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Sample records for fusion program annual

  1. Fusion Safety Program. Annual report, FY 1982

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1983-07-01

    The Fusion Safety Program major activities for Fiscal Year 1982 are summarized in this report. The program was started in FY-79, with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) designated as lead laboratory and EG and G Idaho, Inc., named as prime contractor to implement this role. The report contains four sections: EG and G Idaho, Inc., Activities at INEL includes major portions of papers dealing with ongoing work in tritium implantation experiments, tritium risk assessment, transient code development, heat transfer and fluid flow analysis, and high temperature oxidation and mobilization of structural material experiments. The section Outside Contracts includes studies of superconducting magnet safety conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, experiments concerning superconductor safety issues performed by the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to verify analytical work, a continuation of safety and environmental studies by MIT, a summary of lithium safety experiments at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, and the results of tritium gas conversion to oxide experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A List of Publications and Proposed FY-83 Activities are also presented

  2. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1985

    Holland, D.F.; Merrill, B.J.; Herring, J.S.; Piet, S.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1987-02-01

    The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) has supported magnetic fusion technology for seven years, and this is the seventh annual report issued by the FSP. Program focus is identification of the magnitude and distribution of radioactive inventories in fusion reactors, and research and analysis of postulated accident scenarios that could cause the release of a portion of these inventories. Research results are used to develop improved designs that can reduce the probability and magnitude of such releases and thus improve the overall safety of fusion reactors. During FY-1985, research activities continued and participation continued on the Ignition Systems Project (ISP). This report presents the significant results of EGandG Idaho, Inc., activities and those from outside contracts, and includes a list of publications produced during the year, and activities planned for FY-1986

  3. THE GENERAL ATOMICS FUSION THEORY PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2002

    PROJECT STAFF

    2002-01-01

    OAK B202 THE GENERAL ATOMICS FUSION THEORY PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2002. The dual objective of the fusion theory program at General Atomics (GA) is to significantly advance the scientific understanding of the physics of fusion plasmas and to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments. The program plan is aimed at contributing significantly to the Fusion Energy Science and the Tokamak Concept Improvement goals of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES)

  4. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1994

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1994. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions, including the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in this report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base development, and thermalhydraulics code development and their application to fusion safety issues. Much of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and of the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A major activity this year has been work to develop a DOE Technical Standard for the safety of fusion test facilities

  5. Fusion safety program Annual report, Fiscal year 1995

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Carmack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY-95. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A final activity described is work to develop DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Fusion Test Facilities

  6. Fusion safety program annual report fiscal year 1997

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1997. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in FY 1979 to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEEL, different DOE laboratories, and other institutions. The technical areas covered in this report include chemical reactions and activation product release, tritium safety, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2)

  7. Fusion safety program annual report fiscal year 1997

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C. [and others

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1997. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in FY 1979 to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEEL, different DOE laboratories, and other institutions. The technical areas covered in this report include chemical reactions and activation product release, tritium safety, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2).

  8. Fusion Reactor Safety Research Program annual report, FY-79

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the program is the development, coordination, and execution of activities related to magnetic fusion devices and reactors that will: (a) identify and evaluate potential hazards, (b) assess and disclose potential environmental impacts, and (c) develop design standards and criteria that eliminate, mitigate, or reduce those hazards and impacts. The program will provide a sound basis for licensing fusion reactors. Included in this report are portions of four reports from two outside contractors, discussions of the several areas in which EG and G Idaho is conducting research activities, a discussion of proposed program plan development, mention of special tasks, a review of fusion technology program coordination by EG and G with other laboratories, and a brief view of proposed FY-80 activities

  9. Fusion Safety Program Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1996

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1996. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. The objective is to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non- Site- Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). A final area of activity described is development of the new DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities

  10. Fusion Safety Program annual report, Fiscal Year 1993

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in Fiscal Year 1993. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been designated by DOE as the lead laboratory for fusion safety, and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for INEL operations. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations, including universities and private companies. Technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, activation product release, reactions involving potential plasma-facing materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions and edge physics modeling, risk assessment failure rates, computer codes for reactor transient analysis, and regulatory support. These areas include work completed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed at the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor projects at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and a summary of the technical support for the ARIES/PULSAR commercial reactor design studies

  11. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1992

    Holland, D.F.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1992. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations including the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving beryllium, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base, and computer code development for reactor transients. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental studies performed by the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiments and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, the safety analysis for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support for the ARIES commercial reactor design study

  12. Fusion Safety Program annual report: Fiscal year 1987

    Holland, D.F.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; Lyon, R.E.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1988-02-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program major activities in fiscal year 1987. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboraotry and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for this program, which was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating laboratories including the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment methodology, computer codes development for reactor transients, and fusion waste management. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental analysis and conventional facilities design performed by INEL for the Compact Ignition Tokamak design project, the safety analysis and documentation performed for the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support provided to the Environmental Safety and Economics Committee (ESECOM). 42 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Fusion Safety Program annual report: Fiscal year 1986

    Holland, D.F.; Merrill, B.J.; Herring, J.S.; Piet, S.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1987-06-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program's (FSP) major activities in fiscal year 1986. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for FSP, which was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating facilities, including the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in this report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruption, risk assessment methodology, and computer code development for reactor transients. Contributions to the Technical Planning Activity (TPA) and the ''white paper'' study by the Environmental, Safety,and Economics Committee (ESECOM) are summarized. The report also includes a summary of the safety and environmental analysis and documentation performed by the INEL for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) design project

  14. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1984

    Crocker, J.G.; Holland, D.F.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program major activities in fiscal year 1984. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for this program, which was initiated in 1979. A report section titled ''Activities at the INEL'' includes progress reports on the tritium implantation experiment, tritium blanket permeation, volatilization of reactor alloys, plasma disruptions, a comparative blanket safety assessment, transient code development, and a discussion of the INEL's participation in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design study. The report section titled ''Outside Contracts'' includes progress reports on tritium conversion by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), lithium-lead reactions by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and the University of Wisconsin, magnet safety by the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), risk assessment by MIT, tritium retention by the University of Virginia, and activation product release by GA Technologies. A list of publications produced during the year and brief descriptions of activities planned for FY-1985 are also included

  15. Fusion Reactor Safety Research program. Annual report, FY-80

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1981-06-01

    The report is in three sections. Outside contracts includes a report of newly-started study at the General Atomic Company to consider safety implications of low-activation materials, portions of two papers from ongoing work at PNL and ANL, reports of the lithium spill work at HEDL, the LITFIRE code development at MIT, and risk assessment at MIT, all of which are an expansion of FY-79 outside contracts. EG and G Activities includes adaptations of four papers of ongoing work in transient code development, tritium system risk assessment, heat transfer and fluid flow analysis, and fusion safety data base. Program Plan Development includes the Executive Summary of the Plan, which was completed in FY-80, and is accompanied by a list of publications and a brief outline of proposed FY-81 activities to be based on the Program Plan

  16. NRL inertial confinement fusion theory program. 1979 annual report, October 1978 - December 1979

    1980-01-01

    This is the 1979 annual report of the NRL Inertial Confinement Fusion Theory Program. It covers research performed from October 1978 through December 1979. Research in each of the four current program areas is reported: laser light absorption;fluid dynamics of ablative acceleration; development of computational techniques, and Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization techniques

  17. Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program, Professional Development Program: FY 1987 annual report

    1988-01-01

    In FY 1986, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) initiated two programs for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fusion Energy (OFE): the Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program and the Fusion Energy Professional Development Program. These programs provide opportunities to conduct collaborative research in magnetic fusion energy research and development programs at DOE laboratories and contractor sites. Participants become trained in advanced fusion energy research, interact with outstanding professionals, and become familiar with energy-related national issues while making personal contributions to the search for solutions to scientific problems. Both programs enhance the national fusion energy research and development effort by providing channels for the exchange of scientists and engineers, the diffusion of ideas and knowledge, and the transfer of relevant technologies. These programs, along with the Magnetic Fusion Energy Science and Technology Fellowship Programs, compose the fusion energy manpower development programs administered by ORAU for DOE/OFE

  18. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1983

    Crocker, J.G.; Holland, D.F.

    1984-07-01

    The Fusion Safety Program major activities for Fiscal Year 1983 are summarized in this report. The program was initiated in FY 1979, with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) designated lead laboratory, and EG and G Idaho, inc., named as prime contractor to implement this role. The report contains four sections: EG and G Idaho, Inc., activities at the INEL includes progress reports and portions of papers on the tritium implantation experiment, tritium control systems, tritium release from solid breeding blankets, plasma disruptions, risk assessment, transient code development, data base development, and a discussion of participation in the blanket comparison and selection study. The section outside contracts includes progress reports and portions of papers on lithium-lead reactions by Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and the University of Wisconsin, magnet safety by the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), risk assessment by the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and MIT, tritium retention by the University of Virginia, and effects of plasma disruptions by MIT. A list of publications and planned fiscal year 1984 activities are also included

  19. Magnetic fusion energy materials technology program annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Scott, J.L.

    1977-09-01

    The objectives of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Materials Technology Program, which is described in this report, are to continue to solve the materials problems of the Fusion Energy Division of ORNL and to meet needs of the national MFE program, directed by the ERDA Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy (DMFE). This work is a continuation of the program described in previous annual progress reports. The principal areas of work include radiation effects, compatibility studies, materials studies related to the plasma-materials interaction, materials engineering, radiation behavior of superconducting magnet insulation, and mechanical properties of superconducting composites. The level of effort and schedules are consistent with Logic II of the DMFE Program Plan

  20. THE GENERAL ATOMICS FUSION THEORY PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR GRANT YEAR 2004

    PROJECT STAFF

    2004-01-01

    The dual objective of the fusion theory program at General Atomics (GA) is to significantly advance our scientific understanding of the physics of fusion plasmas and to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments. The program plan is aimed at contributing significantly to the Fusion Energy Science and the Tokamak Concept Improvement goals of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES)

  1. Canadian fusion program

    Brown, T.S.

    1982-06-01

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  2. 1982 laser program annual report

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R.

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications

  3. Fusion program overview

    Clarke, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    There has been and continues to be a perceived need for the fusion energy option in our energy future. The National Energy Plan states that ''the Federal Government recognizes a direct responsibility to demonstrate the scientific and engineering feasibility of fusion''. The goal of the program, in exercising this responsibility, is to develop the knowledge base upon which decisions on the commercial feasibility of fusion will be made after the conclusion of the present scientific feasibility phase of the program. The strategy is to preceed sequentially through a product definition phase, to the product development phase. Product definition is the identification of an attractive fusion reactor concept supported by a sound base of scientific and technological information. Product development is the further refinement of scientific, technological and engineering information base of the selected concept to provide a firm basis for commercial application. Each of these phases will be discussed with special emphasis on the relationship between the annual appropriation process and the influence of external forces on the pace of the program. This discussion will include the use of international cooperation to maintain and extend program scope. Further discussion will cover the important scientific and technological advances of the last few years and the way in which they have influenced the development of our management strategy to maximize our resources

  4. LLE 1998 annual report, October 1997 -September 1998. Inertial fusion program and National Laser Users' Facility program

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), the operation of the National Laser Users' Facility (NLUF), and programs involving the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students for FY98. Research summaries cover: progress in laser fusion; diagnostic development; laser and optical technology; and advanced technology for laser targets

  5. LLE 1998 annual report, October 1997--September 1998. Inertial fusion program and National Laser Users` Facility program

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and programs involving the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students for FY98. Research summaries cover: progress in laser fusion; diagnostic development; laser and optical technology; and advanced technology for laser targets.

  6. Fusion Power Associates annual meeting

    Nickerson, S.B.

    1985-03-01

    The Fusion Power Associates symposium, 'The Search for Attractive Fusion Concepts', was held January 31 - February 1 1985 in La Jolla, California. The purpose of this meeting was to bring together industry, university and government managers of the US fusion program to discuss the state of fusion development and the direction in which the program should be heading, given the cutbacks in the US fusion budget. There was a strong, minority opinion that until the best concept could be identified, the program should be broadly based. But there was also widespread criticism, aimed mainly at the largest segment of the magnetic fusion program, the tokamak. It was felt by many that the tokamak would not develop into a reactor that would be attractive to a utility and therefore should be phased out of the program. If the tokamak will indeed not lead to a commercial product then this meeting shows the US fusion program to be in a healthy state, despite the declining budgets

  7. Laser Program annual report 1984

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1985-06-01

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs

  8. Canada's Fusion Program

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  9. Inertial Confinement Fusion Annual Report 1997

    Correll, D

    1998-01-01

    The ICF Annual Report provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL ICF Program during the fiscal year by the use of two formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the fiscal year and (2) a compilation of the articles that previously appeared in the ICF Quarterly Report that year. Both the Overview and Quarterly Report are also on the Web at http://lasers.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1997, the fourth quarter issue of the ICF Quarterly was no longer printed as a separate document but rather included in the ICF Annual. This change provided a more efficient process of documenting our accomplishments with-out unnecessary duplication of printing. In addition we introduced a new document, the ICF Program Monthly Highlights. Starting with the September 1997 issue and each month following, the Monthly Highlights will provide a brief description of noteworthy activities of interest to our DOE sponsors and our stakeholders. The underlying theme for LLNL's ICF Program research continues to be defined within DOE's Defense Programs missions and goals. In support of these missions and goals, the ICF Program advances research and technology development in major interrelated areas that include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology. While in pursuit of its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application of inertial fusion energy for civilian power production. ICF technologies continue to have spin-off applications for additional government and industrial use. In addition to these topics, the ICF Annual Report covers non-ICF funded, but related, laser research and development and associated applications. We also

  10. Magnetic-fusion program

    1980-08-01

    In February 1980, the Director of Energy Research requested that the Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) review the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetic Fusion Program. Of particular concern to the DOE was the judicious choice of the next major steps toward demonstration of economic power production from fusion. Of equal concern was the overall soundness of the DOE Magnetic Fusion Program: its pace, scope, and funding profiles. Their finding and recommendations are included

  11. Magnetic fusion energy materials technology program, annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1976

    Scott, J.L.

    1976-09-01

    Activities in research programs are reported on materials for use in thermonuclear reactor development. Information and data are included on radiation effects on stainless steel 316, nickel-base alloys, molybdenum-base alloys, vanadium alloys, and SAP. Results of compatibility studies involving iron-base alloys and lithium are also included along with research results on magnet development

  12. Heavy ion fusion program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1, 1979-March 30, 1980

    1980-01-01

    HIF activity at ANL during FY 1980 has been primarily concentrated on conceptual design work, and on initial tests of the independently-phased rf acceleration cavities. Calculations for near-term foil-heating experiments were carried out, and a specific cost-effective synchrotron (Beam Development Facility) plan was developed. Program logics were further refined, and some conceptual reactor issues were addressed

  13. Magnetic fusion energy materials technology program, annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1976

    Scott, J.L. (comp.)

    1976-09-01

    Activities in research programs are reported on materials for use in thermonuclear reactor development. Information and data are included on radiation effects on stainless steel 316, nickel-base alloys, molybdenum-base alloys, vanadium alloys, and SAP. Results of compatibility studies involving iron-base alloys and lithium are also included along with research results on magnet development. (JRD)

  14. Heavy ion fusion program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1, 1979-March 30, 1980

    1980-01-01

    HIF activity at ANL during FY 1980 has been primarily concentrated on conceptual design work, and on initial tests of the independently-phased rf acceleration cavities. Calculations for near-term foil-heating experiments were carried out, and a specific cost-effective synchrotron (Beam Development Facility) plan was developed. Program logics were further refined, and some conceptual reactor issues were addressed.

  15. 1982 laser program annual report

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R. (eds.)

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

  16. Laser fusion program overview

    Emmett, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    This program is structured to proceed through a series of well defined fusion milestones to proof of the scientific feasibility, of laser fusion with the Shiva Nova system. Concurrently, those key technical areas, such as advanced lasers, which are required to progress beyond proof of feasibility, are being studied. We have identified and quantified the opportunities and key technical issues in military applications, such as weapons effects simulations, and in civilian applications, such as central-station electric power production. We summarize the current status and future plans for the laser fusion program at LLL, emphasizing the civilian applications of laser fusion

  17. Fusion-Reactor-Safety Research Program. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1981

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1982-07-01

    The report contains four sections: Outside Contracts includes the continuation of the General Atomic Co. low-activation materials safety study, water-cooled transport activation products study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), studies of superconducting magnet safety conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) coupled with a new experimental superconducting magnet study program by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to verify analytical work, a continuation of safety methodology work by MIT, portions of papers on lithium safety studies conducted at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), and a new program to study tritium gas conversion to tritiated water at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The section EG and G idaho, Inc., Activities at INEL includes adaptations of papers of ongoing work in transient code development, tritium systems risk assessment, heat transfer activities, and a summary of a workshop on safety in design. A List of Publications and Proposed FY-82 Activities are also presented

  18. Fusion safety program plan

    Crocker, J.G.; Holland, D.F.; Herring, J.S.

    1980-09-01

    The program plan consists of research that has been divided into 13 different areas. These areas focus on the radioactive inventories that are expected in fusion reactors, the energy sources potentially available to release a portion of these inventories, and analysis and design techniques to assess and ensure that the safety risks associated with operation of magnetic fusion facilities are acceptably low. The document presents both long-term program requirements that must be fulfilled as part of the commercialization of fusion power and a five-year plan for each of the 13 different program areas. Also presented is a general discussion of magnetic fusion reactor safety, a method for establishing priorities in the program, and specific priority ratings for each task in the five-year plan

  19. Fusion Simulation Program

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. (1). Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  20. Laser Program annual report 1984

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1985-06-01

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  1. Advanced fusion concepts program

    Dove, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    While the prospects for the eventual development of a tokamak-based fusion reactor appear promising at the present time, the Department of Energy maintains a vigorous program in alternate magnetic fusion concepts. Several of the concepts presently supported include the toroidal reversed field pinch, Tormac, Elmo Bumpy Torus, and various linear options. Recent technical accomplishments and program evaluations indicate that the possibility now exists for undertaking the next development stage, a proof-of-principle experiment, for a few of the most promising alternate concepts

  2. Laser program annual report 1983

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1984-06-01

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  3. Laser program annual report 1983

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1984-06-01

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications

  4. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project annual report 93/94

    1994-01-01

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project exists to develop fusion technologies and apply them worldwide in today's advanced fusion projects and to apply these technologies in fusion and tritium research facilities. CFFTP concentrates on developing capability in fusion fuel cycle systems, in tritium handling technologies and in remote handling. This is an annual report for CFFTP and as such also includes a financial report

  5. 1981 inertial fusion research annual technical report

    Solomon, D.E.; Wei, J.L.; Greacen, N.T.

    1981-01-01

    This annual report consists of the following two topics: (1) target fabrication technology, and (2) fusion experiments. The first section is reported by the following seven areas: (1) characterization, (2) fuel shell technology, (3) polymer technology, (4) lithium foil development, (5) precision etch technology, (6) analytical instrumentation, and (7) target fabrication. The second area is reported by the following topics: (1) experiments, (2) plasma theory, (3) code development and simulation, and (4) lasers and optics

  6. Laser fusion project second annual report

    Dumbaugh, W.H.; Morgan, D.W.; Flannery, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    This research program is devoted to the preparation and characterization of fluoride glasses for laser fusion. The overall objective is to explore and characterize fluoride glass systems to find a glass with the lowest possible nonlinear refractive index, satisfactory chemical durability, and physical properties which enable coating large optical quality pieces

  7. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan

    1985-02-01

    This Plan reflects the present conditions of the energy situation and is consistent with national priorities for the support of basic and applied research. It is realistic in taking advantage of the technical position that the United States has already established in fusion research to make cost-effective progress toward the development of fusion power as a future energy option

  8. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project annual report 93/94

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project exists to develop fusion technologies and apply them worldwide in today`s advanced fusion projects and to apply these technologies in fusion and tritium research facilities. CFFTP concentrates on developing capability in fusion fuel cycle systems, in tritium handling technologies and in remote handling. This is an annual report for CFFTP and as such also includes a financial report.

  9. Fusion research program in Korea

    Hwang, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    Fusion research in Korea is still premature, but it is a fast growing program. Groups in several universities and research institutes were working either in small experiments or in theoretical areas. Recently, couple of institutes who have small fusion-related experiments, proposed medium-size tokamak programs to jump into fusion research at the level of international recognition. Last year, Korean government finally approved to construct 'Superconducting Tokamak' as a national fusion program, and industries such as Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO) and Samsung joined to support this program. Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has organized national project teams including universities, research institutes and companies. National project teams are performing design works since this March. (author)

  10. Fusion-breeder program

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The various approaches to a combined fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of breeding 239 Pu and 233 U are described. Design aspects and cost estimates for fuel production and electricity generation are discussed

  11. Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Volume I. Introduction, technical summaries, list of publications, etc., Appendices A-K. Annual report

    Aamodt, R.E.; Byrne, R.N.; Catto, P.J.

    1979-12-01

    An abstract was prepared for the progress summary on transport theory for open and closed magnetic configurations. Seven abstracts were prepared for included appendices of more detailed work on individual devices. Also included is a list of publications, technical presentations, and DOE program contributions

  12. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report

  13. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  14. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs

  16. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    PROJECT STAFF

    2001-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility

  17. Fusion tritium program in Japan

    Okamoto, M.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Fusion Council, Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, has started to review the nuclear fusion R and D plan for the next stage, post JT-60. The council launched a subcommittee on fundamental issues in the nuclear fusion development in 1985, for review of the basic strategy of a development plan. The subcommittee presented an interim report in Feb. 1986 after 6 months discussion and the report was approved by the Nuclear Fusion Council. Two major R and D programs described in the interim report are the development of a Tokamak type large facility and the comprehensive development of the fusion reactor technology. The latter means to promote the reactor technologies which will be essential in the future to construct not only a D/T burning but also a DEMO reactor. The Nuclear Fusion Development Program in Japan is shown. The interim report recommended to organize two subcommittees to establish an integrated national R and D plan; one was for the design of the next step large facility and the other was for the R and program of the fusion technology. The subcommittee for the latter consisted of 7 working groups; one of them was organized for the tritium technology

  18. BNL heavy ion fusion program

    Maschke, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    A principal attraction of heavy ion fusion is that existing accelerator technology and theory are sufficiently advanced to allow one to commence the design of a machine capable of igniting thermonuclear explosions. There are, however, a number of features which are not found in existing accelerators built for other purposes. The main thrust of the BNL Heavy Ion Fusion program has been to explore these features. Longitudinal beam bunching, very low velocity acceleration, and space charge neutralization are briefly discussed

  19. Fusion program research materials inventory

    Roche, T.K.; Wiffen, F.W.; Davis, J.W.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory maintains a central inventory of research materials to provide a common supply of materials for the Fusion Reactor Materials Program. This will minimize unintended material variations and provide for economy in procurement and for centralized record keeping. Initially this inventory is to focus on materials related to first-wall and structural applications and related research, but various special purpose materials may be added in the future. The use of materials from this inventory for research that is coordinated with or otherwise related technically to the Fusion Reactor Materials Program of DOE is encouraged

  20. Inertial fusion research: Annual technical report, 1985

    Larsen, J.T.; Terry, N.C.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research activities undertaken at KMS Fusion (KMSF) during 1985. It is organized into three main technical sections; the first covers fusion experiments and theoretical physics, the second is devoted to progress in materials development and target fabrication, and the third describes laser technology research. These three individual sections have been cataloged separately

  1. Fusion Breeder Program interim report

    Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

    1982-01-01

    This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83

  2. Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Program

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Program is investigating pulsed electron and light ion beam accelerators, with the goal of demonstrating the practical application of such drivers as igniters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. Recent developments in the program are described. Traditionally, two requirements of ICF reactor operation have been the most difficult to satisfy in conceptual designs. Adequate standoff of critical components from damaging pellet emissions must be assured, and the shot repetition rate must be consistent with the desired reactor power level at reasonable pellet gains. Progress in power compression, beam focusing and transport, first-wall protection schemes, and net-energy-gain target design shows how these requirements can be met

  3. 1981 Annual Status Report: thermonuclear fusion technology

    1982-01-01

    The work perfomed on 1981 concerns four projects, namely: - The project 1: ''Reactor Studies''. During 1981 this activity was made in support to the European participation to the INTOR (INternational TOkamak Reactor) studies. This represents a collaborative effort among Europe, Japan; USA and USSR, under the auspices of IAEA, to design a major fusion experiment beyond the upcoming generation of large tokamaks. - The Project 2: ''Blanket Technology'' has the aim to investigate the behaviour of blanket materials in fusion conditions. - The Project 3: ''Materials Sorting and Development'' has the aim to assess the mechanical properties and radiation damage of standard and advanced materials suited for structures, in particular for application as first wall of the fusion reactors. - The Project 4: ''Cyclotron Operation and Experiments'' has the task to exploit a cyclotron to simulate radiation damages to materials in a fusion ambient

  4. 1982 annual status report: thermonuclear fusion technology

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this programme is to study the technological problems related to ''Post Jet'' experimental machines and, in a longer range, to assess the engineering aspects of Fusion Power Reactor Plants. According to the decision taken by the Council of Ministers on the JRC multiannual programme (1980-1983), the work performed on 1982 concerns four projects, namely: The Project 1: ''Fusion Reactor Studies''concerns mainly the NET (Next European Torus) studies which have been continued in the framework of the European participation to INTOR (INternational TOkamak Reactor). This represents a collaborative effort to design a major fusion experiment beyond the-upcoming generation of large tokamaks. The Project 2: ''Blanket Technology'' has the aim to investigate the behaviour of blanket materials in fusion conditions. The Project 3: ''Materials Sorting and Development'' has the aim to assess the mechanical properties and radiation damage of standard and advanced materials suited for structures, in particular for application as first wall of the fusion reactors. The Project 4: ''Cyclotron Operation and Experiments''has the task to exploit a cyclotron to simulate radiation damages to materials in a fusion ambient

  5. Laser program. Annual report, 1978

    Monsler, M.J.; Jarman, B.D.

    1979-03-01

    An overview of the entire program is given. The overview previews the report, highlights progress in 1978, and summarizes the facilities and resources of the laser program. The Argus, Shiva, and Nova facilities are described. The theory of fusion target design is discussed along with specialized techniques of target fabrication

  6. LLL mirror fusion program: summary

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    During 1976, new Mirror Program plans have been laid out to take into account the significant advances during the last 18 months. The program is now focused on two new mirror concepts, field reversal and the tandem mirror, that can obtain high Q, defined as the ratio of fusion power output to the neutral-beam power injected to sustain the reaction. Theoretically, both concepts can attain Q = 5 or more, as compared to Q = 1 in previous mirror designs. Experimental planning for the next 5 years is complete in broad outline, and we are turning attention to what additional steps are necessary to reach our long-range goal of an experimental mirror reactor operating by 1990. Highlights of the events that have led to the above circumstance are listed, and experimental program plans are outlined

  7. The fusion blanket program at Chalk River

    Hastings, I.J.

    1986-03-01

    Work on the Fusion Blanket Program commenced at Chalk River in 1984 June. Co-funded by Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, the Program utilizes Chalk River expertise in instrumented irradiation testing, ceramics, tritium technology, materials testing and compound chemistry. This paper gives highlights of studies to date on lithium-based ceramics, leading contenders for the fusion blanket

  8. Annual report to DOE of the fusion programs in applied plasma physics and development and technology at GA Technologies Inc., fiscal 1984

    Ohkawa, T.

    1985-04-01

    The GA programs in Applied Plasma Physics and Development and Technology have registered substantial accomplishments during fiscal 1984. Theoretical work in the MHD area has contributed to further understanding of the physics governing low-q, high-β tokamak discharges, including the effects of a cold plasma mantle and an edge-temperature pedestal. The universal scaling law for the maximum β stable to ideal-MHD modes has been verified for Doublet III and has also been validated for JET, DIII-D, and a Double Dee configuration. Experimental work in Applied Plasma Physics included the development of two new high-energy diagnostics, one for gamma rays and one for tritons (or, in a reactor, alpha particles), both of which can yield essential physics information that is not readily obtainable from the panoply of existing diagnostic instruments. The development of a current-density profile diagnostic continued, and it was found that the instrument could also be used to obtain relative density profiles throughout a tokamak discharge. And tests of an ergodic magnetic limiter scheme indicated that the configuration has the potential to create a stable, radiating boundary layer while reducing the heat load to the walls in future high-power devices. The work carried out in the area of Development and Technology included a group of reactor systems design studies that bring into focus some of the challenges that will be faced by the engineers of fusion power equipment. Closer to realization are advanced rf equipment and superconducting magnet developments, both under design in the area of plasma technologies. Technological developments that apply directly to current experiments as well as to future devices comprise the rest of the GA D and T program

  9. 1980 Annual status report: thermonuclear fusion technology

    1981-01-01

    According to the decisions taken by the Council of Ministers on the JRC multiannual programme (1980-83), the 1980 activity has been oriented toward four projects which cover a broad range of fields, namely: - the Project 1: 'Reactor Studies'. The main effort was oriented toward the NET/INTOR studies. JRC Ispra is acting as reference nucleus for NET preliminary design. For the moment being this work was made in support to the European participation to INTOR. In 1980 the conceptual design of a demonstration power reactor (FINTOR-D) was also achieved. - The Project 2: 'Blanket Technology' has the aim to investigate structural materials behaviour in fusion conditions. Items like tritium outgassing and permeation from structurals an materials compatibility were investigated. - The Projet 3: 'Material sorting and development'. Its aim is to assess mechanical properties and radiation damage of standard and advanced materials suited for reactor structures. - The Projet 4: 'Cyclotron construction and operation' has the task to install and exploit a cyclotron to simulate demages to materials in a fusion ambient

  10. Fusion Simulation Program Execution Plan

    Brooks, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The overall science goal of the FSP is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in research related to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical areas: 1) the plasma edge and 2) whole device modeling including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model (WDM) will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP. The FSP plan targets the needed modeling capabilities by developing Integrated Science Applications (ISAs) specific to their needs. The Pedestal-Boundary model will include boundary magnetic topology, cross-field transport of multi-species plasmas, parallel plasma transport, neutral transport, atomic physics and interactions with the plasma wall

  11. Review of fusion research program: historical summary and program projections

    Murphy, E.S.

    1976-09-01

    This report provides a brief review of the history and current status of fusion research in the United States. It also describes the Federally funded program aimed at the development of fusion reactors for electric power generation.

  12. Fusion Energy Sciences Program at LANL

    Leeper, Ramon J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-15

    This presentation provides a strategic plan and description of investment areas; LANL vision for existing programs; FES portfolio and other specifics related to the Fusion Energy Sciences program at LANL.

  13. Laser program annual report, 1980

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R. (eds.)

    1981-06-01

    Volume 3 is comprised of three sections, beginning with Section 8 on Advanced Lasers. Both theoretical and experimental research and development activities on advanced laser systems are presented here. Section 9 contains the results of studies in areas of energy and military applications, including those relating to electrical energy production by inertial confinement fusion systems. Finally, Section 10 presents results from selected activities in the Advanced Isotope Separation Program.

  14. Laser program annual report, 1980

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Volume 3 is comprised of three sections, beginning with Section 8 on Advanced Lasers. Both theoretical and experimental research and development activities on advanced laser systems are presented here. Section 9 contains the results of studies in areas of energy and military applications, including those relating to electrical energy production by inertial confinement fusion systems. Finally, Section 10 presents results from selected activities in the Advanced Isotope Separation Program

  15. Laser program annual report, 1977. Volume 2

    Bender, C.F.; Jarman, B.D.

    1978-07-01

    This volume contains detailed information on each of the following sections: (1) fusion target design, (2) target fabrication, (3) laser fusion experiments and analysis, (4) advanced lasers, (5) systems and applications studies, and (6) laser isotope separation program

  16. Laser program annual report, 1977. Volume 2

    Bender, C.F.; Jarman, B.D. (eds.)

    1978-07-01

    This volume contains detailed information on each of the following sections: (1) fusion target design, (2) target fabrication, (3) laser fusion experiments and analysis, (4) advanced lasers, (5) systems and applications studies, and (6) laser isotope separation program. (MOW)

  17. Energy Program annual report

    Borg, I.Y. (ed.)

    1988-02-01

    The national economy is particularly dependent on efficient electrical generation and transportation. Electrical demand continues to grow and will increasingly rely on coal and nuclear fuels. The nuclear power industry still has not found a solution to the problem of disposing of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. Although coal is in ample supply and the infrastructure is in place for its utilization, environmental problems and improved conversion processes remain technical challenges. In the case of transportation, the nation depends almost exclusively on liquid fuels with attendant reliance on imported oil. Economic alternates---synfuels from coal, natural gas, and oil shale, or fuel cells and batteries---have yet to be developed or perfected so as to impact the marketplace. Inefficiencies in energy conversion in almost all phases of resource utilization remain. These collective problems are the focus of the Energy Program.

  18. Annual review in automatic programming

    Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Annual Review in Automatic Programming focuses on the techniques of automatic programming used with digital computers. Topics covered range from the design of machine-independent programming languages to the use of recursive procedures in ALGOL 60. A multi-pass translation scheme for ALGOL 60 is described, along with some commercial source languages. The structure and use of the syntax-directed compiler is also considered.Comprised of 12 chapters, this volume begins with a discussion on the basic ideas involved in the description of a computing process as a program for a computer, expressed in

  19. Annual review in automatic programming

    Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Annual Review in Automatic Programming, Volume 4 is a collection of papers that deals with the GIER ALGOL compiler, a parameterized compiler based on mechanical linguistics, and the JOVIAL language. A couple of papers describes a commercial use of stacks, an IBM system, and what an ideal computer program support system should be. One paper reviews the system of compilation, the development of a more advanced language, programming techniques, machine independence, and program transfer to other machines. Another paper describes the ALGOL 60 system for the GIER machine including running ALGOL pro

  20. CIEE 1993 annual conference: Program

    1993-08-01

    The California Institute for Energy efficiency`s third annual conference highlights the results of CIEE-sponsored multiyear research in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research are also featured.

  1. Magnetic fusion program summary document

    1979-04-01

    This document outlines the current and planned research, development, and commercialization (RD and C) activities of the Offic of Fusion Energy under the Assistant Secretary for Energy Technology, US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this document is to explain the Office of Fusion Energy's activities to Congress and its committees and to interested members of the public

  2. Laser program annual report, 1977. Volume 1

    Bender, C.F.; Jarman, B.D.

    1978-07-01

    An overview is given of the laser fusion program. The solid-state program covers the Shiva and Nova projects. Laser components, control systems, alignment systems, laser beam diagnostics, power conditioning, and optical components are described. The fusion experimental program concerns the diagnostics and data acquisition associated with Argus and Shiva

  3. Laser program annual report, 1977. Volume 1

    Bender, C.F.; Jarman, B.D. (eds.)

    1978-07-01

    An overview is given of the laser fusion program. The solid-state program covers the Shiva and Nova projects. Laser components, control systems, alignment systems, laser beam diagnostics, power conditioning, and optical components are described. The fusion experimental program concerns the diagnostics and data acquisition associated with Argus and Shiva. (MOW)

  4. Annual review in automatic programming

    Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Annual Review in Automatic Programming, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that discusses the controversy about the suitability of COBOL as a common business oriented language, and the development of different common languages for scientific computation. A couple of papers describes the use of the Genie system in numerical calculation and analyzes Mercury autocode in terms of a phrase structure language, such as in the source language, target language, the order structure of ATLAS, and the meta-syntactical language of the assembly program. Other papers explain interference or an ""intermediate

  5. DIII-D Research Operations annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991. Magnetic Fusion Research Program

    Simonen, T.C.; Evans, T.E. [eds.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Doublet-3 research operations: DIII-D Program Overview; Boundary Plasma Research Program/Scientific Progress; Radio Frequency Heating and Current Drive; Core Physics; DIII-D Operations; Program Development; Support Services; ITER Contributions; Burning Plasma Experiment Contributions; and Collaborative Efforts.

  6. 1981 laser program annual report

    1982-08-01

    This report is published in sections that correspond to the division of technical activity in the Program. Section 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2 covers the work on solid-state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations and Nova and Novette systems development. Section 3 reports on target-design activities, plasma theory and simulation, code development, and atomic theory. Section 4 presents the accomplishments of the Target Fabrication group, Section 5 contains the results of our diagnostics development, and Section 6 reports the results of laser-target experiments conducted during the year, along with supporting research and development activities. Section 7 presents the results from laser research and development, including solid-state R and D and the theoretical and experimental research on advanced lasers. Section 8 contains the results of studies in areas of energy and military applications, including those relating to electrical energy production by inertial-confinement fusion systems

  7. 1981 laser program annual report

    1982-08-01

    This report is published in sections that correspond to the division of technical activity in the Program. Section 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2 covers the work on solid-state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations and Nova and Novette systems development. Section 3 reports on target-design activities, plasma theory and simulation, code development, and atomic theory. Section 4 presents the accomplishments of the Target Fabrication group, Section 5 contains the results of our diagnostics development, and Section 6 reports the results of laser-target experiments conducted during the year, along with supporting research and development activities. Section 7 presents the results from laser research and development, including solid-state R and D and the theoretical and experimental research on advanced lasers. Section 8 contains the results of studies in areas of energy and military applications, including those relating to electrical energy production by inertial-confinement fusion systems.

  8. Pacing the US magnetic fusion program

    1989-01-01

    This study addresses the priority and pace of the nation's magnetic fusion research and development program in the context of long-term national energy policy. In particular, the committee interpreted its task as follows: To review the implications of long-term national energy policy for current research and development in magnetic fusion; to identify factors that should enter the further development of such policy to reduce risks associated with the future electricity supply system; to propose criteria applicable to research and develop in electric generation in reaching long-term energy policy goals; to apply these criteria to magnetic fusion and alternative electric generation technologies in order to develop recommendations on the priority pace of the magnetic fusion program; and to present its results in a final report. The most important goals of the US Department of Energy's current Magnetic Fusion Energy Program Plan are to demonstrate the scientific and engineering feasibility of fusion, Demonstrating engineering feasibility will require the design, construction, and operation of an engineering test reactor, which the plan envisions financing through a combination of domestic and international funding. The committee believes that current domestic program funding levels are inadequate to meet even the near-term objectives of the plan

  9. 1983 Annual technical report on inertial fusion research

    Solomon, D.E.; Monsler, M.J.; Terry, N.C.

    1984-03-01

    An overview of the laser fusion program at KMS Fusion is presented. A two-beam laser (1053 nm and 527 nm) system is used for the implosion physics. Stimulated Raman scattering is used to examine the implosion region for high-energy electrons. Holographic and fringe analysis techniques are also used in the diagnostics of the plasma. Computational techniques based on two-plasmon decay are shock-fitting techniques in Lagrangian hydrocodes are also described. Glass shell technology for laser targets is given. The design of the Chemically Pumped Iodine Laser (CPIL) is also presented. 86 refs., 46 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hidetoshi

    2003-11-01

    This annual report provides an overview of research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities, during the period from 1 April, 2002 to 31 March, 2003. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high performance plasma researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, research and development of fusion reactor technologies towards ITER and fusion power demonstration plants, and activities in support of ITER design and construction. JT-60 program has continued to produce fruitful knowledge and understanding necessary to achieve reactor relevant performances of tokamak fusion devices. JFT-2M has made contributions in more basic areas of tokamak plasma research and development in pursuit of high performance plasma. The objectives of JT-60 research have been more shifted to physics R and Ds in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and establishment of physics basis for a steady state tokamak fusion reactor like SSTR as a fusion power demonstration plant. In JFT-2M, the advanced material tokamak experiment program has been carried out to test the low activation ferritic steel for development of the structural material for a fusion reactor. In the area of theories and analyses, significant progress has been made in understanding of the ITB, energy confinement scaling in ITB plasmas, MHD equilibrium in the current hole region, asymmetric feature of divertor plasmas and the divertor detachment. In addition, through the project of numerical experiment on tokamak, the mechanism of the ion temperature gradient mode was clarified by particle simulations. The physics of divertor plasma was also studied by particle simulations. R and Ds of fusion reactor technologies have been carried out both to further improve technologies necessary for ITER construction, and to accumulate

  11. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2003-March 2004

    2004-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2003 and March 2004. 300 collaborating studies have been implemented during this period. The major programs at NIFS are (i) toroidal plasma confinement experiments using the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is a heliotron type net-plasma-current free device and (ii) theoretical research and computer simulations for study of the complex state and the nonlinear dynamics such as these seen in high temperature plasmas. These major projects are accompanied by supporting but unique researches. A fusion reactor design study and its related engineering are also strongly promoted. In addition to the existing collaboration frameworks, a new framework of bilateral collaboration has started to enhance the exploitation of fusion facilities in universities. (J.P.N.)

  12. International program activities in magnetic fusion energy

    1986-03-01

    The following areas of our international activities in magnetic fusion are briefly described: (1) policy; (2) background; (3) strategy; (4) strategic considerations and concerns; (5) domestic program inplications, and (6) implementation. The current US activities are reviewed. Some of our present program needs are outlined

  13. A fusion engineering program for Canada

    Billington, I.J.

    In 1980 the National Research Council asked DSMA ATCON Ltd., in collaboration with Ontario Hydro, the University of Toronto, and McMaster University, to evaluate concepts for a national fusion engineering program, to define a facility that could be constructed in Canada to meet the program goals, and to suggest a strategy for encouraging industrial participation. The central element of the proposed fusion engineering and development program is tritium technology, with additional emphasis on the broader field of all hydrogen isotopes and their interactions with materials. The Canadian program in the initial phase would concentrate on fusion fuel systems, materials development, equipment development, and safety and the environment. A preliminary concept for the facility required has been developed, and key organizational activities identified. The total program costs should be $1 million in the first year, rising to a steady state of $5 million from the fourth year onward. The capital cost of the research facility is estimated to be $20 million spread over three years, and its operating budget around $7 million. The program as envisioned would make use of Canada's existing tritium resources and handling experience to contribute to worldwide fusion research

  14. Materials program for magnetic fusion energy

    Zwilsky, K.M.; Cohen, M.M.; Finfgeld, C.R.; Reuther, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Reactor Materials Program is currently operating at a level of $7.8M. The program is divided into four technical areas which cover both short and long term problems. These are: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance, Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies, Plasma-Materials Interaction, and Special Purpose Materials. A description of the program planning process, the continuing management structure, and the resulting documents is presented

  15. Annual report of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA

    Kubo, Hirotaka; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Isei, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Hiroo; Sato, Satoshi; Shimada, Katsuhiro; Sugie, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008, including those performed in collaboration with other directorates of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. The JT-60U operation regime was extended toward the long sustainment of high normalized beta (β N ) with good confinement (β N =2.6 x 28 s). Effectiveness of real-time control of current profile was demonstrated in high β plasmas. Toroidal momentum diffusivity and the convection velocity were systematically clarified for the first time, and intrinsic rotation due to pressure gradient was discovered. Effects of toroidal rotation and magnetic field ripple on type 1 ELM size and pedestal performance were clarified, and type I ELM control was demonstrated by toroidal rotation control. Variety of inter-machine experiments, such as JT-60U and JET, and domestic collaborations were performed. In theoretical and analytical researches, for the NEXT (Numerical Experiment of Tokamak) project, numerical simulations of a tokamak plasma turbulence progressed and a zonal field generation was investigated. Also, nonlinear MHD simulations found the Alfven resonance effects on the evolution of magnetic islands driven by externally applied perturbations. Integrations of several kinds of element codes progressed in the integrated transport/MHD model, the integrated edge/pedestal model and the integrated SOL/divertor model. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 800 s with 1 MW was demonstrated. Also extracted beam current of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 320 mA at 796 keV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs and R and Ds on Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs were progressed. For

  16. Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Manso, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion is presented. The experimental activity associated with the tokamak ISTTOK as well as the work carried out in the frame of international collaboration are summarized. The main technological features of ISTTOK are described along with studies on microwave reflectometry. Future plans are briefly described

  17. Fusion programs in Applied Plasma Physics

    1992-07-01

    The Applied Plasma Physics (APP) program at General Atomics (GA) described here includes four major elements: (a) Applied Plasma Physics Theory Program, (b) Alpha Particle Diagnostic, (c) Edge and Current Density Diagnostic, and (d) Fusion User Service Center (USC). The objective of the APP theoretical plasma physics research at GA is to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments and to significantly advance our ability to design a commercially-attractive fusion reactor. We categorize our efforts in three areas: magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria and stability; plasma transport with emphasis on H-mode, divertor, and boundary physics; and radio frequency (rf). The objective of the APP alpha particle diagnostic is to develop diagnostics of fast confined alpha particles using the interactions with the ablation cloud surrounding injected pellets and to develop diagnostic systems for reacting and ignited plasmas. The objective of the APP edge and current density diagnostic is to first develop a lithium beam diagnostic system for edge fluctuation studies on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). The objective of the Fusion USC is to continue to provide maintenance and programming support to computer users in the GA fusion community. The detailed progress of each separate program covered in this report period is described in the following sections

  18. Fusion Simulation Program Definition. Final report

    Cary, John R.

    2012-01-01

    We have completed our contributions to the Fusion Simulation Program Definition Project. Our contributions were in the overall planning with concentration in the definition of the area of Software Integration and Support. We contributed to the planning of multiple meetings, and we contributed to multiple planning documents

  19. Laser Program annual report, 1985

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1986-11-01

    This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately

  20. Laser Program annual report, 1985

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1986-11-01

    This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately.

  1. Fusion Research Center, theory program. Progress report

    1982-01-01

    The Texas FRC theory program is directed primarily toward understanding the initiation, heating, and confinement of tokamak plasmas. It supports and complements the experimental programs on the TEXT and PRETEXT devices, as well as providing information generally applicable to the national tokamak program. A significant fraction of the Center's work has been carried out in collaboration with, or as a part of, the program of the Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS). During the past twelve months, 14 FRC theory reports and 12 IFS reports with partial FRC support have been issued

  2. LLL magnetic fusion energy program: an overview

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Over the last 12 months, significant progress has been made in the LLL magnetic fusion energy program. In the 2XIIB experiment, a tenfold improvement was achieved in the plasma confinement factor (the product of plasma density and confinement time), pushed plasma temperature and pressure to values never before reached in a magnetic fusion experiment, and demonstrated--for the first time--plasma startup by neutral beam injection. A new laser-pellet startup technique for Baseball IIT has been successfully tested and is now being incorporated in the experiment. Technological improvements have been realized, such as a breakthrough in fabricating niobium-tin conductors for superconducting magnets. These successes, together with complementary progress in theory and reactor design, have led to a proposal to build the MX facility, which could be on the threshold of a mirror fusion reactor

  3. Suggestions for an updated fusion power program

    Clarke, J.F.

    1976-02-01

    This document contains suggestions for a revised CTR Program strategy which should allow us to achieve equivalent goals while operating within the above constraints. The revised program is designed around three major facilities. The first is an upgrading of the present TFTR facility which will provide a demonstration of the generation of tens of megawatts electric equivalent originally envisioned for the 1985 EPR. The second device is the TTAP which will allow the integration and optimization of the plasma physics results obtained from the next generation of plasma physics experiments. The improvement in tokamak reactor operation resulting from this optimization of fusion plasma performance will enable an EPR to be designed which will produce several hundred megawatts of electric power by 1990. This will move the fusion program much closer to its goal of commercial fusion power by the turn of the century. In addition to this function the TTAP will serve as a prototype of the 1990 EPR system, thus making more certain the successful operation of this device. The third element of this revised program is an intense radiation damage facility which will provide the radiation damage information necessary for the EPR and subsequent fusion reactor facilities. The sum total of experience gained from reacting plasma experiments on TFTR, reactor grade plasma optimization and technological prototyping on TTAP, and end of life radiation damage results from the intense neutron facility will solve all of the presently foreseen problems associated with a tokamak fusion power reactor except those associated with the external nuclear systems. These external system problems such as tritium breeding and optimal power recovery can be developed in parallel on the 1990 EPR

  4. Review of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program

    none,

    2004-03-29

    Igniting fusion fuel in the laboratory remains an alluring goal for two reasons: the desire to study matter under the extreme conditions needed for fusion burn, and the potential of harnessing the energy released as an attractive energy source for mankind. The inertial confinement approach to fusion involves rapidly compressing a tiny spherical capsule of fuel, initially a few millimeters in radius, to densities and temperatures higher than those in the core of the sun. The ignited plasma is confined solely by its own inertia long enough for a significant fraction of the fuel to burn before the plasma expands, cools down and the fusion reactions are quenched. The potential of this confinement approach as an attractive energy source is being studied in the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program, which is the subject of this report. A complex set of interrelated requirements for IFE has motivated the study of novel potential solutions. Three types of “drivers” for fuel compression are presently studied: high-averagepower lasers (HAPL), heavy-ion (HI) accelerators, and Z-Pinches. The three main approaches to IFE are based on these drivers, along with the specific type of target (which contains the fuel capsule) and chamber that appear most promising for a particular driver.

  5. Review of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program

    2004-01-01

    Igniting fusion fuel in the laboratory remains an alluring goal for two reasons: the desire to study matter under the extreme conditions needed for fusion burn, and the potential of harnessing the energy released as an attractive energy source for mankind. The inertial confinement approach to fusion involves rapidly compressing a tiny spherical capsule of fuel, initially a few millimeters in radius, to densities and temperatures higher than those in the core of the sun. The ignited plasma is confined solely by its own inertia long enough for a significant fraction of the fuel to burn before the plasma expands, cools down and the fusion reactions are quenched. The potential of this confinement approach as an attractive energy source is being studied in the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program, which is the subject of this report. A complex set of interrelated requirements for IFE has motivated the study of novel potential solutions. Three types of @@@drivers@@@ for fuel compression are presently studied: high-averagepower lasers (HAPL), heavy-ion (HI) accelerators, and Z-Pinches. The three main approaches to IFE are based on these drivers, along with the specific type of target (which contains the fuel capsule) and chamber that appear most promising for a particular driver.

  6. Assessment of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Final Report

    2001-01-01

    An assessment of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) program with guidance for future program strategy. The overall objective of this study is to prepare an independent assessment of the scientific quality of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program at the Department of Energy. The Fusion Science Assessment Committee (FuSAC) has been appointed to conduct this study

  7. Nuclear fusion project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    Kast, G.

    1987-05-01

    This semi-annual report gives 36 short descriptions of the work done in the framework of the Nuclear Fusion Project and outlines studies for NET/INTOR and for ECRH power sources at 150 GHz. Tables of fusion technology contracts, of NET contracts, of KfK departments contributing to the Fusion Project, and of the Fusion Project management staff complete this report. (GG)

  8. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Fifth annual report

    1981-01-01

    In this and previous efforts, ECON has provided economic assessment of a fusion research program. This phase of study has focused on the future markets for fusion energy and the economics of fusion in those markets. These tasks were performed: (1) fusion market growth, (2) inflation vs. capital investment decisions, and (3) economics of cogeneration

  9. Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of India

    Sen, Abhijit

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fusion energy program of India started in the early eighties with the construction of an indigenous tokamak device ADITYA at the Institute for Plasma Research in Gandhinagar. The initial thrust was on fundamental studies related to plasma instabilities and turbulence phenomena but there was also a significant emphasis on technology development in the areas of magnetics, high vacuum, radio-frequency heating and neutral beam technology. The program took a major leap forward in the late nineties with the decision to build a state-of-the-art superconducting tokamak (SST-1) that catapulted India into the mainstream of the international tokamak research effort. The SST experience and the associated technological and human resource development has now earned the country a place in the ITER collaboration as an equal partner with other major nations. Keeping in mind the rapidly growing and enormous energy needs of the future the program has also identified and launched key development projects that can lead us to a DEMO reactor and eventually a Fusion Power Plant in a systematic manner. I will give a brief overview of the early origins, the present status and some of the highlights of the future road map of the Indian Fusion Program. (author)

  10. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report; ANNUAL

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community

  11. Fusion yearbook. Association Euratom-Tekes Annual report 2011

    Airila, M.; Karttunen, S. (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    This Annual Report summarises the fusion research activities of the Finnish and Estonian Research Units of the Association Euratom-Tekes in 2011. The emphasis of EFDA is in exploiting JET and co-ordinating physics research in the Associations. In addition, emerging technology and goal oriented training (GOT) activities are under EFDA. R and D Grants for the Joint Undertaking 'Fusion for Energy' on remote handling for ITER divertor maintenance and MEMS magnetometer development constituted a significant fraction of the total research volume. The activities of the Research Unit are divided in the fusion physics under the Contract of Association and EFDA. The physics work is carried out at VTT, Aalto University (AU), University of Helsinki and University of Tartu. The research areas of the EFDA Workprogramme within Association Euratom-Tekes are (i) Heat and particle transport and fast particle studies, (ii) Plasma-wall interactions and material transport in SOL region, and (iii) Code development and diagnostics. Association Euratom-Tekes participated in the EFDA JET Workprogramme 2011, including C28 experiments with the ITER-like wall, diagnostics development and code integration. Two persons were seconded to the JET operating team, one physicist (codes and modelling) and one engineer (remote handling) in preparation of the ITER-like wall. The Association participated also in the 2011 experimental programmes of ASDEX Upgrade at IPP, DIII-D at GA and C-Mod at MIT. The technology work is carried out at VTT, Aalto University, Tampere University of Technology (TUT) and Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) in close collaboration with Finnish industry. Industrial participation is co-ordinated by Tekes. The technology research and development includes the DTP2 facility at VTT Tampere, materials and joining techniques, vessel/in-vessel components, magnetic diagnostics by micromechanical magnetometers for ITER, upgrading of the JET NPA diagnostics, Power Plant

  12. Fusion yearbook. Association Euratom-Tekes Annual report 2011

    Airila, M.; Karttunen, S.

    2012-01-01

    This Annual Report summarises the fusion research activities of the Finnish and Estonian Research Units of the Association Euratom-Tekes in 2011. The emphasis of EFDA is in exploiting JET and co-ordinating physics research in the Associations. In addition, emerging technology and goal oriented training (GOT) activities are under EFDA. R and D Grants for the Joint Undertaking 'Fusion for Energy' on remote handling for ITER divertor maintenance and MEMS magnetometer development constituted a significant fraction of the total research volume. The activities of the Research Unit are divided in the fusion physics under the Contract of Association and EFDA. The physics work is carried out at VTT, Aalto University (AU), University of Helsinki and University of Tartu. The research areas of the EFDA Workprogramme within Association Euratom-Tekes are (i) Heat and particle transport and fast particle studies, (ii) Plasma-wall interactions and material transport in SOL region, and (iii) Code development and diagnostics. Association Euratom-Tekes participated in the EFDA JET Workprogramme 2011, including C28 experiments with the ITER-like wall, diagnostics development and code integration. Two persons were seconded to the JET operating team, one physicist (codes and modelling) and one engineer (remote handling) in preparation of the ITER-like wall. The Association participated also in the 2011 experimental programmes of ASDEX Upgrade at IPP, DIII-D at GA and C-Mod at MIT. The technology work is carried out at VTT, Aalto University, Tampere University of Technology (TUT) and Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) in close collaboration with Finnish industry. Industrial participation is co-ordinated by Tekes. The technology research and development includes the DTP2 facility at VTT Tampere, materials and joining techniques, vessel/in-vessel components, magnetic diagnostics by micromechanical magnetometers for ITER, upgrading of the JET NPA diagnostics, Power Plant Physics

  13. Fusion Yearbook. 2008 Annual report Association Euratom-Tekes

    Nora, M.; Karttunen, S.

    2009-05-01

    This Annual Report summarises the fusion research activities of the Finnish and Estonian Research Units of the Association Euratom-Tekes in 2008. The activities of the Research Unit are divided in the fusion physics under the Contract of Association and new EFDA. A few EFDA Technology Tasks and Contracts were still running in 2008 and are now completed. New R and D Grant work on remote handling for ITER launched by the Joint Undertaking 'Fusion for Energy' started in 2008. The Physics Programme is carried out at VTT - Technical Research Centre of Finland, Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) and University of Helsinki (UH). The research areas of the Physics Programme are: (i) Heat and particle transport, MHD physics and plasma edge phenomena, (ii) Plasma-wall interactions and material transport in SOL region, and (iii) Code development and diagnostics. Association Euratom-Tekes participated actively in the EFDA JET Workprogramme 2008 and exploitation of JET facilities in experimental campaigns C20-C25. Three persons were seconded to the UKAEA operating team, two physicists in codes and modelling and one engineer in remote handling. One person was a Task Force Leader in TF T (transport). One engineer from VTT was seconded to the ITER IO at Cadarache in 2008 (Assembly). Practically all physics activities of the Research Unit are carried out in co-operation with other Associations with the focus on EFDA JET work. In addition to EFDA JET activities, the Tekes Association participated in the 2008 experimental programme of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). Several staff mobility visits of total 530 days took place in 2008. The Technology work is carried out at VTT, Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), Tampere University of Technology (TUT) and Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) in close collaboration with Finnish industry. The technology research and development is focused on the remote handling, vessel/in-vessel materials and components plus some activities in

  14. Annual report of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research, JAERI

    1977-02-01

    The JFT-2 operating regime was extended to higher toroidal field of 18 kG. Plasma confinements were studied on impurities, instabilities, plasma-wall interaction. Properties of a plasma with a separatrix magnetic surface and plasma behaviour in the scrape-off layer were studied in JFT-2a. In the diagnostics, a grazing-incidence vacuum ultra-violet spectrometer for studies on impurities was completed and put into operation. Several minor improvement and remodelling on the JFT-2 and JFT-2a tokamaks were carried out for the convenience of operation. In the plasma heating, constructions of the JFT-2 neutral injection system and the injector test stand ITS-2 for development of the higher energy ion source were started. The design of 200 kW RF power source for the plasma heating in JFT-2 was also made. Research in surface effects in fusion devices started at April 1, 1975. Experimental apparatus was designed and constructed in this fiscal year. A group for superconducting magnet development for fusion device was set up in January, 1976. Theoretical works continued in the analyses on transport processes, plasma heating, and mhd stabilities with an increasing effort on computational studies. A preliminary design of the 100 MW sub(t) tokamak experimental fusion reactor has been started in April, 1975. At the same time a conceptual design of the 2000 MW sub(t) power reactor was further improved. In the development of large tokamak device of next generation, programs on JT-60 and JT-4 are being carried out. Research and development works and detailed design studies on JT-60 are started based on the preliminary design studies made in the previous year. Preliminary design studies on JT-4 are completed. (auth.)

  15. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  16. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  17. Strategic plan for the restructured US fusion energy sciences program

    1996-08-01

    This plan reflects a transition to a restructured fusion program, with a change in focus from an energy technology development program to a fusion energy sciences program. Since the energy crisis of the early 1970's, the U.S. fusion program has presented itself as a goal- oriented fusion energy development program, with milestones that required rapidly increasing budgets. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 also called for a goal-oriented development program consistent with the Department's planning. Actual funding levels, however, have forced a premature narrowing of the program to the tokamak approach. By 1995, with no clear, immediate need driving the schedule for developing fusion energy and with enormous pressure to reduce discretionary spending, Congress cut fusion program funding for FY 1996 by one-third and called for a major restructuring of the program. Based on the recommendations of the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC), the Department has decided to pursue a program that concentrates on world-class plasma, science, and on maintaining an involvement in fusion energy science through international collaboration. At the same time, the Japanese and Europeans, with energy situations different from ours, are continuing with their goal- oriented fusion programs. Collaboration with them provides a highly leveraged means of continued involvement in fusion energy science and technology, especially through participation in the engineering and design activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor program, ITER. This restructured fusion energy sciences program, with its focus on fundamental fusion science and technology, may well provide insights that lead to more attractive fusion power plants, and will make use of the scientific infrastructure that will allow the United States to launch a fusion energy development program at some future date

  18. Maryland controlled fusion research program. Volume I

    1985-01-01

    This renewal proposal describes the University of Maryland research program on Magnetic Fusion Energy for a three-year period beginning January 1, 1986. This program consists of five tasks: (I) Plasma Theory; (II) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics for Mirror Machines; (III) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on TFTR; (IV) Atomic Physics; and (V) Magnetic Field Measurement by Ion Beams. The four separate tasks of continuing research (Tasks I to IV) and the new experimental task (Task V) are described in detail. The task descriptions contain estimated budgets for CY 86, 87, and 88

  19. Environmental Planning and Ecology Program Annual Report.

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  20. The restructured fusion program and the role of alternative fusion concepts

    Perkins, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    This testimony to the subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the U.S. House of Representatives's Committee on Science pushes for about 25% of the fusion budget to go to alternative fusion concepts. These concepts are: low density magnetic confinement, inertial confinement fusion, high density magnetic confinement, and non- thermonuclear and miscellaneous programs. Various aspects of each of these concepts are outlined

  1. Fusion

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  2. Laser program annual report, 1979

    Coleman, L.W.; Strack, J.R.

    1980-03-01

    This volume provides a program overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the program, as well as discussions of program resources and facilities. Also covered are the work of the Solid-State Laser program element, which includes systems operations, Nova, and research and development activities

  3. Laser program annual report, 1979

    Coleman, L.W.; Strack, J.R. (eds.)

    1980-03-01

    This volume provides a program overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the program, as well as discussions of program resources and facilities. Also covered are the work of the Solid-State Laser program element, which includes systems operations, Nova, and research and development activities. (MOW)

  4. Fusion program. The interest for the industry

    Dominguez Bautista, M. T.

    2007-01-01

    On November 21, 2006, the ministers representing all the parties taking part in ITER (EU, china, India, Japan, Rusia, USA and south Korea signed the so-called ITER agreement, thereby affirming the decision to build this fusion energy demonstration experiment. As of that moment, each partner has been preparing its Domestic Agency that will manage its contribution. Europe will play a relevant role in this facility, the site of which is located in Cadarache, and will provide 50% of its investment. This leading role of Europe is the continuation of years of decisive support for the fusion program. In successive Framework Programs of EURATOM, resources have been allotted to fusion and projects have been executed with specific organizations to coordinate them (EFDA). One of the most significant decision to accomplish this coordination was to involve the industry; in 1994, the ITER EDA Framework Contract was signed to develop the ITER engineering. Since then the EFET group, formed by seven European engineering firms including Empresarios Agrupados and Sener, has developed design work for ITER. together with these engineering activities, engineering firms and manufacturers were qualified to develop prototypes as apart of the so-called 17-technology program. these decisions have made it possible to provide ITER with the industry experience in the execution of large projects and have provided industry with a knowledge of this facility features. Now the time has come to execute the project, and the challenge will be to know how to take advantage of the experience gained by Europe. This article discusses in greater detail the areas to which the European industry has contributed and the expected conditions for this participation. (Author)

  5. Laser program annual report, 1980

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R. (eds.)

    1981-06-01

    Volume 2 contains five sections that cover the areas of target design, target fabrication, diagnostics, and fusion experiments. Section 3 reports on target design activities, plasma theory and simulation, code development, and atomic theory. Section 4 presents the accomplishments of the Target Fabrication Group, Section 5 contains the results of our diagnostics development, and Section 6 describes advances made in the management and analysis of experimental data. Finally, Section 7 in Volume 2 reports the results of laser target experiments conducted during the year.

  6. Laser program annual report, 1980

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Volume 2 contains five sections that cover the areas of target design, target fabrication, diagnostics, and fusion experiments. Section 3 reports on target design activities, plasma theory and simulation, code development, and atomic theory. Section 4 presents the accomplishments of the Target Fabrication Group, Section 5 contains the results of our diagnostics development, and Section 6 describes advances made in the management and analysis of experimental data. Finally, Section 7 in Volume 2 reports the results of laser target experiments conducted during the year

  7. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  8. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport

  9. Laser program annual report, 1980

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Volume 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2, also in the first volume, covers the work on solid state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations, Nova and Novette system development, and supporting research and development activities

  10. Laser program annual report, 1980

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R. (eds.)

    1981-06-01

    Volume 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2, also in the first volume, covers the work on solid state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations, Nova and Novette system development, and supporting research and development activities.

  11. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety

  12. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

  13. Overview of international fusion technology programs

    Coffman, F.E.; Baublitz, J.E.; Beard, D.S.; Cohen, M.M.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Finfgeld, C.R.; Haas, G.M.; Head, C.R.; Murphy, M.R.; Nardella, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    World fusion technology programs, as well as current progress and future plans for the U.S., are discussed. Regarding conceptual design, the international INTOR tokamak study, the Garching Ignition Test Reactor Study, the U.S. Engineering Test Facility conceptual design, the Argonne National Laboratory Commercial Tokamak Study, mirror conceptual designs, and alternate concepts and applications studies are summarized. With regard to magnetics, progress to date in the large coil program and pulsed coil program is summarized. In the area of plasma heating and fueling and exhaust, work on a new positive ion source research and development program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described, as is negative ion work. Tradeoff considerations for radio-frequency heating alternatives are made, and a new 60-100 GHz electron cyclotron heating research and development program is discussed. Progress and plans for solid hydrogen pellet injector development are analyzed, as are plans for a divertor technology initiative. A brief review of the U.S. alternate applications and environment and safety program is included

  14. Annual review in automatic programming

    Halpern, Mark I; Bolliet, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Computer Science and Technology and their Application is an eight-chapter book that first presents a tutorial on database organization. Subsequent chapters describe the general concepts of Simula 67 programming language; incremental compilation and conversational interpretation; dynamic syntax; the ALGOL 68. Other chapters discuss the general purpose conversational system for graphical programming and automatic theorem proving based on resolution. A survey of extensible programming language is also shown.

  15. Overview of US Fusion Energy Programs: January 1993

    Crandall, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    The US Fusion Program is in open-quotes Transition.close quotes This happens so infrequently that no one knows exactly what to expect; it makes everyone a little skittish. Program leadership does make a difference; Secretary Watkins was a positive force for fusion. Energy Research Director Happer remains in his position and is a positive force for scientific quality. Secretary O'Leary has stated that open-quotes Fusion energy holds great promise as an element of the nation's long-term energy supply.close quotes While new leaders may seek new directions with important implications for fusion, it seems reasonable to expect that, for fusion, such changes are likely to emerge slowly. Thus the assumption now is that the fusion priorities remain unchanged. In the spirit of optimism surrounding the new administration, the Fusion Energy Program's intention is to make as much progress as possible on the course presently established

  16. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004

    Hoshino, Katsumichi; Umeda, Naotaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Nagami, Masayuki

    2004-11-01

    This annual report provides an overview of research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities, during the period from 1 April, 2003 to 31 March, 2004. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, theoretical and analytical plasma researches, research and development of fusion reactor technologies towards ITER and fusion power demonstration plants, and activities in support of ITER design and construction. (J.P.N.)

  17. Energy Program annual report, 1988

    Borg, I.Y.

    1989-07-01

    This report is a summary of work done during FY 1988 (October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988) by the Energy Program of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The program addresses problems relating to supply and utilization of energy in the US. Traditionally the focus of activities has been on long-range technical challenges that are unlikely to be pursued by the private sector. Individual projects making up the Energy Program are divided into three sections in this review: Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, and Nonfossil Energy. (Nonfossil Energy research includes work on geothermal resources and combustion chemistry.)

  18. Magnetic fusion energy annual report, July 1975--September 1976

    Harrison, M.A.; McGregor, C.K.; Gottlieb, L.

    1976-01-01

    Supporting research activities continued to provide the technical basis for future mirror-confinement experiments. The industrial development of a high-current, high-field, high-current-density Nb 3 Sn conductor was the main goal of the superconducting magnet program. Beam direct conversion was being developed as a means of raising the efficiency of neutral-beam production, and plasma direct conversion was shown to work as predicted. Conceptual designs were completed for various types of power reactors. The neutral-beam program progressed in three areas: experimental work, facility construction, and conceptual design. Experiments on the 14-MeV Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) included participation by experimenters from many different institutions. Methods for processing tritium-contaminated wastes were pursued, as were studies of tritiated methane in stainless-steel vessels, the control of tritium in mirror fusion reactors, and the development of titanium tritide targets for the RTNS. The report period witnessed a rapid maturation in ability to describe theoretically the behavior of ion-cyclotron noise in the 2XIIB and the influence of that noise on the confined plasma. The high beta values achieved in 2XIIB prompted much theoretical analysis of the properties of high-beta equilibria and stability, including those of a field-reversed state. Excellent progress was made on the development of computer codes applicable to magnetic-mirror problems, with emphasis on three-dimensional, finite-beta, guiding-center equilibria, field-reversal, and Fokker-Planck codes

  19. Laser program. Annual report, 1978

    Monsler, M.J.; Jarman, B.D. (eds.)

    1979-03-01

    This volume details the year's experiments, data, and analysis. The technology development programs required for the high performance needed in target diagnostic instrumentation and in solid state laser components are reviewed. (MOW)

  20. Laser program. Annual report, 1978

    Monsler, M.J.; Jarman, B.D.

    1979-03-01

    This volume details the year's experiments, data, and analysis. The technology development programs required for the high performance needed in target diagnostic instrumentation and in solid state laser components are reviewed

  1. Progress in fusion technology in the U.S. magnetic fusion program

    Dowling, R.J.; Beard, D.S.; Haas, G.M.; Stone, P.M.; George, T.V.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the major technological achievements that have taken place during the past few years in the U.S. magnetic fusion program which have contributed to the global efforts. The goal has been to establish the scientific and technological base required for fusion energy. To reach this goal the fusion RandD program is focused on four key technical issues: determine the optimum configuration of magnetic confinement systems; determine the properties of burning plasmas; develop materials for fusion systems; and establish the nuclear technology of fusion systems. The objective of the fusion technology efforts has been to develop advanced technologies and provide the necessary support for research of these four issues. This support is provided in a variety of areas such as: high vacuum technology, large magnetic field generation by superconducting and copper coils, high voltage and high current power supplies, electromagnetic wave and particle beam heating systems, plasma fueling, tritium breeding and handling, remote maintenance, energy recovery. The U.S. Fusion Technology Program provides major support or has the primary responsibility in each of the four key technical issues of fusion, as described in the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan of February 1985. This paper has summarized the Technology Program in terms of its activities and progress since the Proceedings of the SOFT Conference in 1984

  2. Remedial action programs annual meeting: Meeting notes

    1987-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office was pleased to host the 1987 Remedial Action programs Annual Meeting and herein presents notes from that meeting as prepared (on relatively short notice) by participants. These notes are a summary of the information derived from the workshops, case studies, and ad hoc committee reports rather than formal proceedings. The order of the materials in this report follows the actual sequence of presentations during the annual meeting

  3. The US fusion materials program: Status and directions

    Doran, D.G.

    1987-05-01

    The general long term objective of the Fusion Materials Program of the Office of Fusion Energy is the development of new or improved materials that will enhance the economic and environmental attractiveness of fusion as an energy source. The US Magnetic Fusion Program Plan, as augmented by the Technical Planning Activity (TPA), calls for information to be developed on critical issues such that a decision can be made by about 2005 on whether to pursue fusion as a viable energy source. Viability will be evaluated in at least four areas: technical, economic, environmental, and safety. The Fusion Materials Program addresses directly only the magnetic confinement option, although some of the information gained is applicable to the alternative approach of inertial confinement. The scope of this paper is limited to programs in which a primary concern is bulk neutron radiation effects, as opposed to those in which the primary concern is interaction of the materials with the plasma. 14 refs

  4. Fusion Programme SCK-CEN - Annual report 2009

    Massaut, V.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the Research and Development work carried out at SCK-CEN on fusion technology in the year 2009. This covers mostly the work done under the EFDA agreement as well as the new developments carried out within the so-called Broader Approach of fusion such as - studies on structural and first wall materials for ITER and DEMO - studies and testing on the radiation resistance of instruments and componenets for the diagnostic and remote handling - development of irradiation devices and systems for the testing of fusion materials under representative environment.

  5. Fusion Programme SCK-CEN - Annual report 2009

    Massaut, V

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes the Research and Development work carried out at SCK-CEN on fusion technology in the year 2009. This covers mostly the work done under the EFDA agreement as well as the new developments carried out within the so-called Broader Approach of fusion such as - studies on structural and first wall materials for ITER and DEMO - studies and testing on the radiation resistance of instruments and componenets for the diagnostic and remote handling - development of irradiation devices and systems for the testing of fusion materials under representative environment.

  6. Leaching Mechanisms Program. Annual report

    Dougherty, D.; Colombo, P.; Doty, R.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1984-09-01

    The primary goal of this work is to determine the leaching mechanisms of a variety of matrix materials either in use or being considered for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes by defense and commercial waste generators. Since this program is new and did not formally begin until May of FY 84, the results reported here are few and preliminary. Efforts were concentrated in the following activities: (1) The literature search for leaching data and proposed leaching models and mechanisms for low-level waste. (2) Data base development for leaching data being compiled from the literature and from the leaching experiments in this program. (3) The selection of solidification agents for the experimental part of the program. (4) Fabrication of leach samples and initiation of leach testing. 28 references, 9 figures, 4 tables

  7. Laser program. Annual report, 1978

    Monsler, M.J.; Jarman, B.D. (eds.)

    1979-03-01

    This volume documents progress in advanced quantum electronics - primarily the quest for advanced rep-rateable short-wavelength lasers with high efficiency. Application studies in electrical energy production and fissile fuel production are also described. Selected highlights of the advanced isotope separation program are also presented. (MOW)

  8. Laser program. Annual report, 1978

    Monsler, M.J.; Jarman, B.D.

    1979-03-01

    This volume documents progress in advanced quantum electronics - primarily the quest for advanced rep-rateable short-wavelength lasers with high efficiency. Application studies in electrical energy production and fissile fuel production are also described. Selected highlights of the advanced isotope separation program are also presented

  9. Purdue Contribution of Fusion Simulation Program

    Jeffrey Brooks

    2011-09-30

    The overall science goal of the FSP is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in research related to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical areas: 1) the plasma edge and 2) whole device modeling including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model (WDM) will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP. The FSP plan targets the needed modeling capabilities by developing Integrated Science Applications (ISAs) specific to their needs. The Pedestal-Boundary model will include boundary magnetic topology, cross-field transport of multi-species plasmas, parallel plasma transport, neutral transport, atomic physics and interactions with the plasma wall

  10. FUSION Yearbook. Association Euratom-Tekes. Annual Report 2004

    Karttunen, S.; Rantamaeki, K.

    2005-05-01

    This report summarises the results of the Tekes FUSION technology programme and the fusion research activities by the Association Euratom-Tekes in 2004. The research areas are fusion physics, plasma engineering, fusion technology and a smaller effort to socioeconomic studies. Fusion technology research is carried out in close collaboration with Finnish industry. The emphasis in fusion physics and plasma engineering is in theoretical and computational studies on turbulent transport and modelling of radio-frequency heating experiments and the real time control of transport barriers in JET plasmas, predictive integrated modelling of tokamak plasmas, and studies on material transport in the edge plasmas supported by surface analysis of the JET divertor and limiter tiles. The work in fusion technology for the EFDA Technology Programme and ITER is strongly focused into vessel/in-vessel materials covering research and characterisation of first wall materials, mechanical testing of reactor materials under neutron irradiation, characterisation of irradiated Ti-alloys, simulations of carbon and tungsten sputtering, joining and welding methods and surface physics studies on plasma facing materials. A second domain of fusion technology consists of remote handling systems including water hydraulic manipulators for the ITER divertor maintenance as well as prototyping of intersector welding and cutting robot. Virtual modelling is an essential element in the remote handling engineering. Preparations to host the ITER divertor test platform (DTP2) were completed in 2004 and the DTP2 facility will be hosted by VTT. Some effort was also devoted to neutronics, socio-economic and power plant studies. Several EFDA technology tasks were successfully completed in 2004. (orig.)

  11. Laser program annual report, 1979

    Coleman, L.W.; Strack, J.R.

    1980-03-01

    Volume 3 comprises three sections, beginning with Section 7 on advanced quantum electronics. Both theoretical and experimental research and development activities on advanced laser concepts in the quest for high efficiency and high repetition rate are presented. Section 8 contains the results of studies by the Energy and Military Applications group. Section 9 presents results from some of the activities of the advanced isotope separation program

  12. Laser program annual report, 1979

    Coleman, L.W.; Strack, J.R. (eds.)

    1980-03-01

    Volume 3 comprises three sections, beginning with Section 7 on advanced quantum electronics. Both theoretical and experimental research and development activities on advanced laser concepts in the quest for high efficiency and high repetition rate are presented. Section 8 contains the results of studies by the Energy and Military Applications group. Section 9 presents results from some of the activities of the advanced isotope separation program. (MOW)

  13. Energy Program annual report, 1991

    Pasternak, A.

    1992-08-01

    The Energy Program emphasizes applied R ampersand D for energy technologies that will be important to the US in the next fifty years and which may be important long after that. Historically, we have focused on coal gasification; the development of alternative liquid fuels from oil shale, coal, and natural gas; transportation uses of electric power from refuelable batteries; geothermal energy; and support of nuclear energy through the development of new technologies for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Our current program addresses three objectives of the National Energy Strategy: (1) To enhance energy security by ensuring stable costs, increasing energy supplies, and developing alternatives to Middle East oil. (2) To improve environmental quality by implementing energy technologies that effect better air and water quality, improve land use, and protect global environmental systems. (3) To encourage economic growth through technologies that reduce the costs of energy production, storage, transport, transmission, and distribution; promote efficiency by reducing costs and end-user services; and strengthen resiliency and flexibility of energy systems. We have just begun a major program to commercialize the technology to extract oil from the large US reserves (greater than 700 billion barrels) of oil shale. Perhaps the single greatest barrier to the public acceptance of nuclear power is the perceived lack of a technical solution to the permanent disposal of wastes. We have developed new concepts that are aimed at improving the likelihood of technical assurance of long-term containment

  14. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  15. Fusion Programme SCK-CEN - Annual Report 2010

    Massaut, V.

    2010-10-15

    In 2010 SCK-CEN centred his activities in fusion Research and Development around four main poles: 1) the studies of the first wall of future DEMO facility and plasma wall interactions, using the recently refurbished plasmatron VISIONI; 2) the study of the radiation resistance of optical and specific diagnostic components and the development and prototyping of a Fiber Optics Current Sensor (FOCS) for measuring Tokamak plasma current for long plasma pulses and without embarked electronics: 3) the further study, by irradiation and mechanical testing but also by modelling, of the future structural material for a fusion plant, the RAFM Eurofer and the development and characterization of ODS-Eurofer; 4) specific fusion socio-economic studies on fusion, based on the specific developments carried out for fusion and radioactive waste management. SCK-CEN is also strongly involved in the Broader Approach agreement as Designated Institution for the Belgian State, having a coordinating and managing role for all Belgian activities in this agreement. The present report is structured following the work programme 2010 of the Association. Some former activities form the old-EFDA have been grouped with new ones in coherent and collaborative packages. Most activities of SCK-CEN are, and have always been, carried out under EFDA task agreements.

  16. Fusion Programme SCK-CEN - Annual Report 2010

    Massaut, V.

    2010-01-01

    In 2010 SCK-CEN centred his activities in fusion Research and Development around four main poles: 1) the studies of the first wall of future DEMO facility and plasma wall interactions, using the recently refurbished plasmatron VISIONI; 2) the study of the radiation resistance of optical and specific diagnostic components and the development and prototyping of a Fiber Optics Current Sensor (FOCS) for measuring Tokamak plasma current for long plasma pulses and without embarked electronics: 3) the further study, by irradiation and mechanical testing but also by modelling, of the future structural material for a fusion plant, the RAFM Eurofer and the development and characterization of ODS-Eurofer; 4) specific fusion socio-economic studies on fusion, based on the specific developments carried out for fusion and radioactive waste management. SCK-CEN is also strongly involved in the Broader Approach agreement as Designated Institution for the Belgian State, having a coordinating and managing role for all Belgian activities in this agreement. The present report is structured following the work programme 2010 of the Association. Some former activities form the old-EFDA have been grouped with new ones in coherent and collaborative packages. Most activities of SCK-CEN are, and have always been, carried out under EFDA task agreements.

  17. Review of the Fusion Theory and Computing Program. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    Antonsen, Thomas M.; Berry, Lee A.; Brown, Michael R.; Dahlburg, Jill P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Greenwald, Martin; Hegna, Chris C.; McCurdy, William; Newman, David E.; Pellegrini, Claudio; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Post, Douglass E.; Rosenbluth, Marshall N.; Sheffield, John; Simonen, Thomas C.; Van Dam, James

    2001-01-01

    At the November 14-15, 2000, meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, a Panel was set up to address questions about the Theory and Computing program, posed in a charge from the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (see Appendix A). This area was of theory and computing/simulations had been considered in the FESAC Knoxville meeting of 1999 and in the deliberations of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) in 2000. A National Research Council committee provided a detailed review of the scientific quality of the fusion energy sciences program, including theory and computing, in 2000.

  18. Overview of the USA inertial fusion program

    Kahalas, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    The next step in the USA inertial fusion program is to begin planning for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility or LMF. The LMF would have an output energy of between 200 and 1000 MJ, the latter energy being equivalent to a quarter ton of high explosive, with an input driver energy of 5-10 MJ. This implies a high target gain, 100-200 or more, with either a laser or particle beam driver. The LMF would cost a half billion to a billion dollars and would require a serious commitment by the country and the Department of Energy. The Department is in the stage of preliminary planning for an LMF and beginning a process by which a driver selection can be made in the fiscal year 1991-1992 timeframe. Construction initiation will require that a departmental decision be made as well as appropriation of funds within the Congressional funding cycle. In this paper, we review recent progress leading to the new USA program planning for the next facility and describe the status of this preliminary planning as well as characteristics of the LMF. (orig.)

  19. Annual report for the steering committee of the association Euratom-Belgian State for fusion 1996

    Moons, F.; Bogaerts, W.; Decreton, M.; Biver, E.; Coenen, S.; Benoit, Ph.; Coheur, L.; Deboodt, P.; Andreev, D.

    1996-09-01

    This report is prepared for the annual steering committee meting of the Association Euratom - Belgian State for Fusion. The period October 1995 to September 1996 is reported on.The fusion technology work performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN, the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering of the Louvain University (Belgium) and S.A. Gradel, a Luxemburg company, is described

  20. Annual report for the steering committee of the association Euratom-Belgian State for fusion 1996

    Moons, F.; Bogaerts, W.; Decreton, M.; Biver, E.; Coenen, S.; Benoit, Ph.; Coheur, L.; Deboodt, P.; Andreev, D.

    1996-09-01

    This report is prepared for the annual steering committee meting of the Association Euratom - Belgian State for Fusion. The period October 1995 to September 1996 is reported on.The fusion technology work performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN, the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering of the Louvain University (Belgium) and S.A. Gradel, a Luxemburg company, is described.

  1. Advanced fusion technology research and development. Annual report to the U.S. Department of Energy

    2001-01-01

    OAK-B135 The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility, the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility. The report summarizes GA's FY00 work in the areas of Fusion Power Plant Studies, Next Step Options, Advanced Liquid Plasma Facing Surfaces, Advanced Power Extraction Study, Plasma Interactive Materials, Radiation Testing of Magnetic Coil, Vanadium Component Demonstration, RF Technology, Inertial Fusion Energy Target Supply System, ARIES Integrated System Studies, and Spin-offs Brochure. The work in these areas continues to address many of the issues that must be resolved for the successful construction and operation of next-generation experiments and, ultimately, the development of safe, reliable, economic fusion power plants

  2. Theoretical atomic physics for fusion. 1994 Annual Report

    Pindzola, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    The understanding of electron-ion collision processes in plasmas remains a key factor in the ultimate development of nuclear fusion as a viable energy source for the nation. The author's 1993-1994 research proposal delineated several areas of research in electron-ion scattering theory. In the paragraphs below the author summarizes 1994 efforts

  3. The U.S. program for fusion nuclear technology development

    Clarke, J.F.; Haas, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT) research and development program in the United States is shaped by a hierarchy of documents and by the environment for nuclear energy existing in the United States. The fission nuclear industry in the United States has suffered problems with public perception of safety, waste disposal issues, and economics as influenced by safety and environmental issues. For fusion to be a viable energy alternative, it must offer significant improvements in these areas. The hierarchy of documents defining objectives, plans, and strategy of the U.S. FNT program consists of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan (MFPP) (February 1985), the Technical Planning Activity Final Report (January 1987), the Finesse Program Report (January 1987), and the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study Final Report (September 1984). In addition, two other documents are also significant in shaping FNT policy. These are the IEA report on Material for Fusion (December 1986) and the Summary of the Report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (September 1987). The U.S. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan defines four key technical issues (magnetic confinement systems, properties of burning plasmas, fusion nuclear technology, and fusion materials). (orig./KP)

  4. FFUSION yearbook 1997. Annual report of the Finnish fusion research unit. Association EURATOM-TEKES

    Karttunen, S; Paettikangas, T [eds.; VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-02-01

    Finnish fusion programme (FFUSION) is one of the eleven national energy research programmes funded by the Technological Development Centre of Finland (TEKES). The FFUSION programme was fully integrated into European Fusion Programme just after Finland joined the European Union. The contract of Association Euratom and Tekes was signed in 1995 and extends to the end of 1999. Finland became a member of JET Joint Undertaking in 1996, other contracts with Euratom include NET agreement and the Staff Mobility Agreement. FFUSION programme with participating research institutes and universities forms the Fusion Research Unit of the Association Euratom-Tekes. This annual report summarises the research activities of the Finnish Research Unit in 1997. The programme consists of two parts: Physics and Technology. The research areas of the physics are: Fusion plasma engineering, and Radio-frequency heating and Plasma diagnostics. The technology is focused into three areas: Fusion reactor materials (first wall components and joining techniques), Remote handling and viewing systems, and Superconductors

  5. Fusion technology development annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    1997-03-01

    In FY96, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the magnetic fusion program. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Design Studies (Section 2), Plasma Interactive Materials (Section 3), SiC/SiC Composite Material Development (Section 4), Magnetic Diagnostic Probes (Section 5) and RF Technology (Section 6). Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA's fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to ITER and other next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, the authors carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. They continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry

  6. Industry perspectives on future directions in the fusion program

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Bell, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Industry is the ultimate recipient of the product of the fusion development program. However, budget trends are causing the program to lose it's focus on the energy goal, thus diminishing opportunities for a meaningful industrial role at a time when technical progress has been remarkable and scientific feasibility is being demonstrated. The findings of the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee Panel charged to report on industrial participation in fusion energy development are summarized. A recommendation of this panel was to increase intellectual involvement of industry in the development of fusion. Opportunities to achieve this include forming partnerships with national laboratories and universities, assigning industry responsibility for a complete scope of work, and assigning industry a major role in system studies and reactor design. These opportunities can be implemented without requiring large budget increases. Increasing the involvement of industry in the fusion program will provide both long and short-term benefits

  7. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators

  8. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  9. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics

  10. Historical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program

    Dean, Stephen O.

    2005-01-01

    Progress and Policy is traced over the approximately 55 year history of the U. S. Fusion Program. The classified beginnings of the effort in the 1950s ended with declassification in 1958. The effort struggled during the 1960s, but ended on a positive note with the emergence of the tokamak and the promise of laser fusion. The decade of the 1970s was the 'Golden Age' of fusion, with large budget increases and the construction of many new facilities, including the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Shiva laser. The decade ended on a high note with the passage of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, overwhelming approved by Congress and signed by President Carter. The Act called for a '$20 billion, 20 year' effort aimed at construction of a fusion Demonstration Power Plant around the end of the century. The U. S. Magnetic Fusion Energy program has been on a downhill slide since 1980, both in terms of budgets and the construction of new facilities. The Inertial Confinement Fusion program, funded by Department of Energy Defense Programs, has faired considerably better, with the construction of many new facilities, including the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

  11. Role of supercomputers in magnetic fusion and energy research programs

    Killeen, J.

    1985-06-01

    The importance of computer modeling in magnetic fusion (MFE) and energy research (ER) programs is discussed. The need for the most advanced supercomputers is described, and the role of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in meeting these needs is explained

  12. From patronage to partnership: Toward a new industrial policy for the fusion program

    Miller, B.

    1992-01-01

    The genesis of the overall assessment can be found in a February 1992 letter to the Department's Director of Research from the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) which suggested that the current level of industrial involvement in the fusion program is less than that needed to keep it actively involved for the long term. Specifically, FEAC recommended that open-quotes[in order] to provide U.S. industry with knowledge of fusion requirements and to secure the maximum benefit from industrial involvement, DOE should develop a plan that deliberately includes a broader and more integral industrial participation in the fusion program.close quotes This is another way of expressing the generally felt concern that after 30 years of waiting for some signal of a national commitment to the program, industry interest in it is flagging. Consider the following evidence. There is not significant investor-owner or public utility interest in the program at this time. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which once was committed to the idea of fusion as the long-term solution to our energy needs, now sees it playing no part in meeting the nation's long-term electrical energy demand. In its most recent annual report, it makes no mention of fusion as a future utility option, effectively consigning it to the role of perennial bridesmaid. Things are little better on the vendor side of industry that has provided the bulk of all industrial involvement in the program. In the final analysis they are profit making entities and must pay attention to the bottom-line of even their speculative research and development efforts or eventually abandon them. In short, there is no operative government policy on industrial involvement in the fusion program, only an unwritten guideline that industry growth will follow growth in the laboratory or core programs in good times and industry contraction will precede core contraction in bad times

  13. Neutral beam systems for the magnetic fusion program

    Beal, J.W.; Staten, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    The attainment of economic, safe fusion power has been described as the most sophisticated scientific problem ever attacked by mankind. The presently established goal of the magnetic fusion program is to develop and demonstrate pure fusion central electric power stations for commercial applications. Neutral beam heating systems are a basic component of the tokamak and mirror experimental fusion plasma confinement devices. The requirements placed upon neutral beam heating systems are reviewed. The neutral beam systems in use or being developed are presented. Finally, the needs of the future are discussed

  14. Fusion reactors: physics and technology. Annual progress report

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-08-01

    Fusion reactors are designed to operate at full power and generally at steady state. Yet experience shows the load variations, licensing constraints, and frequent sub-system failures often require a plant to operate at fractions of rated power. The aim of this study has been to assess the technology problems and design implications of startup and fractional power operation on fusion reactors. The focus of attention has been tandem mirror reactors (TMR) and we have concentrated on the plasma and blanket engineering for startup and fractional power operation. In this report, we first discuss overall problems of startup, shutdown and staged power operation and their influence on TMR design. We then present a detailed discussion of the plasma physics associated with TMR startup and various means of achieving staged power operation. We then turn to the issue of instrumentation and safety controls for fusion reactors. Finally we discuss the limits on transient power variations during startup and shutdown of Li 17 Pb 83 cooled blankets

  15. Optimization of the annual construction program solutions

    Oleinik Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers potentially possible optimization solutions in scheduling while forming the annual production programs of the construction complex organizations. The optimization instrument is represented as a two-component system. As a fundamentally new approach in the first block of the annual program solutions, the authors propose to use a scientifically grounded methodology for determining the scope of work permissible for the transfer to a subcontractor without risk of General Contractor’s management control losing over the construction site. For this purpose, a special indicator is introduced that characterizes the activity of the general construction organization - the coefficient of construction production management. In the second block, the principal methods for the formation of calendar plans for the fulfillment of the critical work effort by the leading stream are proposed, depending on the intensity characteristic.

  16. Theoretical atomic physics for fusion. 1995 annual report

    Pindzola, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The understanding of electron-ion collision processes in plasmas remains a key factor in the ultimate development of nuclear fusion as a viable energy source for the nation. The 1993--1995 research proposal delineated several areas of research in electron-ion scattering theory. In this report the author summarizes his efforts in 1995. The main areas of research are: (1) electron-impact excitation of atomic ions; (2) electron-impact ionization of atomic ions; and (3) electron-impact recombination of atomic ions

  17. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory heavy ion fusion program

    Bangerter, R.O.; Lee, E.P.; Monsler, M.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1978-01-01

    Target design at LLL for heavy ion fusion power production is discussed, including target development and beam-target interaction. The energy conversion chamber design, which utilizes a liquid lithium blanket, is described. Ion beam transport theory is discussed

  18. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  19. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  20. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities

  1. Space Program Annual Report, For Approval

    TM Schaefer

    2004-01-01

    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) (lead) has been requested by the Reference to create an unclassified report on the Prometheus Program's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. This report is expected to be issued annually and be similar in level of content and scope to the NR Program's annual report ''The United States Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program'' (referred to as the Grey Book). The attachment to this letter provides a draft of the Prometheus Program report for NR review and approval. As stated in the Reference, a March 2005 issuance is planned following a coordinated NR Headquarter's review. The information contained in the attached report was obtained from open literature sources, NASA documents and Naval Reactors Program literature. The photographs contained in the report are drafts and their quality will be improved in the final version of the report. This report has been reviewed by the KAPL and Bettis Space Power Plant Staff and has been concurred with by the Manager of Space Power Plant (MJ Wollman) and the Manager of Bettis Reactor Engineering (C Eshelman)

  2. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2011 - March 2012

    2012-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2011 and March 2012. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)

  3. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2009 - March 2010

    2010-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2009 and March 2010. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)

  4. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2012 - March 2013

    2013-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2012 and March 2013. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)

  5. The status of the federal magnetic fusion program, or fusion in transition: from science to technology

    Kane, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of magnetic fusion is summarized. The science is in place; the application must be made. Government will have to underwrite the risk of the program, but the private sector must manage it. Government officials must be convinced fusion is in the interest of the taxpayer, private sector decision makers that it is commercial. Questions concerning reliability, availability, first cost, safety, environment, and sociology must be asked. Fusion energy is essentially inexhaustible, appears environmentally acceptable, and is one of a very short list of alternatives

  6. The international magnetic fusion energy program

    Fowler, T.K.

    1988-10-06

    In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  7. The international magnetic fusion energy program

    Fowler, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs

  8. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1983

    1984-09-01

    The Fusion Program carries out work in a number of areas: (1) experimental and theoretical research on two magnetic confinement concepts - the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) and the tokamak, (2) theoretical and engineering studies on a third concept - the stellarator, (3) engineering and physics of present-generation fusion devices, (4) development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques, (5) development and testing of materials for fusion devices, (6) development and testing of the essential technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, (7) development and testing of the superconducting magnets that will be needed to confine these plasmas, (8) design of future devices, (9) assessment of the environmental impact of fusion energy, and (10) assembly and distribution to the fusion community of data bases on atomic physics and radiation effects. The interactions between these activities and their integration into a unified program are major factors in the success of the individual activities, and the ORNL Fusion Program strives to maintain a balance among these activities that will lead to continued growth

  9. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1983

    1984-09-01

    The Fusion Program carries out work in a number of areas: (1) experimental and theoretical research on two magnetic confinement concepts - the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) and the tokamak, (2) theoretical and engineering studies on a third concept - the stellarator, (3) engineering and physics of present-generation fusion devices, (4) development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques, (5) development and testing of materials for fusion devices, (6) development and testing of the essential technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, (7) development and testing of the superconducting magnets that will be needed to confine these plasmas, (8) design of future devices, (9) assessment of the environmental impact of fusion energy, and (10) assembly and distribution to the fusion community of data bases on atomic physics and radiation effects. The interactions between these activities and their integration into a unified program are major factors in the success of the individual activities, and the ORNL Fusion Program strives to maintain a balance among these activities that will lead to continued growth.

  10. Drinking Water Program 1992 annual report

    Andersen, B.D.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.

    1993-08-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., initiated a monitoring program for drinking water in 1988 for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. EG ampersand G Idaho structured this monitoring program to ensure that they exceeded the minimum regulatory requirements for monitoring drinking water. This program involves tracking the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters that are required for a open-quotes community water systemclose quotes (maximum requirements). This annual report describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at the 17 EG ampersand G Idaho operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters that were detected and the regulatory limits that were exceeded during 1992. In addition, ground water quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for EG ampersand G Idaho production wells

  11. Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989

    Summers, K A [ed.

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

  12. Annual report for the steering committee of the association Euratom-Belgian State for fusion 1998

    Decreton, M

    1998-10-01

    This report is prepared for the annual steering committee meting of the Association Euratom - Belgian State in the area of fusion reactor technology. The Belgian contribution focuses on the assessment of the first wall and blanket materials under radiation and coolant interaction and on developments for the remote handling in maintenance activities. The period October 1997 to September 1998 is reported on.The fusion technology work performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN, the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering of the Louvain University (Belgium) and S.A. Gradel, a Luxemburg-based organisation, is described.

  13. Annual report for the steering committee of the association Euratom-Belgian State for fusion 1999

    Decreton, M

    1999-10-01

    This report is prepared for the annual steering committee meting of the Association Euratom - Belgian State in the area of fusion reactor technology. The Belgian contribution focuses on the assessment of the first wall and blanket materials under radiation and coolant interaction and on developments for the remote handling in maintenance activities. The period October 1998 to September 1999 is reported on.The fusion technology work performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN, the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering of the Louvain University (Belgium) and S.A. Gradel, a Luxemburg-based organisation, is described.

  14. Annual report for the steering committee of the association Euratom-Belgian State for fusion 1999

    Decreton, M.

    1999-10-01

    This report is prepared for the annual steering committee meting of the Association Euratom - Belgian State in the area of fusion reactor technology. The Belgian contribution focuses on the assessment of the first wall and blanket materials under radiation and coolant interaction and on developments for the remote handling in maintenance activities. The period October 1998 to September 1999 is reported on.The fusion technology work performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN, the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering of the Louvain University (Belgium) and S.A. Gradel, a Luxemburg-based organisation, is described

  15. Annual report for the steering committee of the association Euratom-Belgian State for fusion 1998

    Decreton, M.

    1998-10-01

    This report is prepared for the annual steering committee meting of the Association Euratom - Belgian State in the area of fusion reactor technology. The Belgian contribution focuses on the assessment of the first wall and blanket materials under radiation and coolant interaction and on developments for the remote handling in maintenance activities. The period October 1997 to September 1998 is reported on.The fusion technology work performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN, the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering of the Louvain University (Belgium) and S.A. Gradel, a Luxemburg-based organisation, is described

  16. Annual Report: Photovoltaic Subcontract Program FY 1990

    Summers, K. A. [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States)

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Subcontract Program of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. The PV Subcontract Program is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year 1990, this included more than 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities at a total funding of nearly $3.3 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports on its progress.

  17. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Sato, Masayasu; Kudo, Yusuke; Shu, Wataru; Yoshida, Hidetoshi

    2005-09-01

    This annual report provides an overview of research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment during the period from 1 April, 2004 to 31 March, 2005, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities. In the JT-60 research program, the pulse length of the tokamak discharge was extended successfully up to 65 s in FY 2003. In FY 2004, following the successful results, optimization of long pulse discharges was continued. The pulse length of the negative-ion based neutral beam injection system has reached up to 25 s with an injection power of 1 MW. In the electron cyclotron wave system, the pulse length has also extended up to 45 s with an RF power of 0.35 MW by using four gyrotrons in a series operation. Sustainment of higher normalized β of β N >2.3 for 22.3 s, or β N >2.5 for 15.5 s has been achieved by exploiting available plasma heating systems. This discharge exhibits not only the high β N , but also high confinement improvement with the H factor of H 89P =1.9-2.3 and high normalized fusion performance of G≡H 89P β N /q 95 2 =0.4-0.5 during the sustainment, where q 95 is a safety factor at the edge. G-0.4 corresponds to the fusion energy gain of Q=10 for the ITER standard scenario. The H-mode plasma with H 89P -1.4 has been maintained for about 30 s, although degradation of the performance was observed at the later half of the discharge. In the reversed shear plasmas, the operation regime was successfully extended. Demonstration of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization and improvement of plasma performance in the high beta region (β N - 3) has been performed using local current drive by the second harmonic electron cyclotron waves. In addition, a real-time control system of safety factor profile has been developed. The design of National Centralized Tokamak (NCT), which is the superconducting modification of JT-60, progressed both in physics and

  18. Preliminary proposal for a beryllium technology program for fusion applications

    1985-02-01

    The program was designed to provide the answers to the critical issues of beryllium technology needed in fusion blanket designs. The four tasks are as follows: (1) Beryllium property measurements needed for fusion data base. (2) Beryllium stress relaxation and creep measurements for lifetime modelling calculations. (3) Simplified recycle technique development for irradiated beryllium. (4) Beryllium neutron multiplier measurements using manganese bath absolute calibration techniques

  19. The role of radiation damage analysis in the fusion program

    Doran, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of radiation damage analysis is the prediction of the performance of facility components exposed to a radiation environment. The US Magnetic Fusion Energy materials program includes an explicit damage analysis activity within the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. Many of the papers in these Proceedings report work done directly or indirectly in support of the DAFS program. The emphasis of this program is on developing procedures, based on an understanding of damage mechanisms, for applying data obtained in diverse radiation environments to the prediction of component behavior in fusion devices. It is assumed that the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will be available in the late 1980s to test (and calibrate where necessary) correlation procedures to the high fluences expected in commercial reactors. (orig.)

  20. Fundamental radiation effects studies in the fusion materials program

    Doran, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fundamental radiation effects studies in the US Fusion Materials Program generally fall under the aegis of the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. In a narrow sense, the problem addressed by the DAFS program is the prediction of radiation effects in fusion devices using data obtained in non-representative environments. From the onset, the program has had near-term and long-term components. The premise for the latter is that there will be large economic penalties for uncertainties in predictive capability. Fusion devices are expected to be large and complex and unanticipated maintenance will be costly. It is important that predictions are based on a maximum of understanding and a minimum of empiricism. Gaining this understanding is the thrust of the long-term component. (orig.)

  1. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    Magaud, P.; Le vagueres, F.

    1998-01-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  2. Advanced concepts in the United States fusion program

    Dove, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the magnetic fusion program is to establish the scientific and technological base for fusion energy. Development of a variety of magnetic confinement systems is essential to achieving that goal. The role of the advanced concepts program is to conduct experimental investigations of confinement concepts other than the tokamaks and tandem mirror concepts. The present advanced concepts program consists of the reversed-field-pinch (RFP), the spheromak and the field-reversed configuration (FRC). Significant new experiments in the RFP and FRC concepts have been approved and are described

  3. New heavy-ion-fusion accelerator research program

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1983-05-01

    This paper will briefly summarize the concepts of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), especially those aspects that are important to its potential for generating electrical power. It will also note highlights of the various HIF programs throughout the world. Especially significant is that the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans a program, beginning in 1984, aimed at determining the feasibility of using heavy ion accelerators as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The new program concentrates on the aspects of accelerator design that are important to ICF, and for this reason is called HIF Accelerator Research

  4. Building technologies program. 1995 annual report

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

  5. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups

  6. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups.

  7. Hawaii's Annual Journey Through the Universe Program

    Harvey, J.; Daou, D.; Day, B.; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2012-08-01

    Hawaii's annual Journey through the Universe program is a flagship Gemini public education and outreach event that engages the public, teachers, astronomers, engineers, thousands of local students and staff from all of the Mauna Kea Observatories. The program inspires, educates, and engages teachers, students, and their families as well as the community. From February 10-18, 2011, fifty-one astronomy educators from observatories on Mauna Kea and across the world visited over 6,500 students in 310 classrooms at 18 schools. Two family science events were held for over 2,500 people at the 'Imiloa Astronomy Education Center and the University of Hawaii at Hilo. The local Chamber of Commerce(s) held an appreciation celebration for the astronomers attended by over 170 members from the local government and business community. Now going into its eighth year in Hawaii, the 2012 Journey Through the Universe program will continue working with the observatories on Mauna Kea and with the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). As a new partner in our Journey program, NLSI will join the Journey team (Janice Harvey, Gemini Observatory, Journey Team Leader) and give an overview of the successes and future developments of this remarkable program and its growth. The future of America rests on our ability to train the next generation of scientists and engineers. Science education is key and Journey through the Universe opens the doors of scientific discovery for our students. www.gemini.edu/journey

  8. American research programs on controlled thermonuclear fusion

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    At a time when the site of the European JET project has been decided, this study proposes to highlight the American effort in this field over the last five years. The Federal Civil Research and Development budget assigned to Energy has been multiplied by 6.3 and inside this budget the portion allocated to fusion has been multiplied by a factor of 6, in value. Two avenues have been explored; magnetic confinement and inertial confinement but one reaction only has been considered, namely D + T fusion. In magnetic confinement, the first operational reactor is being contemplated for around the year 2012. Three technologies have been explored in inertial confinement: by laser beams, electron beams and ion beams [fr

  9. Role of industry in international fusion program

    Durston, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    ITER combines a wide variety of technologies on an unprecedented scale of application. The experience of industry in design and integration of complex and advanced systems is helping to ensure that the engineering design of ITER is practicable and best meets the technical and cost objectives. The final development of fusion must take full benefit of the vast experience of industry in the management and coordination of major construction projects coupled with the fusion know-how being developed through participation in the ITER design activities. To achieve this, industry must be given an increasingly prominent role in the realization of the next-step device. The AE model provides an excellent means of achieving this aim. (author) 2 figs

  10. The US ICF Ignition Program and the Inertial Fusion Program

    Lindl, J D; Hammel, B A; Logan, B G; Meyerhofer, D D; Payne, S A; Stehian, J D

    2003-01-01

    There has been rapid progress in inertial fusion in the past few years. This progress spans the construction of ignition facilities, a wide range of target concepts, and the pursuit of integrated programs to develop fusion energy using lasers, ion beams and z-pinches. Two ignition facilities are under construction (NIF in the U.S. and LMJ in France) and both projects are progressing toward an initial experimental capability. The LIL prototype beamline for LMJ and the first 4 beams of NIF will be available for experiments in 2003. The full 192 beam capability of NIF will be available in 2009 and ignition experiments are expected to begin shortly after that time. There is steady progress in the target science and target fabrication in preparation for indirect drive ignition experiments on NIF. Advanced target designs may lead to 5-10 times more yield than initial target designs. There has also been excellent progress on the science of ion beam and z-pinch driven indirect drive targets. Excellent progress on direct-drive targets has been obtained on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester. This includes improved performance of targets with a pulse shape predicted to result in reduced hydrodynamic instability. Rochester has also obtained encouraging results from initial cryogenic implosions. There is widespread interest in the science of fast ignition because of its potential for achieving higher target gain with lower driver energy and relaxed target fabrication requirements. Researchers from Osaka have achieved outstanding implosion and heating results from the Gekko XII Petawatt facility and implosions suitable for fast ignition have been tested on the Omega laser. A broad based program to develop lasers and ions beams for IFE is under way with excellent progress in drivers, chambers, target fabrication and target injection. KrF and Diode Pumped Solid-State lasers (DPSSL) are being developed in conjunction with drywall chambers and direct drive targets

  11. Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee report on recommended fusion program priorities and strategy

    1983-09-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee recommends a new program strategy with the following principal features: (1) Initiation in FY86 of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), a moderate-cost tokamak reactor device (less than $1 B PACE) designed to achieve ignition and long-pulse equilibrium burn. Careful trade-off studies are needed before making key design choices in interrelated technology areas. Cost reductions relative to earlier plans can be realized by exploiting new plasma technology, by locating the TFCX at the TFTR site, and by assigning responsibility for complementary reactor engineering tasks to other sectors of the fusion program. (2) Potential utilization of the MFTF Upgrade to provide a cost-effective means for quasi-steady-state testing of blanket and power-system components, complementary to TFCX. This will depend on future assessments of the data base for tandem mirrors. (3) Vigorous pursuit of the broad US base program in magnetic confinement, including new machine starts, where appropriate, at approximately the present total level of support. (4) Utilization of Development and Technology programs in plasma and magnet technology in support of specific hardware requirements of the TFCX and of other major fusion facilities, so as to minimize overall program cost

  12. EU socio-economic research on fusion: Findings and program

    Tosato, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    In 1997 the European Commission launched a Socio-Economic Research program to study under which conditions future fusion power plants may become competitive, compatible with the energy supply system and acceptable for the public. It has been shown, among others, that: 1) local communities are ready to support the construction of an experimental fusion facility, if appropriate communication and awareness campaigns are carried out; 2) since the externalities are much lower than for competitors, fusion power plants may become the major producer of base load electricity at the end of the century in Europe, if climate changes have to be mitigated, if the construction of new nuclear fission power plants continues to be constrained and if nuclear fusion power plants become commercially available in 2050. Cooperating with major international organizations, the program for next year aims to demonstrating, through technical economic programming models and global multi-regional energy environmental scenarios, that the potential global benefits of fusion power plants in the second half of the century largely outdo the RD and D costs borne in the first half to make it available. Making the public aware of such benefits through field experiences will be part of the program. (author)

  13. A thermonuclear fusion power program for Israel

    Friedman, Bruce

    1985-01-01

    Although lacking in financial and physical resources, Israel has a large base of scientific and technological talent that can be organized for the purpose of producing commercial fusion power reactors, thus allowing Israel to attain energy independence and acquiring a monetary inflow through royalties and reactor export. The limited partnership would be suitable for financing a significant portion of the project. Economic feasibility can be estimated through the use of one or more of the approaches supplied by the calculus of variations, cardinal utility theory, catastrophe theory, and noncooperative game theory. (author)

  14. Overview of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    Wiffen, F.W.; Dowling, R.J.; Marton, W.A.; Eckstrand, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Since the 1988 Symposium on Fusion Technology, steady progress has been made in the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. The large US tokamaks have reached new levels of plasma performance with associated improvements in the understanding of transport. The technology support for ongoing and future devices is similarly advancing with notable advances in magnetic, rf heating tubes, pellet injector, plasma interactive materials, tritium handling, structural materials, and system studies. Currently, a high level DOE review of the program is underway to provide recommendations for a strategic plan

  15. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  17. Energy conversion & storage program. 1995 annual report

    Cairns, E.J.

    1996-06-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Energy Conversion and Storage (EC&S) Program. The report is divided into three categories: electrochemistry, chemical applications, and material applications. Research performed in each category during 1995 is described. Specific research topics relate to the development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, the development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion, the characterization of new chemical processes and complex chemical species, and the study and application of novel materials related to energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials and deposition technologies, and advanced methods of analysis.

  18. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program -- 1993

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1994-05-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1993 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report. The 1993 inspection program revealed that the condition of the Savannah River Site waste tanks had not changed significantly from that reported in the previous annual report. No new leaksites were observed. No evidence of corrosion or materials degradation was observed in the waste tanks. However, degradation was observed on covers of the concrete encasements for the out-of-service transfer lines to Tanks 1 through 8

  19. EU socio-economic research on fusion: findings and program

    Tosato, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997 the European Commission launched a Socio-Economic Research program to study under which conditions future fusion power plants may become competitive, compatible with the energy supply system and acceptable for the public. The program is developed by independent experts making use of well established international methodologies. It has been shown, among others, that: 1) local communities are ready to support the construction of an experimental fusion facility, if appropriate communication and awareness campaigns are carried out; 2) since the externalities are much lower than for competitors, fusion power plants may become the major producer of base load electricity at the end of the century in Europe, if climate changes have to be mitigated, if the construction of new nuclear fission power plants continues to be constrained and if nuclear fusion power plants become commercially available in 2050. Cooperating with major international organizations, the program for next year aims to demonstrate that the potential global benefits of fusion power plants in the second half of the century largely outdo the RD and D costs borne in the first half to make it available. (author)

  20. The heavy ion fusion program in the USA

    Bangerter, R.O.; Davidson, R.C.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Lindl, J.; Meier, W.R.; Logan, B.G.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial fusion energy research has enjoyed increased interest and funding. This has allowed expanded programs in target design, target fabrication, fusion chamber research, target injection and tracking, and accelerator research. The target design effort examines ways to minimize the beam power and energy and increase the allowable focal spot size while preserving target gain. Chamber research for heavy ion fusion emphasizes the use of thick liquid walls to serve as the coolant, breed tritium, and protect the structural wall from neutrons, photons, and other target products. Several small facilities are now operating to model fluid chamber dynamics. A facility to study target injection and tracking has been built and a second facility is being designed. Improved economics is an important goal of the accelerator research. The accelerator research is also directed toward the design of an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE is being designed to accelerate ions to >100 MeV, enabling experiments in beam dynamics, focusing, and target physics. Activities leading to the IRE include ion source development and a High Current Experiment (HCX) designed to transport and accelerate a single beam of ions with a beam current of approximately 1 A, the initial current required for each beam of a fusion driver. In terms of theory, the program is developing a source-to-target numerical simulation capability. The goal of the entire program is to enable an informed decision about the promise of heavy ion fusion in about a decade. (author)

  1. Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, technical research programs

    1982-02-01

    Research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature fusion plasmas (plasma theory, RF heating, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator A and C tokamaks, including pioneering investigations of the equilibrium, stability, transport and radiation properties of fusion plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of a new and innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experimental facility scheduled for 1983; and (4) a broadly based program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas

  3. Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship Program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1985

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship program (MFETF) for the 1985 calendar year. The MFETF program has continued to support the mission of the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) and its Division of Development and Technology (DDT) by ensuring the availability of appropriately trained engineering manpower needed to implement the OFE/DDT magnetic fusion energy agenda. This program provides training and research opportunities to highly qualified students at DOE-designated academic, private sector, and government magnetic fusion energy institutions. The objectives of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship program are: (1) to provide support for graduate study, training, and research in magnetic fusion energy technology; (2) to ensure an adequate supply of appropriately trained manpower to implement the nation's magnetic fusion energy agenda; (3) to raise the visibility of careers in magnetic fusion energy technology and to encourage students to pursue such careers; and (4) to make national magnetic fusion energy facilities available for manpower training

  4. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Third annual report

    Hazelrigg, G.A. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The current study reported here has involved three separate tasks. The first re-evaluates previous benefit estimates derived, using more realistic rates of discount and other parameter changes. The second task investigates other possible commercial uses of technologies which must be developed in providing commercial fusion power. Several such applications have been identified and potential market sizes estimated. The third task develops a methodology for evaluating the impact of additional projects in support technology RD and D on the value of the overall fusion program. This effort has shown that it is possible to economically prioritize RD and D on those functions which will be required in commercial fusion and to provide economic rationales for program changes. The results of this task indicate substantial benefit from increased pursuit of RD and D in several support technology areas

  5. Building technolgies program. 1994 annual report

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. We have focused our past efforts on two major building systems, windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed by researchers and designers to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. In addition, we are now taking more of an integrated systems and life cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity-factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout every space in a building, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Window and lighting systems are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program.

  6. X-ray imaging in the laser-fusion program

    McCall, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Imaging devices which are used or planned for x-ray imaging in the laser-fusion program are discussed. Resolution criteria are explained, and a suggestion is made for using the modulation transfer function as a uniform definition of resolution for these devices

  7. Technology spinoffs from the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    1984-02-01

    This document briefly describes eight new spin-offs from the fusion program: (1) cray timesharing system, (2) CRT touch panel, (3) magneform, (4) plasma separation process, (5) homopolar resistance welding, (6) plasma diagnostic development, (7) electrodeless microwave lamp, and (8) superconducting energy storage

  8. Determination of Atomic Data Pertinent to the Fusion Energy Program

    Reader, J.

    2013-01-01

    We summarize progress that has been made on the determination of atomic data pertinent to the fusion energy program. Work is reported on the identification of spectral lines of impurity ions, spectroscopic data assessment and compilations, expansion and upgrade of the NIST atomic databases, collision and spectroscopy experiments with highly charged ions on EBIT, and atomic structure calculations and modeling of plasma spectra

  9. Technology spin-offs from the magnetic fusion energy program

    1982-05-01

    A description is given of 138 possible spin-offs from the magnetic fusion program. The spin-offs cover the following areas: (1) superconducting magnets, (2) materials technology, (3) vacuum systems, (4) high frequency and high power rf, (5) electronics, (6) plasma diagnostics, (7) computers, and (8) particle beams

  10. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The

  11. Presentation Stations of the General Atomics Fusion Educational Program

    Lee, R. L.; Fusion Group Education Outreach Team

    1996-11-01

    The General Atomics Fusion Group's Educational Program has been actively promoting fusion science and applications throughout San Diego County's secondary school systems for over three years. The educational program allows many students to learn more about nuclear fusion science, its applications, and what it takes to become an active participant in an important field of study. It also helps educators to better understand how to teach fusion science in their classroom. Tours of the DIII--D facility are a centerpiece of the program. Over 1000 students visited the DIII--D research facility during the 1995--1996 school year for a half-day of presentations, discussions, and hands-on learning. Interactive presentations are provided at six different stations by GA scientists and engineers to small groups of students during the tours. Stations include topics on energy, plasma science, the electromagnetic spectrum, radiation and risk assessment, and data acquisition. Included also is a tour of the DIII--D machine hall and model where students can see and discuss many aspects of the tokamak. Portions of each station will be presented and discussed.

  12. Fusion reactor design and technology program in China

    Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor program was launched in 1987. The purpose of development of the hybrid reactor is twofold: to solve the problem of nuclear fuel supply for an expected large-scale development of fission reactor plants, and to maintain the momentum of fusion research. The program is described and the activities and progress of the program are presented. Two conceptual designs of an engineering test reactor with tokamak configuration were developed at the Southwestern Institute of Physics and the Institute of Plasma Physics. The results are a tokamak engineering test breeder (TETB) series design and a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design (SSEHR), characterized by a liquid-Li self-cooled blanket and an He-cooled solid tritium breeder blanket respectively. In parallel with the design studies, relevant technological experiments on a small or medium scale have been supported by this program. These include LHCD, ICRH and pellet injection in the area of plasma engineering; neutronics integral experiments with U, Pu, Fe and Be; various irradiation tests of austenitic and ferritic steels, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop experiments using a liquid metal loop; research into permeation barriers for tritium and hydrogen isotopes; solid tritium breeder tests using an in-situ loop in a fission reactor. All these experiments have proceeded successfully. The second step of this program is now starting. It seems reasonable that most of the research carried out in the first step will continue. ((orig.))

  13. Annual coded wire tag program (Washington) missing production groups : annual report 2000; ANNUAL

    Dammers, Wolf; Mills, Robin D.

    2002-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the ''Annual Coded-wire Tag Program - Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries'' project. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) all operate salmon and steelhead rearing programs in the Columbia River basin. The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time and to meet various measures of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The WDFW project has three main objectives: (1) coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to enable evaluation of survival and catch distribution over time, (2) recover coded-wire tags from the snouts of fish tagged under objective 1 and estimate survival, contribution, and stray rates for each group, and (3) report the findings under objective 2 for all broods of chinook, and coho released from WDFW Columbia Basin hatcheries. Objective 1 for FY-00 was met with few modifications to the original FY-00 proposal. Under Objective 2, snouts containing coded-wire tags that were recovered during FY-00 were decoded. Under Objective 3, this report summarizes available recovery information through 2000 and includes detailed information for brood years 1989 to 1994 for chinook and 1995 to 1997 for coho

  14. Technical review of the Sandia Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Program

    1979-01-01

    This report considers the technical aspects of Sandia Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Program and examines the program's initial goals, the progress made to date towards reaching those goals, and the future plans or methods of reaching those original or modified goals. A summary of Sandia Laboratories' effort, which seeks to demonstrate that high voltage pulsed power generated high-current electron or light ion beams can be used to ignite a deuterium or tritium pellet, is provided. A brief review and assessment of the Sandia Pulse Power Program is given. Several critical issues and summaries of the committee members' opinions are discussed

  15. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section

  16. Research program annual review, 1991-92. Annual publication

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This report highlights the year`s activities of the Research Branch of the British Columbia Ministry of Forests in such areas as silviculture, sustainable and integrated resource management, hardwoods management, tree seedling production, forest ecology, growth and yield studies, environmental impacts, integrated wildlife/forestry studies, and collaboration with other agencies. A financial summary of research program expenditures is included.

  17. 2005 Annual Scientific Conference. Program and Abstracts

    Barborica, Andrei; Bulinski, Mircea; Stefan, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Every year the Physics Department of the University of Bucharest organizes the 'Annual Scientific Conference' to present the most interesting scientific results, obtained within the department. This scientific session is opened also to the interested physics researchers from other institutes and universities in the country. This scientific event represents a recognition and a continuation of the prestigious tradition of physics research performed within University. The scientific research in the Physics Department is performed in groups and research centers, the terminal year undergraduate students and graduate students being involved in a high extent in the research works. There are 5 research centers with the status of Center of excellence in research. The long-term strategy adopted by the faculty was focused on developing the scientific research in modern topics of theoretical, experimental and applied physics, as well as in inter-disciplinary fields as biophysics, medical physics, physics and protection of the environment, physics - computer science. Following this strategy, the Faculty of Physics has diversified the research activity, developing new research laboratories and encouraging the academic community to perform modern and competitive research projects. The Faculty of Physics is a partner in many common research programs with prestigious foreign universities and institutes. The 2005 session covered the following 8 topics: 1. Atmosphere and Earth Science; Environment Protection (21 papers); 2. Atomic and Molecular Physics; Astrophysics (12 papers); 3. Electricity and Biophysics (19 papers); 4. Nuclear and Elementary Particles Physics (17 papers); 5. Optics, Spectroscopy, Plasma and Lasers (19 papers); 6. Polymer Physics (10 papers); 7. Solid State Physics and Materials Science (10 papers); 8. Theoretical Physics and Applied Mathematics Seminar (12 papers)

  18. 2004 Annual Scientific Conference. Program and Abstracts

    Barborica, Andrei; Bulinski, Mircea; Stefan, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    As consequence of a long experience in educational as well as research field the Physics Department of the Bucharest University is offering high-standard undergraduate and graduate programs of higher education in physical sciences. The long-term strategy adopted by the faculty was focused on developing scientific research in modern topics of theoretical, experimental and applied physics as well as in inter-disciplinary fields as biophysics, medical physics, physics and protection of environment, physics-computer science. Following this strategy the Faculty of Physics has diversified the research activity, developing new research laboratories and encouraging the academic community to approach modern and competitive research projects. Every year the Physics Department of the University of Bucharest organizes the 'Annual Scientific Conference' to present the most interesting scientific results, obtained within the department. This 2004 scientific session is opened also to the interested physics researchers from other institutes and universities in the country. This scientific event represents a recognition and a continuation of the prestigious tradition of physics research performed within University. The scientific research in the Physics Department is performed in groups and research centers, the terminal year undergraduate students and graduate students being involved in a high extent in the research works. There are 5 research centers with the status of Center of excellence in research. The long-term strategy adopted by the faculty was focused on developing the scientific research in modern topics of theoretical, experimental and applied physics, as well as in inter-disciplinary fields as biophysics, medical physics, physics and protection of the environment, physics - computer science. Following this strategy, the Faculty of Physics has diversified the research activity, developing new research laboratories and encouraging the academic community to perform modern

  19. 2003 Annual Scientific Conference. Program and Abstracts

    Barborica, Andrei; Bulinski, Mircea

    2003-01-01

    As consequence of a long experience in educational as well as research field the Physics Department of the Bucharest University is offering high-standard undergraduate and graduate programs of higher education in physical sciences. The long-term strategy adopted by the faculty was focused on developing scientific research in modern topics of theoretical, experimental and applied physics as well as in inter-disciplinary fields as biophysics, medical physics, physics and protection of environment, physics-computer science. Following this strategy the Faculty of Physics has diversified the research activity, developing new research laboratories and encouraging the academic community to approach modern and competitive research projects. Every year the Physics Department of the University of Bucharest organizes the 'Annual Scientific Conference' to present the most interesting scientific results, obtained within the department. This scientific session is opened also to the interested physics researchers from other institutes and universities in the country. This scientific event represents a recognition and a continuation of the prestigious tradition of physics research performed within University. The scientific research in the Physics Department is performed in groups and research centers, the terminal year undergraduate students and graduate students being involved in a high extent in the research works. There are 5 research centers with the status of Center of excellence in research. The long-term strategy adopted by the faculty was focused on developing the scientific research in modern topics of theoretical, experimental and applied physics, as well as in inter-disciplinary fields as biophysics, medical physics, physics and protection of the environment, physics - computer science. Following this strategy, the Faculty of Physics has diversified the research activity, developing new research laboratories and encouraging the academic community to perform modern and

  20. 2002 Annual Scientific Conference. Program and Abstracts

    Barborica, Andrei; Bulinski, Mircea; Dinca, Mihai P.

    2002-01-01

    As consequence of a long experience in educational as well as research field the Physics Department of the Bucharest University is offering high-standard undergraduate and graduate programs of higher education in physical sciences. The long-term strategy adopted by the faculty was focused on developing scientific research in modern topics of theoretical, experimental and applied physics as well as in inter-disciplinary fields as biophysics, medical physics, physics and protection of environment, physics-computer science. Following this strategy the Faculty of Physics has diversified the research activity, developing new research laboratories and encouraging the academic community to approach modern and competitive research projects. Every year the Physics Department of the University of Bucharest organizes the 'Annual Scientific Conference' to present the most interesting scientific results, obtained within the department. This scientific session is opened also to the interested physics researchers from other institutes and universities in the country. This scientific event represents a recognition and a continuation of the prestigious tradition of physics research performed within University. The scientific research in the Physics Department is performed in groups and research centers, the terminal year undergraduate students and graduate students being involved in a high extent in the research works. There are 5 research centers with the status of Center of excellence in research. The long-term strategy adopted by the faculty was focused on developing the scientific research in modern topics of theoretical, experimental and applied physics, as well as in inter-disciplinary fields as biophysics, medical physics, physics and protection of the environment, physics - computer science. Following this strategy, the Faculty of Physics has diversified the research activity, developing new research laboratories and encouraging the academic community to perform modern and

  1. Materials program plan for inertial confinement fusion

    Garde, A.; Hall, B.O.; Harkness, S.D.; Maiya, P.S.; Rechtin, M.D.; Li, C.Y.

    1979-08-01

    The effect of the irradiation environment on the microstructure of materials is studied. A major part of the initial activity in this area will be aimed toward evaluating the importance of pulse effects on microstructural development. The development effort that is necessary to cope with the high cycle loading of the first wall structure is studied. The loading pulses are expected to range from 1 to 20 per second (3 x 10 7 to 6 x 10 8 /year), thus creating a high cycle fatigue problem for any long-lived first wall structure. The interrelationship between specimen and component testing is a major issue in this section. Static mechanical property requirements are also considered here. Lithium compatibility is treated. The final section integrates the conclusions reached in the body of the report into a unified strategy that suggests a particular effort level to support major program milestones

  2. Materials program plan for inertial confinement fusion

    Garde, A.; Hall, B.O.; Harkness, S.D.; Maiya, P.S.; Rechtin, M.D.; Li, C.Y.

    1979-08-01

    The effect of the irradiation environment on the microstructure of materials is studied. A major part of the initial activity in this area will be aimed toward evaluating the importance of pulse effects on microstructural development. The development effort that is necessary to cope with the high cycle loading of the first wall structure is studied. The loading pulses are expected to range from 1 to 20 per second (3 x 10/sup 7/ to 6 x 10/sup 8//year), thus creating a high cycle fatigue problem for any long-lived first wall structure. The interrelationship between specimen and component testing is a major issue in this section. Static mechanical property requirements are also considered here. Lithium compatibility is treated. The final section integrates the conclusions reached in the body of the report into a unified strategy that suggests a particular effort level to support major program milestones.

  3. 1997 Lower Granite dam smolt monitoring program : annual report.; ANNUAL

    Morrill, Charles; Ross, Doug; Verhey, Peter; Witalis, Shirley

    1997-01-01

    The 1997 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, extensive spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database of fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin

  4. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1979

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-10-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO 2 laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements in the Los Alamos National Laboratory eight-beam Helios system are described. These improvements increased the reliability of the laser and permitted the firing of 290 shots, most of which delivered energies of approximately 8 kJ to the target. Modifications to Gemini are outlined, including the installation of a new target-insertion mechanism. The redirection of the Antares program is discussed in detail, which will achieve a total energy of approximatey 40 kJ with two beams. This redirection will bring Antares on-line almost two years earlier than was possible with the full six-beam system, although at a lower energy. Experiments with isentropically imploded Sirius-B targets are discussed, and x-ray radiation-loss data from gold microballoons are presented, which show that these results are essentially identical with those obtained at glass-laser wavelengths. Significant progress in characterizing laser fusion targets is reported. New processes for fabricating glass miroballoon x-ray diagnostic targets, the application of high-quality metallic coatings, and the deposition of thick plastic coatings are described. Results in the development of x-ray diagnostics are reported, and research in the Los Alamos heavy-ion fusion program is summarized. Results of investigations of phase-conjugation research of gaseous saturable absorbers and of the use of alkali-halide crystals in a new class of saturable absorbers are summarized. New containment-vessel concepts for Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors are discussed, and results of a scoping study of four fusion-fission hybrid concepts are presented

  5. Fusion technology development. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    1998-03-01

    In FY97, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the magnetic fusion program. The work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, International and Technology Division, of the US Department of Energy. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Studies (Section 2), Plasma Interactive Materials (Section 3), Magnetic Diagnostic Probes (Section 4) and RF Technology (Section 5). Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA's fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to ITER and other next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, we carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and we conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. We continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry

  6. Tritium processing and containment technology for fusion reactors. Annual report, July 1975--June 1976

    Maroni, V.A.; Calaway, W.F.; Misra, B.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Weston, J.R.; Yonco, R.M.; Cafasso, F.A.; Burris, L.

    1976-01-01

    The hydrogen permeabilities of selected metals, alloys, and multiplex preparations that are of interest to fusion reactor technology are being characterized. A high-vacuum hydrogen-permeation apparatus has been constructed for this purpose. A program of studies has been initiated to develop design details for the tritium-handling systems of near-term fusion reactors. This program has resulted in a better definition of reactor-fuel-cycle and enrichment requirements and has helped to identify major research and development problems in the tritium-handling area. The design and construction of a 50-gallon lithium-processing test loop (LPTL) is well under way. Studies in support of this project are providing important guidance in the selection of hardware for the LPTL and in the design of a molten-salt processing test section

  7. Scientific and Computational Challenges of the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP)

    Tang, William M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the scientific and computational challenges facing the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) a major national initiative in the United States with the primary objective being to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. It is expected to provide a suite of advanced modeling tools for reliably predicting fusion device behavior with comprehensive and targeted science-based simulations of nonlinearly-coupled phenomena in the core plasma, edge plasma, and wall region on time and space scales required for fusion energy production. As such, it will strive to embody the most current theoretical and experimental understanding of magnetic fusion plasmas and to provide a living framework for the simulation of such plasmas as the associated physics understanding continues to advance over the next several decades. Substantive progress on answering the outstanding scientific questions in the field will drive the FSP toward its ultimate goal of developing the ability to predict the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices with high physics fidelity on all relevant time and space scales. From a computational perspective, this will demand computing resources in the petascale range and beyond together with the associated multi-core algorithmic formulation needed to address burning plasma issues relevant to ITER - a multibillion dollar collaborative experiment involving seven international partners representing over half the world's population. Even more powerful exascale platforms will be needed to meet the future challenges of designing a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). Analogous to other major applied physics modeling projects (e

  8. Scientific and computational challenges of the fusion simulation program (FSP)

    Tang, William M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the scientific and computational challenges facing the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) - a major national initiative in the United States with the primary objective being to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. It is expected to provide a suite of advanced modeling tools for reliably predicting fusion device behavior with comprehensive and targeted science-based simulations of nonlinearly-coupled phenomena in the core plasma, edge plasma, and wall region on time and space scales required for fusion energy production. As such, it will strive to embody the most current theoretical and experimental understanding of magnetic fusion plasmas and to provide a living framework for the simulation of such plasmas as the associated physics understanding continues to advance over the next several decades. Substantive progress on answering the outstanding scientific questions in the field will drive the FSP toward its ultimate goal of developing the ability to predict the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices with high physics fidelity on all relevant time and space scales. From a computational perspective, this will demand computing resources in the petascale range and beyond together with the associated multi-core algorithmic formulation needed to address burning plasma issues relevant to ITER - a multibillion dollar collaborative experiment involving seven international partners representing over half the world's population. Even more powerful exascale platforms will be needed to meet the future challenges of designing a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). Analogous to other major applied physics modeling projects (e

  9. Annual coded wire tag program (Washington) missing production groups: annual report for 1997; ANNUAL

    Byrne, J.; Fuss, H.; Ashbrook, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the ''Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries'' project. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) all operate salmon and steelhead rearing programs in the Columbia River basin. The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time and to meet various measures of the Northwest Power Planning Councils (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The WDFW project has three main objectives: (1) coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to enable evaluation of survival and catch distribution over time, (2) recover coded-wire tags from the snouts of fish tagged under objective 1 and estimate survival, contribution, and stray rates for each group, and (3) report the findings under objective 2 for all broods of chinook, and coho released from WDFW Columbia Basin hatcheries. Objective 1 for FY-97 was met with few modifications to the original FY-97 proposal. Under Objective 2, snouts containing coded-wire tags that were recovered during FY-97 were decoded. Under Objective 3, survival, contribution and stray rate estimates for the 1991-96 broods of chinook and 1993-96 broods of coho have not been made because recovery data for 1996-97 fisheries and escapement are preliminary. This report summarizes recovery information through 1995

  10. Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program

    None

    2000-01-01

    This report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) has been prepared in response to a recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board that, ''Given the complex nature of the fusion effort, an integrated program planning process is an absolute necessity.'' We, therefore, undertook this activity in order to integrate the various elements of the program, to improve communication and performance accountability across the program, and to show the inter-connectedness and inter-dependency of the diverse parts of the national fusion energy sciences program. This report is based on the September 1999 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee's (FESAC) report ''Priorities and Balance within the Fusion Energy Sciences Program''. In its December 5,2000, letter to the Director of the Office of Science, the FESAC has reaffirmed the validity of the September 1999 report and stated that the IPPA presents a framework and process to guide the achievement of the 5-year goals listed in the 1999 report. The National Research Council's (NRC) Fusion Assessment Committee draft final report ''An Assessment of the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program'', reviewing the quality of the science in the program, was made available after the IPPA report had been completed. The IPPA report is, nevertheless, consistent with the recommendations in the NRC report. In addition to program goals and the related 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year objectives, this report elaborates on the scientific issues associated with each of these objectives. The report also makes clear the relationships among the various program elements, and cites these relationships as the reason why integrated program planning is essential. In particular, while focusing on the science conducted by the program, the report addresses the important balances between the science and energy goals of the program, between the MFE and IFE approaches, and between the domestic and international aspects

  11. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories, California Pollution Prevention Program annual report.

    Harris, Janet S.; Farren, Laurie J.

    2010-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, California Air Quality Program annual report.

    Gardizi, Leslee P.; Smith, Richard (ERM, Walnut Creek, CA)

    2009-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Air Quality Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Air Quality Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  14. Status of the US inertial fusion program and the National Ignition Facility

    Crandall, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Research programs supported by the United States Office of Inertial Fusion and the NIF are summarized. The US inertial fusion program has developed an approach to high energy density physics and fusion ignition in the laboratory relying on the current physics basis of capsule drive by lasers and on the National Ignition Facility which is under construction. (AIP) copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  15. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment. From April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1997

    Shimizu, Masatsugu; Ide, Shunsuke; Matsukawa, Makoto; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Koichi; Takahashi, Ichiro [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1997. The activities in Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high temperature plasma research in JT-60 and JFT-2M, and progress in ITER-EDA, including technology development. The objectives of the JT-60 project are to contribute to the ITER physics R and D and to establish the physics basis for a steady state tokamak fusion reactor like SSTR. Objectives of the JFT-2M program are (1) advanced and basic researches for the development of high-performance plasmas for nuclear fusion and (2) contribution to the physics R and D for ITER, with a merit of flexibility of a medium-size device. The Detailed Design Report (DDR) of ITER was issued by the Director in November 1996, as the basis of the Final Design Report (FDR). After the formal review by the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), the DDR was officially accepted by the ITER Council at its 11th Meeting held in December 1996. The DDR is composed of various technical documents on the detailed design of plasma parameters, tokamak components, plant system and tokamak building. The major results of safety analyses described in the Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR)-1 was also included in the DDR. The FDR will be prepared by the end of 1997 for presentation at the ITER Council. (J.P.N.)

  16. The assurance management program for the Nova laser fusion project

    Levy, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    In a well managed project, Quality Assurance is an integral part of the management activities performed on a daily basis. Management assures successful performance within budget and on schedule by using all the good business, scientific, engineering, quality assurance, and safety practices available. Quality assurance and safety practices employed on Nova are put in perspective by integrating them into the overall function of good project management. The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) approach is explained in general terms. The laser ICF and magnetic fusion facilities are significantly different in that the laser system is used solely as a highly reliable energy source for performing plasma physics experiments related to fusion target development; by contrast, magnetic fusion facilities are themselves the experiments. The Nova project consists of a 10-beam, 74 cm aperture neodymium-glass laser experimental facility which is being constructed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Nova has a total estimated cost of $176M and will become operational in the Fall of 1984. The Nova laser will be used as the high energy driver for studying the regime of ignition for ICF. The Nova assurance management program was developed using the quality assurance (QA) approach first implemented at LLNL in early 1978. The LLNL QA program is described as an introduction to the Nova assurance management program. The Nova system is described pictorially through the Nova configuration, subsystems and major components, interjecting the QA techniques which are being pragmatically used to assure the successful completion of the project

  17. The need for a fusion technology information program

    Correll, D.L. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    In providing an adequate energy technology for the future, which new programs should be considered by the Department of Energy national laboratories to ensure that the US remains in the forefront of international science and technology is an important question. This paper suggests that the urgency for energy independence demands an active communication program that would increase awareness of energy as a critical national issue and would present fusion, with its benefits and risks, as one of the long-term alternative energy sources

  18. The need for a fusion technology information program

    Correll, D.L. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    In providing an adequate energy technology for the future, which new programs should be considered by the Department of Energy national laboratories to ensure that the US remains in the forefront of international science and technology is an important question. This paper suggests that the urgency for energy independence demands an active communication program that would increase awareness of energy as a critical national issue and would present fusion, with its benefits and risks, as one of the long-term alternative energy sources.

  19. Strategy and progress in the US magnetic fusion program

    Kintner, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    The US implements the world's most extensive fusion research program. Most of this activity is concentrated on the Tokamak system (one third of the total budget, not including heating and technology). A large machine, TFTR, is to be started up in 1982. This is to be followed by tritium operation. A machine of the JET follow-on generation, FED, is in the definition phase. In the sector of magnetic confinement, the tandem mirror machine is the most important alternative. Twenty percent of the whole budget is spent on this item. Major programs are under way in the fields of heating and technology, which total some 12% of the whole budget. (orig.) [de

  20. Investigation of electromagnetic launcher behavior for impact fusion. Annual report, July 1, 1983-May 1, 1984

    Thio, Y.C.

    1984-06-01

    A program to develop an ultrahigh velocity accelerator (SUVAC), based on the electromagnetic railgun accelerator concept and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has been initiated at Westinghouse R and D Center. The program involves the construction over a 4-year period (July 1983 to June 1987) of a multi-stage railgun accelerator which has the potential of accelerating a 1-g projectile to about 30 km/s (Mach 100). The scientific objective of the program is to use the accelerator so built as the experimental apparatus to investigate the potential technical problems of accelerating macroparticles to velocity presently thought to be required to produce impact fusion. The program is part of a joint program with the University of Washington to develop the scientific and technological basis to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion by hypervelocity impact. This report summarizes the progress made in the first year of the program. It covers work done for the period July 1, 1983 to May 1, 1984

  1. FAA National Aviation Safety Inspection Program. Annual Report FY90

    1991-06-01

    This report was undertaken to document, analyze, and place : into national perspective the findings from the 1990 National : Aviation Safety Inspection Program (NASIP). This report is the : fifth in a series of annual reports covering the results of ...

  2. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership Annual Publications

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership's Annual Report highlights the Academy's efforts to serve the NASA workforce's needs in adapting to the...

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory laser-fusion program

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goals of the Laser-Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are to produce well-diagnosed, high-gain, laser-driven fusion explosions in the laboratory and to exploit this capability for both military applications and for civilian energy production. In the past year we have made significant progress both theoretically and experimentally in our understanding of the laser interaction with both directly coupled and radiation-driven implosion targets and their implosion dynamics. We have made significant developments in fabricating the target structures. Data from the target experiments are producing important near-term physics results. We have also continued to develop attractive reactor concepts which illustrate ICF's potential as an energy producer

  4. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, January-December 1980

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes research and development effort in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program, including absorption measurements with an integrating sphere, generation of high CO 2 -laser harmonics in the backscattered light from laser plasmas, and the effects of hydrogen target contamination on the hot-electron temperature and transport. The development of new diagnostics is outlined and measurements taken with a proximity-focused x-ray streak camera are presented. High gain in phase conjugation using germanium was demonstrated, data were obtained on retropulse isolation by plasmas generated from metal shutters, damage thresholds for copper mirrors at high fluences were characterized, and phase conjugation in the ultraviolet was demonstrated. Significant progress in the characterization of targets, new techniques in target coating, and important advances in the development of low-density, small-cell-size plastic foam that permit highly accurate machining to any desired shape are presented. The results of various fusion reactor system studies are summarized

  5. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, January-December 1980

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes research and development effort in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program, including absorption measurements with an integrating sphere, generation of high CO/sub 2/-laser harmonics in the backscattered light from laser plasmas, and the effects of hydrogen target contamination on the hot-electron temperature and transport. The development of new diagnostics is outlined and measurements taken with a proximity-focused x-ray streak camera are presented. High gain in phase conjugation using germanium was demonstrated, data were obtained on retropulse isolation by plasmas generated from metal shutters, damage thresholds for copper mirrors at high fluences were characterized, and phase conjugation in the ultraviolet was demonstrated. Significant progress in the characterization of targets, new techniques in target coating, and important advances in the development of low-density, small-cell-size plastic foam that permit highly accurate machining to any desired shape are presented. The results of various fusion reactor system studies are summarized.

  6. Magnetic Fusion Science Fellowship program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1986

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the 1985-1986 progress of the Magnetic Fusion Science Fellowship program (MFSF). The program was established in January of 1985 by the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage talented undergraduate and first-year graduate students to enter qualified graduate programs in the sciences related to fusion energy development. The program currently has twelve fellows in participating programs. Six new fellows are being appointed during each of the program's next two award cycles. Appointments are for one year and are renewable for two additional years with a three year maximum. The stipend level also continues at a $1000 a month or $12,000 a year. The program pays all tuition and fee expenses for the fellows. Another important aspect of the fellowship program is the practicum. During the practicum fellows receive three month appointments to work at DOE designated fusion science research and development centers. The practicum allows the MFSF fellows to directly participate in on-going DOE research and development programs

  7. [Research programs in plasma physics]: Annual report

    Weitzner, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains a brief review of the work done in 1987 at New York University in plasma physics. Topics discussed in this report are: reduction and interpretation of experimental tokamak data, turbulent transport in tokamaks and RFP's, laminar flow transport, wave propagation in different frequency regimes, stability of flows, plasma fueling, magnetic reconnection problems, development of new numerical techniques for Fokker-Planck-like equations, and stability of shock waves. Outside of fusion there has been work in free electron lasers, heating of solar coronal loops and renormalized theory of fluid turbulence

  8. Fusion power research and development program. Volume IV. 5-year program, budget and milestone summaries

    1976-07-01

    Budget data are given for each of the tokamak systems, mirror systems, and high density plasma systems for the years 1976 through 1982. All major facilities currently under ERDA contract are included. In addition, budget data are given for the development and technology program consisting of the following; (1) magnetic systems, (2) plasma engineering, (3) fusion reactor materials, (4) fusion systems engineering, (5) environment and safety, and (6) applied plasma physics

  9. 2010 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen Program

    2011-02-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  10. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998; Technologie de la fusion Rapport annuel 1998 Association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    Magaud, P; Le vagueres, F

    1998-07-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  11. Sustainable Transportation Program 2011 Annual Report

    Vaughan, Kathi H [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    Highlights of selected research and development efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory funded by the Vehicle Technologies Program, Biomass Program, and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program of the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; and the Department of Transportation.

  12. Clinical Investigation Program Annual Progress Report

    1988-10-20

    Presented: Interna- tional Symposium on Orthopedics, Mexico , September 1987. Publications: In preparation. 147 FAMC A.P.R. (RCS MED 300) Detail Summary...Infection: A Prospective Study. Presented: 2nd Annual Symposium of the Rocky Moun- tain Flow Cytometry Users Group, Albuquerque, New Mexico , 10-11...Podgore, COL, MC (9) Dept/ISvc: Pediatrics (10) Associate Investigators (11) Key Words: Myron J. Levin, M.D. varicella vaccine U Co. HSC (12

  13. Superconducting magnet and conductor research activities in the US fusion program

    Michael, P.C.; Schultz, J.H.; Antaya, T.A.; Ballinger, R.; Chiesa, L.; Feng, J.; Gung, C.-Y.; Harris, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Lee, P.; Martovetsky, N.; Minervini, J.V.; Radovinsky, A.; Salvetti, M.; Takayasu, M.; Titus, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion research in the United States is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES). The OFES sponsors a wide range of programs to advance fusion science, fusion technology, and basic plasma science. Most experimental devices in the US fusion program are constructed using conventional technologies; however, a small portion of the fusion research program is directed towards large scale commercial power generation, which typically relies on superconductor technology to facilitate steady-state operation with high fusion power gain, Q. The superconductor portion of the US fusion research program is limited to a small number of laboratories including the Plasma Science and Fusion Center at MIT, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Applied Superconductivity Center at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Although Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) are primarily sponsored by the US's High Energy Physics program, both have made significant contributions to advance the superconductor technology needed for the US fusion program. This paper summarizes recent superconductor activities in the US fusion program

  14. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2013 - March 2014

    2014-01-01

    This annual report summarizes achievements from research activities at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) between April 2013 and March 2014. NIFS is an inter-university research organization and conducts open collaboration research under three frameworks which are the General Collaboration Research, the Large Helical Device Collaboration Research and the Bilateral Collaboration Research. More than 500 collaborating studies were implemented during the covered period. About 2,400 collaborators studies were implemented during the covered period. About 2,400 collaborators participated in joint research from 220 external institutions. Many intensively advanced results in plasma physics, fusion science and related fields have been obtained from these studies. Not only NIFS, but also 6 university centers serve as joint research laboratories/centers under bilateral collaboration research. NIFS also organizes diversified frameworks for international collaboration through 6 bilateral agreements, 3 multi-lateral agreements and academic exchange agreements with 18 institutes abroad for the global development of the function of inter-university research organization. (J.P.N.)

  15. The heavy ion fusion research program in West Germany

    Bock, R.

    1984-01-01

    The study on the feasibility of heavy ion beam for inertial confinement fusion was started four years ago, setting the main goal to identify and investigate the key issues of heavy ion fusion concept. The fund for this program has been provided by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. In this paper, the outline of the present research is shown, and some recent achievement is summarized. Moreover, the idea about the goal and the new direction of the future program are discussed. In the present program, two activities are distinguished, that is, the expermental and theoretical studies on accelerators, target physics and atomic physics, and the conceptual design study for a heavy ion-driven power plant. A RF linac with storage rings was chosen as the driver concept. In the accelerator research, ion source studies, RFQ development and beam transport measurement have been considered. Two beam transport experiments were carried out. In the conceptual design study, the HIBALL driver concept, the reactor chamber having the first wall protection using Pb-Li eutectic and so on have been studied. An accelerator facility of modest size has been suggested for basic accelerator physics studies. (Kako, I.)

  16. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    2006-03-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program?s national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  17. 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    None

    2012-10-26

    The 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 14-18, 2012 in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 309 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 189 reviewers. A total of 1,473 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews.

  18. NREL photovoltaic program FY 1997 annual report

    McConnell, R.D.; Hansen, A.; Smoller, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the NREL PV Program from October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997 (FY 1997). The NREL PV Program is part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE National Photovoltaics Program Plan for 1996--2000. The FY 1997 budget authority for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $39.3 million in operating funds and $0.4 million in capital equipment funds. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with $21.8 million (55% of PV funds) going to some 84 subcontractors. Cost sharing by industry added almost $8.8 million to the subcontract R and D activities with industry.

  19. 2010 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program

    None, None

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments in FY2009 for the DOE Hydrogen Program, including the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program and hydrogen-related work in the Offices of Science; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology. It includes reports on all of the research projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program between October 2009 and September 2010.

  20. 1978 annual report, INEL geothermal environmental program

    Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.; Stanley, N.E.

    1979-04-01

    The objective of the Raft River Geothermal Environmental Program, in its fifth year, is to characterize the beneficial and detrimental impacts resulting from the development of moderate-temperature geothermal resources in the valley. This report summarizes the monitoring and research efforts conducted as part of this program in 1978. The results of these monitoring programs will be used to determine the mitigation efforts required to reduce long-term impacts resulting from geothermal development.

  1. Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

    Johnson, R.K.; Bouret, C.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy

  3. Remedial Action Programs annual meeting: Proceedings

    1988-01-01

    Within the DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology manages a number of programs whose purposes are to complete remedial actions at DOE facilities and sites located throughout the United States. These programs include the Surplus Facilities Management Program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings remedial Action Program and the West Valley Demonstration Project. The programs involve the decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively-contaminated structures and equipment, the disposal of uranium mill tailings, and the cleanup or restoration of soils and ground water that have been contaminated with radioactive hazardous substances. Each year the DOE and DOE-contractor staff who conduct these programs meet to exchange information and experience in common technical areas. This year's meeting was hosted by the Surplus Facilities Management Program and was held near DOE Headquarters, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This volume of proceedings provides the record for the meeting. The proceedings consist of abstracts for each presentation made at the meeting, and the visual aids (if any) used by the speakers. The material is organized in the following pages according to the five different sessions at the meeting: Session 1: Environmental Compliance--Policy; Session 2: Environmental Compliance--Practice; Session 3: Reports from working groups; Session 4: DandD Technology; and Session 5: Remedial Action Technology. The agenda for the meeting and the list of meeting registrants are provided in Appendix A and B, respectively. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  4. SERI Biomass Program. FY 1983 annual report

    Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.; McIntosh, R.P.

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1983. The SERI Biomass Program consists of three elements: Aquatic Species, Anaerobic Digestion, and Photo/Biological Hydrogen. Each element has been indexed separately. 2 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  5. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1996 Annual Report

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontract research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaics (PV) Program from October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996 (fiscal year [FY] 1996). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to: "Work in partnership with U.S. industry to develop and deploy photovoltaic technology for generating economically competitive electric power, making photovoltaics an important contributor to the nation's and the world's energy use and environmental improvement. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. PV industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NREL PV Program provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  6. Annual Report: Photovoltaic Subcontract Program FY 1991

    Summers, K. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  7. Energy Analysis Program 1990 annual report

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program has played an active role in the analysis and discussion of energy and environmental issues at several levels. (1) at the international level, with programs as developing scenarios for long-term energy demand in developing countries and organizing leading an analytic effort, ``Energy Efficiency, Developing Countries, and Eastern Europe,`` part of a major effort to increase support for energy efficiency programs worldwide; (2) at national level, the Program has been responsible for assessing energy forecasts and policies affecting energy use (e.g., appliance standards, National Energy Strategy scenarios); and (3) at the state and utility levels, the Program has been a leader in promoting integrated resource utility planning; the collaborative process has led to agreement on a new generation of utility demand-site programs in California, providing an opportunity to use knowledge and analytic techniques of the Program`s researchers. We continue to place highest on analyzing energy efficiency, with particular attention given to energy use in buildings. The Program continues its active analysis of international energy issues in Asia (including China), the Soviet Union, South America, and Western Europe. Analyzing the costs and benefits of different levels of standards for residential appliances continues to be the largest single area of research within the Program. The group has developed and applied techniques for forecasting energy demand (or constructing scenarios) for the United States. We have built a new model of industrial energy demand, are in the process of making major changes in our tools for forecasting residential energy demand, have built an extensive and documented energy conservation supply curve of residential energy use, and are beginning an analysis of energy-demand forecasting for commercial buildings.

  8. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  9. 2016 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    None, None

    2017-03-09

    The 2016 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2016 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; market transformation; and Small Business Innovation Research projects.

  10. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2013-09-23

    This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

  11. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  12. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    Sutula, Raymond A. [DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2006-03-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the program for fiscal year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program’s national laboratories and university and industry partners.

  13. 1970-1971 Annual Report: Extension Service Program, Silliman University.

    Maturan, Eulalio G.

    The 1970-1971 annual report of the Extension Service Program of Silliman University, Dumaguete City, Philippines, treats the following projects: Mabinay Agricultural Extension, Mabinay Negrito Action-Research, Reforestation, and Livestock Dispersal. Also discussed are the Rural Publications Center and other extension services--a radio program,…

  14. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  15. 2009 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    none,

    2009-10-01

    Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting to review the FY2008 accomplishments and FY2009 plans for the Vehicle Technologies Program, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academic to give inputs to DOE on the Program with a structured and formal methodology.

  16. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Satyapal, Sunita [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  17. Remedial Action Program annual conference: Proceedings

    1990-01-01

    Within the DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration ampersand Waste Management, the Office of Environmental Restoration manages a number of programs whose purposes are to complete remedial actions at DOE facilities and sites located throughout the United States. The programs include the Surplus Facilities Management Program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, and the West Valley Demonstration Project. These programs involve the decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively-contaminated structures and equipment, the disposal of uranium mill tailings, and the cleanup or restoration of soils and ground water that have been contaminated with radioactive or hazardous substances. Each year the DOE and DOE-contractor staff who conduct these programs meet to exchange information and experience in common technical areas. This year's meeting was hosted by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, DOE-AL, and was held in Albuquerque, NM. This volume of proceedings is the record of that conference. The proceedings consist of abstracts, summaries, or actual text for each presentation made and any visual aids used by the speakers

  18. Energy Analysis Program 1990 annual report

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program has played an active role in the analysis and discussion of energy and environmental issues at several levels. (1) at the international level, with programs as developing scenarios for long-term energy demand in developing countries and organizing leading an analytic effort, ''Energy Efficiency, Developing Countries, and Eastern Europe,'' part of a major effort to increase support for energy efficiency programs worldwide; (2) at national level, the Program has been responsible for assessing energy forecasts and policies affecting energy use (e.g., appliance standards, National Energy Strategy scenarios); and (3) at the state and utility levels, the Program has been a leader in promoting integrated resource utility planning; the collaborative process has led to agreement on a new generation of utility demand-site programs in California, providing an opportunity to use knowledge and analytic techniques of the Program's researchers. We continue to place highest on analyzing energy efficiency, with particular attention given to energy use in buildings. The Program continues its active analysis of international energy issues in Asia (including China), the Soviet Union, South America, and Western Europe. Analyzing the costs and benefits of different levels of standards for residential appliances continues to be the largest single area of research within the Program. The group has developed and applied techniques for forecasting energy demand (or constructing scenarios) for the United States. We have built a new model of industrial energy demand, are in the process of making major changes in our tools for forecasting residential energy demand, have built an extensive and documented energy conservation supply curve of residential energy use, and are beginning an analysis of energy-demand forecasting for commercial buildings

  19. Energy Analysis Program 1990 annual report

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program has played an active role in the analysis and discussion of energy and environmental issues at several levels. (1) at the international level, with programs as developing scenarios for long-term energy demand in developing countries and organizing leading an analytic effort, Energy Efficiency, Developing Countries, and Eastern Europe,'' part of a major effort to increase support for energy efficiency programs worldwide; (2) at national level, the Program has been responsible for assessing energy forecasts and policies affecting energy use (e.g., appliance standards, National Energy Strategy scenarios); and (3) at the state and utility levels, the Program has been a leader in promoting integrated resource utility planning; the collaborative process has led to agreement on a new generation of utility demand-site programs in California, providing an opportunity to use knowledge and analytic techniques of the Program's researchers. We continue to place highest on analyzing energy efficiency, with particular attention given to energy use in buildings. The Program continues its active analysis of international energy issues in Asia (including China), the Soviet Union, South America, and Western Europe. Analyzing the costs and benefits of different levels of standards for residential appliances continues to be the largest single area of research within the Program. The group has developed and applied techniques for forecasting energy demand (or constructing scenarios) for the United States. We have built a new model of industrial energy demand, are in the process of making major changes in our tools for forecasting residential energy demand, have built an extensive and documented energy conservation supply curve of residential energy use, and are beginning an analysis of energy-demand forecasting for commercial buildings.

  20. Environmental research program. 1992 annual report

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the Environmental Research Program is to contribute to the understanding of the formation, mitigation, transport, transformation, and ecological effects of energy-related pollutants on the environment. The program is multidisciplinary and includes fundamental and applied research in chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, and ecology. The program undertakes research and development in efficient and environmentally benign combustion, pollution abatement and destruction, and novel methods of detection and analysis of criteria and non-criteria pollutants. This diverse group investigates combustion, atmospheric processes, flue-gas chemistry, and ecological systems.

  1. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Fusion material development program in the broader approach activities

    Nishitani, T. [Directorates of Fusion Energy Research: Naka, Ibaraki, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Jitsukawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hayashi, K.; Takatsu, H. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Momie Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Yamanishi, T. [Tritium Process Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Tsuchiya, K. [Directorates of Fusion Energy Research, JAEA, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); MoIslang, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baluc, N. [EPFL-Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, UHD - CRPP, PPB, Lausanne (Switzerland); Pizzuto, A. [ENEA CR Frascat, Frascati (Italy); Hodgson, E.R. [CIEMAT-Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Association Euratom-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Lasser, R.; Gasparotto, M. [EFDA CSU Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The world fusion community is now launching construction of ITER, the first nuclear-grade fusion machine in the world. In parallel to the ITER program, Broader Approach (BA) activities are initiated by EU and Japan, mainly at Rokkasho BA site in Japan. The BA activities include the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility-Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (IFMIF-EVEDA), the International Fusion Energy Research Center (IFERC), and the Satellite Tokamak. IFERC consists of three sub project; a DEMO Design and R and D coordination Center, a Computational Simulation Center, and an ITER Remote Experimentation Center. Technical R and Ds mainly on fusion materials will be implemented as a part of the DEMO Design and R and D coordination Center. Based on the common interest of each party toward DEMO, R and Ds on a) reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels as a DEMO blanket structural material, SiCf/SiC composites, advanced tritium breeders and neutron multiplier for DEMO blankets, and Tritium Technology were selected and assessed by European and Japanese experts. In the R and D on the RAFM steels, the fabrication technology, techniques to incorporate the fracture/rupture properties of the irradiated materials, and methods to predict the deformation and fracture behaviors of structures under irradiation will be investigated. For SiCf/SiC composites, standard methods to evaluate high-temperature and life-time properties will be developed. Not only for SiCf/SiC but also related ceramics, physical and chemical properties such as He and H permeability and absorption will be investigated under irradiation. As the advanced tritium breeder R and D, Japan and EU plan to establish the production technique for advanced breeder pebbles of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, respectively. Also physical, chemical, and mechanical properties will be investigated for produced breeder pebbles. For the

  3. 2015 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual

    Stone, Terri [NNSA Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Washington, DC (United States); Mischo, Millicent [NNSA Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Academic Programs (SSAP) are essential to maintaining a pipeline of professionals to support the technical capabilities that reside at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national laboratories, sites, and plants. Since 1992, the United States has observed the moratorium on nuclear testing while significantly decreasing the nuclear arsenal. To accomplish this without nuclear testing, NNSA and its laboratories developed a science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program to maintain and enhance the experimental and computational tools required to ensure the continued safety, security, and reliability of the stockpile. NNSA launched its academic program portfolio more than a decade ago to engage students skilled in specific technical areas of relevance to stockpile stewardship. The success of this program is reflected by the large number of SSAP students choosing to begin their careers at NNSA national laboratories.

  4. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. SERI biomass program annual technical report: 1982

    Bergeron, P.W.; Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.

    1983-02-01

    The biomass with which this report is concerned includes aquatic plants, which can be converted into liquid fuels and chemicals; organic wastes (crop residues as well as animal and municipal wastes), from which biogas can be produced via anerobic digestion; and organic or inorganic waste streams, from which hydrogen can be produced by photobiological processes. The Biomass Program Office supports research in three areas which, although distinct, all use living organisms to create the desired products. The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) supports research on organisms that are themselves processed into the final products, while the Anaerobic Digestion (ADP) and Photo/Biological Hydrogen Program (P/BHP) deals with organisms that transform waste streams into energy products. The P/BHP is also investigating systems using water as a feedstock and cell-free systems which do not utilize living organisms. This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1982.

  6. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

  7. Fusion Energy Advisory Committee report on program strategy for US magnetic fusion energy research

    Conn, R.W.; Berkner, K.H.; Culler, F.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dreyfus, D.A.; Holdren, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; Parker, R.R.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Siemon, R.E.; Staudhammer, P.; Weitzner, H.

    1992-09-01

    The Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) was charged by the Department of Energy (DOE) with developing recommendations on how best to pursue the goal of a practical magnetic fusion reactor in the context of several budget scenarios covering the period FY 1994-FY 1998. Four budget scenarios were examined, each anchored to the FY 1993 figure of $337.9 million for fusion energy (less $9 million for inertial fusion energy which is not examined here)

  8. Annual report of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA for FY2008 and FY2009

    Isei, Nobuaki

    2011-03-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for FY2008 (from April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009) and FY2009 (from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010), including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. Concerning the ITER project, JAEA was nominated as the domestic agency by the Japanese government after the ITER Agreement took effect, and has fulfilled the obligations. In the development of superconducting conductors, JAEA constructed a technical platform for the fabrication of superconducting conductors for toroidal field (TF) coils ahead of other countries. JAEA immediately started and completed the construction of a plant to fabricate superconducting conductors, and started their fabrication ahead of other countries. In the development of gyrotron high-frequency heating equipment, since only the JAEA satisfies the ITER's procurement specifications among supplier countries, the ITER Organization requested JAEA to conduct confidence tests, and achieved results such as data acquisition that could contribute to the development of the ITER's operational scenario. For the development of neutral beam injectors, advantages of the multi-stage acceleration system developed by JAEA was recognized as a result of comparative experiments with single-stage acceleration systems developed in Europe for the particle acceleration system, and was adopted in the ITER's technical specifications. For the Broader Approach (BA) activities, JAEA was designated as the implementing agency by the Japanese government after the BA Agreement took effect, and has fulfilled the obligations and promoted three projects in the BA activities steadily through domestic cooperation and coordination with Europe. Concerning activities related to the International Fusion Energy

  9. (Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)

    Johnson, R.; Luckhardt, R.; Terry, N.; Drake, D.; Gaines, J. (eds.)

    1990-04-27

    This KMS Fusion Semi-Annual Technical Report covers the period October 1989 through March 1990. It contains a review of work performed by KMS Fusion, Inc. (KMSF), in support of the national program to achieve inertially confined fusion (ICF). A major section of the report is devoted to target technology, a field which is expected to play an increasingly important role in the overall KMSF fusion effort. Among the highlights of our efforts in this area covered in this report are: improvements and new developments in target fabrication techniques, including a discussion of techniques for introducing gaussian bumps and bands on target surfaces. Development of a single automated system for the interferometric characterization of transparent shells. Residual gas analysis of the blowing gases contained in glass shells made from xerogels. These usually include CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, and are objectionable because they dilute the fuel. Efforts to observe the ice layers formed in the {beta}-layering process in cryogenic targets, and to simulate the formation of these layers. In addition to our work on target technology, we conducted experiments with the Chroma laser and supported the ICF effort at other labs with theoretical and computational support as well as diagnostic development. Included in the work covered in this report are: experiments on Chroma to study interpenetration of and ionization balance in laser generated plasmas. Diagnostic development, including an optical probe for the Aurora laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a high energy x-ray continuum spectrograph for Aurora. Investigation of the radiation cooling instability as a possible mechanism for the generation of relatively cold, dense jets observed in ICF experiments.

  10. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program. Annual report, FY 1992

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  11. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program: FY 2004 Annual Report

    2005-10-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2004 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2004. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  12. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    2007-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  13. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program 2007 Annual Report

    2008-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2007 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program from October 2006 to September 2007. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  14. Subseabed Disposal Program. Annual report, January-December 1978

    Talbert, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    This is the fifth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP), which was begun in June 1973. The program was initiated by Sandia Laboratories to explore the utility of stable, uniform, and relatively unproductive areas of the world as possible repositories for high-level nuclear wastes. The program, now international in scope, is currently focused on the stable submarine geologic formations under the deep oceans

  15. Environmental Research Program. 1994 annual report

    Brown, N.J.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of the Environmental Research Program is to enhance the understanding of, and mitigate the effects of pollutants on health, ecological systems, global and regional climate, and air quality. The program is multi-disciplinary and includes fundamental research and development in efficient and environmentally-benign combustion, pollutant abatement and destruction, and novel methods of detection and analysis of criteria and non-criteria pollutants. This diverse group conducts investigations in combustion, atmospheric and marine processes, flue-gas chemistry, and ecological systems.

  16. Indoor environment program: FY 1988 annual report

    1989-03-01

    The Indoor Environment Program examines the scientific issues associated with the design and operation of buildings to optimize energy performance and occupant comfort and health. Optimizing occupant health and comfort is addressed in various ways by groups within the Program. To examine energy flow through all elements of the building shell, the Energy Performance of Buildings Group measures air infiltration rates, studies thermal characteristics of structural elements, and develops simplified models of the behavior of complete buildings. Potential savings in the infiltration area are great

  17. Land Reclamation Program annual report, 1979

    None

    1980-09-01

    The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and has three primary objectives: (1) to develop energy-efficient and cost-effective mining and reclamation techniques; (2) to assist industry in evaluating the viability of environmental regulations and demonstrating techniques to meet these regulations; and (3) to supply data and evaluation techniques to decisionmakers concerned with trade-offs between energy development and environmental quality. Six integrated field research sites have been established to address problems associated with surface mining operations. This program relies heavily on input from industry and has developed working arrangements with coal companies at each of the current mining sites. A major area of interest is the development of a ten-year environmental mining and reclamation research plan for the Assistant Secretary for Environment. The Land Reclamation Program assigns the highest priority to the transfer to users of information generated by its research.

  18. Energy Analysis Program. 1992 Annual report

    1993-06-01

    The Program became deeply involved in establishing 4 Washington, D.C., project office diving the last few months of fiscal year 1942. This project office, which reports to the Energy & Environment Division, will receive the majority of its support from the Energy Analysis Program. We anticipate having two staff scientists and support personnel in offices within a few blocks of DOE. Our expectation is that this office will carry out a series of projects that are better managed closer to DOE. We also anticipate that our representation in Washington will improve and we hope to expand the Program, its activities, and impact, in police-relevant analyses. In spite of the growth that we have achieved, the Program continues to emphasize (1) energy efficiency of buildings, (2) appliance energy efficiency standards, (3) energy demand forecasting, (4) utility policy studies, especially integrated resource planning issues, and (5) international energy studies, with considerate emphasis on developing countries and economies in transition. These continuing interests are reflected in the articles that appear in this report.

  19. Land reclamation program annual report, 1978

    Bernard, J. R.; Carter, R. P.; Cleaves, D. T.

    1979-07-01

    The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers, and has three primary objectives: (1) to develop energy-efficient and cost-effective mining and reclamation techniques; (2) to assist industry in evaluating the applicability of regulations and demonstrating techniques to meet regulations; and (3) to supply data and evaluation techniques to decisionmakers concerned with trade-offs between energy development and environmental quality. Six integrated field research sites have been established to address problems associated with surface mining operations. This program relies heavily on input from industry and has developed excellent working arrangements with coal companies at each of the current mining sites. A major area of interest is the development of a computerized system to store and manage data gathered by the research staff. The Land Reclamation Program assigns the highest priority to the transfer to users of information generated by its research.

  20. Superconducting technology program Sandia 1996 annual report

    Roth, E.P.

    1997-02-01

    Sandia's Superconductivity Technology Program is a thallium-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, open-system thick film conductor development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The research efforts currently underway are: (1) Process development and characterization of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting closed system wire and tape, (2) Investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based thick films using two-zone processing, and (3) Cryogenic design of a 30K superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY96 in each of these areas

  1. Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Neff, Susan Gale

    2015-01-01

    What is the Cosmic Origins (COR) Program? From ancient times, humans have looked up at the night sky and wondered: Are we alone? How did the universe come to be? How does the universe work? COR focuses on the second question. Scientists investigating this broad theme seek to understand the origin and evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present day, determining how the expanding universe grew into a grand cosmic web of dark matter enmeshed with galaxies and pristine gas, forming, merging, and evolving over time. COR also seeks to understand how stars and planets form from clouds in these galaxies to create the heavy elements that are essential to life starting with the first generation of stars to seed the universe, and continuing through the birth and eventual death of all subsequent generations of stars. The COR Programs purview includes the majority of the field known as astronomy, from antiquity to the present.

  2. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-09-01

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

  3. 1998 Environmental Management Science Program Annual Report

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is a collaborative partnership between the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science (DOE-SC), and the Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to sponsor basic environmental and waste management related research. Results are expected to lead to reduction of the costs, schedule, and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. The EMSP research portfolio addresses the most challenging technical problems of the EM program related to high level waste, spent nuclear fuel, mixed waste, nuclear materials, remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and health, ecology, or risk. The EMSP was established in response to a mandate from Congress in the fiscal year 1996 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. Congress directed the Department to ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs, develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective''. This mandate followed similar recommendations from the Galvin Commission to the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. The EMSP also responds to needs identified by National Academy of Sciences experts, regulators, citizen advisory groups, and other stakeholders

  4. Fundamental geosciences program. Annual report, 1977

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Apps, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The geoscience program relating to geothermal energy consists of four projects. In the project on reservoir dynamics, sophisticated codes have been written to simulate the dynamics of heat flow in geothermal reservoir systems. These codes have also been applied to the investigations of natural aquifers as a storage system for thermal energy. In the second project, core samples are studied to determine the high temperature and high pressure behavior of aquifers in the presence of saturating fluids. The third project covers the systematic evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes in order to interpret the behavior of geothermal fluids. The fourth project involves hydrothermal solubility measurements of various minerals to elucidate the chemistry and mass transfer in geothermal systems. The second major program includes four projects which involve precise measurements and analysis of physical and chemical properties of geologic materials. These include measurements of the thermodynamic properties (viscosity, density and heat capacity) of silicate materials to help understand magma genesis and evolution, high-precision neutron activation analysis of rare and trace elements in magmatic materials, and the precise measurement of seismic wave velocities near geological faults, in order to determine the buildup of stress in the earth's crust. Third, the development program in fundamental geosciences includes six innovative projects. These projects include research in the in situ leaching of uranium ore, properties of magmas, removal of pyrite from coal, properties of soils and soft rocks, stress flow behavior of fractured rock systems, and high-precision mass spectrometry.

  5. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1984 annual report

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the program is to generate scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective process for converting biomass resources into clean fuels. The goal of the program is to develop the data base for biomass thermal conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and by exploring those parameters that are critical to the conversion processes. The research activities can be divided into: (1) gasification technology; (2) liquid fuels technology; (3) direct combustion technology; and (4) program support activities. These activities are described in detail in this report. Outstanding accomplishments during fiscal year 1984 include: (1) successful operation of 3-MW combustor/gas turbine system; (2) successful extended term operation of an indirectly heated, dual bed gasifier for producing medium-Btu gas; (3) determination that oxygen requirements for medium-Btu gasification of biomass in a pressurized, fluidized bed gasifier are low; (4) established interdependence of temperature and residence times on biomass pyrolysis oil yields; and (5) determination of preliminary technical feasibility of thermally gasifying high moisture biomass feedstocks. A bibliography of 1984 publications is included. 26 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Research program. Controlled thermonuclear fusion. Synthesis report 2013

    Villard, L.; Marot, L.

    2014-01-01

    In 1961, 3 years after the 2 nd International Conference on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, the Research Centre on Plasma Physics (CRPP) was created as a department of the Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne (Switzerland). From 1979, CRPP collaborates to the European Program on fusion research in the framework of EURATOM. The advantages of fusion are remarkable: the fuel is available in great quantity all over the world; the reactor is intrinsically safe; the reactor material, activated during operation, loses practically all its activity within about 100 years. But the working up of the controlled fusion necessitates extreme technological conditions. The progress realized in the framework of EURATOM has led to the design of the experimental reactor ITER which is being built at Cadarache (France). The future prototype reactor DEMO is foreseen in 2040-2050. In 2013, CRPP participated in the works on ITER in the framework of the Fusion for Energy (F4E) agency. At EPFL the research concerns the physics of the magnetic confinement with experiments on the tokamak TCV (variable configuration tokamak), the numerical simulations, the plasma heating and the generation of current by hyper frequency radio waves. At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), research is devoted to the superconductivity. At the Basel University the studies get on interactions between the plasma and the tokamak walls. A new improved confinement regime, called IN-mode, was discovered on TCV. The theory and numerical simulation group interprets the experimental results and foresees those of futures machines. It requires very high performance computers. The Gyrotron group develops radiofrequency sources in the mm range for heating the TCV plasma as well as for ITER and the Wendelstein-7 stellarator. Concerning superconductivity, tests are conducted at PSI on toroidal cables of ITER. The development of conductors and coils for the DEMO reactor has been pursued. In the context of international

  7. Research program. Controlled thermonuclear fusion. Synthesis report 2015

    Villard, L.; Marot, L.; Soom, P.

    2016-01-01

    In 1961, 3 years after the 2 nd International Conference on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, the Research Centre on Plasma Physics (CRPP) was created as a department of the Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne (Switzerland). From 1979, CRPP collaborates to the European Program on fusion research in the framework of EURATOM. In 2015 its name was changed to Swiss Plasma Centre (SPC). The advantages of fusion are remarkable: the fuel is available in great quantity all over the world; the reactor is intrinsically safe; the reactor material, activated during operation, loses practically all its activity within about 100 years. But the working up of the controlled fusion necessitates extreme technological conditions. In 1979, the Joint European Torus (JET) began its operation; today it is still the most powerful tokamak in the world, in which an energy yield Q of 0.65 could be obtained. In 2015, the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7X), the largest in the world, was set into operation. The progress realized in the framework of EURATOM has led to the planning of the experimental reactor ITER which is being built at Cadarache (France). ITER is designed to reach a Q-value largely above 1. The future prototype reactor DEMO is foreseen in 2040-2050. It should demonstrate the ability of a fusion reactor to inject permanently electricity into the grid. In 2015, SPC participated in the works on ITER in the framework of the Fusion for Energy (F4E) agency. At EPFL the research concerns the physics of the magnetic confinement with experiments on the tokamak TCV (variable configuration tokamak), the numerical simulations, the plasma heating and the generation of current by hyper frequency radio waves. At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), research is devoted to the superconductivity; at the Basel University the studies get on interactions between the plasma and the tokamak walls. The large flexibility of TCV allows creating and controlling plasmas of different shapes which

  8. INEL Geothermal Environmental Program. 1979 annual report

    Thurow, T.L.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-04-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Environmental Program is designed to assess beneficial and detrimental impacts to the ecosystem resulting from the development of moderate temperature geothermal resources in the valley. The results of this research contribute to developing an understanding of Raft River Valley ecology and provide a basis for making management decisions to reduce potential long-term detrimental impacts on the environment. The environmental monitoring and research efforts conducted during the past six years of geothermal development and planned future research are summarized.

  9. Energy Conversion & Storage Program, 1993 annual report

    Cairns, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in: production of new synthetic fuels; development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; and the study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  10. Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Neff, Susan Gale

    2016-01-01

    What is the Cosmic Origins (COR) Program? From ancient times, humans have looked up at the night sky and wondered: Are we alone? How did the universe come to be? How does the universe work? COR focuses on the second question. Scientists investigating this broad theme seek to understand the origin and evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present day, determining how the expanding universe grew into a grand cosmic web of dark matter enmeshed with galaxies and pristine gas, forming, merging, and evolving over time.

  11. Superconducting Technology Program: Sandia 1993 annual report

    Roth, E.P.

    1994-05-01

    Sandia's STP program is a four-part high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, thallium-based HTS film development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The four research efforts currently underway are: (1) process research on the material synthesis of high-temperature superconductors; (2) investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting thick films; (3) process development and characterization of high-temperature superconducting wire and tape, and (4) cryogenic design of a high-temperature superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY93 in each of these four areas. A brief background of each project is included to provide historical context and perspective. Major areas of research are described, although no attempt has been made to exhaustively include all work performed in each of these areas

  12. Environmental research program. 1995 Annual report

    Brown, N.J.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the Environmental Research Program is to enhance the understanding of, and mitigate the effects of pollutants on health, ecological systems, global and regional climate, and air quality. The program is multidisciplinary and includes fundamental research and development in efficient and environmentally benign combustion, pollutant abatement and destruction, and novel methods of detection and analysis of criteria and noncriteria pollutants. This diverse group conducts investigations in combustion, atmospheric and marine processes, flue-gas chemistry, and ecological systems. Combustion chemistry research emphasizes modeling at microscopic and macroscopic scales. At the microscopic scale, functional sensitivity analysis is used to explore the nature of the potential-to-dynamics relationships for reacting systems. Rate coefficients are estimated using quantum dynamics and path integral approaches. At the macroscopic level, combustion processes are modelled using chemical mechanisms at the appropriate level of detail dictated by the requirements of predicting particular aspects of combustion behavior. Parallel computing has facilitated the efforts to use detailed chemistry in models of turbulent reacting flow to predict minor species concentrations.

  13. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  14. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  15. Fusion Power Program biannual progress report, April-September 1979

    1980-02-01

    This biannual report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the April-September 1979 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Separate abstracts were prepared for three sections

  16. INEL BNCT research program: Annual report, 1995

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1995. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, physics (treatment planning software, real-time neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (large animal models efficacy studies). Design of a reactor based epithermal neutron extraction facility is discussed in detail. Final results of boron magnetic resonance imagining is included for both borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) in rats, and BSH in humans. Design of an epithermal neutron facility using electron linear accelerators is presented, including a treatise on energy removal from the beam target. Information on the multiple fraction injection of BSH in rats is presented

  17. INEL BNCT research program: Annual report, 1995

    Venhuizen, J.R. [ed.

    1996-04-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1995. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, physics (treatment planning software, real-time neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (large animal models efficacy studies). Design of a reactor based epithermal neutron extraction facility is discussed in detail. Final results of boron magnetic resonance imagining is included for both borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) in rats, and BSH in humans. Design of an epithermal neutron facility using electron linear accelerators is presented, including a treatise on energy removal from the beam target. Information on the multiple fraction injection of BSH in rats is presented.

  18. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report 1994

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1994. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor studies, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, ICP-AES analysis of biological samples), physics (treatment planning software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of BSH and BPA is presented and results of 21 spontaneous tumor bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are discussed. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors is presented. Highlights from the First International Workshop on Accelerator-Based Neutron Sources for BNCT are included

  19. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1977--September 1978

    1979-04-01

    Research is reported for the combined groups consisting of the Accelerator Division and the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group. Major topics reported include accelerator operations, magnetic fusion energy, and advanced accelerator development. (GHT)

  20. Review projects for the US Fusion Program: Progress report, December 1, 1984-February 28, 1987

    Ribe, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews projects at the University of Washington on the following topics: Magnetic Fusion Energy Program Plan (Feb. 1985); High Density Power Systems; Fusion Systems Studies; Burning Plasmas and Compact Ignition Tokamak; US Magnetic Mirror Program; and Technical Planning Activity (Jan. 1987)

  1. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1996 Annual report

    1996-01-01

    This first annual report on DOE's Price Anderson Amendments Act enforcement program covers the activities, accomplishments, and planning for calendar year 1996. It also includes the infrastructure development activities of 1995. It encompasses the activities of the headquarters' Office of Enforcement in the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and Investigation and the coordinators and technical advisors in DOE's Field and Program Offices and other EH Offices. This report includes an overview of the enforcement program; noncompliances, investigations, and enforcement actions; summary of significant enforcement actions; examples where enforcement action was deferred; and changes and improvements to the program

  2. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report: Class of 2011

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2012-08-20

    Annual report for the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Features the Class of 2011. The NGFP is a NNSA program with a mission to cultivate future technical and policy leaders in nonproliferation and international security. Through the NGFP, outstanding graduate students with career interests in nonproliferation are appointed to program offices within the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN). During their one-year assignment, Fellows participate in programs designed to detect, prevent, and reverse the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  3. Fermi National Acceleator Laboratory Annual Program Review 1992

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; Jovanovic, Drasko; Pordes, Stephen [Fermilab

    1992-01-01

    This book is submitted as a written adjunct to the Annual DOE High Energy Physics Program Review of Fermilab, scheduled this year for March 31 - April 2, 1992. In it are described the functions and activities of the various Laboratory areas plus statements of plans and goals for the coming year.

  4. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Annual Program Review 1999

    1999-05-01

    This book is submitted as one written part of the 1999 Annual DOE High Energy Physics Program Review of Fermilab, scheduled May 5-7,1999. This book should be read in conjunction with the 1999 Fermilab Workbook and the review presentations.

  5. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report, 2016

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The California Community Colleges, through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD), continue to propel the California economy forward by providing students with skills to earn well-paying jobs. At the same time, EWD helps provide California companies with the talent they need to compete on a global scale. This annual report for…

  6. 40 CFR 256.05 - Annual work program.

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS Purpose, General Requirements... included by reference in the annual work program: (1) Substate solid waste management plans, (2) Plans for the development of facilities and services, including hazardous waste management facilities and...

  7. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Annual Program Review 1993

    1993-01-01

    This book is submitted as a written adjunct to the 1993 Annual DOE High Energy Physics Program Review of Fermilab, scheduled for March 31-April 3. In it are described the functions and activities of the various Laboratory Divisions and Sections plus statements of plans and goals for the coming year. The Review Committee, as this goes to press, consists of·

  8. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Annual Program Review 1991

    Appel, Jeffrey A. [Fermilab; Jovanovic, Drasko [Fermilab; Pordes, Stephen [Fermilab

    1991-01-01

    This book is submitted as a written adjunct to the Annual DOE High Energy Physics Program Review of Fermilab, scheduled this year for April 10-12, 1991. In it are described the functions and activities of the various Laboratory areas plus statements of plans and goals for the coming year.

  9. ARIES Oxide Production Program Annual Report - FY14

    Kelley, Evelyn A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dinehart, Steven Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A summary of the major accomplishments (September), milestones, financial summary, project performance and issues facing the ARIES Oxide Production Program at the close of FY14 is presented in this Executive Summary. Annual accomplishments are summarized in the body of the report.

  10. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report 1994

    Venhuizen, J.R. [ed.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1994. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor studies, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, ICP-AES analysis of biological samples), physics (treatment planning software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of BSH and BPA is presented and results of 21 spontaneous tumor bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are discussed. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors is presented. Highlights from the First International Workshop on Accelerator-Based Neutron Sources for BNCT are included. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. INEL BNCT Research Program Annual Report 1993

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Research Program for calendar year 1993. Contributions from all the principal investigators are included, covering chemistry (pituitary tumor studies, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, boron drug analysis), physics (radiation dosimetry software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (tissue and efficacy studies of small and large animal models). Information on the potential toxicity of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine is presented. Results of 21 spontaneous-tumor-bearing dogs that have been treated with boron neutron capture therapy at the Brookhaven National Laboratory are updated. Boron-containing drug purity verification is discussed in some detail. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging of boron in vivo are discussed. Several boron-carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors is presented. Measurement of the epithermal-neutron flux of the Petten (The Netherlands) High Flux Reactor beam (HFB11B), and comparison to predictions are shown.

  12. Elements to be considered in planning heavy ion fusion program: a summary

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1978-01-01

    A summary of Battelle's Engineering Development Program Plan for inertial confinement fusion is presented. Included are development objectives, facilities to achieve these objectives, program strategies, and a discussion of heavy-ion driver development

  13. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report, 1992

    Venhuizen, J.R. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1992. Contributions from all the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor targeting compounds, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of biological samples), physics (radiation dosimetry software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine is presented, results of 21 spontaneous-tumor-bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are discussed, and predictions for an epithermal-neutron beam at the Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) are shown. Cellular-level boron detection and localization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, low atomization resonance ionization spectroscopy, and alpha track are presented. Boron detection by ICP-AES is discussed in detail. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors with BNCT is presented. Measurement of the epithermal-neutron flux at BNL and comparison to predictions are shown. Calculations comparing the GTRR and BMRR epithermal-neutron beams are also presented. Individual progress reports described herein are separately abstracted and indexed for the database.

  14. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

  15. Indoor Environment Program - 1996 Annual Report

    Indoor Environment Program

    1996-11-01

    The forty-five chemists, physicists, biologists, architects, engineers, staff, and students of the Indoor Environment Program are all working to solve the problems of indoor air quality, health, comfort, and energy use associated with the indoor environment. A common thread throughout this work is the importance of ventilation--both for its role in supporting human health and comfort as well as for its liability in requiring large amounts of energy to heat and cool it. The importance of understanding these interactions can be illustrated by two examples: the health and productivity of workers (Fisk and Rosenfeld, 1996) and the performance of sensitive equipment in clean room environments (Faulkner, et d., 1996). During the past year, we estimated the magnitudes of health and productivity gains that may be obtained by providing better indoor environments. The ratio of the potential financial benefits of improving indoor environments to the costs of the improvements ranges between 20 and 50. A second example is from our Clean Room Energy Efficiency Study: Clean rooms utilize large amounts of electricity to operate fans that recirculate air at very high flow rates through particle filters. Usually, the fans operate continuously at full speed, even when the clean room is unused. To reduce the energy use in a research clean room, the rate of air recirculation was controlled in response to real-time measurements of particle concentration. With this new control system, fan energy use decreased by 65% to 85% while maintaining particle concentrations below the allowable limits except during occasional one-minute periods. The estimated payback period for this technology is one to four years.

  16. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report, 1992

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1992. Contributions from all the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor targeting compounds, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of biological samples), physics (radiation dosimetry software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine is presented, results of 21 spontaneous-tumor-bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are discussed, and predictions for an epithermal-neutron beam at the Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) are shown. Cellular-level boron detection and localization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, low atomization resonance ionization spectroscopy, and alpha track are presented. Boron detection by ICP-AES is discussed in detail. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors with BNCT is presented. Measurement of the epithermal-neutron flux at BNL and comparison to predictions are shown. Calculations comparing the GTRR and BMRR epithermal-neutron beams are also presented. Individual progress reports described herein are separately abstracted and indexed for the database

  17. Research program. Controlled thermonuclear fusion. Synthesis report 2014

    Villard, L.; Marot, L.; Fiocco, D.

    2015-01-01

    In 1961, 3 years after the 2 nd International Conference on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, the Research Centre on Plasma Physics (CRPP) was created as a department of the Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne (Switzerland). From 1979, CRPP collaborates to the European Program on fusion research in the framework of EURATOM. The advantages of fusion are remarkable: the fuel is available in great quantity all over the world; the reactor is intrinsically safe; the reactor material, activated during operation, loses practically all its activity within about 100 years. But the working up of the controlled fusion necessitates extreme technological conditions. In 1979, the Joint European Torus (JET) began its operation; today it is still the most powerful tokamak in the world; its energy yield Q reached 0.65. The progress realized in the framework of EURATOM has led to the planning of the experimental reactor ITER which is being built at Cadarache (France). ITER is designed to reach a Q-value largely above 1. The future prototype reactor DEMO is foreseen in 2040-2050. It should demonstrate the ability of a fusion reactor to inject electricity into the grid for long term. In 2014, CRPP participated in the works on ITER in the framework of the Fusion for Energy (F4E) agency. At EPFL the research concerns the physics of the magnetic confinement with experiments on the tokamak TCV (variable configuration tokamak), the numerical simulations, the plasma heating and the generation of current by hyper frequency radio waves. At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), research is devoted to the superconductivity. At the Basel University the studies get on interactions between the plasma and the tokamak walls. The large flexibility of TCV allows creating and controlling plasmas of different shapes which are necessary to optimise the core geometry of future reactors. Moreover, the plasma heating by mm radio waves allows guiding the injected power according to specific

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Pollution Prevention Program annual report.

    Harris, Janet S.

    2011-04-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. Pollution Prevention supports the goals and objectives to increase the procurement and use of environmentally friendly products and materials and minimize the generation of waste (nonhazardous, hazardous, radiological, wastewater). Through participation on the Interdisciplinary Team P2 provides guidance for integration of environmentally friendly purchasing and waste minimization requirements into projects during the planning phase. Table 7 presents SNL's corporate objectives and targets that support the elements of the Pollution Prevention program.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories, California Pollution Prevention Program annual report

    Harris, Janet S.

    2011-01-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. Pollution Prevention supports the goals and objectives to increase the procurement and use of environmentally friendly products and materials and minimize the generation of waste (nonhazardous, hazardous, radiological, wastewater). Through participation on the Interdisciplinary Team P2 provides guidance for integration of environmentally friendly purchasing and waste minimization requirements into projects during the planning phase. Table 7 presents SNL's corporate objectives and targets that support the elements of the Pollution Prevention program.

  20. JAERI/U.S. collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Mori, Takamasa; Kosako, Kazuaki; Oyama, Yukio; Nakamura, Tomoo

    1989-10-01

    Phase IIa and IIb experiments of JAERI/U.S. Collaborative Program on Fusion Blanket Neutronics have been performed using the FNS facility at JAERI. The phase IIa experimental systems consist of the Li 2 O test region, the rotating neutron target and the Li 2 CO 3 container. In phase IIb, a beryllium layer is added to the inner wall to investigate a multiplier effect. Measured parameters are source characteristics by a foil activation method and spectrum measurements using both NE-213 and proton recoil counters. The measurements inside the Li 2 O region included tritium production rates, reaction rate by foil activation and neutron spectrum measurements. Analysis for these parameters was performed by using two dimensional discrete ordinate codes DOT3.5 and DOT-DD, and a Monte Carlo code MORSE-DD. The nuclear data used were based on JENDL3/PR1 and PR2. ENDF/B-IV, V and the FNS file were used as activation cross sections. The configurations analysed for the test region were a reference, a beryllium front and a beryllium sandwiched systems in phase IIa, and a reference and a beryllium front with first wall systems in phase IIb. This document describes the results of analysis and comparison between the calculations and the measurements. The prediction accuracy of key parameters in a fusion reactor blanket are examined. The tritium production rates can be well predicted in the reference systems but are fairly underestimated in the system with a beryllium multiplier. Details of experiments and the experimental techniques are described separately in the another report. (author)

  1. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  2. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, [June 1992--June 1993

    1993-10-01

    This report, the Environment Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) Annual Report, is the second of three reports that document activities under the EHAP grant and details progress made during the first year of the grant. The first year was devoted to the development of a working program implementation plan. During the developmental process some key objectives were achieved such as developing a Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Environmental Studies at MUSC (Medical University of South Carolina) and conducting the first Crossroads of Humanity series Round Table Forum. The PIP (Program Implementation Program) details the objectives, management and budgetary basis for the overall management and control of the grant over the next four years, the yearly program plans provide the monthly and day-to-day programmatic and budgetary control by which the PIP was developed.

  3. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, [June 1992--June 1993

    1993-10-01

    This report, the Environment Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) Annual Report, is the second of three reports that document activities under the EHAP grant and details progress made during the first year of the grant. The first year was devoted to the development of a working program implementation plan. During the developmental process some key objectives were achieved such as developing a Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Environmental Studies at MUSC (Medical University of South Carolina) and conducting the first Crossroads of Humanity series Round Table Forum. The PIP (Program Implementation Program) details the objectives, management and budgetary basis for the overall management and control of the grant over the next four years, the yearly program plans provide the monthly and day-to-day programmatic and budgetary control by which the PIP was developed

  4. Magnetic fusion program in the United States: an overview and perspective

    Clarke, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    Continuing technical progress in magnetic fusion energy research and a coherent national program involving national laboratories, industry and universities has won strong support from the new Department of Energy. This review presents recent technical progress and examines fusion in relation to other long term energy supply options. Fusion is seen as a technology which, because of its apparently minimal environmental impacts and promise of reasonable cost, has a good chance of competing successfully with the other inexhaustible energy sources

  5. Nuclear Fusion Project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    Kast, G.

    1987-12-01

    Short communications give a survey of 38 technology tasks, the development of ECRH power sources at 150 GHz, and 8 NET study contracts. The fusion technology contracts and the NET contracts are listed in the appendices I and II, respectively, while the KfK departments contributing to the Fusion Project and the Fusion Project Management Staff are listed in appendices III and IV, respectively. (GG)

  6. Annual report of the Fusion Research and Development Center for the period of April 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982

    1982-11-01

    Research and development activities of the Fusion Research and Development Center (Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and Division of Large Tokamak Development) from April 1981 to March 1982 are described. Emphasis in the JFT-2 and Doublet III Tokamak programs was placed on high-power heating experiments. JFT-2M, which is to replace JFT-2, is in fabrication and will be operational in early 1983. Construction of JT-60 progressed as planned with its completion targeted in March 1985. In fusion technology programs development of the prototype NBI unit and klystrons for JT-60 made satisfactory progress; particularly rewarding was the demonstration of full capability of the NBI prototype unit in March 1982. The Japanese coil for the IEA Large Coil Task was completed and passed the cooldown test in the domestic test facility. Activities in the design of the near-term FER and INTOR and the power reactor were continued. (author)

  7. Proceedings of the 1981 subseabed disposal program. Annual workshop

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 Annual Workshop was the twelfth meeting of the principal investigators and program management personnel participating in the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP). The first workshop was held in June 1973, to address the development of a program (initially known as Ocean Basin Floors Program) to assess the deep sea disposal of nuclear wastes. Workshops were held semi-annually until late 1977. Since November 1977, the workshops have been conducted following the end of each fiscal year so that the program participants could review and critique the total scope of work. This volume contains a synopsis, as given by each Technical Program Coordinator, abstracts of each of the talks, and copies of the visual materials, as presented by each of the principal investigators, for each of the technical elements of the SDP for the fiscal year 1981. The talks were grouped under the following categories; general topics; site studies; thermal response studies; emplacement studies; systems analysis; chemical response studies; biological oceanography studies; physical oceanographic studies; instrumentation development; transportation studies; social environment; and international seabed disposal

  8. Proceedings of the 1981 subseabed disposal program. Annual workshop

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 Annual Workshop was the twelfth meeting of the principal investigators and program management personnel participating in the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP). The first workshop was held in June 1973, to address the development of a program (initially known as Ocean Basin Floors Program) to assess the deep sea disposal of nuclear wastes. Workshops were held semi-annually until late 1977. Since November 1977, the workshops have been conducted following the end of each fiscal year so that the program participants could review and critique the total scope of work. This volume contains a synopsis, as given by each Technical Program Coordinator, abstracts of each of the talks, and copies of the visual materials, as presented by each of the principal investigators, for each of the technical elements of the SDP for the fiscal year 1981. The talks were grouped under the following categories; general topics; site studies; thermal response studies; emplacement studies; systems analysis; chemical response studies; biological oceanography studies; physical oceanographic studies; instrumentation development; transportation studies; social environment; and international seabed disposal.

  9. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume 1. Mission and program summary

    1981-10-01

    This volume presents, in summary form, a recommended approach to implementing the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980. These recommendations constitute the findings of the FED Technical Management Board (TMB). The TMB and the affiliated technical managers gave particular scrutiny to elucidating the role of FED in fusion development and to defining the device mission

  10. Overview of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Devlopment and Technology Program

    1978-03-01

    This publication gives a comprehensive introduction to controlled fusion research. Topics covered in the discussion include the following: (1) fusion system engineering and advanced design, (2) plasma engineering, (3) magnetic systems, (4) materials, (5) environment and safety, and (6) alternate energy applications

  11. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Annual Program Review 2000

    2000-03-01

    This book is submitted as one written part of the 2000 Annual DOE High Energy Physics Program Review of Fermilab, scheduled March 22-24, 2000. In it are Director's Overview, some experimental highlights, discussions of several projects, and descriptions of the functions and activities of the four laboratory divisions. This book should be read in conjunction with the 2000 Fermilab Workbook and the review presentations (both in formal sessions and at the poster session).

  12. Nuclear Waste Treatment Program: Annual report for FY 1986

    Burkholder, H.C.; Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    To support DOE's attainment of its goals, Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting. This annual report describes progress during FY 1986 toward meeting these two objectives. 29 refs., 59 figs., 25 tabs

  13. Nuclear Waste Treatment Program: Annual report for FY 1986

    Burkholder, H.C.; Brouns, R.A. (comps.); Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    To support DOE's attainment of its goals, Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting. This annual report describes progress during FY 1986 toward meeting these two objectives. 29 refs., 59 figs., 25 tabs.

  14. Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion

    Stanley J. Robboy MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department’s 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%. The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

  15. Summaries of FY 1986 research in the Applied Plasma Physics Fusion Theory Program

    1987-12-01

    The Theory Program is charged with supporting the development of theories and models of plasmas for the fusion research effort. This work ranges from first-principles analysis of elementary plasma processes to empirical simulation of specific experiments. The Theory Program supports research by industrial contractors, US government laboratories, and universities. The university support also helps to fulfill the DOE mission of training scientists for the fusion program. The Theory Program is funded through the Fusion Theory Branch, Division of Applied Plasma Physics in the Office of Fusion Energy. The work is divided among 31 institutions, of which 19 are universities, five are industrial contractors, and seven are US government laboratories; see Table 1 for a complete list. The FY 1986 Theory Program budget was divided among theory types: toroidal, mirror, alternate concept, generic, and atomic. Device modeling is included among the other funding categories, and is not budgeted separately

  16. Nuclear fusion project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    Kast, G.

    1988-07-01

    Short communications give a survey of 38 technology tasks, the development of ECRH power sources at 150 GHz, and 9 NET study are listed in the appendices I and II, respectively, while the KfK departments contributing to the Fusion Project and the Fusion Project Management Staff are listed in appendices III and IV, respectively. (GG)

  17. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment. From April 1, 1995 to March 31, 1996

    Shimada, Michiya; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Shinichi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Seki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; eds.

    1996-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 1995 to March 31, 1996. The activities in Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high-temperature plasma research in JT-60U and JFT-2M, and progress in ITER-EDA, including technology development. (author)

  18. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998. The activities in Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high temperature plasma research in JT-60 and JFT-2M, and progress in ITER-EDA, including technology development. (J.P.N.)

  19. Physics of the Cosmos Program Annual Technology Report

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Cardiff, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    What's in this Report? What's New? This fifth Program Annual Technology Report (PATR) summarizes the Programs technology development activities for fiscal year (FY) 2015. The PATR serves four purposes.1. Summarize the technology gaps identified by the astrophysics community;2. Present the results of this years technology gap prioritization by the PCOS Technology Management Board (TMB);3. Report on newly funded PCOS Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) projects; and4. Detail progress, current status, and activities planned for the coming year for all technologies supported by PCOS Supporting Research and Technology (SRT) funding in FY 2015. .

  20. Aspects of safety and reliability for fusion magnet systems first annual report

    Powell, J.

    1976-01-01

    General systems aspects of fusion magnet safety are examined first, followed by specific detailed analyses covering structural, thermal, electrical, and other aspects of fusion magnet safety. The design examples chosen for analysis are illustrative and are not intended to be definitive, since fusion magnet designs are rapidly evolving. Included is a comprehensive collection of design and operating data relating to the safety of existing superconducting magnet systems. The remainder of the overview lists the main conclusions developed from the work to date. These should be regarded as initial steps. Since this study has concentrated on examining potential safety concerns, it may tend to overemphasize the problems of fusion magnets. In fact, many aspects of fusion magnets are well developed and are consistent with good safety practice. A short summary of the findings of this study is given

  1. Program Annual Technology Report: Cosmic Origins Program Office

    Pham, Thai; Neff, Susan

    2017-01-01

    What is the Cosmic Origins (COR) Program? From ancient times, humans have looked up at the night sky and wondered: Are we alone? How did the universe come to be? How does the universe work? COR focuses on the second question. Scientists investigating this broad theme seek to understand the origin and evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present day, determining how the expanding universe grew into a grand cosmic web of dark matter enmeshed with galaxies and pristine gas, forming, merging, and evolving over time. COR also seeks to understand how stars and planets form from clouds in these galaxies to create the heavy elements that are essential to life, starting with the first generation of stars to seed the universe, and continuing through the birth and eventual death of all subsequent generations of stars. The COR Programs purview includes the majority of the field known as astronomy.

  2. Laser Science and Technology Program Annual Report - 2000

    Chen, H-L

    2001-01-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LSandT) Program Annual Report 2001 provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL LSandT Program during the April 2001 to March 2002 period using three formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the year; (2) brief summaries of research and development activity highlights within the four Program elements: Advanced Lasers and Components (ALandC), Laser Optics and Materials (LOandM), Short Pulse Laser Applications and Technologies (SPLAT), and High-Energy Laser System and Tests (HELST); and (3) a compilation of selected articles and technical reports published in reputable scientific or technology journals in this period. All three elements (Annual Overview, Activity Highlights, and Technical Reports) are also on the Web: http://laser.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. The underlying mission for the LSandT Program is to develop advanced lasers, optics, and materials technologies and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Laboratory and the nation. This mission statement has been our guide for defining work appropriate for our Program. A major new focus of LSandT beginning this past year has been the development of high peak power short-pulse capability for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). LSandT is committed to this activity

  3. International Code Assessment and Applications Program: Annual report

    Ting, P.; Hanson, R.; Jenks, R.

    1987-03-01

    This is the first annual report of the International Code Assessment and Applications Program (ICAP). The ICAP was organized by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in 1985. The ICAP is an international cooperative reactor safety research program planned to continue over a period of approximately five years. To date, eleven European and Asian countries/organizations have joined the program through bilateral agreements with the USNRC. Seven proposed agreements are currently under negotiation. The primary mission of the ICAP is to provide independent assessment of the three major advanced computer codes (RELAP5, TRAC-PWR, and TRAC-BWR) developed by the USNRC. However, program activities can be expected to enhance the assessment process throughout member countries. The codes were developed to calculate the reactor plant response to transients and loss-of-coolant accidents. Accurate prediction of normal and abnormal plant response using the codes enhances procedures and regulations used for the safe operation of the plant and also provides technical basis for assessing the safety margin of future reactor plant designs. The ICAP is providing required assessment data that will contribute to quantification of the code uncertainty for each code. The first annual report is devoted to coverage of program activities and accomplishments during the period between April 1985 and March 1987

  4. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    Johnson, R.K.; Thomson, H.A.

    1982-04-01

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser

  5. Energy Systems Studies Program annual report, fiscal year 1976

    Beller, M. (ed.)

    1976-06-01

    This is the fourth annual progress report of the Energy Systems Studies Program supported at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), Office of the Assistant Administrator for Planning and Analysis. The program is coordinated under the designation of a National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems (NCAES). Five working groups with specific program responsibilities are: policy analysis, economic analysis, biomedical and environmental assessment, technology assessment, and energy data and models. Future scenarios of the implementation of groups of technologies and new resources are developed. The socio-economic and environmental consequences are analyzed in detail and impact analyses are performed. Progress during FY 1976 is summarized in the following areas: energy system model development; energy-economic model development; technology assessments and support; economic analyses; and energy model data base activities. The program plan for FY 1977 is presented. (MCW)

  6. Fusion technology program: progress report 1982-1986

    Caron-Charles, M.

    1987-01-01

    Three task actions are presented in this report: on hydrogen extraction from a gas mixture, on elements for tritium recovery from the fusion reactor ceramic blanket, and on large components for the torus vacuum circuits

  7. Survey of particle codes in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    1977-12-01

    In the spring of 1976, the Fusion Plasma Theory Branch of the Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy conducted a survey of all the physics computer codes being supported at that time. The purpose of that survey was to allow DMFE to prepare a description of the codes for distribution to the plasma physics community. This document is the first of several planned and covers those types of codes which treat the plasma as a group of particles

  8. Inertial Confinement Fusion. Annual report 10/1/98 through 9/30/99

    Gibson, Jane

    1999-12-01

    General Atomics (GA) has served as the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy since December 30, 1990. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999. During this period, GA and our partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ''Onsite Support'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). We fabricated and delivered over 1790 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNL. We produced more than 1380 glass and plastic target capsules over a wide range of sizes and designs (plus over 300 near target-quality capsules) for LLNL, LANL, SNL, and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetic (UR/LLE). We also delivered various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UWLLE in FY99. We fabricated a device to polish NIF-sized beryllium shells and prepared a laboratory for the safe operation of beryllium polishing activities. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY99, the GA/Schafer portion of the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team effort for design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA was completed. All components of the OCTS were procured, fabricated, assembled, tested, and shipped to UR/LLE. Only minor documentation tasks remain to be done in FY00. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D

  9. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, fiscal year 1980, October 1979-September 1980

    1981-03-01

    Research during October 1979 to September 1980 is summarized. Areas covered include: accelerator operations; positron-electron project; stochastic beam cooling; high-field superconducting magnets; accelerator theory; neutral beam sources; and heavy ion fusion

  10. Annual coded wire tag program, Washington: Missing production groups. Annual report for 1998

    Byrne, J.; Fuss, H.

    1999-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the ''Annual Coded Wire Tag Program--Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries'' project. The WDFW project has three main objectives: (1) coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to enable evaluation of survival and catch distribution over time, (2) recover coded-wire tags from the snouts of fish tagged under objective 1 and estimate survival, contribution, and stray rates for each group, and (3) report the findings under objective 2 for all broods of chinook, and coho released from WDFW Columbia Basin hatcheries

  11. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002

    Ando, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Shinichi; Tanaka, Fumiya; Tuda, Takashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, during the period from April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high performance plasma researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, and completion of ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) in July 2001, including technology R and D. (J.P.N.)

  12. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1998 to March 31, 1999

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at the Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 1998 to March 31, 1999. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high temperature plasma research in JT-60 and JFT-2M as well as DIII-D (US-Japan collaboration), and progress in ITER EDA, including ITER technology R and D. (J.P.N.)

  13. 7 CFR 785.3 - Annual certification of State mediation programs.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual certification of State mediation programs. 785... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS CERTIFIED STATE MEDIATION PROGRAM § 785.3 Annual certification of State mediation programs. To obtain FSA certification of the State's mediation program, the...

  14. OSU Reactor Sharing Program FY 1995 annual report

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    This is the annual report of the activities supported under the Oregon State University Reactor Sharing Program, award number DE-FG06-NE38137. The beginning date for the award was September, 30, 1995 and the end date was September 29, 1996. Work conducted under this award is internally administered at the Radiation Center through a project tasking system. This allows for excellent quality control for the work which is performed from the point of initial contact, through the reactor application, project report generation and financial accounting. For the current fiscal year, FY95, the total cost of the reactor sharing program, including Radiation Center contributions, was $66,323.20 of which $40,000.00 was supplied by the DOE Reactor Sharing Program. The details of individual project costs is given in Table 1. The work performed for the individual projects are described in the brief work descriptions given in Table 2

  15. Nuclear fusion project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    1986-11-01

    Nuclear fusion is one of the main activities of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KfK). It is organized as a project under the Directorate of Reactor Development and Safety. The work of KfK concentrates on technology aspects of nuclear fusion with magnetic confinement. It is part of the European Fusion Programme where KfK participates as an association to EURATOM. Close links have been established to the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP). In the Entwicklungsgemeinschaft Kernfusion KfK and IPP cooperate for the development of future fusion experiments joining the experience gained in plasma physics (IPP) and materials, safety, and nuclear technology (KfK), respectively. As in the present strategy of the European Fusion Programme the Next European Tokamak (NET) is foreseen as the major next step, most of the activities of KfK address this subject. In addition to the contributions to NET, studies are carried out to innovate INTOR, the worldwide cooperation for an experimental reactor under the auspices of IAEA. Furthermore, the Entwicklungsgemeinschaft Kernfusion has evaluated the feasibility of a fusion reactor with a stellarator confinement. (orig./GG)

  16. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002

    PROJECT STAFF

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments and, ultimately, for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, we carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and we conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. Our technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility. The following sections summarize GA's FY02 work in the areas of Fusion Power Plant Studies (ARIES, Section 2), Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Chamber Analysis (Section 3), IFE Target Supply System Development (Section 4), Next Step Fusion Design (Section 5), Advanced Liquid Plasma Facing Surfaces (ALPS, Section 6), Advanced Power Extraction Study (APEX, Section 7), Plasma Interactive Materials (DiMES, Section 8) and RF Technology (Section 9). Our work in these areas continues to address many of the issues that must be resolved for the successful construction and operation of next-generation experiments and, ultimately, the development of safe, reliable, economic fusion power plants

  17. Wave heating and the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program

    Staten, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Government's support of the fusion program is predicated upon the long-term need for the fusion option in our energy future, as well as the near-term benefits associated with developments on the frontier of science and high technology. As a long-term energy option, magnetic fusion energy has the potential to provide an inexpensive, vast, and secure fuel reserve, to be environmentally clean and safe. It has many potential uses, which include production of central station electricity, fuel for fission reactors, synthetic fuels, and process heat for such applications as desalination of sea water. This paper presents an overview of the U.S. Government program for magnetic fusion energy. The goal and objectives of the U.S. program are reviewed followed by a summary of plasma experiments presently under way and the application of wave heating to these experiments

  18. Institute for Fusion Research and Large Helical Device program

    Iiyoshi, Atsuo

    1989-01-01

    In the research on nuclear fusion, the final objective is to materialize nuclear fusion reactors, and for the purpose, it is necessary to cause nuclear combustion by making the plasma of higher than 100 million deg and confine it for a certain time. So far in various universities, the researches on diversified fusion processes have been advanced, but in February, 1986, the Science Council issued the report 'Nuclear fusion research in universities hereafter'. As the next large scale device, an external conductor system helical device was decided, and it is desirable to found the organization for joint utilization by national universities to promote the project. The researches on the other processes are continued by utilizing the existing facilitie. The reason of selecting a helical device is the data base of the researches carried out so far can be utilized sufficiently, it is sufficiently novel even after 10 years from now, and many researchers can be collected. The place of the research is Toki City, Gifu Prefecture, where the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, is to be moved. The basic concept of the superconducting helical device project, the trend of nuclear fusion development in the world, the physical research using a helical system and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Commercial waste treatment program annual progress report for FY 1983

    McElroy, J.L.; Burkholder, H.C. (comps.)

    1984-02-01

    This annual report describes progress during FY 1983 relating to technologies under development by the Commercial Waste Treatment Program, including: development of glass waste form and vitrification equipment for high-level wastes (HLW); waste form development and process selection for transuranic (TRU) wastes; pilot-scale operation of a radioactive liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) system for verifying the reliability of the reference HLW treatment proces technology; evaluation of treatment requirements for spent fuel as a waste form; second-generation waste form development for HLW; and vitrification process control and product quality assurance technologies.

  20. Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1980

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1981-06-01

    All of the major research funded under the Compressed Air Energy Storage Technology Program during the period March 1980 to March 1981 is described. This annual report is divided into two segments: Reservoir Stability Studies and Second-Generation Concepts Studies. The first represents research performed to establish stability criteria for CAES reservoirs while the second reports progress on research performed on second-generation CAES concepts. The report consists of project reports authored by research engineers and scientists from PNL and numerous subcontractors including universities, architect-engineering, and other private firms.

  1. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2002

    Garold L. Sommers; R. T. Hunt

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research on advanced hydropower technology through its hydropower program, which is organized under the Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This annual report describes the various projects supported by the hydropower program in FY 2002. The program=s current focus is on improving the environmental performance of hydropower projects by addressing problems such as fish mortality during passage through turbines, alteration of instream habitat, and water quality in tailwaters. A primary goal of this research is to develop new, environmentally friendly technology. DOE-funded projects have produced new conceptual designs for turbine systems, and these are now being tested in pilot-scale laboratory tests and in the field. New design approaches range from totally new turbine runners to modifications of existing designs. Biological design criteria for these new turbines have also been developed in controlled laboratory tests of fish response to physical stresses, such as hydraulic shear and pressure changes. These biocriteria are being combined with computational tools to locate and eliminate areas inside turbine systems that are damaging to fish. Through the combination of laboratory, field, and computational studies, new solutions are being found to environmental problems at hydropower projects. The diverse program activities continue to make unique contributions to clean energy production in the U.S. By working toward technology improvements that can reduce environmental problems, the program is helping to reposition hydropower as an acceptable, renewable, domestic energy choice.

  2. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  3. Land reclamation program. Annual report, July 1976--October 1977

    Carter, R. P.; Hinchman, R. R.; Johnson, D. O.

    1978-05-01

    The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Division of Environment and Safety, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers, and has three primary goals: (1) to conduct research and development projects that are focused on both near- and far-term reclamation problems in all major U.S. coal regions; (2) to coordinate and evaluate related studies at other institutions; and (3) to keep industry and government decision-makers informed of reasonable reclamation options and their costs. Since many of the factors that influence reclamation success are region- or site-specific, the program has adopted a regional approach to field and laboratory research. In each of the nation's eight major coal regions, one or more mines have been (or will be) selected as sites for field studies. The vast amount of data gathered by the research arm of the program has also required the development of a data systems component of the program. This annual report is intended to provide a summary of the program's activities and accomplishments during fiscal year 1977.

  4. Recent Accomplishments and Future Directions in US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program

    David A. Petti; Brad J. Merrill; Phillip Sharpe; L. C. Cadwallader; L. El-Guebaly; S. Reyes

    2006-07-01

    The US fusion program has long recognized that the safety and environmental (S&E) potential of fusion can be attained by prudent materials selection, judicious design choices, and integration of safety requirements into the design of the facility. To achieve this goal, S&E research is focused on understanding the behavior of the largest sources of radioactive and hazardous materials in a fusion facility, understanding how energy sources in a fusion facility could mobilize those materials, developing integrated state of the art S&E computer codes and risk tools for safety assessment, and evaluating S&E issues associated with current fusion designs. In this paper, recent accomplishments are reviewed and future directions outlined.

  5. Essential Role of DAP12 Signaling in Macrophage Programming into a Fusion-Competent State

    Helming, Laura; Tomasello, Elena; Kyriakides, Themis R.; Martinez, Fernando O.; Takai, Toshiyuki; Gordon, Siamon; Vivier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Multinucleated giant cells, formed by fusion of macrophages, are a hallmark of granulomatous inflammation. With a genetic approach, we show that signaling through the adaptor protein DAP12 (DNAX activating protein of 12 kD), its associated receptor triggering receptor expressed by myeloid cells 2 (TREM-2), and the downstream protein tyrosine kinase Syk is required for the cytokine-induced formation of giant cells and that overexpression of DAP12 potentiates macrophage fusion. We also present evidence that DAP12 is a general macrophage fusion regulator and is involved in modulating the expression of several macrophage-associated genes, including those encoding known mediators of macrophage fusion, such as DC-STAMP and Cadherin 1. Thus, DAP12 is involved in programming of macrophages through the regulation of gene and protein expression to induce a fusion-competent state. PMID:18957693

  6. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Fourth annual report

    Hazelrigg, G.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The current study reported here has involved three separate tasks. The first task deals with the development of expected utility analysis techniques for economic evaluation of fusion research. A decision analytic model is developed for the incorporation of market uncertainties, as well as technological uncertainties in an economic evaluation of long-range energy research. The model is applied to the case of fusion research. The second task deals with the potential effects of long-range energy RD and D on fossil fuel prices. ECON's previous fossil fuel price model is extended to incorporate a dynamic demand function. The dynamic demand function supports price fluctuations such as those observed in the marketplace. The third task examines alternative uses of fusion technologies, specifically superconducting technologies and first wall materials to determine the potential for alternative, nonfusion use of these technologies. In both cases, numerous alternative uses are found

  7. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program. FY 1993: Annual report

    Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Marsh, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) monitoring activities. The report details monitoring data for fiscal year (FY) 1993 and is divided into three major areas: SWSA 6 [including tumulus pads, Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), and other sites], the low-level Liquid-Waste Solidification Project (LWSP), and TRU-waste storage facilities in SWSA 5 N. The detailed monitoring methodology is described in the second revision of the ASEMP program plan. This report also presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the results obtained during FY 1993

  8. Active sites environmental monitoring program FY 1997 annual report

    Morrissey, C.M.; Marshall, D.S.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities conducted by the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1996 through September 1997. The purpose of the program is to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of ASEMP monitoring activities. This report details monitoring results for fiscal year (FY) 1997 from SWSA 6, including the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF) and the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF), and (2) TRU-waste storage areas in SWSA 5 N. This report presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the FY 1997 results. Figures referenced in the text are found in Appendix A and data tables are presented in Appendix B

  9. Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 2005 Annual Report.

    St. Hilaire, Danny R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2006-05-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration agreements, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat conditions. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and re-construction aimed at improving fish habitat, through the restoration of stable channel function. This report provides a summary of Program activities for the 2005 calendar year (January 1 through December 31, 2005), within each of the four main project phases, including: (1) Implementation--Pre-Work, (2) Implementation--On Site Development, (3) Operation and Maintenance (O&M), and (4) Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E). This report also summarizes activities associated with Program Administration, Interagency Coordination, and Public Education.

  10. Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-06-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies

  11. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO/sub 2/ lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization.

  12. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO 2 laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO 2 lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization

  13. Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979

    Skoberne, F. (comp.)

    1981-06-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

  14. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that ∼10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit ∼1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm 3 ), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described

  15. Annual progress report 1993. Work in controlled thermonuclear fusion research performed in the fusion research unit under the contract of association between Euratom and Risoe National Laboratory

    1994-09-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom-Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within (a) studies of nonlinear dynamical processes in magnetized plasmas, (b) development of pellet injectors for fusion experiments, and (c) development of diagnostics for fusion plasmas. The activities in technology cover radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. A summary of the activities in 1993 is presented. (au) (4 tabs., 21 ills., 64 refs.)

  16. Theoretical aspects of mirror fusion. Annual progress report, 1 April 1983-31 March 1984

    Nicholson, D.R.; Knorr, G.E.

    1984-03-01

    We have applied the techniques of theoretical and computational plasma physics to two important problems in mirror fusion. First, we have found that electron collisions with neutral gas play an important role in determining the leak width of a cusp confined plasma. Second, we have found that mirror plasmas are susceptible to parametric instabilities during electron cyclotron resonance heating

  17. Pellets for fusion reactor refueling. Annual progress report, 1 January 1975--31 December 1975

    Turnbull, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors using pellets of deuterium-tritium is discussed. A pellet injector has been constructed and experiments have been done injecting solid pellets into the ORMAK machine. Theoretical explanations of the results from these experiments have been successful. Other experiments underway include techniques for charging the pellets in order to accelerate and control them

  18. Annual report on major results and progress of Naka Fusion Research Establishment of JAERI from April 1 to September 30, 2005 and Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA from October 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006

    Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Oasa, Kazumi; Hayashi, Takao; Nakamura, Hiroo; Ogawa, Hiroaki

    2006-09-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) during the period from April 1 to September 30, 2005 and at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from October 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities. In JT-60, ferritic steel tiles (FSTs) were installed inside the vacuum vessel of JT-60U to reduce the toroidal field ripple. After the installation of FSTs, a high normalized beta plasma at β N ∼2.3 was sustained for 28.6s with ELMy H-mode confinement as required for an ITER hybrid operation scenario. National Centralized Tokamak was placed as the ITER satellite tokamak in collaboration with the EU fusion community, and the facility design was modified strongly in support of ITER. In theoretical and analytical researches, studies on H-mode confinement, ITB in reversed shear plasmas, aspect ratio effects on external MHD modes and magnetic island evolution in a rotating plasma were progressed. Progress was also made in the NEXT project in which the behaviors of collisionless MHD modes and the dynamics of zonal flows were simulated. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 1000 s with 0.2 MW was demonstrated. Also current density of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 134A/m 2 at 0.75MeV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs of Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs and R and Ds of tritium breeder/multiplier materials were progressed. Tritium processing technology for breeding blankets was also progressed. For the DEMO reactors, high temperature superconductor such as Bi2212 has been examined. In plasma facing

  19. Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

  20. Annual report on major results and progress of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Ishii, Yasutomo; Sukegawa, Atsuhiko; Iwai, Yasunori; Nakamura, Hiroo; Sugie, Tatsuo

    2008-08-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. In JT-60, as a result of ferritic steel tiles (FSTs) installation to reduce the toroidal field ripple and the application of the real time current profile control, high boot strap current fraction (∼0.7) has successfully been sustained about 8 s. In addition, the conceptual design of JT-60SA, which was placed as a combined project of JA-EU Satellite Tokamak Programme under the Broader Approach Programme and JAEA's programme for national use, was progressed. In theoretical and analytical researches, studies on ITB events and their triggers, plasma shape effect on edge stability and driven magnetic island evolution in rotating plasmas were progressed. In the NEXT project, computer simulations of the plasma turbulence were progressed. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 10min with 0.82MW was demonstrated. Also current density of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 146A/m 2 at 0.84MeV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs and R and Ds of Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs including tritium breeder/multiplier materials were progressed. Tritium processing technology for breeding blankets and neutronics integral experiments with a blanket mockup were also progressed. For ITER and DEMO blankets, studies on neutron irradiation effects and ion irradiation effects on F82H steel characteristics were continued using HFIR, TIARA and so on. In the IFMIF program, transitional activities to EVEDA were continued. In the ITER Program, under the framework of the ITER

  1. Calorimetry exchange program annual data report for 1992

    Barnett, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: discuss measurement differences; review and improve analytical measurements and methods; discuss new measurement capabilities; provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences; provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants; and provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO 2 powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. The data report includes summary tables for each measurement and charts showing the performance of each laboratory. Comparisons are made to the accepted values for the exchange sample and to data previously reported by that laboratory. This information is presented, in the form of quarterly and annual reports, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange. This document provides data for 1992

  2. Planning for U.S. Fusion Community Participation in the ITER Program

    Baker, Charles; Berk, Herbert; Greenwald, Martin; Mauel, Michael E.; Najmabadi, Farrokh; Nevins, William M.; Stambaugh, Ronald; Synakowski, Edmund; Batchelor, Donald B.; Fonck, Raymond; Hawryluk, Richard J.; Meade, Dale M.; Neilson, George H.; Parker, Ronald; Strait, Ted

    2006-01-01

    A central step in the mission of the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences program is the creation and study of a fusion-powered 'star on earth', where the same energy source that drives the sun and other stars is reproduced and controlled for sustained periods in the laboratory. This ''star'' is formed by an ionized gas, or plasma, heated to fusion temperatures in a magnetic confinement device known as a tokamak, which is the most advanced magnetic fusion concept. The ITER tokamak is designed to be the premier scientific tool for exploring and testing expectations for plasma behavior in the fusion burning plasma regime, wherein the fusion process itself provides the dominant heat source to sustain the plasma temperature. It will provide the scientific basis and control tools needed to move toward the fusion energy goal. The ITER project confronts the grand challenge of creating and understanding a burning plasma for the first time. The distinguishing characteristic of a burning plasma is the tight coupling between the fusion heating, the resulting energetic particles, and the confinement and stability properties of the plasma. Achieving this strongly coupled burning state requires resolving complex physics issues and integrating challenging technologies. A clear and comprehensive scientific understanding of the burning plasma state is needed to confidently extrapolate plasma behavior and related technology beyond ITER to a fusion power plant. Developing this predictive understanding is the overarching goal of the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences program. The burning plasma research program in the U.S. is being organized to maximize the scientific benefits of U.S. participation in the international ITER experiment. It is expected that much of the research pursued on ITER will be based on the scientific merit of proposed activities, and it will be necessary to maintain strong fusion research capabilities in the U.S. to successfully contribute to the

  3. Planning for U.S. Fusion Community Participation in the ITER Program

    Baker, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Berk, Herbert [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Greenwald, Martin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Mauel, Michael E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Najmabadi, Farrokh [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Nevins, William M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stambaugh, Ronald [General Atomics, La Jolla, CA (United States); Synakowski, Edmund [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Batchelor, Donald B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fonck, Raymond [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hawryluk, Richard J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Meade, Dale M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Neilson, George H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Parker, Ronald [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Strait, Ted [General Atomics, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2006-06-07

    A central step in the mission of the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences program is the creation and study of a fusion-powered "star on earth", where the same energy source that drives the sun and other stars is reproduced and controlled for sustained periods in the laboratory. This “star” is formed by an ionized gas, or plasma, heated to fusion temperatures in a magnetic confinement device known as a tokamak, which is the most advanced magnetic fusion concept. The ITER tokamak is designed to be the premier scientific tool for exploring and testing expectations for plasma behavior in the fusion burning plasma regime, wherein the fusion process itself provides the dominant heat source to sustain the plasma temperature. It will provide the scientific basis and control tools needed to move toward the fusion energy goal. The ITER project confronts the grand challenge of creating and understanding a burning plasma for the first time. The distinguishing characteristic of a burning plasma is the tight coupling between the fusion heating, the resulting energetic particles, and the confinement and stability properties of the plasma. Achieving this strongly coupled burning state requires resolving complex physics issues and integrating challenging technologies. A clear and comprehensive scientific understanding of the burning plasma state is needed to confidently extrapolate plasma behavior and related technology beyond ITER to a fusion power plant. Developing this predictive understanding is the overarching goal of the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences program. The burning plasma research program in the U.S. is being organized to maximize the scientific benefits of U.S. participation in the international ITER experiment. It is expected that much of the research pursued on ITER will be based on the scientific merit of proposed activities, and it will be necessary to maintain strong fusion research capabilities in the U.S. to successfully contribute to the success of ITER and optimize

  4. Overview of the U.S. Fusion Materials Sciences Program

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    Highlights of recent U.S. fusion materials research activities are summarized, including multiscale materials modeling and experimental results. Recent first principles atomistic calculations on vanadium and iron-helium have found that previous interatomic potentials incorrectly predict several important point defect properties. Molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades are now approaching energies equivalent to 14 MeV fusion neutrons. Considerable effort is being devoted to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. Work is also in progress to determine the allowable temperature and dose operating regimes for candidate reduced activation structural materials (including transmutant helium effects). New compositions of reduced activation steels and vanadium alloys with potential for significantly improved properties are being investigated. Due to recent improvements in SiC/SiC ceramic composites, engineering-relevant mechanical property tests are being introduced to replace historical qualitative screening tests. Materials research in support of the ITER burning plasma physics machine is briefly described

  5. Intense neutron source facility for the fusion energy program

    Armstrong, D.D.; Emigh, C.R.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, E.A.; Schneider, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Intense Neutron Source Facility, INS, has been proposed to provide a neutronic environment similar to that anticipated in a fully operational fusion-power reactor. The neutron generator will produce an intense flux of 14-MeV neutrons greater than 10 14 neutrons per cm 2 /sec from the collision of two intersecting beams, one of 1.1 A of 270 keV tritium ions and the other of a supersonic jet of deuterium gas. Using either the pure 14-MeV primary neutron spectrum or by tailoring the spectrum with appropriate moderators, crucial radiation-damage effects which are likely to occur in fusion reactors can be thoroughly explored and better understood

  6. Tucannon River spring chinook salmon captive brood program, FY 2000 annual report; ANNUAL

    Bumgarner, Joseph D.; Gallinat, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the objectives, tasks, and accomplishments of the Tucannon River spring chinook captive brood program from program inception (1997) through April 2001. The WDFW initiated a captive broodstock program in 1997. The overall goal of the Tucannon River captive broodstock program is for the short-term, and eventually long-term, rebuilding of the Tucannon River spring chinook salmon run, with the hope that natural production will eventually sustain itself. The project goal is to rear captive salmon to adults, spawn them, rear their progeny, and release approximately 150,000 smolts annually into the Tucannon River between 2003-2007. These smolt releases, in combination with the current hatchery supplementation program (132,000 smolts), and wild production, is expected to produce 600-700 returning adult spring chinook to the Tucannon River each year from 2005-2010. The Master Plan, Environmental Assessment, and most facility modifications at LFH were completed for the Tucannon River spring chinook captive broodstock program during FY2000 and FY2001. DNA samples collected since 1997 have been sent to the WDFW genetics lab in Olympia for baseline DNA analysis. Results from the genetic analysis are not available at this time. The captive broodstock program is planned to collect fish from five (1997-2001) brood years (BY). The captive broodstock program was initiated with 1997 BY juveniles, and the 2000 BY fish have been selected. As of April 30, 2001, WDFW has 172 BY 1997, 262 BY 1998, 407 BY 1999, and approximately 1,190 BY 2000 fish on hand at LFH. Twelve of 13 mature 97 BY females were spawned in 2000. Total eggtake was 14,813. Mean fecundity was 1,298 eggs/female based on 11 fully spawned females. Egg survival to eye-up was 47.3%. This low survival was expected for three year old captive broodstock females. As of April 30, 2001, WDFW has 4,211 captive broodstock progeny on hand. These fish will be tagged with blank wire tag without fin clips and

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    editor, Todd C Hansen

    2009-02-23

    consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Berkeley Lab LDRD program also play an important role in leveraging DOE capabilities for national needs. The fundamental scientific research and development conducted in the program advances the skills and technologies of importance to our Work For Others (WFO) sponsors. Among many directions, these include a broad range of health-related science and technology of interest to the National Institutes of Health, breast cancer and accelerator research supported by the Department of Defense, detector technologies that should be useful to the Department of Homeland Security, and particle detection that will be valuable to the Environmental Protection Agency. The Berkeley Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2008 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the LDRD program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, project selection, implementation, and review.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Berkeley Lab LDRD program also play an important role in leveraging DOE capabilities for national needs. The fundamental scientific research and development conducted in the program advances the skills and technologies of importance to our Work For Others (WFO) sponsors. Among many directions, these include a broad range of health-related science and technology of interest to the National Institutes of Health, breast cancer and accelerator research supported by the Department of Defense, detector technologies that should be useful to the Department of Homeland Security, and particle detection that will be valuable to the Environmental Protection Agency. The Berkeley Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2008 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the LDRD program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, project selection, implementation, and review

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories California Waste Management Program Annual Report April 2011

    Brynildson, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  11. Fusion technology. Annual report of the Association CEA/EURATOM 1997

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development work performed by the French EURATOM-CEA Association for fusion technology is part of the Fusion Programme of the European Community. This report compiles the work carried out during the year 1997 as follows: The ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); The second part is dedicated to the Long Term activities as Blankets and material developments, long term safety, socio-economic problem; The Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); And the fourth part describes the inertial confinement studies. (K.A.)

  12. Fusion technology. Annual report of the Association CEA/EURATOM 1997

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F

    1998-12-31

    The research and development work performed by the French EURATOM-CEA Association for fusion technology is part of the Fusion Programme of the European Community. This report compiles the work carried out during the year 1997 as follows: The ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); The second part is dedicated to the Long Term activities as Blankets and material developments, long term safety, socio-economic problem; The Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); And the fourth part describes the inertial confinement studies. (K.A.)

  13. Fourth annual progress report on special-purpose materials for magnetically confined fusion reactors

    1982-08-01

    The scope of Special Purpose Materials covers fusion reactor materials problems other than the first-wall and blanket structural materials, which are under the purview of the ADIP, DAFS, and PMI task groups. Components that are considered as special purpose materials include breeding materials, coolants, neutron multipliers, barriers for tritium control, materials for compression and OH coils and waveguides, graphite and SiC, heat-sink materials, ceramics, and materials for high-field (>10-T) superconducting magnets. The Task Group on Special Purpose Materials has limited its concern to crucial and generic materials problems that must be resolved if magnetic-fusion devices are to succeed. Important areas specifically excluded include low-field (8-T) superconductors, fuels for hybrids, and materials for inertial-confinement devices. These areas may be added in the future when funding permits

  14. Fusion technology. Annual report of the Association CEA/EURATOM 1997

    Magaud, P; Le Vagueres, F

    1999-12-31

    The research and development work performed by the French EURATOM-CEA Association for fusion technology is part of the Fusion Programme of the European Community. This report compiles the work carried out during the year 1997 as follows: The ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); The second part is dedicated to the Long Term activities as Blankets and material developments, long term safety, socio-economic problem; The Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); And the fourth part describes the inertial confinement studies. (K.A.)

  15. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion [Fusion Working Group (FWG)] was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project

  16. Annual report for the steering committee of the association Euratom-Belgian State for fusion 1994

    Moons, F.

    1994-09-01

    The work performed in 1994 at SCK/CEN in the field of technology for thermonuclear fusion is reported. It mainly embraces: (1) neutron irradiation effects on beryllium, (2) corrosion experiments on copper and molybdenum, (3) radiation hardening of opto-electronic components, (4) environmental tolerance and testing optical fibres assessment, (5) electrolytic recovery of elemental tritium from highly tritiated water, (6) in pile AISI 316L low cycle fatigue

  17. Special-purpose materials for magnetically confined fusion reactors. Third annual progress report

    1981-11-01

    The scope of Special Purpose Materials covers fusion reactor materials problems other than the first-wall and blanket structural materials, which are under the purview of the ADIP, DAFS, and PMI task groups. Components that are considered as special purpose materials include breeding materials, coolants, neutron multipliers, barriers for tritium control, materials for compression and OH coils and waveguides, graphite and SiC, heat-sink materials, ceramics, and materials for high-field (>10-T) superconducting magnets. It is recognized that there will be numerous materials problems that will arise during the design and construction of large magnetic-fusion energy devices such as the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and Demonstration Reactor (DEMO). Most of these problems will be specific to a particular design or project and are the responsibility of the project, not the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch. Consequently, the Task Group on Special Purpose Materials has limited its concern to crucial and generic materials problems that must be resolved if magnetic-fusion devices are to succeed. Important areas specifically excluded include low-field (8-T) superconductors, fuels for hybrids, and materials for inertial-confinement devices. These areas may be added in the future when funding permits

  18. US-DOE Fusion-Breeder Program: blanket design and system performance

    Lee, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies are being used to assess the technical and economic feasibility of fusion's potential to produce fissile fuel. A reference design of a fission-suppressed blanket using conventional materials is under development. Theoretically, a fusion breeder that incorporates this fusion-suppressed blanket surrounding a 3000-MW tandem mirror fusion core produces its own tritium plus 5600 kg of 233 U per year. The 233 U could then provide fissile makeup for 21 GWe of light-water reactor (LWR) power using a denatured thorium fuel cycle with full recycle. This is 16 times the net electric power produced by the fusion breeder (1.3 GWe). The cost of electricity from this fusion-fission system is estimated to be only 23% higher than the cost from LWRs that have makeup from U 3 O 8 at present costs (55 $/kg). Nuclear performance, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), radiation effects, and other issues concerning the fission-suppressed blanket are summarized, as are some of the present and future objectives of the fusion breeder program

  19. Development of fusion fuel cycles: Large deviations from US defense program systems

    Klein, James Edward, E-mail: james.klein@srnl.doe.gov; Poore, Anita Sue; Babineau, David W.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • All tritium fuel cycles start with a “Tritium Process.” All have similar tritium processing steps. • Fusion tritium fuel cycles minimize process tritium inventories for various reasons. • US defense program facility designs did not minimize in-process inventories. • Reduced inventory tritium facilities will lower public risk. - Abstract: Fusion energy research is dominated by plasma physics and materials technology development needs with smaller levels of effort and funding dedicated to tritium fuel cycle development. The fuel cycle is necessary to supply and recycle tritium at the required throughput rate; additionally, tritium confinement throughout the facility is needed to meet regulatory and environmental release limits. Small fuel cycle development efforts are sometimes rationalized by stating that tritium processing technology has already been developed by nuclear weapons programs and these existing processes only need rescaling or engineering design to meet the needs of fusion fuel cycles. This paper compares and contrasts features of tritium fusion fuel cycles to United States Cold War era defense program tritium systems. It is concluded that further tritium fuel cycle development activities are needed to provide technology development beneficial to both fusion and defense programs tritium systems.

  20. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    2007-03-01

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program, Annual Report Fiscal Year 2006 is an annual management report that summarizes research projects funded by the DDRD program. The NREL DDRD program comprises projects that strengthen NREL's four technical competencies: Integrated Systems, Renewable Electricity, Renewable Fuels, and Strategic Analysis.

  1. The NASA-Lewis program on fusion energy for space power and propulsion, 1958-1978

    Schulze, N.R.; Roth, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    An historical synopsis is provided of the NASA-Lewis research program on fusion energy for space power and propulsion systems. It was initiated to explore the potential applications of fusion energy to space power and propulsion systems. Some fusion related accomplishments and program areas covered include: basic research on the Electric Field Bumpy Torus (EFBT) magnetoelectric fusion containment concept, including identification of its radial transport mechanism and confinement time scaling; operation of the Pilot Rig mirror machine, the first superconducting magnet facility to be used in plasma physics or fusion research; operation of the Superconducting Bumpy Torus magnet facility, first used to generate a toroidal magnetic field; steady state production of neutrons from DD reactions; studies of the direct conversion of plasma enthalpy to thrust by a direct fusion rocket via propellant addition and magnetic nozzles; power and propulsion system studies, including D(3)He power balance, neutron shielding, and refrigeration requirements; and development of large volume, high field superconducting and cryogenic magnet technology

  2. The Chief Joseph Hatchery Program 2013 Annual Report

    Baldwin, Casey; Pearl, Andrea; Laramie, Matthew; Rohrback, John; Phillips, Pat; Wolf, Keith

    2016-01-01

    population [VSP] parameters) 5) eDNA collection (VSP parameter—distribution/spatial structure). Adult summer/fall Chinook spawning escapement in 2013 was estimated to be 8,193, with more than 6,227 natural-origin spawners, which exceeded the recent five year and long term averages. The values for pHOS (0.24) and proportion of natural influence (PNI) (0.79) in 2013 exceeded the objectives (0.67), but the five year averages fell short of the goals (0.39 and 0.62, respectively). An Annual Program Review (APR) was held in March, 2014 to share hatchery production and monitoring data, review the salmon forecast for the upcoming year, and develop action plans for the hatchery, selective harvest, and monitoring projects. Based on a strong pre-season forecast of 67,500 Upper Columbia summer/fall Chinook, the plan for 2014 is to operate the hatchery at full program levels of 2 million summer/fall Chinook and 900,000 spring Chinook. To maximize PNI, broodstock for the integrated program should Chief Joseph Hatchery Program 2013 Annual Report 3 be 100% natural-origin broodstock (NOB) and CCT should plan to harvest their full allocation with the selective harvest program removing as many adult hatchery Chinook as possible with the purse seine, the weir, and at the hatchery ladder.

  3. Development of tritium technology for the United States magnetic fusion energy program

    Anderson, J.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium technology development for the DOE fusion program is taking place principally at three laboratories, Mound Facility, Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper will review the major aspects of each of the three programs and look at aspects of the tritium technology being developed at other laboratories within the United States. Facilities and experiments to be discussed include the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory and the Tritium Storage and Delivery System for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Mound Facility; the Lithium Processing Test Loop and the solid breeder blanket studies at Argonne; and the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos

  4. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1994 to March 31, 1995

    Nagashima, Takashi; Naito, Osamu; Ogiwara, Norio; Saigusa, Mikio; Seki, Masahiro; Murasawa, Michihiko; Uehara, Yusuke

    1995-11-01

    Research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, are reported for the period from April 1, 1994 to March 31, 1995. The main objectives of the JT-60 experiments are: confinement improvement, impurity control and divertor studies, steady-state studies, and energetic particle physics. JFT-2M experiments progressed in the momentum transport study by applying an external helical field and toroidal momentum input with NBI, and also, the boundary plasma study through the introduction of an electric field in the scrape-off layer (SOL) by the divertor biasing. Progress in the DIII-D experiments was obtained in the studies of divertor radiation, advanced tokamak and VH-mode plasma. As for the fusion technology research, activities are focused on the Research and Development (R and D) for ITER EDA: superconducting magnets, neutral beam heating, radio frequency heating, plasma facing components, reactor structure, remote maintenance, shielding blanket, tritium processing, tritium safety and fusion safety. Based on the Outline Design approved in March 1994 by the ITER Council a sensitivity study was conducted by the new director and JCT in close collaboration with four Home Teams in order to determine the optimum way to achieve a reduction in the cost of ITER while minimizing the impacts regarding its performance margins. Japanese Home Team carried out a part of the ITER design based on task agreements, mainly in the field of vacuum vessel, first wall and blanket, initial assembly, etc. The DREAM tokamak reactor concept was improved focusing on the reactor internals and safety. (J.P.N.)

  5. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1994 to March 31, 1995

    Nagashima, Takashi; Naito, Osamu; Ogiwara, Norio; Saigusa, Mikio; Seki, Masahiro; Murasawa, Michihiko; Uehara, Yusuke [eds.; Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    Research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, are reported for the period from April 1, 1994 to March 31, 1995. The main objectives of the JT-60 experiments are: confinement improvement, impurity control and divertor studies, steady-state studies, and energetic particle physics. JFT-2M experiments progressed in the momentum transport study by applying an external helical field and toroidal momentum input with NBI, and also, the boundary plasma study through the introduction of an electric field in the scrape-off layer (SOL) by the divertor biasing. Progress in the DIII-D experiments was obtained in the studies of divertor radiation, advanced tokamak and VH-mode plasma. As for the fusion technology research, activities are focused on the Research and Development (R and D) for ITER EDA: superconducting magnets, neutral beam heating, radio frequency heating, plasma facing components, reactor structure, remote maintenance, shielding blanket, tritium processing, tritium safety and fusion safety. Based on the Outline Design approved in March 1994 by the ITER Council a sensitivity study was conducted by the new director and JCT in close collaboration with four Home Teams in order to determine the optimum way to achieve a reduction in the cost of ITER while minimizing the impacts regarding its performance margins. Japanese Home Team carried out a part of the ITER design based on task agreements, mainly in the field of vacuum vessel, first wall and blanket, initial assembly, etc. The DREAM tokamak reactor concept was improved focusing on the reactor internals and safety. (J.P.N.).

  6. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.7--nuclear fusion

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear electronics, nuclear detecting technology, pulse power technology, nuclear fusion and plasma

  7. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, January 1-June 30, 1978

    Skoberne, F.

    1980-05-01

    Studies and experiments aimed at investigating the possibility of restoring wavefront quality in optical systems through phase conjugation are summarized, and work that could lead to the development of highly damage-resistant isolators is discussed. The effects of various parameters on pulse-energy uniformity and of multipass extraction on laser efficiency are reported. Results of equation-of-state, shock propagation, multiburst simulation, and opacity measurements are discussed. Target designs are described that should provide a smooth transition from the exploding-pusher regime of experiments to that of isentropic compression. Progress in target fabrication techniques toward creating a 20-times-liquid-density target are outlined, and efforts that led to the extension of our neutron detection capability to levels of less than 10 3 n are summarized. The results of various studies of laser fusion application, e.g., for producing ultrahigh-temperature process heat or hydrogen from water decomposition are presented, as well as investigations of fusion-fission hybrids for the production of 233 U from 232 Th

  8. Nuclear fusion project. Annual report of the Association Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe/EURATOM. October 1994 - September 1995

    Kast, G.

    1996-01-01

    Today about fifty percent of FZK's fusion programme is contracted to ITER via the contribution of the European home team. With the recent selection of blanket concepts in the European frame, a concentration process has been initiated which will result in some restructuring of the blanket programme. The results are documented. Closely related to blanket development is the long term materials programme. FZK has concentrated on reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels. Important project resources for irradiation and hot cell work are devoted to characterize and improve the performance of suitable structural materials. ITER references are given in the nomenclature. The annexes provide with some information on departments and project management. (DG)

  9. Pellets for fusion reactor refueling. Annual progress report, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    Turnbull, R.J.; Kim, K.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the feasibility of refueling fusion reactors using solid pellets composed of fuel elements. A solid hydrogen pellet generator has been constructed and experiments have been done to inject the pellets into the ORMAK Tokamak. A theory has been developed to describe the pellet ablation in the plasma, and an excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiment. Techniques for charging the pellets have been developed in order to accelerate and control them. Other works currently under way include the development of techniques for accelerating the pellets for refueling purpose. Evaluation of electrostatic acceleration has also been performed

  10. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System rogram Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  11. Annual report of the Fusion Research Center for the period of April 1, 1982 to March 31, 1983

    1983-11-01

    Research and development activities of the Fusion Research Center (Department of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and Department of Large Tokamak Development) from April 1982 to March 1983 are described. The JFT-2 tokamak was shutdown after 10 years operation. Operation test of a new device JFT-2M was near completion. In the joint JAERI-USDOE experiment on Doublet-III a record value of beta, 4.6 %, was achieved. Major efforts in theory and computation was on high beta tokamak stability, second stability regions being found for low m internal modes. The JT-60 program progressed as scheduled, installation of the tokamak machine being initiated in February 1983. A 100 kV test was completed of prototype unit for JT-60 NBI. In the development of a high power klystron for JT-60 LH heating, a test fabricated tube generated 1 MW, 10 s RF pulses. Development of TiC coatings for JT-60 first wall was successfully concluded. In the superconducting magnet technology, the Japanese coil for IEA Large Coil Task was installed in a test facility at ORNL after successful performance test at Naka site. A 10 T experiment of a Nb 3 Sn coil with 60 cm inner bore was made. Construction of the Tritium Process Laboratory was started in February 1983. Design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor and INTOR were continued. (author)

  12. Annual report of the Fusion Research Center for the period of April 1, 1983 to March 31, 1984

    1985-03-01

    Research and development activities of the Fusion Research Center (Department of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and Department of Large Tokamak Development) from April 1983 to March 1984 are described. Installation and commissioning of the new tokamak JFT-2M had been completed. The 2nd ICRF heating experiment and LH current drive experiment were started. In the field of plasma theory, the scaling law of the critical beta in a tokamak was obtained and the ICRF heating was analyzed in detail. The first phase of the cooperation of Doublet III will be finished in Sept. 1984. The JT-60 program progressed as scheduled. Installation of the tokamak machine, initiated in Feb. 1983, will be finished in Sept. 1984. The tests of power supply and control system on site and the fabrication of the neutral beam injectors in factory proceeded successfully. Performance tests of prototype injector unit for JT-60 NBI progressed as scheduled. A new advanced source plasma generator was developed to provide a high proton ratio exceeding 90%. Klystrons for JT-60 LH heating achieved the output power of 1 MW for 10 sec. Performance tests of titanium evaporators for JT-60 were completed. The Japanese coil for IEA Large Coil Task was installed in a test facility at ORNL and the partial cool-down was carried out. Construction of the Tritium Process Laboratory was completed. Design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) and INTOR proceeded. (author)

  13. The Heavy Ion Fusion Program in the U.S.A

    Bangerter, R.O.; Davidson, R.C.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Lindl, J.D.; Logan, B.G.; Meier, W.R.

    2000-01-01

    Inertial fusion energy research has enjoyed increased interest and funding. This has allowed expanded programs in target design, target fabrication, fusion chamber research, target injection and tracking, and accelerator research. The target design effort examines ways to minimize the beam power and energy and increase the allowable focal spot size while preserving target gain. Chamber research for heavy ion fusion emphasizes the use of thick liquid walls to serve as the coolant, breed tritium, and protect the structural wall from neutrons, photons, and other target products. Several small facilities are now operating to model fluid chamber dynamics. A facility to study target injection and tracking has been built and a second facility is being designed. Improved economics is an important goal of the accelerator research. The accelerator research is also directed toward the design of an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE is being designed to accelerate ions to >100 MeV, enabling experiments in beam dynamics, focusing, and target physics. Activities leading to the IRE include ion source development and a High Current Experiment (HCX) designed to transport and accelerate a single beam of ions with a beam current of approximately 1 A, the initial current required for each beam of a fusion driver. In terms of theory, the program is developing a source-to-target numerical simulation capability. The goal of the entire program is to enable an informed decision about the promise of heavy ion fusion in about a decade

  14. Electron beam fusion data acquisition program DATAIN (EBD)

    Boyer, W.B.

    1977-02-01

    This report describes the e beam automatic data acquisition program DATAIN. The program was written for a Modular Computer Systems Modcomp II computer interfaced to Tektronix R7912 Transient Digitizers. Operator Communications and data handling steps are described

  15. Fusion Canada

    1987-07-01

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  16. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Hoppe, M.

    1996-05-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ''Onsite Support'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D 2 or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The authors are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Progress has been made on ways to both create viable layers and to characterize them. They continued engineering, assembly and testing of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks

  17. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Hoppe, M. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``Onsite Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The authors are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Progress has been made on ways to both create viable layers and to characterize them. They continued engineering, assembly and testing of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  18. INEEL Cultural Resource Management Program Annual Report - 2004

    Clayton F. Marler

    2005-01-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site is located in southeastern Idaho, and is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,000-year span of human occupation in the region. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these resources with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory, while also cleaning up the waste left by past programs and processes. The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has administrative responsibility for most of the Site, excluding lands and resources managed by the Naval Reactors Facility and (in 2004) Argonne National Laboratory-West. The Department of Energy is committed to a cultural resource program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative requirements. This annual report is an overview of Cultural Resource Management Program activities conducted during Fiscal Year 2004 and is intended to be both informative to external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the Site.

  19. INEEL Cultural Resource Management Program Annual Report - 2004

    Clayton F. Marler

    2005-01-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site is located in southeastern Idaho, and is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,000-year span of human occupation in the region. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these resources with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory, while also cleaning up the waste left by past programs and processes. The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has administrative responsibility for most of the Site, excluding lands and resources managed by the Naval Reactors Facility and (in 2004) Argonne National Laboratory-West. The Department of Energy is committed to a cultural resource program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative requirements. This annual report is an overview of Cultural Resource Management Program activities conducted during Fiscal Year 2004 and is intended to be both informative to external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the Site

  20. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment. From April 1,2000 to March 31, 2001

    Kuriyama, Masaaki; Kizu, Kaname; Kusakawa, Fumio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sengoku, Seio

    2001-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are outstanding at high performance plasma researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, and development in ITER EDA including technological R and Ds. The JT-60 project aims at contributing to the physics R and D for ITER and establishing the physics basis for a steady state tokamak fusion reactor like SSTR. For the achievement of those objectives, both physical and engineering researches have been done. The JT-60 have continued to be productive in many areas covering performance improvements of high β p ELMy H-mode regime and reversed shear plasma, non-inductive current drive, physics study relevant to improved modes, stabilization of MHD modes, feedback control, disruption study, understandings on energetic particles, and scrape off layer and divertor studies with increased pumping capability. On JFT-2M, advanced and basic research of tokamak plasma is being promoted, including application of the low activation ferritic steel, with the flexibility of a medium-sized device. The pre-testing on compatibility of ferritic steel plates (FPs), covering ∼20% of the inside wall of the vacuum vessel, with plasma was performed, demonstrating no adverse effects on plasmas. Boronization was introduced for the first time in JFT-2M after installation of inside FPs. High-β N discharges (β N up to ∼2.8) were obtained with inside FPs and boronization. Formation of negative electric field at the H-mode transition during ECH was clarified by the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). The MSE polarimeter system, which is capable of simultaneous measurement of a radial electric field, has been newly developed. In RF experiments, fast wave electric field profile was directly measured for the first time using the beat wave and HIBP. The principal objective of theoretical and

  1. Status of the US heavy ion fusion program

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1981-04-01

    In order to review the US HIF program, it is necessary to discuss both the program elements and the political situation. The latter topic is discussed and then the technical justification for the interest in HIF is presented. This is followed by a brief description of the Argonne Program to develop the rf linac storage ring system for which the SNS can contribute important data. The new direction being taken by the Berkeley group to develop the induction linac system is described

  2. Assurance management program for the 30 Nova laser fusion project

    Levy, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Nova assurance management program was developed using the quality assurance (QA) approach first implemented at LLNL in early 1978. The LLNL QA program is described as an introduction to the Nova assurance management program. The Nova system is described pictorially through the Nova configuration, subsystems and major components, interjecting the QA techniques which are being pragmatically used to assure the successful completion of the project

  3. Nuclear fusion systems analysis research. FY 1975 annual report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    Weatherwax, R.K. (ed.)

    1975-12-31

    This report summarizes research conducted during FY 1975 on the parametric systems analysis of fusion central power stations. As described in the report the methodology being pursued provides for a phased analysis starting with simple ''nominal'' parameters and associated computer codes and progressing to more complex functional models and then to physically based mathematical models for the systems of major significance in future power station viability. The nominal parameter analysis for preliminary screening only derives from consideration of extant reactor point designs and defines a nominal 5000 MWt reactor with either a 900 or 1250 K peak blanket coolant temperature. Functionalized performance and cost models are described for helium Brayton cycle, steam Rankine cycle and binary cycle electric power generation systems.

  4. Nuclear fusion systems analysis research. FY 1975 annual report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    Weatherwax, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted during FY 1975 on the parametric systems analysis of fusion central power stations. As described in the report the methodology being pursued provides for a phased analysis starting with simple ''nominal'' parameters and associated computer codes and progressing to more complex functional models and then to physically based mathematical models for the systems of major significance in future power station viability. The nominal parameter analysis for preliminary screening only derives from consideration of extant reactor point designs and defines a nominal 5000 MWt reactor with either a 900 or 1250 K peak blanket coolant temperature. Functionalized performance and cost models are described for helium Brayton cycle, steam Rankine cycle and binary cycle electric power generation systems

  5. HYFIRE II: fusion/high-temperature electrolysis conceptual-design study. Annual report

    Fillo, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    As in the previous HYFIRE design study, the current study focuses on coupling a Tokamak fusion reactor with a high-temperature blanket to a High-Temperature Electrolyzer (HTE) process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Scaling of the STARFIRE reactor to allow a blanket power to 6000 MW(th) is also assumed. The primary difference between the two studies is the maximum inlet steam temperature to the electrolyzer. This temperature is decreased from approx. 1300 0 to approx. 1150 0 C, which is closer to the maximum projected temperature of the Westinghouse fuel cell design. The process flow conditions change but the basic design philosophy and approaches to process design remain the same as before. Westinghouse assisted in the study in the areas of systems design integration, plasma engineering, balance-of-plant design, and electrolyzer technology

  6. 40 CFR 97.186 - Withdrawal from CAIR NOX Annual Trading Program.

    2010-07-01

    ... Trading Program. 97.186 Section 97.186 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Opt-In Units § 97.186 Withdrawal from CAIR NOX Annual Trading Program. Except as provided...

  7. 1981 Magnetic-fusion theory program project summaries

    1982-02-01

    The theory program supports research projects at three different types of sites: DOE and other government laboratories, universities, and industrial contractors. This report is organized into three sections corresponding to the three types of sites and within each section is organized alphabetically by site name. Summaries of each program are given

  8. Nuclear waste treatment program: Annual report for FY 1987

    Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    Two of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear waste management-related goals are to ensure that waste management is not an obstacle to the further development of light-water reactors and the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle and to fulfill its institutional responsibility for providing safe storage and disposal of existing and future nuclear wastes. As part of its approach to achieving these goals, the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology of DOE established what is now called the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory during the second half of FY 1982. To support DOE's attainment of its goals, the NWTP is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting assistance, as required to treat existing wastes. This annual report describes progress during FY 1987 towards meeting these two objectives. 24 refs., 59 figs., 24 tabs

  9. Pluri-annual programming of energy (PPE): an escalation policy

    Perves, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Concerning the pluri-annual programming of energy for the 2018-2023 period, the French government proposes to accelerate the deployment of wind and solar energies in order to reach 43.000 - 49.200 MW globally in 2023. To compare wind and solar energies totaled 16.500 MW in 2015. The 2023 level will represent around 70% of the today's nuclear power production. This energy policy will require a huge investment of 60 billions euros by 2023. It appears that offshore wind energy is not favoured because of its important costs and this acceleration will imply more wind turbines installed on land which can have a negative impact on the environment. Furthermore wind and solar energies will require other sources of energy to compensate seasonal effects, the back-up energy may be nuclear but it would increase the kWh cost because nuclear energy will be under-used. The gain in CO_2 will be null because the electricity production in France is largely de-carbonized thanks to the use of nuclear energy. A more progressive deployment of renewable energies in the French energy mix is recommended. (A.C.)

  10. Conceptual design of a moving-ring fusion reactor. AP-3229 Research Project 922, annual report, October 1983

    1983-10-01

    This report concludes a two-year project to design a prototype (roughly 100 MW(e) net) fusion power plant which places emphasis on commercial needs and to outline a development plan for it. This project is a follow-on to an earlier design of a small (11 MW(e) net) pilot power plant (EPRI Report AP-1544), which is included in the development plan as a step to be built before this prototype. The prototype design put major attention on minimizing nuclear issues. Other commercial matters, including suitability for scaling to a wide range of sizes, were also very important. The design, the earlier pilot design, and the extrapolation of these to commercial size designs identify gaps between required technical features and current technical knowledge. These gaps set targets for experiments and technology programs. These programs and designs define the development plan

  11. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment. From April 1,2000 to March 31, 2001

    Kuriyama, Masaaki; Kizu, Kaname; Kusakawa, Fumio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sengoku, Seio (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are outstanding at high performance plasma researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, and development in ITER EDA including technological R and Ds. The JT-60 project aims at contributing to the physics R and D for ITER and establishing the physics basis for a steady state tokamak fusion reactor like SSTR. For the achievement of those objectives, both physical and engineering researches have been done. The JT-60 have continued to be productive in many areas covering performance improvements of high {beta}{sub p} ELMy H-mode regime and reversed shear plasma, non-inductive current drive, physics study relevant to improved modes, stabilization of MHD modes, feedback control, disruption study, understandings on energetic particles, and scrape off layer and divertor studies with increased pumping capability. On JFT-2M, advanced and basic research of tokamak plasma is being promoted, including application of the low activation ferritic steel, with the flexibility of a medium-sized device. The pre-testing on compatibility of ferritic steel plates (FPs), covering {approx}20% of the inside wall of the vacuum vessel, with plasma was performed, demonstrating no adverse effects on plasmas. Boronization was introduced for the first time in JFT-2M after installation of inside FPs. High-{beta}{sub N} discharges ({beta}{sub N} up to {approx}2.8) were obtained with inside FPs and boronization. Formation of negative electric field at the H-mode transition during ECH was clarified by the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). The MSE polarimeter system, which is capable of simultaneous measurement of a radial electric field, has been newly developed. In RF experiments, fast wave electric field profile was directly measured for the first time using the beat wave and HIBP. The

  12. Benefit-analysis of accomplishments from the magnetic fusion energy (MFE) research program

    Lago, A.M.; Weinblatt, H.; Hamilton, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study commissioned by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Program Analysis to examine benefits from selected accomplishments of DOE's Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Research Program. The study objectives are presented. The MFE-induced innovation and accomplishments which were studied are listed. Finally, the benefit estimation methodology used is described in detail. The next seven chapters document the results of benefit estimation for the MFE accomplishments studied

  13. Fusion reactor materials program plan. Section 2. Damage analysis and fundamental studies

    1978-07-01

    The scope of this program includes: (1) Development of procedures for characterizing neutron environments of test facilities and fusion reactors, (2) Theoretical and experimental investigations of the influence of irradiation environment on damage production, damage microstructure evolution, and mechanical and physical property changes, (3) Identification and, where appropriate, development of essential nuclear and materials data, and (4) Development of a methodology, based on damage mechanisms, for correlating the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to diverse test environments and projecting this behavior to magnetic fusion reactor (MFR) environments. Some major problem areas are addressed

  14. Inertial fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: program status and future applications

    Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Laser Fusion Program are to understand and develop the science and technology required to utilize inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for both military and commercial applications. The results of recent experiments are described. We point out the progress in our laser studies, where we continue to develop and test the concepts, components, and materials for present and future laser systems. While there are many potential commercial applications of ICF, we limit our discussions to electric power production

  15. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.

    Garrison, Robert L.; Mallette, Christine; Lewis, Mark A.

    1995-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule brood fall chinook were caught primarily in the British Columbia, Washington and northern Oregon ocean commercial fisheries. The up-river bright fall chinook contributed primarily to the Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. Contribution of Rogue fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River system occurred primarily in the Oregon ocean commercial and Columbia river gillnet fisheries Willamette spring chinook salmon contributed primarily to the Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Oregon freshwater sport and Columbia River gillnet fisheries. Restricted ocean sport and commercial fisheries limited contribution of the Columbia coho released in the Umatilla River that survived at an average rate of 1.05% and contributed primarily to the Washington, Oregon and California ocean sport and commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. The 1987 to 1991 brood years of coho released in the Yakima River survived at an average rate of 0.64% and contributed primarily to the Washington, Oregon and California ocean sport and commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery, disease, density, diet and size and time of release, but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are controlled by large scale weather patterns such as El Nino over which man has no influence. Man could have some influence over river flow conditions, but political and economic pressures generally out weigh the biological needs of the fish.

  16. Area Safety Program for the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR)

    Rappe, G.M.

    1984-10-01

    Overall the Area Safety Program has proved to be a very successful operation. There is no doubt that a safety program organized through line management is the best way to involve all personnel. Naturally, when the program was first started, there was some criticism and a certain resistance on the part of a few individuals to fully participate. However, once the program was underway and it could be seen that it was working to everyone's advantage, this reluctance disappeared and a spirit of full cooperation is now enjoyed. It is very important that for this success to continue there must be a two way flow of information, both from the Area Safety Coordinators up through line management, and from senior management, with decisions and answers, back down through the management chain with the utmost dispatch. As with all programs, there is still room for improvement. This program has started a review cycle with a view to streamlining certain areas and possibly increasing its scope in others

  17. Heavy ion beam fusion theory and simulation: Annual report, October 1985 to 31 January 1987

    Haber, I.

    1987-01-01

    A large number of simulations have been performed to establish a database of simulations for use in accelerator designs, and to compare the simulated emittance growths with the threshold for emittance growth actually measured in the Single Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE) at LBL. These simulations show substantial agreement with the experiment. They also extend into the parameter regime, where emittance growths are slower than could be measured in SBTE, but which may still be important to a driver system several times longer. Also demonstrated by these simulations, is that, even for beams which are not in detailed space-charge equilibrium and can therefore be subject to substantial nonlinear space-charge forces, emittance growths are restricted to what is consistent with energy conservation provided that the instability threshold is not crossed. This occurs even though energy need not be conserved in alternating gradient systems. Major modifications have been made to the two dimensional SHIFT-XY (Simulation of Heavy Ion Fusion Transport) code to add some of the three-dimensional physics associated with the transverse variation of the longitudinal fields in a long beam. Enhancements to the code have also been implemented which can decrease running times as much as 30% for typical parameters. 13 refs., 7 figs

  18. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2000

    Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Inabe, Teruo; Kaneko, Tadao; Konoshima, Sigeru; Miura, M. Yushi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2001-01-01

    In JT-60, some mechanical improvements of the centrifugal pellet injector have been done for stable production and successive ejection of pellet. In addition, a guide tube for an injection from top of high-field side was installed as well as the low-field side in February 2000. The injection power of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system of the frequency of 110 GHz installed last year was increased up to ∼0.75 MW for 2 seconds in this year using the control of RF beam angle. Two gyrotrons were newly installed with total power increased from 1 MW to 3 MW. Highlights of the JT-60 experiments in FY (Fiscal Year) 2000 may be summarized as follows: (1) A reversed shear discharge with an equivalent fusion multiplication factor Q DT eq of ∼0.5 was achieved successfully at plasma current of 2.4 MA for 0.8 seconds. (2) Quasi-steady operation of low current reversed shear plasma with a large fraction (∼80%) of bootstrap current was realized under full non-inductive current drive condition. H-factor of 3.3-3.8 at electron density as high as 73% of the Greenwald limit was sustained for 6 times of the energy confinement time. (3) Normalized beta exceeding the ideal no-wall stability limit was obtained in reversed shear plasmas with a ratio of an outer-wall radius to a plasma minor radius less than 1.3. (4) L-H transition power was reduced by ∼30% in the W-shaped divertor with pumping from both inside and outside slots compared with that in the open divertor. Helium exhaust rate in ELMy H-mode plasmas was improved up to 50% higher than the inside slot pumping. (5) Current drive efficiency of 1.3x10 19 A/m 2 /W was attained with the central electron temperature of 8.6 keV. The efficiency is about 2.6 times higher than that of 100 keV. On the JFT-2M, advanced and basic research of tokamak plasma is being produced including the application of the low activation ferritic steel. A dramatic reduction of trapped ion loss due to the toroidal field ripple was identified for the

  19. The European fusion program and the role of the research reactors

    Laesser, R.; Andreani, R.; Diegele, E.

    2005-01-01

    The main objectives of the European long-term Fusion Technology Program are i) investigation of DEMO breeding blankets options, ii) development of low activation materials resistant to high neutron fluence, iii) construction of IFMIF for validation of DEMO materials, and iv) promotion of modelling efforts for the understanding of radiation damage. A large effort is required for the development and performance verification of the materials subjected to the intense neutron irradiation encountered in fusion reactors. In the absence of a strong 14.1 MeV neutron source fission materials research reactors are used. Elaborate in-pile and post-irradiation examinations are performed. In addition, the modelling effort is increased to predict the damage by a 'true' fusion spectrum in the future. Even assuming that a positive decision for IFMIF construction can be reached, the operation of a limited number of materials test reactors is needed to perform irradiation studies on large samples and for screening. (author)

  20. CFARMHD -- A MathCAD PC program to evaluate performance and economics of CFARII fusion reactors

    Logan, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a PC computer program ''CFARMHD'', developed to evaluate the performance (MHD cycle efficiency) and economics (Cost-of-Electricity CoE) for pulsed fusion reactors using the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine II (CFARII) MHD Balance of Plant (BoP). The CFARII concept to which this code applies is generic to any fusion driver which can be characterized by an assumed yield Y (GJ), target gain G, and unit cost ($/joule driver). The CFARMHD code models the sizes, masses, energies, mass flows and powers corresponding to the physical systems and optimizes them to minimize CoE for given Y, G, $/joule, and choice of material for the working fluid (cast as solid spherical shells around the target). A description of the models used in the CFARMHD code is given in Section 11, and the CoE minimization procedure used in the code is described in Section III

  1. Annual report of the Fusion Research and Development Center for the period of April 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981

    1982-03-01

    Research and development activities of the Fusion Research and Development Center (Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and Division of Large Tokamak Development) from April 1980 to 1981 are described. In plasma physics research, 1.5 MW NBI heating experiments were successfully made on JFT-2 to yield an average beta value of 2.5% without any deleterious effect on plasma confinement. Joint JAERI-US/DOE ECRH experiments revealed detailed physics of plasma heating. Installation of a 1 MW ICRF system was completed. In the Doublet-III experiment, a JAERI-US/DOE cooperation program, extensive studies were made on Joule heated dee-shaped Plasmas. In theory and computation emphasis was placed on beta optimization of tokamaks. Construction of JT-60 was continued as planned. Manufacturing of the major components and facilities was advanced well, e.g. 14 out of the 19 toroidal field coils were completed. Construction of the buildings was continued at the Naka site. In plasma heating technology, construction of the JT-60 prototype NBI unit was in progress, and development works on ion sources and beam line components as well. Trial fabrication of high power klystrons for JT-60 RF heating was started. In superconducting magnet technology, cool-down tests of cluster coils were successfully made. Manufacturing of the Japanese coil for the Large Coil Task under the auspiece of IEA, and of a Nb 3 Sn test module coil was continued. A test facility for the LCT coil was completed. Basic studies on key processes of tritium technology were continued using hydrogen and deuterium. Design of the Tritium Process Laboratory was continued. Development of first wall materials for JT-60 was advanced. Extensive tests were made on a number of low-Z coatings. Design studies of INTOR, a cooperative work in IAEA, were continued. In addition, design of the Fusion Experimental Reactor was started on a conventional type tokamak reactor and swimming pool type one. (author)

  2. Annual report of the Fusion Research Center for the period of April 1, 1984 to March 31, 1985

    1986-01-01

    Research and development activities of the Fusion Research Center (Department of Large Tokamak Development and Department of Thermonuclear Fusion Research) from April 1984 to March 1985 are described. The JT-60 program progressed as scheduled. Commissioning of the JT-60 tokamak was completed by the end of the period under review. In parallel with installation and test of the tokamak machine, installation of basic diagnostic instruments and examination of the procedure for experiment had been made to meet the first phase Joule heating experiment. (The first plasma discharge was recorded on April 8, 1985). Construction of auxiliary heating systems had continued. A medium-sized tokamak, JFT-2M, had been operated for high-power ICRF heating and ECH assisted LH current drive experiments. Installation of a power supply for plasma shaping in JFT-2M was completed. In the field of plasma theory, detailed analysis had been made on nonlinear kink/tearing modes in a plasma with free boundary and also on ICRF heating. Development of a high-voltage, high-current He ion source for JT-60 plasma diagnostics had proceeded successfully, and tests of JT-60 LH and ICRF luanchers as well. Surface erosion of a new ceramics, SiC with BeO addition by proton bombardment was studied. In IEA's Large Coil Task, three coil test was made at ORNL. A 11 T experiment of TMC-1, a large-bore Nb 3 Sn coil was completed. Commissioning tests of tritium handling facilities had proceeded in the Tritium Process Laboratory. Design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) and INTOR had been advanced. (author)

  3. Magnet and conductor developments for the Mirror Fusion Program

    Cornish, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    The conductor development and the magnet design and construction for the MFTF are described. Future plans for the Mirror Program and their influence on the associated superconductor development program are discussed. Included is a summary of the progress being made to develop large, high-field, multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductors and the feasibility of building a 12-T yin-yang set of coils for the machine to follow MFTF. In a further look into the future, possible magnetic configurations and requirements for mirror reactors are surveyed

  4. Annual report of the Naka Fusion Research Establishment for the period of April 1, 1990 to March 31, 1991

    1991-10-01

    R and D activities of the Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, are reported for the period from April 1, 1990 to March 31, 1991. Since the shutdown of JT-60 in November 1989, the reconstruction work of the JT-60 device was continued until the end of March 1991. In the JT-60 Upgrade, the poloidal field coils and vacuum vessel were renewed and the plasma current was planned to increase up to 6 MA with lower single null divertor. The divertor plates were designed to be toroidally continuous and to use high-heat-conduction C/C composite materials. Another objective of JT-60U is to facilitate tokamak experiments with deuterium as the working gas. In the JFT-2M program, a system for divertor bias experiments was brought into operation and initial experiments were started to study its effects on plasma discharges. Effects of ergodic magnetic limiter on H-modes were examined and stationary H-modes were obtained under the control of ergodic magnetic limiter currents. The DIII-D program was highlighted by the attainment of 11% beta with a double null divertor plasma. As for the fusion engineering research, development activities of the ceramic turbo-viscous pump and the surface insulation techniques for the tokamak in-vessel components are remarked in the vacuum technology area. In the high heat flux experiments with the JAERI Electron Beam Irradiation Stand (JEBIS), carbon-based materials and refractory metals were tested to evaluate surface erosion at plasma disruptions. The ITER Conceptual Design Activities, which began in April 1988 under the auspices of the IAEA, were successfully completed in December 1990. A lot of contributions to the program were made by JAERI people to support the design and R and D activities and to prepare a plan for the forthcoming Engineering Design Activities. (J.P.N.)

  5. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Hoppe, M.

    1997-02-01

    On December 30, 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. In September 1995 this contract ended and a second contract was issued for us to continue this ICF target support work. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. During this period, GA and our partners WJ Schafer Associates (WJSA) and Soane Technologies, Inc. (STI) were assigned 14 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct open-quotes Onsite Supportclose quotes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). We fabricated and delivered over 800 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. We produced nearly 1,200 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We also delivered over 100 flat foil targets for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and SNLA in FY96. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require capsules containing cryogenic layered D 2 or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. We are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Substantial progress has been made on ways to both create and characterize viable layers. During FY96, significant progress was made in the design of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA

  6. Nuclear Fusion Project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    Kast, G.

    1988-10-01

    Report on technology tasks: Blanket designs studies; Computational tools for neutronics; Corrosion and fatigue of structural materials in Pb-17Li; Tritium extraction from liquid Pb-17Li by the use of solid getters; Development of ceramic breeder materials; The large coil task; Development of high field composite conductors; Superconducting poloidal field coil development; Poloidal field coil for TORE SUPRA as NET-Prototype Coil; Structural materials Fatigue characterization at 4 K; Low electrical conductivity structures development; MANET 1; Pre- and post-irradiation fatigue properties and fracture toughness of 1.4914 martensitic steel; In-pile creep-fatigue testing of type 316 and 1.4914 steels; Ceramics for first-wall protection and for RF windows; Development of low activation ferritic-martensitic steels; Design study of plasma facing components and shield; Procedures and tools for structural design evaluation; Theory and tools for evaluation of magnetic field effects on liquid-metal breeder blankets; Studies of pebble beds of ceramic compounds; Background studies on remote maintenance; Handling equipment for in-vessel components; Safety aspects of the cryosystem and superconducting magnets; Overall plant accident scenarios and safety guidelines for NET; Generic environmental impact assessment for a fusion facility; Industrial development of large components for plasma exhaust pumping; Optimization of cryogenic vacuum pumping of helium; Plasma exhaust purification by means of cryosorption on molecular-sieves or alternative absorbents and use of hot-metal getters; Adsorption of DT on heated metal beds other than uranium; Catalyst development for the exhaust purification process; Development of ECRH power sources. NET study contracts: Availability of the LCT plant; Investigation of the vacuum and exhaust performation of NET; Study about the NET TF pancake test; Evaluation of crack growth delay in multilayer sheets. (orig./AH)

  7. Nuclear Fusion Project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    Kast, G.

    1989-04-01

    Report on technology tasks: Blanket design studies; development of computational tools for neutronics; corrosion and fatigue of structural materials in flowing Pb-17Li; tritium extraction from liquid Pb-17Li by the use of solid getters; ceramic breeder materials; high field composite conductors; superconducting poloidal field coil development; design and construction of a poloidal field coil for TORE SUPRA as NET-prototype coil; structural materials fatigue characterization at 4 K; low electrical conductivity structural development; MANET 1; pre- and post-irradiation fatigue properties of 1.4914 martensitic steel; in-pile creep-fatigue testing of type 316 and 1.4914 steel; ceramics for first-wall protection and for RF windows; fatigue under dual beam irradiation; low activation ferritic-martensitic steels; plasma facing components; procedures and tools for structural design evaluation; remote maintenance; mechanical component assembly; handling equipment for in-vessel components; safety aspects of the cryosystem and of superconducting magnets; safety guidelines for the design of NET; generic environmental impact assessment for a fusion facility; large components for plasma exhaust pumping; optimization of cryogenic vacuum pumping of He; solid particle separators for plasma exhaust; plasma exhaust purification; adsorption of DT on heated metal beds other than U; catalyst development for the exhaust purification process; ECRH power sources; vacuum and exhaust performance of NET; NET TF pancake tests; CAD DATA exchange between NET and KfK; catalytic plasma exhaust gas clean-up facility for NET; NET blanket handling device; electrical connectors for remote handling. (orig./HP)

  8. 40 CFR 96.186 - Withdrawal from CAIR NOX Annual Trading Program.

    2010-07-01

    ... Trading Program. 96.186 Section 96.186 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Opt-in Units § 96.186 Withdrawal from CAIR NOX Annual Trading...

  9. 24 CFR 4001.203 - Calculation of upfront and annual mortgage insurance premiums for Program mortgages.

    2010-04-01

    ... mortgage insurance premiums for Program mortgages. 4001.203 Section 4001.203 Housing and Urban Development... HOMEOWNERS PROGRAM HOPE FOR HOMEOWNERS PROGRAM Rights and Obligations Under the Contract of Insurance § 4001.203 Calculation of upfront and annual mortgage insurance premiums for Program mortgages. (a...

  10. Nuclear fusion project. Annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    Kast, G.

    1990-09-01

    Report on the technology program for NET: Plasma facing components, magnets, tritium fuel cycle, basic blanket, remote handling and maintenance, safety and environment, solid breeder and liquid metal test blankets, mechanical properties of pre- and post-irradiation of 1.4914 steel (MANET). ECRH power sources, NET study contracts. (HP)

  11. Nuclear fusion project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/Euratom

    Kast, G.

    1989-11-01

    Report on the technology program for NET: Plasma facing components, magnets, tritium fuel cycle, basic blanket, remote handling and maintenance, safety and environment, solid breeder and liquid metal test blankets, mechanical properties of pre- and post-irradiation of 1.4914 steel (MANET), ECRH power sources, NET study contracts. (HP)

  12. Nuclear Fusion Project. Annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    Kast, G.

    1991-10-01

    Report on the technology program for NET: Plasma facing components magnets, tritium fuel cycle, basic blanket, remote handling and maintenance, safety and environment, solid breeder and liquid metal test blankets, mechanical properties of pre- and post-irradiation of 1.4914 steel (MANET). ECRH power sources, NET study contracts. (orig.)

  13. The Economic and Workforce Development Program (ED>Net) Annual Report, 2001-02 [and] Addendum to FY 01-02 Annual Report.

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Economic Development Coordination Network (EDNet).

    This document contains an annual report and its addendum from the Economic and Workforce Development Program of California Community Colleges. The annual report provides an overview of the Program's evaluation processes, regional centers, short-term projects, legislation, strategic plan, etc. It also provides vital facts about the program such as…

  14. The Bioelectromagnetic Society Thirteenth Annual Meeting 1991: Program and abstracts

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains author abstracts representing oral and poster presentations made at the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of The Bioelectromagnetic Society held in Salt Lake City, Utah June 23--27, 1991.

  15. Annual Report: Unconventional Fossil Energy Resource Program (30 September 2013)

    Soong, Yee [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Guthrie, George [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Yee Soong, Technical Coordinator, George Guthrie, Focus Area Lead, UFER Annual Report, NETL-TRS-UFER-2013, NETL Technical Report Series, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA, 2013, p 14.

  16. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2000

    Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Inabe, Teruo; Kaneko, Tadao; Konoshima, Sigeru; Miura, M. Yushi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    In JT-60, some mechanical improvements of the centrifugal pellet injector have been done for stable production and successive ejection of pellet. In addition, a guide tube for an injection from top of high-field side was installed as well as the low-field side in February 2000. The injection power of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system of the frequency of 110 GHz installed last year was increased up to {approx}0.75 MW for 2 seconds in this year using the control of RF beam angle. Two gyrotrons were newly installed with total power increased from 1 MW to 3 MW. Highlights of the JT-60 experiments in FY (Fiscal Year) 2000 may be summarized as follows: (1) A reversed shear discharge with an equivalent fusion multiplication factor Q{sub DT}{sup eq} of {approx}0.5 was achieved successfully at plasma current of 2.4 MA for 0.8 seconds. (2) Quasi-steady operation of low current reversed shear plasma with a large fraction ({approx}80%) of bootstrap current was realized under full non-inductive current drive condition. H-factor of 3.3-3.8 at electron density as high as 73% of the Greenwald limit was sustained for 6 times of the energy confinement time. (3) Normalized beta exceeding the ideal no-wall stability limit was obtained in reversed shear plasmas with a ratio of an outer-wall radius to a plasma minor radius less than 1.3. (4) L-H transition power was reduced by {approx}30% in the W-shaped divertor with pumping from both inside and outside slots compared with that in the open divertor. Helium exhaust rate in ELMy H-mode plasmas was improved up to 50% higher than the inside slot pumping. (5) Current drive efficiency of 1.3x10{sup 19} A/m{sup 2}/W was attained with the central electron temperature of 8.6 keV. The efficiency is about 2.6 times higher than that of 100 keV. On the JFT-2M, advanced and basic research of tokamak plasma is being produced including the application of the low activation ferritic steel. A dramatic reduction of trapped ion loss due to the

  17. Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasmas. Annual progress report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984

    Gould, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    This grant supports an integrated program of experiment and theory in tokamak plasma physics. Emphasis is placed on microscopic fluctuations and anomalous transport. The primary objective is to characterize the properties of the microscopic fluctuations observed in tokamaks and to try to develop an understanding of the fluctuation-induced transport of particles and heat. Anomalous transport, which causes energy losses one to two orders of magnitude larger than predicted by neoclassical transport theory, occurs in all tokamaks and underlies empirical scaling laws

  18. Program for development of toroidal superconducting magnets for fusion research, May 1975

    Long, H.M.; Lubell, M.S.

    1975-11-01

    The objective of this program is a tested magnet design which demonstrates the suitability and reliability needed to qualify toroidal superconducting magnets for fusion research devices in a time compatible with the D-T burning experiments time frame. The overall applied development program including tasks, manpower, and cost estimates is detailed here, but for the full toroidal system only the cost and time frame are outlined to show compatibility with the present program. The details of the full toroidal system fall under major device fabrication and will be included in a subsequent document

  19. INDRA: a program system for calculating the neutronics and photonics characteristics of a fusion reactor blanket

    Perry, R.T.; Gorenflo, H.; Daenner, W.

    1976-01-01

    INDRA is a program system for calculating the neutronics and photonics characteristics of fusion reactor blankets. It incorporates a total of 19 different codes and 5 large data libraries. 10 of the codes are available from the code distribution organizations. Some of them, however, have been slightly modified in order to permit a convenient transfer of information from one program module to the next. The remaining 9 programs have been prepared by the authors to complete the system with respect to flexibility and to facilitate the handling of the results. (orig./WBU) [de

  20. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    Hoppe, M. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments.