings are exposed to it at any time or place, being indoor or outdoor. Three types of commercial indoor ambient with large flow of the population were analyzed: bank offices, shops in the neighborhood of the banks, and shopping centers. A gamma ray portable spectrometer was used, composed by a crystal of NaI (Tl). The mean value of the H * (10) rate obtained was 173,8(17) nSv/h. The results analyzed by commerce type and by the health divisions of the city are also presented. (author)

  15. Reliability for some bivariate gamma distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadarajah Saralees

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the area of stress-strength models, there has been a large amount of work as regards estimation of the reliability R=Pr( Xdistributions when X and Y are independent random variables belonging to the same univariate family. In this paper, we consider forms of R when ( X,Y follows a bivariate distribution with dependence between X and Y . In particular, we derive explicit expressions for R when the joint distribution is bivariate gamma. The calculations involve the use of special functions.

  16. Comparative response of dogs and monkeys to sublethal acute and continuous low dose-rate gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Holland, L.M.; Johnson, O.S.; LaBauve, P.M.; London, J.E.; Prine, J.R.; Vigil, E.A.

    1977-02-01

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (injury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with 35 R/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injury remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50 percent) and monkeys (8 percent) died from injury incurred during the conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what might be expected from a single acute dose. Mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approximately 1400 h). Thus, hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35 R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater than for their control counterparts. Thus, the long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than four times the acute LD 50 - 30 in dogs and approximately two times that of monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 R/day

  17. Cytosolic Hsp70/Hsc70 protein expression in lymphocytes exposed to low gamma-ray dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanares A, E.; Vega C, H.R.; Letechipia de Leon, C.; Guzman E, L.J.; Garcia T, M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low gamma ray intensity upon Hsp70 expression in human Iymphocytes. The heat shock proteins (Hsp) family, are a group of proteins present in all living organism, therefore there are highly conserved and are related to adaptation and evolution. At cellular level these proteins acts as chaperones correcting denatured proteins. When a stress agent, such heavy metals, UV, heat, etc. is affecting a cell a response to this aggression is triggered only through over expression of Hsp. Several studies has been carried out in which the cellular effect are observed, mostly of these studies uses large doses, but very few studies are related with low doses. Blood of healthy volunteers was obtained and the Iymphocytes were isolated by ficoll- histopaque gradient. Experimental lots were irradiated in a 137 Cs gamma-ray. Hsp70 expression was found since 0.5 c Gy, indicating a threshold to very low doses of gamma rays. (Author)

  18. Cytosolic Hsp70/Hsc70 protein expression in lymphocytes exposed to low gamma-ray dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares A, E.; Vega C, H.R.; Letechipia de Leon, C. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)]. E-mail: emanz@cantera.reduaz.mx; Guzman E, L.J. [Unidad Academica de Biologia Experimental, Guadalupe, Zacatecas (Mexico); Garcia T, M. [LIBRA, Centro I and D, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid 47011 (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low gamma ray intensity upon Hsp70 expression in human Iymphocytes. The heat shock proteins (Hsp) family, are a group of proteins present in all living organism, therefore there are highly conserved and are related to adaptation and evolution. At cellular level these proteins acts as chaperones correcting denatured proteins. When a stress agent, such heavy metals, UV, heat, etc. is affecting a cell a response to this aggression is triggered only through over expression of Hsp. Several studies has been carried out in which the cellular effect are observed, mostly of these studies uses large doses, but very few studies are related with low doses. Blood of healthy volunteers was obtained and the Iymphocytes were isolated by ficoll- histopaque gradient. Experimental lots were irradiated in a {sup 137} Cs gamma-ray. Hsp70 expression was found since 0.5 c Gy, indicating a threshold to very low doses of gamma rays. (Author)

  19. Effects of low dose gamma-ray radiation on the seed germination and physiological activity of vegetable crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Lee, Y. G. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, K. H. [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    To determine the effect of low dose gamma-ray radiation on the germination rate and physiology of germinative seeds of Chinese cabbage(Brassica campestris L. cv. Hanyoreum) and radish(Raphanus sativus L. cv. Chungsukoungzoung). The germination rate of irradiation group was higher than that of the control. Especially it was highest at the early stage of induction. The germination rate of Chinese cabbage increased at 4 Gy-, 10 Gy- and 50 Gy irradiation group and that of radish increased at 2 Gy-, 6 Gy- and 10 Gy irradiation group. The seedling height of Chinese cabbage and radish increased positively in low dose irradiation group. The seedling height of Chinese cabbage was noticeably higher at 4 Gy and 10 Gy irradiation group and that of radish at 6 Gy irradiation group. The protein contents of seeds irradiated with low dose gamma-ray radiation was increased compared to that of the control especially at the early stage of induction. The enzyme activity of seeds irradiated with low dose of gamma-ray radiation was increased at 4 Gy and 10 Gy irradiation group. These results suggest that the germination and physiological activity of old seeds could be stimulated promisingly by the low dose gamma-ray radiation.

  20. Simulation studies to determine the gamma radiation dose due to natural radioactivity in construction materials in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.G.; Chougaonkar, M.P.; Mayya, Y.S.; Puranik, V.D.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma radiation dose is imparted to the living due to the natural radionuclides present in the environmental materials, including the building materials used for construction of dwellings. The radionuclides responsible for natural radiation dose are the primordial radionuclides of 232 Th, 238 U series and the 40 K. These nuclides together with their daughters give rise to external gamma ray dose as well as the inhalation doses arising from the short-lived radon/thoron gases and their progenies that are exhaled from the walls of the construction materials. The radioactivity inside a room and the radiation dose caused by it mainly depends on the concentration of the above mentioned radionuclides in the building materials and type/properties like thickness, density etc. of the material used for construction. A computational model for a standard house (without windows and door) has been designed using Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). The code works on probability theory. The present paper discusses the individual contribution of doses from 40 K, uranium and thorium series. Further variation in the gamma doses due to different building materials and densities are also discussed. (author)

  1. Effect of different doses of gamma radiation on shelf life of mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits cv. Dashehari

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghel, B.S.; Gupta, N.; Tiwari, R.

    2005-01-01

    The mango fruits cv. Dashehari irradiated with different doses of gamma radiation for extending their shelf life and for stabilizing the market demand, revealed that irradiation of mango fruits with 200 Gy gamma radiation increase the post harvest life of 93.75 percent mango fruits by 12 days over control (46.66 percent) and proved superior to maintain the considerable physico-chemical composition of mango fruits as compared to control and higher doses of gamma radiation. (author)

  2. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Garduño, O. A., E-mail: oagarciag@innn.edu.mx, E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México and Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Legaria 694, México City 11500, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Ponce, M. [Departamento de Biofísica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City 14080, México (Mexico); Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Galván de la Cruz, O. O. [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. Results: The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators

  3. Shelf Life of Tilapia Fillets Treated with low dose Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, W.S.; El-Mossalami, I.I.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial load (total bacterial count), Psychrophilic count, chemical and sensory examinations in Tilapia fish fillets were determined to evaluate its sanitary status and to increase its storage period during storage at -18 degree C for one year. The experiment was carried out at the time of receiving the samples and after gamma radiation treatment with dose levels of 1, 2 and 3 kGy. The initial total bacterial count was 5.4x10 0 cfu/gm and the psychrophilic count was 4x10 5 cfu/gm; it was slightly increased during freezing storage. The chemical parameters were more indicative in evaluating the shelf life of frozen fish; as they exceeded the permissible limits, so that the frozen non-irradiated samples were rejected after 6 months. The exposure to gamma irradiation at a dose of 1 kGy extended the storage time of the samples to 9 months while irradiation with 3 kGy extended the storage time of the samples to 12 months without changing its quality attributes. The quality during storage at -18 degree C of non irradiated and irradiated fish fillets was investigated every 3 months for one year by measuring the bacterial counts, chemical parameters and sensorial evaluation of the samples to study the effect of irradiation on increasing the storage time of fish fillets. So, it is recommended that fish fillets should be properly cleaned, packaged and exposed to gamma irradiation at a dose of 3 kGy to extend its freezing storage period

  4. The influence of geology on terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Pahang state, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabdo, H.T.; Ramli, A.T.; Sanusi, M.S.; Garba, N.N.; Saleh, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation dose (TGRD) rate measurements have been made in Pahang state, Malaysia. Significant variations were found between TGRD measurements and the underlying geological formations. In some cases revealing significant elevations of TGRD. The acid-intrusive geological formation has the highest mean TGRD measurement of 367 nGy/h -1 . This is more than six times the world average value of 59 nGy/h -1 , while the quaternary geological formation has the lowest mean gamma radiation dose rate of 99 nGy h -1 . The annual effective dose equivalent outdoor to the population was 0.216 mSv. The lifetime equivalent dose and relative lifetime cancer risks for an individual living in Pahang state were 81 mSv and 4.7 x 10 -3 respectively. These values are more than two times the world average of 34 mSv and 1.95 x 10 -3 respectively. (author)

  5. Gamma-ray dose rate surveys help investigating century-scale beach ridge progradation in the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Pedro A.; Pereira, Alcides C.; Quinzeca, Domingos; Jombi, Domingos

    2017-10-01

    A strandplain at the downdrift side of the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola) includes distinguishable deposits with very high natural radioactivity (up to 0.44 microSv/hour). In order to establish the geometry of these sedimentary units and understand their genetic processes, dose rate surveys were performed with the portable equipment Rados RDS-40WE. In addition, grain-size distribution, heavy-mineral composition and gamma-ray mass spectra of the high dose rate deposits were analysed. High dose rate values are found in ribbon units aligned parallel to the shoreline, which are a few tens of meters wide and up to approximately 3 km long. These units reflect the concentration of Th-bearing grains in coastal deposits enriched in heavy minerals. An integrated analysis of the high dose rate ribbons in GIS environment with aerial photography and topographic maps suggests that parts of the high dose rate units formed during the last two centuries may be related with the erosion of older shoreline deposits, due to updrift displacements of the Catumbela river outlet and recycling of shoreline accumulations with downdrift deposition. Simple gamma-ray surveys carried out with a portable detector can unravel depositional units characterised by significant enrichment in heavy-mineral grains that are likely to correspond to key events in the evolution of wave-dominated accumulations. The location of such deposits should be taken into account when planning future work using more expensive or time-consuming techniques.

  6. Radioactivities (dose rates) of rocks in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hideharu; Minato, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The radioactive distribution (radiation doses) of major rocks in Japan was monitored to clarify the factors influencing terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates. The rock samples were reduced to powder and analyzed by well-type NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and pulse height analyzer. Terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates were estimated in terms of gamma radiation dose rate 1 m above the ground. The radioactivity concentration was highest in acidic rock which contains much SiO 2 among igneous rock, followed by neutral rock, basic rock, and ultrabasic rock. The radioactive concentration was 30-40% lower in acidic and clastic rocks than those of the world average concentration. Higher radioactive concentration was observed in soils than the parent rocks of sedimentary rock and metamorphic rock. The gamma radiation dose rate was in proportion to the radioactive concentration of the rocks. To clarify the radioactive effect in the change course of rocks into soils, comparative measurement of outcrop and soil radioactive concentrations is important. (S.Y.)

  7. Adjustment of gamma radiation doses for sterilization of Egyptian surgical sutures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, Z.S.; Helmy, M.M.; Roushdy, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adjustment of gamma radiation doses for sterilization of catguts under local manufacturing conditions has been performed. Average total initial counts for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria per item were relatively low, in the range of 1000 counts for aerobic and 10 counts for anaerobic bacteria. The microfiora (aerobic bacteria) of the studied sutures were isolated and identified to be: Bacillus sp.; Micrococcus varians, Micrococcus roseus, and Staphylococcus. Each purified and identified isolate was exposed to gamma radiation both in liquid media (broth) and in the preservative in which the sutures were supplied by the company. The LD values of the most resistant microorganisms in both case of liquid media and preservative, were obtained to be around 5 KGy. Deliberately contaminated sterile sutures with each isolate and with mixture of isolates were studied. The sterilizing dose was obtained to be 20KGy for most heavily contaminated items (10 10 counts) irradiated both in saline and in preservative. This sterilizing dose was found to be dependent of the initial viable counts. This value was considered to be a safe value for radiosterilization of the studied sutures preserved in isopropyl alcohol, glycerin, and water (90:3.5:16)

  8. Gamma knife radiosurgery for ten or more brain metastases. Analysis of the whole brain irradiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaya, Kotaro; Hori, Tomokatsu; Izawa, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Masaaki

    2002-01-01

    Gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery has recently been recognized as the most powerful treatment modality in managing patients with brain metastasis, be they radioresistant or not, solitary or multiple. Very recently, this treatment has been employed in patients with numerous brain metastases, even those with 10 or more lesions. However, cumulative irradiation doses to the whole brain, with such treatment, remain unknown. Since the Gamma Plan ver. 5.10 (ver. 5.30 is presently available, Leksell Gamma Plan) became available in November, 1998, 105 GK procedures have been performed at our two facilities, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Katsuta Hospital Mito Gamma House. The median lesion number was 17, ranging 10-43, and the median cumulative volume of all tumors was 8.72 cm 3 , ranging 0.41-81.41 cm 3 . The selected doses at the lesion periphery ranged 12-25 Gy, the median being 20 Gy. Based on these treatment protocols, the cumulative irradiation dose was computed. The median cumulative irradiation dose to the whole brain was 4.83, ranging 2.16-8.51 Gy: the median integrated dose to the whole brain was 6.2 J, ranging 2.16-11.9 J. The median brain volumes receiving ≥2, ≥5, ≥10, ≥15 and ≥20 Gy were 1105 (range: 410-1501), 309 (46-1247), 64 (13-282), 24 (2-77), and 8 (0-40) cm 3 , respectively. The cumulative whole brain irradiation doses for patients with numerous radiosurgical targets were considered not to exceed the threshold level of normal brain necrosis. (author)

  9. Morphological changes induced by different doses of gamma irradiation in garlic sprouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.N. E-mail: pellegri@criba.edu.ar; Croci, C.A.; Orioli, G.A

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of different doses of gamma rays applied in dormancy and post-dormancy on garlic bulbs in relation with some morphophysiological parameters. High (commercial) doses cause the complete inhibition of sprouting and mitosis (due to nuclear aberrations). Relatively low doses show no effects on bulbs but doses of 10 Gy applied in post-dormancy reduce sprouting and stop mitosis. This inhibition becomes noticeable from 150 days post-harvest onwards. Exogenous growth regulators can reverse these effects. Results may reinforce the good practice of radioinhibition processes in garlic. (author)0.

  10. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Marko S.; Ristić, Goran S.; Jakšić, Aleksandar B.

    2015-02-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h-1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose.

  11. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andjelković, Marko S; Ristić, Goran S; Jakšić, Aleksandar B

    2015-01-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h −1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose. (paper)

  12. MCNP-based computational model for the Leksell gamma knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Jiri; Novotny, Josef; Kluson, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    We have focused on the usage of MCNP code for calculation of Gamma Knife radiation field parameters with a homogenous polystyrene phantom. We have investigated several parameters of the Leksell Gamma Knife radiation field and compared the results with other studies based on EGS4 and PENELOPE code as well as the Leksell Gamma Knife treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan (LGP). The current model describes all 201 radiation beams together and simulates all the sources in the same time. Within each beam, it considers the technical construction of the source, the source holder, collimator system, the spherical phantom, and surrounding material. We have calculated output factors for various sizes of scoring volumes, relative dose distributions along basic planes including linear dose profiles, integral doses in various volumes, and differential dose volume histograms. All the parameters have been calculated for each collimator size and for the isocentric configuration of the phantom. We have found the calculated output factors to be in agreement with other authors' works except the case of 4 mm collimator size, where averaging over the scoring volume and statistical uncertainties strongly influences the calculated results. In general, all the results are dependent on the choice of the scoring volume. The calculated linear dose profiles and relative dose distributions also match independent studies and the Leksell GammaPlan, but care must be taken about the fluctuations within the plateau, which can influence the normalization, and accuracy in determining the isocenter position, which is important for comparing different dose profiles. The calculated differential dose volume histograms and integral doses have been compared with data provided by the Leksell GammaPlan. The dose volume histograms are in good agreement as well as integral doses calculated in small calculation matrix volumes. However, deviations in integral doses up to 50% can be observed for large

  13. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  14. Environmental gamma radiation measurements in Bangladeshi houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M.

    2002-01-01

    The indoor gamma dose rate in air measured using TLDs in the Dhaka district is not wide ranging and follows a normal distribution with an arithmetic mean of 1.54±0.26 mGy.y -1 . The result has been compared with those found by other investigators for different locations of the world. Measurements were made on a monthly basis for a year period, and a sinusoidal variation of monthly indoor gamma radiation of the type: d = 160 + 65 cos p/6 (m -1 ), where d is the indoor dose rate (nGy.h -1 ) and m the month, was observed. This might be due to seasonally varied air exchange rates of the houses. The average annual effective dose and the collective dose equivalent for the residents were estimated to be 0.86 mSv and 172.20 man-Sv respectively based on the indoor gamma exposure. (author)

  15. Environmental gamma radiation measurements in Bangladeshi houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    Indoor gamma dose rate in air measured using TLDs in the Dhaka district is not wide ranging and follows a normal distribution with an arithmetic mean of 1.54±0.26 mGy y -1 . The result has been compared with those found by other investigators for different locations of the world. Measurements were made on a monthly basis for a year period, and a sinusoidal variation of monthly indoor gamma radiation of the type: d=160+65 cos π/6 (m-1), where d is the indoor dose rate (nGy h -1 ) and m the month. This might be due to the seasonally varied air exchange rates of the houses. The average annual effective dose and the collective dose equivalent for the residents were estimated to be 0.86 mSv and 172.20 man-Sv, respectively, based on the indoor gamma exposure

  16. Environmental gamma radiation measurements in Bangladeshi houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M.I. E-mail: idrish_physics@yahoo.com

    2004-06-01

    Indoor gamma dose rate in air measured using TLDs in the Dhaka district is not wide ranging and follows a normal distribution with an arithmetic mean of 1.54{+-}0.26 mGy y{sup -1}. The result has been compared with those found by other investigators for different locations of the world. Measurements were made on a monthly basis for a year period, and a sinusoidal variation of monthly indoor gamma radiation of the type: d=160+65 cos {pi}/6 (m-1), where d is the indoor dose rate (nGy h{sup -1}) and m the month. This might be due to the seasonally varied air exchange rates of the houses. The average annual effective dose and the collective dose equivalent for the residents were estimated to be 0.86 mSv and 172.20 man-Sv, respectively, based on the indoor gamma exposure.

  17. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in the modeling of the dose/INAK distribution of natural radioactive sources: First studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Luis R.A.; Vieira, Jose W.; Amaral, Romilton dos S.; Santos Junior, Jose A. dos; Silva, Arykerne N.C. da; Silva, Alberto A. da; Damascena, Kennedy F.; Santos Junior, Otavio P.; Medeiros, Nilson V.S.; Santos, Josineide M.N. dos, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: kennedy.eng.ambiental@gmail.com, E-mail: nvsmedeiros@gmail.com, E-mail: josineide.santos@ufpe.br, E-mail: arykerne.silva@ufpe.br, E-mail: luis.rodrigo@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: otavio.santos@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: s, E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), PE (Brazil); Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    One of the means of exposure that the world population is subjected to daily is natural radiation, which covers exposure to sources of cosmic origin and terrestrial origin, which accounts for about 84.1% of all exposure due to natural radiation. Some research groups have been estimating the distribution of the dose by the radiosensitive organs and tissues of people submitted to gamma radiation using Computational Exposure Models (MCE). The MCE is composed, fundamentally, of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), a Monte Carlo code and a radioactive source algorithm. The Group of Computational Dosimetry and Embedded Systems (DCSE), together with the group of Radioecology (RAE), have been developing a variety of MCEs to simulate exposure to natural environmental gamma radiation. Such models estimate the dose distribution absorbed by the organs and tissues radiosensitive to ionizing radiation from a flat portion of the ground in which photons emerge from within a circle of radius r, reaching a person in an orthostatic position and centered on the circumference. We investigated in this work the exposure of an individual by a radioactive cloud of gamma emission of Potassium-40, which emits a photon characteristic of energy 1461 keV. It was optimized the number of histories to obtain Dose/Kerma values in the air, with low dispersion and viable computational time for the available PCs, statistically validating the results. To do so, was adapted the MCE MSTA, composed by the MASH (Male Adult meSH) phantom in an orthostatic position coupled to the EGSnrc, with the planar source algorithm. (author)

  18. Incidence of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors in relation to neutron and gamma dose, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-71

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Otake, Masanori; Ichimaru, Michito.

    1978-03-01

    The incidence of leukemia during 1950-71 in the fixed mortality sample of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been analyzed as a function of individual gamma and neutron kerma and marrow dose. Two dose response models were tested for each of acute leukemia, chronic granulocytic leukemia, and all types of leukemia, respectively. Each model postulates that leukemia incidence depends upon the sum of the separate risks imposed by the gamma ray and neutron doses; in Model I both are assumed to be directly proportional to the respective doses, while Model II assumes that while the risk from neutrons is directly proportional to the dose, the risk from gamma rays is proportional to dose-squared. Weighted regression analyses were performed for each model. When the two models were fitted to the data for all types of leukemia, the estimated regression coefficients corresponding to the neutron and gamma ray doses both differed significantly from zero, for each model. However, when analysis was restricted to acute leukemia, both the neutron and gamma ray coefficients were significant only for Model II, and with respect to chronic granulocytic leukemia, only the coefficient of the neutron dose was significant, using either Model I or Model II. It appeared that the responses of the two leukemia types differed by type of radiation. If the chronic granulocytic and acute leukemias are considered together, the Model II appears to fit the data slightly better than Model I, but neither models is rejected by the data. (author)

  19. Pretreatment with low-dose gamma irradiation enhances tolerance to the stress of cadmium and lead in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Lin; Xu, Hangbo; Jin, Qingsheng; Jiao, Zhen

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with negative impact on plant growth and development. To investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of heavy metal stress mitigated by low-dose gamma irradiation, the dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to a Cobalt-60 gamma source at doses ranging from 25 to 150Gy before being subjected to 75µM CdCl2 or 500µM Pb(NO3)2. Then, the growth parameters, and physiological and molecular changes were determined in response to gamma irradiation. Our results showed that 50-Gy gamma irradiation gave maximal beneficial effects on the germination index and root length in response to cadmium/lead stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents in seedlings irradiated with 50-Gy gamma rays under stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The antioxidant enzyme activities and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were significantly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, a transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of heavy metal detoxification were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under cadmium/lead stress. Our results suggest that low-dose gamma irradiation alleviates heavy metal stress, probably by modulating the physiological responses and gene expression levels related to heavy metal resistance in Arabidopsis seedlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Different gamma ray (60 Co) dose effects on Sorghum genotype germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabosa, Jose Nildo; Gomes, Roberto Vicente; Reis, Odemar Vicente dos; Colaco, Waldeciro

    2004-01-01

    In agriculture, applying irradiation is a very valuable way of obtaining vegetable products for human and animal consumption. Cobalt-60, one of the main sources of gamma-rays, is considered an important tool in plant breeding programs, which have the objective of promoting genetic variability of cultivars with resistance to adverse environments. In this research, the effects of different 60 Co doses on germination vigor and seed germination velocity of forage sorghum genotypes were evaluated. The study was carried out at the IPA (Empresa Pernambucana de Pesquisa Agropecuaria) in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. The work was installed in germination boxes, following laboratory recommendations. Thus, a experiment involving three sorghum genotypes (IPA 467-4-2, IPA 02-03-01, and Sudan 4202), five 60 Co doses (Zero, 150, 300, 350, and 400 Gy), was set up. The sees were irradiated before the beginning of the experiment being exposed to gamma rays from a 60 Co-source (cobalt irradiator) at DEN (Nuclear Engineering Department) of the UFPE (Pernambuco Federal University), Brazil. The work also had the objective of evaluating the sorghum genotypes x 60 Co dose interaction. The main results obtained showed that the sorghum genotype IPA 02-03-01 presented the greatest values of germination and vigor percentages, and seed germination velocity, when compared to the others evaluated, on 350 and 400 Gy of 60 Co doses. (author)

  1. SU-F-T-62: Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Gamma Analysis for Impacts of Tissue Inhomogeneity Using Monte Carlo Simulation in Intracavitary Brachytheray for Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran Thi Thao; Nakamoto, Takahiro; Shibayama, Yusuke [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University (Japan); Arimura, Hidetaka [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University (Japan); Oku, Yoshifumi [Kagoshima University Hospital (Japan); Yoshiura, Takashi [Graduate School of Diagnostic Radiotherapy, Kagoshima University (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distributions using a three-dimensional (3D) gamma analysis in cervical intracavitary brachytherapy using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: MC simulations for comparison of dose calculations were performed in a water phantom and a series of CT images of a cervical cancer patient (stage: Ib; age: 27) by employing a MC code, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHIT) version 2.73. The {sup 192}Ir source was set at fifteen dwell positions, according to clinical practice, in an applicator consisting of a tandem and two ovoids. Dosimetric comparisons were performed for the dose distributions in the water phantom and CT images by using gamma index image and gamma pass rate (%). The gamma index is the minimum Euclidean distance between two 3D spatial dose distributions of the water phantom and CT images in a same space. The gamma pass rates (%) indicate the percentage of agreement points, which mean that two dose distributions are similar, within an acceptance criteria (3 mm/3%). The volumes of physical and clinical interests for the gamma analysis were a whole calculated volume and a region larger than t% of a dose (close to a target), respectively. Results: The gamma pass rates were 77.1% for a whole calculated volume and 92.1% for a region within 1% dose region. The differences of 7.7% to 22.9 % between two dose distributions in the water phantom and CT images were found around the applicator region and near the target. Conclusion: This work revealed the large difference on the dose distributions near the target in the presence of the tissue inhomogeneity. Therefore, the tissue inhomogeneity should be corrected in the dose calculation for clinical treatment.

  2. Radionuclide content in some building materials and gamma dose rate in dwellings in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigido, Oslvaldo; Montalvan, Adelmo; Rosa, Ramon; Hernandez, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials are one of the sources of radiation exposure of the population. This study was undertaken with the purpose of determining radioactivity in some Cuban building materials and for assessing the annual effective dose to Cuban population due external gamma exposure in dwellings for typical Cuban room model. Forty four samples of raw materials and building products were collected in some Cuban provinces. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides were determined by gamma ray spectrometry using a p-type coaxial high purity germanium detector and their mean values are in the ranges: 9 to 857 Bq.kg -1 for 40 K; 6 to 57 Bq.kg -1 for 226 Ra; and 1.2 to 22 Bq.kg -1 for 232 Th. The radium equivalent activity in the 44 samples varied from 4 Bq.kg -1 (wood) to 272 Bq.kg -1 (brick). A high pressure ionisation chamber was used for measuring of the indoor absorbed dose rate in 543 dwellings and workplaces in five Cuban provinces. The average absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 43 n Gy.h -1 (Holguin) to 73 n Gy.h -1 (Camaguey) and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 145 ± 40 μSv. This dose value is 16% higher than the calculated value for typical room geometry of Cuban house. (author)

  3. GLODEP2: a computer model for estimating gamma dose due to worldwide fallout of radioactive debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, L.L.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    The GLODEP2 computer code provides estimates of the surface deposition of worldwide radioactivity and the gamma-ray dose to man from intermediate and long-term fallout. The code is based on empirical models derived primarily from injection-deposition experience gained from the US and USSR nuclear tests in 1958. Under the assumption that a nuclear power facility is destroyed and that its debris behaves in the same manner as the radioactive cloud produced by the nuclear weapon that attached the facility, predictions are made for the gamma does from this source of radioactivity. As a comparison study the gamma dose due to the atmospheric nuclear tests from the period of 1951 to 1962 has been computed. The computed and measured values from Grove, UK and Chiba, Japan agree to within a few percent. The global deposition of radioactivity and resultant gamma dose from a hypothetical strategic nuclear exchange between the US and the USSR is reported. Of the assumed 5300 Mton in the exchange, 2031 Mton of radioactive debris is injected in the atmosphere. The highest estimated average whole body total integrated dose over 50 years (assuming no reduction by sheltering or weathering) is 23 rem in the 30 to 50 degree latitude band. If the attack included a 100 GW(e) nuclear power industry as targets in the US, this dose is increased to 84.6 rem. Hotspots due to rainfall could increase these values by factors of 10 to 50

  4. Effect of low doses gamma irradiation on seed, bulblets and bulbs of onion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, Mohammad

    1991-10-01

    Presowing seed irradiation has been reported as a useful application of radiation in agriculture to stimulate growth and increase the yield of certain crops. To the best of our knowledge the feasibility of this treatment has not yet been tested on onion in Syria. The effect of low doses gamma irradiation on onion seeds, bulblets and bulbs of two local varieties, red and white, was studied during three consecutive seasons (1986 - 1988). Air dried seeds were irradiated by gamma rays from 137 Cs source. Five, 10, 15, 20 and 30 GY, were applied at dose rate of 9.8 Gy/min. The irradiation of onion bulblets and bulbs were carried out with gamma-rays from 60 Co source at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min. using 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Gy. Within 7 - 10 days after irradiation, both controlled and irradiated seeds, bulblets and bulbs were sown in the field in complete randomized block design with 4 replicates. Irradiation of seeds with doses of 5, 10 and 15 Gy led to highly significant increases in bulblets yield in the three seasons. The increases ranged from 14.5 to 22.1 for red variety and from 16.2 to 22.3 for white variety. The irradiation of bulblets with 1 and 2 Gy increase significantly the yield of bulbs by 21.6 - 26.0% for red variety and 21.6 - 24.4% for white variety. A considerable increase in seed yield was obtained after irradiation of bulbs with 1 and 2 Gy doses. The average increment was about 21.0% for both varieties. Large scale application were performed in 1989 and 1990 using doses of 10 Gy for seeds and 1 Gy for bulblets and bulbs. A considerable increase in the yield was obtained. The average percentage increment was 16.9% and 23.3% for seeds, 18.6 and 20.9% for bulblets, 24.8 and 27.3% for bulbs, for red and white varieties respectively. Therefore, presowing irradiation of seeds, bulblets and bulbs of onion with low doses of gamma-rays (5 - 15 Gy for seeds and 1 - 2 Gy for bulblets and bulbs) can be of practical application resulting in improvement of yield of

  5. Effect of sublethal doses of gamma radiation on DNA super helicity and survival of human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koceva-Chyla, A.

    1992-01-01

    Effect of sublethal doses of gamma radiation on cell survival and DNA super helicity in human fibroblasts was studied. Cell survival was estimated on the basis the basis of clonal growth of irradiated fibroblasts in monolayer culture in vitro. The nucleoid sedimentation technique was used to study ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage in vivo as well as to examine DNA super helicity. Increased concentrations of ethidium bromine (EB) were used to titrate the DNA super coiling response in non-irradiated cells. This response consisted of a relaxation phase (1-5 μg/ml EB) and rewinding phase (5-20 μg/ml EB). Observed biphasic dependence of sedimentation distance of nucleoid on the concentration of EB suggests the dye altered the amount of DNA super coiling in situ. The degree of DNA super coiling and thus the sedimentation rate of nucleoid in absence of EB was very sensitive to strand break induced in DNA by the doses of gamma radiation employed in the cell survival assay. Doses of 2-8 Gy of gamma radiation induced a dose -dependent reduction in the sedimentation of nucleoid. Loss of negative DNA super coiling was initially rapid (about 30% after the dose of 2 Gy) and then proceeded at a slower rate (about 35% and 48% after the doses of 4 Gy and 8 Gy respectively), indicating a significant relaxation of nucleoid structure at the doses of gamma radiation greater than 4 Gy, at which also significant decrease in fibroblasts survival occurred. Significant loss of negative DNA super coiling within the range of doses of gamma radiation resulting in significant decrease of cell survival suggests that destabilizing effect of radiation on DNA tertiary- and quaternary structures (extensive DNA breaks and relaxation of nucleonic super helicity) disturb normal functions and replications of genomic DNA, in consequence leading to a reproductive death of cells. Considering the sensitivity and simplicity of the method, the nucleoid sedimentation technique might be also a useful tool

  6. Assessment of the radiological impact of gamma and radon dose rates at former U mining sites in Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lespukh, E.; Stegnar, P.; Yunusov, M.; Tilloboev, H.; Zyazev, G.; Kayukov, P.; Hosseini, A.; Strømman, G.; Salbu, B.

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to gamma radiation, radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) was carried out at former uranium (U) mining and processing sites in Taboshar and at Digmai in Tajikistan. Gamma dose rate measurements were made using various field instruments. 222 Rn/ 220 Rn measurements were carried out with field instruments for instantaneous measurements and then discriminative 222 Rn/ 220 Rn solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were used for longer representative measurements. The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time in different outdoor and indoor public and residential environments at the selected U legacy sites. The results showed that gamma, 222 Rn and 220 Rn doses were in general low, which consequently implies a low to relatively low radiological risk. The radiation doses deriving from external radiation (gamma dose rate), indoor 222 Rn and 220 Rn with their short-lived progenies did not exceed national or international standards. At none of the sites investigated did the average individual annual effective doses exceed 10 mSv, the recommended threshold value for the general public. A radiation hazard could be associated with exceptional situations, such as elevated exposures to ionizing radiation at the Digmai tailings site and/or in industrial facilities, where gamma and 222 Rn/ 220 Rn dose rates could reach values of several 10 mSv/a. Current doses of ionizing radiation do not represent a hazard to the health of the resident public, with the exception of some specific situations. These issues should be adequately addressed to further reduce needless exposure of the resident public to ionizing radiation

  7. Gamma prior distribution selection for Bayesian analysis of failure rate and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waler, R.A.; Johnson, M.M.; Waterman, M.S.; Martz, H.F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    It is assumed that the phenomenon under study is such that the time-to-failure may be modeled by an exponential distribution with failure-rate parameter, lambda. For Bayesian analyses of the assumed model, the family of gamma distributions provides conjugate prior models for lambda. Thus, an experimenter needs to select a particular gamma model to conduct a Bayesian reliability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology which can be used to translate engineering information, experience, and judgment into a choice of a gamma prior distribution. The proposed methodology assumes that the practicing engineer can provide percentile data relating to either the failure rate or the reliability of the phenomenon being investigated. For example, the methodology will select the gamma prior distribution which conveys an engineer's belief that the failure rate, lambda, simultaneously satisfies the probability statements, P(lambda less than 1.0 x 10 -3 ) = 0.50 and P(lambda less than 1.0 x 10 -5 ) = 0.05. That is, two percentiles provided by an engineer are used to determine a gamma prior model which agrees with the specified percentiles. For those engineers who prefer to specify reliability percentiles rather than the failure-rate percentiles illustrated above, one can use the induced negative-log gamma prior distribution which satisfies the probability statements, P(R(t 0 ) less than 0.99) = 0.50 and P(R(t 0 ) less than 0.99999) = 0.95 for some operating time t 0 . Also, the paper includes graphs for selected percentiles which assist an engineer in applying the methodology

  8. Temporal reduction of the external gamma dose rate due to 137Cs mobility in sandy beaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzotto, M.; Toso, J.; Velasco, H.; Belli, M.; Sansone, U.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper the contribution to the external gamma dose rate due o 137 Cs in soil as a function of time is presented. Sampling sites were elected along the Calabria and Basilicata Regions coastal beaches (southern art of Italy) to assess the external gamma dose rate in air, 1 m above the round level. A convection-dispersion model, with constant parameters was sed to approximate the radiocesium soil vertical migration. The model was calibrated using the initial 137 Cs activity deposition in this region Chernobyl fallout) and 137 Cs activity concentration down the soil profile, measured 10 years later. The dispersion coefficient and the advection velocity values, were respectively: 2.17 cm 2 y -1 and 0.32 cm -1 . The Radionuclide Software Package (RSP), which uses a Monte Carlo simulation code, was used to determine the primary 137 Cs gamma dose contribution in air 1 m above the ground surface. The resulting 137 Cs external dose rate ranged from 0.42 nGy h -1 in 1986, to 0.05 nGy h -1 in 007. (author)

  9. Verification by the FISH translocation assay of historic doses to Mayak workers from external gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnik, Natalia V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Darroudi, Firouz [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); College of North Atlantic, Department of Health Science, Centre for Human Safety and Environmental Research, Doha (Qatar); Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Moquet, Jayne E.; Lloyd, David C.; Hone, Pat A.; Edwards, Alan A. [Public Health England, Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Fomina, Janna [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study was to apply the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay in combination with chromosome painting of peripheral blood lymphocytes for retrospective biological dosimetry of Mayak nuclear power plant workers exposed chronically to external gamma radiation. These data were compared with physical dose estimates based on monitoring with badge dosimeters throughout each person's working life. Chromosome translocation yields for 94 workers of the Mayak production association were measured in three laboratories: Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Leiden University Medical Center and the former Health Protection Agency of the UK (hereinafter Public Health England). The results of the study demonstrated that the FISH-based translocation assay in workers with prolonged (chronic) occupational gamma-ray exposure was a reliable biological dosimeter even many years after radiation exposure. Cytogenetic estimates of red bone marrow doses from external gamma rays were reasonably consistent with dose measurements based on film badge readings successfully validated in dosimetry system ''Doses-2005'' by FISH, within the bounds of the associated uncertainties. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of proton and photon dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable work, as yet largely theoretical, in developing ways to improve the dose distributions which can be achieved with x-rays. Foremost among these developments are the use of non-coplanar beam directions, the use of intensity-modulated beams, and the implementation of computer-controlled delivery of complex plans using new beam modifiers such as multi-leaf collimators and beam scanners. One way of improving the dose distributions which have been achieved with conventional radiations is to use protons, with their quite different physical characteristics but very similar radiobiological properties as compared with supervoltage x-rays. Some substantial experience has been gained in the use of protons which has confirmed clinically that better results have been obtained as a result of their better dose distributions. Indeed, it is fair to say that the advantages which protons have demonstrated are, in large part, responsible for the renewed interest in improving the dose distributions from all radiation modalities. So much better are the dose distributions which the new techniques, mentioned above, offer that there is the impression that, with their use, photons can deliver dose distributions as good as can be obtained with protons. In this paper, the extent of the possible improvement will be discussed. It will be suggested that the integral dose is relatively little affected by the treatment technique - so that the lower normal tissue doses which the new approaches offer is almost always at the price of delivering dose to a larger volume. Protons can be matched pencil beam for pencil beam with photons - and then almost always deliver substantially less dose outside the target volume. Ultimately, the clinical importance of the differences will have to decided by clinical trial

  11. Equipment for automatic measurement of gamma activity distribution in a column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalincak, M.; Machan, V.; Vilcek, S.; Balkovsky, K.

    1978-01-01

    The design of a device for stepwise scanning of gamma activity distributions along chromatographic columns is described. In connection with a single-channel gamma spectrometer and a counting ratemeter with a recorder this device permits the resolution of a number of gamma emitters on the column, the determination of the gamma nuclide content in different chemical forms in the sample by means of column separation methods - Gel Chromatography Columns Scanning Method - and the determination of gamma nuclide distribution along the columns. The device permits the scanning of columns of up to 20 mm in diameter and 700 mm in length and continual scanning over a 450 mm column length with one clamping. With minor adaptations it is possible to scan columns up to 30 mm in diameter. The length of the scanned sections is 5 or 10 mm, the scanning time setting is arbitrary and variable activity levels and radiation energies may be measured. (author)

  12. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} at high gamma radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez-Regil, E., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Contreras-Ramírez, A., E-mail: aida.contreras@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Depto. de Tecnología de Materiales, Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Unidad Académica el Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, AP 2-139, CP 50000 Toluca Estado de México (Mexico); Fernández-Valverde, S.M., E-mail: suilma.fernandez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); González-Martínez, P.R., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Física, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Carrasco-Ábrego, H., E-mail: hector.carrasco@inin.gob.mx [Depto. Aceleradores, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} exposed to gamma doses of 10, 30 and 50 MGy. •Gamma radiation produced growth of the crystal size of the NZP. •Morphology changes were reversible by heating. •Linear relationship between the thermoluminescence and the applied gamma dose. •This property could be useful for high-level gamma dosimetry. -- Abstract: This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10–50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported.

  13. Micronuclei induced by fast neutrons versus 60Co gamma-rays in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vral, A; Verhaegen, F; Thierens, H; De Ridder, L

    1994-03-01

    Here we compared the effectiveness of neutrons ( = 5.5 MeV) versus 60Co gamma-rays in producing micronuclei (MN) in human lymphocytes. To obtain dose-response data, blood samples of six donors were irradiated with doses ranging from 0.1 to 5 Gy for gamma-rays and 0.1-3 Gy for neutrons. A linear dependence of MN yield with dose was found for fast neutrons while for gamma-rays a nonlinear dependence existed. For both radiation qualities no significant interindividual differences were found. Derived relative biological effectiveness values decreased with increasing dose. The MN frequency distributions were overdispersed with respect to the Poisson distribution, with neutrons showing higher dispersion values than with gamma-rays. To compare the repair kinetics of both radiation qualities split-dose experiments were performed. A dose of 4 Gy gamma-rays (3 Gy neutrons) was delivered either as a single exposure or in two equal fractions separated by time intervals ranging from 30 min to 10 h (30 min to 7 h for neutrons). The data showed for gamma-rays a significant decline (30% +/- 10%) in MN yield with interfraction time due to repair of DNA damage. This repair is a continuous process starting almost immediately after the first of the two doses and lasting 3-5 h. For fast neutrons no decline was observed indicating irreparable damage.

  14. GammaCHI: a package for the inversion and computation of the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gil (Amparo); J. Segura (Javier); N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA Fortran 90 module GammaCHI for computing and inverting the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral) is presented. The main novelty of this package is the reliable and accurate inversion routines for the noncentral cumulative distribution

  15. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose study to determine the baseline for environmental radiological health practices in Melaka state, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Sahrone, Sallehudin; Wagiran, Husin

    2005-01-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured throughout Melaka, Malaysia, over a period of two years, with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. Results obtained are shown in tabular, graphic and cartographic form. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly over different soil types and for different underlying geological characteristics present in the study area. The values ranged from 54 ± 5 to 378 ± 38 nGy h -1 . The highest terrestrial gamma dose rates were measured over soil types of granitic origin and in areas with underlying geological characteristics of an acid intrusive (undifferentiated) type. An isodose map of terrestrial gamma dose rate in Melaka was drawn by using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This was based on data collected using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector survey meter. The measurements were taken at 542 locations. Three small 'hot spots' were found where the dose rates were more than 350 nGy h -1 . The mean dose rates in the main population areas in the mukims (parishes) of Bukit Katil, Sungai Udang, Batu Berendam, Bukit Baru and Bandar Melaka were 154 ± 15, 161 ± 16, 160 ± 16, 175 ± 18 and 176 ± 18 nGy h -1 , respectively. The population-weighted mean dose rate throughout Melaka state is 172 ± 17 nGy h -1 . This is lower than the geographical mean dose rate of 183 ± 54 nGy h -1 . The lower value arises from the fact that most of the population lives in the central area of the state where the lithology is dominated by sedimentary rocks consisting of shale, mudstone, phyllite, slate, hornfels, sandstone and schist of Devonian origin which have lower associated dose rates. The mean annual effective dose to the population from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 0.21 mSv. This value is higher than the world average of 0.07 mSv

  16. Analysis of gamma dose for 4,8 gU/cm3 density silicide core at the RSG-GAS reactor using MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardani

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety analysis should be done following of substitution of fuel density of 2.96 gU/cc to density of 4,8 gU/cc silicide fuels for the RSG-GAS reactor. MCNP-5 code has been used to perform gamma dose calculation of the RSG-GAS reactor. Gamma radiation source at reactor consists of capture gamma rays, prompt fission gamma rays, and gamma rays of decay of fission and activation products. The strength of the prompt fission gamma rays is obtained by gamma releases of fission process of U-235 and reactor power of 30 MWt., during 46,6 days operation. Radiation dose is calculated at the experimental hall by detection point at the surface of outer of biological shielding and the operation hall by detection point at the top of the pool. The calculation is conducted at reactor on the normal operation and on the worst postulated accident causing the water level at the pool decreases. Calculation result shows that the biggest source strength of gamma rays come from the decay process. The highest calculated dose at the experiment hall is 4,07x10 -3 μSv/h, far from the maximum external dose permitted 25 μSv/h. The highest calculated dose at the operation hall is 19.98 μSv/h. Even though the calculated dose is still acceptable but this is close to the maximum permitted dose for worker. It concluded that loading of 4,8 gU/cc silicide fuel for the RSG-GAS still safe. (author)

  17. Gamma radiation in apartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindborg, J.-E.

    1983-05-01

    This investigation forms the basis for the description of methods for the detection of gamma radiation. The aim is to control that the dose limit will not exceed 50 μR/h in a room where people reside. The distribution of dose rates in different rooms has been calculated and the results have been compared with experimental data. Various instruments have been calibrated and their specifications are discussed. (G.B.)

  18. Modelling simple helically delivered dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kissick, Michael W; Mackie, T Rock

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we described quality assurance procedures for Hi-Art helical tomotherapy machines. Here, we develop further some ideas discussed briefly in that paper. Simple helically generated dose distributions are modelled, and relationships between these dose distributions and underlying characteristics of Hi-Art treatment systems are elucidated. In particular, we describe the dependence of dose levels along the central axis of a cylinder aligned coaxially with a Hi-Art machine on fan beam width, couch velocity and helical delivery lengths. The impact on these dose levels of angular variations in gantry speed or output per linear accelerator pulse is also explored

  19. A comparison of the alpha and gamma radiolysis of CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Gary Groenewold; Gracy Elias

    2011-06-01

    The radiation chemistry of CMPO has been investigated using a combination of irradiation and analytical techniques. The {alpha}-, and {gamma}-irradiation of CMPO resulted in identical degradation rates (G-value, in {mu}mol Gy{sup -1}) for both radiation types, despite the difference in their linear energy transfer (LET). Similarly, variations in {gamma}-ray dose rates did not affect the degradation rate of CMPO. The solvent extraction behavior was different for the two radiation types, however. Gamma-irradiation resulted in steadily increasing distribution ratios for both forward and stripping extractions, with respect to increasing absorbed radiation dose. This was true for samples irradiated as a neat organic solution, or irradiated in contact with the acidic aqueous phase. In contrast, {alpha}-irradiated samples showed a rapid drop in distribution ratios for forward and stripping extractions, followed by essentially constant distribution ratios at higher absorbed doses. These differences in extraction behavior are reconciled by mass spectrometric examination of CMPO decomposition products under the different irradiation sources. Irradiation by {gamma}-rays resulted in the rupture of phosphoryl-methylene bonds with the production of phosphinic acid products. These species are expected to be complexing agents for americium that would result in higher distribution ratios. Irradiation by {alpha}-sources appeared to favor rupture of carbamoyl-methylene bonds with the production of less deleterious acetamide products.

  20. Assessment of genetically significant doses to the Sofia population from natural gamma background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, G.; Khristova, M.

    1977-01-01

    Genetically significant dose to the population of Sofia city was assessed within a program covering larger urban communities in the country. Measurements were made of gamma background exposure rates in the gonadal region. Gonad doses were estimated using a screening factor of 0.73. Based on statistical data for total number of inhabitants and number of people of reproductive age, and on the mean annual gonad doses derived, calculations were made of genetically significant dose to the Sofia population. Base-line data were thus provided for an assessment of extra radiation dose resulting from occupational radiation exposure. (author)

  1. An improved in situ method for determining depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benke, R.R.; Kearfott, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry determines the quantities of radionuclides in some medium with a portable detector. The main limitation of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry lies in determining the depth distribution of radionuclides. This limitation is addressed by developing an improved in situ method for determining the depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in large area sources. This paper implements a unique collimator design with conventional radiation detection equipment. Cylindrically symmetric collimators were fabricated to allow only those gamma-rays emitted from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis) to be detected. Positioned with its axis normal to surface of the media, each collimator enables the detection of gamma-rays emitted from a different range of polar angles and preferential depths. Previous in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. However, the absolute method presented in this paper determines the depth distribution as a histogram and does not rely on such assumptions. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method only requires a single gamma-ray emission, provides more detailed depth information, and offers a superior ability for characterizing complex depth distributions. Collimated spectrometer measurements of buried area sources demonstrated the ability of the method to yield accurate depth information. Based on the results of actual measurements, this method increases the potential of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry as an independent characterization tool in situations with unknown radionuclide depth distributions

  2. Dose-rate effects on gamma-induced genetic injury in rat spermatogonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.

    1990-01-01

    Data for correlation between the reciprocal translocations (RT) yield in rat germ cells and the doses of 0.5 - 3.0 Gy are presented. A 60 Co source has been used with dose rates of 0.25, 8 x 10 -2 and 7 x 10 -3 Gy/min. The results from the cytogenetic analysis made 6 months after irradiation have shown an increase of the yield with the increase of the dose, which can be described as a linear unthreshold dependence. The dose rate effect is expressed in decrease of mutation frequency. The comparison with earlier author's data from similar experiments for acute irradiation allows to determine the RBE of gamma irradiation at the three dose rates investigated as 0.6, 0.2 and 0.1 respectively. The reported results are connected with the problem of variety specificity of the dose rate effect. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs

  3. Assessment of absorbed dose rate from terrestrial gamma radiation in Red Sea State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalrahman, H. E. K.

    2012-09-01

    This study is primarily conducted to contribute in the overall strategic objective of producing Sudan radiation map which will include natural radiation levels and the resultant absorbed dose rate in air. The part covered by this study is the Red Sea State. Soil samples were collected from locations lie between latitudes 17.03 ° and the 20.18 ° N and longitudes 36.06 ° E during September 2007. Activity concentrations of the primordial radionuclides, 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 40 K in the samples were measured using gamma-ray spectrometry equipped with Nal (Tl) detector. Absorbed dose rates in air a height of 1 from the ground level and the corresponding annual effective doses were calculated from the measured activities using Dose Rate Conversion Factors (DRCFs). On the average, the activity concentrations were 19.22±13.13 Bq kg -1 ( 232 Th), 17.91±15.44 Bq kg -1 ( 226 Ra) and (507.13±161.67) Bq kg -1 for 40 K. The obtained results were found to be within the global values reported in the UNSCEAR publication for normal background areas with the exception of the samples taken from Arbaat area. The absorbed dose rate in air as calculated using UNSCEAR conversion factor averaged 40.93 n Gy h -1 which corresponds to annual effective dose of 50.23 μSvy -1 . The major contribution to the total absorbed dose rate comes from 40 K, which amounts to 53.36%. Using Geographical Information System (GIS), predication maps for activity concentrations levels of the measured radionuclides in the Red Sea state was prepared to show their respective spatial distributions. Similarly, GIS predictive map was produced for annual effective dose.(Author)

  4. Dose verification to cochlea during gamma knife radiosurgery of acoustic schwannoma using MOSFET dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil D; Kumar, Rajesh; Akhilesh, Philomina; Pendse, Anil M; Deshpande, Sudesh; Misra, Basant K

    2012-01-01

    Dose verification to cochlea using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter using a specially designed multi slice head and neck phantom during the treatment of acoustic schwannoma by Gamma Knife radiosurgery unit. A multi slice polystyrene head phantom was designed and fabricated for measurement of dose to cochlea during the treatment of the acoustic schwannoma. The phantom has provision to position the MOSFET dosimeters at the desired location precisely. MOSFET dosimeters of 0.2 mm x 0.2 mm x 0.5 μm were used to measure the dose to the cochlea. CT scans of the phantom with MOSFETs in situ were taken along with Leksell frame. The treatment plans of five patients treated earlier for acoustic schwannoma were transferred to the phantom. Dose and coordinates of maximum dose point inside the cochlea were derived. The phantom along with the MOSFET dosimeters was irradiated to deliver the planned treatment and dose received by cochlea were measured. The treatment planning system (TPS) estimated and measured dose to the cochlea were in the range of 7.4 - 8.4 Gy and 7.1 - 8 Gy, respectively. The maximum variation between TPS calculated and measured dose to cochlea was 5%. The measured dose values were found in good agreement with the dose values calculated using the TPS. The MOSFET dosimeter can be a suitable choice for routine dose verification in the Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  5. Life span and tumorigenesis in mice exposed to continuous low dose-rate gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Braga-Tanaka III, Ignacia; Takabatake, Takashi; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Kimio; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Sato, Fumiaki

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation. 1: Late effects of chronic low dose-rate gamma-ray irradiation on SPF mice, using life span and pathological changes as parameters. Continuous irradiation for approximately 400 days was performed using 137 Cs gamma-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until their natural death. Statistical analyses show that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day (p<0.0001) and of females irradiated at 1 mGy/day (p<0.05) were significantly shorter than those of the control group. There was no evidence of lengthened life span in mice continuously exposed to very low dose-rates of gama-rays. Pathodological examinations showed that the most frequently observed lethal neoplasms in males were malignant lymphomas, liver, lung, and soft tissue neoplasms, whereas, in females, malignant lymphomas and soft tissue neoplasms were common. No significant difference in the causes of death and mortality rates between groups. Hematopoietic neoplasms (malignant lymphoma and myeloid leukemia), liver, lung and soft tissue neoplasms, showed a tendency to appear at a younger age in both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day. Experiment 2: effects on the progeny of chronic low dose-rate gamma-ray irradiated SPF mice: preliminary study. No significant difference was observed between non-irradiated group and irradiated group with regards to litter size, sex ratio and causes of death in F1 and F2 mice. (author)

  6. Flattening the Energy Response of a Scintillator Based Gamma Dose Rate Meter Coupled to SiPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knafo, Y.; Manor, A.; Ginzburg, D.; Ellenbogen, M.; Osovizky, A.; Wengrowicz, U.; Ghelman, M.; Seif, R.; Mazor, T.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Among the newest emerging technologies that are used in the design of personal gamma radiation detection instruments, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) light sensor is playing an important role. This type of photo sensor is characterized by low power consumption, small dimensions and high gain. These special characteristics present applicable alternatives for the replacement of traditional gamma sensors based on scintillator coupled to Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or on Geiger-Muller(G.M.) sensors. For health physics applications, flat energy response is required for a wide range of radio-nuclides emitting gamma rays of different energies. Scintillation based radiation instrumentation provides count rate and amplitude of the measured pulses. These pulses can be split in different bins corresponding to the energy of the measured isotopes and their intensity. The count rate and the energy of the measured events are related to the dose rate. The conversion algorithm applys a different calibration factor for each energy bin in order to provide an accurate dose rate response for a wide range of gamma energies. This work describes the utilization of an innovative approach for dose rate conversion by using the abilities of newest 32-bit microcontroller based ARM core architecture

  7. Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Dose Rate of West Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izham, A.; Ramli, A. T.; Saridan Wan Hassan, W. M.; Idris, H. N.; Basri, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    A study of terrestrial gamma radiation (TGR) dose rate was conducted in west of Sarawak, covering Kuching, Samarahan, Serian, Sri Aman, and Betong divisions to construct a baseline TGR dose rate level data of the areas. The total area covered was 20,259.2 km2, where in-situ measurements of TGR dose rate were taken using NaI(Tl) scintillation detector Ludlum 19 micro R meter NaI(Tl) approximately 1 meter above ground level. Twenty-nine soil samples were taken across the 5 divisions covering 26 pairings of 9 geological formations and 7 soil types. A hyperpure Germanium detector was then used to find the samples' 238U, 232Th, and 40K radionuclides concentrations producing a correction factor Cf = 0.544. A total of239 measured data were corrected with Cf resulting in a mean Dm of 47 ± 1 nGy h-1, with a range between 5 nGy h-1 - 103 nGy h-1. A multiple regression analysis was conducted between geological means and soil types means against the corrected TGR dose rate Dm, generating Dg,s= 0.847Dg+ 0.637Ds- 22.313 prediction model with a normalized Beta equation of Dg,s= 0.605Dg+ 0.395Ds. The model has an 84.6% acceptance of Whitney- Mann test null hypothesis when tested against the corrected TGR dose rates.

  8. Separate assessment of natural beta and gamma dose-rates with TL from α-Al2O3:C single-crystal chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalchgruber, R.; Wagner, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    A measurement procedure was developed for fast and separate assessment of beta and gamma dose-rates in natural sediments using highly sensitive α-Al 2 O 3 :C single-crystal chips. The dosemeters were buried for periods from two days to three weeks in sediments with different layer structure and homogeneity. For each measurement, a pair of dosemeters was buried, in order to assess beta and gamma dose-rates separately. One dosemeter was wrapped only in thin plastic foil to shield it from alpha radiation, thus measuring beta + gamma components. The second one, used for the gamma component only, was packed additionally in a 1mm copper container for absorption of beta radiation. For calibration, another set of dosemeters was buried in reference soil with a well-known dose-rate and similar content of radioactive nuclides. By comparing the thermally stimulated luminescence signals from the dosemeters the gamma dose-rate and also, by subtraction, the beta dose-rate in the unknown soil could be determined. The calculated uncertainties were 5-7% and 10%, respectively. The resulting dose-rates for homogeneous and inhomogeneous media were compared with the results obtained by Ge- and on-site NaI-gamma-ray spectrometry. An agreement within 2σ-error limits was found for homogeneous media after only few days of exposure

  9. A new approach to dose estimation and in-phantom figure of merit measurement in BNCT by using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahangari, R.; Afarideh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In-phantom figures of merit of the radiobiological dose distribution are the main criteria for evaluation of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) plan and neutron beam evaluation. Since in BNCT there are several reactions, which contribute to the total dose of the tissue, the calculation of the dose distribution is complicated and requires lengthy and time-consuming simulations. Any changes in the beam shaping assembly (BSA) design would lead to the change of the neutron/gamma spectrum at exit of therapeutic window. As a result of any changes in the beam spectrum, the dose distribution in the tissue will be altered; therefore, another set of lengthy and time-consuming simulations to recalculate the dose distribution would have to be performed. This study proposes a method that applies artificial neural network (ANN) for quick dose prediction in order to avoid lengthy calculations. This method allows us to estimate the depth-dose distribution and in-phantom figures of merit for any energy spectrum without performing a complete Monte Carlo code (MCNP) simulation. To train the ANNs for modeling the depth-dose distribution, this study used a database containing 500 simulations of the neutron depth-dose distribution and 280 simulations of the gamma depth-dose distribution. The calculations were carried out by the MCNP for various mono-energetic neutrons, ranging from thermal up to 10 MeV energy and 280 gamma energy group, ranging from 0.01 MeV up to 20 MeV, through the SNYDER head phantom which is located at the exit of the BSA. The trained ANN was capable of establishing a map between the neutron/gamma beam energy and the dose distribution in the phantom as an input and a response, respectively. The current method is founded upon the observation that the dose which is released by the beam of composite energy spectrum can be decomposing into the various energy components which make the neutron/gamma spectrum. Therefore, in this procedure the neutron/gamma

  10. Dose distribution following selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.A.; Klemp, P.F.; Egan, G.; Mina, L.L.; Burton, M.A.; Gray, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy is the intrahepatic arterial injection of microspheres labelled with 90Y. The microspheres lodge in the precapillary circulation of tumor resulting in internal radiation therapy. The activity of the 90Y injected is managed by successive administrations of labelled microspheres and after each injection probing the liver with a calibrated beta probe to assess the dose to the superficial layers of normal tissue. Predicted doses of 75 Gy have been delivered without subsequent evidence of radiation damage to normal cells. This contrasts with the complications resulting from doses in excess of 30 Gy delivered from external beam radiotherapy. Detailed analysis of microsphere distribution in a cubic centimeter of normal liver and the calculation of dose to a 3-dimensional fine grid has shown that the radiation distribution created by the finite size and distribution of the microspheres results in an highly heterogeneous dose pattern. It has been shown that a third of normal liver will receive less than 33.7% of the dose predicted by assuming an homogeneous distribution of 90Y

  11. The analysis of annual dose distributions for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    The system of dose limitation recommended by the ICRP includes the requirement that no worker shall exceed the current dose limit of 50mSv/a. Continuous exposure at this limit corresponds to an annual death rate comparable with 'high risk' industries if all workers are continuously exposed at the dose limit. In practice, there is a distribution of doses with an arithmetic mean lower than the dose limit. In its 1977 report UNSCEAR defined a reference dose distribution for the purposes of comparison. However, this two parameter distribution does not show the departure from log-normality normally observed for actual distributions at doses which are a significant proportion of the annual limit. In this report an alternative model is suggested, based on a three parameter log-normal distribution. The third parameter is an ''effective dose limit'' and such a model fits very well the departure from log-normality observed in actual dose distributions. (author)

  12. Investigation of zones with increased ground surface gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkus, D.V.; Morkunas, G.S.; Styro, B.I.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the increased gamma radiation zones of soils were conducted in the South-Western part of the Litvinian. The shores of lakes in the north-eastern part of the Suduva high land were investigated. the maximum values of the gamma radiation dose rates were distributed along the lake shores at a distance of 1 m from the water surface, while farther than 1.5 m from it the dose rate was close to the natural value. The increased gamma radiation intensity zones on the ground surface were found only at the northern (Lake Reketija) or the western shore (other lakes under investigation). The highest values of the gamma radiation dose 200-600 μR/h (0.5-1.5 nGy/s) were observed in the comparatively small areas (up to several square metres). The gamma radiation intensity of soil surface increased strongly moving towards the point where the maximum intensity was obsered. 10 figs

  13. Effect of low dose gamma-radiation upon Newcastle disease virus antibody level in chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Gottstein, Z.; Ciglar Grozdanic, I.; Matanovic, K.; Miljanic, S.; Mazija, H.; Kraljevic, P.

    2009-01-01

    The specific antibody response against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs exposed to low dose gamma-radiation was studied. Materials and methods: Two groups of eggs of commercial meat chicken lines were irradiated with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation, respectively. The same number of eggs unexposed to gamma-radiation served as controls. After hatching the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation was not vaccinated while the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation was vaccinated on the 14 day. Specific serum anti-Newcastle disease virus antibodies were quantified by the hemagglutination inhibition assay with 4 HA units of Newcastle disease virus La Sota strain. Result: Specific antibody titres against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation and vaccinated on the 14 th day significantly increased on the 28 th day. Specific antibody titre against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation and non-vaccinated was significantly higher on the 1 st and 14 th day. Conclusion: Acute irradiation of heavy breeding chicken eggs with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation could have a stimulative effect on humoral immunity in chickens.

  14. Sampling optimization trade-offs for long-term monitoring of gamma dose rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melles, S.J.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Twenhöfel, C.J.W.; Stöhlker, U.

    2008-01-01

    This paper applies a recently developed optimization method to examine the design of networks that monitor radiation under routine conditions. Annual gamma dose rates were modelled by combining regression with interpolation of the regression residuals using spatially exhaustive predictors and an

  15. Gamma prior distribution selection for Bayesian analysis of failure rate and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, R.A.; Johnson, M.M.; Waterman, M.S.; Martz, H.F. Jr.

    1976-07-01

    It is assumed that the phenomenon under study is such that the time-to-failure may be modeled by an exponential distribution with failure rate lambda. For Bayesian analyses of the assumed model, the family of gamma distributions provides conjugate prior models for lambda. Thus, an experimenter needs to select a particular gamma model to conduct a Bayesian reliability analysis. The purpose of this report is to present a methodology that can be used to translate engineering information, experience, and judgment into a choice of a gamma prior distribution. The proposed methodology assumes that the practicing engineer can provide percentile data relating to either the failure rate or the reliability of the phenomenon being investigated. For example, the methodology will select the gamma prior distribution which conveys an engineer's belief that the failure rate lambda simultaneously satisfies the probability statements, P(lambda less than 1.0 x 10 -3 ) equals 0.50 and P(lambda less than 1.0 x 10 -5 ) equals 0.05. That is, two percentiles provided by an engineer are used to determine a gamma prior model which agrees with the specified percentiles. For those engineers who prefer to specify reliability percentiles rather than the failure rate percentiles illustrated above, it is possible to use the induced negative-log gamma prior distribution which satisfies the probability statements, P(R(t 0 ) less than 0.99) equals 0.50 and P(R(t 0 ) less than 0.99999) equals 0.95, for some operating time t 0 . The report also includes graphs for selected percentiles which assist an engineer in applying the procedure. 28 figures, 16 tables

  16. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  17. Environmental gamma-ray dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) and environmental radiation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanematsu, Seiko

    1999-01-01

    It is important to evaluate environmental gamma-ray exposure both at work and home in order to assess people's collective dosages. Environmental gamma radiation was measured for air-absorbed dose with a thermoluminescence dosemeter at various points in the workplace and Ningyotoge, and workplace radiation characteristics were analyzed. From the results, the public dose due to gamma rays generated artificially was assessed to be sufficiently lower than the annual limit. For indoor environments of the workplace, the maximum dosage rate among measured values was 97 nGy/h and the minimum value was 70 nGy/h, the average over one year was 83 nGy/h. The average annual outdoor dosage for a year was 82 nGy/ h. In Ningyotoge, the maximum was 103 nGy/h, minimum 60 nGy/h, and average 88 nGy/h. These values depend on the nature of the soil and weather factors, showing higher values in the summer than in the winter in the workplace. There was no significant difference in the dosage rate in houses and the workplace. (author)

  18. Assessment of dose load of personnel in intratissue gamma beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavitskij, R.V.; Zamyatin, O.A.; Varennikov, O.I.; Astakhova, I.V.

    1995-01-01

    Suggest a method for retrospective assessment of levels of irradiation of small groups of personnel exposed to radiation sources. Presents estimated values of cumulative and local doses obtained by personnel during intratissue gamma beam therapy carried out by manual consecutive injections of intrastats and irradiation sources. 3 refs.; 5 tabs

  19. FTIR spectroscopy as an alternative tool for high gamma dose dosimetry using P(VDF-TrFE) fluorinated copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Adriana S.; Liz, Otavio S., E-mail: asm@cdtn.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] is a semicrystalline homopolymer and some of its fluorinated copolymer has demonstrated to have sensitiveness to high doses of ionizing radiation. We have recently proposed a semicrystalline fluorinated PVDF copolymer, the poly(vinylidene-trifluorethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE], as a candidate for measuring larger dose ranges. In fact, in these copolymers the optical absorption peak at 274 nm has been used to measure gamma doses ranging from 1.0 to 100.0 kGy and the melting latent heat, collected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), have been used to measure gamma doses from 1.0 to 1,000.0 kGy. In this paper, the infrared stretching vibration of radio-induced in-chain unsaturations (CH=CF) in P(VDF-TrFE) copolymers has been considered as an alternative tool for high dose dosimetric purposes. FTIR spectroscopic data revealed two optical absorption bands at 1754 cm{sup -1} and 1854 cm{sup -1} whose intensities are unambiguously related to gamma delivered doses ranging from 100.0 kGy to 1,000.0 kGy. Fading was evaluated one month after irradiation. The results indicate that the sample dose evaluation should be performed in the first two hours after being exposed to the radiation beam. The radio-induced formation of unsaturations was also investigated by ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, which has confirmed the gradual increase of conjugated C=C bonds with the absorbed dose. Our results indicate that quantitative analysis of FTIR absorption bands is a useful tool to perform a product end-point dosimetry in radiation processing facilities that use high gamma dose irradiation. (author)

  20. Exfoliated graphite with graphene flakes as potential candidates for TL dosimeters at high gamma doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Morales, A; López-González, E; Rueda-Morales, G; Ortega-Cervantez, G; Ortiz-Lopez, J

    2018-06-06

    Graphite powder (GP) subjected to microwave radiation (MWG) results in exfoliation of graphite particles into few-layered graphene flakes (GF) intermixed with partially exfoliated graphite particles (PEG). Characterization of MWG by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy reveal few-layer GF with sizes ranging from 0.2 to 5 µm. Raman D, G, and 2D (G') bands characteristic of graphitic structures include evidence of the presence of bilayered graphene. The thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetric properties of MWG are evaluated and can be characterized as a gamma-ray sensitive and dose-resistant material with kinetic parameters (activation energy for the main peak located at 400 and 408 K is 0.69 and 0.72 eV) and threshold dose (~1 kGy and 5 kGy respectively). MWG is a low-Z material (Z eff = 6) with a wide linear range of TL dose-response (0.170-2.5 kGy) tested at doses in the 1-20 kGy range with promising results for applications in gamma-ray dosimetry. Results obtained in gamma irradiated MWG are compared with those obtained in graphite powder samples (GP) without microwave treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to use reproducible and stable indicators to evaluate biological responses to long term irradiation at low dose-rate. They should be simple and quantitative enough to produce the results statistically accurate, because we have to analyze the subtle changes of biological responses around background level at low dose. For these purposes we chose micronucleus formation of U2OS, a human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological responses. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation rom bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide, respectively. the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was counted under a fluorescence microscope. Dose rate in the irradiation room was measured with PLD. Dose response of PLD is linear between 1 mGy to 10 Gy, and standard deviation of triplicate count was several percent of mean value. We fitted statistically dose response curves to the data, and they were plotted on the coordinate of linearly scale response and dose. The results followed to the straight line passing through the origin of the coordinate axes between 0.1-5 Gy, and dose and does rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) was less than 2 when cells were irradiated for 1-10 min. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose above 0.1 Gy when 5,000 binuclear cells were analyzed. In contrast, dose response curves never followed LNT, when cells were irradiated for 7 to 124 days. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose below 6 Gy, when cells were continuously irradiated for 124 days. These results suggest that dose response curve of biological reaction is remarkably affected by exposure

  2. Near-term and late biological effects of acute and low-dose-rate continuous gamma-ray exposure in dogs and monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Holland, L.M.

    1979-07-01

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (inury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with gamma rays at 35 r/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injry remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50%) and monkeys (8%) died from injury incurred during conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response (in terms of lethality) of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what we would expect from a single acute dose. The mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approx. 1400 h). Thus, the hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35-R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater (significant in dogs but not in monkeys) than for their control counterparts. Thus, long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than 4 times the acute LD 50 30 in dogs and approximately 2 times that in monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 Rat/day

  3. A study on seasonal variations of indoor gamma dose in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2005-01-01

    Monthly variation of gamma dose rate measured in indoor air of buildings of Bangladesh was found to vary cosinusoidally through a period of 1 year. Significant seasonal variations were observed. Maximum dose rate, however, was observed in January and a minimum in July. Dose rate in January was 32% higher than the annual average, whereas dose rate in July was 50% lower. Seasonally varied ventilation and air exchange rates of the houses might play an important role in the observed variation. The average reduction with respect to winter dose was 59% in summer. Because of lower ventilation and air exchange rates between indoor and outdoor atmosphere, it is expected that the indoor dose rate would be higher in basements than that of upper floors. Monthly dose rate was also found to be influenced by the meteorological conditions. Correlations between dose rate and temperature (r 2 =0.85), rainfall (r=-0.83) and atmospheric pressure (r=0.92) were obtained, but no significant correlation (r=-0.45) was seen between dose rate and humidity. The results show that the seasonal variations of indoor dose rates should be taken into account to estimate annual effective dose equivalent. (author)

  4. Development of a dose simulation software for gamma irradiation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omi, Nelson Minoru

    2000-01-01

    The use of high temperature, thermal and chemical treatment are among the used sterilization process of food and many products. The ionizing radiation came as another option, it has being used for many purposes and it became available due to the technological development in the second half of the 20 th century. Together with sterilization, many uses of the ionizing radiation were developed, such as applications on health, industrial products and waste recycling, food irradiation, vulcanizing, polymerization and gems color enhancing. The 60 Co gamma stands out among the used radiation sources on commercial facilities. lt is used to optimize this process with many dose mapping tests. The objective of this work is to develop a software to simulate the doses in 60 Co gamma irradiation systems. lt can be used to optimize a process on the project stage of a facility and to make viability studies for new applications in installations already set up. The validation of this software was done comparing the simulation results with the dosimetry data of an operating irradiation plant. The flexibility of the software was verified with extra dosimetry tests performed in another sterilization facility. (author)

  5. Effect of dose of gamma-rays and ethylmethane sulphonate on the germination and survival of induced mutations in pigeonpea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premsekar, S [Central Inst. for Cotton Research, Coimbatore (India). Regional Station; Appadurai, R [Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India)

    1981-06-01

    The LD/sub 50/ values for germination and survival of the induced mutants (M/sub 1/) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (Linn.) Millsp.) were attained with 20 and 15 krad when gamma-rays were used, and 30 and 40 mM concentration when EMS was used. In the combination treatments the half-kill dose for germination and survival was reached even at the low dose combination of 5 krad gamma-ray + 20 mM EMS. Higher doses resulted in lower pollen and seed fertility. The sterility was much enhanced in the combined treatments. The number of pods, seed yield and weight of seeds could be stimulated with 10 and 15 krad doses of gamma-rays and 20 mM of EMS. In combination treatments such a stimulatory effect was noticed in seed weight only.

  6. The Fukushima releases: an inverse modelling approach to assess the source term by using gamma dose rate observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Olivier; Mathieu, Anne; Didier, Damien; Tombette, Marilyne; Quélo, Denis; Winiarek, Victor; Bocquet, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident and more recently the Fukushima accident highlighted that the largest source of error on consequences assessment is the source term estimation including the time evolution of the release rate and its distribution between radioisotopes. Inverse modelling methods have proved to be efficient to assess the source term due to accidental situation (Gudiksen, 1989, Krysta and Bocquet, 2007, Stohl et al 2011, Winiarek et al 2012). These methods combine environmental measurements and atmospheric dispersion models. They have been recently applied to the Fukushima accident. Most existing approaches are designed to use air sampling measurements (Winiarek et al, 2012) and some of them use also deposition measurements (Stohl et al, 2012, Winiarek et al, 2013). During the Fukushima accident, such measurements are far less numerous and not as well distributed within Japan than the dose rate measurements. To efficiently document the evolution of the contamination, gamma dose rate measurements were numerous, well distributed within Japan and they offered a high temporal frequency. However, dose rate data are not as easy to use as air sampling measurements and until now they were not used in inverse modelling approach. Indeed, dose rate data results from all the gamma emitters present in the ground and in the atmosphere in the vicinity of the receptor. They do not allow one to determine the isotopic composition or to distinguish the plume contribution from wet deposition. The presented approach proposes a way to use dose rate measurement in inverse modeling approach without the need of a-priori information on emissions. The method proved to be efficient and reliable when applied on the Fukushima accident. The emissions for the 8 main isotopes Xe-133, Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, Ba-137m, I-131, I-132 and Te-132 have been assessed. The Daiichi power plant events (such as ventings, explosions…) known to have caused atmospheric releases are well identified in

  7. Dose rate on the environment generated by a gamma irradiation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J.

    2011-01-01

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation reaching the outdoors floor is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on tables and graphics. (author) [es

  8. Dose-dependent analysis of acute medical effects of mixed neutron-gamma radiation from selected severe 235U or 239Pu criticality accidents in USSR, United States, and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabanova, Tatyana; Wiley, Albert L; Bushmanov, Andrey

    2012-04-01

    Eight of the most severe cases of acute radiation disease (ARS) known to have occurred in humans (as the result of criticality accidents) had survival times less than 120 h (herein defined as "early death"). These accidents were analyzed and are discussed with respect to the specific accident scenarios and the resulting accident-specific, mixed neutron-gamma radiation clinical dose distributions. This analysis concludes that the cardiovascular system appears to be the most critical organ system failure for causing "early death" following approximate total body, mixed gamma-neutron radiation doses greater than 40-50 Gy. The clinical data also suggest that there was definite chest dose dependence in the resulting survival times for these eight workers, who unfortunately suffered profound radiation injury and unusual clinical effects from such high dose radiation exposures. In addition, "toxemic syndrome" is correlated with the irradiation of large volumes of soft tissues. Doses to the hands or legs greater than 80-100 Gy or radiation lung injury also play significant but secondary roles in causing "early death" in accidents delivering chest doses greater than 50 Gy.

  9. The distribution and abundance of gamma emitting radionuclides in Lake Ontario sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, R.S.

    1985-03-01

    The distribution of gamma emitting radionuclides in Lake Ontario sediments was investigated. Samples were collected using a systematic design in the vicinity of Pickering and Darlington, and supplemented by lakewide offshore samples. Naturally occurring 40 K was the predominant source of gamma activity. 60 Co was the only potentially CANDU released radionuclide which showed a distributional association with the Pickering 'A' NGS discharge

  10. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R., E-mail: kerurpbk@rediffmail.com.com [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University Kalaburagi – 585 106 India (India); Anilkumar, S. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  11. In vitro study of dose rate effect on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastykova, V.; Novotny, J. jr.; Vachelova, J.; Davidkova, M.; Liscak, R.

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is to evaluate the radiobiological effect of the dose rate changes in Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) clinical conditions. In principle there are two reasons why dose rate on LGK is reduced during patient irradiation: 1) Co-60 sources decay with a half-life of 5.26 years and 2) using multiple iso-centers and conformal treatment plans (e.g. with blocked beams). This pilot study is an experimental work performed in vitro with medulloblastoma DAOY cells. Are there effects caused by low dose rate which could negatively influence the clinical outcome of the radiosurgery? (authors)

  12. Dose Calculation Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Algorithm for CyberKnife Compared with Other Commercially Available Dose Calculation Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Subhash; Ott, Joseph; Williams, Jamone; Dickow, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms have the potential for greater accuracy than traditional model-based algorithms. This enhanced accuracy is particularly evident in regions of lateral scatter disequilibrium, which can develop during treatments incorporating small field sizes and low-density tissue. A heterogeneous slab phantom was used to evaluate the accuracy of several commercially available dose calculation algorithms, including Monte Carlo dose calculation for CyberKnife, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm and Pencil Beam convolution for the Eclipse planning system, and convolution-superposition for the Xio planning system. The phantom accommodated slabs of varying density; comparisons between planned and measured dose distributions were accomplished with radiochromic film. The Monte Carlo algorithm provided the most accurate comparison between planned and measured dose distributions. In each phantom irradiation, the Monte Carlo predictions resulted in gamma analysis comparisons >97%, using acceptance criteria of 3% dose and 3-mm distance to agreement. In general, the gamma analysis comparisons for the other algorithms were <95%. The Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for CyberKnife provides more accurate dose distribution calculations in regions of lateral electron disequilibrium than commercially available model-based algorithms. This is primarily because of the ability of Monte Carlo algorithms to implicitly account for tissue heterogeneities, density scaling functions; and/or effective depth correction factors are not required.

  13. ZZ DOSDAT-2, Gamma and Electron Dose Conversion Factor Data Library for Body Organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Format: DOSDAT-R; Nuclides: gamma-ray and electron dose rates for whole-body and for various body organs (24) for air and water immersion and from ground-surface sources (approximately 500 radioactive nuclides). Origin: DLC-80/DRALIST library of radioactive decay data. The data are used to estimate the gamma-ray and electron dose rates for whole-body and for various body organs (24) for air and water immersion and from ground-surface sources. The data are given for approximately 500 radioactive nuclides. 2 - Method of solution: The data were computed by the CCC-400 DOSAFACTER II code from the DLC-80/DRALIST library of radioactive decay data for approximately 500 nuclides

  14. Effect of low dose gamma irradiation on onion yield: Large scale application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.

    1993-01-01

    Large scale application of presowing gamma-irradiation of seeds, bulblets and bulbs of onion, performed in 1989, using the doses of 10 Gy for seeds and 1 Gy for bulblets and bulbs. The doses were chosen on the basis of previous experiments. Reliable increases in yield of seeds (19.3%), bulblets (18.9) and bulbs (31.4%) for red variety. and of 22.3% and 23.4% for seeds and bulbs of white variety were obtained. (author). 2 tabs

  15. Dosimetry for terrestrial gamma-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, S.A.; Dickson, H.W.; Kerr, G.D.; Miah, M.F.K.; Perdue, P.T.

    1975-01-01

    Dose rates from natural radionuclides and 137 Cs in soils of the Oak Ridge area have been determined from in situ and core sample measurements. Information on soil composition, density, and moisture content and on the distribution of cesium in the soil was obtained from the core samples. Measurements of radionuclide concentrations in the samples were made with a 4 x 4 in. NaI detector. Gamma-ray spectroscopy using a lithium-drifted germanium (GeLi) detector has been applied to the determination of radionuclide concentrations in soil and the associated gamma dose rates above the earth plane. An unshielded GeLi detector placed about 1 m above the earth detects gamma radiation from an area of about 100 m 2 . The equipment and data processing procedure are briefly described

  16. Theory of thermoluminescence gamma dose response: The unified interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y.S.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the development of a comprehensive theory of thermoluminescence (TL) dose response, the unified interaction model (UNIM). The UNIM is based on both radiation absorption stage and recombination stage mechanisms and can describe dose response for heavy charged particles (in the framework of the extended track interaction model - ETIM) as well as for isotropically ionising gamma rays and electrons (in the framework of the TC/LC geminate recombination model) in a unified and self-consistent conceptual and mathematical formalism. A theory of optical absorption dose response is also incorporated in the UNIM to describe the radiation absorption stage. The UNIM is applied to the dose response supralinearity characteristics of LiF:Mg,Ti and is especially and uniquely successful in explaining the ionisation density dependence of the supralinearity of composite peak 5 in TLD-100. The UNIM is demonstrated to be capable of explaining either qualitatively or quantitatively all of the major features of TL dose response with many of the variable parameters of the model strongly constrained by ancilliary optical absorption and sensitisation measurements

  17. Converting dose distributions into tumour control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahum, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The endpoints in radiotherapy that are truly of relevance are not dose distributions but the probability of local control, sometimes known as the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and the Probability of Normal Tissue Complications (NTCP). A model for the estimation of TCP based on simple radiobiological considerations is described. It is shown that incorporation of inter-patient heterogeneity into the radiosensitivity parameter a through s a can result in a clinically realistic slope for the dose-response curve. The model is applied to inhomogeneous target dose distributions in order to demonstrate the relationship between dose uniformity and s a . The consequences of varying clonogenic density are also explored. Finally the model is applied to the target-volume DVHs for patients in a clinical trial of conformal pelvic radiotherapy; the effect of dose inhomogeneities on distributions of TCP are shown as well as the potential benefits of customizing the target dose according to normal-tissue DVHs. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs

  18. Converting dose distributions into tumour control probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, A E [The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics

    1996-08-01

    The endpoints in radiotherapy that are truly of relevance are not dose distributions but the probability of local control, sometimes known as the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and the Probability of Normal Tissue Complications (NTCP). A model for the estimation of TCP based on simple radiobiological considerations is described. It is shown that incorporation of inter-patient heterogeneity into the radiosensitivity parameter a through s{sub a} can result in a clinically realistic slope for the dose-response curve. The model is applied to inhomogeneous target dose distributions in order to demonstrate the relationship between dose uniformity and s{sub a}. The consequences of varying clonogenic density are also explored. Finally the model is applied to the target-volume DVHs for patients in a clinical trial of conformal pelvic radiotherapy; the effect of dose inhomogeneities on distributions of TCP are shown as well as the potential benefits of customizing the target dose according to normal-tissue DVHs. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs.

  19. Aerial gamma spectrometry of the uranium province of Lagoa Real (Caetite, BA, Brazil): go environmental aspects and distribution of the absorbed dose in the air; Espectrometria gama aerea da provincia uranifera de Lagoa Real (Caetite, BA): aspectos geoambientais e distribuicao da dose absorvida no ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Esau Francisco Sena

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, it was analyzed the surface concentrations of the natural radioelements K, U and Th, as well as the absorbed dose rate in air caused by gamma radiation from the Lagoa Real uranium province, which is located at the center southern portion of Bahia State and comprises an area of approximately 4.600 Km{sup 2}. Data from the airborne gamma ray spectrometric survey of the region (Sao Timoeo Project) carried out in 1979, was used in this study. Besides, recent data of U, Th and absorbed dose rates from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the uranium concentration plant (URA), operated in the region by the Brazilian Nuclear Industries (INB), were used with the aim of inter compare the sampling points in the same geo referenced area. Imaging geo processing software's give support to frame maps of surface concentrations and ternary maps, as well as allow the integration of these with other themes (e.g. hydrology, geology, pedology) favouring the interpretation of geo environmental process from the radioactive cartography. Considering the whole study area, it was obtained the following mean values: absorbed dose rate in air (61,08 nGy.h{sup -1}), Potassium (1,65 % K) , Uranium (3,02 ppm eU) and thorium (18,26 ppm eTh). The geological unities bounding the uranium anomalies were placed in the areas characterized by the highest values of radioelements and, as expected, the major dose levels. The use of ternary maps coupled with the geology and hydrology allowed distinguishing the relationship between the surface distribution of natural radioelements and the geo environmental aspects, including the influence of the catchment in their transport and migration. (author)

  20. [Induction of glutathione and activation of immune functions by low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji

    2006-10-01

    We first examined the relation between the induction of glutathione and immune functions in mice after low-dose gamma-ray irradiation. Thereafter, inhibition of tumor growth by radiation was confirmed in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST)-bearing mice. The total glutathione level of the splenocytes transiently increased soon after irradiation and reached a maximum at around 4 h postirradiation. Thereafter, the level reverted to the 0 h value by 24 h postirradiation. A significantly high splenocyte proliferative response was also recognized 4 h postirradiation. Natural killer (NK) activity was also increased significantly in a similar manner. The time at which the response reached the maximum coincided well with that of maximum total glutathione levels of the splenocytes in the gamma-ray-irradiated mice. Reduced glutathione exogenously added to splenocytes obtained from normal mice enhanced the proliferative response and NK activity in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of radiation on tumor growth was then examined in EST-bearing mice. Repeated low-dose irradiation (0.5 Gy, four times, before and within an early time after inoculation) significantly delayed the tumor growth. Finally, the effect of single low-dose (0.5 Gy), whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on immune balance was examined to elucidate the mechanism underlying the antitumor immunity. The percentage of B cells in blood lymphocytes was selectively decreased after radiation, concomitant with an increase in that of the helper T cell population. The IFN-gamma level in splenocyte culture prepared from EST-bearing mice was significantly increased 48 h after radiation, although the level of IL-4 was unchanged. IL-12 secretion from macrophages was also enhanced by radiation. These results suggest that low-dose gamma-rays induce Th1 polarization and enhance the activities of tumoricidal effector cells, leading to an inhibition of tumor growth.

  1. SU-E-T-542: Comparison of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) of Brain Lesions Using Gamma Knife, VMAT, IMRT, and Conformal Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S; Charpentier, P; Chan, P; Neicu, T; Miyamoto, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions in stereotactic radiation surgery of brain lesions using gamma Knife, VMAT, conformal arcs, and IMRT in order to provide an optimal treatment. Methods: Dose distributions from single shot of 4C model of Gamma Knife at the helmet collimation sizes of 4, 8, 14, and 18 mm in diameter were compared with full arcs with the square shapes of 4×4 (or 5×5), 8×8 (or 10×10), and spherical shapes of 16 or 20 mm in diameter using EDR3 films in the same gamma knife QA phantom. Plans for ten SRS cases with single and multiple lesions were created in gamma knife plans and Pinnacle plans. The external beam plans had enlarged field size by 2-mm and used single conformal full circle arc for solitary lesion and none coplanar arcs/beams for multiple lesions. Coverage, conformity index, dose to critical organs, and integral dose to the brain and nearby critical structures were compared on all plans. Structures and dose matrices were registered in a Velocity deformable image registration system. Results: Single full circle arc from Elekta beam-modulate MLC (4-mm leaf thickness) and agility MLC (5-mm leaf thickness) have larger penumbra and less flatness than that of Gamma Knife single shot. None-coplanar arcs or beams were required to achieve similar dose distribution. In general, Gamma Knife plans provided significant less integral dose than that of linac-based plans. Benefits of IMRT and VMAT versus gamma Knife and conformal arcs were not significant. Conclusion: Our dose measurement and treatment planning evaluation clearly demonstrated dose distribution differences amount current popular SRS modalities for small solitary and multiple brain lesions. The trend of using MLC shape beams or arcs to replace conventional cones should be revisited in order to keep lower integral dose if the late correlates with some radiation-induced side effects. Pilot grant from Elekta LLC

  2. Constraints on the galactic distribution of cosmic rays from the COS-B gamma-ray data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The velocity information of the HI and CO observations is used as a distance indicator to ascertain the spatial distribution of the interstellar gas. Using this distance information, the galacto-centric distribution of the gamma-ray emissivity (the production rate per H atom) is determined for three gamma-ray energy ranges from a correlation study of the gamma-ray intensity maps and the gas-tracer maps for selected galacto-centric distance intervals, taking into account the expected IC contribution and pointlike gamma-ray sources. On the assumption that unresolved gamma-ray point sources do not contribute significantly to the observed gamma-ray emission, the gamma-ray emissivity is proportional to the Cosmic ray density and, more specifically, the energy dependence can be used to study separately the distribution of Cosmic ray electrons and nuclei: whereas the emission for the 300 MeV - 5 GeV range is dominated by π 0 -decay, the 70 MeV - 150 MeV range has a large electron bremsstrahlung contribution

  3. Collimatorless imaging of gamma rays with help of gamma-ray tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2001-01-01

    In many gamma-ray detector systems that are built for imaging purposes Compton scattered photons are suppressed as much as possible. However, the information from photons that scattered inside a detector system can be used to reconstruct the tracks of the photons with help of gamma-ray tracking. Estimates of the incident directions of the photons can be made and an image can be created. Examples of potential applications for this technique are the use as a gamma-camera in medical imaging (e.g. SPECT) or as a detector for PET. Due to the omission of collimators, much higher detection efficiencies can be achieved, reducing the doses required for an image. A gamma-ray tracking method, called backtracking, has been developed for nuclear spectroscopy. The method tracks gamma-rays originating from a point source in the center of a spherical detector system consisting of position-sensitive germanium detectors. This method can also be used as a tracking technique for imaging of an unknown source distribution. With he...

  4. Effects of sublethal doses of gamma radiation on the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, H.; Carlsson, J.; Larsson, B.; Saefwenberg, J.O.

    1975-01-01

    Newborn rats were irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays. Doses of 0, 80 or 160 rads were given to the whole body. The whole body and brain weights, DNA and RNA contents of the brain and 3 H-thymidine or 3 H-uridine incorporated by the brain were measured at 5, 10 or 15 days after birth. A dose of 160 rads produced clear alterations in the brain but no clear effects could be detected when 80 rads were given. (author)

  5. Sterilization and lethal gamma radiation doses on adults and eggs of Sitotroga Cerealella (OLIVIER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendl, F.M.; Bovi, O.A.; Arthur, V.

    1975-04-01

    The influence of lethal doses of radiation from a cobalt 60 gamma source on eggs, adults and fertitility of Sitotroga Cerealella (Olivier) is described. Eggs irradiated with a dose of 14 Krad still showed viability of 16.1%. On longevity doses up to 70 Krad were usually non lethal but some variation could be observed related to the larval diet. Females fertilized by males irradiated with a dose of 70 Krad produced 36% fertile eggs. When the females were irradiated with the same dose, their fertility dropped to 2.2% and when both sexes were irradiated with a 60 Krad dose, the fertility was 28.8%

  6. Optimized Dose Distribution of Gammamed Plus Vaginal Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, Sanjay S.; Bijina, T.K.; Varatharaj, C.; Shwetha, B.; Arunkumar, T.; Sathiyan, S.; Ganesh, K.M.; Ravikumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common malignancy arising in the female genital tract. Intracavitary vaginal cuff irradiation may be given alone or with external beam irradiation in patients determined to be at risk for locoregional recurrence. Vaginal cylinders are often used to deliver a brachytherapy dose to the vaginal apex and upper vagina or the entire vaginal surface in the management of postoperative endometrial cancer or cervical cancer. The dose distributions of HDR vaginal cylinders must be evaluated carefully, so that clinical experiences with LDR techniques can be used in guiding optimal use of HDR techniques. The aim of this study was to optimize dose distribution for Gammamed plus vaginal cylinders. Placement of dose optimization points was evaluated for its effect on optimized dose distributions. Two different dose optimization point models were used in this study, namely non-apex (dose optimization points only on periphery of cylinder) and apex (dose optimization points on periphery and along the curvature including the apex points). Thirteen dwell positions were used for the HDR dosimetry to obtain a 6-cm active length. Thus 13 optimization points were available at the periphery of the cylinder. The coordinates of the points along the curvature depended on the cylinder diameters and were chosen for each cylinder so that four points were distributed evenly in the curvature portion of the cylinder. Diameter of vaginal cylinders varied from 2.0 to 4.0 cm. Iterative optimization routine was utilized for all optimizations. The effects of various optimization routines (iterative, geometric, equal times) was studied for the 3.0-cm diameter vaginal cylinder. The effect of source travel step size on the optimized dose distributions for vaginal cylinders was also evaluated. All optimizations in this study were carried for dose of 6 Gy at dose optimization points. For both non-apex and apex models of vaginal cylinders, doses for apex point and three dome

  7. Sterilization of boll weevil pupae with fractionated doses of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, J.W.; Mitlin, N.; Davich, T.B.; Dawson, J.R.; McGovern, W.L.; McKibben, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Fractionated doses of 6,250-8,000 rads of gamma irradiation administered to pupae of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh., sexually sterilized both sexes. Mortality of males thus treated with 6,250 and 8,000 rads via fractionation was 14% and 27% respectively, by 5 days posttreatment compared with 46% mortality when an equivalent acute dose was administered to newly emerged adults. Pheromone production of males irradiated at 6,250 rads was one-third that of the control for the first 4 days, but equal that of the control during 5-11 days posttreatment. This procedure lends itself to the large-scale sterilization of weevils needed in an eradication program. This technique is applicable to other insects that are highly susceptible to acute doses

  8. Reduction in flatulence factors in mung beans (Vigna radiata) using low-dose gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaiah, J.P.; Pednekar, M.D.; Thomas, P.

    1999-01-01

    Mungbeans (Vigna radiata), control and gamma-irradiated at insect disinfestation dose levels (0.25 and 0.75 kGy) were germinated (0-6 Bays) and the qualitative and quantitative changes in soluble carbohydrates were studied in detail. The key flatulence-producing raffinose family oligosaccharides inmungbeans were degraded in the irradiated samples at the onset of the germination (0-2 days) compared to the control where it occurred much later (>4days). However, the reducing sugars, mainly glucose, fructose and galactose, which are metabolised easily, were enhanced in the irradiated samples. At low dose (0.25 kGy), irradiation had no effect on germination and sprout length, indicating that irradiated beans are suitable for use as sprouted beans. These observations clearly indicate that gamma-irradiation at insect disinfestation dose levels improved the digestibility and nutritional quality of mung beans by reducing the content of oligosaccharides responsible for intestinal gas production. (C) 1999 Society of Chemical Industry

  9. Tumor induction in mice after local irradiation with single doses of either carbon-ion beams or gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ando, Yutaka; Kobashi, Gen

    2014-12-01

    To determine the dose-dependent relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for tumor prevalence in mice receiving single localized doses to their right leg of either carbon ions (15, 45 or 75 keV/μm) or 137Cs gamma rays. A total of 1647 female C3H mice were irradiated to their hind legs with a localized dose of either reference gamma rays or 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams. Irradiated mice were evaluated for tumors twice a month during their three-year life span, and the dimensions of any tumors found were measured with a caliper. The tumor induction frequency was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The incidence of tumors from 50 Gy of 45 keV/μm carbon ions was marginally higher than those from 50 Gy of gamma rays. However, 60 Gy of 15 keV/μm carbon ions induced significantly fewer tumors than did gamma rays. RBE values of 0.87 + 0.12, 1.29 + 0.08 or 2.06 + 0.39 for lifetime tumorigenesis were calculated for 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams, respectively. Fibrosarcoma predominated, with no Linear Energy Transfer (LET)-dependent differences in the tumor histology. Experiments measuring the late effect of leg skin shrinkage suggested that the carcinogenic damage of 15 keV/μm carbon ions would be less than that of gamma rays. We conclude that patients receiving radiation doses to their normal tissues would face less risk of secondary tumor induction by carbon ions of intermediate LET values compared to equivalent doses of photons.

  10. Effect of low gamma-ray doses and seeding rates on growth, yield and its components as well as seed quality of lentils (lens Culinaries, med.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dprgham, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    To study the effect of low doses gamma-rays and seeding rates on growth, yield and its components as well as seed quality, two experiments were conducted during 1993/1994 and 1994/1995 seasons. Each experiment included treatments which were the combinations of three levels of seeding rates (45,60 and 75kg/fed.) and four doses of gamma-rays (15, 25,35 and 45(Gy). The effect of interaction between seeding rates and gamma doses on growth characters was not significant whereas there was a tendency for improvement of growth characters by increasing gamma doses up to 45 Gy. Different gamma doses caused marked increase for lintil's yield components except the number of seeds/plant while high seeding rates (60 and 75 Kg/fed) reduced significantly the number of pods/plant and number of seeds/plant. For yield, various gamma doses showed significant increase for seed straw yield as compared to the control. However, seeding rates of 60 and 75 kg/fed increased significantly seed and straw yield as compared with the seeding rate of 45 kg/fed (control)

  11. Investigating the effect of a magnetic field on dose distributions at phantom-air interfaces using PRESAGE® 3D dosimeter and Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Filipa; Doran, Simon J.; Hanson, Ian M.; Nill, Simeon; Billas, Ilias; Shipley, David; Duane, Simon; Adamovics, John; Oelfke, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    Dosimetric quality assurance (QA) of the new Elekta Unity (MR-linac) will differ from the QA performed of a conventional linac due to the constant magnetic field, which creates an electron return effect (ERE). In this work we aim to validate PRESAGE® dosimetry in a transverse magnetic field, and assess its use to validate the research version of the Monaco TPS of the MR-linac. Cylindrical samples of PRESAGE® 3D dosimeter separated by an air gap were irradiated with a cobalt-60 unit, while placed between the poles of an electromagnet at 0.5 T and 1.5 T. This set-up was simulated in EGSnrc/Cavity Monte Carlo (MC) code and relative dose distributions were compared with measurements using 1D and 2D gamma criteria of 3% and 1.5 mm. The irradiation conditions were adapted for the MR-linac and compared with Monaco TPS simulations. Measured and EGSnrc/Cavity simulated profiles showed good agreement with a gamma passing rate of 99.9% for 0.5 T and 99.8% for 1.5 T. Measurements on the MR-linac also compared well with Monaco TPS simulations, with a gamma passing rate of 98.4% at 1.5 T. Results demonstrated that PRESAGE® can accurately measure dose and detect the ERE, encouraging its use as a QA tool to validate the Monaco TPS of the MR-linac for clinically relevant dose distributions at tissue-air boundaries.

  12. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  13. SU-F-SPS-10: The Dosimetric Comparison of GammaKnife and Cyberknife Treatment Plans for Brain SRS Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanli, E; Mabhouti, H; Cebe, M; Codel, G; Pacaci, P; Serin, E; Kucuk, N; Kucukmorkoc, E; Doyuran, M; Canoglu, D; Altinok, A; Acar, H; Caglar Ozkok, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) involves the use of precisely directed, single session radiation to create a desired radiobiologic response within the brain target with acceptable minimal effects on surrounding structures or tissues. In this study, the dosimetric comparison of GammaKnife perfection and Cyberknife M6 treatment plans were made. Methods: Treatment plannings were done for GammaKnife perfection unit using Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS) on the CT scan of head and neck randophantom simulating the treatment of sterotactic treatments for one brain metastasis. The dose distribution were calculated using TMR 10 algorithm. The treatment planning for the same target were also done for Cyberknife M6 machine using Multiplan (TPS) with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using both machine by delivering 0- 800 cGy. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson 1000XL flatbed scanner. Dose distribution were measured using EBT3 film dosimeter. The measured and calculated doses were compared. Results: The dose distribution in the target and 2 cm beyond the target edge were calculated on TPSs and measured using EBT3 film. For cyberknife treatment plans, the gamma analysis passing rates between measured and calculated dose distributions were 99.2% and 96.7% for target and peripheral region of target respectively. For gammaknife treatment plans, the gamma analysis passing rates were 98.9% and 93.2% for target and peripheral region of target respectively. Conclusion: The study shows that dosimetrically comparable plans are achievable with Cyberknife and GammaKnife. Although TMR 10 algorithm predicts the target dose

  14. SU-F-SPS-10: The Dosimetric Comparison of GammaKnife and Cyberknife Treatment Plans for Brain SRS Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanli, E; Mabhouti, H; Cebe, M; Codel, G; Pacaci, P; Serin, E; Kucuk, N; Kucukmorkoc, E; Doyuran, M; Canoglu, D; Altinok, A; Acar, H; Caglar Ozkok, H [Medipol University, Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) involves the use of precisely directed, single session radiation to create a desired radiobiologic response within the brain target with acceptable minimal effects on surrounding structures or tissues. In this study, the dosimetric comparison of GammaKnife perfection and Cyberknife M6 treatment plans were made. Methods: Treatment plannings were done for GammaKnife perfection unit using Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS) on the CT scan of head and neck randophantom simulating the treatment of sterotactic treatments for one brain metastasis. The dose distribution were calculated using TMR 10 algorithm. The treatment planning for the same target were also done for Cyberknife M6 machine using Multiplan (TPS) with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using both machine by delivering 0- 800 cGy. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson 1000XL flatbed scanner. Dose distribution were measured using EBT3 film dosimeter. The measured and calculated doses were compared. Results: The dose distribution in the target and 2 cm beyond the target edge were calculated on TPSs and measured using EBT3 film. For cyberknife treatment plans, the gamma analysis passing rates between measured and calculated dose distributions were 99.2% and 96.7% for target and peripheral region of target respectively. For gammaknife treatment plans, the gamma analysis passing rates were 98.9% and 93.2% for target and peripheral region of target respectively. Conclusion: The study shows that dosimetrically comparable plans are achievable with Cyberknife and GammaKnife. Although TMR 10 algorithm predicts the target dose.

  15. Natural radioactivity in some building materials in Cuba and their contribution to the indoor gamma dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigido Flores, Osvaldo; Barreras Caballero, Aldo A.; Montalvan Estrada, Alberto; Queipo Garcia, Maite [Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia y Medio Ambiente, Camaguey (Cuba). Centro de Atencion a la Actividad Nuclear. Lab. de Vigilancia Radiologica Ambiental]. E-mail: sean@caonao.cmw.inf.cu; Zerquera, Juan Tomas [Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia y Medio Ambiente, La Habana (Cuba). Agencia de Energia Nuclear. Centro de Proteccion y Higiene de las Radiaciones

    2001-07-01

    The natural radioactivity of some building materials commonly used in Cuba was measured by gamma spectrometry. Typical concentrations, so far encountered, are in the ranges: 47 to 2511 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 40} K; 9 to 71 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 226} Ra; and 2 to 38 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 232} Th. The external gamma ray absorbed doses in indoor air, and the corresponding effective dose equivalents in a typical dwelling are presented in this work. (author)

  16. Distribution characteristics of natural gamma background levels around the capital city Shillong, Meghalaya (India)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukreti, B.M.; Sharma, G.K.; Rao, M.S.; Ramabhadraih, T.; Bhaskar Rao, Arjun; Bhuphang, A.

    2012-01-01

    Onsite measurement of natural gamma radiation around the capital city Shillong in Meghalaya, has been carried out using GPS device and environmental survey meter. Each referenced insitu data point was validated at the site by means of simultaneous measurements of radiation levels (at 1.0 mts height) through handheld dosimeters. Collected data points on natural background levels, have been analysed and quantified in the context of preparing reference background levels in the city in order to deal with any radiological emergency that may arise in the public domain. Study reveals Gaussian distributed mean annual gamma dose of 0.77 mSv (n=53) in the range of 0.38 to 1.51 mSv. The study area, bound by the coordinates N (25.50°-25.66°, and E (91.82°-91.96°) indicates few pockets of higher average background levels, particularly towards the eastern side of study area, namely Nongmynsong, NEIGRIMS and Happy Valley. However, from the radiological safety aspects in public domain, all these reported levels are within the safety limits of prevailing environmental background. (author)

  17. Gamma irradiation of cultural artifacts for disinfection using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong-il; Yoon, Minchul; Kim, Dongho

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it has been investigated the disinfection of Korean cultural artifacts by gamma irradiation, simulating the absorbed dose distribution on the object with the Monte Carlo methodology. Fungal contamination was identified on two traditional Korean agricultural tools, Hongdukkae and Holtae, which had been stored in a museum. Nine primary species were identified from these items: Bjerkandera adusta, Dothideomycetes sp., Penicillium sp., Cladosporium tenuissimum, Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium sp., Entrophospora sp., Aspergillus sydowii, and Corynascus sepedonium. However, these fungi were completely inactivated by gamma irradiation at an absorbed dose of 20 kGy on the front side. Monte Carlo N Particle Transport Code was used to simulate the doses applied to these cultural artifacts, and the measured dose distributions were well predicted by the simulations. These results show that irradiation is effective for the disinfection of cultural artifacts and that dose distribution can be predicted with Monte Carlo simulations, allowing the optimization of the radiation treatment. - Highlights: ► Radiation was applied for the disinfection of Korean cultural artifacts. ► Fungi on the artifacts were completely inactivated by the irradiation. ► Monte Carlo N Particle Transport Code was used to predict the dose distribution. ► This study is applicable for the preservation of cultural artifacts by irradiation.

  18. Protective and Therapeutic Role of Low Dose Gamma Radiation on Streptozotocin Induced Diabetes in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, H.H.; Hafez, H.F.; Shouman, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-factorial disease which is characterized by vascular and renal complication. This study was initiated to investigate the protective and the therapeutic effect of low dose of gamma radiation (LDR) on diabetic complications. A total of 30 adult male rats were divided into 5 groups: Group I: served as control and injected intraperitoneally with 0.2 ml of 0.1 mol/l citrate buffer (ph 4.5), group II: rats became diabetic via intraperitoneal injection with 60 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) dissolved in 0.2 ml of 0.1 mol/l citrate buffer (ph 4.5), group III irradiated rats (IRR): submitted to fractionated dose of whole body gamma rays; 0.25 Gy for 2 consecutive days (whole dose 0.5 Gy), group IV diabetic irradiated rats (STZ + IRR): rats became diabetic as group II then four weeks after diabetes induction (day 28), rats were submitted to 2 fractions of whole body gamma rays as in group III, and group V irradiated diabetic rats (IRR + STZ): rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0.2 ml of 0.1 mol/l citrate buffer then submitted to whole body gamma rays; 0.25 Gy for 2 consecutive days then one hour after the last IRR dose, rats were made diabetic as group II. In pre and post-irradiation of STZ rats, significant changes were observed in serum lipid profiles, hepatic and cardiac serum enzymes. Significant decrease in hepatic and cardiac malondialdehyde (MDA) and total nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) levels, and significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels were observed as compared to diabetic group. The study suggests that LDR may provide useful protective and therapeutic option in the reversal of oxidative stress induced in diabetic rats

  19. On k-Gamma and k-Beta Distributions and Moment Generating Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauhar Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present paper is to define k-gamma and k-beta distributions and moments generating function for the said distributions in terms of a new parameter k>0. Also, the authors prove some properties of these newly defined distributions.

  20. Influence of high-dose gamma radiation and particle size on antioxidant properties of Maize ( Zea mays L.) flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Haq; Shad, Muhammad Aslam; Rehman, Tanzila; Ramzan, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Influence of high-dose gamma radiation and particle size on antioxidant properties of maize (Zea mays L.) flour was studied using response surface methodology. A central composite design based on three levels of each of particle size, in terms of mesh number (40, 60 and 80 meshes), and gamma radiation dose (25, 50 and 75 kGy) was constructed. A statistically significant dose-dependent decrease (p<0.05) in antioxidant properties of gamma irradiated flour was observed. However, an increase in the mesh number (decrease in particle size of flour) resulted in an increase in antioxidant properties. The optimum level of radiation dose to achieve maximum value of responses was found to be 50 kGy for Trolox equivalent total antioxidant activity (TETAOA), 25 kGy for iron chelating ability (ICA), 25 kGy for reducing power (RP) and 75 kGy for linoleic acid reduction capacity (LARC). However, the optimum level of mesh number to achieve desired levels of TETAOA, ICA, RP and LARC was found to be 80 meshes. (author)

  1. Influence of high-dose gamma radiation and particle size on antioxidant properties of Maize ( Zea mays L.) flour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawaz, Haq; Shad, Muhammad Aslam; Rehman, Tanzila; Ramzan, Ayesha, E-mail: haqnawaz@bzu.edu.pk [Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    Influence of high-dose gamma radiation and particle size on antioxidant properties of maize (Zea mays L.) flour was studied using response surface methodology. A central composite design based on three levels of each of particle size, in terms of mesh number (40, 60 and 80 meshes), and gamma radiation dose (25, 50 and 75 kGy) was constructed. A statistically significant dose-dependent decrease (p<0.05) in antioxidant properties of gamma irradiated flour was observed. However, an increase in the mesh number (decrease in particle size of flour) resulted in an increase in antioxidant properties. The optimum level of radiation dose to achieve maximum value of responses was found to be 50 kGy for Trolox equivalent total antioxidant activity (TETAOA), 25 kGy for iron chelating ability (ICA), 25 kGy for reducing power (RP) and 75 kGy for linoleic acid reduction capacity (LARC). However, the optimum level of mesh number to achieve desired levels of TETAOA, ICA, RP and LARC was found to be 80 meshes. (author)

  2. Aerial gamma spectrometry of the uranium province of Lagoa Real (Caetite, BA, Brazil): go environmental aspects and distribution of the absorbed dose in the air; Espectrometria gama aerea da provincia uranifera de Lagoa Real (Caetite, BA): aspectos geoambientais e distribuicao da dose absorvida no ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Esau Francisco Sena

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, it was analyzed the surface concentrations of the natural radioelements K, U and Th, as well as the absorbed dose rate in air caused by gamma radiation from the Lagoa Real uranium province, which is located at the center southern portion of Bahia State and comprises an area of approximately 4.600 Km{sup 2}. Data from the airborne gamma ray spectrometric survey of the region (Sao Timoeo Project) carried out in 1979, was used in this study. Besides, recent data of U, Th and absorbed dose rates from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the uranium concentration plant (URA), operated in the region by the Brazilian Nuclear Industries (INB), were used with the aim of inter compare the sampling points in the same geo referenced area. Imaging geo processing software's give support to frame maps of surface concentrations and ternary maps, as well as allow the integration of these with other themes (e.g. hydrology, geology, pedology) favouring the interpretation of geo environmental process from the radioactive cartography. Considering the whole study area, it was obtained the following mean values: absorbed dose rate in air (61,08 nGy.h{sup -1}), Potassium (1,65 % K) , Uranium (3,02 ppm eU) and thorium (18,26 ppm eTh). The geological unities bounding the uranium anomalies were placed in the areas characterized by the highest values of radioelements and, as expected, the major dose levels. The use of ternary maps coupled with the geology and hydrology allowed distinguishing the relationship between the surface distribution of natural radioelements and the geo environmental aspects, including the influence of the catchment in their transport and migration. (author)

  3. Influence of low dose {gamma} radiation on the dormancy, growth and physiological activity of seed potato (solanum tuberosum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, Y. K.; Lee, H. Y.; Baek, M. H.; Yoo, Z. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    To observe the stimulating effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on the dormancy breaking and growth of potato with different storage duration and conditions, potato were irradiated with the dose of 1 {approx} 16 Gy. Though varied with storage duration and conditions, sprouting rate of potato stored at 5 .deg. C in the dark was promoted at the 8 and 16 Gy irradiation group compared to 20 .deg. C in the light. The field growth of potato stored at 5 .deg. C in the dark was highly increased at the 2, 4, 8 Gy irradiation group. The CAT activity of potato was increased by about 20% at 1,8 and 16 Gy irradiation group. POD activity was also increased by 7 {approx} 16% at 1, 8 and 16 Gy irradiation group compared to the control. Fv/Fm was not changed by the low dose {gamma} radiation. However, the effective quantum yield of PSII was slightly increased by about 12% at 1 and 16 Gy irradiation group. Seedling irradiated with low dose {gamma} radiation showed the lower excitation pressure on PSII (1- {sub q}P), while NPQ was greatly increased by 45% at 4 Gy irradiation group. These results clearly showed the positive effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on the seedling growth of potato via increasing photoprotective capacities of photosynthetic apparatus.

  4. Novel Concrete Chemistry Achieved with Low Dose Gamma Radiation Curing and Resistance to Neutron Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Steven Robert

    As much as 50% of ageing-related problems with concrete structures can be attributed to con-struction deficiencies at the time of placement. The most influential time affecting longevity of concrete structures is the curing phase, or commonly the initial 28 days following its placement. A novel advanced atomistic analysis of novel concrete chemistry is presented in this dissertation with the objective to improve concrete structural properties and its longevity. Based on experiments and computational models, this novel concrete chemistry is discussed in two cases: (a) concrete chemistry changes when exposed to low-dose gamma radiation in its early curing stage, thus improving its strength in a shorter period of time then curing for the conventional 28 days; (b) concrete chemistry is controlled by its atomistic components to assure strength is not reduced but that its activation due to long-term exposure to neutron flux in nuclear power plants is negligible. High dose gamma radiation is well documented as a degradation mechanism that decreases concrete's compressive strength; however, the effects of low-dose gamma radiation on the initial curing phase of concrete, having never been studied before, proved its compressive strength increases. Using a 137 Cs source, concrete samples were subjected to gamma radiation during the initial curing phase for seven, 14, and 28 days. The compressive strength after seven days is improved for gamma cured concrete by 24% and after 14 days by 76%. Concrete shows no improvement in compressive strength after 28 days of exposure to gamma radiation, showing that there is a threshold effect. Scanning Electron Microscopy is used to examine the microstructure of low-dose gamma radiation where no damage to its microstructure is found, showing no difference between gamma cured and conventionally cured concrete. Molecular dynamics modeling based on the MOPAC package is used to study how gamma radiation during the curing stage improves

  5. Effect of low-doses gamma radiation on physico-chemical properties of cereal starches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambus, H.; Juszczak, L.; Achremowicz, B.

    1995-01-01

    Wheat starch of Emika variety was treated with 3 and 5 kGy doses of gamma radiation, rye starch of Dankowskie Zlote variety and triticale starch of Dagro variety - with 3 kGy doses. Radiation of this starch caused an increase of reduction ability and water solubility at 60 and 80 o C. However with the increased radiation doses a significant decrease of maximum viscosity and of the viscosity of starch pastes being cooled to 50% was observed. Mild radiopolimerization also decreased the degree of retrogradation of wheat and rye starch pastes stored at above 0 o C. (author)

  6. Dose reduction by ploughing down gamma-active isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roed, J.

    1982-12-01

    This report discusses the effectiveness and feasibility of various treatments, especially ploughing, for reducing the doses on farmlands that have been contaminated with radioactive isotopes. Experiments have been conducted where contamination has been spread on three 100 m 2 farmland areas that have subsequently been ploughed with a 14-inch moldboard plough. The reduction factor of the dose rate has been found to be around 5, by measuring the rate 1 m above the surface before and after ploughing. The reduction factor for a large area, on the other hand, is calculated to be 3 times as great, or approximately 15. The purpose of the ploughing procedure was to place the contaminated surface in the bottom of the furrow. However, an investigation of the distribution of the contamination in the vertical direction revealed that this ideal distribution was not at all reached. To produce the desired distribution, and reduce doses through ploughing, it is recommended that either a tracer plough or one that is able to place the uppermost layer in the furrow without altering the intermediate layer positions be used. It is suggested that this latter type of plough be developed. (author)

  7. Gamma dose assessment to the environment of uraniferous area - Case of Vinaninkarena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriamarojaona, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar has several old abandoned uranium sites. Mining exploitations have been undertaken as the case of uranium in sedimentary formation of Vinaninkarena. After its exploitation, it still presents risks. The mine can cause harmful effects to human health and the environment. This work concerns especially the gamma dose assessment, identification of existing radionuclides gamma emitters and measurements of contamination level of the mine. The obtained results were compared with the standards fixed by the regulatory body and International Reference. In order to protect the public and the environment against the harmful effect of ionizing radiation around the sites, the proposed recommendations should be applied and respected. [fr

  8. Calculation of dose distribution on Rhizophora spp soy protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of the commercial solid phantoms were unable to provide a good simulation to water at low and high energy ranges. A potential phantom from Malaysian mangrove wood family, Rhizophoraspp was fabricated with addition of Soy Protein. An Electron Gamma Sho (EGSnrc) code was used to evaluate the dose ...

  9. Intercomparison of personnel dosimetry for thermal neutron dose equivalent in neutron and gamma-ray mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    1985-01-01

    In order to consider the problems concerned with personnel dosimetry using film badges and TLDs, an intercomparison of personnel dosimetry, especially dose equivalent responses of personnel dosimeters to thermal neutron, was carried out in five different neutron and gamma-ray mixed fields at KUR and UTR-KINKI from the practical point of view. For the estimation of thermal neutron dose equivalent, it may be concluded that each personnel dosimeter has good performances in the precision, that is, the standard deviations in the measured values by individual dosimeter were within 24 %, and the dose equivalent responses to thermal neutron were almost independent on cadmium ratio and gamma-ray contamination. However, the relative thermal neutron dose equivalent of individual dosimeter normalized to the ICRP recommended value varied considerably and a difference of about 4 times was observed among the dosimeters. From the results obtained, it is suggested that the standardization of calibration factors and procedures is required from the practical point of radiation protection and safety. (author)

  10. Effects of differents gamma radiation doses absorbed for postharvest tomato fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Abreu, Toneypson da; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Soares, Antonio G.

    1997-01-01

    Postharvest tomato fuits Santa Cruz were submitted to prestorage gamma irradiation treatment with different doses range zero (unirradiated fruits) to 1000 Gy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the postharvest quality parameters: Hunter colour values for light transmittance analysis, pH, total titratable acidity, total soluble solids, maximum firmness and maturity stage. The fruits were stored under (25±1) 0 C with (93±3) relative humidity. The results obtained from the different irradiated treatments showed 600 Gy as the best dose to increase the shelf-life of tomato fruits and to decay its ripening. (author). 5 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  11. Assessment of Annual Effective Dose for Natural Radioactivity of Gamma Emitters in Biscuit Samples in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abojassim, Ali Abid; Al-Alasadi, Lubna A; Shitake, Ahmed R; Al-Tememie, Faeq A; Husain, Afnan A

    2015-09-01

    Biscuits are an important type of food, widely consumed by babies in Iraq and other countries. This work uses gamma spectroscopy to measure the natural radioactivity due to long-lived gamma emitters in children's biscuits; it also estimates radiation hazard indices, that is, the radium equivalent activity, the representative of gamma level index, the internal hazard index, and the annual effective dose in children. Ten samples were collected from the Iraqi market from different countries of origin. The average specific activities for (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K were 9.390, 3.1213, and 214.969 Bq/kg, respectively, but the average of the radium equivalent activity and the internal hazard index were 33.101 Bq/kg and 0.107, respectively. The total average annual effective dose from consumption by adults, children, and infants is estimated to be 0.655, 1.009, and 0.875 mSv, respectively. The values found for specific activity, radiation hazard indices, and annual effective dose in all samples in this study were lower than worldwide median values for all groups; therefore, these values are found to be safe.

  12. Influence of gamma dose rate on longevity of Laemophloeus ferrugineus (STEPH.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendl, F.M.; Tornisielo, V.L.

    1975-12-01

    Insects of the species Laemophloeus ferrugineus (Steph.) were irradiated with different gamma dose rates from a radial type Co-60 source. The rates utilized were 59580, 15750, 2750, 632, 154 and 63 rad/hour, respectively at 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 and 300 cm from the source. The insects were irradiated with a dose of 15000 rad. Death rate was checked every 7 days; starting from these numbers, life expectancy was estimated for each week in relation to respective dose rate. The following results were obtained for insects life expectancy estimates upon beginning of the experiment: 85.63 days (control); 19.50 (10 cm); 19.40 (20 cm); 20.40 (50 cm); 22.23 (100 cm); 22.00 (200 cm) and 23.11 (300 cm). The number of days until the last individuals of each dose rate died was also registered: 248 days (control); 31 (10 cm); 31 (20 cm); 31 (50 cm); 185 (100 cm); 164 (200 cm) and 143 (300 cm)

  13. Activation of the JET vacuum vessel: a comparison of calculated with measured gamma-radiation fluxes and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.; Avery, A.; Verschuur, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    The gamma-radiation dose-rates inside the JET vacuum vessel due to induced radioactivity were measured at intervals throughout the 1986 period of operation, and the decay gamma energy spectrum was measured during the subsequent lengthy shutdown. The dose-rates were found to be in good agreement with values calculated using the neutron yield records compiled from the time-resolved neutron yield monitor responses for individual discharges. This result provides strong support for the reliability of the neutron yield monitor calibration. (author)

  14. Gamma processes and peaks-over-threshold distributions for time-dependent reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noortwijk, J.M. van; Weide, J.A.M. van der; Kallen, M.J.; Pandey, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    In the evaluation of structural reliability, a failure is defined as the event in which stress exceeds a resistance that is liable to deterioration. This paper presents a method to combine the two stochastic processes of deteriorating resistance and fluctuating load for computing the time-dependent reliability of a structural component. The deterioration process is modelled as a gamma process, which is a stochastic process with independent non-negative increments having a gamma distribution with identical scale parameter. The stochastic process of loads is generated by a Poisson process. The variability of the random loads is modelled by a peaks-over-threshold distribution (such as the generalised Pareto distribution). These stochastic processes of deterioration and load are combined to evaluate the time-dependent reliability

  15. SU-F-T-266: Dynalogs Based Evaluation of Different Dose Rate IMRT Using DVH and Gamma Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S [Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Sindh (Pakistan); Ahmed, S [Pakistan Inst of Eng Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmed, F; Hussain, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the impact of low and high dose rate on IMRT through Dynalogs by evaluating Gamma Index and Dose Volume Histogram. Methods: The Eclipse™ treatment planning software was used to generate plans on prostate and head and neck sites. A range of dose rates 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min were applied to each plan in order to investigate their effect on the beam ON time, efficiency and accuracy. Each plan had distinct monitor units per fraction, delivery time, mean dose rate and leaf speed. The DVH data was used in the assessment of the conformity and plan quality.The treatments were delivered on Varian™ Clinac 2100C accelerator equipped with 120 leaf millennium MLC. Dynalogs of each plan were analyzed by MATLAB™ program. Fluence measurements were performed using the Sun Nuclear™ 2D diode array and results were assessed, based on Gamma analysis of dose fluence maps, beam delivery statistics and Dynalogs data. Results: Minor differences found by adjusted R-squared analysis of DVH’s for all the plans with different dose rates. It has been also found that more and larger fields have greater time reduction at high dose rate and there was a sharp decrease in number of control points observed in dynalog files by switching dose rate from 300 MU/min to 600 MU/min. Gamma Analysis of all plans passes the confidence limit of ≥95% with greater number of passing points in 300 MU/min dose rate plans. Conclusion: The dynalog files are compatible tool for software based IMRT QA. It can work perfectly parallel to measurement based QA setup and stand-by procedure for pre and post delivery of treatment plan.

  16. SU-F-T-266: Dynalogs Based Evaluation of Different Dose Rate IMRT Using DVH and Gamma Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S; Ahmed, S; Ahmed, F; Hussain, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work investigates the impact of low and high dose rate on IMRT through Dynalogs by evaluating Gamma Index and Dose Volume Histogram. Methods: The Eclipse™ treatment planning software was used to generate plans on prostate and head and neck sites. A range of dose rates 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min were applied to each plan in order to investigate their effect on the beam ON time, efficiency and accuracy. Each plan had distinct monitor units per fraction, delivery time, mean dose rate and leaf speed. The DVH data was used in the assessment of the conformity and plan quality.The treatments were delivered on Varian™ Clinac 2100C accelerator equipped with 120 leaf millennium MLC. Dynalogs of each plan were analyzed by MATLAB™ program. Fluence measurements were performed using the Sun Nuclear™ 2D diode array and results were assessed, based on Gamma analysis of dose fluence maps, beam delivery statistics and Dynalogs data. Results: Minor differences found by adjusted R-squared analysis of DVH’s for all the plans with different dose rates. It has been also found that more and larger fields have greater time reduction at high dose rate and there was a sharp decrease in number of control points observed in dynalog files by switching dose rate from 300 MU/min to 600 MU/min. Gamma Analysis of all plans passes the confidence limit of ≥95% with greater number of passing points in 300 MU/min dose rate plans. Conclusion: The dynalog files are compatible tool for software based IMRT QA. It can work perfectly parallel to measurement based QA setup and stand-by procedure for pre and post delivery of treatment plan.

  17. Comparison of Kodak EDR2 and Gafchromic EBT film for intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose distribution verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, A; Ayyangar, Komanduri M; Nehru, R Mothilal; Kurup, P G Gopalakrishna; Murali, V; Enke, Charles A; Velmurugan, J

    2006-01-01

    The quantitative dose validation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans require 2-dimensional (2D) high-resolution dosimetry systems with uniform response over its sensitive region. The present work deals with clinical use of commercially available self-developing Radio Chromic Film, Gafchromic EBT film, for IMRT dose verification. Dose response curves were generated for the films using a VXR-16 film scanner. The results obtained with EBT films were compared with the results of Kodak extended dose range 2 (EDR2) films. The EBT film had a linear response between the dose range of 0 to 600 cGy. The dose-related characteristics of the EBT film, such as post irradiation color growth with time, film uniformity, and effect of scanning orientation, were studied. There was up to 8.6% increase in the color density between 2 to 40 hours after irradiation. There was a considerable variation, up to 8.5%, in the film uniformity over its sensitive region. The quantitative differences between calculated and measured dose distributions were analyzed using DTA and Gamma index with the tolerance of 3% dose difference and 3-mm distance agreement. The EDR2 films showed consistent results with the calculated dose distributions, whereas the results obtained using EBT were inconsistent. The variation in the film uniformity limits the use of EBT film for conventional large-field IMRT verification. For IMRT of smaller field sizes (4.5 x 4.5 cm), the results obtained with EBT were comparable with results of EDR2 films.

  18. Comparison of Kodak EDR2 and Gafchromic EBT film for intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose distribution verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, A.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Nehru, R. Mothilal; Gopalakrishna Kurup, P.G.; Murali, V.; Enke, Charles A.; Velmurugan, J.

    2006-01-01

    The quantitative dose validation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans require 2-dimensional (2D) high-resolution dosimetry systems with uniform response over its sensitive region. The present work deals with clinical use of commercially available self-developing Radio Chromic Film, Gafchromic EBT film, for IMRT dose verification. Dose response curves were generated for the films using a VXR-16 film scanner. The results obtained with EBT films were compared with the results of Kodak extended dose range 2 (EDR2) films. The EBT film had a linear response between the dose range of 0 to 600 cGy. The dose-related characteristics of the EBT film, such as post irradiation color growth with time, film uniformity, and effect of scanning orientation, were studied. There was up to 8.6% increase in the color density between 2 to 40 hours after irradiation. There was a considerable variation, up to 8.5%, in the film uniformity over its sensitive region. The quantitative differences between calculated and measured dose distributions were analyzed using DTA and Gamma index with the tolerance of 3% dose difference and 3-mm distance agreement. The EDR2 films showed consistent results with the calculated dose distributions, whereas the results obtained using EBT were inconsistent. The variation in the film uniformity limits the use of EBT film for conventional large-field IMRT verification. For IMRT of smaller field sizes (4.5 x 4.5 cm), the results obtained with EBT were comparable with results of EDR2 films

  19. The Measuring of the Gamma Dose Rate in the Air at Location of the Sar-Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrovic, F.; Ninkovic, M.; Adrovic, S.

    1999-01-01

    The results of the measured values of gamma dose rate in the air at the location of Sar-mountain (Balkan Peninsula) using autonomous ADL-probe Gamma Tracer system. The difference between levels of the natural background radiation and natural environment has been pointed out at the different chosen measuring overall research of natural radioactivity at the location of Sar-mountain

  20. Comparison of gamma knife validation film's analysis results of different film dose analysis software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaojun; Zhang Conghua; Liu Han; Dai Fuyou; Hu Chuanpeng; Liu Cheng; Yao Zhongfu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the analytical result of different kinds of film dose analysis software for the same gamma knife, analyze the reasons of difference caused, and explore the measurements and means for quality control and quality assurance during testing gamma knife and analyzing its result. Methods: To test the Moon Deity gamma knife with Kodak EDR2 film and γ-Star gamma knife with GAFCHROMIC® EBT film, respectively. All the validation films are scanned to proper imagine format for dose analysis software by EPSON PERFECTION V750 PRO scanner. Then imagines of Moon Deity gamma knife are analyzed with Robot Knife Adjuvant 1.09 and Fas-09 1.0, and imagines of γ-Star gamma knife with Fas-09 and MATLAB 7.0. Results: There is no significant difference in the maximum deviation of radiation field size (Full Width at Half Maximum, FWHM) and its nominal value between Robot Knife Adjuvant and Fas-09 for Moon Deity gamma knife (t=-2.133, P>0.05). The analysis on the radiation field's penumbra region width of collimators which have different sizes indicated that the differences are significant (t=-8.154, P<0.05). There is no significant difference in the maximum deviation of FWHM and its nominal value between Fas-09 and MATLAB for γ-Star gamma knife (t=-1.384, P>0.05). However, following national standards,analysis of φ4 mm width of collimators can obtain different results according to the two kinds software, and the result of Fas-09 is not qualified while MATLAB is qualified. The analysis on the radiation field's penumbra region width of collimators which have different sizes indicates that the differences are significant (t=3.074, P<0.05). The imagines are processed with Fas-09. The analysis of imagine in the pre-and the post-processing indicates that there is no significant difference in the maximum deviation of FWHM and its nominal value (t=0.647, P>0.05), and the analytical result of the radiation field's penumbra region width indicates that there is

  1. Effect of dose fractionation of 60Co gamma radiation on longevity and reproduction of Sitophilus granarius (L., 1785) (Col., Curculionidae) in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, V.; Walder, J.M.M.; Wiendl, F.M.; Domarco, R.E.; Haddad, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of fractionated doses of gamma radiation in different interval of time on longevity and reproductivity of Sitophilus granarius (L., 1785) are studied. Gamma radiation was provided at dose rate of 1.56 kGy/hour by a Cobalt 60 source (Gammabeam-650). The insects were divided in two sets: one was irradiated at acute doses and the other in fractionated doses, with interval of 48 hours. Both sets received doses of 0,40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100Gy. Mortality and and emergency were determined weekly. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. A simple method for conversion of airborne gamma-ray spectra to ground level doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    A new and simple method for conversion of airborne NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectra to dose rates at ground level has been developed. By weighting the channel count rates with the channel numbers a spectrum dose index (SDI) is calculated for each spectrum. Ground level dose rates then are determined...... by multiplying the SDI by an altitude dependent conversion factor. The conversion factors are determined from spectra based on Monte Carlo calculations. The results are compared with measurements in a laboratory calibration set-up. IT-NT-27. June 1996. 27 p....

  3. Phantoms for IMRT dose distribution measurement and treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Gerber, Russell L.; Mutic, Sasa; Purdy, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient treatment dose distributions is currently based on custom-built or modified dose measurement phantoms. The only commercially available IMRT treatment planning and delivery system (Peacock, NOMOS Corp.) is supplied with a film phantom that allows accurate spatial localization of the dose distribution using radiographic film. However, measurements using other dosimeters are necessary for the thorough verification of IMRT. Methods: We have developed a phantom to enable dose measurements using a cylindrical ionization chamber and the localization of prescription isodose curves using a matrix of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chips. The external phantom cross-section is identical to that of the commercial phantom, to allow direct comparisons of measurements. A supplementary phantom has been fabricated to verify the IMRT dose distributions for pelvis treatments. Results: To date, this phantom has been used for the verification of IMRT dose distributions for head and neck and prostate cancer treatments. Designs are also presented for a phantom insert to be used with polymerizing gels (e.g., BANG-2) to obtain volumetric dose distribution measurements. Conclusion: The phantoms have proven useful in the quantitative evaluation of IMRT treatments

  4. Low rate doses effects of gamma radiation on glycoproteins of transmembrane junctions in fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bringas, J.E.; Caceres, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Glycoproteins of trans-membrane junctions are molecules that help to bind cells with the extracellular matrix. Integrins are the most important trans-membrane molecules among others. The damage of gamma radiation on those proteins could be an important early event that causes membrane abnormalities which may lead to cell malfunction and cancer induced by radiation due to cell dissociation. Randomized blocks with 3 repetitions of mouse embryo fibroblast cultures, were irradiated with Cobalt-60 gamma rays, during 20 days. Biological damage to glycoproteins and integrins was evaluated by cellular growth and fibroblast proliferative capacity. Integrins damage was studied by isolation by column immunoaffinity chromatography migrated on SDS-Page under reducing and non reducing conditions, and inhibition of integrins extracellular matrix adhesion by monoclonal antibodies effect. The dose/rate (0.05 Gy/day-0.2 Gy/day) of gamma given to cells did not show damage evidence on glycoproteins and integrins. If damage happened, it was repaired by cells very soon, was delayed by continuous cellular division or by glycoproteins characteristic of being multiple extracellular ligatures. Bio effects became more evident with an irradiation time greater than 20 days or a high dose/rate. (authors). 6 refs

  5. Dose/volume–response relations for rectal morbidity using planned and simulated motion-inclusive dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thor, Maria; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O.; Karlsdóttir, Àsa; Moiseenko, Vitali; Liu, Mitchell; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many dose-limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy (RT) display considerable internal motion between fractions over a course of treatment, potentially reducing the appropriateness of using planned dose distributions to predict morbidity. Accounting explicitly for rectal motion could improve the predictive power of modelling rectal morbidity. To test this, we simulated the effect of motion in two cohorts. Materials and methods: The included patients (232 and 159 cases) received RT for prostate cancer to 70 and 74 Gy. Motion-inclusive dose distributions were introduced as simulations of random or systematic motion to the planned dose distributions. Six rectal morbidity endpoints were analysed. A probit model using the QUANTEC recommended parameters was also applied to the cohorts. Results: The differences in associations using the planned over the motion-inclusive dose distributions were modest. Statistically significant associations were obtained with four of the endpoints, mainly at high doses (55–70 Gy), using both the planned and the motion-inclusive dose distributions, primarily when simulating random motion. The strongest associations were observed for GI toxicity and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.12–0.21; Rs = 0.11–0.20). Applying the probit model, significant associations were found for tenesmus and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.13, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Equally strong associations with rectal morbidity were observed at high doses (>55 Gy), for the planned and the simulated dose distributions including in particular random rectal motion. Future studies should explore patient-specific descriptions of rectal motion to achieve improved predictive power

  6. Inhibition of alloxan diabetes by low dose {gamma}-irradiation before alloxan administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Takehara, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Tamotsu; Utsumi, Kozo

    1994-10-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of whole body {sup 60}Co-{gamma} irradiation at a single low dose on alloxan-induced hyperglycemia in rats. (1) In rats that received alloxan, SOD activity in pancreas significantly decreased, but the decrease was inhibited by irradiation at a dose of 0.5 Gy. (2) Similarly, plasma peroxide, pancreatic peroxide, and blood glucose increased. However, the increase in pancreatic peroxide was inhibited by irradiation at a dose of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy and the increase in blood glucose by irradiation at 0.5 Gy. (3) After alloxan administration, degranulation was observed in cells, but this was inhibited by irradiation at 0.5 Gy. These results suggest that alloxan diabetes was inhibited by the increase of SOD activity in pancreas after low dose irradiation at 0.5 Gy. (author).

  7. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion filtering of Monte Carlo dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Binhe; Jeraj, Robert; Bao Shanglian; Mackie, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for radiotherapy dose calculations, if used correctly. However, any Monte Carlo dose calculation is burdened with statistical noise. In this paper, denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions with a three-dimensional adaptive anisotropic diffusion method was investigated. The standard anisotropic diffusion method was extended by changing the filtering parameters adaptively according to the local statistical noise. Smoothing of dose distributions with different noise levels in an inhomogeneous phantom, a conventional and an IMRT treatment case is shown. The resultant dose distributions were analysed using several evaluating criteria. It is shown that the adaptive anisotropic diffusion method can reduce statistical noise significantly (two to five times, corresponding to the reduction of simulation time by a factor of up to 20), while preserving important gradients of the dose distribution well. The choice of free parameters of the method was found to be fairly robust

  8. Definition of the dose(tempo)-distribution in the biological irradiation-facility of the RIVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, F.J.M.

    1990-02-01

    The RIVM biological irradiation facility (BBF) for the irradiation of biological samples and small animals is a self shielded device and can be safely operated in an existing laboratory environment. There are two 137 Cs sources (15TBq) in a bilateral geometry to give maximum dose uniformity. The easily accessible irradiation chamber is housed in a rotating lead shielding. The dosimetry of BBF was performed by the Dosimetry Section of the RIVM. Experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose in plastic tubes filled with water and the dose distribution over the tube-holder. Separate experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose during the rotation of the irradiation chamber and to check the irradiation timer. For the experiments LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) extruded ribbons were used. The TLDs were calibrated in a collimated beam of 137 Cs gamma rays. The determination of the absorbed dose in water was based on a users biological irradiation set up. The TLDs were individually sealed in thin plastic foil and put in plastic tubes filled for 1/3 with water. The tubes were vertically placed in the tube-holder and placed in the centre of the irradiation chamber. The results show that the absorbed dose in water (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.97 Gy/timer-unit, with a total uncertainty of 7 percent (1σ). During the rotation of the irradiation chamber the absorbed dose (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.38 Gy, with a total uncertainty of 15 percent (1σ). The variation of the dose distribution was determined at 15 different measurement points distributed over the tube-holder. The dosis in the measurement point in the centre of the tube-holder was taken as reference value. The maximum observed deviation over the other 14 measurement points amounts to -16 percent of it. The BBF-timer was checked against a special timer. The results indicate that within a range from 2-11 'timer-units' no differences are present. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 fotos

  9. Generation of uniformly distributed dose points for anatomy-based three-dimensional dose optimization methods in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahanas, M; Baltas, D; Giannouli, S; Milickovic, N; Zamboglou, N

    2000-05-01

    We have studied the accuracy of statistical parameters of dose distributions in brachytherapy using actual clinical implants. These include the mean, minimum and maximum dose values and the variance of the dose distribution inside the PTV (planning target volume), and on the surface of the PTV. These properties have been studied as a function of the number of uniformly distributed sampling points. These parameters, or the variants of these parameters, are used directly or indirectly in optimization procedures or for a description of the dose distribution. The accurate determination of these parameters depends on the sampling point distribution from which they have been obtained. Some optimization methods ignore catheters and critical structures surrounded by the PTV or alternatively consider as surface dose points only those on the contour lines of the PTV. D(min) and D(max) are extreme dose values which are either on the PTV surface or within the PTV. They must be avoided for specification and optimization purposes in brachytherapy. Using D(mean) and the variance of D which we have shown to be stable parameters, achieves a more reliable description of the dose distribution on the PTV surface and within the PTV volume than does D(min) and D(max). Generation of dose points on the real surface of the PTV is obligatory and the consideration of catheter volumes results in a realistic description of anatomical dose distributions.