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Sample records for g2-m cell cycle

  1. Middle infrared radiation induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in A549 lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Shih, Meng-Her; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2013-01-01

    There were studies investigating the effects of broadband infrared radiation (IR) on cancer cell, while the influences of middle-infrared radiation (MIR) are still unknown. In this study, a MIR emitter with emission wavelength band in the 3-5 µm region was developed to irradiate A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. It was found that MIR exposure inhibited cell proliferation and induced morphological changes by altering the cellular distribution of cytoskeletal components. Using quantitative PCR, we found that MIR promoted the expression levels of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related and Rad3-related), TP53 (tumor protein p53), p21 (CDKN1A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A) and GADD45 (growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible), but decreased the expression levels of cyclin B coding genes, CCNB1 and CCNB2, as well as CDK1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1). The reduction of protein expression levels of CDC25C, cyclin B1 and the phosphorylation of CDK1 at Thr-161 altogether suggest G(2)/M arrest occurred in A549 cells by MIR. DNA repair foci formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) marker γ-H2AX and sensor 53BP1 was induced by MIR treatment, it implies the MIR induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted from DSB. This study illustrates a potential role for the use of MIR in lung cancer therapy by initiating DSB and blocking cell cycle progression.

  2. Progesterone receptor blockade in human breast cancer cells decreases cell cycle progression through G2/M by repressing G2/M genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Susan E; Gupta, Akash; Choi, MiRan; Ranjan, Manish; Lee, Oukseub; Wang, Jun; Ivancic, David Z; Kim, J Julie; Khan, Seema A

    2016-05-23

    The synthesis of specific, potent progesterone antagonists adds potential agents to the breast cancer prevention and treatment armamentarium. The identification of individuals who will benefit from these agents will be a critical factor for their clinical success. We utilized telapristone acetate (TPA; CDB-4124) to understand the effects of progesterone receptor (PR) blockade on proliferation, apoptosis, promoter binding, cell cycle progression, and gene expression. We then identified a set of genes that overlap with human breast luteal-phase expressed genes and signify progesterone activity in both normal breast cells and breast cancer cell lines. TPA administration to T47D cells results in a 30 % decrease in cell number at 24 h, which is maintained over 72 h only in the presence of estradiol. Blockade of progesterone signaling by TPA for 24 h results in fewer cells in G2/M, attributable to decreased expression of genes that facilitate the G2/M transition. Gene expression data suggest that TPA affects several mechanisms that progesterone utilizes to control gene expression, including specific post-translational modifications, and nucleosomal organization and higher order chromatin structure, which regulate access of PR to its DNA binding sites. By comparing genes induced by the progestin R5020 in T47D cells with those increased in the luteal-phase normal breast, we have identified a set of genes that predict functional progesterone signaling in tissue. These data will facilitate an understanding of the ways in which drugs such as TPA may be utilized for the prevention, and possibly the therapy, of human breast cancer.

  3. Progesterone receptor blockade in human breast cancer cells decreases cell cycle progression through G2/M by repressing G2/M genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clare, Susan E.; Gupta, Akash; Choi, MiRan; Ranjan, Manish; Lee, Oukseub; Wang, Jun; Ivancic, David Z.; Kim, J. Julie; Khan, Seema A.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of specific, potent progesterone antagonists adds potential agents to the breast cancer prevention and treatment armamentarium. The identification of individuals who will benefit from these agents will be a critical factor for their clinical success. We utilized telapristone acetate (TPA; CDB-4124) to understand the effects of progesterone receptor (PR) blockade on proliferation, apoptosis, promoter binding, cell cycle progression, and gene expression. We then identified a set of genes that overlap with human breast luteal-phase expressed genes and signify progesterone activity in both normal breast cells and breast cancer cell lines. TPA administration to T47D cells results in a 30 % decrease in cell number at 24 h, which is maintained over 72 h only in the presence of estradiol. Blockade of progesterone signaling by TPA for 24 h results in fewer cells in G2/M, attributable to decreased expression of genes that facilitate the G2/M transition. Gene expression data suggest that TPA affects several mechanisms that progesterone utilizes to control gene expression, including specific post-translational modifications, and nucleosomal organization and higher order chromatin structure, which regulate access of PR to its DNA binding sites. By comparing genes induced by the progestin R5020 in T47D cells with those increased in the luteal-phase normal breast, we have identified a set of genes that predict functional progesterone signaling in tissue. These data will facilitate an understanding of the ways in which drugs such as TPA may be utilized for the prevention, and possibly the therapy, of human breast cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2355-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  4. Tributyltin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanagi, Miki; Yamada, Shigeru; Hirata, Naoya; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2016-04-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We have recently reported that TBT induces growth arrest in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 at nanomolar levels by inhibiting NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the irreversible conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we examined whether TBT at nanomolar levels affects cell cycle progression in NT2/D1 cells. Propidium iodide staining revealed that TBT reduced the ratio of cells in the G1 phase and increased the ratio of cells in the G2/M phase. TBT also reduced cell division cycle 25C (cdc25C) and cyclin B1, which are key regulators of G2/M progression. Furthermore, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. The G2/M arrest induced by TBT was abolished by NAD-IDHα knockdown. Treatment with a cell-permeable α-ketoglutarate analogue recovered the effect of TBT, suggesting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Taken together, our data suggest that TBT at nanomolar levels induced G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, cell cycle analysis in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with nanomolar level exposure of EDCs.

  5. ALG-2 knockdown in HeLa cells results in G2/M cell cycle phase accumulation and cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Berit Rahbek; la Cour, Peter Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    downregulation induces accumulation of HeLa cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase and increases the amount of early apoptotic and dead cells. Caspase inhibition by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk attenuated the increase in the amount of dead cells following ALG-2 downregulation. Thus, our results indicate...... that ALG-2 has an anti-apoptotic function in HeLa cells by facilitating the passage through checkpoints in the G2/M cell cycle phase.......ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2 encoded protein) has been shown to be upregulated in a variety of human tumors questioning its previously assumed pro-apoptotic function. The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the role of ALG-2 in human cancer cells. We show that ALG-2...

  6. Study of the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint in irradiated mammary epithelial cells overexpressing Cul-4A gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anu; Yang, L.-X.; Chen, L.-C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Members of the cullin gene family are known to be involved in cell cycle control. One of the cullin genes, Cul-4A, is amplified and overexpressed in breast cancer cells. This study investigates the effect of Cul-4A overexpression upon G2/M cell cycle checkpoint after DNA damage induced by either ionizing or nonionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The normal mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A was stably transfected with full-length Cul-4A cDNA. Independent clones of MCF10A cells that overexpress Cul-4A proteins were selected and treated with either 8 Gy of ionizing radiation or 7 J/M 2 of UV radiation. The profile of cell cycle progression and the accumulation of several cell cycle proteins were analyzed. Results: We found that overexpression of Cul-4A in MCF10A cells abrogated the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage induced by ionizing irradiation, but not to DNA damage induced by nonionizing radiation. Analysis of cell cycle proteins showed that after ionizing irradiation, p53 accumulated in the mock-transfected MCF10A cells, but not in the Cul-4A transfectants. Conclusion: Our results suggest a role for Cul-4A in tumorigenesis and/or tumor progression, possibly through disruption of cell cycle control

  7. Progesterone receptor blockade in human breast cancer cells decreases cell cycle progression through G2/M by repressing G2/M genes

    OpenAIRE

    Clare, Susan E.; Gupta, Akash; Choi, MiRan; Ranjan, Manish; Lee, Oukseub; Wang, Jun; Ivancic, David Z.; Kim, J. Julie; Khan, Seema A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The synthesis of specific, potent progesterone antagonists adds potential agents to the breast cancer prevention and treatment armamentarium. The identification of individuals who will benefit from these agents will be a critical factor for their clinical success. Methods We utilized telapristone acetate (TPA; CDB-4124) to understand the effects of progesterone receptor (PR) blockade on proliferation, apoptosis, promoter binding, cell cycle progression, and gene expression. We then...

  8. Cell cycle G2/M arrest through an S phase-dependent mechanism by HIV-1 viral protein R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge; Park, Hyeon U; Liang, Dong; Zhao, Richard Y

    2010-07-07

    Cell cycle G2 arrest induced by HIV-1 Vpr is thought to benefit viral proliferation by providing an optimized cellular environment for viral replication and by skipping host immune responses. Even though Vpr-induced G2 arrest has been studied extensively, how Vpr triggers G2 arrest remains elusive. To examine this initiation event, we measured the Vpr effect over a single cell cycle. We found that even though Vpr stops the cell cycle at the G2/M phase, but the initiation event actually occurs in the S phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, Vpr triggers activation of Chk1 through Ser345 phosphorylation in an S phase-dependent manner. The S phase-dependent requirement of Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation by Vpr was confirmed by siRNA gene silencing and site-directed mutagenesis. Moreover, downregulation of DNA replication licensing factors Cdt1 by siRNA significantly reduced Vpr-induced Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation and G2 arrest. Even though hydroxyurea (HU) and ultraviolet light (UV) also induce Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation in S phase under the same conditions, neither HU nor UV-treated cells were able to pass through S phase, whereas vpr-expressing cells completed S phase and stopped at the G2/M boundary. Furthermore, unlike HU/UV, Vpr promotes Chk1- and proteasome-mediated protein degradations of Cdc25B/C for G2 induction; in contrast, Vpr had little or no effect on Cdc25A protein degradation normally mediated by HU/UV. These data suggest that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a unique molecular mechanism that regulates host cell cycle regulation in an S-phase dependent fashion.

  9. Cell cycle G2/M arrest through an S phase-dependent mechanism by HIV-1 viral protein R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell cycle G2 arrest induced by HIV-1 Vpr is thought to benefit viral proliferation by providing an optimized cellular environment for viral replication and by skipping host immune responses. Even though Vpr-induced G2 arrest has been studied extensively, how Vpr triggers G2 arrest remains elusive. Results To examine this initiation event, we measured the Vpr effect over a single cell cycle. We found that even though Vpr stops the cell cycle at the G2/M phase, but the initiation event actually occurs in the S phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, Vpr triggers activation of Chk1 through Ser345 phosphorylation in an S phase-dependent manner. The S phase-dependent requirement of Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation by Vpr was confirmed by siRNA gene silencing and site-directed mutagenesis. Moreover, downregulation of DNA replication licensing factors Cdt1 by siRNA significantly reduced Vpr-induced Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation and G2 arrest. Even though hydroxyurea (HU and ultraviolet light (UV also induce Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation in S phase under the same conditions, neither HU nor UV-treated cells were able to pass through S phase, whereas vpr-expressing cells completed S phase and stopped at the G2/M boundary. Furthermore, unlike HU/UV, Vpr promotes Chk1- and proteasome-mediated protein degradations of Cdc25B/C for G2 induction; in contrast, Vpr had little or no effect on Cdc25A protein degradation normally mediated by HU/UV. Conclusions These data suggest that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a unique molecular mechanism that regulates host cell cycle regulation in an S-phase dependent fashion.

  10. Role of polyamines at the G1/S boundary and G2/M phase of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tomoko; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Saiki, Ryotaro; Okudaira, Hiroyuki; Tome, Mayuko; Higashi, Kyohei; Nakamura, Mizuho; Terui, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Kunio; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2013-06-01

    The role of polyamines at the G1/S boundary and in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle was studied using synchronized HeLa cells treated with thymidine or with thymidine and aphidicolin. Synchronized cells were cultured in the absence or presence of α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, plus ethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (EGBG), an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase. When polyamine content was reduced by treatment with DFMO and EGBG, the transition from G1 to S phase was delayed. In parallel, the level of p27(Kip1) was greatly increased, so its mechanism was studied in detail. Synthesis of p27(Kip1) was stimulated at the level of translation by a decrease in polyamine levels, because of the existence of long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) in p27(Kip1) mRNA. Similarly, the transition from the G2/M to the G1 phase was delayed by a reduction in polyamine levels. In parallel, the number of multinucleate cells increased by 3-fold. This was parallel with the inhibition of cytokinesis due to an unusual distribution of actin and α-tubulin at the M phase. Since an association of polyamines with chromosomes was not observed by immunofluorescence microscopy at the M phase, polyamines may have only a minor role in structural changes of chromosomes at the M phase. In general, the involvement of polyamines at the G2/M phase was smaller than that at the G1/S boundary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Induces G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest in Brain Pericytes Associated with ERK Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenjie; Yu, Zhiyuan; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has revealed that brain pericytes are multifunctional and contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of neurological disorders. However, the role of pericytes in cerebral ischemia, and especially the pathophysiological alterations in pericytes, remains unclear. In the present study, our aim was to determine whether the proliferation of pericytes is affected by cerebral ischemia and, if so, to identify the underlying mechanism(s). Cultured brain pericytes subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) were used as our model of cerebral ischemia; the protein expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cdk4, and cyclin B1 were determined by Western blot analysis, and cell cycle analysis was assessed by flow cytometry. The OGD treatment reduced the brain pericyte proliferation by causing G2/M phase arrest and downregulating the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cdk4, and cyclin B1. Further studies demonstrated a simultaneous decrease in the activity of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK), suggesting a critical role of the ERK signaling cascade in the inhibition of OGD-induced pericyte proliferation. We suggest that OGD inhibition of the proliferation of brain pericytes is associated with the inactivation of the ERK signaling pathway, which arrests them in the G2/M phase.

  12. Anthocyanins from roselle extract arrest cell cycle G2/M phase transition via ATM/Chk pathway in p53-deficient leukemia HL-60 cells.

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    Tsai, Tsung-Chang; Huang, Hui-Pei; Chang, Kai-Ting; Wang, Chau-Jong; Chang, Yun-Ching

    2017-04-01

    Cell cycle regulation is an important issue in cancer therapy. Delphinidin and cyanidin are two major anthocyanins of the roselle plant (Hibiscus sabdariffa). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hibiscus anthocyanins (HAs) on cell cycle arrest in human leukemia cell line HL-60 and the analyzed the underlying molecular mechanisms. HAs extracted from roselle calyces (purity 90%) markedly induced G2/M arrest evaluated with flow cytometry analysis. Western blot analyses revealed that HAs (0.1-0.7 mg mL -1 ) induced G2/M arrest via increasing Tyr15 phosphorylation of Cdc2, and inducing Cdk inhibitors p27 and p21. HAs also induced phosphorylation of upstream signals related to G2/M arrest such as phosphorylation of Cdc25C tyrosine phosphatase at Ser216, increasing the binding of pCdc25C with 14-3-3 protein. HAs-induced phosphorylation of Cdc25C could be activated by ATM checkpoint kinases, Chk1, and Chk2. We first time confirmed that ATM-Chk1/2-Cdc25C pathway as a critical mechanism for G2/M arrest in HAs-induced leukemia cell cycle arrest, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate or chemopreventive agents for further investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1290-1304, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Tributyltin induces a G2/M cell cycle arrest in human amniotic cells via PP2A inhibition-mediated inactivation of the ERK1/2 cascades.

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    Zhang, Yali; Guo, Zonglou; Xu, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the cell cycle alterations induced by tributyltin (TBT), a highly toxic environmental contaminant, remain elusive. In this study, cell cycle progression and some key regulators in G2/M phase were investigated in human amniotic cells treated with TBT. Furthermore, protein phosphatase (PP) 2A and the ERK cascades were examined. The results showed that TBT caused a G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accompanied by a decrease in the total cdc25C protein level and an increase in the p-cdc2 level in the nucleus. TBT caused a decrease in PP2A activity and inhibited the ERK cascade by inactivating Raf-1, resulting in the dephosphorylation of MEK1/2, ERK1/2, and c-Myc. Taken together, TBT leads to a G2/M cell cycle arrest in FL cells, an increase in p-cdc2 and a decrease in the levels of total cdc25C protein, which may be caused by the PP2A inhibition-mediated inactivation of the ERK1/2 cascades. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer cells is associated with an abrogation of cisplatin-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest.

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    Navin Sarin

    Full Text Available The efficacy of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in cancer is limited by the occurrence of innate and acquired drug resistance. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying acquired cisplatin resistance, we have compared the adenocarcinoma-derived non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line A549 and its cisplatin-resistant sub-line A549rCDDP2000 with regard to cisplatin resistance mechanisms including cellular platinum accumulation, DNA-adduct formation, cell cycle alterations, apoptosis induction and activation of key players of DNA damage response. In A549rCDDP2000 cells, a cisplatin-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was lacking and apoptosis was reduced compared to A549 cells, although equitoxic cisplatin concentrations resulted in comparable platinum-DNA adduct levels. These differences were accompanied by changes in the expression of proteins involved in DNA damage response. In A549 cells, cisplatin exposure led to a significantly higher expression of genes coding for proteins mediating G2/M arrest and apoptosis (mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2, xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC, stress inducible protein (SIP and p21 compared to resistant cells. This was underlined by significantly higher protein levels of phosphorylated Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (pAtm and p53 in A549 cells compared to their respective untreated control. The results were compiled in a preliminary model of resistance-associated signaling alterations. In conclusion, these findings suggest that acquired resistance of NSCLC cells against cisplatin is the consequence of altered signaling leading to reduced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  15. Diacerein retards cell growth of chondrosarcoma cells at the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint via cyclin B1/CDK1 and CDK2 downregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohberger, Birgit; Leithner, Andreas; Stuendl, Nicole; Kaltenegger, Heike; Kullich, Werner; Steinecker-Frohnwieser, Bibiane

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is characterized for its lack of response to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, propensity for developing lung metastases, and low rates of survival. Research within the field of development and expansion of new treatment options for unresectable or metastatic diseases is of particular priority. Diacerein, a symptomatic slow acting drug in osteoarthritis (SYSADOA), implicates a therapeutic benefit for the treatment of chondrosarcoma by an antitumor activity. After treatment with diacerein the growth behaviour of the cells was analyzed with the xCELLigence system and MTS assay. Cell cycle was examined using flow cytometric analysis, RT-PCR, and western blot analysis of specific checkpoint regulators. The status for phosophorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was analyzed with a proteome profiler assay. In addition, the possible impact of diacerein on apoptosis was investigated using cleaved caspase 3 and Annexin V/PI flow cytometric analysis. Diacerein decreased the cell viability and the cell proliferation in two different chondrosarcoma cell lines in a dose dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed a classical G2/M arrest. mRNA and protein analysis revealed that diacerein induced a down-regulation of the cyclin B1-CDK1 complex and a reduction in CDK2 expression. Furthermore, diacerein treatment increased the phosphorylation of p38α and p38β MAPKs, and Akt1, Akt2, and Akt 3 in SW-1353, whereas in Cal-78 the opposite effect has been demonstrated. These observations accordingly to our cell cycle flow cytometric analysis and protein expression data may explain the G2/M phase arrest. In addition, no apoptotic induction after diacerein treatment, neither in the Cal-78 nor in the SW-1353 cell line was observed. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the SYSADOA diacerein decreased the viability of human chondrosarcoma cells and induces G2/M cell cycle arrest by CDK1/cyclin B1 down-regulation

  16. 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Han, Kai-Lin; Yang, Yao; Song, Bin-Bin; Guo, Qian-Nan; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Zhang, Yong-Min; Teng, Yu-Ou; Yu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative (HKL 2H) inhibited K562’s proliferation. • HKL 2H caused the morphology change of G 2 /M phase arrest and typical apoptosis. • HKL 2H induced G2/M cell cycle phase arrest in K562 cells. • HKL 2H induced apoptosis in K562 cells through the mitochondrial pathway. - Abstract: Our previous study successfully identified that the novel isatin derivative (E)-methyl 3-(1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) acrylate (HKL 2H) acts as an anticancer agent at an inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) level of 3 nM. In this study, the molecular mechanism how HKL 2H induces cytotoxic activity in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells was investigated. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the cells were arrested in the G 2 /M phase and accumulated subsequently in the sub-G 1 phase in the presence of HKL 2H. HKL 2H treatment down-regulated the expressions of CDK1 and cyclin B but up-regulated the level of phosphorylated CDK1. Annexin-V staining and the classic DNA ladder studies showed that HKL 2H induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. Our study further showed that HKL 2H treatment caused the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, activated caspase-3 and lowered the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in K562 cells, suggesting that the HKL 2H-causing programmed cell death of K562 cells was caused via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together, our data demonstrated that HKL 2H, a 5-(2-carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative, notably induces G 2 /M cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in K562 cells, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate for further investigation

  17. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus latency associated nuclear antigen protein release the G2/M cell cycle blocks by modulating ATM/ATR mediated checkpoint pathway.

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    Amit Kumar

    Full Text Available The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infects the human population and maintains latency stage of viral life cycle in a variety of cell types including cells of epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial origin. The establishment of latent infection by KSHV requires the expression of an unique repertoire of genes among which latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA plays a critical role in the replication of the viral genome. LANA regulates the transcription of a number of viral and cellular genes essential for the survival of the virus in the host cell. The present study demonstrates the disruption of the host G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation as an associated function of LANA. DNA profile of LANA expressing human B-cells demonstrated the ability of this nuclear antigen in relieving the drug (Nocodazole induced G2/M checkpoint arrest. Caffeine suppressed nocodazole induced G2/M arrest indicating involvement of the ATM/ATR. Notably, we have also shown the direct interaction of LANA with Chk2, the ATM/ATR signalling effector and is responsible for the release of the G2/M cell cycle block.

  18. Human cytochrome c enters murine J774 cells and causes G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Yoshinori; Granja, Ana Teresa; Fialho, Arsenio M.; Schlarb-Ridley, Beatrix G.; Das Gupta, Tapas K.; Chakrabarty, Ananda M.; Yamada, Tohru

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome c is well known as a carrier of electrons during respiration. Current evidence indicates that cytochrome c also functions as a major component of apoptosomes to induce apoptosis in eukaryotic cells as well as an antioxidant. More recently, a prokaryotic cytochrome c, cytochrome c 551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been shown to enter in mammalian cells such as the murine macrophage-like J774 cells and causes inhibition of cell cycle progression. Much less is known about such functions by mammalian cytochromes c, particularly the human cytochrome c. We now report that similar to P. aeruginosa cytochrome c 551 , the purified human cytochrome c protein can enter J774 cells and induce cell cycle arrest at the G 1 to S phase, as well as at the G 2 /M phase at higher concentrations. Unlike P. aeruginosa cytochrome c 551 which had no effect on the induction of apoptosis, human cytochrome c induces significant apoptosis and cell death in J774 cells, presumably through inhibition of the cell cycle at the G 2 /M phase. When incubated with human breast cancer MCF-7 and normal mammary epithelial cell line MCF-10A1 cells, human cytochrome c entered in both types of cells but induced cell death only in the normal MCF-10A1 cells. The ability of human cytochrome c to enter J774 cells was greatly reduced at 4 deg. C, suggesting energy requirement in the entry process

  19. Genistein induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via ATM/p53-dependent pathway in human colon cancer cells.

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    Zhang, Zhiyu; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Du, Guang-Jian; Qi, Lian-Wen; Calway, Tyler; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2013-07-01

    Soybean isoflavones have been used as a potential preventive agent in anticancer research for many years. Genistein is one of the most active flavonoids in soybeans. Accumulating evidence suggests that genistein alters a variety of biological processes in estrogen-related malignancies, such as breast and prostate cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of genistein in the prevention of human colon cancer remains unclear. Here we attempted to elucidate the anticarcinogenic mechanism of genistein in human colon cancer cells. First we evaluated the growth inhibitory effect of genistein and two other isoflavones, daidzein and biochanin A, on HCT-116 and SW-480 human colon cancer cells. In addition, flow cyto-metry was performed to observe the morphological changes in HCT-116/SW-480 cells undergoing apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, which had been visualized using Annexin V-FITC and/or propidium iodide staining. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses were also employed to study the changes in expression of several important genes associated with cell cycle regulation. Our data showed that genistein, daidzein and biochanin A exhibited growth inhibitory effects on HCT-116/SW-480 colon cancer cells and promoted apoptosis. Genistein showed a significantly greater effect than the other two compounds, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, genistein caused cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, which was accompanied by activation of ATM/p53, p21waf1/cip1 and GADD45α as well as downregulation of cdc2 and cdc25A demonstrated by q-PCR and immunoblotting assay. Interestingly, genistein induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in a p53-dependent manner. These findings exemplify that isoflavones, especially genistein, could promote colon cancer cell growth inhibition and facilitate apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. The ATM/p53-p21 cross-regulatory network may play a crucial role in mediating the anticarcinogenic activities of genistein in colon cancer.

  20. Enrichment of G2/M cell cycle phase in human pluripotent stem cells enhances HDR-mediated gene repair with customizable endonucleases.

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    Yang, Diane; Scavuzzo, Marissa A; Chmielowiec, Jolanta; Sharp, Robert; Bajic, Aleksandar; Borowiak, Malgorzata

    2016-02-18

    Efficient gene editing is essential to fully utilize human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in regenerative medicine. Custom endonuclease-based gene targeting involves two mechanisms of DNA repair: homology directed repair (HDR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HDR is the preferred mechanism for common applications such knock-in, knock-out or precise mutagenesis, but remains inefficient in hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that synchronizing synchronizing hPSCs in G2/M with ABT phase increases on-target gene editing, defined as correct targeting cassette integration, 3 to 6 fold. We observed improved efficiency using ZFNs, TALENs, two CRISPR/Cas9, and CRISPR/Cas9 nickase to target five genes in three hPSC lines: three human embryonic stem cell lines, neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. Reversible synchronization has no effect on pluripotency or differentiation. The increase in on-target gene editing is locus-independent and specific to the cell cycle phase as G2/M phase enriched cells show a 6-fold increase in targeting efficiency compared to cells in G1 phase. Concurrently inhibiting NHEJ with SCR7 does not increase HDR or improve gene targeting efficiency further, indicating that HR is the major DNA repair mechanism after G2/M phase arrest. The approach outlined here makes gene editing in hPSCs a more viable tool for disease modeling, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies.

  1. A methoxyflavanone derivative from the Asian medicinal herb (Perilla frutescens) induces p53-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma.

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    Abd El-Hafeez, Amer Ali; Fujimura, Takashi; Kamei, Rikiya; Hirakawa, Noriko; Baba, Kenji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Kawamoto, Seiji

    2017-07-14

    Perilla frutescens is an Asian dietary herb consumed as an essential seasoning in Japanese cuisine as well as used for a Chinese medicine. Here, we report that a newly found methoxyflavanone derivative from P. frutescens (Perilla-derived methoxyflavanone, PDMF; 8-hydroxy-5,7-dimethoxyflavanone) shows carcinostatic activity on human lung adenocarcinoma, A549. We found that treatment with PDMF significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased viability through induction of G 2 /M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The PDMF stimulation induces phosphorylation of tumor suppressor p53 on Ser15, and increases its protein amount in conjunction with up-regulation of downstream cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 Cip1/Waf1 and proapoptotic caspases, caspase-9 and caspase-3. We also found that small interfering RNA knockdown of p53 completely abolished the PDMF-induced G 2 /M cell cycle arrest, and substantially abrogated its proapoptotic potency. These results suggest that PDMF represents a useful tumor-preventive phytochemical that triggers p53-driven G 2 /M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  2. The novel anthraquinone derivative IMP1338 induces death of human cancer cells by p53-independent S and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Kyung; Ryu, Hwani; Son, A-Rang; Seo, Bitna; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Ahn, Jiyeon

    2016-04-01

    To identify novel small molecules that induce selective cancer cell death, we screened a chemical library containing 1040 compounds in HT29 colon cancer and CCD18-Co normal colon cells, using a phenotypic cell-based viability assay system with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). We discovered a novel anthraquinone derivative, N-(4-[{(9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydro-1-anthracenyl)sulfonyl}amino]phenyl)-N-methylacetamide (IMP1338), which was cytotoxic against the human colon cancer cells tested. The MTT cell viability assay showed that treatment with IMP1338 selectively inhibited HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), HT29, and A549 cancer cell proliferation compared to that of Beas2B normal epithelial cells. To elucidate the cellular mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of IMP1338, we examined the effect of IMP1338 on the cell cycle distribution and death of cancer cells. IMP1338 treatment significantly arrested the cell cycle at S and G2/M phases by DNA damage and led to apoptotic cell death, which was determined using FACS analysis with Annexin V/PI double staining. Furthermore, IMP1338 increased caspase-3 cleavage in wild-type p53, p53 knockout HCT116, and HT29 cells as determined using immunoblotting. In addition, IMP1338 markedly induced the phosphorylation of histone H2AX and Chk1 in both cell lines while the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiation inhibited the viability of HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), and HT29 cells compared to 5-FU or radiation alone. Our findings indicated that IMP1338 induced p53-independent cell death through S and G2/M phase arrest as well as DNA damage. These results provide a basis for future investigations assessing the promising anticancer properties of IMP1338. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Microvesicles derived from human Wharton's Jelly mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate ischemia-reperfusion-induced renal fibrosis by releasing from G2/M cell cycle arrest.

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    Chen, Wenxia; Yan, Yongbin; Song, Chundong; Ding, Ying; Du, Tao

    2017-12-14

    Studies have demonstrated that microvesicles (MVs) derived from human Wharton's Jelly mesenchymal stromal cells (hWJMSCs) could ameliorate renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI); however, the underlying mechanisms were not clear yet. Here, MVs were isolated and injected intravenously into rats immediately after ischemia of the left kidney, and Erk1/2 activator hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) or inhibitor U0126 was administrated. Tubular cell proliferation and apoptosis were identified by Ki67 or terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling immunostaining. Masson's tri-chrome straining and alpha-smooth muscle actin staining were used for assessing renal fibrosis. The mRNA or protein expression in the kidney was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR or Western blot, respectively. The total collagen concentration was also determined. In vitro , NRK-52E cells that treated with MVs under hypoxia injury and with HGF or U0126 administration were used, and cell cycle analysis was performed. The effects of hWJMSC-MVs on enhancing the proliferation and mitigating the apoptosis of renal cells, abrogating IRI-induced fibrosis, improving renal function, decreasing collagen deposition, and altering the expression levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell cycle-related proteins in IRI rats were found. In vitro experiment showed that hWJMSC-MVs could induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and decrease the expression of collagen deposition-related proteins in NRK-52E cells after 24 or 48 h. However, U0126 treatment reversed these effects. In conclusion, MVs derived from hWJMSCs ameliorate IR-induced renal fibrosis by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest via Erk1/2 signaling. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Oridonin nanosuspension was more effective than free oridonin on G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cell line

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    Qi XL

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Qi1, Dianrui Zhang2, Xia Xu1, Feifei Feng2, Guijie Ren1, Qianqian Chu1, Qiang Zhang3, Keli Tian11Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Shandong University, Jinan, 3State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescencs, has been reported to have antitumor effects. However, low solubility has limited its clinical applications. Preparation of drugs in the form of nanosuspensions is an extensively utilized protocol. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of oridonin and oridonin nanosuspension on human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed to investigate the effect of oridonin on cell growth. Propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining were used to detect morphologic changes. The percentage of apoptosis and cell cycle progression was determined by flow cytometric method staining with propidium iodide. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC/PI staining was used to evaluate cell apoptosis by flow cytometry. Caspase-3 activity was measured by spectrophotometry. The apoptotic and cell cycle protein expression were determined by Western blot analysis. Both oridonin and oridonin nanosuspension induced apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, and the latter had a more significant cytotoxic effect. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression was decreased and caspase-3 activity was stimulated. The expression of cyclin B1 and p-cdc2 (T161 was suppressed. Our results showed that oridonin nanosuspension was more effective than free oridonin on G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cell line.Keywords: cyclin B1, cdc2, caspase-3, Bcl-2, Bax

  5. Alkali-soluble polysaccharide, isolated from Lentinus edodes, induces apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in H22 cells through microtubule depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ru-Xu; Liu, Jin-Yu; Li, Shi-Jun; Wang, Liu; Wang, Kai-Ping; Zhang, Yu

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the pro-apoptotic effects of polysaccharides derived from Lentinus edodes and further elucidated the mechanisms of this action. Our results demonstrated that marked morphological changes of apoptosis were observed after treatment of L. edodes polysaccharides [Lentinan (LTN)]. Moreover, LTN-induced cell apoptosis was characterized by a rapid stimulation of reactive oxygen species production, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) . In addition, the results of the haematoxylin and eosin and TUNEL assay further confirmed that LTN-induced apoptosis in vivo. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that LTN could arrest the cell cycle at G2/M phase, and immunofluorescence showed LTN caused disruption of microtubule. These results suggest that disruption of cellular microtubule network, arrest of the cell cycle at G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis may be one of the possible mechanisms of anti-tumour effect of LTN. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Induction of G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrests by the dietary compound 3,3'-diindolylmethane in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

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    Choi Hyun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM, an indole derivative produced in the stomach after the consumption of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, has been demonstrated to exert anti-cancer effects in both in vivo and in vitro models. We have previously determined that DIM (0 – 30 μmol/L inhibited the growth of HT-29 human colon cancer cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DIM on cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells. Methods HT-29 cells were cultured with various concentrations of DIM (0 – 30 μmol/L and the DNA was stained with propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometric analysis. [3H]Thymidine incorporation assays, Western blot analyses, immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assays for cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK and cell division cycle (CDC2 were conducted. Results The percentages of cells in the G1 and G2/M phases were dose-dependently increased and the percentages of cells in S phase were reduced within 12 h in DIM-treated cells. DIM also reduced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. DIM markedly reduced CDK2 activity and the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma proteins (Rb and E2F-1, and also increased the levels of hypophosphorylated Rb. DIM reduced the protein levels of cyclin A, D1, and CDK4. DIM also increased the protein levels of CDK inhibitors, p21CIP1/WAF1 and p27KIPI. In addition, DIM reduced the activity of CDC2 and the levels of CDC25C phosphatase and cyclin B1. Conclusion Here, we have demonstrated that DIM induces G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in HT-29 cells, and this effect may be mediated by reduced CDK activity.

  7. Induction of G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrests by the dietary compound 3,3'-diindolylmethane in HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ju; Lim, Do Young; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-05-29

    3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM), an indole derivative produced in the stomach after the consumption of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, has been demonstrated to exert anti-cancer effects in both in vivo and in vitro models. We have previously determined that DIM (0 - 30 micromol/L) inhibited the growth of HT-29 human colon cancer cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DIM on cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells. HT-29 cells were cultured with various concentrations of DIM (0 - 30 micromol/L) and the DNA was stained with propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometric analysis. [3H]Thymidine incorporation assays, Western blot analyses, immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assays for cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and cell division cycle (CDC)2 were conducted. The percentages of cells in the G1 and G2/M phases were dose-dependently increased and the percentages of cells in S phase were reduced within 12 h in DIM-treated cells. DIM also reduced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. DIM markedly reduced CDK2 activity and the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma proteins (Rb) and E2F-1, and also increased the levels of hypophosphorylated Rb. DIM reduced the protein levels of cyclin A, D1, and CDK4. DIM also increased the protein levels of CDK inhibitors, p21CIP1/WAF1 and p27KIPI. In addition, DIM reduced the activity of CDC2 and the levels of CDC25C phosphatase and cyclin B1. Here, we have demonstrated that DIM induces G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in HT-29 cells, and this effect may be mediated by reduced CDK activity.

  8. Curcumin analog WZ35 induced cell death via ROS-dependent ER stress and G2/M cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiuhua; Chen, Minxiao; Zou, Peng; Kanchana, Karvannan; Weng, Qiaoyou; Chen, Wenbo; Zhong, Peng; Ji, Jiansong; Zhou, Huiping; He, Langchong; Liang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy among men. The Discovery of new agents for the treatment of prostate cancer is urgently needed. Compound WZ35, a novel analog of the natural product curcumin, exhibited good anti-prostate cancer activity, with an IC 50 of 2.2 μM in PC-3 cells. However, the underlying mechanism of WZ35 against prostate cancer cells is still unclear. Human prostate cancer PC-3 cells and DU145 cells were treated with WZ35 for further proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and mechanism analyses. NAC and CHOP siRNA were used to validate the role of ROS and ER stress, respectively, in the anti-cancer actions of WZ35. Our results show that WZ35 exhibited much higher cell growth inhibition than curcumin by inducing ER stress-dependent cell apoptosis in human prostate cells. The reduction of CHOP expression by siRNA partially abrogated WZ35-induced cell apoptosis. WZ35 also dose-dependently induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we found that WZ35 treatment for 30 min significantly induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in PC-3 cells. Co-treatment with the ROS scavenger NAC completely abrogated the induction of WZ35 on cell apoptosis, ER stress activation, and cell cycle arrest, indicating an upstream role of ROS generation in mediating the anti-cancer effect of WZ35. Taken together, this work presents the novel anticancer candidate WZ35 for the treatment of prostate cancer, and importantly, reveals that increased ROS generation might be an effective strategy in human prostate cancer treatment. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1851-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  9. Lamprey Prohibitin2 Arrest G2/M Phase Transition of HeLa Cells through Down-regulating Expression and Phosphorylation Level of Cell Cycle Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Guo, Sicheng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei; Li, Tiesong

    2018-03-02

    Prohibitin 2(PHB2) is a member of the SFPH trans-membrane family proteins. It is a highly conserved and functionally diverse protein that plays an important role in preserving the structure and function of the mitochondria. In this study, the lamprey PHB2 gene was expressed in HeLa cells to investigate its effect on cell proliferation. The effect of Lm-PHB2 on the proliferation of HeLa cells was determined by treating the cells with pure Lm-PHB2 protein followed by MTT assay. Using the synchronization method with APC-BrdU and PI double staining revealed rLm-PHB2 treatment induced the decrease of both S phase and G0/G1 phase and then increase of G2/M phase. Similarly, cells transfected with pEGFP-N1-Lm-PHB2 also exhibited remarkable reduction in proliferation. Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR(qRT-PCR) assays suggested that Lm-PHB2 caused cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells through inhibition of CDC25C and CCNB1 expression. According to our western blot analysis, Lm-PHB2 was also found to reduce the expression level of Wee1 and PLK1 and the phosphorylation level of CCNB1, CDC25C and CDK1 in HeLa cells. Lamprey prohibitin 2 could arrest G2/M phase transition of HeLa cells through down-regulating expression and phosphorylation level of cell cycle proteins.

  10. The SFP1 gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates G2/M transitions during the mitotic cell cycle and DNA-damage response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Norris, D.

    1998-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, checkpoint pathways arrest cell-cycle progression if a particular event has failed to complete appropriately or if an important intracellular structure is defective or damaged. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that lack the SFP1 gene fail to arrest at the G2 DNA-damage checkpoint in response to genomic injury, but maintain their ability to arrest at the replication and spindle-assembly checkpoints. sfp1D mutants are characterized by a premature entrance into mitosis during a normal (undamaged) cell cycle, while strains that overexpress Sfp1p exhibit delays in G2. Sfp1p therefore acts as a repressor of the G2/M transition, both in the normal cell cycle and in the G2 checkpoint pathway. Sfp1 is a nuclear protein with two Cys2His2 zinc-finger domains commonly found in transcription factors. We propose that Sfp1p regulates the expression of gene products involved in the G2/M transition during the mitotic cell cycle and the DNA-damage response. In support of this model, overexpression of Sfp1p induces the expression of the PDS1 gene, which is known to encode a protein that regulates the G2 checkpoint. (author)

  11. Cucurbitacin B inhibits proliferation, induces G2/M cycle arrest and autophagy without affecting apoptosis but enhances MTT reduction in PC12 cells

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    Chuanhong Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of cucurbitacin B (a natural product with anti-cancer effect was studied on PC12 cells. It significantly reduced the cell number, changed cell morphology and inhibited colony formation while MTT results showed increased cell viability. Cucurbitacin B treatment increased activity of succinode hydrogenase. No alteration in the integrity of mem-brane, the release of lactic dehydrogenase, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the expression of apoptotic proteins suggested that cucurbitacin B did not induce apoptosis. The cell cycle was remarkably arrested at G2/M phase. Furthermore, cucurbitacin B induced autophagy as evidence by accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and the increase of LC3II. In addition, cucurbitacin B up-regulated the expression of p-beclin-1, p-ULK1, p-Wee1, p21 and down-regulated p-mTOR, p-p70S6K, CDC25C, CDK1, Cyclin B1. In conclusion, cucurbitacin B inhibited PC12 proliferation but caused MTT pitfall. Cucurbitacin B induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, autophagy, but not the apoptosis in PC12 cells.

  12. RPA accumulation during class switch recombination represents 5'-3' DNA-end resection during the S-G2/M phase of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Arito; Robbiani, Davide F; Resch, Wolfgang; Bothmer, Anne; Nakahashi, Hirotaka; Oliveira, Thiago; Rommel, Philipp C; Brown, Eric J; Nussenzweig, Andre; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Casellas, Rafael

    2013-01-31

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) promotes chromosomal translocations by inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and oncogenes in the G1 phase. RPA is a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein that associates with resected DSBs in the S phase and facilitates the assembly of factors involved in homologous repair (HR), such as Rad51. Notably, RPA deposition also marks sites of AID-mediated damage, but its role in Ig gene recombination remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that RPA associates asymmetrically with resected ssDNA in response to lesions created by AID, recombination-activating genes (RAG), or other nucleases. Small amounts of RPA are deposited at AID targets in G1 in an ATM-dependent manner. In contrast, recruitment in the S-G2/M phase is extensive, ATM independent, and associated with Rad51 accumulation. In the S-G2/M phase, RPA increases in nonhomologous-end-joining-deficient lymphocytes, where there is more extensive DNA-end resection. Thus, most RPA recruitment during class switch recombination represents salvage of unrepaired breaks by homology-based pathways during the S-G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. EGFR-targeted plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles suppress lung tumor growth by abrogating G2/M cell-cycle arrest and inducing DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shinji Kuroda,1 Justina Tam,2 Jack A Roth,1 Konstantin Sokolov,2 Rajagopal Ramesh3–5 1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Pathology, 4Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, 5Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Background: We have previously demonstrated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (225-NP produce a therapeutic effect in human lung cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 225-NP-mediated antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo using the EGFR-mutant HCC827 cell line. Methods: The growth inhibitory effect of 225-NP on lung tumor cells was determined by cell viability and cell-cycle analysis. Protein expression related to autophagy, apoptosis, and DNA-damage were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted using a human lung tumor xenograft mouse model. Results: The 225-NP treatment markedly reduced tumor cell viability at 72 hours compared with the cell viability in control treatment groups. Cell-cycle analysis showed the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was reduced when treated with 225-NP, with a concomitant increase in the number of cells in Sub-G1 phase, indicative of cell death. Western blotting showed LC3B and PARP cleavage, indicating 225-NP-treatment activated both autophagy- and apoptosis-mediated cell death. The 225-NP strongly induced γH2AX and phosphorylated histone H3, markers indicative of DNA damage and mitosis, respectively. Additionally, significant γH2AX foci formation was observed in 225-NP-treated cells compared with control treatment groups, suggesting 225-NP induced cell death by triggering DNA damage. The 225-NP-mediated DNA damage involved abrogation of the

  15. Dendrobium candidum inhibits MCF-7 cells proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and regulating key biomarkers

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    Sun J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jing Sun,1 Yidi Guo,1 Xueqi Fu,1–3 Yongsen Wang,1 Ye Liu,1 Bo Huo,1 Jun Sheng,4 Xin Hu1–3 1School of Life Sciences, 2Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of Ministry of Education, 3National Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, 4Yunnan Research Centre for Advance Tea Processing, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, People’s Republic of China Background: Breast cancer is one of the most frequently occurring cancers in women. In recent years, Dendrobium candidum has played a part in antihyperthyroidism and anticancer drugs. This study aims to examine the antitumor effect of D. candidum on breast cancer. Methods: Human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A were used to observe the effects of D. candidum treatment on human breast cancer. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was employed to examine the cell proliferation of the MCF-7 and MCF10A cells. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the key molecules and biomarkers in breast cancer pathology. Cell cycle was analyzed by using Becton Dickinson FACScan cytofluorometer. Results: The results indicated that D. candidum significantly decreased cell viability at different concentrations compared to the control group (P<0.05. D. candidum-treated MCF-7 cells in the G2/M phase was significantly increased compared to the control group (P<0.05. The messenger RNA levels of estrogen receptor alpha, IGFBP2, IGFBP4, and GATA3 were significantly decreased, and the messenger RNA and protein levels of ELF5, p53, p21, p18, CDH1, CDH2, and p12 were significantly increased, compared to the control group (P<0.05. The protein levels of estrogen receptor alpha, PGR, GATA3, and Ki67 were significantly decreased and the protein levels of p53 and ELF5 were significantly increased compared to the control group (P

  16. Calotropis procera extract induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in human skin melanoma (SK-MEL-2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aparna L; Roham, Pratiksha H; Mhaske, Rooth; Jadhav, Mahadev; Krishnadas, Kavitha; Kharat, Amol; Hardikar, Bhagyashree; Kharat, Kiran R

    2015-01-01

    Calotropis procera (family: Asclepiadaceae) contains cardiac glycosides which are cytotoxic to cancer cells. The extracts of C. procera have been reported to be cytotoxic to many cancer cell lines and this is the first report against the human skin melanoma cells (SK-MEL-2). The SK-MEL-2 cells treated with C. procera methanolic extract (CPME) were analysed for growth inhibition and apoptosis. The exposure of phosphatidylserine in apoptotic SK-MEL-2 was analysed by using the Annexin-V FITC flow cytometry method. In CPME-treated SK-MEL-2 cells, 19.6% of apoptotic and 58.3% dead cells were observed. The 15.97% and 15.85% of early apoptotic cells were found at 20 μg/mL of the ouabain and paclitaxel, respectively. Active caspases, nuclear degradation confirmed apoptotic SK-MEL-2 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner. The cell cycle analysis shows that CPME treated cells halt at G2/M phase. Significant cytotoxic activity of CPME against SK-MEL-2 may be attributed to its high cardenolide content.

  17. AZD2014 Radiosensitizes Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Inhibiting AKT/mTOR Axis and Inducing G1/G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chia Yu

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is one of the most common malignant neoplasms in Taiwan. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway has been linked to decreased radiation responsiveness in human oral cancer, thus it limits efficacy of radiotherapy. To address this question, we investigated the effect of AZD2014, a novel small molecular ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase, as a radiosensitizer in primary OSCC and OSCC-derived cell line models.We isolated primary tumor cells from OSCC tissues and cell lines. AZD2014 was administered with and without ionizing radiation. The radiosensitizing effect of AZD2014 were then assessed using cell viability assays, clonogenic survival assays, and cell cycle analyses. Western blotting was used to detect protein expression.Combination treatment with AZD2014 and irradiation resulted in significant reduction in OSCC cell line and primary OSCC cell colony formation due to the enhanced inhibition of AKT and both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity. Pre-treatment with AZD2014 in irradiated oral cancer cells induced tumor cell cycle arrest at the G1 and G2/M phases, which led to disruption of cyclin D1-CDK4 and cyclin B1-CDC2 complexes. Moreover, AZD2014 synergized with radiation to promote both apoptosis and autophagy by increasing caspase-3 and LC3 in primary OSCC cells.These findings suggest that in irradiated OSCC cells, co-treatment with AZD2014, which targets mTORC1 and mTORC2 blockade, is an effective radiosensitizing strategy for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. Hexamethoxylated Monocarbonyl Analogues of Curcumin Cause G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest in NCI-H460 Cells via Michael Acceptor-Dependent Redox Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ping; Dai, Fang; Yan, Wen-Jing; Wang, Hai-Bo; Tu, Zhi-Shan; Zhou, Bo

    2015-09-09

    Curcumin, derived from the dietary spice turmeric, holds promise for cancer prevention. This prompts much interest in investigating the action mechanisms of curcumin and its analogues. Two symmetrical hexamethoxy-diarylpentadienones (1 and 2) as cucumin analogues were reported to possess significantly enhanced cytotoxicity compared with the parent molecule. However, the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, compounds 1 and 2 were identified as the G2/M cell cycle arrest agents to mediate the cytotoxicity toward NCI-H460 cells via Michael acceptor-dependent redox intervention. Compared with curcumin, they could more easily induce a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and collapse of the redox buffering system. One possible reason is that they could more effectively target intracellular TrxR to convert this antioxidant enzyme into a ROS promoter. Additionally, they caused up-regulation of p53 and p21 and down-regulation of redox-sensitive Cdc25C along with cyclin B1/Cdk1 in a Michael acceptor- and ROS-dependent fashion. Interestingly, in comparison with compound 2, compound 1 displayed a relatively weak ability to generate ROS but increased cell cycle arrest activity and cytotoxicity probably due to its Michael acceptor-dependent microtubule-destabilizing effect and greater GST-inhibitory activity, as well as its enhanced cellular uptake. This work provides useful information for understanding Michael acceptor-dependent and redox-mediated cytotoxic mechanisms of curcumin and its active analogues.

  19. Zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway in a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman HS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heshu Sulaiman Rahman,1–3 Abdullah Rasedee,1,2 Ahmad Bustamam Abdul,2,4 Nazariah Allaudin Zeenathul,1,2 Hemn Hassan Othman,1,3 Swee Keong Yeap,2 Chee Wun How,2 Wan Abd Ghani Wan Nor Hafiza4,51Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sulaimanyah, Sulaimanyah City, Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq; 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 5College of Medical Laboratory Technology, Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: This investigation evaluated the antileukemia properties of a zerumbone (ZER-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC prepared by hot high-pressure homogenization techniques in an acute human lymphoblastic leukemia (Jurkat cell line in vitro. The apoptogenic effect of the ZER-NLC on Jurkat cells was determined by fluorescent and electron microscopy, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate, Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity. An MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that ZER-NLC did not have adverse effects on normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. ZER-NLC arrested the Jurkat cells at G2/M phase with inactivation of cyclin B1 protein. The study also showed that the antiproliferative effect of ZER-NLC on Jurkat cells is through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol, and subsequent cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP. These findings show that the ZER-NLC is a potentially useful treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in humans.Keywords: zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, mitochondrial pathway

  20. Fluoroquinolone-mediated inhibition of cell growth, S-G2/M cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in canine osteosarcoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyoung won; Holt, Roseline; Jung, Yong-Sam; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Chen, Xinbin; Rebhun, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advancements in osteosarcoma research, the overall survival of canine and human osteosarcoma patients has remained essentially static over the past 2 decades. Post-operative limb-spare infection has been associated with improved survival in both species, yet a mechanism for improved survival has not been clearly established. Given that the majority of canine osteosarcoma patients experiencing post-operative infections were treated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics, we hypothesized that fluoroquinolone antibiotics might directly inhibit the survival and proliferation of canine osteosarcoma cells. Ciprofloxacin or enrofloxacin were found to inhibit p21(WAF1) expression resulting in decreased proliferation and increased S-G(2)/M accumulation. Furthermore, fluoroquinolone exposure induced apoptosis of canine osteosarcoma cells as demonstrated by cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, and activation of caspase-3/7. These results support further studies examining the potential impact of quinolones on survival and proliferation of osteosarcoma.

  1. Fluoroquinolone-mediated inhibition of cell growth, S-G2/M cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in canine osteosarcoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung won Seo

    Full Text Available Despite significant advancements in osteosarcoma research, the overall survival of canine and human osteosarcoma patients has remained essentially static over the past 2 decades. Post-operative limb-spare infection has been associated with improved survival in both species, yet a mechanism for improved survival has not been clearly established. Given that the majority of canine osteosarcoma patients experiencing post-operative infections were treated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics, we hypothesized that fluoroquinolone antibiotics might directly inhibit the survival and proliferation of canine osteosarcoma cells. Ciprofloxacin or enrofloxacin were found to inhibit p21(WAF1 expression resulting in decreased proliferation and increased S-G(2/M accumulation. Furthermore, fluoroquinolone exposure induced apoptosis of canine osteosarcoma cells as demonstrated by cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, and activation of caspase-3/7. These results support further studies examining the potential impact of quinolones on survival and proliferation of osteosarcoma.

  2. The Gcn2 Regulator Yih1 Interacts with the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Cdc28 and Promotes Cell Cycle Progression through G2/M in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Silva

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Yih1, when overexpressed, inhibits the eIF2 alpha kinase Gcn2 by competing for Gcn1 binding. However, deletion of YIH1 has no detectable effect on Gcn2 activity, suggesting that Yih1 is not a general inhibitor of Gcn2, and has no phenotypic defect identified so far. Thus, its physiological role is largely unknown. Here, we show that Yih1 is involved in the cell cycle. Yeast lacking Yih1 displays morphological patterns and DNA content indicative of a delay in the G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and this phenotype is independent of Gcn1 and Gcn2. Accordingly, the levels of phosphorylated eIF2α, which show a cell cycle-dependent fluctuation, are not altered in cells devoid of Yih1. We present several lines of evidence indicating that Yih1 is in a complex with Cdc28. Yih1 pulls down endogenous Cdc28 in vivo and this interaction is enhanced when Cdc28 is active, suggesting that Yih1 modulates the function of Cdc28 in specific stages of the cell cycle. We also demonstrate, by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation, that endogenous Yih1 and Cdc28 interact with each other, confirming Yih1 as a bona fide Cdc28 binding partner. Amino acid substitutions within helix H2 of the RWD domain of Yih1 enhance Yih1-Cdc28 association. Overexpression of this mutant, but not of wild type Yih1, leads to a phenotype similar to that of YIH1 deletion, supporting the view that Yih1 is involved through Cdc28 in the regulation of the cell cycle. We further show that IMPACT, the mammalian homologue of Yih1, interacts with CDK1, the mammalian counterpart of Cdc28, indicating that the involvement with the cell cycle is conserved. Together, these data provide insights into the cellular function of Yih1/IMPACT, and provide the basis for future studies on the role of this protein in the cell cycle.

  3. Tousled-like kinase-dependent phosphorylation of Rad9 plays a role in cell cycle progression and G2/M checkpoint exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Kelly

    Full Text Available Genomic integrity is preserved by checkpoints, which act to delay cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA damage or replication stress. The heterotrimeric Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1 complex is a PCNA-like clamp that is loaded onto DNA at structures resulting from damage and is important for initiating and maintaining the checkpoint response. Rad9 possesses a C-terminal tail that is phosphorylated constitutively and in response to cell cycle position and DNA damage. Previous studies have identified tousled-like kinase 1 (TLK1 as a kinase that may modify Rad9. Here we show that Rad9 is phosphorylated in a TLK-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo, and that T355 within the C-terminal tail is the primary targeted residue. Phosphorylation of Rad9 at T355 is quickly reduced upon exposure to ionizing radiation before returning to baseline later in the damage response. We also show that TLK1 and Rad9 interact constitutively, and that this interaction is enhanced in chromatin-bound Rad9 at later stages of the damage response. Furthermore, we demonstrate via siRNA-mediated depletion that TLK1 is required for progression through S-phase in normally cycling cells, and that cells lacking TLK1 display a prolonged G2/M arrest upon exposure to ionizing radiation, a phenotype that is mimicked by over-expression of a Rad9-T355A mutant. Given that TLK1 has previously been shown to be transiently inactivated upon phosphorylation by Chk1 in response to DNA damage, we propose that TLK1 and Chk1 act in concert to modulate the phosphorylation status of Rad9, which in turn serves to regulate the DNA damage response.

  4. Inhibition of the oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 causes G2-M cell cycle arrest and enhanced vincristine sensitivity in Ewing's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, Stefan K; Selvanathan, Saravana P; Graham, Garrett T; Commins, Ryan M T; Hong, Sung Hyeok; Moseley, Eric; Parks, Sydney; Haladyna, Jessica N; Erkizan, Hayriye V; Dirksen, Uta; Hogarty, Michael D; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A

    2017-10-03

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a rare and highly malignant cancer that grows in the bones or surrounding tissues mostly affecting adolescents and young adults. A chimeric fusion between the RNA binding protein EWS and the ETS family transcription factor FLI1 (EWS-FLI1), which is generated from a chromosomal translocation, is implicated in driving most ES cases by modulation of transcription and alternative splicing. The small-molecule YK-4-279 inhibits EWS-FLI1 function and induces apoptosis in ES cells. We aimed to identify both the underlying mechanism of the drug and potential combination therapies that might enhance its antitumor activity. We tested 69 anticancer drugs in combination with YK-4-279 and found that vinca alkaloids exhibited synergy with YK-4-279 in five ES cell lines. The combination of YK-4-279 and vincristine reduced tumor burden and increased survival in mice bearing ES xenografts. We determined that independent drug-induced events converged to cause this synergistic therapeutic effect. YK-4-279 rapidly induced G 2 -M arrest, increased the abundance of cyclin B1, and decreased EWS-FLI1-mediated generation of microtubule-associated proteins, which rendered cells more susceptible to microtubule depolymerization by vincristine. YK-4-279 reduced the expression of the EWS-FLI1 target gene encoding the ubiquitin ligase UBE2C, which, in part, contributed to the increase in cyclin B1. YK-4-279 also increased the abundance of proapoptotic isoforms of MCL1 and BCL2, presumably through inhibition of alternative splicing by EWS-FLI1, thus promoting cell death in response to vincristine. Thus, a combination of vincristine and YK-4-279 might be therapeutically effective in ES patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. ANTITUMOR AND APOPTOTIC EFFECTS OF CUCURBITACIN A IN A-549 LUNG CARCINOMA CELLS IS MEDIATED VIA G2/M CELL CYCLE ARREST AND M-TOR/PI3K/AKT SIGNALLING PATHWAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Dong; Liu, Yan; Su, Yuan; Xiong, Xian-Zhi; Shang, Dan; Xu, Juan-Juan; Liu, Hong-Ju

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to demonstrate the antitumor potential of cucurbitacin A on A-549 NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer cells). The effects of Cucurbitacin A on apoptotic induction, cell physic, cell cycle failure and m-TOR/PI3K/Akt signalling pathway were also investigated in the present study. MTT assay and clonogenic assay were carried out to study effects of this compound on cell cytotoxicity and colony forming tendency in A-549 cells. Moreover, phase and fluorescence microscopic techniques were used to examine the effects on cell morphology and induction of apoptosis. The effects on cell cycle phase distribution were investigated by flow cytometry and effects on m-TOR/PI3K/Akt signalling proteins were assessed by western blot analysis. Results showed that cucurbitacin A induced dose-dependent cytotoxic effects along with suppressing the colony forming tendency in these cells. Cucurbitacin A also induced morphological changes in these cells featuring chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and apoptotic body formation. G2/M phase cell cycle collapse was also induced by Cucurbitacin A along with inhibition of expression levels of m-TOR/PI3K/Akt proteins. In conclusion, cucurbitacin A inhibits cancer growth in A-549 NSCLC cells by inducing apoptosis, targeting m-TOR/PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and G2/M cell cycle.

  6. Proteasome-mediated degradation of cell division cycle 25C and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 in phenethyl isothiocyanate-induced G2-M-phase cell cycle arrest in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Singh, Shivendra V

    2004-05-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a constituent of many cruciferous vegetables, offers significant protection against cancer in animals induced by a variety of carcinogens. The present study demonstrates that PEITC suppresses proliferation of PC-3 cells in a dose-dependent manner by causing G(2)-M-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Interestingly, phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC), which is a structural analogue of PEITC but lacks the -CH(2) spacers that link the aromatic ring to the -N=C=S group, neither inhibited PC-3 cell viability nor caused cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. These results indicated that even a subtle change in isothiocyanate (ITC) structure could have a significant impact on its biological activity. The PEITC-induced cell cycle arrest was associated with a >80% reduction in the protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C; 24 h after treatment with 10 micro M PEITC), which led to an accumulation of Tyr(15) phosphorylated (inactive) Cdk1. On the other hand, PITC treatment neither reduced protein levels of Cdk1 or Cdc25C nor affected Cdk1 phosphorylation. The PEITC-induced decline in Cdk1 and Cdc25C protein levels and cell cycle arrest were significantly blocked on pretreatment of PC-3 cells with proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. A 24 h exposure of PC-3 cells to 10 micro M PEITC, but not PITC, resulted in about 56% and 44% decrease in the levels of antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), respectively. However, ectopic expression of Bcl-2 failed to alter sensitivity of PC-3 cells to growth inhibition or apoptosis induction by PEITC. Treatment of cells with PEITC, but not PITC, also resulted in cleavage of procaspase-3, procaspase-9, and procaspase-8. Moreover, the PEITC-induced apoptosis was significantly attenuated in the presence of general caspase inhibitor and specific inhibitors of caspase-8 and caspase-9. In conclusion, our data indicate that PEITC-induced cell cycle arrest in PC-3 cells is likely due

  7. Glycoprotein 5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain SD16 inhibits viral replication and causes G2/M cell cycle arrest, but does not induce cellular apoptosis in Marc-145 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Yang; Li, Liangliang; Zhang, Beibei; Huang, Baicheng; Gao, Jiming

    2015-01-01

    Cell apoptosis is common after infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). PRRSV GP5 has been reported to induce cell apoptosis. To further understand the role of GP5 in PRRSV induced cell apoptosis, we established Marc-145 cell lines stably expressing full-length GP5, GP5 Δ84-96 (aa 84-96 deletion), and GP5 Δ97-119 (aa 97-119 deletion). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis and virus replication in these cell lines were evaluated. Neither truncated nor full-length GP5 induced cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells. However, GP5 Δ97-119 , but not full-length or GP5 Δ84-96 , induced a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase resulting in a reduction in the growth of Marc-145 cells. Additionally, GP5 Δ84-96 inhibited the replication of PRRSV in Marc-145 cells through induction of IFN-β. These findings suggest that PRRSV GP5 is not responsible for inducing cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells under these experimental conditions; however it has other important roles in virus/host cell biology. - Highlights: • Marc-145 cell lines stable expression PRRSV GP5 or truncated GP5 were constructed. • GP5 Δ97-119 expression in Marc-145 cell induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. • Expression of GP5 and truncated GP5 could not induce Marc-145 cells apoptosis. • PRRSV replication in Marc-145-GP5 Δ84-96 was significantly inhibited

  8. Fisetin induces G2/M phase cell cycle arrest by inactivating cdc25C-cdc2 via ATM-Chk1/2 activation in human endometrial cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Ying Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is one of the most prevalent gynaecological malignancies where, currently available therapeutic options remain limited. Recently phytochemicals are exploited for their efficiency in cancer therapy. The present study investigates the anti-proliferative effect of fisetin, a flavonoid on human endometrial cancer cells (KLE and Hec1 A. Fisetin (20-100 µM effectively reduced the viability of Hec1 A and KLE cells and potentially altered the cell population at G2/M stage. Expression levels of the cell cycle proteins (cyclin B1, p-Cdc2, p-Cdc25C, p-Chk1, Chk2, p-ATM, cyclin B1, H2AX, p21 and p27 were analyzed. Fisetin suppressed cyclin B1 expression and caused inactiva-tion of Cdc25C and Cdc2 by increasing their phosphorylation levels and further activated ATM, Chk1 and Chk2. Increased levels of p21 and p27 were observed as well. These results suggest that fisetin induced G2/M cell cycle arrest via inactivating Cdc25c and Cdc2 through activation of ATM, Chk1 and Chk2.

  9. The indolinone MAZ51 induces cell rounding and G2/M cell cycle arrest in glioma cells without the inhibition of VEGFR-3 phosphorylation: involvement of the RhoA and Akt/GSK3β signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Hee Park

    Full Text Available MAZ51 is an indolinone-based molecule originally synthesized as a selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-3 tyrosine kinase. This study shows that exposure of two glioma cell lines, rat C6 and human U251MG, to MAZ51 caused dramatic shape changes, including the retraction of cellular protrusions and cell rounding. These changes were caused by the clustering and aggregation of actin filaments and microtubules. MAZ51 also induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. This led to an inhibition of cellular proliferation, without triggering significant cell death. These alterations induced by MAZ51 occurred with similar dose- and time-dependent patterns. Treatment of glioma cells with MAZ51 resulted in increased levels of phosphorylated GSK3β through the activation of Akt, as well as increased levels of active RhoA. Interestingly, MAZ51 did not affect the morphology and cell cycle patterns of rat primary cortical astrocytes, suggesting it selectively targeted transformed cells. Immunoprecipitation-western blot analyses indicated that MAZ51 did not decrease, but rather increased, tyrosine phosphorylation of VEGFR-3. To confirm this unanticipated result, several additional experiments were conducted. Enhancing VEGFR-3 phosphorylation by treatment of glioma cells with VEGF-C affected neither cytoskeleton arrangements nor cell cycle patterns. In addition, the knockdown of VEGFR-3 in glioma cells did not cause morphological or cytoskeletal alterations. Furthermore, treatment of VEGFR-3-silenced cells with MAZ51 caused the same alterations of cell shape and cytoskeletal arrangements as that observed in control cells. These data indicate that MAZ51 causes cytoskeletal alterations and G2/M cell cycle arrest in glioma cells. These effects are mediated through phosphorylation of Akt/GSK3β and activation of RhoA. The anti-proliferative activity of MAZ51 does not require the inhibition of VEGFR-3 phosphorylation, suggesting that it is

  10. 12-Chloracetyl-PPD, a novel dammarane derivative, shows anti-cancer activity via delay the progression of cell cycle G2/M phase and reactive oxygen species-mediate cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu De; Sun, Yuan Yuan; Zhao, Chen; Qu, Fan Zhi; Zhao, Yu Qing

    2017-03-05

    (20R)-Dammarane-3β, 12β, 20, 25-tetrol (25-OH-PPD) is a ginsenoside isolated from Panax ginseng (C. A. Meyer). This compound exhibits anti-cancer activities on many human cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated anti-cancer mechanisms of 12β-O-( L -Chloracetyl)-dammar-20(22)-ene-3β,25-diol(12-Chloracetyl-PPD), a modified 25-OH-PPD. We found that compound 12-Chloracetyl-PPD resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of viability in prostate, breast, and gastric cancer cells, without affecting the viability of normal cell (human gastric epithelial cell line-GES-1, hair follicle dermal papilla cell line-HHDPC and rat myocardial cell line-H9C2). In MDA-MB-435 and C4-2B cancer cells, 12-Chloracetyl-PPD induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, down-regulated mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) expression, up-regulated p53 expression, triggered apoptosis, and stimulated reactive oxygen species production. Apoptosis can be attenuated by the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Our results suggested that compound 12-Chloracetyl-PPD showed obvious anti-cancer activity based on delaying cell cycle arrest and inducing cell apoptosis by reactive oxygen species production, which supported development of 12-Chloracetyl-PPD as a potential agent for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. TNF-alpha impairs the S-G2/M cell cycle checkpoint and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair in premalignant skin cells: Role of the PI3K-Akt pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Gniadecki, R.; Calay, D.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is induced by UVB radiation and has been implicated in the early stages of skin carcinogenesis. Here, we show that in normal keratinocytes and the transformed keratinocyte cell lines, HaCaT and A431, TNF-alpha stimulates protein kinase B/Akt, which results...... cycling. TNF-alpha enhanced apoptosis less potently and did not increase the level of CPD or stimulate cell cycle progression in normal keratinocytes. Our data suggest that TNF-alpha overrides the G2/M checkpoint in premalignant skin cells and allows for some cells containing unrepaired CPD to enter...... in activation of the survival complex mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) and inhibition of the proapoptotic proteins Bad and Fox03a. In UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells (10-20 mJ cm(-2)), TNF-alpha increased the proportion of cycling cells and enhanced the rate of apoptosis. A significantly higher...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Lpl Lipoproteins Delay G2/M Phase Transition in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Deplanche, Martine; Nega, Mulugeta; Le Loir, Yves; Peisl, Loulou; Götz, Friedrich; Berkova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is an ordered set of events, leading to cell growth and division into two daughter cells. The eukaryotic cell cycle consists of interphase (G 1 , S, and G 2 phases), followed by the mitotic phase and G 0 phase. Many bacterial pathogens secrete cyclomodulins that interfere with the host cell cycle. In Staphylococcus aureus four cyclomodulins have been described so far that all represent toxins and are secreted into the culture supernatant. Here we show that the membrane-anchored lipoprotein-like proteins (Lpl), encoded on a genomic island called νSaα, interact with the cell cycle of HeLa cells. By comparing wild type and lpl deletion mutant it turned out that the lpl cluster is causative for the G2/M phase transition delay and also contributes to increased invasion frequency. The lipoprotein Lpl1, a representative of the lpl cluster, also caused G2/M phase transition delay. Interestingly, the lipid modification, which is essential for TLR2 signaling and activation of the immune system, is not necessary for cyclomodulin activity. Unlike the other staphylococcal cyclomodulins Lpl1 shows no cytotoxicity even at high concentrations. As all Lpl proteins are highly conserved there might be a common function that is accentuated by their multiplicity in a tandem gene cluster. The cell surface localized Lpls' suggests a correlation between G2/M phase transition delay and host cell invasion.

  13. Effects on g2/m phase cell cycle distribution and aneuploidy formation of exposure to a 60 Hz electromagnetic field in combination with ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide in l132 nontumorigenic human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Yoon, Hye Eun; Lee, Jae-Seon; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Myung, Sung Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether exposure to the combination of an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF; 60 Hz, 1 mT or 2 mT) with a stress factor, such as ionizing radiation (IR) or H2O2, results in genomic instability in non-tumorigenic human lung epithelial L132 cells. To this end, the percentages of G2/M-arrested cells and aneuploid cells were examined. Exposure to 0.5 Gy IR or 0.05 mM H2O2 for 9 h resulted in the highest levels of aneuploidy; however, no cells were observed in the subG1 phase, which indicated the absence of apoptotic cell death. Exposure to an ELF-MF alone (1 mT or 2 mT) did not affect the percentages of G2/M-arrested cells, aneuploid cells, or the populations of cells in the subG1 phase. Moreover, when cells were exposed to a 1 mT or 2 mT ELF-MF in combination with IR (0.5 Gy) or H2O2 (0.05 mM), the ELF-MF did not further increase the percentages of G2/M-arrested cells or aneuploid cells. These results suggest that ELF-MFs alone do not induce either G2/M arrest or aneuploidy, even when administered in combination with different stressors.

  14. Ziyuglycoside I Inhibits the Proliferation of MDA-MB-231 Breast Carcinoma Cells through Inducing p53-Mediated G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Intrinsic/Extrinsic Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Ting; Yin, Yongxiang; Xu, Fei

    2016-11-22

    Due to the aggressive clinical behavior, poor outcome, and lack of effective specific targeted therapies, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has currently been recognized as one of the most malignant types of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of ziyuglycoside I, one of the major components extracted from Chinese anti-tumor herbal Radix Sanguisorbae , on the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231. The underlying molecular mechanism of the cytotoxic effect ziyuglycoside I on MDA-MB-231 cells was investigated with cell viability assay, flow cytometric analysis and Western blot. Compared to normal mammary gland Hs 578Bst cells, treatment of ziyuglycoside I resulted in a significant growth inhibitory effect on MDA-MB-231 cells. Ziyuglycoside I induced the G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were found to be partially mediated through the up-regulation of p53 and p21 WAF1 , elevated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and the activation of both intrinsic (mitochondrial-initiated) and extrinsic (Fas/FasL-initiated) apoptotic pathways. Furthermore, the p53 specific siRNA attenuated these effects. Our study suggested that ziyuglycoside I-triggered MDA-MB-231 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were probably mediated by p53. This suggests that ziyuglycoside I might be a potential drug candidate for treating TNBC.

  15. NFBD1/MDC1 participates in the regulation of G2/M transition in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bu, Youquan; Suenaga, Yusuke; Okoshi, Rintaro; Sang, Meixiang; Kubo, Natsumi; Song, Fangzhou; Nakagawara, Akira; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2010-01-01

    NFBD1/MDC1 is a large nuclear protein involved in the early cellular response to DNA damage. Upon DNA damage, NFBD1 has an ability to facilitate the efficient DNA repair. In the present study, we have found that, in addition to DNA damage response, NFBD1 plays a critical role in the regulation of G2/M transition. Expression study using synchronized HeLa cells demonstrated that, like the mitotic kinase Plk1, NFBD1 expression level is maximal in G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFBD1 resulted in G2/M arrest as well as simultaneous apoptosis in association with a significant increase in the amounts of γH2AX and pro-apoptotic p73. Since a remarkable down-regulation of mitotic phospho-histone H3 was detectable in NFBD1-knocked down cells, it is likely that knocking down of NFBD1 inhibits G2/M transition. Taken together, our present findings suggest that NFBD1 has a pivotal role in the regulation of proper mitotic entry.

  16. Cells bearing chromosome aberrations lacking one telomere are selectively blocked at the G2/M checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Pilar [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Barquinero, Joan Francesc [Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Duran, Assumpta [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Caballin, Maria Rosa [Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de Radiofisica i Radioproteccio de l' Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Barrios, Leonardo, E-mail: Lleonard.Barrios@uab.cat [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2009-11-02

    Cell cycle checkpoints are part of the cellular mechanisms to maintain genomic integrity. After ionizing radiation exposure, the cells can show delay or arrest in their progression through the cell cycle, as well as an activation of the DNA repair machinery in order to reduce the damage. The G2/M checkpoint prevents G2 cells entering mitosis until the DNA damage has been reduced. The present study evaluates which G0 radiation-induced chromosome aberrations are negatively selected in the G2/M checkpoint. For this purpose, peripheral blood samples were irradiated at 1 and 3 Gy of {gamma}-rays, and lymphocytes were cultured for 48 h. Calyculin-A and Colcemid were used to analyze, in the same slide, cells in G2 and M. Chromosome spreads were consecutively analyzed by solid stain, pancentromeric and pantelomeric FISH and mFISH. The results show that the frequency of incomplete chromosome elements, those lacking a telomeric signal at one end, decreases abruptly from G2 to M. This indicates that cells with incomplete chromosome elements can progress from G0 to G2, but at the G2/M checkpoint suffer a strong negative selection.

  17. Cells bearing chromosome aberrations lacking one telomere are selectively blocked at the G2/M checkpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Pilar; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Duran, Assumpta; Caballin, Maria Rosa; Ribas, Montserrat; Barrios, Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are part of the cellular mechanisms to maintain genomic integrity. After ionizing radiation exposure, the cells can show delay or arrest in their progression through the cell cycle, as well as an activation of the DNA repair machinery in order to reduce the damage. The G2/M checkpoint prevents G2 cells entering mitosis until the DNA damage has been reduced. The present study evaluates which G0 radiation-induced chromosome aberrations are negatively selected in the G2/M checkpoint. For this purpose, peripheral blood samples were irradiated at 1 and 3 Gy of γ-rays, and lymphocytes were cultured for 48 h. Calyculin-A and Colcemid were used to analyze, in the same slide, cells in G2 and M. Chromosome spreads were consecutively analyzed by solid stain, pancentromeric and pantelomeric FISH and mFISH. The results show that the frequency of incomplete chromosome elements, those lacking a telomeric signal at one end, decreases abruptly from G2 to M. This indicates that cells with incomplete chromosome elements can progress from G0 to G2, but at the G2/M checkpoint suffer a strong negative selection.

  18. G2M arrest and apoptosis in murine T lymphoma cells following exposure to 212Bi alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palayoor, S.T.; Humm, J.L.; Macklis, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Asynchronous exponentially growing EL4 murine T lymphoma cells were exposed either to high LET α-radiation from 212 Bi-DTPA or to γ-radiation from a 137 Cs source. Radiation-induced cell cycle perturbation was studied by flow cytometry. Alpha irradiation, like γ, transiently arrested cells in the G2M phase in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum percentages of cells accumulated in G2M 18 h after α- and γ-irradiation were comparable, though the dose-response relationships differed. The ''RBE'' value for G2M block for α- versus γ-radiation was approx. 4. (author)

  19. The chalcone flavokawain B induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human oral carcinoma HSC-3 cells through the intracellular ROS generation and downregulation of the Akt/p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Wu, Chi-Rei; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Lai, Guan-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Kumar, K J Senthil; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2012-03-07

    Chalcones have been described to represent cancer chemopreventive food components that are rich in fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the anti-oral cancer effect of flavokawain B (FKB), a naturally occurring chalcone isolated from Alpinia pricei (shell gingers), and revealed its molecular mechanism of action. Treatment of human oral carcinoma (HSC-3) cells with FKB (1.25-10 μg/mL; 4.4-35.2 μM) inhibited cell viability and caused G(2)/M arrest through reductions in cyclin A/B1, Cdc2, and Cdc25C levels. Moreover, FKB treatment resulted in the induction of apoptosis, which was associated with DNA fragmentation, mitochondria dysfunction, cytochrome c and AIF release, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2/Bax dysregulation. Furthermore, increased Fas activity and procaspase-8, procaspase-4, and procaspase-12 cleavages were accompanied by death receptor and ER-stress, indicating the involvement of mitochondria, death-receptor, and ER-stress signaling pathways. FKB induces apoptosis through ROS generation as evidenced by the upregulation of oxidative-stress markers HO-1/Nrf2. This mechanism was further confirmed by the finding that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly blocked ROS generation and consequently inhibited FKB-induced apoptosis. Moreover, FKB downregulated the phosphorylation of Akt and p38 MAPK, while their inhibitors LY294002 and SB203580, respectively, induced G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis. The profound reduction in cell number was observed in combination treatment with FKB and Akt/p38 MAPK inhibitors, indicating that the disruption of Akt and p38 MAPK cascades plays a functional role in FKB-induced G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis in HSC-3 cells.

  20. Sinularin Selectively Kills Breast Cancer Cells Showing G2/M Arrest, Apoptosis, and Oxidative DNA Damage

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    Hurng-Wern Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The natural compound sinularin, isolated from marine soft corals, is antiproliferative against several cancers, but its possible selective killing effect has rarely been investigated. This study investigates the selective killing potential and mechanisms of sinularin-treated breast cancer cells. In 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H- tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS assay, sinularin dose-responsively decreased the cell viability of two breast cancer (SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells, but showed less effect on breast normal (M10 cells after a 24 h treatment. According to 7-aminoactinomycin D (7AAD flow cytometry, sinularin dose-responsively induced the G2/M cycle arrest of SKBR3 cells. Sinularin dose-responsively induced apoptosis on SKBR3 cells in terms of a flow cytometry-based annexin V/7AAD assay and pancaspase activity, as well as Western blotting for cleaved forms of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, caspases 3, 8, and 9. These caspases and PARP activations were suppressed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC pretreatment. Moreover, sinularin dose-responsively induced oxidative stress and DNA damage according to flow cytometry analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential (MitoMP, mitochondrial superoxide, and 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG. In conclusion, sinularin induces selective killing, G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and oxidative DNA damage of breast cancer cells.

  1. A Benzothiazole Derivative (5g) Induces DNA Damage And Potent G2/M Arrest In Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Mahesh; Vartak, Supriya V; Kavitha, Chandagirikoppal V; Ananda, Hanumappa; Prasanna, Doddakunche S; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Choudhary, Bibha; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2017-05-31

    Chemically synthesized small molecules play important role in anticancer therapy. Several chemical compounds have been reported to damage the DNA, either directly or indirectly slowing down the cancer cell progression by causing a cell cycle arrest. Direct or indirect reactive oxygen species formation causes DNA damage leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent cell death. Therefore, identification of chemically synthesized compounds with anticancer potential is important. Here we investigate the effect of benzothiazole derivative (5g) for its ability to inhibit cell proliferation in different cancer models. Interestingly, 5g interfered with cell proliferation in both, cell lines and tumor cells leading to significant G2/M arrest. 5g treatment resulted in elevated levels of ROS and subsequently, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) explaining observed G2/M arrest. Consistently, we observed deregulation of many cell cycle associated proteins such as CDK1, BCL2 and their phosphorylated form, CyclinB1, CDC25c etc. Besides, 5g treatment led to decreased levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of apoptosis. Interestingly, 5g administration inhibited tumor growth in mice without significant side effects. Thus, our study identifies 5g as a potent biochemical inhibitor to induce G2/M phase arrest of the cell cycle, and demonstrates its anticancer properties both ex vivo and in vivo.

  2. Disorder of G2-M Checkpoint Control in Aniline-Induced Cell Proliferation in Rat Spleen.

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    Jianling Wang

    Full Text Available Aniline, a toxic aromatic amine, is known to cause hemopoietic toxicity both in humans and animals. Aniline exposure also leads to toxic response in spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and the eventual formation of tumors on chronic in vivo exposure. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative DNA damage, and increased cell proliferation, which could eventually contribute to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. Despite our demonstration that cell proliferation was associated with deregulation of G1 phase cyclins and increased expression of G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, molecular mechanisms, especially the regulation of G2 phase and contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in aniline-induced splenic cellular proliferation remain largely unclear. This study therefore, mainly focused on the regulation of G2 phase in an animal model preceding a tumorigenic response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day in drinking water or drinking water only (controls for 30 days, and expression of G2 phase cyclins, CDK1, CDK inhibitors and miRNAs were measured in the spleen. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in cell cycle regulatory proteins, including cyclins A, B and CDK1, particularly phosphor-CDK1, and decreases in CDK inhibitors p21 and p27, which could promote the splenocytes to go through G2/M transition. Our data also showed upregulation of tumor markers Trx-1 and Ref-1 in rats treated with aniline. More importantly, we observed lower expression of miRNAs including Let-7a, miR-15b, miR24, miR-100 and miR-125, and greater expression of CDK inhibitor regulatory miRNAs such as miR-181a, miR-221 and miR-222 in the spleens of aniline-treated animals. Our findings suggest that significant increases in the expression of cyclins, CDK1 and aberrant regulation of miRNAs could lead to an accelerated G2/M transition of the splenocytes, and

  3. Zeatin is indispensable for the G2-M transition in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureys, F; Dewitte, W; Witters, E; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Van Onckelen, H

    1998-04-10

    The importance of N6-isoprenoid cytokinins in the G2-M transition of Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cells was investigated. Both cytokinin biosynthesis and entry in mitosis were partially blocked by application at early or late G2 of lovastatin (10 microM), an inhibitor of mevalonic acid synthesis. LC-MS/MS quantification of endogenous cytokinins proved that lovastatin affects cytokinin biosynthesis by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase. Out of eight different aminopurines and a synthetic auxin tested for their ability to override lovastatin inhibition of mitosis, only zeatin was active. Our data point to a key role for a well-defined cytokinin (here, zeatin) in the G2-M transition of tobacco BY-2 cells.

  4. Chromosomal instability and the abrogated G2/M arrest in x-irradiated myelodysplastic syndrome cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, S.; Sudo, H.; Saegusa, K.; Sagara, M.; Imai, T.; Kimura, A.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary epidemiological study demonstrated that myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) has an excess relative risk per sievert of 13 in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima. MDS is the only other radiogenic blood disease apart from leukemia. Clinically, MDS involves dysplastic hematopoiesis and an increased risk of leukemic transformation. Because it is uncertain whether MDS pathogenesis affects lymphoid progenitor cells as well as myeloid progenitor cells, we investigated the karyotypes of bone marrow cells and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in peripheral T lymphocytes of twenty- three atomic bomb survivors with MDS and five normal individuals. Aneuploidy was observed in 10 of 23 patients. Chromosome aberrations were observed in 3 of 12 patients with mild symptoms, and six of 11 patients of severe symptoms. The spontaneous- and X-ray-induced-MN frequencies were significantly higher in MDS patients than in normal individuals. Interestingly, radiation sensitivity increased along with the severity of MDS clinical subtypes. Because many of the patients in this study had not been exposed to chemo- or radiation- therapy, their unusual radiosensitivity may be related to their chromosomal or genomic instability. Immortalized lymphoid cell lines were established from B-lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus in vitro. The abrogation of radiation-induced-G2/M arrest was observed in 10 of 12 MDS-B lymphoid cell lines, but not in the normal B lymphoid cell lines. Our data suggest that the control of chromosomal stability is impaired in pluripotent stem cells of MDS patients, and that the abrogated G2/M arrest may be involved in the pathophysiology of disease progression and the high radiation sensitivity of patients

  5. Methyl Sartortuoate Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Inducing Apoptosis and G2/M-Phase Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Qiusheng; Li, Shoufeng; Lai, Wei; Xu, Heyang; Zhang, Yang; Zeng, Yujie; Lan, Wenjian; Chu, Zhonghua

    2015-08-17

    The potential anti-neoplastic activity of terpenoids is of continued interest. In this study, we investigate whether methyl sartortuoate, a terpenoid isolated from soft coral, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a human colon cancer cell line. Culture studies found that methyl sartortuoate inhibited colon cancer cell (LoVo and RKO) growth and caused apoptotic death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, by activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, p53 and Bax, and inactivation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) apoptosis regulating proteins. Methyl sartortuoate treatment led to reduced expression of cdc2 and up-regulated p21 and p53, suggesting that Methyl sartortuoate induced G2-M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/cdc2 pathways. Methyl sartortuoate also up-regulated phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 expression levels. This resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2-M phase and apoptosis in LoVo and RKO cells. Treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented methyl sartortuoate-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. Moreover, methyl sartortuoate also prevented neoplasm growth in NOD-SCID nude mice inoculated with LoVo cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that methyl sartortuoate is capable of leading to activation of caspase-8, -9, -3, increasing p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio apoptosis through MAPK-dependent apoptosis and results in G2-M phase arrest in LoVo and RKO cells. Thus, methyl sartortuoate may be a promising anticancer candidate.

  6. Asperlin induces G2/M arrest through ROS generation and ATM pathway in human cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Long; Nan, Mei-Hua; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Young Ho; Jang, Jae Hyuk; Erikson, Raymond Leo; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Bo Yeon

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new anti-cancer effect of an antibiotics, asperlin, is exploited. → Asperlin induced human cervical cancer cell apoptosis through ROS generation. → Asperlin activated DNA-damage related ATM protein and cell cycle associated proteins. → Asperlin could be developed as a new anti-cancer therapeutics. -- Abstract: We exploited the biological activity of an antibiotic agent asperlin isolated from Aspergillus nidulans against human cervical carcinoma cells. We found that asperlin dramatically increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation accompanied by a significant reduction in cell proliferation. Cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and reduction of Bcl-2 could also be detected after asperlin treatment to the cells. An anti-oxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), however, blocked all the apoptotic effects of asperlin. The involvement of oxidative stress in asperlin induced apoptosis could be supported by the findings that ROS- and DNA damage-associated G2/M phase arrest and ATM phosphorylation were increased by asperlin. In addition, expression and phosphorylation of cell cycle proteins as well as G2/M phase arrest in response to asperlin were significantly blocked by NAC or an ATM inhibitor KU-55933 pretreatment. Collectively, our study proved for the first time that asperlin could be developed as a potential anti-cancer therapeutics through ROS generation in HeLa cells.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus-induced G2/M phase transition delay in host epithelial cells increases bacterial infective efficiency.

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    Ludmila Alekseeva

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration.

  8. [Pseudolaric acid B induces G2/M arrest and inhibits invasion and migration in HepG2 hepatoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Guo, Lianyi

    2018-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanisms of pseudolaric acid B (PAB) blocks cell cycle and inhibits invasion and migration in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Methods The proliferation effect of PAB on HepG2 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. The effect of PAB on the cell cycle of HepG2 cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescence cytochemical staining was applied to observe the effect of PAB on the α-tubulin polymerization and expression in HepG2 cells. Transwell TM chamber invasion assay and wound healing assay were performed to detect the influence of PAB on the migration and invasion ability of HepG2 cells. Western blotting was used to determine the expressions of α-tubulin, E-cadherin and MMP-9 in HepG2 cells after treated with PAB. Results PAB inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner and blocked the cell cycle in G2/M phase. PAB significantly changed the polymerization and decreased the expression of α-tubulin. The capacities of invasion and migration of HepG2 cells treated by PAB were significantly depressed. The protein levels of α-tubulin and MMP-9 decreased while the E-cadherin protein level increased. Conclusion PAB can inhibits the proliferation of HepG2 cells by down-regulating the expression of α-tubulin and influencing its polymerization, arresting HepG2 cells in G2/M phase. Meanwhile, PAB also can inhibit the invasion and migration of HepG2 cells by lowering cytoskeleton α-tubulin and MMP-9, and increasing E-cadherin.

  9. N,N'-di-(m-methylphenyi)-3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydro-1,2,4,5-tetrazine-1,4-dicarboamide (ZGDHu-1) suppresses the proliferation of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells via apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Feng; Xia, Jun; Lv, Ya-Ping; Liu, Jin-Lin; Li, Wan-Xiang; Yu, Xi-Ping; Hu, Wei-Xiao; Zhou, Yong-Lie

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the human gastrointestinal malignancies with a high mortality and poor prognosis. Approximately eighty percent of patients are diagnosed with unresectable or metastatic disease. Thus, development of novel chemicals in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is imperative. This study aimed to investigate the anticancer effects of N,N'-di-(m-methylphenyi)-3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydro-1,2,4,5-tetrazine-1,4-dicarboamide (ZGDHu-1), a new tetrazine derivative, on the PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell line and clarify the underlying molecular mechanism. Using an MTT assay, we found that ZGDHu-1 significantly suppressed the proliferation of PANC-1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, according to the morphological and flow cytometric analysis, the results indicated that ZGDHu-1 induced PANC-1 cell apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. In the western blot analysis, expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax gene was upregulated while the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene was downregulated following treatment with ZGDHu-1. ZGDHu-1 also activated pro-caspase-3 and PARP and increased the expression of NF-κB inhibitor IκB. Furthermore, the expression levels of G2/M regulatory molecules such as cyclin B1 and cdc2 were decreased while that of Chk1 was increased. These results suggested that ZGDHu-1 suppressed the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells, rendering it a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G2/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to 137 Cs γ irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of γ radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G 2 /M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G 2 /M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G 2 /M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G 2 /M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G 2 /M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs

  11. Different G2/M accumulation in M059J and M059K cells after exposure to DNA double-strand break-inducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holgersson, Asa; Heiden, Thomas; Castro, Juan; Edgren, Margareta R.; Lewensohn, Rolf; Meijer, Annelie E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate and compare the cell cycle progression in relation to cell death in the human glioma cell lines, M059J and M059K, after exposure to DNA double-strand break-inducing agents. Methods and materials: The M059J and M059K cells, deficient and proficient in the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase, respectively, were exposed to 1 and 4 Gy of photons or accelerated nitrogen ions. In addition, M059J and M059K cells were treated with 10 and 40 μg/mL of bleomycin for 30 min, respectively. Cell cycle progression, monitored by DNA flow cytometry, was measured up to 72 h after treatment. Results: M059J, but not M059K, cells displayed G 2 /M accumulation after low linear energy transfer irradiation. High linear energy transfer radiation exposure however, resulted in a substantial increase of M059K cells in the G 2 /M phase detected at 48 h. At 72 h, the number of cells in the G 2 /M phase was equivalent to its control. M059J cells accumulated mainly in S phase after high linear energy transfer irradiation. In contrast to M059K, M059J cells were still blocked at 72 h. Bleomycin induced G 2 /M accumulation for both M059J and M059K cells detected 24 h after treatment. At 48 h, the percentage of bleomycin-treated M059J cells in G 2 /M phase remained high, and the number of M059K cells had decreased to control levels. Neither cell line showed cell cycle arrest (≤10 h) after exposure to these agents. Conclusion: Distinct cell cycle block and release is dependent on the complexity of the induced DNA damage and the presence of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit

  12. MyoD undergoes a distinct G2/M-specific regulation in muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batonnet-Pichon, Sabrina; Tintignac, Lionel J.; Castro, Anna; Sirri, Valentina; Leibovitch, Marie Pierre; Lorca, Thierry; Leibovitch, Serge A.

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factors MyoD and Myf5 present distinct patterns of expression during cell cycle progression and development. In contrast to the mitosis-specific disappearance of Myf5, which requires a D-box-like motif overlapping the basic domain, here we describe a stable and inactive mitotic form of MyoD phosphorylated on its serine 5 and serine 200 residues by cyclin B-cdc2. In mitosis, these modifications are required for releasing MyoD from condensed chromosomes and inhibiting its DNA-binding and transcriptional activation ability. Then, nuclear MyoD regains instability in the beginning of G1 phase due to rapid dephosphorylation events. Moreover, a non-phosphorylable MyoD S5A/S200A is not excluded from condensed chromatin and alters mitotic progression with apparent abnormalities. Thus, the drop of MyoD below a threshold level and its displacement from the mitotic chromatin could present another window in the cell cycle for resetting the myogenic transcriptional program and to maintain the myogenic determination of the proliferating cells

  13. MyoD undergoes a distinct G2/M-specific regulation in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batonnet-Pichon, Sabrina; Tintignac, Lionel J; Castro, Anna; Sirri, Valentina; Leibovitch, Marie Pierre; Lorca, Thierry; Leibovitch, Serge A

    2006-12-10

    The transcription factors MyoD and Myf5 present distinct patterns of expression during cell cycle progression and development. In contrast to the mitosis-specific disappearance of Myf5, which requires a D-box-like motif overlapping the basic domain, here we describe a stable and inactive mitotic form of MyoD phosphorylated on its serine 5 and serine 200 residues by cyclin B-cdc2. In mitosis, these modifications are required for releasing MyoD from condensed chromosomes and inhibiting its DNA-binding and transcriptional activation ability. Then, nuclear MyoD regains instability in the beginning of G1 phase due to rapid dephosphorylation events. Moreover, a non-phosphorylable MyoD S5A/S200A is not excluded from condensed chromatin and alters mitotic progression with apparent abnormalities. Thus, the drop of MyoD below a threshold level and its displacement from the mitotic chromatin could present another window in the cell cycle for resetting the myogenic transcriptional program and to maintain the myogenic determination of the proliferating cells.

  14. A Subpopulation of the K562 Cells Are Killed by Curcumin Treatment after G2/M Arrest and Mitotic Catastrophe.

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    Macario Martinez-Castillo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is extensively investigated as a good chemo-preventive agent in the development of many cancers and particularly in leukemia, including treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and it has been proposed as an adjuvant for leukemia therapies. Human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562, were treated with 20 μM of curcumin, and we found that a subpopulation of these cells were arrested and accumulate in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Characterization of this cell subpopulation showed that the arrested cells presented nuclear morphology changes resembling those described for mitotic catastrophe. Mitotic cells displayed abnormal chromatin organization, collapse of the mitotic spindle and abnormal chromosome segregation. Then, these cells died in an apoptosis dependent manner and showed diminution in the protein levels of BCL-2 and XIAP. Moreover, our results shown that a transient activation of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB occurred early in these cells, but decreased after 6 h of the treatment, explaining in part the diminution of the anti-apoptotic proteins. Additionally, P73 was translocated to the cell nuclei, because the expression of the C/EBPα, a cognate repressor of the P73 gene, was decreased, suggesting that apoptosis is trigger by elevation of P73 protein levels acting in concert with the diminution of the two anti-apoptotic molecules. In summary, curcumin treatment might produce a P73-dependent apoptotic cell death in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells (K562, which was triggered by mitotic catastrophe, due to sustained BAX and survivin expression and impairment of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and XIAP.

  15. Flavokawain derivative FLS induced G2/M arrest and apoptosis on breast cancer MCF-7 cell line

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    Ali NM

    2016-06-01

    arrest within 24 hours and apoptosis at subsequent time point was discovered via flow cytometry analysis. The roles of PLK-1, Wee-1, and phosphorylation of CDC-2 in G2/M arrest and proapoptotic factors (Bax, caspase 9, and p53 in promotion of apoptosis of FLS against MCF-7 cell were discovered using fluorometric, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis. Interestingly, the presence of SCH3 (thiomethyl group on ring B structure contributed to the selective cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cell compared to other chalcones, flavokawain A and B. Overall, our data suggest potential therapeutic value for flavokawain derivative FLS to be further developed as new anticancer drug. Keywords: (E-1-(2'-Hydroxy-4',6'-dimethoxyphenyl-3-(4-methylthiophenylprop-2-ene-1-one (FLS, MCF-7, G2/M arrest, apoptosis, cell cycle, PLK-1, p53, caspase

  16. Sulforaphane Induces Cell Death Through G2/M Phase Arrest and Triggers Apoptosis in HCT 116 Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Ching; Shih, Ting-Ying; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Ma, Yi-Shih; Yang, Jiun-Long; Wu, Ping-Ping; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate, exists exclusively in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to possess potent antitumor and chemopreventive activity. However, there is no available information that shows SFN affecting human colon cancer HCT 116 cells. In the present study, we found that SFN induced cell morphological changes, which were photographed by contrast-phase microscopy, and decreased viability. SFN also induced G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis in HCT 116 cells, which were measured with flow cytometric assays. Western blotting indicated that SFN increased Cyclin A, cdk 2, Cyclin B and WEE1, but decreased Cdc 25C, cdk1 protein expressions that led to G2/M phase arrest. Apoptotic cell death was also confirmed by Annexin V/PI and DAPI staining and DNA gel electrophoresis in HCT 116 cells after exposure to SFN. The flow cytometric assay also showed that SFN induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca[Formula: see text] and decreased mitochondria membrane potential and increased caspase-8, -9 and -3 activities in HCT 116 cell. Western blotting also showed that SFN induced the release of cytochrome c, and AIF, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy examination. SFN induced ER stress-associated protein expression. Based on those observations, we suggest that SFN may be used as a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of human colon cancer in the future.

  17. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Isothiocyanate, Induces G2/M Arrest in Cervical Cancer Cells through CyclinB1 Downregulation and GADD45β/CDC2 Association

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    Ya-Min Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, cervical cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The main treatment methods for this type of cancer include conization or hysterectomy procedures. Sulforaphane (SFN is a natural, compound-based drug derived from dietary isothiocyanates which has previously been shown to possess potent anti-tumor and chemopreventive effects against several types of cancer. The present study investigated the effects of SFN on anti-proliferation and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cell lines (Cx, CxWJ, and HeLa. We found that cytotoxicity is associated with an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phases of the cell-cycle. Treatment with SFN led to cell cycle arrest as well as the down-regulation of Cyclin B1 expression, but not of CDC2 expression. In addition, the effects of GADD45β gene activation in cell cycle arrest increase proportionally with the dose of SFN; however, mitotic delay and the inhibition of proliferation both depend on the dosage of SFN used to treat cancer cells. These results indicate that SFN may delay the development of cancer by arresting cell growth in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cyclin B1 gene expression, dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex, and up-regulation of GADD45β proteins.

  18. (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G2/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhães, Hemerson I.F.; Wilke, Diego V.; Bezerra, Daniel P.; Cavalcanti, Bruno C.; Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson; Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo; Pessoa, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC 50 values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G 2 /M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis

  19. Toxic effect of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells through DNA damage response via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Duan

    Full Text Available Silica nanoparticles have become promising carriers for drug delivery or gene therapy. Endothelial cells could be directly exposed to silica nanoparticles by intravenous administration. However, the underlying toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells are still poorly understood. In order to clarify the cytotoxicity of endothelial cells induced by silica nanoparticles and its mechanisms, cellular morphology, cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release were observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs as assessing cytotoxicity, resulted in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Silica nanoparticles-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation caused oxidative damage followed by the production of malondialdehyde (MDA as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px. Both necrosis and apoptosis were increased significantly after 24 h exposure. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP decreased obviously in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of DNA damage including the percentage of tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment (OTM were markedly aggravated. Silica nanoparticles also induced G2/M arrest through the upregulation of Chk1 and the downregulation of Cdc25C, cyclin B1/Cdc2. In summary, our data indicated that the toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells was through DNA damage response (DDR via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint signaling pathway, suggesting that exposure to silica nanoparticles could be a potential hazards for the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Cordyceps militaris Fraction induces apoptosis and G2/M Arrest via c-Jun N-Terminal kinase signaling pathway in oral squamous carcinoma KB Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wangshi; Zhang, Zhang; Song, Liyan; Huang, Chunhua; Guo, Zhongyi; Hu, Xianjing; Bi, Sixue; Yu, Rongmin

    2018-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris fraction (CMF) has been shown to possess in vitro antitumor activity against human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells in our previous research. The in vitro inhibitory activities of CMF on the growth of KB cells were evaluated by viability assay. The apoptotic and cell cycle influences of CMF were detected by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and flow cytometry assay. The expression of different apoptosis-associated proteins and cell cycle regulatory proteins was examined by Western blot assay. The nuclear localization of c-Jun was observed by fluorescence staining. The objective of this study was to investigate the antiproliferative effect of CMF as well as the mechanism underlying the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest it induces in KB cells. CMF suppressed KB cells' proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that CMF induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed that CMF induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavages, and increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. CMF also led to increased expression of p21, decreased expression of cyclin B1, mitotic phosphatase cdc25c, and mitotic kinase cdc2, as well as unchanged expression of p53. In addition, CMF stimulated c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) protein phosphorylations, resulting in upregulated expression of c-Jun and nuclear localization of c-Jun. Pretreatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 suppressed CMF-induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest. CMF is capable of modulating c-Jun caspase and Bcl-2 family proteins through JNK-dependent apoptosis, which results in G2/M phase arrest in KB cells. CMF could be developed as a promising candidate for the new antitumor agents. CMF exhibited strong anticancer activity against oral squamous carcinoma KB cellsCMF inhibited KB cells' proliferation via induction of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrestCMF activated JNK signaling pathway and promoted the nuclear localization of c-JunCMF regulated the

  1. The 20-hydroxyecdysone-induced signalling pathway in G2/M arrest of Plodia interpunctella imaginal wing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaussat, David; Bozzolan, Françoise; Porcheron, Patrick; Debernard, Stéphane

    2008-05-01

    The mechanisms involved in the control of cellular proliferation by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) in insects are not known. We dissected the 20E signalling pathway responsible for G2/M arrest of imaginal cells from the IAL-PID2 cells of the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella. We first used a 5'-3' RACE-based strategy to clone a 4479bp cDNA encoding a putative P. interpunctella HR3 transcription factor named PiHR3. The deduced amino acid sequence of PiHR3 was highly similar to those of HR3 proteins from other lepidopterans, e.g. Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori. Using double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (dsRNAi), we then succeeded in blocking the ability of 20E to induce the expression of PiEcR-B1, PiUSP-2 and PiHR3 genes that encode the P. interpunctella ecdysone receptor B1-isoform, Ultraspiracle-2 isoform, the insect homologue of the vertebrate retinoid X receptor, and the HR3 transcription factor. We showed that inhibiting the 20E induction of PiEcR-B1, PiUSP-2 and PiHR3 mRNAs prevented the decreased expression of B cyclin and consequently the G2/M arrest of IAL-PID2 cells. Using this functional approach, we revealed the participation of EcR, USP and HR3 in a 20E signalling pathway that controls the proliferation of imaginal cells by regulating the expression of B cyclin.

  2. Exposure of Human Lung Cancer Cells to 8-Chloro-Adenosine Induces G2/M Arrest and Mitotic Catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yu Zhang

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available 8-Chloro-adenosine (8-CI-Ado is a potent chemotherapeutic agent whose cytotoxicity in a variety of tumor cell lines has been widely investigated. However, the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. In this study, we found that exposure of human lung cancer cell lines A549 (p53-wt and H1299 (p53-depleted to 8-CI-Ado induced cell arrest in the G2/M phase, which was accompanied by accumulation of binucleated and polymorphonucleated cells resulting from aberrant mitosis and failed cytokinesis. Western blotting showed the loss of phosphorylated forms of Cdc2 and Cdc25C that allowed progression into mitosis. Furthermore, the increase in Ser10-phosphorylated histone H3-positive cells revealed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting suggested that the agent-targeted cells were able to exit the G2 phase and enter the M phase. Immunocytochemistry showed that microtubule and microfilament arrays were changed in exposed cells, indicating that the dynamic instability of microtubules and microfilaments was lost, which may correlate with mitotic dividing failure. Aberrant mitosis resulted in mitotic catastrophe followed by varying degrees of apoptosis, depending on the cell lines. Thus, 8-CI-Ado appears to exert its cytotoxicity toward cells in culture by inducing mitotic catastrophe.

  3. Menadione induces G2/M arrest in gastric cancer cells by down-regulation of CDC25C and proteasome mediated degradation of CDK1 and cyclin B1

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Kim, Do Hyun; Woo, Hyun Jun; Yang, Ji Yeong; Kwon, Hye Jin; Yeon, Min Ji; Park, Min; Kim, Sa-Hyun; Moon, Cheol; Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Kim, Tae Ue; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Menadione (vitamin K3) has been reported to induce apoptotic cell death and growth inhibition in various types of cancer cells. However, involvement of menadione in cell cycle control has not been considered in gastric cancer cells yet. In the current study, we have investigated whether menadione is involved in the cell cycle regulation and suppression of growth in gastric cancer cells. In the cell cycle analysis, we found that menadione induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in AGS cells. To elucida...

  4. Xylopine Induces Oxidative Stress and Causes G2/M Phase Arrest, Triggering Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis by p53-Independent Pathway in HCT116 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano de Souza Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xylopine is an aporphine alkaloid that has cytotoxic activity to cancer cells. In this study, the underlying mechanism of xylopine cytotoxicity was assessed in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. Xylopine displayed potent cytotoxicity in different cancer cell lines in monolayer cultures and in a 3D model of cancer multicellular spheroids formed from HCT116 cells. Typical morphology of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, increased internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and increased phosphatidylserine externalization and caspase-3 activation were observed in xylopine-treated HCT116 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with a caspase-3 inhibitor (Z-DEVD-FMK, but not with a p53 inhibitor (cyclic pifithrin-α, reduced xylopine-induced apoptosis, indicating induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis by the p53-independent pathway. Treatment with xylopine also caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS, including hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, but not superoxide anion, and reduced glutathione levels were decreased in xylopine-treated HCT116 cells. Application of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine reduced the ROS levels and xylopine-induced apoptosis, indicating activation of ROS-mediated apoptosis pathway. In conclusion, xylopine has potent cytotoxicity to different cancer cell lines and is able to induce oxidative stress and G2/M phase arrest, triggering caspase-mediated apoptosis by the p53-independent pathway in HCT116 cells.

  5. Resistance to bleomycin in cancer cell lines is characterized by prolonged doubling time, reduced DNA damage and evasion of G2/M arrest and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available To establish, characterize and elucidate potential mechanisms of acquired bleomycin (BLM resistance using human cancer cell lines. Seven BLM-resistant cell lines were established by exposure to escalating BLM concentrations over a period of 16-24 months. IC50 values and cell doubling times were quantified using a real time cytotoxicity assay. COMET and γ-H2AX assays, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis assessment further investigated the mechanisms of BLM resistance in these cell lines.Compared with parental cell lines, real time cytotoxicity assays revealed 7 to 49 fold increases in IC50 and a mean doubling time increase of 147 % (range 64 %-352% in BLM-resistant sub-clones (p<0.05 for both. Higher maintenance BLM concentrations were associated with higher IC50 and increased doubling times (p<0.05. Significantly reduced DNA damage (COMET and γ-H2AX assays, G2/M arrest, and apoptosis (p<0.05 for each set of comparison following high-dose acute BLM exposure was observed in resistant sub-clones, compared with their BLM-sensitive parental counterparts. Three weeks of BLM-free culturing resulted in a partial return to BLM sensitivity in 3/7 BLM-resistant sub-clones (p<0.05.Bleomycin resistance may be associated with reduced DNA damage after bleomycin exposure, resulting in reduced G2/M arrest, and reduced apoptosis.

  6. β-Arrestin 1 has an essential role in neurokinin-1 receptor-mediated glioblastoma cell proliferation and G2/M phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Li, Xiao-Fang; Yuan, Guo-Qiang; Hu, Hui; Song, Xiao-Yun; Li, Jing-Yi; Miao, Xiao-Kang; Zhou, Tian-Xiong; Yang, Wen-Le; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Mou, Ling-Yun; Wang, Rui

    2017-05-26

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor and has a poor prognosis. Tachykinin receptor neurokinin-1 (NK1R) is a promising target in glioblastoma therapy because of its overexpression in human glioblastoma. NK1R agonists promote glioblastoma cell growth, whereas NK1R antagonists efficiently inhibit cell growth both in vitro and in vivo However, the molecular mechanisms involved in these effects are incompletely understood. β-Arrestins (ARRBs) serve as scaffold proteins and adapters to mediate intracellular signal transduction. Here we show that the ARRB1-mediated signaling pathway is essential for NK1-mediated glioblastoma cell proliferation. ARRB1 knockdown significantly inhibited NK1-mediated glioblastoma cell proliferation and induced G 2 /M phase cell cycle arrest. ARRB1 knockdown cells showed remarkable down-regulation of CDC25C/CDK1/cyclin B1 activity. We also demonstrated that ARRB1 mediated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt in glioblastoma cells induced by NK1R activation. ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation are involved in regulating CDC25C/CDK1/cyclin B1 activity. The lack of long-term ERK1/2 and Akt activation in ARRB1 knockdown cells was at least partly responsible for the delayed cell cycle progression and proliferation. Moreover, we found that ARRB1-mediated ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation regulated the transcriptional activity of both NF-κB and AP-1, which were involved in cyclin B1 expression. ARRB1 deficiency increased the sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to the treatment of NK1R antagonists. Taken together, our results suggest that ARRB1 plays an essential role in NK1R-mediated cell proliferation and G 2 /M transition in glioblastoma cells. Interference with ARRB1-mediated signaling via NK1R may have potential significance for therapeutic strategies targeting glioblastoma. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. 4beta-Hydroxywithanolide E from Physalis peruviana (golden berry) inhibits growth of human lung cancer cells through DNA damage, apoptosis and G2/M arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ching-Yu; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chen, Jeff Yi-Fu; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Hseu, You-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Ling; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Tsai, Ming-Tz; Guo, Zong-Lun; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Yin-Chang; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Yu-Ching; Ko, Ying-Chin; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2010-02-18

    The crude extract of the fruit bearing plant, Physalis peruviana (golden berry), demonstrated anti-hepatoma and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this process is still unknown. Herein, we isolated the main pure compound, 4beta-Hydroxywithanolide (4betaHWE) derived from golden berries, and investigated its antiproliferative effect on a human lung cancer cell line (H1299) using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis analyses. An alkaline comet-nuclear extract (NE) assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage due to the drug. It was shown that DNA damage was significantly induced by 1, 5, and 10 microg/mL 4betaHWE for 2 h in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.005). A trypan blue exclusion assay showed that the proliferation of cells was inhibited by 4betaHWE in both dose- and time-dependent manners (p < 0.05 and 0.001 for 24 and 48 h, respectively). The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 4betaHWE in H1299 cells for 24 and 48 h were 0.6 and 0.71 microg/mL, respectively, suggesting it could be a potential therapeutic agent against lung cancer. In a flow cytometric analysis, 4betaHWE produced cell cycle perturbation in the form of sub-G1 accumulation and slight arrest at the G2/M phase with 1 microg/mL for 12 and 24 h, respectively. Using flow cytometric and annexin V/propidium iodide immunofluorescence double-staining techniques, these phenomena were proven to be apoptosis and complete G2/M arrest for H1299 cells treated with 5 microg/mL for 24 h. In this study, we demonstrated that golden berry-derived 4betaHWE is a potential DNA-damaging and chemotherapeutic agent against lung cancer.

  8. 4β-Hydroxywithanolide E from Physalis peruviana (golden berry) inhibits growth of human lung cancer cells through DNA damage, apoptosis and G2/M arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Ching-Yu; Guo, Zong-Lun; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Yin-Chang; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Yu-Ching; Ko, Ying-Chin; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chen, Jeff Yi-Fu; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Hseu, You-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Ling; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Tsai, Ming-Tz

    2010-01-01

    The crude extract of the fruit bearing plant, Physalis peruviana (golden berry), demonstrated anti-hepatoma and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this process is still unknown. Herein, we isolated the main pure compound, 4β-Hydroxywithanolide (4βHWE) derived from golden berries, and investigated its antiproliferative effect on a human lung cancer cell line (H1299) using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis analyses. An alkaline comet-nuclear extract (NE) assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage due to the drug. It was shown that DNA damage was significantly induced by 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL 4βHWE for 2 h in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.005). A trypan blue exclusion assay showed that the proliferation of cells was inhibited by 4βHWE in both dose- and time-dependent manners (p < 0.05 and 0.001 for 24 and 48 h, respectively). The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) of 4βHWE in H1299 cells for 24 and 48 h were 0.6 and 0.71 μg/mL, respectively, suggesting it could be a potential therapeutic agent against lung cancer. In a flow cytometric analysis, 4βHWE produced cell cycle perturbation in the form of sub-G 1 accumulation and slight arrest at the G 2 /M phase with 1 μg/mL for 12 and 24 h, respectively. Using flow cytometric and annexin V/propidium iodide immunofluorescence double-staining techniques, these phenomena were proven to be apoptosis and complete G 2 /M arrest for H1299 cells treated with 5 μg/mL for 24 h. In this study, we demonstrated that golden berry-derived 4βHWE is a potential DNA-damaging and chemotherapeutic agent against lung cancer

  9. 4β-Hydroxywithanolide E from Physalis peruviana (golden berry) inhibits growth of human lung cancer cells through DNA damage, apoptosis and G2/M arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The crude extract of the fruit bearing plant, Physalis peruviana (golden berry), demonstrated anti-hepatoma and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this process is still unknown. Methods Herein, we isolated the main pure compound, 4β-Hydroxywithanolide (4βHWE) derived from golden berries, and investigated its antiproliferative effect on a human lung cancer cell line (H1299) using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis analyses. An alkaline comet-nuclear extract (NE) assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage due to the drug. Results It was shown that DNA damage was significantly induced by 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL 4βHWE for 2 h in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.005). A trypan blue exclusion assay showed that the proliferation of cells was inhibited by 4βHWE in both dose- and time-dependent manners (p < 0.05 and 0.001 for 24 and 48 h, respectively). The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 4βHWE in H1299 cells for 24 and 48 h were 0.6 and 0.71 μg/mL, respectively, suggesting it could be a potential therapeutic agent against lung cancer. In a flow cytometric analysis, 4βHWE produced cell cycle perturbation in the form of sub-G1 accumulation and slight arrest at the G2/M phase with 1 μg/mL for 12 and 24 h, respectively. Using flow cytometric and annexin V/propidium iodide immunofluorescence double-staining techniques, these phenomena were proven to be apoptosis and complete G2/M arrest for H1299 cells treated with 5 μg/mL for 24 h. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that golden berry-derived 4βHWE is a potential DNA-damaging and chemotherapeutic agent against lung cancer. PMID:20167063

  10. 4β-Hydroxywithanolide E from Physalis peruviana (golden berry inhibits growth of human lung cancer cells through DNA damage, apoptosis and G2/M arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zong-Lun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The crude extract of the fruit bearing plant, Physalis peruviana (golden berry, demonstrated anti-hepatoma and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this process is still unknown. Methods Herein, we isolated the main pure compound, 4β-Hydroxywithanolide (4βHWE derived from golden berries, and investigated its antiproliferative effect on a human lung cancer cell line (H1299 using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis analyses. An alkaline comet-nuclear extract (NE assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage due to the drug. Results It was shown that DNA damage was significantly induced by 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL 4βHWE for 2 h in a dose-dependent manner (p p 50 of 4βHWE in H1299 cells for 24 and 48 h were 0.6 and 0.71 μg/mL, respectively, suggesting it could be a potential therapeutic agent against lung cancer. In a flow cytometric analysis, 4βHWE produced cell cycle perturbation in the form of sub-G1 accumulation and slight arrest at the G2/M phase with 1 μg/mL for 12 and 24 h, respectively. Using flow cytometric and annexin V/propidium iodide immunofluorescence double-staining techniques, these phenomena were proven to be apoptosis and complete G2/M arrest for H1299 cells treated with 5 μg/mL for 24 h. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that golden berry-derived 4βHWE is a potential DNA-damaging and chemotherapeutic agent against lung cancer.

  11. Curcumin induces G2/M arrest, apoptosis, NF-κB inhibition, and expression of differentiation genes in thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwertheim, Suzan; Wein, Frederik; Lennartz, Klaus; Worm, Karl; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Sheu-Grabellus, Sien-Yi

    2017-07-01

    The therapy of unresectable advanced thyroid carcinomas shows unfavorable outcome. Constitutive nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in thyroid carcinomas frequently contributes to therapeutic resistance; the radioiodine therapy often fails due to the loss of differentiated functions in advanced thyroid carcinomas. Curcumin is known for its anticancer properties in a series of cancers, but only few studies have focused on thyroid cancer. Our aim was to evaluate curcumin's molecular mechanisms and to estimate if curcumin could be a new therapeutic option in advanced thyroid cancer. Human thyroid cancer cell lines TPC-1 (papillary), FTC-133 (follicular), and BHT-101 (anaplastic) were treated with curcumin. Using real-time PCR analysis, we investigated microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA expression levels. Cell cycle, Annexin V/PI staining, and caspase-3 activity analysis were performed to detect apoptosis. NF-κB p65 activity and cell proliferation were analyzed using appropriate ELISA-based colorimetric assay kits. Treatment with 50 μM curcumin significantly increased the mRNA expression of the differentiation genes thyroglobulin (TG) and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in all three cell lines and induced inhibition of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and decrease of NF-κB p65 activity. The miRNA expression analyses showed a significant deregulation of miRNA-200c, -21, -let7c, -26a, and -125b, known to regulate cell differentiation and tumor progression. Curcumin arrested cell growth at the G2/M phase. Curcumin increases the expression of redifferentiation markers and induces G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and downregulation of NF-κB activity in thyroid carcinoma cells. Thus, curcumin appears to be a promising agent to overcome resistance to the conventional cancer therapy.

  12. Induction of G2/M arrest and apoptosis through mitochondria pathway by a dimer sesquiterpene lactone from Smallanthus sonchifolius in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Yurika; Zhang, Xia; Hayashida, Yushi; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Tamura, Hirotoshi

    2017-07-01

    Dimer sesquiterpene lactones (SLs), uvedafolin and enhydrofolin, against four monomer SLs isolated from yacon, Smallanthus sonchifolius, leaf were the most cytotoxic substances on HeLa cells (IC 50 values 2.96-3.17 μM at 24 hours). However, the cytotoxic mechanism of dimer SL has not been elucidated yet. Therefore, in this study, we clarified the in vitro cytotoxic mechanism of uvedafolin on the HeLa cells, and evaluated the cytotoxicity against NIH/3T3 cells which were used as normal cells. In consequence, the dimer SLs had low toxicity for the NIH/3T3 cells (IC 50 4.81-4.98 μM at 24 hours) and then the uvedafolin mediated cell cycle arrest at the G 2 /M phase and induced apoptosis on the HeLa cells evidenced by appearance of a subG1 peak. Uvedafolin induced apoptosis was attributed to caspase-9 and caspase-3/7 activities. An effectively induced apoptosis pathway was demonstrated from mitochondria membrane potential change and cytochrome c release to cytosol. These results reveal that uvedafolin induced apoptosis via the mitochondria pathway. The present results indicate the potential of uvedafolin as a leading compound of new anticancer agents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Synthesis of an anthraquinone derivative (DHAQC) and its effect on induction of G2/M arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer MCF-7 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, SweeKeong; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Lim, Kian Lam; Abu, Nadiah; Ho, Wan Yong; Zareen, Seema; Roohani, Kiarash; Ky, Huynh; Tan, Sheau Wei; Lajis, Nordin; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2015-01-01

    Anthraquinones are an important class of naturally occurring biologically active compounds. In this study, anthraquinone derivative 1,3-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone-2- carboxylic acid (DHAQC) (2) was synthesized with 32% yield through the Friedel-Crafts condensation reaction. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity of DHAQC (2) in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells were further investigated. Results from the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that DHAQC (2) exhibited potential cytotoxicity and selectivity in the MCF-7 cell line, comparable with the naturally occurring anthraquinone damnacanthal. DHAQC (2) showed a slightly higher IC50 (inhibitory concentration with 50% cell viability) value in the MCF-7 cell line compared to damnacanthal, but it is more selective in terms of the ratio of IC50 on MCF-7 cells and normal MCF-10A cells. (selective index for DHAQC (2) was 2.3 and 1.7 for damnacanthal). The flow cytometry cell cycle analysis on the MCF-7 cell line treated with the IC50 dose of DHAQC (2) for 48 hours showed that DHAQC (2) arrested MCF-7 cell line at the G2/M phase in association with an inhibited expression of PLK1 genes. Western blot analysis also indicated that the DHAQC (2) increased BAX, p53, and cytochrome c levels in MCF-7 cells, which subsequently activated apoptosis as observed in annexin V/propidium iodide and cell cycle analyses. These results indicate that DHAQC (2) is a synthetic, cytotoxic, and selective anthraquinone, which is less toxic than the natural product damnacanthal, and which demonstrates potential in the induction of apoptosis in the breast cancer MCF-7 cell line.

  14. An evidence on G2/M arrest, DNA damage and caspase mediated apoptotic effect of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles on human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyaraj, M.; Arun, R.; Sathishkumar, G.; MubarakAli, D.; Rajesh, M.; Sivanandhan, G.; Kapildev, G.; Manickavasagam, M.; Thajuddin, N.; Ganapathi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been synthesized using Podophyllum hexandrum L. • AuNPs induces the oxidative stress to cell death in human cervical carcinoma cells. • It activates the caspase-cascade to cellular death. • It is actively blocks G2/M phase of cell cycle. - Abstract: Current prospect of nanobiotechnology involves in the greener synthesis of nanostructured materials particularly noble metal nanoparticles for various biomedical applications. In this study, biologically (Podophyllum hexandrum L.) synthesized crystalline gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the size range between 5 and 35 nm were screened for its anticancereous potential against human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa). Stoichiometric proportion of the reaction mixture and conditions were optimized to attain stable nanoparticles with narrow size range. Different high throughput techniques like transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectroscopy were adopted for the physio-chemical characterization of AuNPs. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed that the water soluble fractions present in the plant extract solely influences the reduction of AuNPs. Sublimely, synthesized AuNPs exhibits an effective in vitro anticancer activity against HeLa cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage. Furthermore, it was evidenced that AuNPs treated cells are undergone apoptosis through the activation of caspase cascade which subsequently leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby, this study proves that biogenic colloidal AuNPs can be developed as a promising drug candidature for human cervical cancer therapy

  15. Jaridonin-induced G2/M phase arrest in human esophageal cancer cells is caused by reactive oxygen species-dependent Cdc2-tyr15 phosphorylation via ATM–Chk1/2–Cdc25C pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yong-Cheng [Clinical Pharmacology Laboratory, Henan Province People' s Hospital, No. 7, Wei Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Su, Nan [Department of Quality Detection and Management, Henan University of Animal Husbandry and Economy, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Shi, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Wen; Ke, Yu [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, No. 100, Science Avenue, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Zi, Xiaolin [Department of Urology, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States); Zhao, Ning-Min; Qin, Yu-Hua; Zhao, Hong-Wei [Clinical Pharmacology Laboratory, Henan Province People' s Hospital, No. 7, Wei Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Liu, Hong-Min, E-mail: liuhm@zzu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, No. 100, Science Avenue, Zhengzhou, Henan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Jaridonin, a novel diterpenoid from Isodon rubescens, has been shown previously to inhibit proliferation of esophageal squamous cancer cells (ESCC) through G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. However, the involved mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we found that the cell cycle arrest by Jaridonin was associated with the increased expression of phosphorylation of ATM at Ser1981 and Cdc2 at Tyr15. Jaridonin also resulted in enhanced phosphorylation of Cdc25C via the activation of checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2, as well as in increased phospho-H2A.X (Ser139), which is known to be phosphorylated by ATM in response to DNA damage. Furthermore, Jaridonin-mediated alterations in cell cycle arrest were significantly attenuated in the presence of NAC, implicating the involvement of ROS in Jaridonin's effects. On the other hand, addition of ATM inhibitors reversed Jaridonin-related activation of ATM and Chk1/2 as well as phosphorylation of Cdc25C, Cdc2 and H2A.X and G2/M phase arrest. In conclusion, these findings identified that Jaridonin-induced cell cycle arrest in human esophageal cancer cells is associated with ROS-mediated activation of ATM–Chk1/2–Cdc25C pathway. - Highlights: • Jaridonin induced G2/M phase arrest through induction of redox imbalance. • Jaridonin increased the level of ROS through depleting glutathione in cell. • ATM–Chk1/2–Cdc25C were involved in Jaridonin-induced cell cycle arrest. • Jaridonin selectively inhibited cancer cell viability and cell cycle progression.

  16. A miR-21 inhibitor enhances apoptosis and reduces G2-M accumulation induced by ionizing radiation in human glioblastoma U251 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yi; Li, Qiang; Asai, Akio; Kawamoto, Keiji; Zhao Shiguang; Zhen Yunbo; Teng Lei

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that take part in diverse biological processes by suppressing target gene expression. Elevated expression of miR-21 has been reported in many types of human cancers. Radiotherapy is a standard adjuvant treatment for patients with glioblastoma. However, the resistance of glioblastoma cells to radiation limits the success of this treatment. In this study, we found that miR-21 expression was upregulated in response to ionizing radiation (IR) in U251 cells, which suggested that miR-21 could be involved in the response of U251 cells to radiation. We showed that a miR-21 inhibitor enhanced IR-induced glioblastoma cell growth arrest and increased the level of apoptosis, which was probably caused by abrogation of the G 2 -M arrest induced by IR. Further research demonstrated that the miR-21 inhibitor induced the upregulation of Cdc25A. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-21 inhibitor can increase IR-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in U251 glioblastoma cells, at least in part by abrogating G 2 -M arrest, and that Cdc25A is a potential target of miR-21. (author)

  17. Menadione induces G2/M arrest in gastric cancer cells by down-regulation of CDC25C and proteasome mediated degradation of CDK1 and cyclin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Kim, Do Hyun; Woo, Hyun Jun; Yang, Ji Yeong; Kwon, Hye Jin; Yeon, Min Ji; Park, Min; Kim, Sa-Hyun; Moon, Cheol; Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Kim, Tae Ue; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Menadione (vitamin K3) has been reported to induce apoptotic cell death and growth inhibition in various types of cancer cells. However, involvement of menadione in cell cycle control has not been considered in gastric cancer cells yet. In the current study, we have investigated whether menadione is involved in the cell cycle regulation and suppression of growth in gastric cancer cells. In the cell cycle analysis, we found that menadione induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in AGS cells. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we investigated the cell cycle regulatory molecules involved in the G2/M cell cycle transition. After 24 h of menadione treatment, the protein level of CDK1, CDC25C and cyclin B1 in AGS cells was decreased in a menadione dose-dependent manner. In the time course experiment, the protein level of CDC25C decreased in 6 h, and CDK1and cyclin B1 protein levels began to decrease after 18 h of menadione treatment. We found that mRNA level of CDC25C decreased by menadione treatment in 6 h. Menadione did not have an influence on mRNA level of CDK1 and cyclin B1 though the protein levels were decreased. However, the decreased protein levels of CDK1 and cyclin B1 were recovered by inhibition of proteasome. Collectively, these results suggest that menadione inhibits growth of gastric cancer cells by reducing expression of CDC25C and promoting proteasome mediated degradation of CDK1 and cyclin B1 thereby blocking transition of the cell cycle from G2 phase to M phase. PMID:28077999

  18. Nuclear interaction of Smac/DIABLO with Survivin at G2/M arrest prompts docetaxel-induced apoptosis in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young; Chung, Jin-Yong; Lee, Seung Gee; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Park, Ji-Eun; Yoo, Ki Soo; Yoo, Young Hyun; Park, Young Chul; Kim, Byeong Gee; Kim, Jong-Min

    2006-01-01

    Smac/DIABLO is released by mitochondria in response to apoptotic stimuli and is thought to antagonize the function of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins. Recently, it has been shown that, like XIAP, Survivin can potentially interact with Smac/DIABLO. However, the precise mechanisms and cellular location of their action have not been determined. We report for the first time that Smac/DIABLO translocates to the nucleus and is colocalized with Survivin at mitotic spindles during apoptosis resulting from G2/M arrest due to docetaxel treatment of DU145 prostate cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that the nuclear interaction of Smac/DIABLO with Survivin is an important step for suppressing the anti-apoptotic function of Survivin in Doc-induced apoptosis. This suggests that the balance between cellular Smac/DIABLO and Survivin levels could be critical for cellular destiny in taxane-treated cancer cells

  19. Enhancement of Cisplatin-Mediated Apoptosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells through Potentiating G2/M Arrest and p21 Upregulation by Combinatorial Epigallocatechin Gallate and Sulforaphane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced-stage ovarian cancer is characterized by high mortality due to development of resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Novel compounds that can enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy in ovarian cancer may overcome this drug resistance. Consumption of green tea (epigallocatechin gallate, EGCG and cruciferous vegetables (sulforaphane, SFN is inversely associated with occurrence of ovarian cancer and has anticancer effects through targeting multiple molecules in cancer cells. However, the effects of EGCG and SFN combinational treatment on ovarian cancer cells and on efficacy of cisplatin to these cells are unknown. In this study, EGCG or SFN was used to treat both cisplatin-sensitive (A2780 and cisplatin-resistant (A2780/CP20 ovarian cancer cells alone or in combination with cisplatin. We found that EGCG and SFN combinational treatment can reduce cell viability of both ovarian cancer cell lines time- and dose-dependently. Furthermore, EGCG and SFN combinational treatment can enhance cisplatin-induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest, thereby enhancing the efficacy of cisplatin on both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. EGCG and SFN combinational treatment upregulated p21 expression induced by cisplatin in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells, while p27 expression was not regulated by these treatments. Collectively, these studies provide novel approaches to overcoming cisplatin chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer.

  20. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: Role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Harish C.; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) one of the most common neoplasms causes serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3′,4′,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and anti-proliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fistein (5-80 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1), (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad), (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential, (iv) release of cytchrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria, (v) activation of caspases, and (vi) cleavage of PARP protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. PMID:23800058

  1. Grp/DChk1 is required for G(2)-M checkpoint activation in Drosophila S2 cells, whereas Dmnk/DChk2 is dispensable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, HI; Uyetake, L; Lemstra, W; Brunsting, JF; Su, TT; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2005-01-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoints are signal-transduction pathways required to maintain genomic stability in dividing cells. Previously, it was reported that two kinases essential for checkpoint signalling, Chk1 and Chk2 are structurally conserved. In contrast to yeast, Xenopus and mammals, the Chk1- and

  2. Proliferation of germ cells and somatic cells in first trimester human embryonic gonads as indicated by S and S+G2+M phase fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristina Pilekær; Lutterodt, Melissa Catherine R; Mamsen, Linn S

    2011-01-01

    The number of germ cells and somatic cells in human embryonic and foetal gonads has previously been estimated by stereological methods, which are time- and labour-consuming with little information concerning cell proliferation. Here, we studied whether flow cytometry could be applied as an easier...

  3. RPF101, a new capsaicin-like analogue, disrupts the microtubule network accompanied by arrest in the G2/M phase, inducing apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in the MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sá-Júnior, Paulo Luiz de; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Tavares, Maurício Temotheo; Damião, Mariana Celestina Frojuello Costa Bernstorff; Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre de; Câmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Pereira, Alexandre; Madeiro de Souza, Dener; Parise Filho, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the world's leading cause of death among women. This situation imposes an urgent development of more selective and less toxic agents. The use of natural molecular fingerprints as sources for new bioactive chemical entities has proven to be a quite promising and efficient method. Capsaicin, which is the primary pungent compound in red peppers, was reported to selectively inhibit the growth of a variety tumor cell lines. Here, we report for the first time a novel synthetic capsaicin-like analogue, RPF101, which presents a high antitumor activity on MCF-7 cell line, inducing arrest of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase through a disruption of the microtubule network. Furthermore, it causes cellular morphologic changes characteristic of apoptosis and a decrease of Δψm. Molecular modeling studies corroborated the biological findings and suggested that RPF101, besides being a more reactive molecule towards its target, may also present a better pharmacokinetic profile than capsaicin. All these findings support the fact that RPF101 is a promising anticancer agent. -- Highlights: ► We report for the first time that RPF101 possesses anticancer properties. ► RPF101 induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. ► RPF 101 decreases mitochondrial potential and induces DNA fragmentation.

  4. Mitofusin 1 is degraded at G2/M phase through ubiquitylation by MARCH5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Yong-Yea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria exhibit a dynamic morphology in cells and their biogenesis and function are integrated with the nuclear cell cycle. In mitotic cells, the filamentous network structure of mitochondria takes on a fragmented form. To date, however, whether mitochondrial fusion activity is regulated in mitosis has yet to be elucidated. Findings Here, we report that mitochondria were found to be fragmented in G2 phase prior to mitotic entry. Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1, a mitochondrial fusion protein, interacted with cyclin B1, and their interactions became stronger in G2/M phase. In addition, MARCH5, a mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase, reduced Mfn1 levels and the MARCH5-mediated Mfn1 ubiquitylation were enhanced in G2/M phase. Conclusions Mfn1 is degraded through the MARCH5-mediated ubiquitylation in G2/M phase and the cell cycle-dependent degradation of Mfn1 could be facilitated by interaction with cyclin B1/Cdk1 complexes.

  5. NF-kappa B signaling pathway is involved in growth inhibition, G2/M arrest and apoptosis induced by Trichostatin A in human tongue carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Jun; Duan, Li; Fan, Mingwen; Wu, Xinxing

    2006-01-01

    The HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) exhibits antiturnour activity in various tumour cells. However, little is known about the effect of TSA on growth of human tongue carcinoma cells. In this study, we observed that TSA concentration-dependently inhibited growth of human tongue carcinoma Tca8113

  6. Enhanced sensitivity to neoplastic transformation by 137Cs γ-rays of cells in the G2-/M-phase age interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, J.; Wells, R.L.; Elkind, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    C3H mouse 10T1/2 cells, exposed to low doses of fission-spectrum neutrons, have an enhanced frequency of neoplastic transformation if protracted exposures are used (Hill et al. 1982, 1984a, 1985). To explain this anormaly, a biophysical model was proposed (Elkind 1991 a,b). The unique shape and radiobiological properties of cells in and around mitosis, led to the proposal that the sensitive window is mitosis and possible cells just preceding or just following M phase (Elkind 1991a,b). This study was undertaken using 137 Cs γ-rays. The authors found that late G 2- to M-phase 10T1/2 cells have a maximal sensitivity to neoplastic transformation as well as to killing by 137 Cs γ-rays. (author)

  7. 3-(3-Hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,2,5-selenadiazole (G-1103), a novel combretastatin A-4 analog, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis by disrupting tubulin polymerization in human cervical HeLa cells and fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Daiying; Guo, Dandan; Jiang, Xuewei; Guan, Qi; Qi, Huan; Xu, Jingwen; Li, Zengqiang; Yang, Fushan; Zhang, Weige; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-02-05

    Microtubule is a popular target for anticancer drugs. In this study, we describe the effect 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,2,5-selenadiazole (G-1103), a newly synthesized analog of combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), showing a strong time- and dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect on human cervical cancer HeLa cells and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. We demonstrated that the growth inhibitory effects of G-1103 in HeLa and HT-1080 cells were associated with microtubule depolymerization and proved that G-1103 acted as microtubule destabilizing agent. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that G-1103 treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in a time-dependent manner with subsequent apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis revealed that down-regulation of cdc25c and up-regulation of cyclin B1 was related with G2/M arrest in HeLa and HT-1080 cells treatment with G-1103. In addition, G-1103 induced HeLa cell apoptosis by up-regulating cleaved caspase-3, Fas, cleaved caspase-8 expression, which indicated that G-1103 induced HeLa cell apoptosis was mainly associated with death receptor pathway. However, G-1103 induced HT-1080 cell apoptosis by up-regulating cleaved caspase-3, Fas, cleaved caspase-8, Bax and cleaved caspase-9 expression and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 expression, which indicated that G-1103 induced HT-1080 cell apoptosis was associated with both mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Taken together, all the data demonstrated that G-1103 exhibited its antitumor activity through disrupting the microtubule assembly, causing cell cycle arrest and consequently inducing apoptosis in HeLa and HT-1080 cells. Therefore, the novel compound G-1103 is a promising microtubule inhibitor that has great potentials for therapeutic treatment of various malignancies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cdk2 is required for p53-independent G2/M checkpoint control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon H Chung

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The activation of phase-specific cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks is associated with ordered cell cycle transitions. Among the mammalian Cdks, only Cdk1 is essential for somatic cell proliferation. Cdk1 can apparently substitute for Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, which are individually dispensable in mice. It is unclear if all functions of non-essential Cdks are fully redundant with Cdk1. Using a genetic approach, we show that Cdk2, the S-phase Cdk, uniquely controls the G(2/M checkpoint that prevents cells with damaged DNA from initiating mitosis. CDK2-nullizygous human cells exposed to ionizing radiation failed to exclude Cdk1 from the nucleus and exhibited a marked defect in G(2/M arrest that was unmasked by the disruption of P53. The DNA replication licensing protein Cdc6, which is normally stabilized by Cdk2, was physically associated with the checkpoint regulator ATR and was required for efficient ATR-Chk1-Cdc25A signaling. These findings demonstrate that Cdk2 maintains a balance of S-phase regulatory proteins and thereby coordinates subsequent p53-independent G(2/M checkpoint activation.

  9. ERK1/2 signaling plays an important role in topoisomerase II poison-induced G2/M checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Ryan H; Greer, Patrick M; Cao, Phu T; Cowan, Kenneth H; Yan, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Topo II poisons, which target topoisomerase II (topo II) to generate enzyme mediated DNA damage, have been commonly used for anti-cancer treatment. While clinical evidence demonstrate a capability of topo II poisons in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, accumulating evidence also show that topo II poison treatment frequently results in cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, which was associated with subsequent resistance to these treatments. Results in this report indicate that treatment of MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells with topo II poisons resulted in an increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and an subsequent induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation using specific inhibitors markedly attenuated the topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest and diminished the topo II poison-induced activation of ATR and Chk1 kinases. Moreover, decreased expression of ATR by specific shRNA diminished topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest but had no effect on topo II poison-induced ERK1/2 activation. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling had little, if any, effect on topo II poison-induced ATM activation. In addition, ATM inhibition by either incubation of cells with ATM specific inhibitor or transfection of cells with ATM specific siRNA did not block topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest. Ultimately, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling greatly enhanced topo II poison-induced apoptosis. These results implicate a critical role for ERK1/2 signaling in the activation of G2/M checkpoint response following topo II poison treatment, which protects cells from topo II poison-induced apoptosis.

  10. Clinical significations of G2-M stage partial synchronization on radiation therapies of uterine cervical carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    The present study revealed that irradiation-induced changes of repopulation and redistribution played an important role in radiosensitivity and cure process of human uterine cervical carcinoma. DNA measurements by a microspectrophotometer were made on Feulgen stained biopsy specimens obtained from 20 patients. On the other hand, flow-microfluorometric measurements with Fried's computed cell cycle analysis were made on transplanted human cervical carcinomas. The mean nuclear DNA amount of human cervical carcinoma cells increased according as the irradiation doses increase until 2,000 rad. Moreover, as regards with the mean nuclear diameter of cancer cells the same phenomenon was recognized, and there was an interrelation between the increase of mean nuclear DNA amount and that of mean nuclear diameter. This phenomenon was proved in nuclear DNA analysis by flow-microfluorometric measurements on transplanted human cervical carcinoma in nude mice. Computed cell cycle analysis of F.M.F. data demonstrated that this phenomenon was due to irradiation-induced changes of repopulation and redistribution. That is to say, irradiation induces the increase of cycling cells and then partial synchronization to G2-M stage. Examination of the interrelation between this phenomenon at 500 rad and 5 years survival rate demonstrated that there was more increase of nuclear DNA amount in the good prognosis group than in the poor prognosis group. Estimation of residual cells near the G1 stage at 2,000 rad demonstrated that there were more residual cells near the G1 stage in the poor prognosis group than in the good prognosis group. (author)

  11. Systematic Investigation of Expression of G2/M Transition Genes Reveals CDC25 Alteration in Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Henriett; Németh, Kinga; Czenke, Dóra; Likó, István; Czirják, Sándor; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Baghy, Kornélia; Korbonits, Márta; Kovalszky, Ilona; Igaz, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila

    2017-07-01

    Dysregulation of G1/S checkpoint of cell cycle has been reported in pituitary adenomas. In addition, our previous finding showing that deregulation of Wee1 kinase by microRNAs together with other studies demonstrating alteration of G2/M transition in nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) suggest that G2/M transition may also be important in pituitary tumorigenesis. To systematically study the expression of members of the G2/M transition in NFPAs and to investigate potential microRNA (miRNA) involvement. Totally, 80 NFPA and 14 normal pituitary (NP) tissues were examined. Expression of 46 genes encoding members of the G2/M transition was profiled on 34 NFPA and 10 NP samples on TaqMan Low Density Array. Expression of CDC25A and two miRNAs targeting CDC25A were validated by individual quantitative real time PCR using TaqMan assays. Protein expression of CDC25A, CDC25C, CDK1 and phospho-CDK1 (Tyr-15) was investigated on tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. Several genes' expression alteration were observed in NFPA compared to normal tissues by transcription profiling. On protein level CDC25A and both the total and the phospho-CDK1 were overexpressed in adenoma tissues. CDC25A correlated with nuclear localized CDK1 (nCDK1) and with tumor size and nCDK1 with Ki-67 index. Comparing primary vs. recurrent adenomas we found that Ki-67 proliferation index was higher and phospho-CDK1 (inactive form) was downregulated in recurrent tumors compared to primary adenomas. Investigating the potential causes behind CDC25A overexpression we could not find copy number variation at the coding region nor expression alteration of CDC25A regulating transcription factors however CDC25A targeting miRNAs were downregulated in NFPA and negatively correlated with CDC25A expression. Our results suggest that among alterations of G2/M transition of the cell cycle, overexpression of the CDK1 and CDC25A may have a role in the pathogenesis of the NFPA and that CDC25A is potentially

  12. PRR11 regulates late-S to G2/M phase progression and induces premature chromatin condensation (PCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yi; Zhu, Huifang; Wang, Yitao; Cai, Wei [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhu, Jiang [Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Ozaki, Toshinori [Laboratory of DNA Damage Signaling, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, 666-2 Nitona, Chuohku, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Bu, Youquan, E-mail: buyqcn@aliyun.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2015-03-13

    Recently, we have demonstrated that proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) is a novel tumor-related gene product likely implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression as well as lung cancer development. However, its precise role in cell cycle progression remains unclear. In the present study, we have further investigated the expression pattern and functional implication of PRR11 during cell cycle in detail in human lung carcinoma-derived H1299 cells. According to our immunofluorescence study, PRR11 was expressed largely in cytoplasm, the amount of PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase, and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. Consistent with those observations, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRR11 caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase. Intriguingly, the treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. Moreover, knockdown of PRR11 also resulted in a remarkable retardation of G2/M progression, and PRR11-knockdown cells subsequently underwent G2 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by obvious mitotic defects such as multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. In addition, forced expression of PRR11 promoted the premature Chromatin condensation (PCC), and then proliferation of PRR11-expressing cells was massively attenuated and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that PRR11, which is strictly regulated during cell cycle progression, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of accurate cell cycle progression through the late S phase to mitosis. - Highlights: • PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. • PRR11-knockdown caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase and G2 phase. • The treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. • PRR11-knockdown led to multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. • Forced expression of PRR11 promoted the PCC and inhibited

  13. PRR11 regulates late-S to G2/M phase progression and induces premature chromatin condensation (PCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yi; Zhu, Huifang; Wang, Yitao; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Jiang; Ozaki, Toshinori; Bu, Youquan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) is a novel tumor-related gene product likely implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression as well as lung cancer development. However, its precise role in cell cycle progression remains unclear. In the present study, we have further investigated the expression pattern and functional implication of PRR11 during cell cycle in detail in human lung carcinoma-derived H1299 cells. According to our immunofluorescence study, PRR11 was expressed largely in cytoplasm, the amount of PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase, and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. Consistent with those observations, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRR11 caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase. Intriguingly, the treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. Moreover, knockdown of PRR11 also resulted in a remarkable retardation of G2/M progression, and PRR11-knockdown cells subsequently underwent G2 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by obvious mitotic defects such as multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. In addition, forced expression of PRR11 promoted the premature Chromatin condensation (PCC), and then proliferation of PRR11-expressing cells was massively attenuated and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that PRR11, which is strictly regulated during cell cycle progression, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of accurate cell cycle progression through the late S phase to mitosis. - Highlights: • PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. • PRR11-knockdown caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase and G2 phase. • The treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. • PRR11-knockdown led to multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. • Forced expression of PRR11 promoted the PCC and inhibited

  14. 14-3-3 σ expression effects G2/M response to oxygen and correlates with ovarian cancer metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashnamoorthy Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cell culture experiments with primary cells have reported that cell proliferation is retarded in the presence of ambient compared to physiological O₂ levels. Cancer is primarily a disease of aberrant cell proliferation, therefore, studying cancer cells grown under ambient O₂ may be undesirable. To understand better the impact of O₂ on the propagation of cancer cells in vitro, we compared the growth potential of a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines under ambient (21% or physiological (3% O₂.Our observations demonstrate that similar to primary cells, many cancer cells maintain an inherent sensitivity to O₂, but some display insensitivity to changes in O₂ concentration. Further analysis revealed an association between defective G2/M cell cycle transition regulation and O₂ insensitivity resultant from overexpression of 14-3-3 σ. Targeting 14-3-3 σ overexpression with RNAi restored O₂ sensitivity in these cell lines. Additionally, we found that metastatic ovarian tumors frequently overexpress 14-3-3 σ, which in conjunction with phosphorylated RB, results in poor prognosis.Cancer cells show differential proliferative sensitivity to changes in O₂ concentration. Although a direct link between O₂ insensitivity and metastasis was not determined, this investigation showed that an O₂ insensitive phenotype in cancer cells to correlate with metastatic tumor progression.

  15. Genetic Control of the Trigger for the G2/M Checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Eric J. [Columbia University; Smilenov, Lubomir B. [Columbia University; Young, Erik F. [Columbia University

    2013-10-01

    system, the engagement of the G2/M checkpoint only occurs at doses where most of the cells are bound for mitotic catastrophe. Further, compound haploinsufficiency of various radiosensitizing genes does not impact the threshold of activation. The experiments confirm a threshold of activation for the G2/M checkpoint, hinting at two separate radiation response programs acting below and above this threshold. Small RNA transfer in bystander effect biology: Small regulatory RNA molecules have now risen in prominence and utility. Specific examples are small interfering RNAs (siRNA) which are employed in cell level expression ablation projects and micro-RNAs (miRNA) which are a pool of short transcription products which serve to modulate the expression of other transcripts emerging from the genome in a meta-regulatory fine tuning of gene expression. The existing tenets of bystander effect radiation biology involve the communication of inflammatory mediators or direct intercellular communication of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in cell-to-cell communicative organelles called gap junctions. By ablating gap junctions, reducing the ROS/inflammatory cytokine expression one can attenuate bystander effect signaling in cell culture systems. We hypothesized that miRNAs are a competent intercellular communication molecule and therefore a possible component of the bystander response. This view is supported by the observation that miRNA are secreted from cells in exosomes found in the circulation. This circulating pool reports disease type and severity in humans. We proposed use of microbeam irradiation technology at our facilities and enhancement of this capability with a new sorting technology which would allow us to sort irradiated and non-irradiated cells with absolute fidelity. Pursuing direct quantitative transfer assessment, we succeeded in designing and constructing a new add-on sorting appliance which harmonized with our existing instruments. The sorter allowed us to gently sort

  16. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P cycle duration were observed in the S and G2/M phases, whereas the G1 phase was indistinguishable under liganded and unliganded conditions. In addition, ERα knockdown in MCF-7 cells accelerated mitotic exit, whereas transfection of ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with exogenous ERα significantly shortened the S and G2/M phases (by 9.1 hours, P cycle progression through the S and G2/M phases than fulvestrant does, presumably because of the destabilizing effect of fulvestrant on ERα protein. Together, these results show that ERα modulates breast cancer cell proliferation by regulating events during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  17. Histone Modification Is Involved in Okadaic Acid (OA Induced DNA Damage Response and G2-M Transition Arrest in Maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are involved in regulation of chromatin structure. To investigate the relationship between chromatin modification and cell cycle regulation during plant cell proliferation, Okadaic acid (OA, a specific inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatase, was applied in this study. The results showed that OA caused the cell cycle arrest at preprophase, leading to seedling growth inhibition. Western blotting assay revealed that the spatial distribution of phosphorylation of Ser10 histone H3 tails (H3S10ph signals was altered under OA treatment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS was found to be at higher levels and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay displayed DNA breaks happened at the chromatin after treatment with OA, companied with an increase in the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 5 (H4K5ac level. From these observations, we speculated that the alteration of the spatial distribution of H3S10ph and the level of H4K5ac was involved in the procedure that OA induced DNA breaks and G2-M arrested by the accumulation of ROS, and that the histone H3S10ph and H4K5ac might facilitate DNA repair by their association with the chromatin decondensation.

  18. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. → Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. → Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  19. Effect of hyperthermia and radiation on the cell cycle progression of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia and irradiation on cytokinetics was studied using exponentially growing HeLa cells. To determine the effect of heat and/or radiation on the cell cycle progression, the changes in the DNA distribution of the cell population after time intervals after treatment were studied. The cellular DNA content of the cell population was measured by flow cytometry. The results obtained were as follows: 1. Compared with the control, the cellular DNA content distribution of HeLa cells treated with 43 0 C for 20 min and 60 min showed cell accumulation in S and G 2 M phases 8 hours after treatment. 2. Hyperthermic treatment at 45 0 C for 20 min caused cells to accumulate in S phase in the first 4 hours and G 2 M phase after 8 to 14.5 hours, whereas heat treatment at 45 0 C for 60 min caused cells to accumulate in G 2 M phase after 24 hours. 3. Irradiation of exponentially growing cells induced a block in the progress from G 2 M to G 1 phase. 4. Dose survival curves of HeLa cells with and without postirradiation thermal treatment (43 0 C, 60 min) showed significant enhancement of radiosensitivity by hyperthermia. 5. The sequential treatment, i.e. 5 Gy irradiation followed immediately by heat treatment at 43 0 C for 60 min, caused more cells to accumulate in G 2 M phase after 24 and 48 hours, as compared with 5 Gy irradiation alone. (author)

  20. Cell-cycle phase specificity of chloroethylnitrosoureas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linfoot, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the cancer chemotherapeutic agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) is considered a non-cell cycle phase specific drug, it has been shown to produce differential cell killing in G 1 , S, and G 2 /M phase cells, with S phase cells appearing relatively resistant. Studies of cell cycle phase specific cell killing produced by nitrosoureas with different chemical reactivities, clearly indicated that the ability of compounds to cross-link DNA was important in determining their phase specificity. Cells that lacked guanine O 6 -alkytransferase activity showed similar patterns of BCNU phase specificity regardless of their intrinsic sensitivity to BCNU. DNA inter-strand cross-linking, as measured by alkaline elution, was similar in cells exposed to BCNU in G 1 or S phase. 3 H [1-chloroethyl-1nitrosourea] binding to DNA was the same in G 1 , S and G 2 /M phase cells indicating that phase-specific differences in drug uptake and intracellular drug dose were not responsible for phase specific cell kill. These studies suggest that cross-link lesions, other than DNA inter-strand cross-links, and/or effects on DNA repair, other than guanine O 6 -alkyltransferase, are additional important determinants of BCNU phase specific cell killing

  1. Cell cycle arrest induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okaichi, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    1994-01-01

    It is known that various chemical reactions, such as cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and cell killing, can occur within the cells when exposed to ionizing radiation and ultraviolet radiation. Thus protein dynamics involved in such chemical reactions has received considerable attention. In this article, cell cycle regulation is first discussed in terms of the G2/M-phase and the G1/S-phase. Then, radiation-induced cell cycle arrest is reviewed. Cell cycle regulation mechanism involved in the G2 arrest, which is well known to occur when exposed to radiation, has recently been investigated using yeasts. In addition, recent study has yielded a noticeable finding that the G1 arrest can occur with intracellular accumulation of p53 product following ionization radiation. p53 is also shown to play an extremely important role in both DNA repair and cell killing due to DNA damage. Studies on the role of genes in protein groups induced by radiation will hold promise for the elucidation of cell cycle mechanism. (N.K.) 57 refs

  2. Endothelial cell subpopulations in vitro: cell volume, cell cycle, and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Bauer, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) are important clinical targets of radiation and other forms of free radical/oxidant stresses. In this study, we found that the extent of endothelial damage may be determined by the different cytotoxic responses of EC subpopulations. The following characteristics of EC subpopulations were examined: (1) cell volume; (2) cell cycle position; and (3) cytotoxic indexes for both acute cell survival and proliferative capacity after irradiation (137Cs, gamma, 0-10 Gy). EC cultured from bovine aortas were separated by centrifugal elutriation into subpopulations of different cell volumes. Through flow cytometry, we found that cell volume was related to the cell cycle phase distribution. The smallest EC were distributed in G1 phase and the larger cells were distributed in either early S, middle S, or late S + G2M phases. Cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation was not associated with acute cell loss. However, distribution in the cell cycle did relate to cell survival based on proliferative capacity (P less than 0.01). The order of increasing radioresistance was cells in G1 (D0 = 110 cGy), early S (135 cGy), middle S (145 cGy), and late S + G2M phases (180 cGy). These findings (1) suggest an age-related response to radiation in a nonmalignant differentiated cell type and (2) demonstrate EC subpopulations in culture

  3. Casticin impairs cell growth and induces cell apoptosis via cell cycle arrest in human oral cancer SCC-4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Guan-Ling; Peng, Shu-Fen; Liao, Ching-Lung; Ho, Heng-Chien; Lu, Kung-Wen; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Fan, Ming-Jen; La, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2018-02-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, present in natural plants, has been shown to have biological activities including anti-cancer activities. Herein, we investigated the anti-oral cancer activity of casticin on SCC-4 cells in vitro. Viable cells, cell cycle distribution, apoptotic cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and Ca 2+ production, levels of ΔΨ m and caspase activity were measured by flow cytometric assay. Cell apoptosis associated protein expressions were examined by Western blotting and confocal laser microscopy. Results indicated that casticin induced cell morphological changes, DNA condensation and damage, decreased the total viable cells, induced G 2 /M phase arrest in SCC-4 cells. Casticin promoted ROS and Ca 2+ productions, decreases the levels of ΔΨ m , promoted caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities in SCC-4 cells. Western blotting assay demonstrated that casticin affect protein level associated with G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Confocal laser microscopy also confirmed that casticin increased the translocation of AIF and cytochrome c in SCC-4 cells. In conclusion, casticin decreased cell number through G 2 /M phase arrest and the induction of cell apoptosis through caspase- and mitochondria-dependent pathways in SCC-4 cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Susceptibility of Hep3B cells in different phases of cell cycle to tBid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-Hong; Chen, George G; Ye, Caiguo; Leung, Billy C S; Ho, Rocky L K; Lai, Paul B S

    2011-01-01

    tBid is a pro-apoptotic molecule. Apoptosis inducers usually act in a cell cycle-specific fashion. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether effect of tBid on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) Hep3B cells was cell cycle phase specific. We synchronized Hep3B cells at G0/G1, S or G2/M phases by chemicals or flow sorting and tested the susceptibility of the cells to recombinant tBid. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay and apoptosis by TUNEL. The results revealed that tBid primarily targeted the cells at G0/G1 phase of cell cycle, and it also increased the cells at the G2/M phase. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), on the other hand, arrested Hep3B cells at the G0/G1 phase, but significantly reduced cells at G2/M phase. The levels of cell cycle-related proteins and caspases were altered in line with the change in the cell cycle. The combination of tBid with 5-FU caused more cells to be apoptotic than either agent alone. Therefore, the complementary effect of tBid and 5-FU on different phases of the cell cycle may explain their synergistric effect on Hep3B cells. The elucidation of the phase-specific effect of tBid points to a possible therapeutic option that combines different phase specific agents to overcome resistance of HCC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interplay between cell cycle and autophagy induced by boswellic acid analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathania, Anup S.; Guru, Santosh K.; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar, Ashok; Ahmad, Masroor; Bhushan, Shashi; Sharma, Parduman R.; Mahajan, Priya; Shah, Bhahwal A.; Sharma, Simmi; Nargotra, Amit; Vishwakarma, Ram; Korkaya, Hasan; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of autophagy induced by boswellic acid analog BA145 on cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells. BA145 induced robust autophagy in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and exhibited cell proliferation inhibition by inducing cells to undergo G2/M arrest. Inhibition of G2/M progression was associated with decreased expression of cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin E, cdc2, cdc25c and CDK-1. Pre-treatment of cells with autophagy inhibitors or silencing the expression of key autophagy genes abrogated BA145 induced G2/M arrest and downregulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. It was further observed that BA145 induced autophagy by targeting mTOR kinase (IC50 1 μM), leading to reduced expression of p-mTOR, p-p70S6K (T389), p-4EBP (T37/46) and p-S6 (S240/244). Notably, inhibition of mTOR signalling by BA145 was followed by attendant activation of AKT and its membrane translocation. Inhibition of Akt through pharmacological inhibitors or siRNAs enhanced BA145 mediated autophagy, G2/M arrest and reduced expression of G2/M regulators. Further studies revealed that BA145 arbitrated inhibition of mTOR led to the activation of Akt through IGFR/PI3k/Akt feedback loop. Intervention in IGFR/PI3k/Akt loop further depreciated Akt phosphorylation and its membrane translocation that culminates in augmented autophagy with concomitant G2/M arrest and cell death. PMID:27680387

  6. Cell cycle dependence of boron uptake in various boron compounds used for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, F.; Matsumura, A.; Shibata, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Nose, T.; Okumura, M.

    2000-01-01

    In neutron capture therapy, it is important that the tumor take boron in selectively. Furthermore, it is ideal when the uptake is equal in each tumor cell. Some indirect proof of differences in boron uptake among neoplastic cell cycles has been documented. However, no investigation has yet measured boron uptake directly. Using flow cytometry, in the present study cells were sorted by G0/G1 phase and G2/M phase, and the boron concentration of each fraction was measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The results were that BSH (sodiumborocaptate) and BPA (p-boronophenylalanine) had higher rates of boron uptake in the G2/M group than in the G0/G1 group. However, in BPA the difference was more prominent, which revealed a 2.2-3.3 times higher uptake of boron in the G2/M group than in the G0/G1 group. (author)

  7. Identification of a novel EGF-sensitive cell cycle checkpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Francesca; Zhang Huihua; Burgess, Antony W.

    2007-01-01

    The site of action of growth factors on mammalian cell cycle has been assigned to the boundary between the G1 and S phases. We show here that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) is also required for mitosis. BaF/3 cells expressing the EGFR (BaF/wtEGFR) synthesize DNA in response to EGF, but arrest in S-phase. We have generated a cell line (BaF/ERX) with defective downregulation of the EGFR and sustained activation of EGFR signalling pathways: these cells undergo mitosis in an EGF-dependent manner. The transit of BaF/ERX cells through G2/M strictly requires activation of EGFR and is abolished by AG1478. This phenotype is mimicked by co-expression of ErbB2 in BaF/wtEGFR cells, and abolished by inhibition of the EGFR kinase, suggesting that sustained signalling of the EGFR, through impaired downregulation of the EGFR or heterodimerization, is required for completion of the cycle. We have confirmed the role of EGFR signalling in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle using a human tumor cell line which overexpresses the EGFR and is dependent on EGFR signalling for growth. These findings unmask an EGF-sensitive checkpoint, helping to understand the link between sustained EGFR signalling, proliferation and the acquisition of a radioresistant phenotype in cancer cells

  8. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-26

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer.

  9. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence

  10. Cell cycle delays induced by heavy ion irradiation of synchronous mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Ritter, S.; Kraft, G.

    1994-01-01

    Cell cycle delays in V79 Chinese hamster cells induced by heavy ion exposure have been investigated using flow cytometry. Synchronous cell populations in G 1 -, S- and late-S/G 2 M-phase were used. Cells were irradiated with particles from Z = 10 (neon) up to Z = 96 (uranium) in the energy range from 2.4 to 17.4 MeV/u and the LET range from 415 to 16225 keV/μm at the UNILAC at GSI, Darmstadt. For comparison, experiments with 250 kV X-rays were performed. For light particles like neon, cell cycle perturbations comparable to those after X-ray irradiation were found, and with increasing LET an increasing delay per particle traversal was observed. For the highest LET-values, extended delays in G 1 -, S- and G 2 M-phase were detected immediately after irradiation. A large fraction of the cells remained in S-phase or G 2 M-phase up to 48 h or longer after irradiation. No significant cell age dependence of cycle delays was detected for the very high LET values. In addition to cell cycle delays, two effects related to the DNA-content as determined by flow cytometry were found after irradiation with very high LET particles, which were attributed to cell fusion and to drastic morphological changes of the cells. Estimations based on the dose deposited by a single particle hit in the cell nucleus and the actual number of hits show, that the basic trend of the experimental results can be explained by the stochastic properties of particle radiation. (orig.)

  11. Multiparameter Cell Cycle Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobberger, James W; Sramkoski, R Michael; Stefan, Tammy; Woost, Philip G

    2018-01-01

    Cell cycle cytometry and analysis are essential tools for studying cells of model organisms and natural populations (e.g., bone marrow). Methods have not changed much for many years. The simplest and most common protocol is DNA content analysis, which is extensively published and reviewed. The next most common protocol, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine S phase labeling detected by specific antibodies, is also well published and reviewed. More recently, S phase labeling using 5'-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and a chemical reaction to label substituted DNA has been established as a basic, reliable protocol. Multiple antibody labeling to detect epitopes on cell cycle regulated proteins, which is what this chapter is about, is the most complex of these cytometric cell cycle assays, requiring knowledge of the chemistry of fixation, the biochemistry of antibody-antigen reactions, and spectral compensation. However, because this knowledge is relatively well presented methodologically in many papers and reviews, this chapter will present a minimal Methods section for one mammalian cell type and an extended Notes section, focusing on aspects that are problematic or not well described in the literature. Most of the presented work involves how to segment the data to produce a complete, progressive, and compartmentalized cell cycle analysis from early G1 to late mitosis (telophase). A more recent development, using fluorescent proteins fused with proteins or peptides that are degraded by ubiquitination during specific periods of the cell cycle, termed "Fucci" (fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators) provide an analysis similar in concept to multiple antibody labeling, except in this case cells can be analyzed while living and transgenic organisms can be created to perform cell cycle analysis ex or in vivo (Sakaue-Sawano et al., Cell 132:487-498, 2007). This technology will not be discussed.

  12. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Anna; Rosebrock, Adam; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Chen, Haiying; Skiena, Steve; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2005-07-01

    Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  13. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  14. Lobaplatin arrests cell cycle progression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

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    Chen Chang-Jie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC still is a big burden for China. In recent years, the third-generation platinum compounds have been proposed as potential active agents for HCC. However, more experimental and clinical data are warranted to support the proposal. In the present study, the effect of lobaplatin was assessed in five HCC cell lines and the underlying molecular mechanisms in terms of cell cycle kinetics were explored. Methods Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin to human HCC cell lines was examined using MTT cell proliferation assay. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Expression of cell cycle-regulated genes was examined at both the mRNA (RT-PCR and protein (Western blot levels. The phosphorylation status of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and retinoblastoma (Rb protein was also examined using Western blot analysis. Results Lobaplatin inhibited proliferation of human HCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. For the most sensitive SMMC-7721 cells, lobaplatin arrested cell cycle progression in G1 and G2/M phases time-dependently which might be associated with the down-regulation of cyclin B, CDK1, CDC25C, phosphorylated CDK1 (pCDK1, pCDK4, Rb, E2F, and pRb, and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and p27. Conclusion Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin in human HCC cells might be due to its ability to arrest cell cycle progression which would contribute to the potential use of lobaplatin for the management of HCC.

  15. Effects on proliferation and cell cycle of irradiated KG-1 cells stimulated by CM-CSF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dehuang; Dong Bo; Wen Gengyun; Luo Qingliang; Mao Bingzhi

    2000-01-01

    In order to explore the variety of cell proliferation and cell cycle after exposure to ionizing radiation, the responses of irradiated KG-1 cells of the human myeloid leukemia stimulated by GM-CSF, the most common used cytokine in clinic, were investigated. The results showed that GM-CSF enhance KG-1 cells proliferation, reduce G0/G1 block, increase S phase and G2/M phase. The stimulation effects of the GM-CSF are more effective in irradiated group than in control group

  16. Influence of cell cycle on responses of MCF-7 cells to benzo[a]pyrene

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    Giddings Ian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP is a widespread environmental genotoxic carcinogen that damages DNA by forming adducts. This damage along with activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR induces complex transcriptional responses in cells. To investigate whether human cells are more susceptible to BaP in a particular phase of the cell cycle, synchronised breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were exposed to BaP. Cell cycle progression was analysed by flow cytometry, DNA adduct formation was assessed by 32P-postlabeling analysis, microarrays of 44K human genome-wide oligos and RT-PCR were used to detect gene expression (mRNA changes and Western blotting was performed to determine the expression of some proteins, including cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A1 and CYP1B1, which are involved in BaP metabolism. Results Following BaP exposure, cells evaded G1 arrest and accumulated in S-phase. Higher levels of DNA damage occurred in S- and G2/M- compared with G0/G1-enriched cultures. Genes that were found to have altered expression included those involved in xenobiotic metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed the involvement of various signalling pathways in response to BaP exposure, such as the Catenin/Wnt pathway in G1, the ERK pathway in G1 and S, the Nrf2 pathway in S and G2/M and the Akt pathway in G2/M. An important finding was that higher levels of DNA damage in S- and G2/M-enriched cultures correlated with higher levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA and proteins. Moreover, exposure of synchronised MCF-7 cells to BaP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE, the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of BaP, did not result in significant changes in DNA adduct levels at different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusions This study characterised the complex gene response to BaP in MCF-7 cells and revealed a strong correlation between the varying efficiency of BaP metabolism and DNA damage in different phases of the cell

  17. Redistribution of cell cycle by arsenic trioxide is associated with demethylation and expression changes of cell cycle related genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (NB4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Saeed; Khaleghian, Ali; Ahmadian, Shahin; Alizadeh, Shaban; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2018-01-01

    PML-RARα perturbs the normal epigenetic setting, which is essential to oncogenic transformation in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Transcription induction and recruitment of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) by PML-RARα and subsequent hypermethylation are components of this perturbation. Arsenic trioxide (ATO), an important drug in APL therapy, concurrent with degradation of PML-RARα induces cell cycle change and apoptosis. How ATO causes cell cycle alteration has remained largely unexplained. Here, we investigated DNA methylation patterns of cell cycle regulatory genes promoters, the effects of ATO on the methylated genes and cell cycle distribution in an APL cell line, NB4. Analysis of promoter methylation status of 22 cell cycle related genes in NB4 revealed that CCND1, CCNE1, CCNF, CDKN1A, GADD45α, and RBL1 genes were methylated 60.7, 84.6, 58.6, 8.7, 33.4, and 73.7%, respectively, that after treatment with 2 μM ATO for 48 h, turn into 0.6, 13.8, 0.1, 6.6, 10.7, and 54.5% methylated. ATO significantly reduced the expression of DNMT1, 3A, and 3B. ATO induced the expression of CCND1, CCNE1, and GADD45α genes, suppressed the expression of CCNF and CDKN1A genes, which were consistent with decreased number of cells in G1 and S phases and increased number of cells in G2/M phase. In conclusion, demethylation and alteration in the expression level of the cell cycle related genes may be possible mechanisms in ATO-induced cell cycle arrest in APL cells. It may suggest that ATO by demethylation of CCND1 and CCNE1 and their transcriptional activation accelerates G1 and S transition into the G2/M cell cycle arrest.

  18. Effects of γ-radiation on cell growth, cell cycle and promoter methylation of 22 cell cycle genes in the 1321NI astrocytoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamian, Yaman; Abou Alchamat, Ghalia; Murad, Hossam; Madania, Ammar

    2017-09-01

    DNA damage caused by radiation initiates biological responses affecting cell fate. DNA methylation regulates gene expression and modulates DNA damage pathways. Alterations in the methylation profiles of cell cycle regulating genes may control cell response to radiation. In this study we investigated the effect of ionizing radiation on the methylation levels of 22 cell cycle regulating genes in correlation with gene expression in 1321NI astrocytoma cell line. 1321NI cells were irradiated with 2, 5 or 10Gy doses then analyzed after 24, 48 and 72h for cell viability using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliu bromide) assay. Flow cytometry were used to study the effect of 10Gy irradiation on cell cycle. EpiTect Methyl II PCR Array was used to identify differentially methylated genes in irradiated cells. Changes in gene expression was determined by qPCR. Azacytidine treatment was used to determine whether DNA methylation affectes gene expression. Our results showed that irradiation decreased cell viability and caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M. Out of 22 genes tested, only CCNF and RAD9A showed some increase in DNA methylation (3.59% and 3.62%, respectively) after 10Gy irradiation, and this increase coincided with downregulation of both genes (by 4 and 2 fold, respectively). with azacytidine confirmed that expression of CCNF and RAD9A genes was regulated by methylation. 1321NI cell line is highly radioresistant and that irradiation of these cells with a 10Gy dose increases DNA methylation of CCNF and RAD9A genes. This dose down-regulates these genes, favoring G2/M arrest. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Helicase-like transcription factor (Hltf regulates G2/M transition, Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a cardiac transcription networks, and collagen biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Helmer

    Full Text Available HLTF/Hltf regulates transcription, remodels chromatin, and coordinates DNA damage repair. Hltf is expressed in mouse brain and heart during embryonic and postnatal development. Silencing Hltf is semilethal. Seventy-four percent of congenic C57BL/6J Hltf knockout mice died, 75% within 12-24 hours of birth. Previous studies in neonatal (6-8 hour postpartum brain revealed silencing Hltf disrupted cell cycle progression, and attenuated DNA damage repair. An RNA-Seq snapshot of neonatal heart transcriptome showed 1,536 of 20,000 total transcripts were altered (p < 0.05 - 10 up- and 1,526 downregulated. Pathway enrichment analysis with MetaCore™ showed Hltf's regulation of the G2/M transition (p=9.726E(-15 of the cell cycle in heart is nearly identical to its role in brain. In addition, Brca1 and 12 members of the Brca1 associated genome surveillance complex are also downregulated. Activation of caspase 3 coincides with transcriptional repression of Bcl-2. Hltf loss caused downregulation of Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a signaling cascades as well as Myh7b/miR499 transcription. Hltf-specific binding to promoters and/or regulatory regions of these genes was authenticated by ChIP-PCR. Hif-1a targets for prolyl (P4ha1, P4ha2 and lysyl (Plod2 collagen hydroxylation, PPIase enzymes (Ppid, Ppif, Ppil3 for collagen trimerization, and lysyl oxidase (Loxl2 for collagen-elastin crosslinking were downregulated. However, transcription of genes for collagens, fibronectin, Mmps and their inhibitors (Timps was unaffected. The collective downregulation of genes whose protein products control collagen biogenesis caused disorganization of the interstitial and perivascular myocardial collagen fibrillar network as viewed with picrosirius red-staining, and authenticated with spectral imaging. Wavy collagen bundles in control hearts contrasted with collagen fibers that were thin, short and disorganized in Hltf null hearts. Collagen bundles in Hltf null hearts were tangled and

  20. High content image based analysis identifies cell cycle inhibitors as regulators of Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Krishna P; Benko, Jacqueline G; Mudhasani, Rajini; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G

    2012-09-25

    Viruses modulate a number of host biological responses including the cell cycle to favor their replication. In this study, we developed a high-content imaging (HCI) assay to measure DNA content and identify different phases of the cell cycle. We then investigated the potential effects of cell cycle arrest on Ebola virus (EBOV) infection. Cells arrested in G1 phase by serum starvation or G1/S phase using aphidicolin or G2/M phase using nocodazole showed much reduced EBOV infection compared to the untreated control. Release of cells from serum starvation or aphidicolin block resulted in a time-dependent increase in the percentage of EBOV infected cells. The effect of EBOV infection on cell cycle progression was found to be cell-type dependent. Infection of asynchronous MCF-10A cells with EBOV resulted in a reduced number of cells in G2/M phase with concomitant increase of cells in G1 phase. However, these effects were not observed in HeLa or A549 cells. Together, our studies suggest that EBOV requires actively proliferating cells for efficient replication. Furthermore, multiplexing of HCI based assays to detect viral infection, cell cycle status and other phenotypic changes in a single cell population will provide useful information during screening campaigns using siRNA and small molecule therapeutics.

  1. High Content Image Based Analysis Identifies Cell Cycle Inhibitors as Regulators of Ebola Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Bavari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses modulate a number of host biological responses including the cell cycle to favor their replication. In this study, we developed a high-content imaging (HCI assay to measure DNA content and identify different phases of the cell cycle. We then investigated the potential effects of cell cycle arrest on Ebola virus (EBOV infection. Cells arrested in G1 phase by serum starvation or G1/S phase using aphidicolin or G2/M phase using nocodazole showed much reduced EBOV infection compared to the untreated control. Release of cells from serum starvation or aphidicolin block resulted in a time-dependent increase in the percentage of EBOV infected cells. The effect of EBOV infection on cell cycle progression was found to be cell-type dependent. Infection of asynchronous MCF-10A cells with EBOV resulted in a reduced number of cells in G2/M phase with concomitant increase of cells in G1 phase. However, these effects were not observed in HeLa or A549 cells. Together, our studies suggest that EBOV requires actively proliferating cells for efficient replication. Furthermore, multiplexing of HCI based assays to detect viral infection, cell cycle status and other phenotypic changes in a single cell population will provide useful information during screening campaigns using siRNA and small molecule therapeutics.

  2. Studies with GFP-Vpr fusion proteins: induction of apoptosis but ablation of cell-cycle arrest despite nuclear membrane or nuclear localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldhuber, Megan G.; Bateson, Michael; Tan, Judith; Greenway, Alison L.; McPhee, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr protein is known to arrest the cell cycle in G 2 /M and induce apoptosis following arrest. The functions of Vpr relative to its location in the cell remain unresolved. We now demonstrate that the location and function of Vpr are dependent on the makeup of fusion proteins and that the functions of G 2 /M arrest and apoptosis are separable. Using green fluorescence protein mutants (EGFP or EYFP), we found that fusion at either the N- or C-terminus compromised the ability of Vpr to arrest cell cycling, relative to that of His-Vpr or wild-type protein. Additionally, utilizing the ability to specifically identify cells expressing the fusion proteins, we confirm that Vpr can induce apoptosis, but appears to be independent of cell-cycle arrest in G 2 /M. Both N- and C-terminal Vpr/EYFP fusion proteins induced apoptosis but caused minimal G 2 /M arrest. These studies with Vpr fusion proteins indicate that the functions of Vpr leading to G 2 /M arrest and apoptosis are separable and that fusion of Vpr to EGFP or EYFP affected the localization of the protein. Our findings suggest that nuclear membrane localization and nuclear import and export are strongly governed by modification of the N-terminus of Vpr

  3. Radiation could induce p53-independent and cell cycle - unrelated apoptosis in 5-fluorouracil radiosensitized head and neck carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didelot, C.; Mirjolet, J.F.; Barberi-Heyob, M.; Ramacci, C.; Merlin, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of chemoresistance induction in radio sensitivity and cellular behavior after irradiation remains misunderstood. This study was designed to understand the relationship between radiation-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and radiosensitivity in KB cell line and KB3 subline selected after 5-fluorouracil (5FU) exposure. Exposure of KB cells to 5FU led to an increase in radiosensitivity. G 2 /M cell cycle arrest was observed in the two cell lines after irradiation. The radioresistant KB cell line reached the maximum arrest two hours before KB3. The cellular exit from this arrest was found to be related to the wild type p53 protein expression induction. After irradiation, only KB3 cell line underwent apoptosis. This apoptosis induction seemed to be independent of G 2 /M arrest exit, which was carried out later. The difference in radiosensitivity between KB and KB3 subline may result therefore from both a difference in apoptosis induction and a difference in G 2 /M arrest maximum duration. Moreover, 5FU exposure has led to an increase in constitutive p53 protein expression, which may be associated with an increase in basal apoptosis cell fraction. Given the existing correlation between radiosensitivity and the percentage of basal apoptosis. the constitutive p53 protein expression may be related to intrinsic radiosensitivity in our cellular model. (author)

  4. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID.

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    Quy Le

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AID (Activation Induced Deaminase deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome.

  5. 14-3-3 theta binding to cell cycle regulatory factors is enhanced by HIV-1 Vpr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Keiko

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite continuing advances in our understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell depletion in HIV-1-infected individuals remains unclear. The HIV-1 Vpr accessory protein causes cell death, likely through a mechanism related to its ability to arrest cells in the G2,M phase. Recent evidence implicated the scaffold protein, 14-3-3, in Vpr cell cycle blockade. Results We found that in human T cells, 14-3-3 plays an active role in mediating Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest and reveal a dramatic increase in the amount of Cdk1, Cdc25C, and CyclinB1 bound to 14-3-3 θ during Vprv-induced G2,M arrest. By contrast, a cell-cycle-arrest-dead Vpr mutant failed to augment 14-3-3 θ association with Cdk1 and CyclinB1. Moreover, G2,M arrest caused by HIV-1 infection strongly correlated with a disruption in 14-3-3 θ binding to centrosomal proteins, Plk1 and centrin. Finally, Vpr caused elevated levels of CyclinB1, Plk1, and Cdk1 in a complex with the nuclear transport and spindle assembly protein, importin β. Conclusion Thus, our data reveal a new facet of Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest involving previously unrecognized abnormal rearrangements of multiprotein assemblies containing key cell cycle regulatory proteins. Reviewers This article was reviewed by David Kaplan, Nathaniel R. Landau and Yan Zhou.

  6. Bevacizumab inhibits proliferation of choroidal endothelial cells by regulation of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusovici, Raluca; Patel, Chirag J; Chalam, Kakarla V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cell cycle changes in choroidal endothelial cells treated with varying doses of bevacizumab in the presence of a range of concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab, a drug widely used in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, neutralizes all isoforms of VEGF. However, the effect of intravitreal administration of bevacizumab on the choroidal endothelial cell cycle has not been established. Monkey choroidal endothelial (RF/6A) cells were treated with VEGF 50 ng/mL and escalating doses of bevacizumab 0.1-2 mg/mL for 72 hours. Cell cycle changes in response to bevacizumab were analyzed by flow cytometry and propidium iodide staining. Cell proliferation was measured using the WST-1 assay. Morphological changes were recorded by bright field cell microscopy. Bevacizumab inhibited proliferation of choroidal endothelial cells by stabilization of the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle analysis of VEGF-enriched choroidal endothelial cells revealed a predominant increase in the G2/M population (21.84%, P, 0.01) and a decrease in the G0/G1 phase population (55.08%, P, 0.01). Addition of escalating doses of bevacizumab stabilized VEGF-enriched cells in the G0/G1 phase (55.08%, 54.49%, 56.3%, and 64% [P, 0.01]) and arrested proliferation by inhibiting the G2/M phase (21.84%, 21.46%, 20.59%, 20.94%, and 16.1% [P, 0.01]). The increase in G0/G1 subpopulation in VEGF-enriched and bevacizumab-treated cells compared with VEGF-enriched cells alone was dose-dependent. Bevacizumab arrests proliferation of VEGF-enriched choroidal endothelial cells by stabilizing the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase and inhibiting the G2/M phase in a dose-dependent fashion.

  7. Cell cycle progression in irradiated endothelial cells cultured from bovine aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Ward, W.F.; Bauer, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    Logarithmically growing endothelial cells from bovine aortas were exposed to single doses of 0-10 Gy of 60Co gamma rays, and cell cycle phase distribution and progression were examined by flow cytometry and autoradiography. In some experiments, cells were synchronized in the cell cycle with hydroxyurea (1 mM). Cell number in sham-irradiated control cultures doubled in approximately 24 h. Estimated cycle stage times for control cells were 14.4 h for G1 phase, 7.2 h for S phase, and 2.4 h for G2 + M phase. Irradiated cells demonstrated a reduced distribution at the G1/S phase border at 4 h, and an increased distribution in G2 + M phase at 24 h postirradiation. Autoradiographs of irradiated cells after continuous [3H]thymidine labeling indicated a block in G1 phase or at the G1/S-phase border. The duration of the block was dose dependent (2-3 min/cGy). Progression of the endothelial cells through S phase after removal of the hydroxyurea block also was retarded by irradiation, as demonstrated by increased distribution in early S phase and decreased distribution in late S phase. These results indicate that progression of asynchronous cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells through the DNA synthetic cycle is susceptible to radiation inhibition at specific sites in the cycle, resulting in redistribution and partial synchronization of the population. Thus aortic endothelial cells, diploid cells from a normal tissue, resemble many immortal cell types that have been examined in this regard in vitro

  8. Biogenesis and dynamics of mitochondria during the cell cycle: significance of 3'UTRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martínez-Diez

    Full Text Available Nowadays, we are facing a renaissance of mitochondria in cancer biology. However, our knowledge of the basic cell biology and on the timing and mechanisms that control the biosynthesis of mitochondrial constituents during progression through the cell cycle of mammalian cells remain largely unknown. Herein, we document the in vivo changes on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics that accompany cellular mitosis, and illustrate the following key points of the biogenesis of mitochondria during progression of liver cells through the cycle: (i the replication of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes is synchronized during cellular proliferation, (ii the accretion of OXPHOS proteins is asynchronously regulated during proliferation being the synthesis of beta-F1-ATPase and Hsp60 carried out also at G2/M and, (iii the biosynthesis of cardiolipin is achieved during the S phase, although full development of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim is attained at G2/M. Furthermore, we demonstrate using reporter constructs that the mechanism regulating the accretion of beta-F1-ATPase during cellular proliferation is controlled at the level of mRNA translation by the 3'UTR of the transcript. The 3'UTR-driven synthesis of the protein at G2/M is essential for conferring to the daughter cells the original phenotype of the parental cell. Our findings suggest that alterations on this process may promote deregulated beta-F1-ATPase expression in human cancer.

  9. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy after partial synchronization of cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, H.J.; Ammon, J.; Nuevemann, M.; Zum Winkel, K.; Technische Hochschule Aachen

    1977-01-01

    Apart from densely ionising radiations, radiotherapy and chemotherapy after partial synchronisation of the cell cycle are, at the moment, the only way to improve the efficiency of a treatment of malignant tumours. The new principle is based on the finding that tumour cells are more sensitive to radiation or chemotherapy in a certain metabolic situation. Partial synchronisation of the cell cycle makes it possible to enrich tumour cells in a certain metabolic state. In order to show the efficiency of such a measure, several methods can be used. Recently, impulse cytophotometry has been replacing these methods, since it permits a quick, simple, and individual control of the synchronisation effect. However, there has not been any clinical experiment yet to prove that tumour cells show a maximum sensitivity to radio- and chemotherapy in the G 2 -M-phase. This is why a number of patients with malignant tumours which could not be operated or treated with the usual radiotherapy or polychemotherapy were treated according to this new therapeutic principle. The results obtained in 233 cases encourage the specialists to continue the experiments. The indication of a treatment after partial synchronisation of the cell cycle should be based on the tumour spread as documented according to the TNM-system. Only when these guidelines are followed will it be possible to explain the problems still unsolved in the principle of radiotherapy and chemotherapy after partial synchronisation of the cell cycle and to carry out radio- and chemotherapy with improved efficiency in the future. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Phase-changes in cell cycle of wound tissue irradiated with 5.21 Gy soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianzhong; Zhou Yuanguo; Cheng Tianmin; Zhou Ping; Liu Xia; Li Ping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the phase-changes in cell cycle of wound tissue which was locally irradiated with 5.21 Gy soft X-rays. Methods: Flow cytometry and PI staining were used to analyze cell cycle. Cell proliferation was determined with BrdU labeling. Results: During 3-9 days after irradiation, the percentage of the G 0 /G 1 phase cells in wound of the control side decreased while the percentage of S phase cells increased and reached the highest value on day 9. The percentage of G 2 /M phase cells also increased, and reached its peak on day 15. The percentage of G 0 /G 1 phase cell increased in wound of the irradiation side and was higher than that of the control wound, meanwhile the percentages of S and G 2 /M cells were significantly lower than those of the control wound. In the period of 12-22 days after wounding, the percentage of S phase cells increased and reached its peak value on the 22 th day. When most of cells were in S phase and arrested dramatically. Through the whole healing process, the percentage of G 2 /M in wound of the irradiation side was lower than that of the non-irradiated wound. The BrdU-positive cells were fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Conclusion: These results suggest that G 1 block, S phase arrest, and switch of G 2 /M with suppression of mitotic activity of these cells are induced by local 5.21 Gy soft X-ray irradiation. Therefore, wound healing delay is induced partly by cell cycle arrest

  11. Cell cycle pathway dysregulation in human keratinocytes during chronic exposure to low arsenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eryani, Laila; Waigel, Sabine; Jala, Venkatakrishna; Jenkins, Samantha F; States, J Christopher

    2017-09-15

    Arsenic is naturally prevalent in the earth's crust and widely distributed in air and water. Chronic low arsenic exposure is associated with several cancers in vivo, including skin cancer, and with transformation in vitro of cell lines including immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Arsenic also is associated with cell cycle dysregulation at different exposure levels in multiple cell lines. In this work, we analyzed gene expression in HaCaT cells to gain an understanding of gene expression changes contributing to transformation at an early time point. HaCaT cells were exposed to 0 or 100nM NaAsO 2 for 7weeks. Total RNA was purified and analyzed by microarray hybridization. Differential expression with fold change≥|1.5| and p-value≤0.05 was determined using Partek Genomic Suite™ and pathway and network analyses using MetaCore™ software (FDR≤0.05). Cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry. 644 mRNAs were differentially expressed. Cell cycle/cell cycle regulation pathways predominated in the list of dysregulated pathways. Genes involved in replication origin licensing were enriched in the network. Cell cycle assay analysis showed an increase in G2/M compartment in arsenite-exposed cells. Arsenite exposure induced differential gene expression indicating dysregulation of cell cycle control, which was confirmed by cell cycle analysis. The results suggest that cell cycle dysregulation is an early event in transformation manifested in cells unable to transit G2/M efficiently. Further study at later time points will reveal additional changes in gene expression related to transformation processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell cycle-dependent Rho GTPase activity dynamically regulates cancer cell motility and invasion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Shinji; Kamioka, Yuji; Mimori, Koshi; Naito, Yoko; Ishii, Taeko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nishida, Naohiro; Maeda, Sakae; Naito, Atsushi; Kikuta, Junichi; Nishikawa, Keizo; Nishimura, Junichi; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Ishii, Hideshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Kikuchi, Akira; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP), was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers.

  13. Cell cycle-dependent Rho GTPase activity dynamically regulates cancer cell motility and invasion in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kagawa

    Full Text Available The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP, was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers.

  14. Laser scanning cytometry (LCS) allows detailed analysis of the cell cycle in PI stained human fibroblasts (TIG-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M; Sasaki, K; Satoh, T; Kurose, A; Kamada, T; Furuya, T; Murakami, T; Todoroki, T

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated a method for the in situ determination of the cell cycle phases of TIG-7 fibroblasts using a laser scanning cytometer (LSC) which has not only a function equivalent to flow cytometry (FCM) but also has a capability unique in itself. LSC allows a more detailed analysis of the cell cycle in cells stained with propidium iodide (PI) than FCM. With LSC it is possible to discriminate between mitotic cells and G2 cells, between post-mitotic cells and G1 cells, and between quiescent cells and cycling cells in a PI fluorescence peak (chromatin condensation) vs. fluorescence value (DNA content) cytogram for cells stained with PI. These were amply confirmed by experiments using colcemid and adriamycin. We were able to identify at least six cell subpopulations for PI stained cells using LSC; namely G1, S, G2, M, postmitotic and quiescent cell populations. LSC analysis facilitates the monitoring of effects of drugs on the cell cycle.

  15. The production of reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial membrane potential are modulated during onion oil-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-jiang; Stahl, Thorsten; Hu, Ying; Kassie, Fekadu; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2006-03-01

    Protective effects of Allium vegetables against cancers have been shown extensively in experimental animals and epidemiologic studies. We investigated cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis by onion oil extracted from Allium cepa, a widely consumed Allium vegetable, in human lung cancer A549 cells. GC/MS analysis suggested that propyl sulfides but not allyl sulfides are major sulfur-containing constituents of onion oil. Onion oil at 12.5 mg/L significantly induced apoptosis (13% increase of apoptotic cells) as indicated by sub-G1 DNA content. It also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase; 25 mg/L onion oil increased the percentage of G2/M cells almost 6-fold compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide control. The action of onion oil may occur via a reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway because cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were blocked by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and exogenous glutathione. Marked collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that dysfunction of the mitochondria may be involved in the oxidative burst and apoptosis induced by onion oil. Expression of phospho-cdc2 and phospho-cyclin B1 were downregulated by onion oil, perhaps accounting for the G2/M arrest. Overall, these results suggest that onion oil may exert chemopreventive action by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells.

  16. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Miaoxian; Chung, Hau Yin; Li, Yaolan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. → ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. → ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. → ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  17. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Miaoxian [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Chung, Hau Yin, E-mail: anthonychung@cuhk.edu.hk [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Yaolan [Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Pharmacodynamic Constituents of TCM and New Drug Research, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  18. Determination of cell cycle phases in live B16 melanoma cells using IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedolla, Diana E; Kenig, Saša; Mitri, Elisa; Ferraris, Paolo; Marcello, Alessandro; Grenci, Gianluca; Vaccari, Lisa

    2013-07-21

    The knowledge of cell cycle phase distribution is of paramount importance for understanding cellular behaviour under normal and stressed growth conditions. This task is usually assessed using Flow Cytometry (FC) or immunohistochemistry. Here we report on the use of FTIR microspectroscopy in Microfluidic Devices (MD-IRMS) as an alternative technique for studying cell cycle distribution in live cells. Asynchronous, S- and G0-synchronized B16 mouse melanoma cells were studied by running parallel experiments based on MD-IRMS and FC using Propidium Iodide (PI) staining. MD-IRMS experiments have been done using silicon-modified BaF2 devices, where the thin silicon layer prevents BaF2 dissolution without affecting the transparency of the material and therefore enabling a better assessment of the Phosphate I (PhI) and II (PhII) bands. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) of cellular microspectra in the 1300-1000 cm(-1) region pointed out a distribution of cells among clusters, which is in good agreement with FC results among G0/G1, S and G2/M phases. The differentiation is mostly driven by the intensity of PhI and PhII bands. In particular, PhI almost doubles from the G0/G1 to G2/M phase, in agreement with the trend followed by nucleic acids during cellular progression. MD-IRMS is then proposed as a powerful method for the in situ determination of the cell cycle stage of an individual cell, without any labelling or staining, which gives the advantage of possibly monitoring specific cellular responses to several types of stimuli by clearly separating the spectral signatures related to the cellular response from those of cells that are normally progressing.

  19. HIV-1 Vif's Capacity To Manipulate the Cell Cycle Is Species Specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Edward L; Becker, Jordan T; Fricke, Stephanie L; Patel, Kishan; Sherer, Nathan M

    2018-04-01

    Cells derived from mice and other rodents exhibit profound blocks to HIV-1 virion production, reflecting species-specific incompatibilities between viral Tat and Rev proteins and essential host factors cyclin T1 (CCNT1) and exportin-1 (XPO1, also known as CRM1), respectively. To determine if mouse cell blocks other than CCNT1 and XPO1 affect HIV's postintegration stages, we studied HIV-1 NL4-3 gene expression in mouse NIH 3T3 cells modified to constitutively express HIV-1-compatible versions of CCNT1 and XPO1 (3T3.CX cells). 3T3.CX cells supported both Rev-independent and Rev-dependent viral gene expression and produced relatively robust levels of virus particles, confirming that CCNT1 and XPO1 represent the predominant blocks to these stages. Unexpectedly, however, 3T3.CX cells were remarkably resistant to virus-induced cytopathic effects observed in human cell lines, which we mapped to the viral protein Vif and its apparent species-specific capacity to induce G 2 /M cell cycle arrest. Vif was able to mediate rapid degradation of human APOBEC3G and the PPP2R5D regulatory B56 subunit of the PP2A phosphatase holoenzyme in mouse cells, thus demonstrating that Vif NL4-3 's modulation of the cell cycle can be functionally uncoupled from some of its other defined roles in CUL5-dependent protein degradation. Vif was also unable to induce G 2 /M cell cycle arrest in other nonhuman cell types, including cells derived from nonhuman primates, leading us to propose that one or more human-specific cofactors underpin Vif's ability to modulate the cell cycle. IMPORTANCE Cells derived from mice and other rodents exhibit profound blocks to HIV-1 replication, thus hindering the development of a low-cost small-animal model for studying HIV/AIDS. Here, we engineered otherwise-nonpermissive mouse cells to express HIV-1-compatible versions of two species-specific host dependency factors, cyclin T1 (CCNT1) and exportin-1 (XPO1) (3T3.CX cells). We show that 3T3.CX cells rescue HIV-1

  20. Cyclin D1 overexpression, cell cycle progression and radiosensitivity in MBP cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lijun; Yu Zengliang

    2000-11-01

    Clones that exhibited a minimum of 7-8 fold cyclin D1 level above the parent cell lines or the vector control were obtained after transfected with the entire coding sequence of human 1.1 kb cyclin D1 cDNA. Studies showed that there was no significant difference in Radiosensitivity between over-expressing cyclin D1 and control cultures from either mouse or human origin. Using flow cytometry to access cell cycle distribution in the exponentially growth cultures of MCF10F-D1-21 and MCF10F-V-3, it was found that there was a 50 percent increase in the proportion of G2/M phase cells and 5.3 percent decrease in the proportion of G0/G1 phase cells in MCF10F-D1-21 comparing with MCF10F-V-3, though they were with the same proportion of cells in S phase

  1. Cell cycle delays in synchronized cell populations following irradiation with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1992-11-01

    Mammalian cells subjected to irradiation with heavy ions were investigated for cell cycle delays. The ions used for this purpose included Ne ions in the LET range of 400 keV/μm just as well as uranium ions of 16225 keV/μm. The qualitative changes in cell cycle progression seen after irradiation with Ne ions (400 keV/μm) were similar to those observed in connection with X-rays. Following irradiation with extremely heavy ions (lead, uranium) the majority of cells were even at 45 hours still found to be in the S phase or G 2 M phase of the first cycle. The delay cross section 'σ-delay' was introduced as a quantity that would permit quantitative comparisons to be carried out between the changes in cell progression and other effects of radiation. In order to evaluate the influence of the number of hits on the radiation effect observed, the size of the cell nucleus was precisely determined with reference to the cycle phase and local cell density. A model to simulate those delay effects was designed in such a way that account is taken of this probability of hit and that the results can be extrapolated from the delay effects after X-irradiation. On the basis of the various probabilities of hit for cells at different cycle stages a model was developed to ascertain the intensified effect following fractionated irradiation with heavy ions. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Restrictions in cell cycle progression of adult vestibular supporting cells in response to ectopic cyclin D1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Loponen

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells and supporting cells of the mammalian inner ear are quiescent cells, which do not regenerate. In contrast, non-mammalian supporting cells have the ability to re-enter the cell cycle and produce replacement hair cells. Earlier studies have demonstrated cyclin D1 expression in the developing mouse supporting cells and its downregulation along maturation. In explant cultures of the mouse utricle, we have here focused on the cell cycle control mechanisms and proliferative potential of adult supporting cells. These cells were forced into the cell cycle through adenoviral-mediated cyclin D1 overexpression. Ectopic cyclin D1 triggered robust cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells, accompanied by changes in p27(Kip1 and p21(Cip1 expressions. Main part of cell cycle reactivated supporting cells were DNA damaged and arrested at the G2/M boundary. Only small numbers of mitotic supporting cells and rare cells with signs of two successive replications were found. Ectopic cyclin D1-triggered cell cycle reactivation did not lead to hyperplasia of the sensory epithelium. In addition, a part of ectopic cyclin D1 was sequestered in the cytoplasm, reflecting its ineffective nuclear import. Combined, our data reveal intrinsic barriers that limit proliferative capacity of utricular supporting cells.

  3. Restrictions in cell cycle progression of adult vestibular supporting cells in response to ectopic cyclin D1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loponen, Heidi; Ylikoski, Jukka; Albrecht, Jeffrey H; Pirvola, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Sensory hair cells and supporting cells of the mammalian inner ear are quiescent cells, which do not regenerate. In contrast, non-mammalian supporting cells have the ability to re-enter the cell cycle and produce replacement hair cells. Earlier studies have demonstrated cyclin D1 expression in the developing mouse supporting cells and its downregulation along maturation. In explant cultures of the mouse utricle, we have here focused on the cell cycle control mechanisms and proliferative potential of adult supporting cells. These cells were forced into the cell cycle through adenoviral-mediated cyclin D1 overexpression. Ectopic cyclin D1 triggered robust cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells, accompanied by changes in p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1) expressions. Main part of cell cycle reactivated supporting cells were DNA damaged and arrested at the G2/M boundary. Only small numbers of mitotic supporting cells and rare cells with signs of two successive replications were found. Ectopic cyclin D1-triggered cell cycle reactivation did not lead to hyperplasia of the sensory epithelium. In addition, a part of ectopic cyclin D1 was sequestered in the cytoplasm, reflecting its ineffective nuclear import. Combined, our data reveal intrinsic barriers that limit proliferative capacity of utricular supporting cells.

  4. Chalcone derivatives cause accumulation of colon cancer cells in the G2/M phase and induce apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kello, M.; Drutovič, Dávid; Bago Pilátová, M.; Tischlerová, V.; Perjesi, P.; Mojžíš, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 150, č. 1 (2016), s. 32-38 ISSN 0024-3205 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : chalcones * colorectal cancer * antiproliferative Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.936, year: 2016

  5. Cell Cycle Control by PTEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmaier, Andrew; Hou, Sheng-Qi; Shen, Wen H

    2017-07-21

    Continuous and error-free chromosome inheritance through the cell cycle is essential for genomic stability and tumor suppression. However, accumulation of aberrant genetic materials often causes the cell cycle to go awry, leading to malignant transformation. In response to genotoxic stress, cells employ diverse adaptive mechanisms to halt or exit the cell cycle temporarily or permanently. The intrinsic machinery of cycling, resting, and exiting shapes the cellular response to extrinsic stimuli, whereas prevalent disruption of the cell cycle machinery in tumor cells often confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor and a guardian of the genome that is frequently mutated or deleted in human cancer. Moreover, it is increasingly evident that PTEN deficiency disrupts the fundamental processes of genetic transmission. Cells lacking PTEN exhibit cell cycle deregulation and cell fate reprogramming. Here, we review the role of PTEN in regulating the key processes in and out of cell cycle to optimize genomic integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell cycle dependent changes in the plasma membrane organization of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, Manuela; Chiantia, Salvatore; Herrmann, Andreas; Mueller, Peter; Korte, Thomas; Schwarzer, Roland

    2017-03-01

    Lipid membranes are major structural elements of all eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Although many aspects of their biology have been studied extensively, their dynamics and lateral heterogeneity are still not fully understood. Recently, we observed a cell-to-cell variability in the plasma membrane organization of CHO-K1 cells (Schwarzer et al., 2014). We surmised that cell cycle dependent changes of the individual cells from our unsynchronized cell population account for this phenomenon. In the present study, this hypothesis was tested. To this aim, CHO-K1 cells were arrested in different cell cycle phases by chemical treatments, and the order of their plasma membranes was determined by various fluorescent lipid analogues using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Our experiments exhibit significant differences in the membrane order of cells arrested in the G2/M or S phase compared to control cells. Our single-cell analysis also enabled the specific selection of mitotic cells, which displayed a significant increase of the membrane order compared to the control. In addition, the lipid raft marker GPImYFP was used to study the lateral organization of cell cycle arrested cells as well as mitotic cells and freely cycling samples. Again, significant differences were found between control and arrested cells and even more pronounced between control and mitotic cells. Our data demonstrate a direct correlation between cell cycle progression and plasma membrane organization, underlining that cell-to-cell heterogeneities of membrane properties have to be taken into account in cellular studies especially at the single-cell level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cell cycle of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense (Dinophyceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Zhi Wang

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are the major causative agents of harmful algal blooms in the coastal zone, which has resulted in adverse effects on the marine ecosystem and public health, and has become a global concern. Knowledge of cell cycle regulation in proliferating cells is essential for understanding bloom dynamics, and so this study compared the protein profiles of Prorocentrum donghaiense at different cell cycle phases and identified differentially expressed proteins using 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results showed that the synchronized cells of P. donghaiense completed a cell cycle within 24 hours and cell division was phased with the diurnal cycle. Comparison of the protein profiles at four cell cycle phases (G1, S, early and late G2/M showed that 53 protein spots altered significantly in abundance. Among them, 41 were identified to be involved in a variety of biological processes, e.g. cell cycle and division, RNA metabolism, protein and amino acid metabolism, energy and carbon metabolism, oxidation-reduction processes, and ABC transport. The periodic expression of these proteins was critical to maintain the proper order and function of the cell cycle. This study, to our knowledge, for the first time revealed the major biological processes occurring at different cell cycle phases which provided new insights into the mechanisms regulating the cell cycle and growth of dinoflagellates.

  8. Curcumin Induces Autophagy, Apoptosis, and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Curcumin is an active extract from turmeric. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying mechanism of curcumin on PCa cells and the role of autophagy in this process. Methods. The inhibitory effect of curcumin on the growth of PANC1 and BxPC3 cell lines was detected by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were tested by flow cytometry. Autophagosomes were tested by cell immunofluorescence assay. The protein expression was detected by Western blot. The correlation between LC3II/Bax and cell viability was analyzed. Results. Curcumin inhibited the cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin could induce cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis of PCa cells. The autophagosomes were detected in the dosing groups. Protein expression of Bax and LC3II was upregulated, while Bcl2 was downregulated in the high dosing groups of curcumin. There was a significant negative correlation between LC3II/Bax and cell viability. Conclusions. Autophagy could be triggered by curcumin in the treatment of PCa. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest also participated in this process. These findings imply that curcumin is a multitargeted agent for PCa cells. In addition, autophagic cell death may predominate in the high concentration groups of curcumin.

  9. Capsaicin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human KB cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Han; Lu, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Che-Wei; Chan, Ya-Chi; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2013-02-25

    Capsaicin, a pungent phytochemical in a variety of red peppers of the genus Capsicum, has shown an anti-proliferative effect on various human cancer cell lines. In contrast, capsaicin has also been considered to promote the growth of cancer cells. Thus, the effects of capsaicin on various cell types need to be explored. The anti-proliferative effects of capsaicin on human KB cancer cells are still unknown. Therefore, we examined the viability, cell cycle progression, and factors associated with apoptosis in KB cells treated with capsaicin. The cell proliferation/viability and cytotoxicity of KB cells exposed to capsaicin were determined by a sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay and trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst staining and confirmed by western blot analysis of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Cell cycle distribution and changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9 was evaluated by immunoblotting. We found that treatment of KB cells with capsaicin significantly reduced cell proliferation/viability and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner compared with that in the untreated control. Cell cycle analysis indicated that exposure of KB cells to capsaicin resulted in cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Capsaicin-induced growth inhibition of KB cells appeared to be associated with induction of apoptosis. Moreover, capsaicin induced disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as activation of caspase 9, 3 and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase in KB cells. Our data demonstrate that capsaicin modulates cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis in human KB cancer cells through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation. These observations suggest an anti-cancer activity of capsaicin.

  10. Enhanced efficacy of combined {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel therapy of peritoneal carcinomatosis is mediated by enhanced induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallon, Mario; Seidl, Christof; Blechert, Birgit; Li, Zhoulei; Gaertner, Florian C.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Essler, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Gilbertz, Klaus-Peter [German Armed Forces, Institute of Radiobiology, Munich (Germany); Baumgart, Anja [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, III. Medical Department, Munich (Germany); Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Walch, Axel K. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Neuherberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred [Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Targeted therapy with {alpha}-particle emitting radionuclides is a promising new option in cancer therapy. Stable conjugates of the vascular tumour-homing peptide F3 with the {alpha}-emitter {sup 213}Bi specifically target tumour cells. The aim of our study was to determine efficacy of combined {sup 213}Bi-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-F3 and paclitaxel treatment compared to treatment with either {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 or paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity of treatment with {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel, alone or in combination, was assayed towards OVCAR-3 cells using the alamarBlue assay, the clonogenic assay and flow cytometric analyses of the mode of cell death and cell cycle arrest. Therapeutic efficacy of the different treatment options was assayed after repeated treatment of mice bearing intraperitoneal OVCAR-3 xenograft tumours. Therapy monitoring was performed by bioluminescence imaging and histopathologic analysis. Treatment of OVCAR-3 cells in vitro with combined {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest compared to treatment with either {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 or paclitaxel. Accordingly, i.p. xenograft OVCAR-3 tumours showed the best response following repeated (six times) combined therapy with {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 (1.85 MBq) and paclitaxel (120 {mu}g) as demonstrated by bioluminescence imaging and histopathologic investigation of tumour spread on the mesentery of the small and large intestine. Moreover, mean survival of xenograft mice that received combined therapy with {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel was significantly superior to mice treated with either {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 or paclitaxel alone. Combined treatment with {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel significantly increased mean survival of mice with peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian origin, thus favouring future therapeutic application. (orig.)

  11. Enhanced efficacy of combined 213Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel therapy of peritoneal carcinomatosis is mediated by enhanced induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallon, Mario; Seidl, Christof; Blechert, Birgit; Li, Zhoulei; Gaertner, Florian C.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Essler, Markus; Gilbertz, Klaus-Peter; Baumgart, Anja; Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Walch, Axel K.; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapy with α-particle emitting radionuclides is a promising new option in cancer therapy. Stable conjugates of the vascular tumour-homing peptide F3 with the α-emitter 213 Bi specifically target tumour cells. The aim of our study was to determine efficacy of combined 213 Bi-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-F3 and paclitaxel treatment compared to treatment with either 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 or paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity of treatment with 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel, alone or in combination, was assayed towards OVCAR-3 cells using the alamarBlue assay, the clonogenic assay and flow cytometric analyses of the mode of cell death and cell cycle arrest. Therapeutic efficacy of the different treatment options was assayed after repeated treatment of mice bearing intraperitoneal OVCAR-3 xenograft tumours. Therapy monitoring was performed by bioluminescence imaging and histopathologic analysis. Treatment of OVCAR-3 cells in vitro with combined 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest compared to treatment with either 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 or paclitaxel. Accordingly, i.p. xenograft OVCAR-3 tumours showed the best response following repeated (six times) combined therapy with 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 (1.85 MBq) and paclitaxel (120 μg) as demonstrated by bioluminescence imaging and histopathologic investigation of tumour spread on the mesentery of the small and large intestine. Moreover, mean survival of xenograft mice that received combined therapy with 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel was significantly superior to mice treated with either 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 or paclitaxel alone. Combined treatment with 213 Bi-DTPA-F3 and paclitaxel significantly increased mean survival of mice with peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian origin, thus favouring future therapeutic application. (orig.)

  12. CXCR3 surface expression in human airway epithelial cells: cell cycle dependence and effect on cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Ji, Rong; Reddy, P J; Shahabuddin, Syed; Litvin, Judith; Rogers, Thomas J; Kelsen, Steven G

    2006-05-01

    We recently demonstrated that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) constitutively express the CXC chemokine receptor CXCR3, which when activated, induces directed cell migration. The present study in HBEC examined the relative expression of the CXCR3 splice variants CXCR3-A and -B, cell cycle dependence of CXCR3 expression, and the effects of the CXCR3 ligand, the interferon-gamma-inducible CXC chemokine I-TAC/CXCL11, on DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Both CXCR3-A and -B mRNA, assessed by real-time RT-PCR, were expressed in normal HBEC (NHBEC) and the HBEC line 16-HBE. However, CXCR3-B mRNA was 39- and 6-fold greater than CXCR3-A mRNA in NHBEC and 16-HBE, respectively. Although most HBEC (>80%) assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy contained intracellular CXCR3, only a minority (75%) were in the S + G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle. Stimulation of CXCR3 with I-TAC enhanced thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation and increased p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These data indicate that 1) human airway epithelial cells primarily express CXCR3-B mRNA, 2) surface expression of CXCR3 is largely confined to the S + G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle, and 3) activation of CXCR3 induces DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and activation of MAPK pathways. We speculate that activation of CXCR3 exerts a mitogenic effect in HBEC, which may be important during airway mucosal injury in obstructive airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ting; Zhang, Zizhu; Li, Bin; Chen, Guilin; Xie, Xueshun; Wei, Yongxin; Wu, Jie; Zhou, Youxin; Du, Ziwei

    2013-01-01

    Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma

  14. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Yang, Yongbo

    2013-01-01

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization

  15. N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) retinamide potentiated paclitaxel for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma C6 and RG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Rajiv; Butler, Jonathan T.; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma grows aggressively due to its ability to maintain abnormally high potentials for cell proliferation. The present study examines the synergistic actions of N-(4-hdroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR) and paclitaxel (PTX) to control the growth of rat glioblastoma C6 and RG2 cell lines. 4-HPR induced astrocytic differentiation was accompanied by increased expression of the tight junction protein e-cadherin and sustained down regulation of Id2 (member of inhibitor of differentiation family), catalytic subunit of rat telomerase reverse transcriptase (rTERT), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Flow cytometric analysis showed that the microtubule stabilizer PTX caused cell cycle deregulation due to G2/M arrest. This in turn could alter the fate of kinetochore-spindletube dynamics thereby halting cell cycle progression. An interesting observation was induction of G1/S arrest by combination of 4-HPR and PTX, altering the G2/M arrest induced by PTX alone. This was further ratified by the upregulation of tumor suppressor protein retinoblastoma, which repressed the expression of the key signaling moieties to induce G1/S arrest. Collectively, combination of 4-HPR and PTX diminished the survival factors (e.g., rTERT, PCNA, and Bcl-2) to make glioblastoma cells highly prone to apoptosis with activation of cysteine proteases (e.g., calpain, cathepsins, caspase-8, caspase-3) in two glioblastoma cell lines. Hence, combination 4-HPR and PTX can be considered as an effective therapeutic strategy for controlling the growth of heterogeneous glioblastoma cell populations. PMID:19285047

  16. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Jingjing [College of Life Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002, Hubei (China); Liu, Kaiyu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: johnli2668@hotmail.com [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Bioengineering Department, Wuhan Bioengineering Institute, Wuhan 430415, Hubei (China); Yang, Yongbo, E-mail: yongboyang@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China)

    2013-05-25

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization.

  17. Cell growth and division cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darzynkiewicz, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of the cell cycle in its present form was introduced more than three decades ago. Studying incorporation of DNA precursors by autoradiography, these authors observed that DNA synthesis in individual cells was discontinuous and occupied a discrete portion of the cell life (S phase). Mitotic division was seen to occur after a certain period of time following DNA replication. A distinct time interval between mitosis and DNA replication was also apparent. Thus, the cell cycle was subdivided into four consecutive phases, G/sub 1/, S, G/sub 2/, and M. The G/sub 1/ and G/sub 2/ phases represented the ''gaps'' between mitosis and the start of DNA replication, and between the end of DNA replication and the onset of mitosis, respectively. The cell cycle was defined as the interval between the midpoint of mitosis and the midpoint of the subsequent mitosis of the daughter cell(s). The authors' present knowledge on the cell cycle benefited mostly from the development of four different techniques: autoradiography, time-lapse cinematography, cell synchronization and flow cytometry. Of these, autoradiography has been the most extensively used, especially during the past two decades. By providing a means to analyse incorporation of precursors of DNA, RNA or proteins by individual cells and, in combination with various techniques of cell synchronization, autoradiography yielded most of the data fundamental to the current understanding of the cell cycle-related phenomena. Kinetics of cell progression through the cell cycle could be analysed in great detail after development of such sophisticated autoradiographic approaches as measurements of the fraction of labeled mitoses (''FLM curves'') or multiple sequential cell labelling with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR

  18. Change of cell cycle arrest of tumor cell lines after 60Co γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yi; Liu Wenli; Zhou Jianfeng; Gao Qinglei; Wu Jianhong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the cell cycle arrest changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) of normal persons and several kinds of tumor cell lines after 60 Co γ-irradiation. Methods: PBMNCs of normal persons, HL-60, K562, SiHA and 113 tumor cell lines were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays at the absorbed doses of 6, 10,15 Gy. Cell cycles changes were checked 6, 12, 24, 48 and 60 h after the irradiation. Results: A stasis state was observed in normal person PBMNCs, 95 percents of which were in G 1 phase, and they still remained stasis after the irradiation. Except the 113 cell line manifesting G 1 phase arrest, all other tumor cell lines showed G 2 /M phase arrest after irradiation. The radiation sensitivity of HL-60 was higher than that of SiHA cell line. Conclusion: Different cell lines have different cell cycle arrest reaction to radiation and their radiation sensitivity are also different

  19. SHP1-mediated cell cycle redistribution inhibits radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Rubo; Ding, Qian; Li, Pindong; Xue, Jun; Zou, Zhenwei; Huang, Jing; Peng, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Radioresistance is the common cause for radiotherapy failure in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the degree of radiosensitivity of tumor cells is different during different cell cycle phases. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of cell cycle redistribution in the establishment of radioresistance in NSCLC, as well as the signaling pathway of SH2 containing Tyrosine Phosphatase (SHP1). A NSCLC subtype cell line, radioresistant A549 (A549S1), was induced by high-dose hypofractionated ionizing radiations. Radiosensitivity-related parameters, cell cycle distribution and expression of cell cycle-related proteins and SHP1 were investigated. siRNA was designed to down-regulate SHP1expression. Compared with native A549 cells, the proportion of cells in the S phase was increased, and cells in the G0/G1 phase were consequently decreased, however, the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase did not change in A549S1 cells. Moreover, the expression of SHP1, CDK4 and CylinD1 were significantly increased, while p16 was significantly down-regulated in A549S1 cells compared with native A549 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of SHP1 by siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of A549S1 cells, induced a G0/G1 phase arrest, down-regulated CDK4 and CylinD1expressions, and up-regulated p16 expression. SHP1 decreases the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells through affecting cell cycle distribution. This finding could unravel the molecular mechanism involved in NSCLC radioresistance

  20. Cell cycle control by a minimal Cdk network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Gérard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In present-day eukaryotes, the cell division cycle is controlled by a complex network of interacting proteins, including members of the cyclin and cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk families, and the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC. Successful progression through the cell cycle depends on precise, temporally ordered regulation of the functions of these proteins. In light of this complexity, it is surprising that in fission yeast, a minimal Cdk network consisting of a single cyclin-Cdk fusion protein can control DNA synthesis and mitosis in a manner that is indistinguishable from wild type. To improve our understanding of the cell cycle regulatory network, we built and analysed a mathematical model of the molecular interactions controlling the G1/S and G2/M transitions in these minimal cells. The model accounts for all observed properties of yeast strains operating with the fusion protein. Importantly, coupling the model's predictions with experimental analysis of alternative minimal cells, we uncover an explanation for the unexpected fact that elimination of inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk is benign in these strains while it strongly affects normal cells. Furthermore, in the strain without inhibitory phosphorylation of the fusion protein, the distribution of cell size at division is unusually broad, an observation that is accounted for by stochastic simulations of the model. Our approach provides novel insights into the organization and quantitative regulation of wild type cell cycle progression. In particular, it leads us to propose a new mechanistic model for the phenomenon of mitotic catastrophe, relying on a combination of unregulated, multi-cyclin-dependent Cdk activities.

  1. 14-3-3 σ expression effects G2/M response to oxygen and correlates with ovarian cancer metastasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy

    2011-01-01

    In vitro cell culture experiments with primary cells have reported that cell proliferation is retarded in the presence of ambient compared to physiological O₂ levels. Cancer is primarily a disease of aberrant cell proliferation, therefore, studying cancer cells grown under ambient O₂ may be undesirable. To understand better the impact of O₂ on the propagation of cancer cells in vitro, we compared the growth potential of a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines under ambient (21%) or physiological (3%) O₂.

  2. Berberine induces p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells by inflicting DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhaojian; Liu Qiao; Xu Bing; Wu Jingjing; Guo Chun; Zhu Faliang; Yang Qiaozi; Gao Guimin; Gong Yaoqin; Shao Changshun

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloid berberine is widely used for the treatment of diarrhea and other diseases. Many laboratory studies showed that it exhibits anti-proliferative activity against a wide spectrum of cancer cells in culture. In this report we studied the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of berberine on human osteosarcoma cells and on normal osteoblasts. The inhibition was largely attributed to cell cycle arrest at G1 and G2/M, and to a less extent, to apoptosis. The G1 arrest was dependent on p53, as G1 arrest was abolished in p53-deficient osteosarcoma cells. The induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis was accompanied by a p53-dependent up-regulation of p21 and pro-apoptotic genes. However, the G2/M arrest could be induced by berberine regardless of the status of p53. Interestingly, DNA double-strand breaks, as measured by the phosphorylation of H2AX, were remarkably accumulated in berberine-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, one major mechanism by which berberine exerts its growth-inhibitory effect is to inflict genomic lesions on cells, which in turn trigger the activation of p53 and the p53-dependent cellular responses including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

  3. Berberine induces p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells by inflicting DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhaojian; Liu Qiao; Xu Bing; Wu Jingjing [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Guo Chun; Zhu Faliang [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Yang Qiaozi [Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gao Guimin [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Gong Yaoqin [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)], E-mail: yxg8@sdu.edu.cn; Shao Changshun [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: shao@biology.rutgers.edu

    2009-03-09

    Alkaloid berberine is widely used for the treatment of diarrhea and other diseases. Many laboratory studies showed that it exhibits anti-proliferative activity against a wide spectrum of cancer cells in culture. In this report we studied the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of berberine on human osteosarcoma cells and on normal osteoblasts. The inhibition was largely attributed to cell cycle arrest at G1 and G2/M, and to a less extent, to apoptosis. The G1 arrest was dependent on p53, as G1 arrest was abolished in p53-deficient osteosarcoma cells. The induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis was accompanied by a p53-dependent up-regulation of p21 and pro-apoptotic genes. However, the G2/M arrest could be induced by berberine regardless of the status of p53. Interestingly, DNA double-strand breaks, as measured by the phosphorylation of H2AX, were remarkably accumulated in berberine-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, one major mechanism by which berberine exerts its growth-inhibitory effect is to inflict genomic lesions on cells, which in turn trigger the activation of p53 and the p53-dependent cellular responses including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  4. DNA alkylation and tumor induction in regenerating rat liver after cell cycle-related continuous N-nitrosodimethylamine infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabes, H.M.; Kerler, R.; Wilhelm, R.

    1983-01-01

    Synchronized regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy was used to study cell cycle-related DNA base alkylation and liver carcinogenesis. A continuous iv infusion of (/sup 14/C)N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/hour was given to inbred male Wistar Af/Han rats over a period of 8 hours either during the G1 phase, hydroxyurea-synchronized DNA synthesis, or the G2+M-phase of regenerating liver or to untreated rats (G0-phase liver--carcinogen dose, 1.5 mg/kg/hour). Two hours after the end of the infusion, the amount of 7-methylguanine was highest in the G0-phase liver, with a decrease in the G1 phase, the S-phase, and the G2+M-phase. After continuous DMN exposure, the O/sub 6/-methylguanine:7-methylguanine ratio was lower in the S-phase and G2+M-phase livers than in the G0-phase and G1-phase livers, indicating an increased O/sub 6/-methylguanine repair during DNA synthesis and the G2+M-phase. Liver tumors in rats treated by continuous DMN infusion either during the G0 phase or the S-phase developed only after carcinogen exposure during DNA synthesis.

  5. Analysis of protein incorporation of radioactive isotopes in the Chinese hamster ovary cell cycle by electronic sorting and gel microelectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipkin, J.L.; Anson, J.F.; Hinson, W.G.; Schol, H.; Burns, E.R.; Casciano, D.A.

    1986-03-01

    The patterns of (3H)-leucine and (32P)-phosphate incorporation of proteins extracted with varying molarities of sodium chloride were analyzed from nuclei physically sorted from six fluorescence windows after propidium iodine staining of the G0 + G1 and G2 + M phases of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cycle. Eight hundred nanograms of protein were used in each electrophoretic analysis obtained from 200,000 nuclei, a portion of the sample, from each window. Autoradiography was performed in a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel ultra-microelectrophoresis apparatus (UMEA) designed and fabricated in this laboratory. There was a net reduction and/or loss of (3H)-leucine- and (32P)-phosphate-labeled protein regions from the autoradiographs occurring primarily in the G2 + M phase. Two phosphorylated proteins that were stage specific were observed in partitions of the G2 + M phase. The use of isolated proteins and the coelectrophoresis of these markers demonstrated the similarity in mobility of a number of proteins seen in the autoradiographs of proteins extracted with high and low salt molarities and implied they are synonymous. Coelectrophoresis indicated that a substantial number of high molecular weight proteins that decreased or disappeared at late stages of G2 + M and early mitosis were composed, in part, of nucleolar proteins.

  6. Effect of low dose radiation on cell cycle and expression of its related proteins of HCT-8 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ying; Ma Kewei; Li Wei; Wang Guanjun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on cell cycle and the expression of its related proteins of HCT-8 cells and provide theoretical basis for clinical application of LDR. Methods: Human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-8) cultivated in vitro were divided into seven groups: sham radiation group (0 mGy), LDR groups (25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 mGy) and high dose radiation group (1000 mGy). The proliferation rate was detected with the method of cell count and MTT, the ratios of G 0 /G 1 , S, G 2 /M in cell cycle were determined with flow cytometry after LDR, The cell cycle and expressions of related signal proteins were analyzed with protein assay system. Results: The results of cell count and MTT showed that there were no significant differences of proliferation rate of HCT-8 cells between 25, 50, 75, 100, 200 mGy LDR groups and sham radiation group (P>0.05); compared with high dose radiation group, there were significant differences (P 0 /G 1 phase of HCT-8 cells increased (P>0.05), the ratio of S phase decreased significantly (P 2 /M phase increased obviously (P 0 /G 1 , S, and G 2 /M phases of HCT-8 cells 48 h after radiation compared with sham radiation group (P>0.05). The protein assay result indicated that the expressions of AKt, PCNA, p27, CDK2, cyclin E, EGFR, ERK1/2, p-ERK, p-GSK-32/β in HCT-8 cells after LDR decreased compared with sham radiation group. Conclusion: LDR has no stimulating effect on HCT-8 cells. However, to some extent LDR suppress the expressions of some proteins related to proliferation and cell cycle. (authors)

  7. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Sun, Guangchao; Wilson, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose.

  8. Cell cycle arrest and the evolution of chronic kidney disease from acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaud, Guillaume; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-04-01

    For several decades, acute kidney injury (AKI) was generally considered a reversible process leading to complete kidney recovery if the individual survived the acute illness. Recent evidence from epidemiologic studies and animal models, however, have highlighted that AKI can lead to the development of fibrosis and facilitate the progression of chronic renal failure. When kidney injury is mild and baseline function is normal, the repair process can be adaptive with few long-term consequences. When the injury is more severe, repeated, or to a kidney with underlying disease, the repair can be maladaptive and epithelial cell cycle arrest may play an important role in the development of fibrosis. Indeed, during the maladaptive repair after a renal insult, many tubular cells that are undergoing cell division spend a prolonged period in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. These tubular cells recruit intracellular pathways leading to the synthesis and the secretion of profibrotic factors, which then act in a paracrine fashion on interstitial pericytes/fibroblasts to accelerate proliferation of these cells and production of interstitial matrix. Thus, the tubule cells assume a senescent secretory phenotype. Characteristic features of these cells may represent new biomarkers of fibrosis progression and the G2/M-arrested cells may represent a new therapeutic target to prevent, delay or arrest progression of chronic kidney disease. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the biology of the cell cycle and how cell cycle arrest links AKI to chronic kidney disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytotoxicity and cell-cycle effects of paclitaxel when used as a single agent and in combination with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Nalin; Hu, Lily J.; Deen, Dennis F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to determine the extent of paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity and cell-cycle perturbations when used alone and in combination with radiation in human glioma cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of paclitaxel alone on three human glioma cells lines--SF-126, U-87 MG, and U-251 MG--was assessed after 24, 48, 72, or 96 h treatment. For experiments in combination with radiation, cells were exposed to either a long (48-h) or short (8-h) duration of paclitaxel treatment prior to irradiation. Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle perturbations were assessed by using flow cytometry to measure the proportion of cells in G 1 , S, and G 2 /M phases. Results: When cells were treated with paclitaxel alone for ≥24 h, cytotoxicity increased up to a threshold dose, after which it plateaued. When treatment duration was ≤24 h, cytotoxicity was appreciably greater in U-251 MG cells than in SF-126 and U-87 MG cells. After 24 h of paclitaxel treatment, cells in plateau phase growth had increased survival compared to cells in log phase growth. In contrast, after 8 h paclitaxel treatment, mitotic cells had reduced survival compared to cells from an asynchronous population. Cell-cycle perturbations were consistent with the presence of a mitotic block after paclitaxel treatment, although changes in other cell-cycle phase fractions varied among cell lines. For experiments in combination with radiation, cytotoxicity was increased when cells were irradiated after 48 h of paclitaxel treatment but not after 8 h of treatment. Conclusion: The duration of paclitaxel treatment and the location of cells in the cell cycle modify the degree of radiation cytotoxicity. The mechanisms of paclitaxel cytotoxicity are likely to be multifactorial because varying effects are seen in different cell lines. Furthermore, it is clear that simply increasing the number of cells in G 2 /M is insufficient in itself to increase the response of cells to radiation

  10. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yin Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1 based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs activity.

  11. Exogenous lactate interferes with cell-cycle control in BALB/3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutz, H. Peter; Little, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that exogenous lactate may influence proliferation rates, radiation sensitivity, and postirradiation repair capacity of mammalian cells. In the present study, we addressed the question of potential underlying mechanisms and, therefore, examined effects of exogenous lactate on proliferation rates and cell-cycle distribution in immortal but nontumorigenic mammalian cells. Methods and Materials: Cells were grown at 37 deg. C in an incubator with 5% CO 2 and 95% air, in a culture medium supplemented or not with lactate at a 10 mM concentration. Daily, we changed the culture medium and counted cells per dish. On selected days, cell-cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Balb/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were used. Results: During the exponential phase of cell proliferation, mean population doubling time was significantly increased from 17.7 to 19.9 h, due to selective prolongation of G 2 /M. However, in density-inhibited cultures, exogenous lactate stimulated entry into S and proliferation to a significantly higher saturation density. Conclusions: These findings indicate that exogenous lactate interferes with mechanisms of cell-cycle control at two different points in the cell-cycle, depending on cell density and the resulting absence or presence of inhibition of cell proliferation. Interference with cell-cycle control may underlay the modification by exogenous lactate of radiosensitivity and postirradiation repair capacity in mammalian cells

  12. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase deficiency influences normal cell cycle progression and apoptosis in trabecular meshwork cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Liao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To clarify how the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3 make effect on outflow facility through the trabecular meshwork (TM. METHODS: Inhibition of NOS3 gene expression in human TM cells were conducted by three siRNAs. Then the mRNA and protein levels of NOS3 in siRNA-treated and negative control (NC cells were determined, still were the collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1 and fibronectin 1 by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, NOS3 concentrations in culture supernatant fluids of TM cells were measured. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis analysis were performed using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The mRNA level of NOS3 was decreased by three different siRNA interference, similar results were obtained not only of the relative levels of NOS3 protein, but also the expression levels of COL4A1 and fibronectin 1. The number of cells in S phase was decreased, while contrary result was obtained in G2 phase. The number of apoptotic cells in siRNA-treated groups were significant increased compared to the NC samples. CONCLUSION: Abnormal NOS3 expression can make effects on the proteins levels of extracellular matrix component (e.g. fibronectin 1 and COL4A1. Reduced NOS3 restrains the TM cell cycle progression at the G2/M-phase transition and induced cell apoptosis.

  13. A Flavone Constituent from Myoporum bontioides Induces M-Phase Cell Cycle Arrest of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Ru Weng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Myoporum bontioides is a traditional medicinal plant in Asia with various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial characteristics. To identify the bioactive constituents from M. bontioides, a newly-identified flavone, 3,4′-dimethoxy-3′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone (compound 1, along with eight known compounds, were investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer, SCC4 oral cancer, and THP-1 monocytic leukemia cells. Among these compounds, compound 1 exhibited the strongest antiproliferative activity with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values ranging from 3.3 μM (MCF-7 to 8.6 μM (SCC4. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that compound 1 induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells. Mechanistic evidence suggests that the G2/M arrest could be attributable to compound 1’s modulatory effects on the phosphorylation and expression of numerous key signaling effectors, including cell division cycle 2 (CDC2, CDC25C, and p53. Notably, compound 1 downregulated the expression of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2 and HDAC4, leading to increased histone H3 acetylation and p21 upregulation. Together, these findings suggest the translational potential of compound 1 as a breast cancer treatment.

  14. OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) interacts with Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5) and mediates oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Wenbin; Zhou, You; Li, Jiwei; Mysore, Raghavendra; Luo, Wei; Li, Shiqian; Chang, Mau-Sun; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Yan, Daoguang

    2014-01-01

    We earlier identified OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) as an endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope oxysterol-binding protein implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen identified Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5)/Astrin as interaction partner of ORP8. The putative interaction was further confirmed by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. ORP8 did not colocalize with kinetochore-associated SPAG5 in mitotic HepG2 or HuH7 cells, but overexpressed ORP8 was capable of recruiting SPAG5 onto endoplasmic reticulum membranes in interphase cells. In our experiments, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) retarded the HepG2 cell cycle, causing accumulation in G2/M phase; ORP8 overexpression resulted in the same phenotype. Importantly, ORP8 knock-down dramatically inhibited the oxysterol effect on HepG2 cell cycle, suggesting a mediating role of ORP8. Furthermore, knock-down of SPAG5 significantly reduced the effects of both ORP8 overexpression and 25OHC on the cell cycle, placing SPAG5 downstream of the two cell-cycle interfering factors. Taken together, the present results suggest that ORP8 may via SPAG5 mediate oxysterol interference of the HepG2 cell cycle. - Highlights: • The oxysterol-binding protein ORP8 was found to interact with the mitotic regulator SPAG5/Astrin. • Treatment of HepG2 cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol caused cell cycle retardation in G2/M. • ORP8 overexpression caused a similar G2/M accumulation, and ORP8 knock-down reversed the 25-hydroxycholesterol effect. • Reduction of cellular of SPAG5/Astrin reversed the cell cycle effects of both 25-hydroxycholesterol and ORP8 overexpression. • Our results suggest that ORP8 mediates via SPAG5/Astrin the oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle

  15. OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) interacts with Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5) and mediates oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Wenbin [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhou, You [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Li, Jiwei [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Mysore, Raghavendra [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Luo, Wei; Li, Shiqian [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Chang, Mau-Sun [Institute of Biochemical Sciences, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Olkkonen, Vesa M. [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Yan, Daoguang, E-mail: tydg@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-04-01

    We earlier identified OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) as an endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope oxysterol-binding protein implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen identified Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5)/Astrin as interaction partner of ORP8. The putative interaction was further confirmed by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. ORP8 did not colocalize with kinetochore-associated SPAG5 in mitotic HepG2 or HuH7 cells, but overexpressed ORP8 was capable of recruiting SPAG5 onto endoplasmic reticulum membranes in interphase cells. In our experiments, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) retarded the HepG2 cell cycle, causing accumulation in G2/M phase; ORP8 overexpression resulted in the same phenotype. Importantly, ORP8 knock-down dramatically inhibited the oxysterol effect on HepG2 cell cycle, suggesting a mediating role of ORP8. Furthermore, knock-down of SPAG5 significantly reduced the effects of both ORP8 overexpression and 25OHC on the cell cycle, placing SPAG5 downstream of the two cell-cycle interfering factors. Taken together, the present results suggest that ORP8 may via SPAG5 mediate oxysterol interference of the HepG2 cell cycle. - Highlights: • The oxysterol-binding protein ORP8 was found to interact with the mitotic regulator SPAG5/Astrin. • Treatment of HepG2 cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol caused cell cycle retardation in G2/M. • ORP8 overexpression caused a similar G2/M accumulation, and ORP8 knock-down reversed the 25-hydroxycholesterol effect. • Reduction of cellular of SPAG5/Astrin reversed the cell cycle effects of both 25-hydroxycholesterol and ORP8 overexpression. • Our results suggest that ORP8 mediates via SPAG5/Astrin the oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle.

  16. Glucose capped silver nanoparticles induce cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Mariano, Stefania; Vergallo, Cristian; Carata, Elisabetta; Fimia, Gian Maria; Mura, Francesco; Rossi, Marco; Vergaro, Viviana; Ciccarella, Giuseppe; Corazzari, Marco; Dini, Luciana

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to determine the interaction (uptake and biological effects on cell viability and cell cycle progression) of glucose capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs-G) on human epithelioid cervix carcinoma (HeLa) cells, in relation to amount, 2×10 3 or 2×10 4 NPs/cell, and exposure time, up to 48h. The spherical and well dispersed AgNPs (30±5nm) were obtained by using glucose as reducing agent in a green synthesis method that ensures to stabilize AgNPs avoiding cytotoxic soluble silver ions Ag + release. HeLa cells take up abundantly and rapidly AgNPs-G resulting toxic to cells in amount and incubation time dependent manner. HeLa cells were arrested at S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle and subG1 population increased when incubated with 2×10 4 AgNPs-G/cell. Mitotic index decreased accordingly. The dissolution experiments demonstrated that the observed effects were due only to AgNPs-G since glucose capping prevents Ag + release. The AgNPs-G influence on HeLa cells viability and cell cycle progression suggest that AgNPs-G, alone or in combination with chemotherapeutics, may be exploited for the development of novel antiproliferative treatment in cancer therapy. However, the possible influence of the cell cycle on cellular uptake of AgNPs-G and the mechanism of AgNPs entry in cells need further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Study of the cell cycle control for human malignant mesothelioma lines. Interferon and radiations effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivo, C.

    1999-01-01

    In order to better understand the inhibition mechanisms of the IFN-R-HU on tumoral development, the IFN-R-U effect on MM lines has been studied. Three groups of lines has been distinguished: eight sensitive lines, two intermediate and three resistant. The sensitive lines showed a triple locking of the cell cycle: in phases S, G1 and G2. The study of the cell cycle control points function, realized by the MM lines radiation exposure showed the points function on G1/S and-or on G2/M and the dependence or non dependence of the cycle stop of the protein P53 and P21 W at F1/CIP1. (A.L.B.)

  18. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooderham Nigel J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent, cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid, benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular

  19. Synchronization and Arrest of the Budding Yeast Cell Cycle Using Chemical and Genetic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebrock, Adam P

    2017-01-03

    The cell cycle of budding yeast can be arrested at specific positions by different genetic and chemical methods. These arrests enable study of cell cycle phase-specific phenotypes that would be missed during examination of asynchronous cultures. Some methods for arrest are reversible, with kinetics that enable release of cells back into a synchronous cycling state. Benefits of chemical and genetic methods include scalability across a large range of culture sizes from a few milliliters to many liters, ease of execution, the absence of specific equipment requirements, and synchronization and release of the entire culture. Of note, cell growth and division are decoupled during arrest and block-release experiments. Cells will continue transcription, translation, and accumulation of protein while arrested. If allowed to reenter the cell cycle, cells will do so as a population of mixed, larger-than-normal cells. Despite this important caveat, many aspects of budding yeast physiology are accessible using these simple chemical and genetic tools. Described here are methods for the block and release of cells in G 1 phase and at the M/G 1 transition using α-factor mating pheromone and the temperature-sensitive cdc15-2 allele, respectively, in addition to methods for arresting the cell cycle in early S phase and at G 2 /M by using hydroxyurea and nocodazole, respectively. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Nek1 silencing slows down DNA repair and blocks DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrini, Alessandra Luíza; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Brenner, Bethânia Luise; Ledur, Pitia Flores; Maques, Gabriela Porto; Henriques, João Antônio Pegas; Saffi, Jenifer; Lenz, Guido

    2010-09-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinases (Nek) are evolutionarily conserved proteins structurally related to the Aspergillus nidulans mitotic regulator NIMA. Nek1 is one of the 11 isoforms of the Neks identified in mammals. Different lines of evidence suggest the participation of Nek1 in response to DNA damage, which is also supported by the interaction of this kinase with proteins involved in DNA repair pathways and cell cycle regulation. In this report, we show that cells with Nek1 knockdown (KD) through stable RNA interference present a delay in DNA repair when treated with methyl-methanesulfonate (MMS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and cisplatin (CPT). In particular, interstrand cross links induced by CPT take much longer to be resolved in Nek1 KD cells when compared to wild-type (WT) cells. In KD cells, phosphorylation of Chk1 in response to CPT was strongly reduced. While WT cells accumulate in G(2)/M after DNA damage with MMS and H(2)O(2), Nek1 KD cells do not arrest, suggesting that G(2)/M arrest induced by the DNA damage requires Nek1. Surprisingly, CPT-treated Nek1 KD cells arrest with a 4N DNA content similar to WT cells. This deregulation in cell cycle control in Nek1 KD cells leads to an increased sensitivity to genotoxic agents when compared to WT cells. These results suggest that Nek1 is involved in the beginning of the cellular response to genotoxic stress and plays an important role in preventing cell death induced by DNA damage.

  1. Effect of specific silencing of EMMPRIN on the growth and cell cycle distribution of MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X Q; Yang, J; Wang, R; Zhang, S; Tan, Q W; Lv, Q; Meng, W T; Mo, X M; Li, H J

    2015-12-02

    The extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, CD147) is a member of the immunoglobulin family and shows increased expression in tumor cells. We examined the effect of RNAi-mediated EMMPRIN gene silencing induced by lentiviral on the growth and cycle distribution of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Lentiviral expressing EMMPRIN-short hairpin RNA were packaged to infect MCF-7 cells. The inhibition efficiency of EMMPRIN was validated by real-time fluorescent quantitation polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The effect of EMMPRIN on cell proliferation ability was detected using the MTT assay and clone formation experiments. Changes in cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. EMMPRIN-short hairpin RNA-packaged lentiviral significantly down-regulated EMMPRIN mRNA and protein expression, significantly inhibited cell proliferation and in vitro tumorigenicity, and induced cell cycle abnormalities. Cells in the G0/G1 and G2/M phases were increased, while cells in the S phase were decreased after infection of MCF-7 cells for 3 days. The EMMPRIN gene facilitates breast cancer cell malignant proliferation by regulating cell cycle distribution and may be a molecular target for breast cancer gene therapy.

  2. Heterocyclic organobismuth (III) compounds containing an eight-membered ring: Inhibitory effects on cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Yagura, Tatsuo

    2018-03-21

    We previously showed that heterocyclic organobismuth compounds have excellent antimicrobial and antitumor potential. These compounds structurally consist of either six- or eight-membered rings. Previous research has shown that bi-chlorodibenzo[c,f][1,5]thiabismocine (Compound 3), an eight-membered ring, induced G 2 /M arrest via inhibition of tubulin polymerization in HeLa cells. Additionally, N-tert-butyl-bi-chlorodi-benzo[c,f][1,5]azabismocine (Compound 1), another eight-membered ring, exhibited higher cytotoxicity than Compound 3 against several cancer cell lines, including HeLa and K562. Finally, bi-chlorophenothiabismin-S,S-dioxide (Compound 5), a six-membered ring, exhibited lower antitumor activity than eight-membered ring compounds. In this study, we investigated the antimitotic activity of Compounds 1 and 5 in HeLa cells. At low concentrations, (0.1 and 0.25 μM), Compound 1 inhibited cell growth and arrested the cell cycle in mitosis. However, 0.5 μM Compound 1 exhibited no antimitotic activity. Conversely, Compound 5 weakly inhibited cell growth and did not markedly arrest the cell cycle. Flow cytometry showed that Compound 1 arrested the cell cycle at G 2 /M, resulting in apoptosis. Compound 1 inhibited tubulin polymerization as revealed by a cell-free assay, and both Compounds 1 and 3 inhibited microtubule spindle formation and chromosome alignment during prometaphase. These results suggest that eight-membered ring-containing organobismuth compounds can induce mitotic arrest by perturbing spindle dynamics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Cell kinetics of hypoxic cells in a murine tumour in vivo: flow cytometric determination of the radiation-induced blockage of cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutgers, D.H.; Niessen, D.P.P.; Linden, P.M. van der

    1987-01-01

    Cells from the small cell population of viable cells in the large necrotic centre of murine M8013 tumours were investigated with respect to their cell kinetics. Flow cytometry (FCM) of this part of subcutaneously transplanted tumours revealed the presence of tumour cells with G1,S and G2 + M phase DNA-contents. These severely hypoxic cells could have stopped cell cycle progression due to the nutritional deprivation, irrespective of their position within the cell cycle. Labelling methods, used to disclose the cell kinetics of this cell population, are hampered by the absence of a transport system in these large necrotic areas. Therefore FCM was used to monitor radiation induced changes in the cell cycle distribution. From this investigation it was concluded that hypoxic cells in the necrotic centre of the M8013 tumour progress through the cell cycle. As well as a cell population with a cell cycle time (Tsub(c)) of approximately 84 hr, a subpopulation with a Tsub(c) of approximately 21 hr occurred. (author)

  4. Arecoline decreases interleukin-6 production and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human basal cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hu, Yu-Chen [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-Tsan [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Division of Hepatobiliarypancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kee-Lung, E-mail: Chang.KeeLung@msa.hinet.net [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-15

    Arecoline, the most abundant areca alkaloid, has been reported to decrease interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in epithelial cancer cells. Since IL-6 overexpression contributes to the tumorigenic potency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), this study was designed to investigate whether arecoline altered IL-6 expression and its downstream regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle in cultured BCC-1/KMC cells. BCC-1/KMC cells and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were treated with arecoline at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 μg/ml, then IL-6 production and expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle progress-related factors were examined. After 24 h exposure, arecoline inhibited BCC-1/KMC cell growth and decreased IL-6 production in terms of mRNA expression and protein secretion, but had no effect on HaCaT cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation showed that arecoline induced apoptosis of BCC-1/KMC cells in a dose-dependent manner, activated caspase-3, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, arecoline induced progressive and sustained accumulation of BCC-1/KMC cells in G2/M phase as a result of reducing checkpoint Cdc2 activity by decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase levels and increasing p53 levels. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of arecoline led to decreased BCC-1/KMC tumor growth in BALB/c mice by inducing apoptosis. This study demonstrates that arecoline has potential for preventing BCC tumorigenesis by reducing levels of the tumor cell survival factor IL-6, increasing levels of the tumor suppressor factor p53, and eliciting cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Highlights: ► Arecoline has potential to prevent against basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis. ► It has more effectiveness on BCC as compared with a human keratinocyte cell line. ► Mechanisms involved including reducing tumor cells’ survival factor IL-6, ► Decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase, enhancing tumor suppressor factor p53, ► Eliciting G2/M

  5. DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest: a hallmark of apoptosis induced by Ruta graveolens in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shagun; Tandon, Simran

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of various potencies of Ruta graveolens (Ruta) on COLO-205 cell line, as evidenced by cytotoxicity, migration, clonogenecity, morphological and biochemical changes and modification in the levels of genes associated with apoptosis and cell cycle. On treatment of COLO-205 cells maximal effects were seen with mother tincture (MT) and 30C potencies, wherein decrease in cell viability along with reduced clonogenecity and migration capabilities were noted. In addition morphological and biochemical alterations such as nuclear changes (fragmented nuclei with condensed chromatin) and DNA ladder-like pattern (increased amount of fragmented DNA) in COLO-205 cells indicating apoptotic related cell death were seen. The expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle related regulatory genes assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed an up-regulation of caspase 9, caspase-3, Bax, p21 and p27 expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression in treated cells. The mode of cell death was suggestive of intrinsic apoptotic pathway along with cell cycle arrest at the G2/M of the cell cycle. Our findings indicate that phytochemicals present in Ruta showed potential for natural therapeutic product development for colon carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A comprehensive complex systems approach to the study and analysis of mammalian cell cycle control system in the presence of DNA damage stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroudi, Ali; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2017-09-21

    Not many models of mammalian cell cycle system exist due to its complexity. Some models are too complex and hard to understand, while some others are too simple and not comprehensive enough. Moreover, some essential aspects, such as the response of G1-S and G2-M checkpoints to DNA damage as well as the growth factor signalling, have not been investigated from a systems point of view in current mammalian cell cycle models. To address these issues, we bring a holistic perspective to cell cycle by mathematically modelling it as a complex system consisting of important sub-systems that interact with each other. This retains the functionality of the system and provides a clearer interpretation to the processes within it while reducing the complexity in comprehending these processes. To achieve this, we first update a published ODE mathematical model of cell cycle with current knowledge. Then the part of the mathematical model relevant to each sub-system is shown separately in conjunction with a diagram of the sub-system as part of this representation. The model sub-systems are Growth Factor, DNA damage, G1-S, and G2-M checkpoint signalling. To further simplify the model and better explore the function of sub-systems, they are further divided into modules. Here we also add important new modules of: chk-related rapid cell cycle arrest, p53 modules expanded to seamlessly integrate with the rapid arrest module, Tyrosine phosphatase modules that activate Cyc_Cdk complexes and play a crucial role in rapid and delay arrest at both G1-S and G2-M, Tyrosine Kinase module that is important for inactivating nuclear transport of CycB_cdk1 through Wee1 to resist M phase entry, Plk1-Related module that is crucial in activating Tyrosine phosphatases and inactivating Tyrosine kinase, and APC-Related module to show steps in CycB degradation. This multi-level systems approach incorporating all known aspects of cell cycle allowed us to (i) study, through dynamic simulation of an ODE model

  7. Endosulfan inhibiting the meiosis process via depressing expressions of regulatory factors and causing cell cycle arrest in spermatogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang-Zi; Zhang, Lian-Shuang; Wei, Jia-Liu; Ren, Li-Hua; Zhang, Jin; Jing, Li; Yang, Man; Wang, Ji; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Endosulfan is a persistent organic pollutant and widely used in agriculture as a pesticide. It is present in air, water, and soil worldwide; therefore, it is a health risk affecting especially the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of endosulfan in the reproductive system. To investigate the effect of endosulfan on meiosis process, 32 rats were divided into four groups, treated with 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day endosulfan, respectively, and sacrificed after the 21 days of treatments. Results show that endosulfan caused the reductions in sperm concentration and motility rate, which resulted into an increased in sperm abnormality rate; further, endosulfan induced downregulation of spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (Sohlh1) which controls the switch on meiosis in mammals, as well cyclin A1, cyclin-dependent kinases 1 (CDK1), and cyclin-dependent kinases 2 (CDK2). In vitro, endosulfan induced G2/M phase arrest in the spermatogenic cell cycle and caused proliferation inhibition. Moreover, endosulfan induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in vivo and vitro. The results suggested that endosulfan could inhibit the start of meiosis by downregulating the expression of Sohlh1 and induce G2/M phase arrest of cell cycle by decreasing the expression of cyclin A1, CDK1, and CDK2 via oxidative damage, which inhibits the meiosis process, and therefore decrease the amount of sperm.

  8. Replicative stress and alterations in cell cycle checkpoint controls following acetaminophen hepatotoxicity restrict liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Preeti; Sharma, Yogeshwar; Gupta, Priya; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2018-03-05

    Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of hepatic failure with impairments in liver regeneration producing significant mortality. Multiple intracellular events, including oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, inflammation, etc., signify acetaminophen toxicity, although how these may alter cell cycle controls has been unknown and was studied for its significance in liver regeneration. Assays were performed in HuH-7 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, primary human hepatocytes and tissue samples from people with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. Cellular oxidative stress, DNA damage and cell proliferation events were investigated by mitochondrial membrane potential assays, flow cytometry, fluorescence staining, comet assays and spotted arrays for protein expression after acetaminophen exposures. In experimental groups with acetaminophen toxicity, impaired mitochondrial viability and substantial DNA damage were observed with rapid loss of cells in S and G2/M and cell cycle restrictions or even exit in the remainder. This resulted from altered expression of the DNA damage regulator, ATM and downstream transducers, which imposed G1/S checkpoint arrest, delayed entry into S and restricted G2 transit. Tissues from people with acute liver failure confirmed hepatic DNA damage and cell cycle-related lesions, including restrictions of hepatocytes in aneuploid states. Remarkably, treatment of cells with a cytoprotective cytokine reversed acetaminophen-induced restrictions to restore cycling. Cell cycle lesions following mitochondrial and DNA damage led to failure of hepatic regeneration in acetaminophen toxicity but their reversibility offers molecular targets for treating acute liver failure. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Blocking anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the TCA cycle sensitizes K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqcena, M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Hosny, C; Alhamed, A; Chatterjee, A; Foster, D A

    2015-05-14

    Cancer cells undergo a metabolic transformation that allows for increased anabolic demands, wherein glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are shunted away for the synthesis of biological molecules required for cell growth and division. One of the key shunts is the exit of citrate from the mitochondria and the TCA cycle for the generation of cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A that can be used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. With the loss of mitochondrial citrate, cancer cells rely on the 'conditionally essential' amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates. Although Q deprivation causes G1 cell cycle arrest in non-transformed cells, its impact on the cancer cell cycle is not well characterized. We report here a correlation between bypass of the Q-dependent G1 checkpoint and cancer cells harboring K-Ras mutations. Instead of arresting in G1 in response to Q-deprivation, K-Ras-driven cancer cells arrest in either S- or G2/M-phase. Inhibition of K-Ras effector pathways was able to revert cells to G1 arrest upon Q deprivation. Blocking anaplerotic utilization of Q mimicked Q deprivation--causing S- and G2/M-phase arrest in K-Ras mutant cancer cells. Significantly, Q deprivation or suppression of anaplerotic Q utilization created synthetic lethality to the cell cycle phase-specific cytotoxic drugs, capecitabine and paclitaxel. These data suggest that disabling of the G1 Q checkpoint could represent a novel vulnerability of cancer cells harboring K-Ras and possibly other mutations that disable the Q-dependent checkpoint.

  10. Paris Saponin I Sensitizes Gastric Cancer Cell Lines to Cisplatin via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuichuan; Du, Leiwen; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Xinhai; Li, Jinhui; Xu, Ji

    2016-10-18

    BACKGROUND Dose-related toxicity is the major restriction of cisplatin and cisplatin-combination chemotherapy, and is a challenge for advanced gastric cancer treatment. We explored the possibility of using Paris saponin I as an agent to sensitize gastric cancer cells to cisplatin, and examined the underlying mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS Growth inhibition was detected by MTT assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected using flow cytometry and Annexin V/PI staining. The P21waf1/cip1, Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 protein expression were detected using Western blot analysis. RESULTS The results revealed that PSI sensitized gastric cancer cells to cisplatin, with low toxicity. The IC50 value of cisplatin in SGC-7901 cell lines was decreased when combined with PSI. PSI promoted cisplatin-induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in a cisplatin concentration-dependent manner. Bcl-2 protein expression decreased, but Bax, caspase-3, and P21waf1/cip1 protein expression increased with PSI treatment. CONCLUSIONS The underlying mechanism of Paris saponin I may be related to targeting the apoptosis pathway and cell cycle blocking, which suggests that PSI is a potential therapeutic sensitizer for cisplatin in treating gastric cancer.

  11. [Effects of HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG on cell cycle and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meini; Xu, Jinghong; Zhao, Jumei

    2013-02-01

    To study the effect of the HSP90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human cancer SGC-7901 cells and explore the mechanisms. The inhibitory effect of 17-AAG on the proliferation and morphology of SGC-7901 cells was assessed with MTT assay and DNA-PI staining, respectively. Flow cytometry was employed to analyze the changes in cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells following 17-AAG exposure. The cellular expression of Fas protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. 17-AAG significantly suppressed the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After treatment with 17-AAG for 48 h, SGC-7901 cells showed cell cycle arrested at G(2)/M stage, and the cell apoptosis rate increased with the 17-AAG concentration. The expression of Fas protein in the cytoplasm of SGC-7901 cells increased gradually with the increase of 17-AAG concentration. 17-AAG can induce apoptosis, alters the cell cycle distribution and up-regulates the expression of Fas protein in SGC-7901 cells to suppress the cell proliferation.

  12. Albumin Suppresses Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Proliferation and the Cell Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Nojiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many investigations have revealed that a low recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is associated with high serum albumin levels in patients; therefore, high levels of serum albumin are a major indicator of a favorable prognosis. However, the mechanism inhibiting the proliferation of HCC has not yet been elucidated, so we investigated the effect of serum albumin on HCC cell proliferation. Hep3B was cultured in MEM with no serum or containing 5 g/dL human albumin. As control samples, Prionex was added to generate the same osmotic pressure as albumin. After 24-h incubation, the expressions of α-fetoprotein (AFP, p53, p21, and p57 were evaluated with real-time PCR using total RNA extracted from the liver. Protein expressions and the phosphorylation of Rb (retinoblastoma were determined by Western blot analysis using total protein extracted from the liver. For flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle, FACS analysis was performed. The percentages of cell cycle distribution were evaluated by PI staining, and all samples were analyzed employing FACScalibur (BD with appropriate software (ModFit LT; BD. The cell proliferation assay was performed by counting cells with using a Scepter handy automated cell counter (Millipore. The mRNA levels of AFP relative to Alb(−: Alb(−, Alb(+, and Prionex, were 1, 0.7 ± 0.2 (p < 0.001 for Alb(−, and 1 ± 0.3, respectively. The mRNA levels of p21 were 1, 1.58 ± 0.4 (p = 0.007 for Alb(− and p = 0.004 for Prionex, and 0.8 ± 0.2, respectively. The mRNA levels of p57 were 1, 4.4 ± 1.4 (p = 0.002 for Alb(− and Prionex, and 1.0 ± 0.1, respectively. The protein expression levels of Rb were similar in all culture media. The phosphorylation of P807/811 and P780 of Rb protein was reduced in Alb(+. More cells in the G0/G1 phase and fewer cells in S and G2/M phases were obtained in Alb(+ than in Alb(− (G0/G1: 60.9%, 67.7%, 61.5%; G2/M: 16.5%, 13.1%, 15.6%; S: 22.6%, 19.2%, 23.0%, Alb(−, Alb

  13. Evaluation of cell cycle changes activated by the administration of "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-antiCD20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos B, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    In the present project, cytometric evaluation of cell cycle changes induced by the "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-antiCD20 thermostatic radiopharmaceutical was performed, in which a cell culture of Raji cells from Burkitts lymphoma were used, which are CD20+; for flow cytometry different parameters were measured in which the cells were synchronized in G0/G1 and G2/M, to calculate the dose to nucleus that were given to the cells the Monte Carlo method was used at a dose interval from 1 to 5 Gy. The purpose of this work is to be able to observe by flow cytometry the arrest in the cell cycle with a lower dose interval than the one applied in other papers. (Author)

  14. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  15. Certain and progressive methylation of histone H4 at lysine 20 during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, James J; Yang, Hongbo; Kelleher, Neil L; Mizzen, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Methylation of histone H4 at lysine 20 (K20) has been implicated in transcriptional activation, gene silencing, heterochromatin formation, mitosis, and DNA repair. However, little is known about how this modification is regulated or how it contributes to these diverse processes. Metabolic labeling and top-down mass spectrometry reveal that newly synthesized H4 is progressively methylated at K20 during the G(2), M, and G(1) phases of the cell cycle in a process that is largely inescapable and irreversible. Approximately 98% of new H4 becomes dimethylated within two to three cell cycles, and K20 methylation turnover in vivo is undetectable. New H4 is methylated regardless of prior acetylation, and acetylation occurs predominantly on K20-dimethylated H4, refuting the hypothesis that K20 methylation antagonizes H4 acetylation and represses transcription epigenetically. Despite suggestions that it is required for normal mitosis and cell cycle progression, K20 methylation proceeds normally during colchicine treatment. Moreover, delays in PR-Set7 synthesis and K20 methylation which accompany altered cell cycle progression during sodium butyrate treatment appear to be secondary to histone hyperacetylation or other effects of butyrate since depletion of PR-Set7 did not affect cell cycle progression. Together, our data provide an unbiased perspective of the regulation and function of K20 methylation.

  16. Effects of low priming dose irradiation on cell cycle arrest of HepG2 cells caused by high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jingguang; Jin Xiaodong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Li Wenjian; Wang Jufang; Guo Chuanling; Gao Qingxiang

    2005-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells hepG2 were irradiated twice by 60 Co γ-rays with a priming dose of 5 cGy and a higher dose of 3 Gy performed 4h or 8h after the low dose irradiation. Effects of the priming dose irradiation on cell cycle arrest caused by high dose were examined with flow cytometry. Cells in G 2 /M phase accumulated temporarily after the 5 cGy irradiation, and proliferation of tumor cells was promoted significantly by the low dose irradiation. After the 3 Gy irradiation, G 2 phase arrest occurred, and S phase delayed temporally. In comparison with 3 kGy irradiation only, the priming dose delivered 4h prior to the high dose irradiation facilitated accumulation of hepG2 cells in G 2 /M phase, whereas the priming dose delivered 8h prior to the high dose irradiation helped the cells to overcome G 2 arrest. It was concluded that effects of the priming dose treatment on cell cycle arrest caused by high dose irradiation were dependent on time interval between the two irradiations. (authors)

  17. Fisetin and hesperetin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in chronic myeloid leukemia cells accompanied by modulation of cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Baran, Yusuf

    2016-05-01

    Fisetin and hesperetin, naturally occurring flavonoids, have been reported as novel antioxidants with chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic potential against various types of cancer. However, their mechanism of action in CML is still unknown. This particular study aims to evaluate the therapeutic potentials of fisetin and hesperetin and their effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression in human K562 CML cells. The results indicated that fisetin and hesperetin inhibited cell proliferation and triggered programmed cell death in these cells. The latter was confırmed by mitochondrial membrane depolarization and an increase in caspase-3 activation. In addition to that, we have detected S and G2/M cell cycle arrests and G0/G1 arrest upon fisetin and hesperetin treatment, respectively. To identify the altered genes and genetic networks in response to fisetin and hesperetin, whole-genome microarray analysis was performed. The microarray gene profiling analysis revealed some important signaling pathways including JAK/STAT pathway, KIT receptor signaling, and growth hormone receptor signaling that were altered upon fisetin and hesperetin treatment. Moreover, microarray data suggested potential candidate genes for targeted CML therapy. Fisetin and hesperetin significantly modulated the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and division, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and other significant cellular processes such as replication, transcription, and translation. In conclusion, our results suggest that fisetin and hesperetin as potential natural agents for CML therapy.

  18. [Knockdown of DNA-PKcs inhibits cell cycle and its mechanism of drug-resistant Bel7402/5-Fu hepatocellular carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayu; Liu, Yun; Yu, Chunbo; Liu, Xiping; Fan, Fang

    2017-12-01

    Objective To study the effect of the knock-down of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) on the cell cycle of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Bel7402/5-Fu hepatocellular carcinoma cells and its MDR mechanism. Methods After cationic liposome-mediated siDNA-PKcs oligonucleotide transfection, the drug sensitivity of Bel7402/5-Fu cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and adriamycin (ADM) was determined by MTT assay; the cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry; meanwhile, the protein expressions of cell cycle-related proteins P21, cell cycle protein B1 (cyclin B1), cell cycle division protein 2 (CDC2) were tested by Western blotting; the expressions of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and p53 at both mRNA and protein levels were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results The MTT results showed siDNA-PKcs increased the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of Bel7402/5-Fu cells to 5-Fu and ADM. The flow cytometric analysis showed siDNA-PKcs decreased the percentage of S-phase cells but increased the percentage of G2/M phase cells. Western blotting showed siDNA-PKcs increased the protein expression of P21 but decreased cyclinB1 and CDC2 proteins. In addition, siDNA-PKcs also increased the expressions of ATM and p53. Conclusion DNA-PKcs silencing increases P21 while decreases cyclin B1 and CDC2 expressions, and finally induces G2/M phase arrest in Bel7402/5-Fu cells, which may be related to ATM-p53 signaling pathway.

  19. Cell radiosensitivity variation in synchronously-dividing root meristems of Pisum sativum L. and Zea mays L. during the mitotic cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, I.N.; Grodzinsky, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The cell divisions in pea and maize seedling root meristems were synchronized by treatment with 0.03 per cent hydroxyurea for 24 hours. At different times after block cessation (removing seedlings from hydroxyurea), i.e. according to certain phases and subphases of the mitotic cycle, the seedlings were treated with 60 Co γ-radiation at doses from 3 to 32 Gy. Evaluation of seedling radioresistance by the survival of the main root meristem on the tenth day after irradiation led to the following sequence of cell stages in order of increasing resistance. For the pea root meristem: G 2 , M, late G 1 , early S, late S, middle S and early G 1 . For the maize root meristem: late G 2 , M, G 1 , early S, early G 2 , late S and middle S. (author)

  20. Epigenetic dynamics across the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Tony Bou; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of the mammalian cell cycle depends on correct timing and co-ordination of a series of events, which are managed by the cellular transcriptional machinery and epigenetic mechanisms governing genome accessibility. Epigenetic chromatin modifications are dynamic across the cell cycle...... a correct inheritance of epigenetic chromatin modifications to daughter cells. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on the dynamics of epigenetic chromatin modifications during progression of the cell cycle....

  1. Secretory activity and cell cycle alteration of alveolar type II cells in the early and late phase after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willner, Jochen; Vordermark, Dirk; Schmidt, Michael; Gassel, Andreamaria; Flentje, Michael; Wirtz, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Type II cells and the surfactant system have been proposed to play a central role in pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. We analyzed the secretory function and proliferation parameters of alveolar type II cells in the early (until 24 h) and late phase (1-5 weeks) after irradiation (RT) in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Type II cells were isolated from rats according to the method of Dobbs. Stimulation of secretion was induced with terbutaline, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for a 2-h period. Determination of secretion was performed using 3 H-labeled phosphatidylcholine. For the early-phase analysis, freshly isolated and adherent type II cells were irradiated in vitro with 9-21 Gy (stepwise increase of 3 Gy). Secretion stimulation was initiated 1, 6, 24, and 48 h after RT. For late-phase analysis, type II cells were isolated 1-5 weeks after 18 Gy whole lung or sham RT. Each experiment was repeated at least fivefold. Flow cytometry was used to determine cell cycle distribution and proliferating cell nuclear antigen index. Results: During the early-phase (in vitro) analysis, we found a normal stimulation of surfactant secretion in irradiated, as well as unirradiated, cells. No change in basal secretion and no dose effect were seen. During the late phase, 1-5 weeks after whole lung RT, we observed enhanced secretory activity for all secretagogues and a small increase in basal secretion in Weeks 3 and 4 (pneumonitis phase) compared with controls. The total number of isolated type II cells, as well as the rate of viable cells, decreased after the second post-RT week. Cell cycle alterations suggesting an irreversible G 2 /M block occurred in the second post-RT week and did not resolve during the observation period. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index of type II cells from irradiated rats did not differ from that of controls. Conclusion: In contrast to literature data, we observed no direct

  2. The G2/M DNA damage checkpoint inhibits mitosis through Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 in Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, X S; Fincher, R R; Tang, A; Osmani, S A

    1997-01-01

    It is possible to cause G2 arrest in Aspergillus nidulans by inactivating either p34cdc2 or NIMA. We therefore investigated the negative control of these two mitosis-promoting kinases after DNA damage. DNA damage caused rapid Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 and transient cell cycle arrest but had little effect on the activity of NIMA. Dividing cells deficient in Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 were sensitive to both MMS and UV irradiation and entered lethal premature mitosis with damaged DN...

  3. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koramit Suppipat

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9, inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21(CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling.

  4. SB225002 Induces Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells through the Activation of GLIPR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Paulo C.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zenatti, Priscila Pini; Nunes, Ricardo J.; Yunes, Rosendo A.; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Libermann, Towia A.; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent childhood malignancy. In the effort to find new anti-leukemic agents, we evaluated the small drug SB225002 (N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-N’-(2-bromophenyl)urea). Although initially described as a selective antagonist of CXCR2, later studies have identified other cellular targets for SB225002, with potential medicinal use in cancer. We found that SB225002 has a significant pro-apoptotic effect against both B- and T-ALL cell lines. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that treatment with SB225002 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest. Transcriptional profiling revealed that SB225002-mediated apoptosis triggered a transcriptional program typical of tubulin binding agents. Network analysis revealed the activation of genes linked to the JUN and p53 pathways and inhibition of genes linked to the TNF pathway. Early cellular effects activated by SB225002 included the up-regulation of GLIPR1, a p53-target gene shown to have pro-apoptotic activities in prostate and bladder cancer. Silencing of GLIPR1 in B- and T-ALL cell lines resulted in increased resistance to SB225002. Although SB225002 promoted ROS increase in ALL cells, antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine pre-treatment only modestly attenuated cell death, implying that the pro-apoptotic effects of SB225002 are not exclusively mediated by ROS. Moreover, GLIPR1 silencing resulted in increased ROS levels both in untreated and SB225002-treated cells. In conclusion, SB225002 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different B- and T-ALL cell lines. Inhibition of tubulin function with concurrent activation of the p53 pathway, in particular, its downstream target GLIPR1, seems to underlie the anti-leukemic effect of SB225002. PMID:26302043

  5. Differential response of cell-cycle and cell-expansion regulators to heat stress in apple (Malus domestica) fruitlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaishman, Moshe A; Peles, Yuval; Dahan, Yardena; Milo-Cochavi, Shira; Frieman, Aviad; Naor, Amos

    2015-04-01

    Temperature is one of the most significant factors affecting physiological and biochemical aspects of fruit development. Current and progressing global warming is expected to change climate in the traditional deciduous fruit tree cultivation regions. In this study, 'Golden Delicious' trees, grown in a controlled environment or commercial orchard, were exposed to different periods of heat treatment. Early fruitlet development was documented by evaluating cell number, cell size and fruit diameter for 5-70 days after full bloom. Normal activities of molecular developmental and growth processes in apple fruitlets were disrupted under daytime air temperatures of 29°C and higher as a result of significant temporary declines in cell-production and cell-expansion rates, respectively. Expression screening of selected cell cycle and cell expansion genes revealed the influence of high temperature on genetic regulation of apple fruitlet development. Several core cell-cycle and cell-expansion genes were differentially expressed under high temperatures. While expression levels of B-type cyclin-dependent kinases and A- and B-type cyclins declined moderately in response to elevated temperatures, expression of several cell-cycle inhibitors, such as Mdwee1, Mdrbr and Mdkrps was sharply enhanced as the temperature rose, blocking the cell-cycle cascade at the G1/S and G2/M transition points. Moreover, expression of several expansin genes was associated with high temperatures, making them potentially useful as molecular platforms to enhance cell-expansion processes under high-temperature regimes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of heat tolerance associated with genes controlling cell cycle and cell expansion may lead to the development of novel strategies for improving apple fruit productivity under global warming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on the cell cycle in normal and UV-sensitive cell lines with reference to the nature of the defect in xeroderma pigmentosum variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imray, P.; Mangan, T.; Saul, A.; Kidson, C.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of the distribution of cells through the phases of the cell cycle by DNA flow cytofluorimetry has been utilized to investigate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on cell-cycle progression in normal and UV-sensitive lymphoblastoid cell lines. In time-course studies only slight perturbation of DNA distribution was seen in normal cells, or UV-sensitive familial melanoma (FM) lines in the 48 h following irradiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPA) excision-deficient cells showed a large increase in the proportion of cells in S phase 16-40 h post-irradiation. XP variant (XPV) cells were blocked in G 1 and S phases with the complete absence of cells with G 2 DNA content 16-28 h after irradiation. By 48 h post-irradiation the DNA distribution of XPA and XPV cells had returned to that of an unirradiated control. When colcemid was added to the cultures immediately after irradiation to prevent mitotic cells dividing and re-entering the cell cycle, progression through the first cycle after irradiation was followed. UV irradiation did not affect the rate of movement of cells out of G 1 into S phase in normal, FM or XPA cells. The proportion of cells in S phase was increased in UV-irradiated cultures in these cell types and the number of cells entering the G 2 +M compartment was reduced. (orig./AJ)

  7. Cell cycle effects of L-sulforaphane, a major antioxidant from cruciferous vegetables: The role of the anaphase promoting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Zhaoping; Royce, Simon G; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    L-sulforaphane (LSF) is a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables particularly broccoli. LSF has been identified as a potent antioxidant and anti-cancer agent and is widely known to regulate phase II detoxifying enzymes and induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in malignant cells in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have found significant G2/M cell cycle arrest in response to LSF in various model of cancer and results have mainly been attributed to increased cyclin B1 protein levels and increased p21expression. Using genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis we provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of LSF to identify a key pathway in cell cycle progression - the role of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) pathway. We evaluated gene expression changes in human erythroleukemic K562 cells following treatment with 15 μM LSF for 48h and compared them to immortalized human keratinocytes, human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) cells and normal human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). We identified disparate gene expression changes in response to LSF between malignant and normal cells and immortalized cell lines. The results highlight significant down-regulation of kinase CDK1 which is suggestive that the existence and activity of APC/CDC20 complex will be inhibited along with its associated down-stream degradation of key cell cycle regulators preventing cell cycle progression from mitotic exit.

  8. Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 p30 alters cell cycle G2 regulation of T lymphocytes to enhance cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Lee

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is linked to a number of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 and p30, whose roles are still being defined in the virus life cycle and in HTLV-1 virus-host cell interactions. Proviral clones of HTLV-1 with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. p30 expressed exogenously differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and while acting as a repressor of many genes including Tax, in part by blocking tax/rex RNA nuclear export, selectively enhances key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Results Herein, we analyzed the role of p30 in cell cycle regulation. Jurkat T-cells transduced with a p30 expressing lentivirus vector accumulated in the G2-M phase of cell cycle. We then analyzed key proteins involved in G2-M checkpoint activation. p30 expression in Jurkat T-cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylation at serine 216 of nuclear cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C, had enhanced checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1 serine 345 phosphorylation, reduced expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, diminished phosphorylation of PLK1 at tyrosine 210 and reduced phosphorylation of Cdc25C at serine 198. Finally, primary human lymphocyte derived cell lines immortalized by a HTLV-1 proviral clone defective in p30 expression were more susceptible to camptothecin induced apoptosis. Collectively these data are consistent with a cell survival role of p30 against genotoxic insults to HTLV-1 infected lymphocytes. Conclusion Collectively, our data are the first to indicate that HTLV-1 p30 expression results in activation of the G2-M cell cycle checkpoint, events that would promote early viral spread and T-cell

  9. Bombyx mori cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor is involved in regulation of the silkworm cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X-F; Zhou, X-L; Zhang, Q; Chen, P; Lu, C; Pan, M-H

    2018-06-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) are negative regulators of the cell cycle. They can bind to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-cyclin complexes and inhibit CDK activities. We identified a single homologous gene of the CDK interacting protein/kinase inhibitory protein (Cip/Kip) family, BmCKI, in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The gene transcribes two splice variants: a 654-bp-long BmCKI-L (the longer splice variant) encoding a protein with 217 amino acids and a 579-bp-long BmCKI-S (the shorter splice variant) encoding a protein with 192 amino acids. BmCKI-L and BmCKI-S contain the Cip/Kip family conserved cyclin-binding domain and the CDK-binding domain. They are localized in the nucleus and have an unconventional bipartite nuclear localization signal at amino acid residues 181-210. Overexpression of BmCKI-L or BmCKI-S affected cell cycle progression; the cell cycle was arrested in the first gap phase of cell cycle (G1). RNA interference of BmCKI-L or BmCKI-S led to cells accumulating in the second gap phase and the mitotic phase of cell cycle (G2/M). Both BmCKI-L and BmCKI-S are involved in cell cycle regulation and probably have similar effects. The transgenic silkworm with BmCKI-L overexpression (BmCKI-L-OE), exhibited embryonic lethal, larva developmental retardation and lethal phenotypes. These results suggest that BmCKI-L might regulate the growth and development of silkworm. These findings clarify the function of CKIs and increase our understanding of cell cycle regulation in the silkworm. © 2018 The Royal Entomological Society.

  10. Cell cycle indicators of buccal epithelial cells in the treatment of different types of removable plate partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Beliaiev

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work. To investigate nuclear DNA and buccal epithelial cells proliferative activity in patients with dental defects, who use removable partial dentures plates made of acrylic or thermoplastic. Materials and Methods. The study of buccal epithelial cell cycle parameters was carried out in 70 people. Among them 23 patients were treated with acrylic dentures prostheses, 23 patients – with thermoplastic-based prostheses. The comparison group consisted of 24 clinically healthy persons without defects in the dentition. DNA content in human buccal epithelial cells nuclei was determined by flow cytometry. Results. The obtained indicators of buccal epithelial cell cycle of the control group indicate a high intensity of cell self-renewal in the normal range. It is suggested by a significant percentage of events occurring within the Sub-G1 range that characterizes apoptosis, as well as the fact that more than half of the cells were in the range of S + G2/M. It has been revealed by flow cytometry that the percentage of apoptosis in cells was higher in patients using acrylic dentures base plastic, showed initial signs of keratinization that was confirmed by increase in cells in the range of Sub-G1 and by their decrease in the range of S-G2/M. It has been established in the study of buccal epithelium cell cycle indicators in the dentures bases thermoplastic application that these prostheses did not affect the proliferative activity of buccal epithelial cells compared to the group using acrylic dentures bases with prolonged use. This is evident in almost the same number of cellular events ranging Sub-G1, so apoptosis in the thermoplastic dentures bases application corresponded to the control group indicators both in the early period and over a year of use. Conclusions. The direct negative effect of prostheses with acrylic bases on the complex mechanism of the oral cavity mucous membrane functioning has been revealed. Absence of dentures

  11. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Saghaeian Jazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after   24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27 expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies.

  12. Establishment and cell cycle distribution pattern of a radioresistant subline from human lung cancer D6 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Qichun; Zheng Shu

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To establish a radioresistant cell subline from a human D6 lung cancer cell line and investigate the mechanism of radioresistance. Methods: D6 human NSCLC cells were exposed to X-rays generated by a linear accelerator(650 cGy per fraction). After a total exposure dose of 5200 cGy, a monoclone was obtained. The radiosensitivity and cell cycle distribution of this clone, together with its parent D6 cells, were measured by clonogenic assay and flow cytometry. Results: The new clone, namely D 6 -R subline, had a higher D 0 (D 0 =2.08 Gy) and a broader initial shoulder(Dq=1.64 Gy, N=2.20) than those of the parent D6 cell line (D 0 =1.84 Gy, Dq=0.34 Gy, N=1.20), being 1.65-fold increase in radioresistance as regards to the SF 2 . The D6-R subline also showed higher percentage of cells in S phase(53.4% vs 37.8%), but lower percentages in G 1 (44.1% vs 57.2%) and G 2 /M(2.5% vs 5%) phases. Conclusion: The new subline D6-R is more radioresistant as compare to its parent D6 cell line, and has a different cell cycle distribution

  13. Modulation of Cell Cycle Profile by Chlorella vulgaris Prevents Replicative Senescence of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Saberbaghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of Chlorella vulgaris (CV on replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs were investigated. Hot water extract of CV was used to treat HDFs at passages 6, 15, and 30 which represent young, presenescence, and senescence ages, respectively. The level of DNA damage was determined by comet assay while apoptosis and cell cycle profile were determined using FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Our results showed direct correlation between increased levels of damaged DNA and apoptosis with senescence in untreated HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle profile showed increased population of untreated senescent cells that enter G0/G1 phase while the cell population in S phase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Treatment with CV however caused a significant reduction in the level of damaged DNA and apoptosis in all age groups of HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle analysis showed that treatment with CV increased significantly the percentage of senescent HDFs in S phase and G2/M phases but decreased the population of cells in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05. In conclusion, hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris effectively decreased the biomarkers of ageing, indicating its potential as an antiageing compound.

  14. A novel parameter, cell-cycle progression index, for radiation dose absorbed estimation in the premature chromosome condensation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Nakano, Manabu; Nakata, Akifumi; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Abe, Yu; Tsushima, Eiki; Ossetrova, Natalia I.; Blakely, William F.

    2014-01-01

    The calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay is a simple and useful method for assessing the cell-cycle distribution in cells, since calyculin A induces chromosome condensation in various phases of the cell cycle. In this study, a novel parameter, the cell-cycle progression index (CPI), in the PCC assay was validated as a novel bio-marker for bio-dosimetry. Peripheral blood was drawn from healthy donors after informed consent was obtained. CPI was investigated using a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) ex vivo irradiation ( 60 Co-gamma rays: ∼0.6 Gy min -1 , or X ray: 1.0 Gy min -1 ; 0-10 Gy) model. The calyculin A-induced PCC assay was performed for chromosome preparation. PCC cells were divided into the following five categories according to cell-cycle stage: non-PCC, G1-PCC, S-PCC, G2/M-PCC and M/A-PCC cells. CPI was calculated as the ratio of G2/M-PCC cells to G1-PCC cells. The PCC-stage distribution varied markedly with irradiation doses. The G1-PCC cell fraction was significantly reduced, and the G2/M-PCC cell fraction increased, in 10-Gy-irradiated PBL after 48 h of culture. CPI levels were fitted to an exponential dose-response curve with gamma-ray irradiation [y = 0.6729 + 0.3934 exp(0.5685D), r = 1.0000, p < 0.0001] and X-ray irradiation [y = -0.3743 + 0.9744 exp(0.3321D), r = 0.9999, p < 0.0001]. There were no significant individual (p = 0.853) or gender effects (p = 0.951) on the CPI in the human peripheral blood ex vivo irradiation model. Furthermore, CPI measurements are rapid (< 15 min per case). These results suggest that the CPI is a useful screening tool for the assessment of radiation doses received ranging from 0 to 10 Gy in radiation exposure early after a radiation event, especially after a mass-casualty radiological incident. (authors)

  15. Sulforaphane enhances irradiation effects in terms of perturbed cell cycle progression and increased DNA damage in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Naumann

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN, an herbal isothiocyanate enriched in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower, has gained popularity for its antitumor effects in cell lines such as pancreatic cancer. Antiproliferative as well as radiosensitizing properties were reported for head and neck cancer but little is known about its effects in pancreatic cancer cells in combination with irradiation (RT.In four established pancreatic cancer cell lines we investigated clonogenic survival, analyzed cell cycle distribution and compared DNA damage via flow cytometry and western blot after treatment with SFN and RT.Both SFN and RT show a strong and dose dependent survival reduction in clonogenic assays, an induction of a G2/M cell cycle arrest and an increase in γH2AX protein level indicating DNA damage. Effects were more pronounced in combined treatment and both cell cycle perturbation and DNA damage persisted for a longer period than after SFN or RT alone. Moreover, SFN induced a loss of DNA repair proteins Ku 70, Ku 80 and XRCC4.Our results suggest that combination of SFN and RT exerts a more distinct DNA damage and growth inhibition than each treatment alone. SFN seems to be a viable option to improve treatment efficacy of chemoradiation with hopefully higher rates of secondary resectability after neoadjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  16. Cell cycle phases in the unequal mother/daughter cell cycles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, B J; Chlebowicz-Sledziewska, E; Fangman, W L

    1984-11-01

    During cell division in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mother cells produce buds (daughter cells) which are smaller and have longer cell cycles. We performed experiments to compare the lengths of cell cycle phases in mothers and daughters. As anticipated from earlier indirect observations, the longer cell cycle time of daughter cells is accounted for by a longer G1 interval. The S-phase and the G2-phase are of the same duration in mother and daughter cells. An analysis of five isogenic strains shows that cell cycle phase lengths are independent of cell ploidy and mating type.

  17. Cell cycle control by components of cell anchorage

    OpenAIRE

    Gad, Annica

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular factors, such as growth factors and cell anchorage to the extracellular matrix, control when and where cells may proliferate. This control is abolished when a normal cell transforms into a tumour cell. The control of cell proliferation by cell anchorage was elusive and less well studied than the control by growth factors. Therefore, we aimed to clarify at what points in the cell cycle and through which molecular mechanisms cell anchorage controls cell cycle pro...

  18. Calotropin from Asclepias curasavica induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, En-Pan; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Tan, Qiu-Tong; Liu, Fang-Lan; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-09-16

    Calotropin (M11), an active compound isolated from Asclepias curasavica L., was found to exert strong inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activity specifically against cisplatin-induced resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549/CDDP). Molecular mechanism study revealed that M11 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase through down-regulating cyclins, CDK1, CDK2 and up-regulating p53 and p21. Furthermore, M11 accelerated apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was accompanied by increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in reactive oxygen species production, activations of caspases 3 and 9 as well as cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The activation and phosphorylation of JNK was also found to be involved in M11-induced apoptosis, and SP610025 (specific JNK inhibitor) partially prevented apoptosis induced by M11. In contrast, all of the effects that M11 induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/CDDP cells were not significant in A549 cells. Drugs with higher sensitivity against resistant tumor cells than the parent cells are rather rare. Results of this study supported the potential application of M11 on the non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) with cisplatin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proliferation marker pKi-67 affects the cell cycle in a self-regulated manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko H H; Broll, Rainer; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Duchrow, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The proliferation marker pKi-67 is commonly used in research and pathology to detect proliferating cells. In a previous work, we found the protein to be associated with regulators of the cell cycle, controlling S-phase progression, as well as entry into and exit from mitosis. Here we investigate whether pKi-67 has a regulative effect on the cell cycle itself. For that purpose we cloned four fragments of pKi-67, together representing nearly the whole protein, and an N-terminal pKi-67 antisense oligonucleotide into a tetracycline inducible gene expression system. The sense fragments were C-terminally modified by addition of either a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a STOP codon to address the impact of their intracellular distribution. FACS based cell cycle analysis revealed that expression of nearly all pKi-67 domains and the antisense oligonucleotide led to a decreased amount of cells in S-phase and an increased number of cells in G(2)/M- and G(1)-phase. Subsequent analysis of the endogenous pKi-67 mRNA and protein levels revealed that the constructs with the most significant impact on the cell cycle were able to silence pKi-67 transcription as well. We conclude from the data that pKi-67 influences progression of S-phase and mitosis in a self-regulated manner and, therefore, effects the cell cycle checkpoints within both phases. Furthermore, we found pKi-67 mediates an anti-apoptotic effect on the cell and we verified that this marker, although it is a potential ribosomal catalyst, is not expressed in differentiated tissues with a high transcriptional activity. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Hsiao, Ping-Hsuan; Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1?3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4?2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAP...

  1. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  2. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  3. Senescence-associated microRNAs target cell cycle regulatory genes in normal human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markopoulos, Georgios S; Roupakia, Eugenia; Tokamani, Maria; Vartholomatos, George; Tzavaras, Theodore; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael; Polytarchou, Christos; Kolettas, Evangelos

    2017-10-01

    Senescence recapitulates the ageing process at the cell level. A senescent cell stops dividing and exits the cell cycle. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) acting as master regulators of transcription, have been implicated in senescence. In the current study we investigated and compared the expression of miRNAs in young versus senescent human fibroblasts (HDFs), and analysed the role of mRNAs expressed in replicative senescent HFL-1 HDFs. Cell cycle analysis confirmed that HDFs accumulated in G 1 /S cell cycle phase. Nanostring analysis of isolated miRNAs from young and senescent HFL-1 showed that a distinct set of 15 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in senescent cells including hsa-let-7d-5p, hsa-let-7e-5p, hsa-miR-23a-3p, hsa-miR-34a-5p, hsa-miR-122-5p, hsa-miR-125a-3p, hsa-miR-125a-5p, hsa-miR-125b-5p, hsa-miR-181a-5p, hsa-miR-221-3p, hsa-miR-222-3p, hsa-miR-503-5p, hsa-miR-574-3p, hsa-miR-574-5p and hsa-miR-4454. Importantly, pathway analysis of miRNA target genes down-regulated during replicative senescence in a public RNA-seq data set revealed a significant high number of genes regulating cell cycle progression, both G 1 /S and G 2 /M cell cycle phase transitions and telomere maintenance. The reduced expression of selected miRNA targets, upon replicative and oxidative-stress induced senescence, such as the cell cycle effectors E2F1, CcnE, Cdc6, CcnB1 and Cdc25C was verified at the protein and/or RNA levels. Induction of G1/S cell cycle phase arrest and down-regulation of cell cycle effectors correlated with the up-regulation of miR-221 upon both replicative and oxidative stress-induced senescence. Transient expression of miR-221/222 in HDFs promoted the accumulation of HDFs in G1/S cell cycle phase. We propose that miRNAs up-regulated during replicative senescence may act in concert to induce cell cycle phase arrest and telomere erosion, establishing a senescent phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The G2/M DNA damage checkpoint inhibits mitosis through Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X S; Fincher, R R; Tang, A; Osmani, S A

    1997-01-02

    It is possible to cause G2 arrest in Aspergillus nidulans by inactivating either p34cdc2 or NIMA. We therefore investigated the negative control of these two mitosis-promoting kinases after DNA damage. DNA damage caused rapid Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 and transient cell cycle arrest but had little effect on the activity of NIMA. Dividing cells deficient in Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 were sensitive to both MMS and UV irradiation and entered lethal premature mitosis with damaged DNA. However, non-dividing quiescent conidiospores of the Tyr15 mutant strain were not sensitive to DNA damage. The UV and MMS sensitivity of cells unable to tyrosine phosphorylate p34cdc2 is therefore caused by defects in DNA damage checkpoint regulation over mitosis. Both the nimA5 and nimT23 temperature-sensitive mutations cause an arrest in G2 at 42 degrees C. Addition of MMS to nimT23 G2-arrested cells caused a marked delay in their entry into mitosis upon downshift to 32 degrees C and this delay was correlated with a long delay in the dephosphorylation and activation of p34cdc2. Addition of MMS to nimA5 G2-arrested cells caused inactivation of the H1 kinase activity of p34cdc2 due to an increase in its Tyr15 phosphorylation level and delayed entry into mitosis upon return to 32 degrees C. However, if Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 was prevented then its H1 kinase activity was not inactivated upon MMS addition to nimA5 G2-arrested cells and they rapidly progressed into a lethal mitosis upon release to 32 degrees C. Thus, Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 in G2 arrests initiation of mitosis after DNA damage in A. nidulans.

  5. Comprehensive Mass Cytometry Analysis of Cell Cycle, Activation, and Coinhibitory Receptors Expression in CD4 T Cells from Healthy and HIV-Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, Aurélien; Cosma, Antonio; Even, Sophie; Katlama, Christine; Le Grand, Roger; Frachet, Véronique; Blanc, Catherine; Autran, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Mass cytometry allows large multiplex analysis of cell cycle stages together with differentiation, activation, and exhaustion markers, allowing further assessment of the quiescence status of resting CD4 T cells. Peripheral blood CD4 T lymphocytes from 8 individuals, 4 healthy donors, and 4 HIV-infected on antiretroviral treatment (T) were stained with the same 26 monoclonal antibodies and dyes targeting surface and intracellular markers of differentiation, activation, exhaustion, and cell cycle stages. Samples were run on a CYTOF-2. Patterns of naïve [TN] CD4 T cells strongly differed from all other memory subsets central-memory (CM), transitional-memory (TM), effector-memory (EM), and terminally differentiated RA-expressing (TEMRA) subsets, while stem-cell memory (SCM) and T follicular-helper cells (TfH) were close to CM and TM cells with the highest percentages in cell cycle. EM and TEMRA were the most altered by HIV infection, with an increased frequency of activated and cycling cells. Activation markers and coinhibitory receptor expression differed among cell cycle stages, with HLA-DR fitting better than CD25 or CD38 with cycle, and opposite PD-1 gradients along differentiation and cell cycle. "Resting" DR-CD25- CD4+ T cells contained similar amounts of cells in G1 than the activated DR ± CD25± ones but three fold lower cells in S-G2-M. This broad multiplex mass cytometry analysis demonstrates some subsets of the so-called "resting" CD25-DR- CD4+ T cells contain noticeable amounts of cells into cycle or expressing coinhibitory receptors, opening new avenues for a redefinition of resting peripheral blood CD4 T cells harboring the HIV reservoirs. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  6. MS4a4B, a CD20 homologue in T cells, inhibits T cell propagation by modulation of cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available MS4a4B, a CD20 homologue in T cells, is a novel member of the MS4A gene family in mice. The MS4A family includes CD20, FcεRIβ, HTm4 and at least 26 novel members that are characterized by their structural features: with four membrane-spanning domains, two extracellular domains and two cytoplasmic regions. CD20, FcεRIβ and HTm4 have been found to function in B cells, mast cells and hematopoietic cells respectively. However, little is known about the function of MS4a4B in T cell regulation. We demonstrate here that MS4a4B negatively regulates mouse T cell proliferation. MS4a4B is highly expressed in primary T cells, natural killer cells (NK and some T cell lines. But its expression in all malignant T cells, including thymoma and T hybridoma tested, was silenced. Interestingly, its expression was regulated during T cell activation. Viral vector-driven overexpression of MS4a4B in primary T cells and EL4 thymoma cells reduced cell proliferation. In contrast, knockdown of MS4a4B accelerated T cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis showed that MS4a4B regulated T cell proliferation by inhibiting entry of the cells into S-G2/M phase. MS4a4B-mediated inhibition of cell cycle was correlated with upregulation of Cdk inhibitory proteins and decreased levels of Cdk2 activity, subsequently leading to inhibition of cell cycle progression. Our data indicate that MS4a4B negatively regulates T cell proliferation. MS4a4B, therefore, may serve as a modulator in the negative-feedback regulatory loop of activated T cells.

  7. MS4a4B, a CD20 homologue in T cells, inhibits T cell propagation by modulation of cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Yan, Yaping; Williams, Mark S; Carey, Gregory B; Yang, Jingxian; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2010-11-01

    MS4a4B, a CD20 homologue in T cells, is a novel member of the MS4A gene family in mice. The MS4A family includes CD20, FcεRIβ, HTm4 and at least 26 novel members that are characterized by their structural features: with four membrane-spanning domains, two extracellular domains and two cytoplasmic regions. CD20, FcεRIβ and HTm4 have been found to function in B cells, mast cells and hematopoietic cells respectively. However, little is known about the function of MS4a4B in T cell regulation. We demonstrate here that MS4a4B negatively regulates mouse T cell proliferation. MS4a4B is highly expressed in primary T cells, natural killer cells (NK) and some T cell lines. But its expression in all malignant T cells, including thymoma and T hybridoma tested, was silenced. Interestingly, its expression was regulated during T cell activation. Viral vector-driven overexpression of MS4a4B in primary T cells and EL4 thymoma cells reduced cell proliferation. In contrast, knockdown of MS4a4B accelerated T cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis showed that MS4a4B regulated T cell proliferation by inhibiting entry of the cells into S-G2/M phase. MS4a4B-mediated inhibition of cell cycle was correlated with upregulation of Cdk inhibitory proteins and decreased levels of Cdk2 activity, subsequently leading to inhibition of cell cycle progression. Our data indicate that MS4a4B negatively regulates T cell proliferation. MS4a4B, therefore, may serve as a modulator in the negative-feedback regulatory loop of activated T cells.

  8. Anticancer effects of kaempferol in A375 human malignant melanoma cells are mediated via induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, inhibition of cell migration and downregulation of m-TOR/PI3K/AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia; Xiao, Peng; Sun, Jiaming; Guo, Liang

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of human cancer with limited treatment options currently available. The present study was aimed to evaluate the anticancer activity of kaempferol (KAM) against the human malignant melanoma A375 cell line along with evaluation of its effects on apoptosis, cell cycle, cell migration and m-TOR/PI3K/AKT pathway. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT assay while clonogenic assay measured the effects of KAM on colony formation. Annexin V assay evaluated the apoptotic effects of KAM in these cells using flow cytometry. Effects on cell cycle were determined by using flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) as probe. The effects of KAM on m-TOR/ PI3K/AKT signalling pathway were evaluated by western blot assay. MTT assay indicated that KAM exhibits a significant anticancer activity against A375 cells with an IC50 of 20 μM. These antiproliferative effects of KAM were also supported by the colony formation assay wherein KAM reduced the colony formation in a dose-dependent manner. The anticancer effect of KAM was found to be due to the initiation of apoptosis in human malignant melanoma A375 cells. Additionally, KAM also exhibited the capacity to trigger G2/M cell cycle arrest and to inhibit the cell migratory potential of A375 cells. KAM caused significant downregulation of m-TOR, phosphorylated (p) m-TOR, PI3K, p-PI3K and Akt protein levels in A375 malignantmelanoma cells. KAM exerts potent anticancer effects via induction of apoptosis, G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell migration inhibition and downregulation of m-TOR, pm-TOR, PI3K, p-PI3K and Akt protein levels.

  9. Lactobacillus Decelerates Cervical Epithelial Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielfort, Katarina; Weyler, Linda; Söderholm, Niklas; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Löfmark, Sonja; Aro, Helena

    2013-01-01

    We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells. PMID:23675492

  10. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  11. Changes of Constituents and Activity to Apoptosis and Cell Cycle During Fermentation of Tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Lu; Ge, Ya-kun; Sheng, Jun; Shi, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Tea is believed to be beneficial for health, and the effects of the fermentation process on its contributions to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of gastric cancer cells have not been completely investigated. In this study, the chemical components in green tea, black tea and pu-erh tea aqueous extracts were analyzed and compared. The polysaccharide and caffeine levels were substantially higher in the fermented black tea and pu-erh tea, while the polyphenol level was higher in the unfermented green tea. Hence, a treatment of tea aqueous extract and the components, which are emerging as promising anticancer agents, were pursued to determine whether this treatment could lead to enhance apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. In the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901, the cell viability and flow cytometry analysis for apoptotic cells indicated effects in a dose-dependent inhibition manner for the three tea treatment groups. The apoptosis rates were found to be elevated after 48 h of treatment with 31.2, 125, and 500 μg/mL of green tea extract, the higher catechins content may be involved in the mechanism. Cell cycle was arrested in S phase in the fermented black tea and pu-erh tea, and the populations were significantly decreased in G2/M phases, possibly due to the oxidation of tea polyphenols, which causes an increase of theabrownins. CCC-HEL-1 normal cells were not sensitive to tea extract. These findings suggest that the fermentation process causes changes of the compounds which might be involved in the changes of cell proliferation inhibition, apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21673927

  12. Dramatic repositioning of c-Myb to different promoters during the cell cycle observed by combining cell sorting with chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M Quintana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The c-Myb transcription factor is a critical regulator of proliferation and stem cell differentiation, and mutated alleles of c-Myb are oncogenic, but little is known about changes in c-Myb activity during the cell cycle. To map the association of c-Myb with specific target genes during the cell cycle, we developed a novel Fix-Sort-ChIP approach, in which asynchronously growing cells were fixed with formaldehyde, stained with Hoechst 33342 and separated into different cell cycle fractions by flow sorting, then processed for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. We found that c-Myb actively repositions, binding to some genes only in specific cell cycle phases. In addition, the specificity of c-Myb is dramatically different in small subpopulations of cells, for example cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, than in the bulk population. The repositioning of c-Myb during the cell cycle is not due to changes in its expression and also occurs with ectopically expressed, epitope-tagged versions of c-Myb. The repositioning occurs in established cell lines, in primary human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and in primary human acute myeloid leukemia cells. The combination of fixation, sorting and ChIP analysis sheds new light on the dynamic nature of gene regulation during the cell cycle and provides a new type of tool for the analysis of gene regulation in small subsets of cells, such as cells in a specific phase of the cell cycle.

  13. G2(+)M study on N-alkylamino cation affinities of neutral main-group element hydrides: trends across the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Song; Wu, Ding-Lu; Yang, Jing; Wei, Xi-Guang; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Ren, Yi; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2014-05-08

    We have made an extensive theoretical exploration of gas-phase N-alkylamino cation affinities (NAAMCA), including amino cation affinities (AMCA) and N-dimethylamino cation affinities (NDMAMCA), of neutral main-group element hydrides of groups 15-17 and periods 2-4 in the periodic table by using the G2(+)M method. Some similarities and differences are found between NAAMCA and the corresponding alkyl cation affinities (ACA) of H(n)X. Our calculations show that the AMCA and NDMAMCA are systematically lower than the corresponding proton affinities (PA) for H(n)X. In general, there is no linear correlation between NAAMCA and PA of H(n)X. Instead, the correlations exist only within the central elements X in period 2, or periods 3-4, which is significantly different from the reasonable correlations between ACA and PA for all H(n)X. NAAMCA (H(n)X) are weaker than NAAMCA (H(n-1)X(-)) by more than 700 kJ/mol and generally stronger than ACA (H(n)X), with three exceptions: H2ONR2(+)(R = H, Me) and HFNH2(+). These new findings can be rationalized by the negative hyperconjugation and Pauli repulsion.

  14. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus through p53-dependent pathway causes cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pei; Wu, Haoyang; Huang, Jiali; Xu, Ying; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Qi; Xu, Xingang

    2018-05-22

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), an enteropathogenic Alphacoronavirus, has caused enormous economic losses in the swine industry. p53 protein exists in a wide variety of animal cells, which is involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, cell differentiation and other biological functions. In this study, we investigated the effects of PEDV infection on the cell cycle of Vero cells and p53 activation. The results demonstrated that PEDV infection induces cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in Vero cells, while UV-inactivated PEDV does not cause cell cycle arrest. PEDV infection up-regulates the levels of p21, cdc2, cdk2, cdk4, Cyclin A protein and down-regulates Cyclin E protein. Further research results showed that inhibition of p53 signaling pathway can reverse the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase induced by PEDV infection and cancel out the up-regulation of p21 and corresponding Cyclin/cdk mentioned above. In addition, PEDV infection of the cells synchronized in various stages of cell cycle showed that viral subgenomic RNA and virus titer were higher in the cells released from G0/G1 phase synchronized cells than that in the cells released from the G1/S phase and G2/M phase synchronized or asynchronous cells after 18 h p.i.. This is the first report to demonstrate that the p53-dependent pathway plays an important role in PEDV induced cell cycle arrest and beneficially contributes to viral infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanism for ginkgolic acid (15 : 1)-induced MDCK cell necrosis: Mitochondria and lysosomes damages and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qing-Qing; Liu, Zhen-Hua; Xu, Ming-Cheng; Hu, Hai-Hong; Zhou, Hui; Jiang, Hui-Di; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2017-05-01

    Ginkgolic acids (GAs), primarily found in the leaves, nuts, and testa of ginkgo biloba, have been identified with suspected allergenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic properties. However, little information is available about GAs toxicity in kidneys and the underlying mechanism has not been thoroughly elucidated so far. Instead of GAs extract, the renal cytotoxicity of GA (15 : 1), which was isolated from the testa of Ginkgo biloba, was assessed in vitro by using MDCK cells. The action of GA (15 : 1) on cell viability was evaluated by the MTT and neutral red uptake assays. Compared with the control, the cytotoxicity of GA (15 : 1) on MDCK cells displayed a time- and dose-dependent manner, suggesting the cells mitochondria and lysosomes were damaged. It was confirmed that GA (15 : 1) resulted in the loss of cells mitochondrial trans-membrane potential (ΔΨm). In propidium iodide (PI) staining analysis, GA (15 : 1) induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases, influencing on the DNA synthesis and cell mitosis. Characteristics of necrotic cell death were observed in MDCK cells at the experimental conditions, as a result of DNA agarose gel electrophoresis and morphological observation of MDCK cells. In conclusion, these findings might provide useful information for a better understanding of the GA (15 : 1) induced renal toxicity. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Heterogenic final cell cycle by chicken retinal Lim1 horizontal progenitor cells leads to heteroploid cells with a remaining replicated genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shirazi Fard

    Full Text Available Retinal progenitor cells undergo apical mitoses during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration and newly generated post-mitotic neurons migrate to their prospective retinal layer. Whereas this is valid for most types of retinal neurons, chicken horizontal cells are generated by delayed non-apical mitoses from dedicated progenitors. The regulation of such final cell cycle is not well understood and we have studied how Lim1 expressing horizontal progenitor cells (HPCs exit the cell cycle. We have used markers for S- and G2/M-phase in combination with markers for cell cycle regulators Rb1, cyclin B1, cdc25C and p27Kip1 to characterise the final cell cycle of HPCs. The results show that Lim1+ HPCs are heterogenic with regards to when and during what phase they leave the final cell cycle. Not all horizontal cells were generated by a non-apical (basal mitosis; instead, the HPCs exhibited three different behaviours during the final cell cycle. Thirty-five percent of the Lim1+ horizontal cells was estimated to be generated by non-apical mitoses. The other horizontal cells were either generated by an interkinetic nuclear migration with an apical mitosis or by a cell cycle with an S-phase that was not followed by any mitosis. Such cells remain with replicated DNA and may be regarded as somatic heteroploids. The observed heterogeneity of the final cell cycle was also seen in the expression of Rb1, cyclin B1, cdc25C and p27Kip1. Phosphorylated Rb1-Ser608 was restricted to the Lim1+ cells that entered S-phase while cyclin B1 and cdc25C were exclusively expressed in HPCs having a basal mitosis. Only HPCs that leave the cell cycle after an apical mitosis expressed p27Kip1. We speculate that the cell cycle heterogeneity with formation of heteroploid cells may present a cellular context that contributes to the suggested propensity of these cells to generate cancer when the retinoblastoma gene is mutated.

  17. Transcriptional Waves in the Yeast Cell Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Anna; Rosebrock, Adam; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Chen, Haiying; Skiena, Steve; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The 750 genes with the most significant oscillat...

  18. Regulation of cell cycle checkpoint kinase WEE1 by miR-195 in malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Schmitz, U; Wolkenhauer, O; Schönherr, M; Raatz, Y; Kunz, M

    2013-06-27

    WEE1 kinase has been described as a major gate keeper at the G2 cell cycle checkpoint and to be involved in tumour progression in different malignant tumours. Here we analysed the expression levels of WEE1 in a series of melanoma patient samples and melanoma cell lines using immunoblotting, quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. WEE1 expression was significantly downregulated in patient samples of metastatic origin as compared with primary melanomas and in melanoma cell lines of high aggressiveness as compared with cell lines of low aggressiveness. Moreover, there was an inverse correlation between the expression of WEE1 and WEE1-targeting microRNA miR-195. Further analyses showed that transfection of melanoma cell lines with miR-195 indeed reduced WEE1 mRNA and protein expression in these cells. Reporter gene analysis confirmed direct targeting of the WEE1 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) by miR-195. Overexpression of miR-195 in SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells was accompanied by WEE1 reduction and significantly reduced stress-induced G2-M cell cycle arrest, which could be restored by stable overexpression of WEE1. Moreover, miR-195 overexpression and WEE1 knockdown, respectively, increased melanoma cell proliferation. miR-195 overexpression also enhanced migration and invasiveness of melanoma cells. Taken together, the present study shows that WEE1 expression in malignant melanoma is directly regulated by miR-195. miR-195-mediated downregulation of WEE1 in metastatic lesions may help to overcome cell cycle arrest under stress conditions in the local tissue microenvironment to allow unrestricted growth of tumour cells.

  19. Regulation of cell cycle progression by cell-cell and cell-matrix forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uroz, Marina; Wistorf, Sabrina; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Conte, Vito; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Guimerà, Roger; Trepat, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    It has long been proposed that the cell cycle is regulated by physical forces at the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces 1-12 . However, the evolution of these forces during the cycle has never been measured in a tissue, and whether this evolution affects cell cycle progression

  20. Regulation of DNA synthesis and the cell cycle in human prostate cancer cells and lymphocytes by ovine uterine serpin

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    Hansen Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine serpins are members of the serine proteinase inhibitor superfamily. Like some other serpins, these proteins do not appear to be functional proteinase inhibitors. The most studied member of the group, ovine uterine serpin (OvUS, inhibits proliferation of several cell types including activated lymphocytes, bovine preimplantation embryos, and cell lines for lymphoma, canine primary osteosarcoma and human prostate cancer (PC-3 cells. The goal for the present study was to evaluate the mechanism by which OvUS inhibits cell proliferation. In particular, it was tested whether inhibition of DNA synthesis in PC-3 cells involves cytotoxic actions of OvUS or the induction of apoptosis. The effect of OvUS in the production of the autocrine and angiogenic cytokine interleukin (IL-8 by PC-3 cells was also determined. Finally, it was tested whether OvUS blocks specific steps in the cell cycle using both PC-3 cells and lymphocytes. Results Recombinant OvUS blocked proliferation of PC-3 cells at concentrations as low as 8 μg/ml as determined by measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation or ATP content per well. Treatment of PC-3 cells with OvUS did not cause cytotoxicity or apoptosis or alter interleukin-8 secretion into medium. Results from flow cytometry experiments showed that OvUS blocked the entry of PC-3 cells into S phase and the exit from G2/M phase. In addition, OvUS blocked entry of lymphocytes into S phase following activation of proliferation with phytohemagglutinin. Conclusion Results indicate that OvUS acts to block cell proliferation through disruption of the cell cycle dynamics rather than induction of cytotoxicity or apoptosis. The finding that OvUS can regulate cell proliferation makes this one of only a few serpins that function to inhibit cell growth.

  1. Cell Cycle Deregulation in Ewing's Sarcoma Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Ashley A.; Randall, R. Lor; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly aggressive pediatric tumor of bone that usually contains the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12). This translocation encodes the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/FLI, which acts as an aberrant transcription factor to deregulate target genes necessary for oncogenesis. One key feature of oncogenic transformation is dysregulation of cell cycle control. It is therefore likely that EWS/FLI and other cooperating mutations in Ewing's sarcoma modulate the cell cycle to facilitate tumorigenesis. This paper will summarize current published data associated with deregulation of the cell cycle in Ewing's sarcoma and highlight important questions that remain to be answered. PMID:21052502

  2. Cell Cycle Deregulation in Ewing's Sarcoma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Kowalewski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma is a highly aggressive pediatric tumor of bone that usually contains the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(11;22(q24;q12. This translocation encodes the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/FLI, which acts as an aberrant transcription factor to deregulate target genes necessary for oncogenesis. One key feature of oncogenic transformation is dysregulation of cell cycle control. It is therefore likely that EWS/FLI and other cooperating mutations in Ewing's sarcoma modulate the cell cycle to facilitate tumorigenesis. This paper will summarize current published data associated with deregulation of the cell cycle in Ewing's sarcoma and highlight important questions that remain to be answered.

  3. Incorporation of 35S-sulfate and 3H-glucosamine into heparan and chondroitin sulfates during the cell cycle of B16-F10 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, O.C.; Sartorelli, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in glycosaminoglycan composition occurring during the cell cycle were determined in B16-F10 cells sorted flow cytometrically with respect to DNA content. Incorporation of 35 S-sulfate into heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate of unsorted and G1,S, and G2 +M sorted cells was determined following chondroitinase ABC or nitrous acid treatment; the incorporation into surface material was measured as the difference between the radioactivity of control and trypsin-treated cells. Incorporation of 35 S-sulfate and 3 H-glucosamine into cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC)-precipitable material was characterized before and after chondroitinase or nitrous acid treatment by Sephadex G50 chromatography. Long-term (48 h) and short-term (1 h) labeling studies demonstrate that (a) the amount of total cellular chondroitin sulfate is greater than that of heparan sulfate, with larger amounts of unsulfated heparan than chondroitin being present; (b) the rate of turnover of heparan sulfate is greater than that of chondroitin sulfate; (c) greatest short-term incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into CPC-precipitable material occurs during S phase; and (d) the rate of turnover of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate is decreased in S phase relative to G1 and G2 + M

  4. Regulation of the cell cycle by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Makoto

    1995-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cell proliferation is extremely complex; deregulation results in neoplastic transformation. In eukaryotes, proliferation of cells is finely regulated through the cell cycle. Studies have shown that the cell cycle is regulated by s series of enzymes known as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The activities of CDKs are controlled by their association with regulatory subunits, cyclins; the expression of cyclins and the activation of the different cyclin-CDK complexes are required for the cell to cycle. Thus, the cell cycle is regulated by activating and inhibiting phosphorylation of the CDK subunits and this program has internal check points at different stages of the cell cycle. When cells are exposed to external insults such as DNA damaging agents, negative regulation of the cell cycle occurs; arrest in either G1 or G2 stage is induced to prevent the cells from prematurely entering into the next stage before DNA is repaired. Recently, a potent inhibitor of CDKs, which inhibits the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma susceptibility (Rb) gene product by cyclin A-CDK2, cyclin E-CDK2, cyclin D1-CDK4, and cyclin D2-CDK4 complexes has been identified. This protein named WAF1, Sdi1, Cip1, or p21 (a protein of Mr 21,000) contains a p53-binding site in its promoter and studies have reported that the expression of WAF1 was directly regulated by p53; cells with loss of p53 activity due to mutational alteration were unable to induce WAF1. This chapter will be focused on the mechanisms of the cell cycle including inhibitors of CDKs, and the induction of WAF1 by irradiation through a pathway independent of p53 will be also described. (author)

  5. Cell cycle sensitivity of HL-60 cells to the differentiation-inducing effects of 1-alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studzinski, G.P.; Bhandal, A.K.; Brelvi, Z.S.

    1985-01-01

    A recently described system for monocyte-like differentiation of HL-60 cells was utilized to determine if the initiation of this pathway can be linked to a set of replicative cellular events. The standard induction system consisted of a 4-h exposure to 100 nM 1-alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] followed by determination of nonspecific esterase and phagocytic activity 24 h later. The cell cycle status was ascertained by the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine and autoradiography. Studies in which cell cycle block in the G1/S phase boundary region was produced by a partial inhibition of DNA synthesis with thymidine, or sodium butyrate, showed that the exposure of such semisynchronous cultures to 1,25(OH)2D3 resulted in an increased proportion of differentiated cells. Conversely, blocking the cell cycle with vinblastine (G2/M block) or theobromine (mid-G1 block) inhibited the initiation of differentiation by 1,25(OH)2D3. Experiments in which the differentiated cells were examined for the cell cycle position at the time of the exposure to 1,25(OH)2D3 by [ 3 H]thymidine labeling and autoradiography confirmed that the late G1 and early S phase cells are those which predominate in the differentiated fraction of 1,25(OH)2D3-treated HL-60 cultures. These results link pre- and early replicative cellular events to the induction of monocytic differentiation by 1,25(OH)2D3

  6. Lamprey immune protein-1 (LIP-1) from Lampetra japonica induces cell cycle arrest and cell death in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiaoyuan; Su, Peng; Bi, Dan; Tai, Zhao; Li, Yingying; Pang, Yue; Li, Qingwei

    2018-04-01

    The lamprey (Lampetra japonica), a representative of the jawless vertebrates, is the oldest extant species in the world. LIP-1, which has a jacalin-like domain and an aerolysin pore-forming domain, has previously been identified in Lampetra japonica. However, the structure and function of the LIP-1 protein have not been described. In this study, the LIP-1 gene was overexpressed in HeLa cells and H293T cells. The results showed that the overexpression of LIP-1 in HeLa cells significantly elevated LDH release (P HeLa cells, while it had no effect on H293T cell organelles. Array data indicated that overexpression of LIP-1 primarily upregulated P53 signaling pathways in HeLa cells. Cell cycle assay results confirmed that LIP-1 caused arrest in the G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle in HeLa cells. In summary, our findings provide insights into the function and characterization of LIP-1 genes in vertebrates and establish the foundation for further research into the biological function of LIP-1. Our observations suggest that this lamprey protein has the potential for use in new applications in the medical field. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Coupling TOR to the Cell Cycle by the Greatwall–Endosulfine–PP2A-B55 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Pérez-Hidalgo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell growth and division are two processes tightly coupled in proliferating cells. While Target of Rapamycin (TOR is the master regulator of growth, the cell cycle is dictated by the activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. A long-standing question in cell biology is how these processes may be connected. Recent work has highlighted that regulating the phosphatases that revert CDK phosphorylations is as important as regulating the CDKs for cell cycle progression. At mitosis, maintaining a low level of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B55 activity is essential for CDK substrates to achieve the correct level of phosphorylation. The conserved Greatwall–Endosulfine pathway has been shown to be required for PP2A-B55 inhibition at mitosis in yeasts and multicellular organisms. Interestingly, in yeasts, the Greatwall–Endosulfine pathway is negatively regulated by TOR Complex 1 (TORC1. Moreover, Greatwall–Endosulfine activation upon TORC1 inhibition has been shown to regulate the progression of the cell cycle at different points: the G1 phase in budding yeast, the G2/M transition and the differentiation response in fission yeast, and the entry into quiescence in both budding and fission yeasts. In this review, we discuss the recent findings on how the Greatwall–Endosulfine pathway may provide a connection between cell growth and the cell cycle machinery.

  8. Andrographolide Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis of Chondrosarcoma by Targeting TCF-1/SOX9 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan-Tian; Yang, Jie; Liang, Gui-Hong; Gao, Xue-Juan; Sang, Yuan; Gui, Tao; Liang, Zu-Jian; Tam, Man-Seng; Zha, Zhen-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most malignant bone tumor with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Thus, development of more effective treatments has become urgent. Recently, natural compounds derived from medicinal plants have emerged as promising therapeutic options via targeting multiple key cellular molecules. Andrographolide (Andro) is such a compound, which has previously been shown to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in several human cancers. However, the molecular mechanism through which Andro exerts its anti-cancer effect on chondrosarcoma remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we showed that Andro-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest of chondrosarcoma by fine-tuning the expressions of several cell cycle regulators such as p21, p27, and Cyclins, and that prolonged treatment of cells with Andro caused pronounced cell apoptosis. Remarkably, we found that SOX9 was highly expressed in poor-differentiated chondrosarcoma, and that knockdown of SOX9 suppressed chondrosarcoma cell growth. Further, our results showed that Andro dose-dependently down-regulated SOX9 expression in chondrosarcoma cells. Concomitantly, an inhibition of T cell factor 1 (TCF-1) mRNA expression and an enhancement of TCF-1 protein degradation by Andro were observed. In contrast, the expression and subcellular localization of β-catenin were not altered upon the treatment of Andro, suggesting that β-catenin might not function as the primary target of Andro. Additionally, we provided evidence that there was a mutual regulation between TCF-1 and SOX9 in chondrosarcoma cells. In conclusion, these results highlight the potential therapeutic effects of Andro in treatment of chondrosarcoma via targeting the TCF-1/SOX9 axis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4575-4586, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-associated KIAA0101/PAF15 protein is a cell cycle-regulated anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele, Michael J; Ciccia, Alberto; Elia, Andrew E H; Elledge, Stephen J

    2011-06-14

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a cell cycle-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls the degradation of substrate proteins at mitotic exit and throughout the G1 phase. We have identified an APC/C substrate and cell cycle-regulated protein, KIAA0101/PAF15. PAF15 protein levels peak in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and drop rapidly at mitotic exit in an APC/C- and KEN-box-dependent fashion. PAF15 associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and depletion of PAF15 decreases the number of cells in S phase, suggesting a role for it in cell cycle regulation. Following irradiation, PAF15 colocalized with γH2AX foci at sites of DNA damage through its interaction with PCNA. Finally, PAF15 depletion led to an increase in homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair, and overexpression caused sensitivity to UV-induced DNA damage. We conclude that PAF15 is an APC/C-regulated protein involved in both cell cycle progression and the DNA damage response.

  10. Ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production accompanied by upregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain function and mitochondrial content under control of the cell cycle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamazumi, Masayuki; Wada, Yusuke; Nakamura, Yoshinari; Nakamura, Hideo; Inanami, Osamu

    2012-07-15

    Whereas ionizing radiation (Ir) instantaneously causes the formation of water radiolysis products that contain some reactive oxygen species (ROS), ROS are also suggested to be released from biological sources in irradiated cells. It is now becoming clear that these ROS generated secondarily after Ir have a variety of biological roles. Although mitochondria are assumed to be responsible for this Ir-induced ROS production, it remains to be elucidated how Ir triggers it. Therefore, we conducted this study to decipher the mechanism of Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, Ir (10 Gy of X-rays) induced a time-dependent increase in the mitochondrial ROS level. Ir also increased mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial ATP production, suggesting upregulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) function after Ir. Although we found that Ir slightly enhanced mitochondrial ETC complex II activity, the complex II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid failed to reduce Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. Meanwhile, we observed that the mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA level were upregulated after Ir, indicating that Ir increased the mitochondrial content of the cell. Because irradiated cells are known to undergo cell cycle arrest under control of the checkpoint mechanisms, we examined the relationships between cell cycle and mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. We found that the cells in the G2/M phase had a higher mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level than cells in the G1 or S phase, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated. We also found that Ir-induced accumulation of the cells in the G2/M phase led to an increase in cells with a high mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. This suggested that Ir upregulated mitochondrial ETC function and mitochondrial content, resulting in mitochondrial ROS production, and that

  11. UBE2C Is a Transcriptional Target of the Cell Cycle Regulator FOXM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Nicolau-Neto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available FOXM1 (forkhead box protein M1 is a transcription factor that participates in all stages of tumor development, mainly through the control of cell cycle and proliferation, regulating the expression of genes involved in G1/S and G2/M transition and M phase progression. The ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2 (UBE2C is a member of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, promoting the degradation of several target proteins along cell cycle progression, during metaphase/anaphase transition. FOXM1 and UBE2C have been found overexpressed in a wide range of different solid tumors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether UBE2C is a transcriptional target of FOXM1, using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC as a model, in addition to several cancer-deposited data. Our results show that FOXM1 and UBE2C expression present a positive correlation in normal tissues and in 25 distinct tumor types, including ESCC, where these genes are overexpressed. Moreover, FOXM1 binds to UBE2C promoter region in ESCC cell line and transcriptionally activates it, leading to UBE2C upregulation. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that FOXM1 transcriptionally regulates UBE2C expression in ESCC and their deregulation may be a general phenomenon in human neoplasias.

  12. Disruptive cell cycle regulation involving epigenetic downregulation of Cdkn2a (p16Ink4a) in early-stage liver tumor-promotion facilitating liver cell regeneration in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Takuma; Wang, Liyun; Yafune, Atsunori; Kimura, Masayuki; Ohishi, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle aberration was immunohistochemically examined in relation to preneoplastic liver cell foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) at early stages of tumor-promotion in rats with thioacetamide (TAA), a hepatocarcinogen facilitating liver cell regeneration. Immunoexpression of p16 Ink4a following exposure to other hepatocarcinogens/promoters and its DNA methylation status were also analyzed during early and late tumor-promotion stages. GST-P + liver cell foci increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis when compared with surrounding liver cells. In concordance with GST-P + foci, checkpoint proteins at G 1 /S (p21 Cip1 , p27 Kip1 and p16 Ink4a ) and G 2 /M (phospho-checkpoint kinase 1, Cdc25c and phospho-Wee1) were either up- or downregulated. Cellular distribution within GST-P + foci was either increased or decreased with proteins related to G 2 -M phase or DNA damage (topoisomerase IIα, phospho-histone H2AX, phospho-histone H3 and Cdc2). In particular, p16 Ink4a typically downregulated in GST-P + foci and regenerative nodules at early tumor-promotion stage with hepatocarcinogens facilitating liver cell regeneration and in neoplastic lesions at late tumor-promotion stage with hepatocarcinogens/promoters irrespective of regenerating potential. Hypermethylation at exon 2 of Cdkn2a was detected at both early- and late-stages. Thus, diverse disruptive expression of G 1 /S and G 2 /M proteins, which allows for clonal selection of GST-P + foci, results in the acquisition of multiple aberrant phenotypes to disrupt checkpoint function. Moreover, increased DNA-damage responses within GST-P + foci may be the signature of genetic alterations. Intraexonic hypermethylation may be responsible for p16 Ink4a -downregulation, which facilitates cell cycle progression in early preneoplastic lesions produced by repeated cell regeneration and late-stage neoplastic lesions irrespective of the carcinogenic mechanism.

  13. Study of the cell cycle control for human malignant mesothelioma lines. Interferon and radiations effect; Etude de la regulation du cycle cellulaire de lignees de mesotheliome malin humain. Effet de l'interferon et des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivo, C

    1999-07-01

    In order to better understand the inhibition mechanisms of the IFN-R-HU on tumoral development, the IFN-R-U effect on MM lines has been studied. Three groups of lines has been distinguished: eight sensitive lines, two intermediate and three resistant. The sensitive lines showed a triple locking of the cell cycle: in phases S, G1 and G2. The study of the cell cycle control points function, realized by the MM lines radiation exposure showed the points function on G1/S and-or on G2/M and the dependence or non dependence of the cycle stop of the protein P53 and P21 W at F1/CIP1. (A.L.B.)

  14. 2-Aminopurine overrides multiple cell cycle checkpoints in BHK cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, P R; Margolis, R L

    1992-01-01

    BHK cells blocked at any of several points in the cell cycle override their drug-induced arrest and proceed in the cycle when exposed concurrently to the protein kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine (2-AP). For cells arrested at various points in interphase, 2-AP-induced cell cycle progression is made evident by arrival of the drug-treated cell population in mitosis. Cells that have escaped from mimosine G1 arrest, from hydroxyurea or aphidicolin S-phase arrest, or from VM-26-induced G2 arrest subs...

  15. Extra-virgin olive oil phenols block cell cycle progression and modulate chemotherapeutic toxicity in bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, Andrea; Mosca, Luciana; Puca, Rosa; Mangino, Giorgio; Rossi, Alessandro; Lendaro, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that the daily consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), a common dietary habit of the Mediterranean area, lowers the incidence of certain types of cancer, in particular bladder neoplasm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of polyphenols extracted from EVOO on bladder cancer (BCa), and to clarify the biological mechanisms that trigger cell death. Furthermore, we also evaluated the ability of low doses of extra-virgin olive oil extract (EVOOE) to modulate the in vitro activity of paclitaxel or mitomycin, two antineoplastic drugs used in the management of different types of cancer. Our results showed that EVOOE significantly inhibited the proliferation and clonogenic ability of T24 and 5637 BCa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis after EVOOE treatment showed a marked growth arrest prior to mitosis in the G2/M phase for both cell lines, with the subsequent induction of apoptosis only in the T24 cells. Notably, simultaneous treatment of mitomycin C and EVOOE reduced the drug cytotoxicity due to inhibition of ROS production. Conversely, the co-treatment of T24 cells with paclitaxel and the polyphenol extract strongly increased the apoptotic cell death at each tested concentration compared to paclitaxel alone. Our results support the epidemiological evidence indicating that olive oil consumption exerts health benefits and may represent a starting point for the development of new anticancer strategies. PMID:27748855

  16. The influence of survivin shRNA on the cell cycle and the invasion of SW480 cells of colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to understand the influence of Survivin plasmid with short hairpin RNA (shRNA on the cell cycle, invasion, and the silencing effect of Survivin gene in the SW480 cell of colorectal carcinoma. Methods A eukaryotic expression vector, PGCH1/Survivin shRNA, a segment sequence of Survivin as target, was created and transfected into colorectal carcinoma cell line SW480 by the non-lipid method. The influence on the Survivin protein was analyzed by Western blotting, while the cell cycle, cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry, and invasion of the cell was analyzed by Transwell's chamber method. Results After the transfection of PGCH1/Survivin shRNA, the expression of Survivin protein in SW480 cells was dramatically decreased by 60.68%, in which the cells were stopped at G2/M phase, even though no apoptosis was detected. The number of transmembranous cells of the experimental group, negative control group, and blank control group were 14.46 ± 2.11, 25.12 ± 8.37, and 25.86 ± 7.45, respectively (P 0.05. Conclusion Survivin shRNA could significantly reduce the expression of Survivin protein and invasion of SW480 cells. Changes in cell cycle were observed, but no apoptosis was induced.

  17. [The effect of heat stress on the cytoskeleton and cell cycle of human umbilical vein endothelial cell in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhiguo; Shao, Yu; Geng, Yan; Chen, Jinghe; Su, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To study the effect of heat stress on the cytoskeleton and cell cycle of human umbilical vein endothelial cell ( HUVEC ) in vitro. HUVEC was cultured in vitro in 5%CO(2) medium at 37 centigrade ( control group ) or 43 centigrade ( heat stress group ) for 1 hour. Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 staining was used to determine the effect of heat stress on the cytoskeleton. The cells in heat stress group were subsequently cultured at 37 centigradein 5%CO(2) medium after heat stress for 1 hour, and cell cycle of HUVEC was determined at 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours with flow cytometry. Under light microscopy normal cytoskeleton was observed in control group, but thicker and shorter cytoskeleton was found after a rise of temperature, and stress fibers were found in heat stress group. The DNA content of HUVEC at all time points in G0/G1 stage was 38.07%-55.19% after heat stress. The DNA content in control group was 48.57%, and it was 54.06%, 55.19%, 48.23%, 38.07%, and 41.03% at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours in G0/G1 stage in heat stress group. DNA content in S phase was 35.33%-48.18%. The DNA content in control group was 44.62%, and it was 35.33%, 39.50%, 42.50%, 48.18%, and 47.99% at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours in S stage in heat stress group. DNA content in G2/M phase was 5.31%-13.75%. The DNA content in control group was 6.81, and it was 10.61%, 5.31%, 9.27%,13.75%, and 10.98% at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours in G2/M stage in heat stress group. It was demonstrated that compared with control group, the DNA content in G0/G1 stage was significantly increased when the HUVEC were separated from heat stress within 6 hours, and it recovered at a similar level as control group at 12 hours. Heat stress can change the cytoskeleton of HUVEC, and cause stagnation at G0/G1 stage in cell cycle.

  18. A hybrid mammalian cell cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Noël

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid modeling provides an effective solution to cope with multiple time scales dynamics in systems biology. Among the applications of this method, one of the most important is the cell cycle regulation. The machinery of the cell cycle, leading to cell division and proliferation, combines slow growth, spatio-temporal re-organisation of the cell, and rapid changes of regulatory proteins concentrations induced by post-translational modifications. The advancement through the cell cycle comprises a well defined sequence of stages, separated by checkpoint transitions. The combination of continuous and discrete changes justifies hybrid modelling approaches to cell cycle dynamics. We present a piecewise-smooth version of a mammalian cell cycle model, obtained by hybridization from a smooth biochemical model. The approximate hybridization scheme, leading to simplified reaction rates and binary event location functions, is based on learning from a training set of trajectories of the smooth model. We discuss several learning strategies for the parameters of the hybrid model.

  19. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus; Dreffke, Kirstin

    2014-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons for the increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancers of the oropharynx. Radiation response including clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and cell cycle redistribution in four HPV-positive (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) cell lines was evaluated. HPV-positive cells were more radiosensitive (mean SF2: 0.198 range: 0.22-0.18) than HPV-negative cells (mean SF2: 0.34, range: 0.45-0.27; p = 0.010). Irradiated HPV-positive cell lines progressed faster through S-phase showing a more distinct accumulation in G2/M. The abnormal cell cycle checkpoint activation was accompanied by a more pronounced increase of cell death after x-irradiation and a higher number of residual and unreleased DSBs. The enhanced responsiveness of HPV-related HNSCC to radiotherapy might be caused by a higher cellular radiosensitivity due to cell cycle dysregulation and impaired DNA DSB repair. (orig.) [de

  20. Regulation of cAMP on the first mitotic cell cycle of mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Aiming; Zhang, Zhe; Bi, Qiang; Sun, Bingqi; Su, Wenhui; Guan, Yifu; Mu, Runqing; Miao, Changsheng; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Bingzhi

    2008-03-01

    Mitosis promoting factor (MPF) plays a central role during the first mitosis of mouse embryo. We demonstrated that MPF activity increased when one-cell stage mouse embryo initiated G2/M transition following the decrease of cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. When cAMP and PKA activity increases again, MPF activity decreases and mouse embryo starts metaphase-anaphase transition. In the downstream of cAMP/PKA, there are some effectors such as polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), Cdc25, Mos (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase), MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Wee1, anaphase-promoting complex (APC), and phosphoprotein phosphatase that are involved in the regulation of MPF activity. Here, we demonstrated that following activation of MPF, MAPK activity was steady, whereas Plk1 activity fluctuated during the first cell cycle. Plk1 activity was the highest at metaphase and decreased at metaphase-anaphase transition. Further, we established a mathematical model using Gepasi algorithm and the simulation was in agreement with the experimental data. Above all the evidences, we suggested that cAMP and PKA might be the upstream factors which were included in the regulation of the first cell cycle development of mouse embryo. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Cell Cycle Regulation of Stem Cells by MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mens, Michelle M J; Ghanbari, Mohsen

    2018-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules involved in the regulation of gene expression. They are involved in the fine-tuning of fundamental biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis in many cell types. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNAs regulate critical pathways involved in stem cell function. Several miRNAs have been suggested to target transcripts that directly or indirectly coordinate the cell cycle progression of stem cells. Moreover, previous studies have shown that altered expression levels of miRNAs can contribute to pathological conditions, such as cancer, due to the loss of cell cycle regulation. However, the precise mechanism underlying miRNA-mediated regulation of cell cycle in stem cells is still incompletely understood. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of miRNAs regulatory role in cell cycle progression of stem cells. We describe how specific miRNAs may control cell cycle associated molecules and checkpoints in embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells. We further outline how these miRNAs could be regulated to influence cell cycle progression in stem cells as a potential clinical application.

  2. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.baptista@ist.utl.pt [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley [Intelligent Energy, Charnwood Building, HolywellPark, Ashby Road, Loughborough, LE11 3GR (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO{sub 2} emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: > A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. > The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions results. > A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  3. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Patricia; Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla; Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO 2 emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO 2 emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: → A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. → The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO 2 emissions results. → A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  4. A nuclear glutathione cycle within the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Vivancos, Pedro; Wolff, Tonja; Markovic, Jelena; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2010-10-15

    The complex antioxidant network of plant and animal cells has the thiol tripeptide GSH at its centre to buffer ROS (reactive oxygen species) and facilitate cellular redox signalling which controls growth, development and defence. GSH is found in nearly every compartment of the cell, including the nucleus. Transport between the different intracellular compartments is pivotal to the regulation of cell proliferation. GSH co-localizes with nuclear DNA at the early stages of proliferation in plant and animal cells. Moreover, GSH recruitment and sequestration in the nucleus during the G1- and S-phases of the cell cycle has a profound impact on cellular redox homoeostasis and on gene expression. For example, the abundance of transcripts encoding stress and defence proteins is decreased when GSH is sequestered in the nucleus. The functions of GSHn (nuclear GSH) are considered in the present review in the context of whole-cell redox homoeostasis and signalling, as well as potential mechanisms for GSH transport into the nucleus. We also discuss the possible role of GSHn as a regulator of nuclear proteins such as histones and PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase] that control genetic and epigenetic events. In this way, a high level of GSH in the nucleus may not only have an immediate effect on gene expression patterns, but also contribute to how cells retain a memory of the cellular redox environment that is transferred through generations.

  5. The human RNA polymerase II-associated factor 1 (hPaf1: a new regulator of cell-cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Moniaux

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The human PAF (hPAF complex is part of the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus and regulates multiple steps in gene expression. Further, the yeast homolog of hPaf1 has a role in regulating the expression of a subset of genes involved in the cell-cycle. We therefore investigated the role of hPaf1 during progression of the cell-cycle.Herein, we report that the expression of hPaf1, a subunit of the hPAF complex, increases with cell-cycle progression and is regulated in a cell-cycle dependant manner. hPaf1 specifically regulates a subclass of genes directly implicated in cell-cycle progression during G1/S, S/G2, and G2/M. In prophase, hPaf1 aligns in filament-like structures, whereas in metaphase it is present within the pole forming a crown-like structure, surrounding the centrosomes. Moreover, hPaf1 is degraded during the metaphase to anaphase transition. In the nucleus, hPaf1 regulates the expression of cyclins A1, A2, D1, E1, B1, and Cdk1. In addition, expression of hPaf1 delays DNA replication but favors the G2/M transition, in part through microtubule assembly and mitotic spindle formation.Our results identify hPaf1 and the hPAF complex as key regulators of cell-cycle progression. Mutation or loss of stoichiometry of at least one of the members may potentially lead to cancer development.

  6. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  7. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Bei; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ying-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  8. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production on diallyl disulfide (DADS) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human A549 lung carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xinjiang; Kassie, Fekadu; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2005-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), an oil soluble constituent of garlic (Allium sativum), has been reported to cause antimutagentic and anticarcinogenic effects in vitro and in vivo by modulating phases I and II enzyme activities. In recent years, several studies suggested that the chemopreventive effects of DADS can also be attributed to induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. In the present study, we reported that DADS-induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M and apoptosis in human A549 lung cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a significant increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced in A549 cells less than 0.5 h after DADS treatment, indicating that ROS may be an early event in DADS-modulated apoptosis. Treatment of A549 cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely abrogated DADS-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The result indicated that oxidative stress modulates cell proliferation and cell death induced by DADS

  9. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production on diallyl disulfide (DADS) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human A549 lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xinjiang [Institute of Indoor and Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Aulweg 123, D-35385 Giessen (Germany); Kassie, Fekadu [Institute of Indoor and Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Aulweg 123, D-35385 Giessen (Germany); Mersch-Sundermann, Volker [Institute of Indoor and Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Aulweg 123, D-35385 Giessen (Germany)]. E-mail: Volker.mersch-sundermann@uniklinikum-giessen.de

    2005-11-11

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), an oil soluble constituent of garlic (Allium sativum), has been reported to cause antimutagentic and anticarcinogenic effects in vitro and in vivo by modulating phases I and II enzyme activities. In recent years, several studies suggested that the chemopreventive effects of DADS can also be attributed to induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. In the present study, we reported that DADS-induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M and apoptosis in human A549 lung cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a significant increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced in A549 cells less than 0.5 h after DADS treatment, indicating that ROS may be an early event in DADS-modulated apoptosis. Treatment of A549 cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely abrogated DADS-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The result indicated that oxidative stress modulates cell proliferation and cell death induced by DADS.

  10. Do lipids shape the eukaryotic cell cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furse, Samuel; Shearman, Gemma C

    2018-01-01

    Successful passage through the cell cycle presents a number of structural challenges to the cell. Inceptive studies carried out in the last five years have produced clear evidence of modulations in the lipid profile (sometimes referred to as the lipidome) of eukaryotes as a function of the cell cycle. This mounting body of evidence indicates that lipids play key roles in the structural transformations seen across the cycle. The accumulation of this evidence coincides with a revolution in our understanding of how lipid composition regulates a plethora of biological processes ranging from protein activity through to cellular signalling and membrane compartmentalisation. In this review, we discuss evidence from biological, chemical and physical studies of the lipid fraction across the cell cycle that demonstrate that lipids are well-developed cellular components at the heart of the biological machinery responsible for managing progress through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanisms by which this careful control is exercised. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in distribution of cell cycle phases and DNA content in HeLa S3 cell after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shunbao

    1992-01-01

    The effects of irradiation and hyperthermia on the distribution in various phases and DNA content of HeLa S 3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and an image analysis instrument. A marked increase in DNA content from 6.718 to 9.614(AU) in HeLa S 3 cells after 6 Gy irradiation was seen to correspond with the changes in the distribution of various phases in G 2 + M, from 22% to 52%. Meanwhile, the surviving fraction of HeLa S 3 cells after 6 Gy irradiation was less than 1%. However, after heating at 44 deg C for 10 min, the amount of cells in G 2 + M increased from 22.5% to 52.5% and the surviving fraction after hyperthermia was less than 2.65%. The changes in distribution of various phases after Ir-192 irradiation were similar to those seen after X-ray irradiation. The delay of G 2 + M phase after treatment with 8 Gy plus heating at 44 deg C for 7 min in HeLa S 3 cells was similar to that seen in the case of treatment with 8 Gy alone. As the surviving fraction accompanying the G 2 + M delay after irradiation plus heat treatment was very low, we suggest that the changes of distribution in various phases of HeLa S 3 cells after treatment might be used as a rapid indicator of serious injury

  12. Cell cycle kinetics and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation therapy as currently practiced involves the subtle largely empirical art of balancing the recurrence of cancer due to undertreatment against severe damage to local tissues due to overtreatment. Therapeutic results too often fall short of desired success rates; yet, the therapist is continually tantalized to the likelihood that a slight shift of therapeutic ratio favoring normal tissue over cancer would have a profoundly beneficial effect. The application of cell cycle kinetics to radiation therapy is one hope for improving the therapeutic ratio; but, as I will try to show, kinetic approaches are complex, poorly understood, and presently too elusive to elicit confidence or to be used clinically. Their promise lies in their diversity and in the magnitude of our ignorance about how they work and how they should be used. Potentially useful kinetic approaches to therapy can be grouped into three classes. The first class takes advantage of intracyclic differential sensitivity, an effect involving the metabolism and biology of the cell cycle; its strategies are based on synchronization of cells over intervals of hours to days. The second class involves the distinction between cycling and noncycling cells; its strategies are based on the resistance of noncycling cells to cycle-linked radiation sensitizers and chemotherapeutic agents. The third class uses cell repopulation between fractions; its strategies are based on the relative growth rates of tumor and relevant normal tissue before and after perturbation

  13. Cell Cycle Inhibition To Treat Sleeping Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad L. Epting

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. During infection, this pathogen divides rapidly to high density in the bloodstream of its mammalian host in a manner similar to that of leukemia. Like all eukaryotes, T. brucei has a cell cycle involving the de novo synthesis of DNA regulated by ribonucleotide reductase (RNR, which catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleotides into their deoxy form. As an essential enzyme for the cell cycle, RNR is a common target for cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that inhibition of RNR by genetic or pharmacological means would impair parasite growth in vitro and prolong the survival of infected animals. Our results demonstrate that RNR inhibition is highly effective in suppressing parasite growth both in vitro and in vivo. These results support drug discovery efforts targeting the cell cycle, not only for African trypanosomiasis but possibly also for other infections by eukaryotic pathogens.

  14. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  15. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lin; Yue, Grace G.L.; Lau, Clara B.S.; Sun, Handong; Fung, Kwok Pui; Leung, Ping Chung; Han, Quanbin; Leung, Po Sing

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lin [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Yue, Grace G.L. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lau, Clara B.S. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Sun, Handong [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, CAS, Yunnan (China); Fung, Kwok Pui [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Ping Chung [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Han, Quanbin, E-mail: simonhan@hkbu.edu.hk [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); School of Chinese Medicine, The Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Po Sing, E-mail: psleung@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Modifications of cell cycle according to conditions of photodynamic therapy induced by hypericin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikes, J.; Kleban, J.; Szilardiova, B.; Sackova, V; Fedorocko, P.; Horvath, V.; Brezani, P.

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is becoming a rapidly developing method in cancer therapy, recently. PDT is based on administration of nontoxic/weakly toxic photosensitive compound and its activation with light of appropriate wave length. Although PDT is of use in clinical practise, new promising photosensitive compounds with advantageous attributes are discovered continuously. Hypericin, one of these compounds, is known to induce cell cycle arrest in G 2 /M phase at low doses. This arrest is caused by microtubules destruction linked to Bcl-2 phosphorylation as a consequence of CDK-1/cyclin B1 complex activation, but data about combinations of different hypericin concentrations and light doses are missing. PDT effect is effected by multiple factors. In our experiment, we have been shown, by cytokinetical and flow-cytometric analysis, the way how the cells response to photo-cytotoxic effect of hypericin. By combination of two factors, light doses and concentrations of hypericin, we eliminated inappropriate combinations and chose for another analysis narrow ranges of both factors. We discovered a breakpoint between a controlled cell death - apoptosis and cell signalling disaster followed by necrosis. (authors)

  18. Control points within the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures

  19. Structure related effects of flavonoid aglycones on cell cycle progression of HepG2 cells: Metabolic activation of fisetin and quercetin by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poór, Miklós; Zrínyi, Zita; Kőszegi, Tamás

    2016-10-01

    Dietary flavonoids are abundant in the Plant Kingdom and they are extensively studied because of their manifold pharmacological activities. Recent studies highlighted that cell cycle arrest plays a key role in their antiproliferative effect in different tumor cells. However, structure-activity relationship of flavonoids is poorly characterized. In our study the influence of 18 flavonoid aglycones (as well as two metabolites) on cell cycle distribution was investigated. Since flavonoids are extensively metabolized by liver cells, HepG2 tumor cell line was applied, considering the potential metabolic activation/inactivation of flavonoids. Our major observations are the followings: (1) Among the tested compounds diosmetin, fisetin, apigenin, lutelin, and quercetin provoked spectacular extent of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. (2) Inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme by entacapone decreased the antiproliferative effects of fisetin and quercetin. (3) Geraldol and isorhamnetin (3'-O-methylated metabolites of fisetin and quercetin, respectively) demonstrated significantly higher antiproliferative effect on HepG2 cells compared to the parent compounds. Based on these results, O-methylated flavonoid metabolites or their chemically modified derivatives may be suitable candidates of tumor therapy in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, Lianne Simone Mirjam

    2006-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was aimed at identifying the role of cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease, a disorder occurring in the large and medium-sized arteries of the body. Although in the beginning 90s promising

  1. Dynamic ubiquitin signaling in cell cycle regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberto, Samuel; Peter, Matthias

    2017-08-07

    The cell division cycle is driven by a collection of enzymes that coordinate DNA duplication and separation, ensuring that genomic information is faithfully and perpetually maintained. The activity of the effector proteins that perform and coordinate these biological processes oscillates by regulated expression and/or posttranslational modifications. Ubiquitylation is a cardinal cellular modification and is long known for driving cell cycle transitions. In this review, we emphasize emerging concepts of how ubiquitylation brings the necessary dynamicity and plasticity that underlie the processes of DNA replication and mitosis. New studies, often focusing on the regulation of chromosomal proteins like DNA polymerases or kinetochore kinases, are demonstrating that ubiquitylation is a versatile modification that can be used to fine-tune these cell cycle events, frequently through processes that do not involve proteasomal degradation. Understanding how the increasing variety of identified ubiquitin signals are transduced will allow us to develop a deeper mechanistic perception of how the multiple factors come together to faithfully propagate genomic information. Here, we discuss these and additional conceptual challenges that are currently under study toward understanding how ubiquitin governs cell cycle regulation. © 2017 Gilberto and Peter.

  2. Flavagline analog FL3 induces cell cycle arrest in urothelial carcinoma cell of the bladder by inhibiting the Akt/PHB interaction to activate the GADD45α pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Gangjun; Chen, Xin; Liu, Zhuowei; Wei, Wensu; Shu, Qinghai; Abou-Hamdan, Hussein; Jiang, Lijuan; Li, Xiangdong; Chen, Rixin; Désaubry, Laurent; Zhou, Fangjian; Xie, Dan

    2018-02-07

    Prohibitin 1 (PHB) is a potential target for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). FL3 is a newly synthesized agent that inhibits cancer cell proliferation by targeting the PHB protein; however, the effect of FL3 in UCB cells remains unexplored. FL3 was identified to be a potent inhibitor of UCB cell viability using CCK-8 (cell counting kit-8) assay. Then a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to further demonstrate the inhibitory effect of FL3 on UCB cell proliferation and to determine the underlying mechanisms. FL3 inhibited UCB cell proliferation and growth both in vitro and in vivo. By targeting the PHB protein, FL3 inhibited the interaction of Akt and PHB as well as Akt-mediated PHB phosphorylation, which consequently decreases the localization of PHB in the mitochondria. In addition, FL3 treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, and this inhibitory effect of FL3 could be mimicked by knockdown of PHB. Through the microarray analysis of mRNA expression after FL3 treatment and knockdown of PHB, we found that the mRNA expression of the growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible alpha (GADD45α) gene were significantly upregulated. When knocked down the expression of GADD45α, the inhibitory effect of FL3 on cell cycle was rescued, suggesting that FL3-induced cell cycle inhibition is GADD45α dependent. Our data provide that FL3 inhibits the interaction of Akt and PHB, which in turn activates the GADD45α-dependent cell cycle inhibition in the G2/M phase.

  3. Identification of Eusynstyelamide B as a Potent Cell Cycle Inhibitor Following the Generation and Screening of an Ascidian-Derived Extract Library Using a Real Time Cell Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Liberio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ascidians are marine invertebrates that have been a source of numerous cytotoxic compounds. Of the first six marine-derived drugs that made anticancer clinical trials, three originated from ascidian specimens. In order to identify new anti-neoplastic compounds, an ascidian extract library (143 samples was generated and screened in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells using a real-time cell analyzer (RTCA. This resulted in 143 time-dependent cell response profiles (TCRP, which are read-outs of changes to the growth rate, morphology, and adhesive characteristics of the cell culture. Twenty-one extracts affected the TCRP of MDA-MB-231 cells and were further investigated regarding toxicity and specificity, as well as their effects on cell morphology and cell cycle. The results of these studies were used to prioritize extracts for bioassay-guided fractionation, which led to the isolation of the previously identified marine natural product, eusynstyelamide B (1. This bis-indole alkaloid was shown to display an IC50 of 5 µM in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, 1 caused a strong cell cycle arrest in G2/M and induced apoptosis after 72 h treatment, making this molecule an attractive candidate for further mechanism of action studies.

  4. Alpinia pricei Rhizome Extracts Induce Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Squamous Carcinoma KB Cells and Suppress Tumor Growth in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Cheng Hseu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpinia pricei has been shown to induce apoptosis in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells. In this study, we report the effectiveness of the ethanol (70% extracts of A. pricei rhizome (AP extracts in terms of tumor regression as determined using both in vitro cell culture and in vivo athymic nude mice models of KB cells. We found that the AP extract (25–200 μg/mL treatment decreased the proliferation of KB cells by arresting progression through the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. This cell cycle blockade was associated with reductions in cyclin A and B1, Cdc2, and Cdc25C, and increased p21/WAF1, Wee1, p53 and phospho-p53 (p-p53 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that AP extract treatment decreased metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA expression, while expression of their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 (TIMP-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, were increased in KB cells. Furthermore, AP extract treatment effectively delayed tumor incidence in nude mice inoculated with KB cells and reduced the tumor burden. AP extract treatment also induced apoptotic DNA fragmentation, as detected by in situ TUNEL staining. Thus, A. pricei may possess antitumor activity in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells.

  5. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  6. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  7. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  8. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  9. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions

  10. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions.

  11. Cancer cells mimic in vivo spatial-temporal cell-cycle phase distribution and chemosensitivity in 3-dimensional Gelfoam® histoculture but not 2-dimensional culture as visualized with real-time FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Uehara, Fuminaru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Zhao, Ming; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The phase of the cell cycle can determine whether a cancer cell can respond to a given drug. We previously reported monitoring of real-time cell cycle dynamics of cancer cells throughout a live tumor, intravitally in live mice, using a fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI). Approximately 90% of cancer cells in the center and 80% of total cells of an established tumor are in G0/G1 phase. Longitudinal real-time imaging demonstrated that cytotoxic agents killed only proliferating cancer cells at the surface and, in contrast, had little effect on quiescent cancer cells, which are the vast majority of an established tumor. Moreover, resistant quiescent cancer cells restarted cycling after cessation of chemotherapy. These results suggested why most drugs currently in clinical use, which target cancer cells in S/G2/M, are mostly ineffective on solid tumors. In the present report, we used FUCCI imaging and Gelfoam® collagen-sponge-gel histoculture, to demonstrate in real time, that the cell-cycle phase distribution of cancer cells in Gelfoam® and in vivo tumors is highly similar, whereby only the surface cells proliferate and interior cells are quiescent in G0/G1. This is in contrast to 2D culture where most cancer cells cycle. Similarly, the cancer cells responded similarly to toxic chemotherapy in Gelfoam® culture as in vivo, and very differently than cancer cells in 2D culture which were much more chemosensitive. Gelfoam® culture of FUCCI-expressing cancer cells offers the opportunity to image the cell cycle of cancer cells continuously and to screen for novel effective therapies to target quiescent cells, which are the majority in a tumor and which would have a strong probability to be effective in vivo.

  12. Induction of tumor cell death through targeting tubulin and evoking dysregulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins by multifunctional cinnamaldehydes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita A Nagle

    Full Text Available Multifunctional trans-cinnamaldehyde (CA and its analogs display anti-cancer properties, with 2-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA and 5-fluoro-2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (FHCA being identified as the ortho-substituted analogs that possess potent anti-tumor activities. In this study, BCA, FHCA and a novel analog 5-fluoro-2-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (FBCA, were demonstrated to decrease growth and colony formation of human colon-derived HCT 116 and mammary-derived MCF-7 carcinoma cells under non-adhesive conditions. The 2-benzoyloxy and 5-fluoro substituents rendered FBCA more potent than BCA and equipotent to FHCA. The cellular events by which these cinnamaldehydes caused G(2/M phase arrest and halted proliferation of HCT 116 cells were thereby investigated. Lack of significant accumulation of mitosis marker phospho-histone H3 in cinnamaldehyde-treated cells indicated that the analogs arrested cells in G(2 phase. G(2 arrest was brought about partly by cinnamaldehyde-mediated depletion of cell cycle proteins involved in regulating G(2 to M transition and spindle assembly, namely cdk1, cdc25C, mad2, cdc20 and survivin. Cyclin B1 levels were found to be increased, which in the absence of active cdk1, would fail to drive cells into M phase. Concentrations of cinnamaldehydes that brought about dysregulation of levels of cell cycle proteins also caused tubulin aggregation, as evident from immunodetection of dose-dependent tubulin accumulation in the insoluble cell lysate fractions. In a cell-free system, reduced biotin-conjugated iodoacetamide (BIAM labeling of tubulin protein pretreated with cinnamaldehydes was indicative of drug interaction with the sulfhydryl groups in tubulin. In conclusion, cinnamaldehydes treatment at proapoptotic concentrations caused tubulin aggregation and dysegulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins cdk1 and cdc25C that contributed at least in part to arresting cells at G(2 phase, resulting in apoptotic cell death characterized by

  13. Induction of tumor cell death through targeting tubulin and evoking dysregulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins by multifunctional cinnamaldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Amrita A; Gan, Fei-Fei; Jones, Gavin; So, Choon-Leng; Wells, Geoffrey; Chew, Eng-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Multifunctional trans-cinnamaldehyde (CA) and its analogs display anti-cancer properties, with 2-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA) and 5-fluoro-2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (FHCA) being identified as the ortho-substituted analogs that possess potent anti-tumor activities. In this study, BCA, FHCA and a novel analog 5-fluoro-2-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (FBCA), were demonstrated to decrease growth and colony formation of human colon-derived HCT 116 and mammary-derived MCF-7 carcinoma cells under non-adhesive conditions. The 2-benzoyloxy and 5-fluoro substituents rendered FBCA more potent than BCA and equipotent to FHCA. The cellular events by which these cinnamaldehydes caused G(2)/M phase arrest and halted proliferation of HCT 116 cells were thereby investigated. Lack of significant accumulation of mitosis marker phospho-histone H3 in cinnamaldehyde-treated cells indicated that the analogs arrested cells in G(2) phase. G(2) arrest was brought about partly by cinnamaldehyde-mediated depletion of cell cycle proteins involved in regulating G(2) to M transition and spindle assembly, namely cdk1, cdc25C, mad2, cdc20 and survivin. Cyclin B1 levels were found to be increased, which in the absence of active cdk1, would fail to drive cells into M phase. Concentrations of cinnamaldehydes that brought about dysregulation of levels of cell cycle proteins also caused tubulin aggregation, as evident from immunodetection of dose-dependent tubulin accumulation in the insoluble cell lysate fractions. In a cell-free system, reduced biotin-conjugated iodoacetamide (BIAM) labeling of tubulin protein pretreated with cinnamaldehydes was indicative of drug interaction with the sulfhydryl groups in tubulin. In conclusion, cinnamaldehydes treatment at proapoptotic concentrations caused tubulin aggregation and dysegulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins cdk1 and cdc25C that contributed at least in part to arresting cells at G(2) phase, resulting in apoptotic cell death characterized by emergence

  14. Cell Cycle Regulation and Apoptotic Responses of the Embryonic Chick Retina by Ionizing Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Mayer

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR exerts deleterious effects on the developing brain, since proliferative neuronal progenitor cells are highly sensitive to IR-induced DNA damage. Assuming a radiation response that is comparable to mammals, the chick embryo would represent a lower vertebrate model system that allows analysis of the mechanisms underlying this sensitivity, thereby contributing to the reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experiments. Thus, this study aimed to elucidate the radiation response of the embryonic chick retina in three selected embryonic stages. Our studies reveal a lack in the radiation-induced activation of a G1/S checkpoint, but rapid abrogation of G2/M progression after IR in retinal progenitors throughout development. Unlike cell cycle control, radiation-induced apoptosis (RIA showed strong variations between its extent, dose dependency and temporal occurrence. Whereas the general sensitivity towards RIA declined with ongoing differentiation, its dose dependency constantly increased with age. For all embryonic stages RIA occurred during comparable periods after irradiation, but in older animals its maximum shifted towards earlier post-irradiation time points. In summary, our results are in good agreement with data from the developing rodent retina, strengthening the suitability of the chick embryo for the analysis of the radiation response in the developing central nervous system.

  15. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK and FOXO1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fodor

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK jointly with methotrexate (MTX, a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer.

  16. Role of p53 status in radiation sensitivity and cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellars, Richard C.; Loney, Tania; Schott, Ann F.; Davis, Mary A.; Maybaum, Jonathan; Clarke, Michael F.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Although p53 function plays a major role in G1 arrest after radiation, the influence of p53 status on progress through other phases of the cell cycle and on radiation sensitivity of human tumors is less clear. We investigated these issues using cells with a conditional expression system for wild type p53. Methods: A temperature sensitive murine wild type p53 plasmid was used (Ginsberg D, et al: Mol. Cell.Biol . 11:582, 1991). At the permissive temperature (32 deg. C), this plasmid produces a protein which assumes a conformation that exhibits wild type p53 function. However, when cells are cultured at 38 deg. C, this protein assumes an inactive conformation. HT29 human colon cancer cells (which are p53 mutant) were transduced with this plasmid (designated PEP A and PEP G cells) or a control vector (designated CCH1 cells) using electroporation and Geneticin selection. The presence of murine p53 transcript in the PEP cells was confirmed by Northern analysis. Results: Cells were cultured under 3 conditions: 1) 38 deg. C at all times; 2) 32 deg. C for 24 hours prior to irradiation and 3) 32 deg. C for 24 hours after irradiation. We found that culturing under permissive temperatures produced a small decrease in surviving fraction in the PEP clones (0.61 ± 0.10 and 0.64 ± 0.07, for PEP A and G, respectively) but not the CCH1 controls (1.14 ± 0.15). PEP cells tended to be more radiosensitive than CCH1 cells (even under non-permissive conditions) and demonstrated a trend towards increased radiosensitivity under both Conditions 2 and 3. In addition, flow cytometry revealed that a 24 hour exposure to permissive conditions increased the fraction of cells in G1 slightly and in G2/M substantially. S phase was almost absent. Conclusion: Restoration of p53 function in HT29 human colon cancer cells using this temperature sensitive system produced increased cytotoxicity and radiation sensitivity as well as cell cycle redistribution. It will be important to assess the

  17. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kulcenty, Katarzyna [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Wierzchowski, Marcin [Department of Chemical Technology of Drugs, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Murias, Marek [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Department of Cancer Diagnostics and Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan (Poland); Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga, E-mail: liebert@ump.edu.pl [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  18. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja; Kulcenty, Katarzyna; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Murias, Marek; Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC 50 = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC 50 = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  19. p53 represses autophagy in a cell cycle-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Orhon, Idil; Kepp, Oliver; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    Autophagy is one of the principal mechanisms of cellular defense against nutrient depletion and damage to cytoplasmic organelles. When p53 is inhibited by a pharmacological antagonist (cyclic pifithrin-alpha), depleted by a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) or deleted by homologous recombination, multiple signs of autophagy are induced. Here, we show by epistatic analysis that p53 inhibition results in a maximum level of autophagy that cannot be further enhanced by a variety of different autophagy inducers including lithium, tunicamycin-induced stress of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or inhibition of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) with the BH3 mimetic ABT737. Chemical inducers of autophagy (including rapamycin, lithium, tunicamycin and ABT737) induced rapid depletion of the p53 protein. The absence or the inhibition of p53 caused autophagy mostly in the G(1) phase, less so in the S phase and spares the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. The possible pathophysiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Evaluation of cell cycle changes activated by the administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-antiCD20; Evaluacion de cambios en el ciclo celular activados por la administracion de {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-antiCD20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos B, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    In the present project, cytometric evaluation of cell cycle changes induced by the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-antiCD20 thermostatic radiopharmaceutical was performed, in which a cell culture of Raji cells from Burkitts lymphoma were used, which are CD20+; for flow cytometry different parameters were measured in which the cells were synchronized in G0/G1 and G2/M, to calculate the dose to nucleus that were given to the cells the Monte Carlo method was used at a dose interval from 1 to 5 Gy. The purpose of this work is to be able to observe by flow cytometry the arrest in the cell cycle with a lower dose interval than the one applied in other papers. (Author)

  1. [The mechanisms of p21WAF1/Cip-1 expression in MOLT-4 cell line induced by TSA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi; Liu, Mei-Ju; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Qian, Jun-Jie; Dong, Yan; Liu, Hua; Sun, Guo-Jing; Mei, Zhu-Zhong; Liu, Bin; Tian, Bao-Lei; Sun, Zhi-Xian

    2005-04-01

    To investigate the function and molecular mechanism of p21(WAF1/Cip-1) expression in MOLT-4 cells induced by HDAC inhibitor TSA, the expression pattern of p21(WAF1/Cip-1) and the distribution of cell cycle in TSA treated cells were analyzed. The results showed that TSA could effectively induce G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that p21(WAF1/Cip-1) were upregulated quickly before cell arrested in G(2)/M and began decreasing at the early stage of apoptosis. Meanwhile, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 could inhibit the decrease of p21(WAF1/Cip-1) at the early stage of apoptosis, which showed that proteasome pathway involved in p21(WAF1/Cip-1) degradation during the TSA induced G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis responses. This study also identified that the protein level of p21(WAF1/Cip-1) was highly associated with the cell cycle change induced by TSA. Compared to cells treated by TSA only, exposure MOLT-4 cells to TSA meanwhile treatment with MG-132 increased the protein level of p21(WAF1/Cip-1) and increased the numbers of cell in G(2)/M-phase, whereas the cell apoptosis were delayed. It is concluded that p21(WAF1/Cip-1) plays a significant role in G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis signaling induced by TSA in MOLT-4 cells.

  2. Impact of cycling cells and cell cycle regulation on Hydra regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzgariu, Wanda; Wenger, Yvan; Tcaciuc, Nina; Catunda-Lemos, Ana-Paula; Galliot, Brigitte

    2018-01-15

    Hydra tissues are made from three distinct populations of stem cells that continuously cycle and pause in G2 instead of G1. To characterize the role of cell proliferation after mid-gastric bisection, we have (i) used flow cytometry and classical markers to monitor cell cycle modulations, (ii) quantified the transcriptomic regulations of 202 genes associated with cell proliferation during head and foot regeneration, and (iii) compared the impact of anti-proliferative treatments on regeneration efficiency. We confirm two previously reported events: an early mitotic wave in head-regenerating tips, when few cell cycle genes are up-regulated, and an early-late wave of proliferation on the second day, preceded by the up-regulation of 17 cell cycle genes. These regulations appear more intense after mid-gastric bisection than after decapitation, suggesting a position-dependent regulation of cell proliferation during head regeneration. Hydroxyurea, which blocks S-phase progression, delays head regeneration when applied before but not after bisection. This result is consistent with the fact that the Hydra central region is enriched in G2-paused adult stem cells, poised to divide upon injury, thus forming a necessary constitutive pro-blastema. However a prolonged exposure to hydroxyurea does not block regeneration as cells can differentiate apical structures without traversing S-phase, and also escape in few days the hydroxyurea-induced S-phase blockade. Thus Hydra head regeneration, which is a fast event, is highly plastic, relying on large stocks of adult stem cells paused in G2 at amputation time, which immediately divide to proliferate and/or differentiate apical structures even when S-phase is blocked. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of the N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C)–Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neave, Antje S.; Sarup, Sussi; Seidelin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Recent results have shown that indole-3-carbinol (I3C) inhibits the cellular growth of human cancer cell lines. In some cruciferous vegetables, another indole, N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C), is found beside I3C. Knowledge about the biological effects of NI3C is limited. The aim of the present...... study was to show the effect of NI3C on cell growth of two human colon cancer cell lines, DLD-1 and HCT-116. For the first time it is shown that NI3C inhibits cellular growth of DLD-1 and HCT-116 and that NI3C is a more potent inhibitor of cell proliferation than I3C. In addition to the inhibition...... of cellular proliferation, NI3C caused an accumulation of HCT-116 cells in the G2/M phase, in contrast to I3C, which led to an accumulation of the colon cells in G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, NI3C delays the G1-S phase transition of synchronized HCT-116 cells. The indole-mediated cell-cycle arrest may be related...

  4. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  5. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G 1 phase preferred to proliferate during S/G 2 phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G 1 phase than in cells infected during S/G 2 phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases

  6. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  7. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Hiroto, E-mail: h-izumi@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Kohno, Kimitoshi [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-19

    We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143) regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), aurora kinase B (AURKB) and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM). However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells) and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  8. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143) regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), aurora kinase B (AURKB) and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM). However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells) and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division

  9. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimitoshi Kohno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143 regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, aurora kinase B (AURKB and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM. However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  10. ETME, a novel β-elemene derivative, synergizes with arsenic trioxide in inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in hepatocarcinoma cells via a p53-dependent pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Yu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic trioxide (ATO has been identified as an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL but is much less effective against solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In the search for ways to enhance its therapeutic efficacy against solid tumors, we have examined its use in combination with a novel derivative of β-elemene, N-(β-elemene-13-yltryptophan methyl ester (ETME. Here we report the effects of the combination on cell viability, apoptosis, the cell cycle and mitochondria membrane potential (MMP in HCC SMMC-7721 cells. We found that the two compounds acted synergistically to enhance antiproliferative activity and apoptosis. The combination also decreased the MMP, down-regulated Bcl-2 and pro-proteins of the caspase family, and up-regulated Bax and BID, all of which were reversed by the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α. In addition, the combination induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and reduced tumor volume and weight in an xenograft model of nude mice. Overall, the results suggest that ETME in combination with ATO may be useful in the treatment of HCC patients particularly those unresponsive to ATO alone.

  11. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  12. Interlink between cholesterol & cell cycle in prostate carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Singh

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings along with increased expression of cell cycle protein cyclin E in the cell nucleus of the tumour tissue suggested the possibility of an intriguing role of cholesterol in the mechanism of cell cycle process of prostate cell proliferation.

  13. A novel curcumin derivative which inhibits P-glycoprotein, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in multidrug resistance cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Oliveira, Ana; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Pinto, Madalena; Lima, Raquel T; Sousa, Emília; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2017-01-15

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major limitation to the success of cancer treatment and is highly associated with the overexpression of drug efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In order to achieve more effective chemotherapeutic treatments, it is important to develop P-gp inhibitors to block/decrease its activity. Curcumin (1) is a secondary metabolite isolated from the turmeric of Curcuma longa L.. Diverse biological activities have been identified for this compound, particularly, MDR modulation in various cancer cell models. However, curcumin (1) has low chemical stability, which severely limits its application. In order to improve stability and P-gp inhibitory effect, two potential more stable curcumin derivatives were synthesized as building blocks, followed by several curcumin derivatives. These compounds were then analyzed in terms of antitumor and anti-P-gp activity, in two MDR and sensitive tumor lines (from chronic myeloid leukemia and non-small cell lung cancer). We identified from a series of curcumin derivatives a novel curcumin derivative (1,7-bis(3-methoxy-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)phenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione, 10) with more potent antitumor and anti-P-gp activity than curcumin (1). This compound (10) was shown to promote cell cycle arrest (at the G2/M phase) and induce apoptosis in the MDR chronic myeloid leukemia cell line. Therefore it is a really interesting P-gp inhibitor due to its ability to inhibit both P-gp function and expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Facile construction of fused benzimidazole-isoquinolinones that induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liu-Jun; Yang, Dong-Lin; Li, Shi-Qiang; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Tang, Yan; Lei, Jie; Frett, Brendan; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Zhong-Zhu; Xu, Zhi-Gang

    2018-06-12

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent, malignant gastrointestinal tumors, and strategies and effectiveness of current therapy are limited. A series of benzimidazole-isoquinolinone derivatives (BIDs) was synthesized and screened to identify novel scaffolds for CRC. Of the compounds evaluated, 7g exhibited the most promising anti-cancer properties. Employing two CRC cell lines, SW620 and HT29, 7g was found to suppress growth and proliferation of the cell lines at a concentration of ∼20 µM. Treatment followed an increase in G 2 /M cell cycle arrest, which was attributed to cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) signaling deficiencies with simultaneous enhancement in p21 and p53 activity. In addition, mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis was induced in CRC cells. Interestingly, 7g decreased phosphorylated AKT, mTOR and 4E-BP1 levels, while promoting the expression/stability of PTEN. Since PTEN controls input into the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, antiproliferative effects can be attributed to PTEN-mediated tumor suppression. Collectively, these results suggest that BIDs exert antitumor activity in CRC by impairing PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Against a small kinase panel, 7g exhibited low affinity at 5 µM suggesting anticancer properties likely stem through a non-kinase mechanism. Because of the novelty of BIDs, the structure can serve as a lead scaffold to design new CRC therapies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Genome-Wide Studies Reveal that H3K4me3 Modification in Bivalent Genes Is Dynamically Regulated during the Pluripotent Cell Cycle and Stabilized upon Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, Rodrigo A; Whitfield, Troy W; Wu, Hai; Fitzgerald, Mark P; VanOudenhove, Jennifer J; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Montecino, Martin A; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, André J; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2016-02-15

    Stem cell phenotypes are reflected by posttranslational histone modifications, and this chromatin-related memory must be mitotically inherited to maintain cell identity through proliferative expansion. In human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), bivalent genes with both activating (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) histone modifications are essential to sustain pluripotency. Yet, the molecular mechanisms by which this epigenetic landscape is transferred to progeny cells remain to be established. By mapping genomic enrichment of H3K4me3/H3K27me3 in pure populations of hESCs in G2, mitotic, and G1 phases of the cell cycle, we found striking variations in the levels of H3K4me3 through the G2-M-G1 transition. Analysis of a representative set of bivalent genes revealed that chromatin modifiers involved in H3K4 methylation/demethylation are recruited to bivalent gene promoters in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. Interestingly, bivalent genes enriched with H3K4me3 exclusively during mitosis undergo the strongest upregulation after induction of differentiation. Furthermore, the histone modification signature of genes that remain bivalent in differentiated cells resolves into a cell cycle-independent pattern after lineage commitment. These results establish a new dimension of chromatin regulation important in the maintenance of pluripotency. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Fungal-induced cell cycle impairment, chromosome instability and apoptosis via differential activation of NF-κB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem Ben-Abdallah

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens have developed efficient strategies to compromise host immune responses. Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen, recognised as the most common cause of systemic fungal infections leading to severe meningoencephalitis, mainly in immunocompromised patients. This yeast is characterized by a polysaccharide capsule, which inhibits its phagocytosis. Whereas phagocytosis escape and macrophage intracellular survival have been intensively studied, extracellular survival of this yeast and restraint of host innate immune response are still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated whether C. neoformans affected macrophage cell viability and whether NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB, a key regulator of cell growth, apoptosis and inflammation, was involved. Using wild-type (WT as well as mutant strains of C. neoformans for the pathogen side, and WT and mutant cell lines with altered NF-κB activity or signalling as well as primary macrophages for the host side, we show that C. neoformans manipulated NF-κB-mediated signalling in a unique way to regulate macrophage cell fate and viability. On the one hand, serotype A strains reduced macrophage proliferation in a capsule-independent fashion. This growth decrease, which required a critical dosage of NF-κB activity, was caused by cell cycle disruption and aneuploidy, relying on fungal-induced modification of expression of several cell cycle checkpoint regulators in S and G2/M phases. On the other hand, C. neoformans infection induced macrophage apoptosis in a capsule-dependent manner with a differential requirement of the classical and alternative NF-κB signalling pathways, the latter one being essential. Together, these findings shed new light on fungal strategies to subvert host response through uncoupling of NF-κB activity in pathogen-controlled apoptosis and impairment of cell cycle progression. They also provide the first demonstration of induction of

  17. Korean Byungkyul - Citrus platymamma Hort.et Tanaka flavonoids induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, regulating MMP protein expression in Hep3B hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Kim, Jin A; Yumnam, Silvia; Raha, Suchismita; Venkatarame Gowda Saralamma, Venu; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Eun Hee; Won, Chun Kil; Kim, Gon Sup

    2017-02-01

    Citrus platymamma Hort.et Tanaka is an indigenous fruit of Jeju island in Korea. In this study the bioactivity of C. platymamma flavonoids were evaluated on human hepatoma Hep3B cell lines. Eleven flavonoids were identified from the peels of C. platymamma Hort.et Tanaka through high-performance liquid chromatography-Tandem mass spectrometry and the anticancer effect of these C. platymamma flavonoids on human hepatoma Hep3B were studied. Chromatin condensation was observed in Hep3B cells treated with C. platymamma flavonoids. DNA fragmentation was confirmed through agarose gel electrophoresis and TUNEL assay. An increase in the total apoptotic cells and G2/M cell cycle arrest with decreased protein expression of CDC25C, CDK1, cyclin B1 and p21 were observed in Hep3B cells treated with flavonoids of C. platymamma. Further, protein expression of Bcl-XL, Bax, caspase-3 and -9 were also modulated by C. platymamma flavonoids treatment indicating that cell death is through intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Moreover, C. platymamma flavonoids also regulated the phosphorylation of MAPKs, PI3K, and Akt in Hep3B cells. Relevant to inhibiting metastasis, C. platymamma treatment reduced wound closure of Hep3B cells and the protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 were reduced in C. platymamma treated cells. The results show that C. platymamma flavonoids induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis following activation of MAPKs and suppression of PI3K/Akt pathway which eventually inhibits cell migration in Hep3B cells. The finding provides evidence on biochemical activities of C. platymamma Hort.et Tanaka, which would be an essential agent for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment.

  18. Effects of 17-AAG on the cell cycle and apoptosis of H446 cells and the associated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuerong; Wang, Jianping; Xiao, Lijun; Xu, Qian; Zhao, Enhong; Zheng, Xin; Zheng, Huachuan; Zhao, Shuang; Ding, Shi

    2016-08-01

    As a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17‑demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) has been studied in numerous types of cancer, however the effects of 17-AAG on apoptosis and the cell cycle of H446 cells remain unclear. In the current study, the MTT method was used to evaluate the inhibitory effects of different durations and doses of 17‑AAG treatment on the proliferation of H446 cells. The cells were stained with Annexin-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide and measured by flow cytometry, and the gene and protein expression levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), survivin, cyclin D1, cyt‑C, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results indicated that with treatment with 1.25‑20 mg/l 17‑AAG for 24 and 48 h, significant inhibition of H446 cell proliferation was observed in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner. With treatment of 3.125, 6.25 and 12.5 mg/l 17‑AAG for 48 h, significant apoptosis and cell cycle arrest was observed. The results indicated that the gene and protein expression levels of STAT3, survivin and cyclin D1 were downregulated, and cyt‑C, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were upregulated by 17‑AAG in a dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated with 3.125 and 6.25 mg/l 17-AAG for 48 h. The results indicated that 17‑AAG is able to inhibit the cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and G2/M arrest and downregulate the gene and protein expression levels of STAT3, survivin and cyclin D1, and upregulate gene and protein expression of cyt‑C, caspase 9, caspase 3.

  19. 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative induces G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Han, Kai-Lin; Yang, Yao; Song, Bin-Bin; Guo, Qian-Nan [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industry Microbiology, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Fan, Zhen-Chuan [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety (Tianjin University of Science and Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300457 (China); Obesita and Algaegen LLC, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Zhang, Yong-Min [Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Institut Parisien de Chimie Moléculaire UMR CNRS 8232, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Teng, Yu-Ou, E-mail: tyo201485@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industry Microbiology, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Yu, Peng, E-mail: yupeng@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industry Microbiology, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative (HKL 2H) inhibited K562’s proliferation. • HKL 2H caused the morphology change of G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and typical apoptosis. • HKL 2H induced G2/M cell cycle phase arrest in K562 cells. • HKL 2H induced apoptosis in K562 cells through the mitochondrial pathway. - Abstract: Our previous study successfully identified that the novel isatin derivative (E)-methyl 3-(1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) acrylate (HKL 2H) acts as an anticancer agent at an inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) level of 3 nM. In this study, the molecular mechanism how HKL 2H induces cytotoxic activity in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells was investigated. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the cells were arrested in the G{sub 2}/M phase and accumulated subsequently in the sub-G{sub 1} phase in the presence of HKL 2H. HKL 2H treatment down-regulated the expressions of CDK1 and cyclin B but up-regulated the level of phosphorylated CDK1. Annexin-V staining and the classic DNA ladder studies showed that HKL 2H induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. Our study further showed that HKL 2H treatment caused the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, activated caspase-3 and lowered the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in K562 cells, suggesting that the HKL 2H-causing programmed cell death of K562 cells was caused via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together, our data demonstrated that HKL 2H, a 5-(2-carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative, notably induces G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in K562 cells, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate for further investigation.

  20. KOH concentration effect on cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. III - Cycle life test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A cycle life test of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered type nickel electrode was carried out at 23 C using a 45 min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. One of three cells containing 26 percent KOH has achieved over 28,000 cycles, and the other two 19,000 cycles, without a sign of failure. Two other cells containing 31 percent KOH electrolyte, which is the concentration presently used in aerospace cells, failed after 2,979 and 3,620 cycles. This result indicates that the cycle life of the present type of Ni/H2 cells may be extended by a factor of 5 to 10 simply by lowering the KOH concentration. Long cycle life of a Ni/H2 battery at high depth-of-discharge operation is desired, particularly for an LEO spacecraft application. Typically, battery life of about 30,000 cycles is required for a five year mission in an LEO. Such a cycle life with presently available cells can be assured only at a very low depth-of-discharge operation. Results of testing already show that the cycle life of an Ni/H2 cell is tremendously improved by simply using an electrolyte of low KOH concentration.

  1. Overexpression of high molecular weight FGF-2 forms inhibits glioma growth by acting on cell-cycle progression and protein translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemiere, Sylvie; Azar, Rania; Belloc, Francis; Guersel, Demir; Pyronnet, Stephane; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In order to clarify the role of HMW FGF-2 in glioma development and angiogenesis, we over-expressed different human FGF-2 isoforms in C6 rat glioma cell line using a tetracycline-regulated expression system. Phenotypic modifications were analyzed in vitro and compared to untransfected cells or to cells over-expressing 18 kDa FGF-2 or all FGF-2 isoforms. In particular, we demonstrate that HMW FGF-2 has unique features in inhibiting glioma cell proliferation. HMW FGF-2 expressing cells showed a cell-cycle arrest at the G2M, demonstrating a role of HMW FGF-2 in controlling the entry in mitosis. Moreover, hydroxyurea was ineffective in blocking cells at the G1S boundary when HMW FGF-2 was expressed. We also show that the HMW FGF-2 isoforms inhibit 4E-BP1 phosphorylation at critical sites restoring the translation inhibitory activity of 4E-BP1. In vivo, inhibition of tumor growth was observed when cells expressed HMW FGF-2. This indicates that HMW FGF-2 inhibits tumor growth in glioma cells by acting on cell-cycle progression and protein translation

  2. Plant WEE1 kinase is cell cycle regulated and removed at mitosis via the 26S proteasome machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Gemma S.; Grønlund, Anne Lentz; Siciliano, Ilario; Spadafora, Natasha; Amini, Maryam; Herbert, Robert J.; Bitonti, M. Beatrice; Graumann, Katja; Francis, Dennis; Rogers, Hilary J.

    2013-01-01

    In yeasts and animals, premature entry into mitosis is prevented by the inhibitory phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) by WEE1 kinase, and, at mitosis, WEE1 protein is removed through the action of the 26S proteasome. Although in higher plants WEE1 function has been confirmed in the DNA replication checkpoint, Arabidopsis wee1 insertion mutants grow normally, and a role for the protein in the G2/M transition during an unperturbed plant cell cycle is yet to be confirmed. Here data are presented showing that the inhibitory effect of WEE1 on CDK activity in tobacco BY-2 cell cultures is cell cycle regulated independently of the DNA replication checkpoint: it is high during S-phase but drops as cells traverse G2 and enter mitosis. To investigate this mechanism further, a yeast two-hybrid screen was undertaken to identify proteins interacting with Arabidopsis WEE1. Three F-box proteins and a subunit of the proteasome complex were identified, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation confirmed an interaction between AtWEE1 and the F-box protein SKP1 INTERACTING PARTNER 1 (SKIP1). Furthermore, the AtWEE1–green fluorescent protein (GFP) signal in Arabidopsis primary roots treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 was significantly increased compared with mock-treated controls. Expression of AtWEE1–YFPC (C-terminal portion of yellow fluorescent protein) or AtWEE1 per se in tobacco BY-2 cells resulted in a premature increase in the mitotic index compared with controls, whereas co-expression of AtSKIP1–YFPN negated this effect. These data support a role for WEE1 in a normal plant cell cycle and its removal at mitosis via the 26S proteasome. PMID:23536609

  3. Molecular biological mechanism II. Molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, T.

    2000-01-01

    The cell cycle in eukaryotes is regulated by central cell cycle controlling protein kinase complexes. These protein kinase complexes consist of a catalytic subunit from the cyclin-dependent protein kinase family (CDK), and a regulatory subunit from the cyclin family. Cyclins are characterised by their periodic cell cycle related synthesis and destruction. Each cell cycle phase is characterised by a specific set of CDKs and cyclins. The activity of CDK/cyclin complexes is mainly regulated on four levels. It is controlled by specific phosphorylation steps, the synthesis and destruction of cyclins, the binding of specific inhibitor proteins, and by active control of their intracellular localisation. At several critical points within the cell cycle, named checkpoints, the integrity of the cellular genome is monitored. If damage to the genome or an unfinished prior cell cycle phase is detected, the cell cycle progression is stopped. These cell cycle blocks are of great importance to secure survival of cells. Their primary importance is to prevent the manifestation and heritable passage of a mutated genome to daughter cells. Damage sensing, DNA repair, cell cycle control and apoptosis are closely linked cellular defence mechanisms to secure genome integrity. Disregulation in one of these defence mechanisms are potentially correlated with an increased cancer risk and therefore in at least some cases with an increased radiation sensitivity. (orig.) [de

  4. Cell cycle control by the thyroid hormone in neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Silva, Susana; Perez-Juste, German; Aranda, Ana

    2002-01-01

    The thyroid hormone (T3) blocks proliferation and induces differentiation of neuroblastoma N2a-β cells that overexpress the β1 isoform of the T3 receptor. An element in the region responsible for premature termination of transcription mediates a rapid repression of c-myc gene expression by T3. The hormone also causes a decrease of cyclin D1 gene transcription, and is able to antagonize the activation of the cyclin D1 promoter by Ras. In addition, a strong and sustained increase of the levels of the cyclin kinase inhibitor (CKI) p27 Kip1 are found in T3-treated cells. The increased levels of p27 Kip1 lead to a marked inhibition of the kinase activity of the cyclin-CDK2 complexes. As a consequence of these changes, retinoblastoma proteins are hypophosphorylated in T3-treated N2a-β cells, and progression through the restriction point in the cell cycle is blocked

  5. Cell cycle checkpoints: reversible when possible, irreversible when needed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenning, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are reversible in nature, and can prevent progression into the next cell cycle phase if needed. In the case of DNA damage, cells can prevent progression from G1 into S phase, and from G2 into mitosis in the presence of DNA double strand breaks. Following DNA repair, these

  6. Distinctive adaptive response to repeated exposure to hydrogen peroxide associated with upregulation of DNA repair genes and cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria A. Santa-Gonzalez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many environmental and physiological stresses are chronic. Thus, cells are constantly exposed to diverse types of genotoxic insults that challenge genome stability, including those that induce oxidative DNA damage. However, most in vitro studies that model cellular response to oxidative stressors employ short exposures and/or acute stress models. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic and repeated exposure to a micromolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 could activate DNA damage responses, resulting in cellular adaptations. For this purpose, we developed an in vitro model in which we incubated mouse myoblast cells with a steady concentration of ~50 μM H2O2 for one hour daily for seven days, followed by a final challenge of a 10 or 20X higher dose of H2O2 (0.5 or 1 mM. We report that intermittent long-term exposure to this oxidative stimulus nearly eliminated cell toxicity and significantly decreased genotoxicity (in particular, a >5-fold decreased in double-strand breaks resulting from subsequent acute exposure to oxidative stress. This protection was associated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M and induction of expression of nine DNA repair genes. Together, this evidence supports an adaptive response to chronic, low-level oxidative stress that results in genomic protection and up-regulated maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  7. Cell cycle controls: potential targets for chemical carcinogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Afshari, C A; Barrett, J C

    1993-01-01

    The progression of the cell cycle is controlled by the action of both positive and negative growth regulators. The key players in this activity include a family of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, which are themselves regulated by other kinases and phosphatases. Maintenance of balanced cell cycle controls may be directly linked to genomic stability. Loss of the check-points involved in cell cycle control may result in unrepaired DNA damage during DNA synthesis or mitosis leading to genet...

  8. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about thirty years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. Th...

  9. Inducible nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the cell cycle of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence that inducible NER is confined to the G1 phase of the mitotic cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.D.; Waters, R.

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported on an inducible component of nucleotide excision repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is controlled by the RAD16 gene. Here we describe a study of this event at the MAT alpha and HML alpha mating-type loci and on the transcribed (TS) and nontranscribed (NTS) strands of the RAD16 gene. Events were examined at various stages of the mitotic cycle in cells synchronised by centrifugal elutriation. Repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) following a single UV dose does not vary significantly in different stages of the mitotic cell cycle. CPDs are removed more rapidly from the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus than from the silent HML alpha locus, and the TS of RAD16 is repaired faster than the NTS in all stages of the cycle following a single UV irradiation. Enhanced excision of CPDs at MAT alpha and HML alpha can be induced only in the G1 and early S stages of the cell cycle. Here prior irradiation of cells with 25 J/m 2 enhances the removal of CPDs following a second UV dose of 70 J/m 2 . The level of enhancement of repair does not differ significantly between MAT alpha and HML alpha in G1. Enhanced removal of CPDs is absent when cells receive the inducing dose in late S or G2/M. Repair of CPDs in both strands of RAD16 is similarly enhanced only if cells receive the initial irradiation in G1 and early S. The level of enhanced removal of CPDs is not significantly different in the TS and NTS of RAD16 either in asynchronous cells or in cells preirradiated in G1 and early S. It has been shown by others that UV-induced expression of RAD16 remains at high levels if cells are held in G1 by treatment with alpha factor. Therefore the increase in RAD16 transcript levels in G1 may be responsible for the ability to enhance NER solely in this stage of the cell cycle

  10. Temporal fluxomics reveals oscillations in TCA cycle flux throughout the mammalian cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eunyong; Kumar, Praveen; Mukha, Dzmitry; Tzur, Amit; Shlomi, Tomer

    2017-11-06

    Cellular metabolic demands change throughout the cell cycle. Nevertheless, a characterization of how metabolic fluxes adapt to the changing demands throughout the cell cycle is lacking. Here, we developed a temporal-fluxomics approach to derive a comprehensive and quantitative view of alterations in metabolic fluxes throughout the mammalian cell cycle. This is achieved by combining pulse-chase LC-MS-based isotope tracing in synchronized cell populations with computational deconvolution and metabolic flux modeling. We find that TCA cycle fluxes are rewired as cells progress through the cell cycle with complementary oscillations of glucose versus glutamine-derived fluxes: Oxidation of glucose-derived flux peaks in late G1 phase, while oxidative and reductive glutamine metabolism dominates S phase. These complementary flux oscillations maintain a constant production rate of reducing equivalents and oxidative phosphorylation flux throughout the cell cycle. The shift from glucose to glutamine oxidation in S phase plays an important role in cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  11. Borealin/Dasra B is a cell cycle-regulated chromosomal passenger protein and its nuclear accumulation is linked to poor prognosis for human gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.-L.; Chen, T.-H.; Wang, C.-F.; Chiang, Y.-H.; Huang, Y.-L.; Wong, F.-H.; Chou, C.-K.; Chen, C.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosomal passenger proteins including Aurora B, Survivin, and Borealin/Dasra B, also called CDCA8/FLJ10468, are known to play crucial roles during mitosis and cell division. Inappropriate chromosomal segregation and cell division may cause auneuploidy leading to cancer. However, it is still unclear how the expression of chromosomal passenger proteins may be linked to cancer. In this study, we demonstrated that Borealin is a cell cycle-regulated gene and is upregulated at G2-M phases of the cell cycle. We showed that Borealin interacts with Survivin but not with Aurora B. The interaction domain of Survivin in Borealin was mapped to the N-terminal 92 amino-acid residues of Borealin. To examine the linkage between expression of Borealin and cancer, we performed immunohistochemistry analysis using anti-Borealin specific antibody on the paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues. Our results showed that Borealin expression is significantly correlated with Survivin (P = 0.003) and Ki67 (P = 0.007) in gastric cancer. Interestingly, an increased nuclear Borealin level reveals borderline association with a poor survival rate (P = 0.047). Taken together, our results demonstrated that Borealin is a cell cycle-regulated chromosomal passenger protein and its aberrant expression is linked to a poor prognosis for gastric cancer

  12. Polyalthia longifolia Methanolic Leaf Extracts (PLME) induce apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial potential depolarization by possibly modulating the redox status in hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayarathna, Soundararajan; Oon, Chern Ein; Chen, Yeng; Kanwar, Jagat R; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2017-05-01

    Medicinal plants have been accepted as a gold mine, with respect to the diversity of their phytochemicals. Many medicinal plants extracts are potential anticancer agents. Polyalthia longifolia var. angustifolia Thw. (Annonaceae) is one of the most significant native medicinal plants and is found throughout Malaysia. Hence, the present study was intended to assess the anticancer properties of P. longifolia leaf methanolic extract (PLME) and its underlying mechanisms. The Annexin V/PI flow cytometry analysis showed that PLME induces apoptosis in HeLa cells in dose-dependent manner whereas the PI flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle demonstrated the accumulation of cells at sub G0/G1, G0/G1 and G2/M phases. Investigation with JC-1 flow cytometry analysis indicated increase in mitochondria membrane potential depolarisation corresponding to increase in PLME concentrations. PLME was also shown to influence intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by exerting anti-oxidant (half IC 50 ) and pro-oxidant (IC 50 and double IC 50 ) affect against HeLa cells. PLME treatment also displayed DNA damage in HeLa cells in concentration depended fashion. The proteomic profiling array exposed the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins upon PLME treatment at IC 50 concentration in HeLa cells. Pro-apoptotic proteins; BAX, BAD, cytochrome c, caspase-3, p21, p27 and p53 were found to be significantly up-regulated while anti-apoptotic proteins; BCL-2 and BCL-w were found to be significantly down-regulated. This investigation postulated the role of p53 into mediating apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial potential depolarisation by modulating the redox status of HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Combination of HDAC inhibitor TSA and silibinin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by targeting survivin and cyclinB1/Cdk1 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wan; Cai, Dawei; Zhang, Bin; Lou, Guochun; Zou, Xiaoping

    2015-08-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are involved in diverse biological processes and therefore emerge as potential targets for pancreatic cancer. Silibinin, an active component of silymarin, is known to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer in vivo and in vitro. Herein, we examined the cytotoxic effects of TSA in combination with silibinin and investigated the possible mechanism in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc1 and Capan2). Our study found that combination treatment of HDAC inhibitor and silibinin exerted additive growth inhibitory effect on pancreatic cancer cell. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that combination therapy induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Panc1and Capan2 cells. The induction of apoptosis was further confirmed by evaluating the activation of caspases. Moreover, treatment with TSA and silibinin resulted in a profound reduction in the expression of cyclinA2, cyclinB1/Cdk1 and survivin. Taken together, our study might indicate that the novel combination of HDAC inhibitor and silibinin could offer therapeutic potential against pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. A Method to Design Synthetic Cell-Cycle Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke-Ke, Miao

    2009-01-01

    The interactions among proteins, DNA and RNA in an organism form elaborate cell-cycle networks which govern cell growth and proliferation. Understanding the common structure of cell-cycle networks will be of great benefit to science research. Here, inspired by the importance of the cell-cycle regulatory network of yeast which has been studied intensively, we focus on small networks with 11 nodes, equivalent to that of the cell-cycle regulatory network used by Li et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101(2004)4781] Using a Boolean model, we study the correlation between structure and function, and a possible common structure. It is found that cascade-like networks with a great number of interactions between nodes are stable. Based on these findings, we are able to construct synthetic networks that have the same functions as the cell-cycle regulatory network. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  15. Playing with the cell cycle to build the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Angie; Pituello, Fabienne

    2017-12-01

    A fundamental issue in nervous system development and homeostasis is to understand the mechanisms governing the balance between the maintenance of proliferating progenitors versus their differentiation into post-mitotic neurons. Accumulating data suggest that the cell cycle and core regulators of the cell cycle machinery play a major role in regulating this fine balance. Here, we focus on the interplay between the cell cycle and cellular and molecular events governing spinal cord development. We describe the existing links between the cell cycle and interkinetic nuclear migration (INM). We show how the different morphogens patterning the neural tube also regulate the cell cycle machinery to coordinate proliferation and patterning. We give examples of how cell cycle core regulators regulate transcriptionally, or post-transcriptionally, genes involved in controlling the maintenance versus the differentiation of neural progenitors. Finally, we describe the changes in cell cycle kinetics occurring during neural tube patterning and at the time of neuronal differentiation, and we discuss future research directions to better understand the role of the cell cycle in cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Dietary Flavonoid Fisetin Causes Cell Cycle Arrest, Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis, and Enhanced Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew L; Murphy, Kaylee; Doucette, Carolyn D; Greenshields, Anna L; Hoskin, David W

    2016-08-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonoid found in a number of fruits and vegetables, has diverse biological activities, including cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of fisetin on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. TNBC has a poorer prognosis than other types of breast cancer and treatment options for this disease are limited. Fisetin inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 TNBC cells, as well as their ability to form colonies, without substantially affecting the growth of non-malignant cells. In addition, fisetin inhibited the growth of estrogen receptor-bearing MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. Fisetin inhibited TNBC cell division and induced apoptosis, which was associated with mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-8, as well as the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis by fisetin was confirmed by reduced killing of TNBC cells in the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and BOC-D-FMK. Decreased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 in fisetin-treated TNBC cells at G2/M phase of the cell cycle suggested that fisetin-induced apoptosis was the result of Aurora B kinase inhibition. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide metabolite of cyclophosphamide on TNBC cells was increased in the presence of fisetin. These findings suggest that further investigation of fisetin is warranted for possible use in the management of TNBC. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1913-1925, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Solena amplexicaulis induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis in hepatocarcinoma cells and HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie; Xu, Yuan Yuan; Jiang, He Fei; Yang, Meng; Huang, Qian Hui; Yang, Jie; Hu, Kun; Wei, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Solena amplexicaulis (Lam.) Gandhi (SA) has been used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of dysentery, multiple abscess, gastralgia, urethritis, and eczema in the minority area of China. This study was aimed to examine the cell proliferation inhibitory activity of the SA extract (SACE) and its mechanism of action in human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) and evaluate its anti-angiogenesis activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVEC). SACE could inhibit the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FCM analysis showed that SACE could induce G2/M phase arrest, cell apoptosis, the mitochondrial membrane potential loss (ΔΨm) and increase the production of intracellular ROS of HepG2 cells. After treatment with SACE, topical morphological changes of apoptotic body formation, obvious increase of apoptosis-related protein expressions, such as Bax, cytochrome c, caspase-3, PARP-1, and decrease of Bcl-2, procaspase-9 protein expressions were observed at the same time. Moreover, SACE caused the significant inhibition of endothelial cell migration and tube formation in HUVEC cells. The results suggested that SACE could act as an angiogenesis inhibitor and induce cell apoptosis via a caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, SACE could be a potent candidate for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer.

  18. Cyclin A regulates a cell-cycle-dependent expression of CKAP2 through phosphorylation of Sp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Du-Seock; Hong, Kyeong-Man; Park, Joobae; Bae, Chang-Dae

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We identified a GC box and a CHR element in human CKAP2 minimal promoter. ► The CHR element repressed the CKAP2 minimal promoter activity at the G1/S phase. ► The GC box was essential for the basic promoter activity of human CKAP2. ► The GC box was also essential for the cyclic expression of human CKAP2. ► The phosphorylation of Sp1, mediated by Cyclin A, underlies the cyclic expression. -- Abstract: CKAP2 plays crucial roles in proper chromosome segregation and maintaining genomic stability. CKAP2 protein showed cell-cycle-dependent expression, which reached a maximum level at the G2/M phase and disappeared at the onset of G1 phase. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying cell cycle-dependent expression of CKAP2, we cloned and analyzed the human CKAP2 promoter. The upstream 115-bp region from the transcription start site was sufficient for minimal CKAP2 promoter activity. We identified 2 regulatory sequences; a CHR (−110 to −104 bp) and a GC box (−41 to −32 bp). We confirmed Sp1 bound to the GC box using a supershift assay and a ChIP assay. Mutation in the GC box resulted in a near complete loss of CKAP2 promoter activity while mutation in the CHR decreased the promoter activity by 50%. The CHR mutation showed enhanced activity at the G1/S phase, but still retained cyclic activity. The Chromatin IP revealed that the amount of Sp1 bound to the GC box gradually increased and reached a maximum level at the G2/M phase. The amount of Sp1 bound to the GC box was greatly reduced when Cyclin A was depleted, which was restored by adding Cyclin A/Cdk2 complex back into the nuclear extracts. Together, we concluded that the GC box was responsible for the cyclic activity of human CKAP2 promoter through the phosphorylation of Sp1, possibly by Cyclin A/Cdk complex.

  19. Segmentation and classification of cell cycle phases in fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Ilker; Bunyak, Filiz; Chagin, Vadim; Cardoso, M Christina; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2009-01-01

    Current chemical biology methods for studying spatiotemporal correlation between biochemical networks and cell cycle phase progression in live-cells typically use fluorescence-based imaging of fusion proteins. Stable cell lines expressing fluorescently tagged protein GFP-PCNA produce rich, dynamically varying sub-cellular foci patterns characterizing the cell cycle phases, including the progress during the S-phase. Variable fluorescence patterns, drastic changes in SNR, shape and position changes and abundance of touching cells require sophisticated algorithms for reliable automatic segmentation and cell cycle classification. We extend the recently proposed graph partitioning active contours (GPAC) for fluorescence-based nucleus segmentation using regional density functions and dramatically improve its efficiency, making it scalable for high content microscopy imaging. We utilize surface shape properties of GFP-PCNA intensity field to obtain descriptors of foci patterns and perform automated cell cycle phase classification, and give quantitative performance by comparing our results to manually labeled data.

  20. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selhuber-Unkel, C.; Yde, P.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2009-01-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast...... Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent...... a that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent a was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences...

  1. Rethinking cell-cycle-dependent gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Three studies of gene expression during the division cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe led to the proposal that a large number of genes are expressed at particular times during the S. pombe cell cycle. Yet only a small fraction of genes proposed to be expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner are reproducible in all three published studies. In addition to reproducibility problems, questions about expression amplitudes, cell-cycle timing of expression, synchronization artifacts, and the problem with methods for synchronizing cells must be considered. These problems and complications prompt the idea that caution should be used before accepting the conclusion that there are a large number of genes expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner in S. pombe.

  2. Berberine, a genotoxic alkaloid, induces ATM-Chk1 mediated G2 arrest in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Liu Qiao; Liu Zhaojian; Li Boxuan; Sun Zhaoliang; Zhou Haibin; Zhang Xiyu; Gong Yaoqin; Shao Changshun

    2012-01-01

    Berberine has been shown to possess anti-tumor activity against a wide spectrum of cancer cells. It inhibits cancer cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest, at G1 and/or G2/M, and apoptosis. While it has been documented that berberine induces G1 arrest by activating the p53-p21 cascade, it remains unclear what mechanism underlies the berberine-induced G2/M arrest, which is p53-independent. In this study, we tested the anti-proliferative effect of berberine on murine prostate cancer cell line RM-1 and characterized the underlying mechanisms. Berberine dose-dependently induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis. At low concentrations, berberine was observed to induce G1 arrest, concomitant with the activation of p53-p21 cascade. Upon exposure to berberine at a higher concentration (50 μM) for 24 h, cells exhibited G2/M arrest. Pharmacological inhibition of ATM by KU55933, or Chk1 by UCN-01, could efficiently abrogate the G2/M arrest in berberine-treated cells. Downregulation of Chk1 by RNA interference also abolished the G2/M arrest caused by berberine, confirming the role of Chk1 in the pathway leading to G2/M arrest. Abrogation of G2/M arrest by ATM inhibition forced more cells to undergo apoptosis in response to berberine treatment. Chk1 inhibition by UCN-01, on the other hand, rendered cells more sensitive to berberine only when p53 was inhibited. Our results suggest that combined administration of berberine and caffeine, or other ATM inhibitor, may accelerate the killing of cancer cells.

  3. Berberine, a genotoxic alkaloid, induces ATM-Chk1 mediated G2 arrest in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yu; Liu Qiao; Liu Zhaojian; Li Boxuan; Sun Zhaoliang; Zhou Haibin; Zhang Xiyu; Gong Yaoqin [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan (China); Shao Changshun, E-mail: changshun.shao@gmail.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan (China)

    2012-06-01

    Berberine has been shown to possess anti-tumor activity against a wide spectrum of cancer cells. It inhibits cancer cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest, at G1 and/or G2/M, and apoptosis. While it has been documented that berberine induces G1 arrest by activating the p53-p21 cascade, it remains unclear what mechanism underlies the berberine-induced G2/M arrest, which is p53-independent. In this study, we tested the anti-proliferative effect of berberine on murine prostate cancer cell line RM-1 and characterized the underlying mechanisms. Berberine dose-dependently induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis. At low concentrations, berberine was observed to induce G1 arrest, concomitant with the activation of p53-p21 cascade. Upon exposure to berberine at a higher concentration (50 {mu}M) for 24 h, cells exhibited G2/M arrest. Pharmacological inhibition of ATM by KU55933, or Chk1 by UCN-01, could efficiently abrogate the G2/M arrest in berberine-treated cells. Downregulation of Chk1 by RNA interference also abolished the G2/M arrest caused by berberine, confirming the role of Chk1 in the pathway leading to G2/M arrest. Abrogation of G2/M arrest by ATM inhibition forced more cells to undergo apoptosis in response to berberine treatment. Chk1 inhibition by UCN-01, on the other hand, rendered cells more sensitive to berberine only when p53 was inhibited. Our results suggest that combined administration of berberine and caffeine, or other ATM inhibitor, may accelerate the killing of cancer cells.

  4. Andrographis paniculata extracts and major constituent diterpenoids inhibit growth of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyo, Tawit; Pholphana, Nanthanit; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2014-05-01

    Andrographis paniculata is an important herbal medicine widely used in several Asian countries for the treatment of various diseases due to its broad range of pharmacological activities. The present study reports that A. paniculata extracts potently inhibit the growth of liver (HepG2 and SK-Hep1) and bile duct (HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1) cancer cells. A. paniculata extracts with different contents of major diterpenoids, including andrographolide, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, neoandrographolide, and 14-deoxyandrographolide, exhibited a different potency of growth inhibition. The ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage, which contained a high amount of 14-deoxyandrographolide but a low amount of andrographolide, showed a cytotoxic effect to cancer cells about 4 times higher than the water extract of A. paniculata at the mature leaf stage, which contained a high amount of andrographolide but a low amount of 14-deoxyandrographolide. Andrographolide, not 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, neoandrographolide, or 14-deoxyandrographolide, possessed potent cytotoxic activity against the growth of liver and bile duct cancer cells. The cytotoxic effect of the water extract of A. paniculata at the mature leaf stage could be explained by the present amount of andrographolide, while the cytotoxic effect of the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage could not. HuCCA-1 cells showed more sensitivity to A. paniculata extracts and andrographolide than RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage increased cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases, and induced apoptosis in both HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1 cells. The expressions of cyclin-D1, Bcl-2, and the inactive proenzyme form of caspase-3 were reduced by the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata in the first true leaf stage treatment, while a proapoptotic protein Bax was increased. The cleavage of poly (ADP

  5. Cell-cycle-dependent localization of human cytomegalovirus UL83 phosphoprotein in the nucleolus and modulation of viral gene expression in human embryo fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Rodighiero, Isabella; Mirandola, Prisco; De Conto, Flora; Covan, Silvia; Germini, Diego; Razin, Sergey; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The nucleolus is a multifunctional nuclear compartment widely known to be involved in several cellular processes, including mRNA maturation and shuttling to cytoplasmic sites, control of the cell cycle, cell proliferation, and apoptosis; thus, it is logical that many viruses, including herpesvirus, target the nucleolus in order to exploit at least one of the above-mentioned functions. Recent studies from our group demonstrated the early accumulation of the incoming ppUL83 (pp65), the major tegument protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), in the nucleolus. The obtained results also suggested that a functional relationship might exist between the nucleolar localization of pp65, rRNA synthesis, and the development of the lytic program of viral gene expression. Here we present new data which support the hypothesis of a potentially relevant role of HCMV pp65 and its nucleolar localization for the control of the cell cycle by HCMV (arrest of cell proliferation in G1-G1/S), and for the promotion of viral infection. We demonstrated that, although the incoming pp65 amount in the infected cells appears to be constant irrespective of the cell-cycle phase, its nucleolar accumulation is prominent in G1 and G1/S, but very poor in S or G2/M. This correlates with the observation that only cells in G1 and G1/S support an efficient development of the HCMV lytic cycle. We propose that HCMV pp65 might be involved in regulatory/signaling pathways related to nucleolar functions, such as the cell-cycle control. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments have permitted to identify nucleolin as one of the nucleolar partners of pp65.

  6. Chromatin association of UHRF1 during the cell cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Gashgari, Bothayna

    2017-05-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING Finger domains 1 (UHRF1) is a nuclear protein that associates with chromatin. Regardless of the various functions of UHRF1 in the cell, one of its more important functions is its role in the maintenance of DNA methylation patterns by the recruitment of DNMT1. Studies on UHRF1 based on this function have revealed the importance of UHRF1 during the cell cycle. Moreover, based on different studies various factors were described to be involved in the regulation of UHRF1 with different functionalities that can control its binding affinity to different targets on chromatin. These factors are regulated differently in a cell cycle specific manner. In light of this, we propose that UHRF1 has different binding behaviors during the cell cycle in regard to its association with chromatin. In this project, we first analyzed the binding behavior of endogenous UHRF1 from different unsynchronized cell systems in pull-down assays with peptides and oligonucleotides. Moreover, to analyze UHRF1 binding behavior during the cell cycle, we used two different approaches. First we sorted Jurkat and HT1080 cells based on their cell cycle stage using FACS analysis. Additionally, we synchronized HeLa cells to different stages of the cell cycle by chemical treatments, and used extracts from cellsorting and cell synchronization experiments for pull-down assays. We observed that UHRF1 in different cell systems has different preferences in regard to its binding to H3 unmodified and H3K9me3. Moreover, we detected that UHRF1, in general, displays different patterns between different stages of cell cycle; however, we cannot draw a final model for UHRF1 binding pattern during cell cycle.

  7. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

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    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  8. Connecting the nucleolus to the cell cycle and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Robert Y L; Pederson, Thoru

    2014-08-01

    Long known as the center of ribosome synthesis, the nucleolus is connected to cell cycle regulation in more subtle ways. One is a surveillance system that reacts promptly when rRNA synthesis or processing is impaired, halting cell cycle progression. Conversely, the nucleolus also acts as a first-responder to growth-related stress signals. Here we review emerging concepts on how these "infraribosomal" links between the nucleolus and cell cycle progression operate in both forward and reverse gears. We offer perspectives on how new cancer therapeutic designs that target this infraribosomal mode of cell growth control may shape future clinical progress. © FASEB.

  9. Repressive histone methylation regulates cardiac myocyte cell cycle exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nachef, Danny; Oyama, Kyohei; Wu, Yun-Yu; Freeman, Miles; Zhang, Yiqiang; Robb MacLellan, W

    2018-05-22

    Mammalian cardiac myocytes (CMs) stop proliferating soon after birth and subsequent heart growth comes from hypertrophy, limiting the adult heart's regenerative potential after injury. The molecular events that mediate CM cell cycle exit are poorly understood. To determine the epigenetic mechanisms limiting CM cycling in adult CMs (ACMs) and whether trimethylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3), a histone modification associated with repressed chromatin, is required for the silencing of cell cycle genes, we developed a transgenic mouse model where H3K9me3 is specifically removed in CMs by overexpression of histone demethylase, KDM4D. Although H3K9me3 is found across the genome, its loss in CMs preferentially disrupts cell cycle gene silencing. KDM4D binds directly to cell cycle genes and reduces H3K9me3 levels at these promotors. Loss of H3K9me3 preferentially leads to increased cell cycle gene expression resulting in enhanced CM cycling. Heart mass was increased in KDM4D overexpressing mice by postnatal day 14 (P14) and continued to increase until 9-weeks of age. ACM number, but not size, was significantly increased in KDM4D expressing hearts, suggesting CM hyperplasia accounts for the increased heart mass. Inducing KDM4D after normal development specifically in ACMs resulted in increased cell cycle gene expression and cycling. We demonstrated that H3K9me3 is required for CM cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in ACMs. Depletion of H3K9me3 in adult hearts prevents and reverses permanent cell cycle exit and allows hyperplastic growth in adult hearts in vivo. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  11. Distinct mechanisms act in concert to mediate cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toettcher, Jared E; Loewer, Alexander; Ostheimer, Gerard J; Yaffe, Michael B; Tidor, Bruce; Lahav, Galit

    2009-01-20

    In response to DNA damage, cells arrest at specific stages in the cell cycle. This arrest must fulfill at least 3 requirements: it must be activated promptly; it must be sustained as long as damage is present to prevent loss of genomic information; and after the arrest, cells must re-enter into the appropriate cell cycle phase to ensure proper ploidy. Multiple molecular mechanisms capable of arresting the cell cycle have been identified in mammalian cells; however, it is unknown whether each mechanism meets all 3 requirements or whether they act together to confer specific functions to the arrest. To address this question, we integrated mathematical models describing the cell cycle and the DNA damage signaling networks and tested the contributions of each mechanism to cell cycle arrest and re-entry. Predictions from this model were then tested with quantitative experiments to identify the combined action of arrest mechanisms in irradiated cells. We find that different arrest mechanisms serve indispensable roles in the proper cellular response to DNA damage over time: p53-independent cyclin inactivation confers immediate arrest, whereas p53-dependent cyclin downregulation allows this arrest to be sustained. Additionally, p21-mediated inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity is indispensable for preventing improper cell cycle re-entry and endoreduplication. This work shows that in a complex signaling network, seemingly redundant mechanisms, acting in a concerted fashion, can achieve a specific cellular outcome.

  12. Cell cycle-dependent induction of autophagy, mitophagy and reticulophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Vitale, Ilio; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Hickman, John A; Geneste, Olivier; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-09-15

    When added to cells, a variety of autophagy inducers that operate through distinct mechanisms and target different organelles for autophagic destruction (mitochondria in mitophagy, endoplasmic reticulum in reticulophagy) rarely induce autophagic vacuolization in more than 50% or the cells. Here we show that this heterogeneity may be explained by cell cycle-specific effects. The BH3 mimetic ABT737, lithium, rapamycin, tunicamycin or nutrient depletion stereotypically induce autophagy preferentially in the G(1) and S phases of the cell cycle, as determined by simultaneous monitoring of cell cycle markers and the cytoplasmic aggregation of GFP-LC3 in autophagic vacuoles. These results point to a hitherto neglected crosstalk between autophagic vacuolization and cell cycle regulation.

  13. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK induces apoptosis or necrosis, but has no major influence on the cell cycle of Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Pozarowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Benzalkonium chloride (BAK is a cationic detergent with a very slow turnover. Because of its strong antibacterial activities, BAK is widely used especially in dentistry and ophthalmology. It is the most commonly used preservative in topical ophthalmic medications. Due to chronicity and widespread use of such treatments, BAK’s side effects are of great importance. BAK toxicity for adherent cells, probably related to its pro-oxidative activities, is time- and dose-dependent. Although lymphocytes often infiltrate superficial eye tissues, the BAK influence on them is yet to be established. The aim of this study was to check BAK cytotoxicity on T lymphocytic Jurkat line cells and to verify the suggestion that BAK can induce G2M cell blocks. A dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect of BAK on lymphoid cells in relatively low concentrations was shown in this study. In lower concentrations, it shows a moderate apoptotic and minimal antiproliferative effect on Jurkat cells, while in higher concentrations it shows a rapid necrotic effect. No G2M cell blocks were observed. Our findings could suggest lymphoid dysfunction during intensive, prolonged topical BAK treatment, even at dosages relatively non-toxic to epithelial eye cells. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 225–230

  15. Unusual expression of red fluorescence at M phase induced by anti-microtubule agents in HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda-Uezono, Asumi [Section of Oral Radiation Oncology, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Maxillofacial and Neck Reconstruction, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Kaida, Atsushi [Section of Oral Radiation Oncology, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Michi, Yasuyuki; Harada, Kiyoshi [Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Maxillofacial and Neck Reconstruction, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoshiki; Hayashi, Yoshio [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Miura, Masahiko, E-mail: masa.mdth@tmd.ac.jp [Section of Oral Radiation Oncology, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fucci visualizes cell cycle by green and red fluorescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plinabulin, induced unusual red fluorescence at M-phase in HeLa-Fucci cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The unusual pattern was followed by mitotic catastrophe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The unusual pattern may be an early indicator of cell death in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Plinabulin (NPI-2358) is a novel microtubule-depolymerizing agent. In HeLa cells, plinabulin arrests the cell-cycle at M phase and subsequently induces mitotic catastrophe. To better understand the effects on this compound on the cell-cycle, we used the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), which normally enables G1 and S/G2/M cells to emit red and green fluorescence, respectively. When HeLa-Fucci cells were treated with 50 nM plinabulin, cells began to fluoresce both green and red in an unusual pattern; most cells exhibited the new pattern after 24 h of treatment. X-irradiation efficiently induced G2 arrest in plinabulin-treated cells and significantly retarded the emergence of the unusual pattern, suggesting that entering M phase is essential for induction of the pattern. By simultaneously visualizing chromosomes with GFP-histone H2B, we established that the pattern emerges after nuclear envelope breakdown but before metaphase. Pedigree assay revealed a significant relationship between the unusual expression and mitotic catastrophe. Nocodazole, KPU-133 (a more potent derivative of plinabulin), and paclitaxel also exerted similar effects. From these data, we conclude that the unusual pattern may be associated with dysregulation of late M phase-specific E3 ligase activity and mitotic catastrophe following treatment with anti-microtubule agents.

  16. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian R Black

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about thirty years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. The outcome of PKC activation is highly context-dependent, with the precise cell cycle target(s and overall effects determined by the specific isozyme involved, the timing of PKC activation, the cell type, and the signaling environment. Although PKCs can regulate all stages of the cell cycle, they appear to predominantly affect G0/G1 and G2. PKCs can modulate multiple cell cycle regulatory molecules, including cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks, cdk inhibitors and cdc25 phosphatases; however, evidence points to Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins as key mediators of PKC-regulated cell cycle-specific effects. Several PKC isozymes can target Cip/Kip proteins to control G0/G1→S and/or G2→M transit, while effects on D-type cyclins regulate entry into and progression through G1. Analysis of PKC signaling in T cells has largely focused on its roles in T cell activation; thus, observed cell cycle effects are mainly positive. A prominent role is emerging for PKCθ, with non-redundant functions of other isozymes also described. Additional evidence points to PKCδ as a negative regulator of the cell cycle in these cells. As in other cell types, context-dependent effects of individual isozymes have been noted in T cells, and Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins appear to be major PKC targets. Future studies are anticipated to take advantage of the similarities between these various systems to enhance understanding of PKC-mediated cell cycle regulation in

  17. Analysis of the Budding Yeast Cell Cycle by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebrock, Adam P

    2017-01-03

    DNA synthesis is one of the landmark events in the cell cycle: G 1 cells have one copy of the genome, S phase cells are actively engaged in DNA synthesis, and G 2 cells have twice as much nuclear DNA as G 1 cells. Cellular DNA content can be measured by staining with a fluorescent dye followed by a flow-cytometric readout. This method provides a quantitative measurement of cell cycle position on a cell-by-cell basis at high speed. Using flow cytometry, tens of thousands of single-cell measurements can be generated in a few seconds. This protocol details staining of cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for flow cytometry using Sytox Green dye in a method that can be scaled widely-from one sample to many thousands and operating on inputs ranging from 1 million to more than 100 million cells. Flow cytometry is preferred over light microscopy or Coulter analyses for the analysis of the cell cycle as DNA content and cell cycle position are being directly measured. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  19. Effect of Quercetin on radio-sensitivity of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaofen; Hong Chengjiao; Guo Wenxiu; Pan Yanling; Zhang Baoguo

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of Quercetin on radio-sensitivity of human Uterine Cervix Cancer HeLa cells, HeLa cells were cultured in different concentrations of Quercetin and different doses of irradiation. The clonogenic assay was used to observe the cell survival rate. The repair of DNA double-strand breaks and effect of Quercetin combination of radiation on the cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The results show that the radio-sensitivity of Quercetin on HeLa cells was obvious and the unrepaired DSBs after irradiation increased, but did not decrease G2/M cell cycle arrest. From this it can be inferred that the effect on HeLa cell radio-sensitivity may be related to the inhibition of the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by Quercetin, but it dose not reveal a significant relation with the cell cycle and G2/M arrest. (authors)

  20. Cell-cycle inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Scotti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application.

  1. Studies on regulation of the cell cycle in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Požgajová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All living organisms including plants and animals are composed of millions of cells. These cells perform different functions for the organism although they possess the same chromosomes and carry the same genetic information. Thus, to be able to understand multicellular organism we need to understand the life cycle of individual cells from which the organism comprises. The cell cycle is the life cycle of a single cell in the plant or animal body. It involves series of events in which components of the cell doubles and afterwards equally segregate into daughter cells. Such process ensures growth of the organism, and specialized reductional cell division which leads to production of gamets, assures sexual reproduction. Cell cycle is divided in the G1, S, G2 and M phase. Two gap-phases (G1 and G2 separate S phase (or synthesis and M phase which stays either for mitosis or meiosis. Essential for normal life progression and reproduction is correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Defects in the division program lead to aneuploidy, which in turn leads to birth defects, miscarriages or cancer. Even thou, researchers invented much about the regulation of the cell cycle, there is still long way to understand the complexity of the regulatory machineries that ensure proper segregation of chromosomes. In this paper we would like to describe techniques and materials we use for our studies on chromosome segregation in the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  2. Cell cycle regulation by the Wee1 Inhibitor PD0166285, Pyrido [2,3-d] pyimidine, in the B16 mouse melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Shinkawa, Masako; Torimura, Takuji; Nakamura, Toru; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Sakamoto, Masaharu; Koga, Hironori; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio

    2006-01-01

    Wee1 kinase plays a critical role in maintaining G2 arrest through its inhibitory phosphorylation of cdc2. In previous reports, a pyridopyrimidine molecule PD0166285 was identified to inhibit Wee1 activity at nanomolar concentrations. This G2 checkpoint abrogation by PD0166285 was demonstrated to kill cancer cells, there at a toxic highest dose of 0.5 μM in some cell lines for exposure periods of no longer than 6 hours. The deregulated cell cycle progression may have ultimately damaged the cancer cells. We herein report one of the mechanism by which PD0166285 leads to cell death in the B16 mouse melanoma cell line. Tumor cell proliferation was determined by counting cell numbers. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Morphogenesis analysis such as microtubule stabilization, Wee1 distribution, and cyclin B location were observed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. An immunoblot analysis of cdc2-Tyr15, cyclin D, E, p16, 21, 27, and Rb. A real-time PCR of the mRNA of cyclin D were completed. In our experiment, B16 cells also dramatically abrogated the G2 checkpoint and were found to arrest in the early G1 phase by treatment with 0.5 μM for 4 hours observed by flow cytometry. Cyclin D mRNA decreased within 4 hours observed by Real-time PCR. Rb was dephosphrylated for 24 hours. However, B16 cells did not undergo cell death after 0.5 μM treatment for 24 hours. Immnofluoscence microscopy showed that the cells become round and small in the morphogenesis. More interesting phenomena were that microtubule stabilization was blocked, and Wee1 distribution was restricted after treatment for 4 hours. We analyzed the effect of Wee1 inhibitor PD0166285 described first by Wang in the G2 transition in the B16 melanoma cell line. The inhibitor PD0166285 abrogated G2/M checkpoint inducing early cell division. Moreover, we found that the treatment of cells with the inhibitor is related to microtubule stabilization and decrease in cyclin D transcription

  3. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Philipps-University, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, BMFZ - Biomedical Research Center, Marburg (Germany); Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus [Justus Liebig University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Giessen (Germany); Dreffke, Kirstin [Philipps-University, Institute for Radiobiology and Molecular Radiooncology, Marburg (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons