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Sample records for fused silica suspension

  1. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Conte, A. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Farnesini, L. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Montani, M. [University of Urbino and INFN Firenze (Italy); Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Piergiovanni, F. [University of Urbino and INFN Firenze (Italy); Piluso, A. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Puppo, P., E-mail: paola.puppo@roma1.infn.it [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Rapagnani, P. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Travasso, F. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Vicerè, A. [University of Urbino and INFN Firenze (Italy); Vocca, H. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV. - Highlights: • Suspension system design for the test masses of the gravitational wave detectors. • Finite element model studies. • Suspension thermal noise studies.

  2. Fused silica suspension for the VIRGO optics: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Amico, P; Carbone, L; Gammaitoni, L; Punturo, M; Travasso, F; Vocca, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension wires is the main limitation of low-frequency sensitivity of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. In order to minimize the pendulum thermal noise, a monolithic design, using a low dissipation material, is proposed for VIRGO. High mechanical Qs and high breaking strengths have been obtained for monolithic fused silica fibres. A low-dissipation and high-strength bonding technique using potassium silicate bonding is proposed.

  3. Apparatus for dimensional characterization of fused silica fibers for the suspensions of advanced gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, A; Jones, R; Barton, M; Cagnoli, G; Cantley, C A; Crooks, D R M; Hammond, G D; Heptonstall, A; Hough, J; Rowan, S; Strain, K A

    2011-04-01

    Detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources remains one of the most challenging problems faced by experimental physicists. A significant limit to the sensitivity of future long-baseline interferometric gravitational wave detectors is thermal displacement noise of the test mass mirrors and their suspensions. Suspension thermal noise results from mechanical dissipation in the fused silica suspension fibers suspending the test mass mirrors and is therefore an important noise source at operating frequencies between ∼10 and 30 Hz. This dissipation occurs due to a combination of thermoelastic damping, surface and bulk losses. Its effects can be reduced by optimizing the thermoelastic and surface loss, and these parameters are a function of the cross sectional dimensions of the fiber along its length. This paper presents a new apparatus capable of high resolution measurements of the cross sectional dimensions of suspension fibers of both rectangular and circular cross section, suitable for use in advanced detector mirror suspensions.

  4. Invited article: CO2 laser production of fused silica fibers for use in interferometric gravitational wave detector mirror suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heptonstall, A; Barton, M A; Bell, A; Cagnoli, G; Cantley, C A; Crooks, D R M; Cumming, A; Grant, A; Hammond, G D; Harry, G M; Hough, J; Jones, R; Kelley, D; Kumar, R; Martin, I W; Robertson, N A; Rowan, S; Strain, K A; Tokmakov, K; van Veggel, M

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the first mirror suspensions to use a quasi-monolithic final stage were installed at the GEO600 detector site outside Hannover, pioneering the use of fused silica suspension fibers in long baseline interferometric detectors to reduce suspension thermal noise. Since that time, development of the production methods of fused silica fibers has continued. We present here a review of a novel CO(2) laser-based fiber pulling machine developed for the production of fused silica suspensions for the next generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors and for use in experiments requiring low thermal noise suspensions. We discuss tolerances, strengths, and thermal noise performance requirements for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. Measurements made on fibers produced using this machine show a 0.8% variation in vertical stiffness and 0.05% tolerance on length, with average strengths exceeding 4 GPa, and mechanical dissipation which meets the requirements for Advanced LIGO thermal noise performance.

  5. Fused silica windows for solar receiver applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Johannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Söhn, Matthias; Schenk, Christian; Helsch, Gundula; Bornhöft, Hansjörg

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study of optical and mechanical properties of quartz glass (fused silica) with regard to application in high temperature solar receivers is presented. The dependence of rupture strength on different surface conditions as well as high temperature is analyzed, focussing particularly on damage by devitrification and sandblasting. The influence of typical types of contamination in combination with thermal cycling on the optical properties of fused silica is determined. Cleaning methods are compared regarding effectiveness on contamination-induced degradation for samples with and without antireflective coating. The FEM-aided design of different types of receiver windows and their support structure is presented. A large-scale production process has been developed for producing fused silica dome shaped windows (pressurized window) up to a diameter of 816 mm. Prototypes were successfully pressure-tested in a test bench and certified according to the European Pressure Vessel Directive.

  6. Electrostatic Discharge Properties of Fused Silica Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Allen; Sim, Charles; Dennison, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    The electric field value at which electrostatic discharge (ESD) occurs was studied for thin coatings of fused silica (highly disordered SiO2/SiOx) on conductive substrates, such as those encountered as optical coatings and in Si microfabrication. The electrostatic breakdown field was determined using an increasing voltage, while monitoring the leakage current. A simple parallel-plate capacitor geometry was used, under medium vacuum and at temperatures down to ˜150 K using a liquid N2 reservoir. The breakdown field, pre-breakdown arcing and I-V curves for fused silica samples are compared for ˜60 nm and ˜80 μm thick, room and low temperature, and untreated and irradiated samples. Unlike typical I-V results for polymeric insulators, the thin film silica samples did not exhibit pre-breakdown arcing, displayed transitional resistivity after initial breakdown, and in many cases showed evidence of a second discontinuity in the I-V curves. This diversity of observed discharge phenomena is discussed in terms of breakdown modes and defect generation on a microscopic scale.

  7. Quartz/fused silica chip carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this research and development effort was to develop monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) packaging which will operate efficiently at millimeter-wave frequencies. The packages incorporated fused silica as the substrate material which was selected due to its favorable electrical properties and potential performance improvement over more conventional materials for Ka-band operation. The first step towards meeting this objective is to develop a package that meets standard mechanical and thermal requirements using fused silica and to be compatible with semiconductor devices operating up to at least 44 GHz. The second step is to modify the package design and add multilayer and multicavity capacity to allow for application specific integrated circuits (ASIC's) to control multiple phase shifters. The final step is to adapt the package design to a phased array module with integral radiating elements. The first task was a continuation of the SBIR Phase 1 work. Phase 1 identified fused silica as a viable substrate material by demonstrating various plating, machining, and adhesion properties. In Phase 2 Task 1, a package was designed and fabricated to validate these findings. Task 2 was to take the next step in packaging and fabricate a multilayer, multichip module (MCM). This package is the predecessor to the phased array module and demonstrates the ability to via fill, circuit print, laminate, and to form vertical interconnects. The final task was to build a phased array module. The radiating elements were to be incorporated into the package instead of connecting to it with wire or ribbon bonds.

  8. Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

    2009-11-11

    There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

  9. Fused silica challenges in sensitive space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criddle, Josephine; Nürnberg, Frank; Sawyer, Robert; Bauer, Peter; Langner, Andreas; Schötz, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Space bound as well as earthbound spectroscopy of extra-terrestrial objects finds its challenge in light sources with low intensities. High transmission for every optical element along the light path requires optical materials with outstanding performance to enable the measurement of even a one-photon event. Using the Lunar Laser Ranging Project and the LIGO and VIRGO Gravitational Wave Detectors as examples, the influence of the optical properties of fused silica will be described. The Visible and Infrared Surveillance Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) points out the material behavior in the NIR regime, where the chemical composition of optical materials changes the performance. Special fibers are often used in combination with optical elements as light guides to the spectroscopic application. In an extended spectral range between 350 and 2,200 nm Heraeus developed STU fiber preforms dedicated for broad band spectroscopy in astronomy. STU fibers in the broad spectral range as well as SSU fibers for UV transmission (180 - 400 nm) show also high gamma radiation resistance which allows space applications.

  10. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William T.

    2014-02-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10-12 Pa-1. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  11. Effects of Vacuum of Fused Silica UV Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shi-Zhen; LV Hai-Bing; YUAN Xiao-Dong; HUANG Jin; JIANG Xiao-Dong; WANG Hai-Jun; ZU Xiao-Tao; ZHENG Wan-Guo

    2008-01-01

    Damage points induced by 355 nm laser irradiation increase more quickly on the surface of fused silica in vacuum of about 10-3Pa than in atmospheric air at the same fluence.The larger concentration of point defects in vacuum is confirmed by photoluminescence intensity.X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared absorption indicate the formation of sub-stoichiometric sillca on the surface.The degradation mechanism of fused silica in vacuum is discussed.

  12. Global equation of state for a glassy material: Fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettger, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    A new SESAME equation of state (EOS) for fused silica has been generated using the computer program GRIZZLY and will be added to the SESAME library as material number 7387. This new EOS provides better agreement with experimental data than was achieved by all previous SESAME EOSs for fused silica. Material number 7387 also constitutes the most realistic SESAME-type EOS generated for any glassy material thus far.

  13. Quantification of Residual Stress from Photonic Signatures of Fused Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William E.

    2013-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 +/- 0.54 x 10(exp -12)/Pa. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented. Keywords: Glass, fused silica, photoelasticity, residual stress

  14. Viscosity of fused silica and thermal noise from the standard linear solid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiev, N. M.; Gorodetsky, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem states that each source of dissipation yields corresponding fluctuations. The most obvious source of dissipation in liquids is viscosity—internal friction between layers of matter. However, this property also exists in solid materials in a glass state, i.e., an amorphous substance that cannot become a crystal due to high viscosity. Fused silica is a low-loss glass material used in many interferometric applications demanding high stability, such as Fabry-Perot etalons and gravitational-wave detector mirrors and suspensions. Very high viscosity (from 1 017 to 1 040 Pa s in the literature) can be the source of additional noise and can influence the performance of such devices. We show that fused silica may be described with the standard linear solid model of viscoelastisity and present a method to estimate this type of noise.

  15. Nanodrilling of fused silica using nanosecond laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, P., E-mail: pierre.lorenz@iom-leipzig.de; Zajadacz, J.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low-fluence irradiation of 10 nm Mo on SiO{sub 2} results in the formation of Mo droplets. • High-fluence irradiation of droplets results in the formation of holes in the SiO{sub 2}. • The process allows the formation of randomly distributed and periodic holes. • The randomly distributed hole density ρ{sub h} depends on the fluence (ρ{sub h} ≤ 1.3 μm{sup −2}). • The interaction of the laser beam with Mo/SiO{sub 2} was simulated by FEM. - Abstract: The fast laser drilling of dielectric surfaces with hole diameters in the sub-μm range and a high aspect ratio is a challenge for laser methods. In this study, a novel laser structuring method for the production of randomly and periodically distributed holes in a fused silica surface will be presented using a self-assembling process. A fused silica surface was covered with a 10 nm thick magnetron-sputtered molybdenum film. The metal film was irradiated by a KrF excimer laser (wavelength λ = 248 nm, pulse duration Δt{sub p} = 25 ns) with low laser fluences (Φ < 1 J/cm{sup 2}) and the laser-induced heating resulting in a melting of the metal film and finally in a self-assembled formation of randomly distributed metal droplets due to the surface tension of the metal liquid phase using a top hat beam profile. Furthermore, the usage of a periodically modulated laser beam profile allows the fabrication of periodically distributed droplet pattern. The multi-pulse irradiation of the laser-generated metal droplets with higher laser fluences results in a stepwise evaporation of the metal and in a partial evaporation of the fused silica near the metal droplets. Finally, the laser-induced stepwise evaporation process results in a formation of cone-like holes in the fused silica surface where the resultant holes are dependent on the size of the generated metal droplets and on the laser parameters. The “drilling” process allows the fabrication of holes with a depth up to 1

  16. Optimized condition for etching fused-silica phase gratings with inductively coupled plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunquan; Zhou, Changhe; Ru, Huayi; Zhang, Yanyan

    2005-07-20

    Polymer deposition is a serious problem associated with the etching of fused silica by use of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technology, and it usually prevents further etching. We report an optimized etching condition under which no polymer deposition will occur for etching fused silica with ICP technology. Under the optimized etching condition, surfaces of the fabricated fused silica gratings are smooth and clean. Etch rate of fused silica is relatively high, and it demonstrates a linear relation between etched depth and working time. Results of the diffraction of gratings fabricated under the optimized etching condition match theoretical results well.

  17. Threats to ICF reactor materials: computational simulations of radiation damage induced topological changes in fused silica

    CERN Document Server

    Kubota, A; Stolken, J; Sadigh, B; Reyes, S; Rubia, T D; Latkowski, J F

    2003-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in fused silica. In this study, we discuss the role of successive cascade overlap on the saturation and self-healing of oxygen vacancy defects in the amorphous fused silica network. Furthermore, we present findings on the topological changes in fused silica due to repeated energetic recoil atoms. These topological network modifications consistent with experimental Raman spectroscopic observation on neutron and ion irradiated fused silica are indicators of permanent densification that has also been observed experimentally.

  18. Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

    2012-03-19

    Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

  19. Note: Discharging fused silica test masses with ionized nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, D.; Funk, Q.; Amen, T.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a technique for discharging fused silica test masses in a gravitational-wave interferometer with nitrogen ionized by an electron beam. The electrons are produced from a heated filament by thermionic emission in a low-pressure region to avoid contamination and burnout. Some electrons then pass through a small aperture and ionize nitrogen in a higher-pressure region, and this ionized gas is pumped across the test mass surface, neutralizing both polarities of charge. The discharge rate varies exponentially with charge density and filament current, quadratically with filament potential, and has an optimal working pressure of ˜8 mT. Adapting the technique to larger test mass chambers is also discussed.

  20. Fabrication of microchannels in fused silica using femtosecond Bessel beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashunin, D. A., E-mail: yashuninda@yandex.ru [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Str., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University, 24 Minin St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Malkov, Yu. A. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Str., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Mochalov, L. A.; Stepanov, A. N. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Str., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University, 24 Minin St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Ave., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-07

    Extended birefringent waveguiding microchannels up to 15 mm long were created inside fused silica by single-pulse irradiation with femtosecond Bessel beams. The birefringent refractive index change of 2–4 × 10{sup −4} is attributed to residual mechanical stress. The microchannels were chemically etched in KOH solution to produce 15 mm long microcapillaries with smooth walls and a high aspect ratio of 1:250. Bessel beams provide higher speed of material processing compared to conventional multipulse femtosecond laser micromachining techniques and permit simple control of the optical axis direction of the birefringent waveguides, which is important for practical applications [Corrielli et al., “Rotated waveplates in integrated waveguide optics,” Nat. Commun. 5, 4249 (2014)].

  1. Characterization of the polishing induced contamination of fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffer, Mathilde; Longuet, Jean-Louis; Labrugère, Christine; Fargin, Evelyne; Bousquet, Bruno; Dussauze, Marc; Lambert, Sébastien; Cormont, Philippe; Néauport, Jérôme

    2016-12-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS), Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to analyze the polishing induced contamination layer at the fused silica optics surface. Samples were prepared using an MRF polishing machine and cerium-based slurry. The cerium and iron penetration and concentration were measured in the surface out of defects. Cerium is embedded at the surface in a 60 nm layer and concentrated at 1200 ppmw in this layer while iron concentration falls down at 30 nm. Spatial distribution and homogeneity of the pollution were also studied in scratches and bevel using SIMS and EPMA techniques. An overconcentration was observed in the chamfer and we saw evidence that surface defects such as scratches are specific places that hold the pollutants. A wet etching was able to completely remove the contamination in the scratch.

  2. Colloidal suspensions of functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Johannes; Möller, Karin; Bein, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    The synthesis and characterization of colloidal mesoporous silica (CMS) functionalized with vinyl-, benzyl-, phenyl-, cyano-, mercapto-, aminopropyl- or dihydroimidazole moieties is reported. Uniform mesoporous particles ranging in size from 40 to 150 nm are generated in a co-condensation process of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and organotriethoxysilanes (RTES) in alkaline aqueous media containing triethanolamine (TEA) in combination with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTACl) serving as a structure-directing agent. The materials are obtained as colloidal suspensions featuring long-term stability after template removal by ion exchange with an ethanolic solution of ammonium nitrate or HCl. The spherical particles exhibit a wormlike pore system with defined pore sizes and high surface areas. Samples are analyzed by a number of techniques including TEM, SEM, DLS, TGA, Raman, and cross-polarized (29)Si-MAS NMR spectroscopy, as well as nitrogen sorption measurements. We demonstrate that co-condensation and grafting methods result in similar changes in the nitrogen adsorption behavior, indicating a successful internal lining of the pores with functional groups through both procedures.

  3. Rheological properties of silica suspensions in aqueous cellulose derivatives solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, Y.; Kawaguchi, M.

    1992-05-01

    The rheological properties of the silica suspensions in aqueous solutions of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) were investigated in terms of the shear stress and storage and loss moduli (G' and G`) as a function of silica content, HPMC concentration, and HPMC molecular weight by using a coaxial cylinder rheometer.

  4. Indirect slumping of D263 glass on Fused Silica mould

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proserpio, Laura; Wen, Mingwu; Breunig, Elias; Burwitz, Vadim; Friedrich, Peter; Madarasz, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    The Slumped Glass Optic (SGO) group of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial physics (MPE) is studying the indirect slumping technology for its application to X-ray telescope manufacturing. Several aspects of the technology have been analyzed in the past. During the last months, we concentrated our activities on the slumping of Schott D263 glass on a precise machined Fused Silica mould: The concave mould was produced by the Italian company Media Lario Technologies with the parabola and hyperbola side of the typical Wolter I design in one single piece. Its shape quality was estimated by optical metrology to be around 6 arcsec Half Energy Width (HEW) in double reflection. The application of an anti-sticking Boron Nitride layer was necessary to avoid the adhesion of the glass on the mould during the forming process at high temperatures. The mould has been used for the slumping of seven mirror segments 200 mm long, 100 mm wide, and with thickness of 200 μm or 400 μm. The influence of the holding time at maximum temperature was explored in this first run of tests. The current results of the activities are described in the paper and plans for further investigations are outlined.

  5. The compaction of fused silica resulting from ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.M.; Ridgway, M.C. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Leech, P.L. [Telstra Research Laboratories, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation of fused silica results in compaction and consequently an increase in refractive index. This method of modifying the near-surface region has been shown as a potential means for fabricating single mode channel waveguides. This study has measured the compaction of the implanted regions for Si implantations as a function of dose (2x10{sup 12} - 6x10{sup l6} ions/cm{sup 2}), energy (1-9 MeV) and post-implantation annealing temperature (200-900 degree C). For a given energy, a dose-dependence of the step height (depth of compacted region) is observed for doses less than {approx}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. At higher doses the step height saturates. For a given dose, a linear trend is evident for the step height as a function of energy suggesting that the major mechanism for this compaction is electronic stopping. As the annealing temperature increases, the step height gradually decreases from {approx}0.1-0.2 {mu} to -10-20% of the original value. From the annealing data, it is possible to extract an activation energy of 0.08 eV associated with the thermal removal of the compacted region. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Mitigation of organic laser damage precursors from chemical processing of fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxamusa, S; Miller, P E; Wong, L; Steele, R; Shen, N; Bude, J

    2014-12-01

    Increases in the laser damage threshold of fused silica have been driven by the successive elimination of near-surface damage precursors such as polishing residue, fractures, and inorganic salts. In this work, we show that trace impurities in ultrapure water used to process fused silica optics may be responsible for the formation of carbonaceous deposits. We use surrogate materials to show that organic compounds precipitated onto fused silica surfaces form discrete damage precursors. Following a standard etching process, solvent-free oxidative decomposition using oxygen plasma or high-temperature thermal treatments in air reduced the total density of damage precursors to as low as inorganic compounds are more likely to cause damage when they are tightly adhered to a surface, which may explain why high-temperature thermal treatments have been historically unsuccessful at removing extrinsic damage precursors from fused silica.

  7. Effects of humidity on the interaction between a fused silica test mass and an electrostatic drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koptsov, D.V., E-mail: kopcov@physics.msu.ru; Prokhorov, L.G.; Mitrofanov, V.P.

    2015-10-23

    Interaction of a fused silica test mass with electric field of an electrostatic drive with interdigitated electrodes and influence of ambient air humidity on this interaction are investigated. The key element of the experimental setup is the fused silica torsional oscillator. Time dependent increase of the torque acting on the oscillator's plate after application of DC voltage to the drive is demonstrated. The torque relaxation is presumably caused by the redistribution of electric charges on the fused silica plate. The numerical model has been developed to compute the time evolution of the plate's surface charge distribution and the corresponding torque. - Highlights: • Interaction between a fused silica plate and an electrostatic drive was investigated. • The interaction force is time and relative humidity dependent. • Numerical model of the interaction was developed. • Charge redistribution is shown to be the cause of the interaction force evolution.

  8. Search for stress dependence in the internal friction of fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, Phil; Lamb, Corinne; Heptonstall, Alastair; Hough, Jim

    2003-12-01

    The quality factor (Q) of the vertical bounce mode of a fused silica fiber pendulum is measured at high and low stresses. The internal friction of fused silica fibers is found to be independent of stress from 12.8 to 213 MPa at a level of 1.6x10{sup -8}. Comparison with Q's of fiber bending modes is consistent with losses concentrated in the surface of the fiber.

  9. Search for stress dependence in the internal friction of fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Phil; Lamb, Corinne; Heptonstall, Alastair; Hough, Jim

    2003-12-01

    The quality factor ( Q) of the vertical bounce mode of a fused silica fiber pendulum is measured at high and low stresses. The internal friction of fused silica fibers is found to be independent of stress from 12.8 to 213 MPa at a level of 1.6×10 -8. Comparison with Q's of fiber bending modes is consistent with losses concentrated in the surface of the fiber.

  10. Effect of Sintering Temperature on the Properties of Fused Silica Ceramics Prepared by Gelcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Huang, Chun-e.; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Jinzhen; Qiu, Tai

    2014-07-01

    Fused silica ceramics were fabricated by gelcasting, by use of a low-toxicity N' N-dimethylacrylamide gel system, and had excellent properties compared with those obtained by use of the low-toxicity 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and toxic acrylamide systems. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure, mechanical and dielectric properties, and thermal shock resistance of the fused silica ceramics was investigated. The results showed that sintering temperature has a critical effect. Use of an appropriate sintering temperature will promote densification and improve the strength, thermal shock resistance, and dielectric properties of fused silica ceramics. However, excessively high sintering temperature will greatly facilitate crystallization of amorphous silica and result in more cristobalite in the sample, which will cause deterioration of these properties. Fused silica ceramics sintered at 1275°C have the maximum flexural strength, as high as 81.32 MPa, but, simultaneously, a high coefficient of linear expansion (2.56 × 10-6/K at 800°C) and dramatically reduced residual flexural strength after thermal shock (600°C). Fused silica ceramics sintered at 1250°C have excellent properties, relatively high and similar flexural strength before (67.43 MPa) and after thermal shock (65.45 MPa), a dielectric constant of 3.34, and the lowest dielectric loss of 1.20 × 10-3 (at 1 MHz).

  11. Photothermal microscopic studies of surface and subsurface defects on fused silica at 355nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Dong, Jingtao; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Zhouling

    2014-10-01

    It is believed that surface and subsurface defects formed during standard grinding and polishing processes are mainly responsible for laser induced damage in fused silica. The correlation between the laser damage susceptibility and absorption property of these defects has not been totally understood. In this paper, we present the characterization of surface and subsurface defects of fused silica by measuring their absorption properties based on a photothermal technique at 355 nm. The photothermal microscopic imaging reveals that the surface/subsurface absorption defects in fused silica can be identified. In addition, a 3D photothermal imaging of a laser damage site on the silica is also obtained. Our results demonstrate that photothermal microscopy is a powerful tool for defect characterization of optical materials for high power laser applications.

  12. Mechanical quality factor measurements of monolithically suspended fused silica test masses of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J R [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute) and University of Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Cagnoli, G [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Crooks, D R M [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fejer, M M [Edward L Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4088 (United States); Gossler, S [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute) and University of Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Lueck, H [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute) and University of Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Rowan, S [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Hough, J [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Danzmann, K [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute) and University of Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2004-03-07

    Internal thermal noise is expected to be a limiting noise source in the most sensitive frequency band of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector. Because thermal noise is directly related to energy dissipation, care has been taken to construct test mass suspensions from low-dissipation materials and to eliminate inter-material rubbing where possible. Recently, the GEO 600 team finished the installation of triple-pendulum suspensions for the optics of the Michelson interferometer. Each of these triple pendulums incorporates a monolithic fused silica pendulum as the lowest stage. We have made internal mode quality factor measurements of three monolithically suspended test masses. Using these measurements we estimate of the level of internal thermal noise in the GEO 600 interferometer.

  13. Mechanical quality factor measurements of monolithically suspended fused silica test masses of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. R.; Cagnoli, G.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Fejer, M. M.; Goßler, S.; Lück, H.; Rowan, S.; Hough, J.; Danzmann, K.

    2004-03-01

    Internal thermal noise is expected to be a limiting noise source in the most sensitive frequency band of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector. Because thermal noise is directly related to energy dissipation, care has been taken to construct test mass suspensions from low-dissipation materials and to eliminate inter-material rubbing where possible. Recently, the GEO 600 team finished the installation of triple-pendulum suspensions for the optics of the Michelson interferometer. Each of these triple pendulums incorporates a monolithic fused silica pendulum as the lowest stage. We have made internal mode quality factor measurements of three monolithically suspended test masses. Using these measurements we estimate of the level of internal thermal noise in the GEO 600 interferometer.

  14. Densification and Devitrification of Fused Silica Induced by Ballistic Impact: A Computational Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mica Grujicic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular-level computational investigation is carried out to determine the dynamic response and material topology changes of fused silica subjected to ballistic impact by a hard projectile. The analysis was focused on the investigation of specific aspects of the dynamic response and of the topological changes such as the deformation of highly sheared and densified regions, and the conversion of amorphous fused silica to SiO2 crystalline polymorphs (in particular, α-quartz and stishovite. The topological changes in question were determined by carrying out a postprocessing atom-coordination procedure. This procedure suggested the formation of stishovite (and perhaps α-quartz within fused silica during ballistic impact. To rationalize the findings obtained, the all-atom molecular-level computational analysis is complemented by a series of quantum-mechanics density functional theory (DFT computations. The latter computations enable determination of the relative potential energies of the fused silica, α-quartz and stishovite, under ambient pressure (i.e., under their natural densities as well as under imposed (as high as 50 GPa pressures (i.e., under higher densities and shear strains. In addition, the transition states associated with various fused-silica devitrification processes were identified. The results obtained are found to be in good agreement with their respective experimental counterparts.

  15. On the mechanical quality factors of cryogenic test masses from fused silica and crystalline quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeter, Anja; Schnabel, Roman; Reid, Stuart; Martin, Iain; Rowan, Sheila; Schwarz, Christian; Koettig, Torsten; Neubert, Ralf; Thürk, Matthias; Vodel, Wolfgang; Tünnermann, Andreas; Danzmann, Karsten; Seidel, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors (IGWDs) are operated at room temperature with test masses made from fused silica. Fused silica shows very low absorption at the laser wavelength of 1064 nm. It is also well suited to realize low thermal noise floors in the detector signal band since it offers low mechanical loss, i. e. high quality factors (Q factors) at room temperature. However, for a further reduction of thermal noise, cooling the test masses to cryogenic temperatures may prove an interesting technique. Here we compare the results of Q factor measurements at cryogenic temperatures of acoustic eigenmodes of test masses from fused silica and its crystalline counterpart. Our results show that the mechanical loss of fused silica increases with lower temperature and reaches a maximum at 30 K for frequencies of slightly above 10 kHz. The losses of crystalline quartz generally show lower values and even fall below the room temperature values of fused silica below 10 K. Our results show that in ...

  16. Nanosecond laser nanostructuring of fused silica surfaces assisted by a chromium triangle template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, P.; Grüner, C.; Frost, F.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.

    2017-10-01

    The well-reproducible, fast and cost-effective nanostructuring is a big challenge for laser methods. The laser nanostructuring of fused silica assisted by chromium nanotriangles was studied using a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, Δtp = 25 ns, top hat beam profile). Therefore, a fused silica substrate was covered with periodically ordered polystyrene (PS) spheres with a diameter of 1.59 μm. Subsequently, this system was covered with 30 nm chromium by electron beam evaporation. Afterwards the PS spheres were removed and the bare and resultant periodic Cr triangles were irradiated. The laser irradiation with high laser fluences resulted in a removal of the chromium and in localized modifications of the fused silica like a localized ablation of the fused silica. The resultant structures were studied by scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as the surface composition was analysed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The laser process allows the production of well-defined periodic hole structures into the fused silica surface where the resultant surface structure depends on the laser parameters. The multi-pulse irradiation of the Cr/SiO2 sample with moderate laser fluences (Φ ∼ 650 mJ/cm2) allows the fabrication of periodic pyramidal-like structures (depth Δz = 130 nm).

  17. Applying Fused Silica and Other Transparent Window Materials in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jon

    2017-01-01

    A variety of transparent ceramics, such as AlONs and spinels, that were developed for military applications hold promise as spacecraft windows. Window materials in spacecraft such as the Space Shuttle must meet many requirements such as maintaining cabin pressure, sustaining thermal shock, and tolerating damage from hyper-velocity impact while providing superior optical characteristics. The workhorse transparent material for space missions from Apollo to the International Space Station has been fused silica due in part to its low density, low coefficient of expansion and optical quality. Despite its successful use, fused silica exhibits lower fracture toughness and impact resistance as compared to newer materials. Can these newer transparent ceramics lighten spacecraft window systems and might they be useful for applications such as phone screens? This presentation will compare recent optical ceramics to fused silica and demonstrate how weight can be saved.

  18. Laser-Induced Damage Growth on Larger-Aperture Fused Silica Optical Components at 351 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wan-Qing; ZHANG Xiao-Min; HAN Wei; WANG Fang; XIANG Yong; LI Fu-Quan; FENG Bin; JING Feng; WEI Xiao-Feng; ZHENG Wan-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced damage is a key lifetime limiter for optics in high-power laser facility. Damage initiation and growth under 351 nm high-fluence laser irradiation are observed on larger-aperture fused silica optics. The input surface of one fused silica component is damaged most severely and an explanation is presented. Obscurations and the area of a scratch on it are found to grow exponentially with the shot number. The area of damage site grows linearly. Micrographs of damage sites support the micro-explosion damage model which could be used to qualitatively explain the phenomena.

  19. Development of a Process Model for CO(2) Laser Mitigation of Damage Growth in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Boley, C; Rotter, M D

    2003-11-01

    A numerical model of CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of damage growth in fused silica has been constructed that accounts for laser energy absorption, heat conduction, radiation transport, evaporation of fused silica and thermally induced stresses. This model will be used to understand scaling issues and effects of pulse and beam shapes on material removal, temperatures reached and stresses generated. Initial calculations show good agreement of simulated and measured material removal. The model has also been applied to LG-770 glass as a prototype red blocker material.

  20. Structural Modifications in Fused Silica Due to Laser Damage Induced Shock Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, A; Davila, L; Caturla, M J; Stolken, J S; Sadigh, B; Quong, A; Rubenchik, A; Feit, M D

    2001-12-05

    High power laser pulses can produce damage in high quality fused silica optics that can lead to its eventual obscuration and failure. Current models suggest the initiation of a plasma detonation due to absorbing initiators and defects, leading to the formation of shock waves. Recent experiments have found a densified layer at the bottom of damage sites, as evidence of the laser-damage model. We have studied the propagation of shock waves through fused silica using molecular dynamics. These simulations show drastic modifications in the structure and topology of the network, in agreement with experimental observations.

  1. Simulation of Light Intensification Induced by Defects of Polished Fused Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng-Rui; LIU Hong-Jie; HUANG Jin; ZHOU Xin-Da; JIANG Xiao-Dong; WU Wei-Dong; ZHENG Wan-Guo; JU Xin

    2011-01-01

    Light intensity distribution in the vicinity of inclusions and etched cracks in polished fused silica at wavelength scale are simulated by using the finite-difference time-domain algorithm. Light intensity enhancement factor as functions of diameter and refractive index of inclusions are investigated, more than 10 times that of incident beam is obtained in the simulation. We model the etched crack in close proximity to a real structure, which is characterized by AFM. We find that the peak light intensity of the crack is a function of its cross sectional breadth depth ratio, providing good hints for the effective processing of fused silica samples to improve the damage threshold.

  2. Rapidly removing grinding damage layer on fused silica by inductively coupled plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Xuhui; Shi, Baolu; Xiong, Haobin

    2016-10-01

    During the conventional optical shaping process of fused silica, lapping is generally used to remove grinding damage layer. But this process is of low efficiency, it cannot meet the demand of large aperture optical components. Therefore, Inductively Coupled Plasma Processing (ICPP) was proposed to remove grinding damage layer instead of lapping. ICPP is a non-contact, deterministic figuring technology performed at atmospheric pressure. The process benefits from its ability to simultaneously remove sub-surface damage (SSD) while imparting the desired figure to the surface with high material remove rate. The removing damage capability of ICPP has preliminarily been confirmed on medium size optical surfaces made of fused silica, meanwhile serious edge warping was found. This paper focused on edge effect and a technique has been designed to compensate for these difficulties. Then it was demonstrated on a large aperture fused silica mirror (Long320mm×Wide370mm×High50mm), the removal depth was 30.2μm and removal rate got 6.6mm3/min. The results indicate that ICPP can rapidly remove damage layer on the fused silica induced by the previous grinding process and edge effect is effective controlled.

  3. Wear and mechanical properties of nano-silica-fused whisker composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H K; Quinn, J B; Giuseppetti, A A

    2004-12-01

    Resin composites must be improved if they are to overcome the high failure rates in large stress-bearing posterior restorations. This study aimed to improve wear resistance via nano-silica-fused whiskers. It was hypothesized that nano-silica-fused whiskers would significantly improve composite mechanical properties and wear resistance. Nano-silicas were fused onto whiskers and incorporated into a resin at mass fractions of 0%-74%. Fracture toughness (mean +/- SD; n = 6) was 2.92 +/- 0.14 MPa.m(1/2) for whisker composite with 74% fillers, higher than 1.13 +/- 0.19 MPa.m(1/2) for a prosthetic control, and 0.95 +/- 0.11 MPa.m(1/2) for an inlay/onlay control (Tukey's at 0.95). A whisker composite with 74% fillers had a wear depth of 77.7 +/- 6.9 mum, less than 118.0 +/- 23.8 microm of an inlay/onlay control, and 172.5 +/- 15.4 microm of a prosthetic control (p hardness, modulus, strength, and toughness, with R = 0.95-0.97. Novel nano-silica-fused whisker composites possessed high toughness and wear resistance with smooth worn surfaces, and may be useful in large stress-bearing restorations.

  4. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  5. Ionoluminescence of fused silica under swift ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra, R. [Fusion Materials Research Unit, National Fusion Laboratory, CIEMAT, Av Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jiménez-Rey, D. [Fusion Materials Research Unit, National Fusion Laboratory, CIEMAT, Av Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centre for Micro Analysis of Materials, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martin, P.; Vila, R. [Fusion Materials Research Unit, National Fusion Laboratory, CIEMAT, Av Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Irradiation with He{sup +} ions (lowest stopping power) shows highest luminescence. • Silica with highest OH content presents the lowest blue luminescence. • Electronic excitation was the predominant process of energy transfer. • Surface cracks were observed in Si or O irradiated samples at low fluence. • Blue IL maximum for O and Si irradiated samples is related to structural changes. - Abstract: Ion beam induced luminescence spectra have been in-situ recorded during He{sup +} (2.5 MeV), O{sup 4+} (13.5 MeV) and Si{sup 4+} (24.4 MeV) irradiations for three vitreous silica grades with different OH content (KU1, KS-4V and Infrasil 301). Remarkable changes in the ionoluminescence spectra of the three silica grades were observed for low ion fluences. He{sup +} irradiated samples exhibited higher luminescence than equivalent ones irradiated with heavier O{sup 4+} and Si{sup 4+} ions. KU1 samples with the highest OH content showed the lowest blue luminescence. Blue luminescence maximum during ion irradiations with O{sup 4+} and Si{sup 4+} ions is correlated with structural changes.

  6. Evolution of Oxygen Deficiency Center on Fused Silica Surface Irradiated by Ultraviolet Laser and Posttreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bing Lü

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of oxygen deficiency centers (ODCs on a fused silica surface irradiated using a 355 nm ultraviolet (UV laser beam in both vacuum and atmospheric conditions was quantitatively studied using photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When the fusedsilica surface was exposed to the UV laser in vacuum, the laser damage threshold was decreased whereas the concentration of the ODCs was increased. For the fuse silica operated under the high power lasers, creation of ODCs on their surface resulted from the UV laser irradiation, and this is more severe in a high vacuum. The laser fluence and/or laser intensity have significant effects on the increase of the ODCs concentration. The ODCs can be effectively repaired using postoxygen plasma treatment and UV laser irradiation in an excessive oxygen environment. Results also demonstrated that the “gain” and “loss” of oxygen at the silica surface is a reversible and dynamic process.

  7. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-08-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process.

  8. Rheological behavior of fumed silica suspension in polyethylene glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The rheological behavior of fumed silica suspensions in polyethylene glycol(PEG) was studied at steady and oscillatory shear stress using AR 2000 stress controlled rheometer. The systems show reversible shear thickening behavior and the shear-thickening behavior can be explained by the clustering mechanism. The viscosity and the degree of shear-thickening of the systems strongly depend on the mass fraction of the silica, the molecular weigh of PEG and the frequency used in the rheological measurement. The silica volume fraction of the systems is 1.16 %-3.62%, corresponding to the mass fraction of 4%- 9 %. The shear-thickening taking place in the low volume fraction may contribute to the fractal nature of the silica. At oscillatory shear stress, when the shear stress is less than the critical stress, the storage modulus decreases significantly, meanwhile the loss modulus and the complex viscosity almost remain unchanged; when the shear stress is larger than the critical stress, the storage modulus, the loss modulus and the complex viscosity increase with the increase of shear stress. The loss modulus is larger than the storage modulus in the range of stress studied and both moduli depend on frequency.

  9. Thermal transport in CO2 laser irradiated fused silica: In situ measurements and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Steven T.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Elhadj, Selim; Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Bisson, Scott E.

    2009-11-01

    In situ spatial and temporal temperature measurements of pristine fused silica surfaces heated with a 10.6 μm CO2 laser were obtained using an infrared radiation thermometer based on a mercury cadmium telluride camera. Laser spot sizes ranged from 250 to 1000 μm diameter with peak axial irradiance levels of 0.13-16 kW/cm2. For temperatures below 2800 K, the measured steady-state surface temperature is observed to rise linearly with both increasing beam size and incident laser irradiance. The effective thermal conductivity estimated over this range was approximately 2 W/m-K, in good agreement with classical calculations based on phonon heat capacities. Similarly, time-dependent temperature measurements up to 2000 K yielded thermal diffusivity values which were close to reported values of 7×10-7 m2/s. Above ˜2800 K, the fused silica surface temperature asymptotically approaches 3100 K as laser power is further increased, consistent with the onset of evaporative heat losses near the silica boiling point. These results show that in the laser heating regime studied here, the T3 temperature dependent thermal conductivity due to radiation transport can be neglected, but at temperatures above 2800 K heat transport due to evaporation must also be considered. The thermal transport in fused silica up to 2800 K, over a range of conditions, can then be adequately described by a linear diffusive heat equation assuming constant thermal properties.

  10. Particle damage sources for fused silica optics and their mitigation on high energy laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bude, J; Carr, C W; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Whitman, P; Monticelli, M; Raman, R; Cross, D; Welday, B; Ravizza, F; Suratwala, T; Davis, J; Fischer, M; Hawley, R; Lee, H; Matthews, M; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; VanBlarcom, D; Sommer, S

    2017-05-15

    High energy laser systems are ultimately limited by laser-induced damage to their critical components. This is especially true of damage to critical fused silica optics, which grows rapidly upon exposure to additional laser pulses. Much progress has been made in eliminating damage precursors in as-processed fused silica optics (the advanced mitigation process, AMP3), and very high damage resistance has been demonstrated in laboratory studies. However, the full potential of these improvements has not yet been realized in actual laser systems. In this work, we explore the importance of additional damage sources-in particular, particle contamination-for fused silica optics fielded in a high-performance laser environment, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system. We demonstrate that the most dangerous sources of particle contamination in a system-level environment are laser-driven particle sources. In the specific case of the NIF laser, we have identified the two important particle sources which account for nearly all the damage observed on AMP3 optics during full laser operation and present mitigations for these particle sources. Finally, with the elimination of these laser-driven particle sources, we demonstrate essentially damage free operation of AMP3 fused silica for ten large optics (a total of 12,000 cm(2) of beam area) for shots from 8.6 J/cm(2) to 9.5 J/cm(2) of 351 nm light (3 ns Gaussian pulse shapes). Potentially many other pulsed high energy laser systems have similar particle sources, and given the insight provided by this study, their identification and elimination should be possible. The mitigations demonstrated here are currently being employed for all large UV silica optics on the National Ignition Facility.

  11. Fiber fuse light-induced continuous breakdown of silica glass optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Todoroki, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the fiber fuse phenomenon that causes a serious problem for the present optical communication systems. High-power light often brings about catastrophic damage to optical devices. Silica glass optical fibers with ultralow transmission loss are not the exception. A fiber fuse appears in a heated region of the fiber cable delivering a few watts of light and runs toward the light source destroying its core region. Understanding this phenomenon is a necessary first step in the development of future optical communication systems. This book provides supplementary videos and photog

  12. The size prediction of potential inclusions embedded in the sub-surface of fused silica by damage morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A model for predicting the size ranges of different potential inclusions initiating damage on the surface of fused silica has been presented. This accounts for the heating of nanometric inclusions whose absorptivity is described based on Mie Theory. The depth profile of impurities has been measured by ICP-OES. By the measured temporal pulse profile on the surface of fused silica, the temperature and thermal stress has been calculated. Furthermore, considering the limit conditions of temperature and thermal stress strength for different damage morphologies, the size range of potential inclusions for fused silica is discussed.

  13. UV-induced modification of fused silica: Insights from ReaxFF-based molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Du, Jincheng; Zu, Xiaotao; Han, Wei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-09-01

    Atomic structural modification and defect processes of fused silica resulting from UV-laser irradiation are studied by a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF). Bond state transitions by laser excitation are modeled as the result of localized recoils during energy deposition. Computations of pair distribution functions and bond angle distributions of the irradiated structure reveal that fused silica undergoes significant changes in terms of Si-O, Si-Si pair distances and Si-O-Si bond angles, which are attributed to the formation of silicon and oxygen coordination defects. It is found that nonbridging oxygen is responsible for the decreased Si-O bond length, while laser-induced five-coordinated silicon leads to small Si-O-Si bond angles in 2-membered rings.

  14. Microwave interrogated large core fused silica fiber Michelson interferometer for strain sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Liwei; Song, Yang; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Li, Yanjun; Xiao, Hai

    2015-08-20

    A Michelson-type large core optical fiber sensor has been developed, which is designed based on the optical carrier-based microwave interferometry technique, and fabricated by using two pieces of 200-μm diameter fused silica core fiber as two arms of the Michelson interferometer. The interference fringe pattern caused by the optical path difference of the two arms is interrogated in the microwave domain, where the fringe visibility of 40 dB has easily been obtained. The strain sensing at both room temperature and high temperatures has been demonstrated by using such a sensor. Experimental results show that this sensor has a linear response to the applied strain, and also has relatively low temperature-strain cross talk. The dopant-free quality of the fused silica fiber provides high possibility for the sensor to have promising strain sensing performance in a high temperature environment.

  15. Birefringence and residual stress induced by CO2 laser mitigation of damage growth in fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, L.; Cormont, P.; Rullier, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the residual stress field created near mitigated sites and its influence on the efficiency on the CO2 laser mitigation of damage growth process. A numerical model of CO2 laser interaction with fused silica is developed that take into account laser energy absorption, heat transfer, thermally-induced stress and birefringence. Specific photoelastic methods are developed to characterize the residual stress near mitigated sites in fused silica samples. The stress distribution and quantitative values of stress levels are obtained for sites treated with the CO2 laser in various conditions of energy deposition (beam size, pulse duration, incident power). The results obtained also show that the presence of birefringence/residual stress around the mitigated sites has a critical effect on their laser damage resistance.

  16. Studies on transmitted beam modulation effect from laser induced damage on fused silica optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Ma, Ping; Li, Haibo; Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin

    2013-07-15

    UV laser induced damage (LID) on exit surface of fused silica could cause modulation effect to transmitted beam and further influence downstream propagation properties. This paper presents our experimental and analytical studies on this topic. In experiment, a series of measurement instruments are applied, including beam profiler, interferometer, microscope, and optical coherent tomography (OCT). Creating and characterizing of LID on fused silica sample have been implemented. Morphological features are studied based on their particular modulation effects on transmitted beam. In theoretical investigation, analytical modeling and numerical simulation are performed. Modulation effects from amplitude, phase, and size factors are analyzed respectively. Furthermore, we have novelly designed a simplified polygon model to simulate actual damage site with multiform modulation features, and the simulation results demonstrate that the modeling is usable and representative.

  17. Resonance Fluorescence of Fused Silica by the Depopulation of the Ground State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Bayrakceken

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopically pure fused silica has been used in many applications ranging from optoelectronics and optical fibers to laser flash spectroscopy. Although ultraviolet light irradiated optical absorption spectra and coherence fluorescence of silicon dioxide have been studied in the past, we present discrete absorption and resonance coherent fluorescence line of silicon dioxide which were recorded photographically at 288.2 nm. This discrete fluorescence is observed at room temperature using high photon flux (1024 photon/pulse excitation spectroscopy.

  18. Form control in atmospheric pressure plasma processing of ground fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; Wang, Bo; Xin, Qiang; Jin, Huiliang; Wang, Jun; Dong, Wenxia

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing (APPP) using inductively coupled plasma has demonstrated that it can achieve comparable removal rate on the optical surface of fused silica under the atmosphere pressure and has the advantage of inducing no sub-surface damage for its non-contact and chemical etching mechanism. APPP technology is a cost effective way, compared with traditional mechanical polishing, magnetorheological finishing and ion beam figuring. Thus, due to these advantages, this technology is being tested to fabricate large aperture optics of fused silica to help shorten the polishing time in optics fabrication chain. Now our group proposes to use inductively coupled plasma processing technology to fabricate ground surface of fused silica directly after the grinding stage. In this paper, form control method and several processing parameters are investigated to evaluate the removal efficiency and the surface quality, including the robustness of removal function, velocity control mode and tool path strategy. However, because of the high heat flux of inductively coupled plasma, the removal depth with time can be non-linear and the ground surface evolvement will be affected. The heat polishing phenomenon is founded. The value of surface roughness is reduced greatly, which is very helpful to reduce the time of follow-up mechanical polishing. Finally, conformal and deterministic polishing experiments are analyzed and discussed. The form error is less 3%, before and after the APPP, when 10μm depth of uniform removal is achieved on a 60×60mm ground fused silica. Also, a basin feature is fabricated to demonstrate the figuring capability and stability. Thus, APPP is a promising technology in processing the large aperture optics.

  19. Capillary electrophoresis in a fused-silica capillary with surface roughness gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horká, Marie; Šlais, Karel; Karásek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Šalplachta, Jiří; Šesták, Jozef; Kahle, Vladislav; Roth, Michal

    2016-10-01

    The electro-osmotic flow, a significant factor in capillary electrophoretic separations, is very sensitive to small changes in structure and surface roughness of the inner surface of fused silica capillary. Besides a number of negative effects, the electro-osmotic flow can also have a positive effect on the separation. An example could be fused silica capillaries with homogenous surface roughness along their entire separation length as produced by etching with supercritical water. Different strains of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were separated on that type of capillaries. In the present study, fused-silica capillaries with a gradient of surface roughness were prepared and their basic behavior was studied in capillary zone electrophoresis with UV-visible detection. First the influence of the electro-osmotic flow on the peak shape of a marker of electro-osmotic flow, thiourea, has been discussed. An antifungal agent, hydrophobic amphotericin B, and a protein marker, albumin, have been used as model analytes. A significant narrowing of the detected zones of the examined analytes was achieved in supercritical-water-treated capillaries as compared to the electrophoretic separation in smooth capillaries. Minimum detectable amounts of 5 ng/mL amphotericin B and 5 μg/mL albumin were reached with this method.

  20. Measurement of initial absorption of fused silica at 193nm using laser induced deflection technique (LID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Dörte; Klett, Ursula; Mühlig, Christian; Thomas, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing development in microlithography towards further miniaturization of structures creates a strong demand for lens material with nearly ideal optical properties. Beside the highly demanding requirements on homogeneity and stress induced birefringence (SIB), low absorption is a key factor. Even a small absorption is associated with a temperature increase and results in thermally induced local variations of refractive index and SIB. This could affect the achievable resolution of the lithographic process. The total absorption of the material is composed of initial absorption and of absorption induced during irradiation. Thus, the optimization of both improves the lifetime of the material. In principal, it is possible to measure transmission and scattering with a suitable spectrometer assembly and calculate absorption from them. However, owing to the influence of sample surfaces and errors of measurement, these methods usually do not provide satisfactory results for highly light-transmissive fused silica. Therefore, it is most desirable to find a technique that is capable of directly measuring absorption coefficients in the range of (1...10)•10 -4 cm -1 (base 10) directly. We report our first results for fused silica achieved with the LID technique. Besides a fused silica grade designed for 193 nm applications, grades with higher absorption at 193 nm were measured to test the LID technique. A special focus was set on the possibility of measuring initial absorption without the influence of degradation effects.

  1. Pattern transfer on fused silica samples using sub-aperture reactive ion beam etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miessler, Andre; Arnold, Thomas [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung (IOM), Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In comparison to sole Ar ion beam sputtering Reactive Ion Beam Etching (RIBE) reveals the main advantage of increasing the selectivity for different kind of materials due to chemical contributions during the material removal. Therefore RIBE is qualified to be an excellent candidate for pattern transfer applications. The goal of the present study is to apply a sub-aperture reactive ion beam for pattern transfer on large fused silica samples. Concerning this matter, the etching behavior in the ion beam periphery plays a decisive role. Using a Kaufman-typed ion source with NF{sub 3} as reactive gas, XPS measurements of the modified surface exposes impurities like Ni, Fe and Cr, which belongs to chemically eroded material of the plasma pot and a layer formation of silicon nitride, handicaps the etching process mainly in the beam periphery where the sputtering contribution decrease. These side effects influence the pattern transfer of trench structures, produced in AZ MIR 701 photoresist by lithography on a 2'' fused silica plate, by changing the selectivity due to modified chemical reactions of the resist layer. Concerning this we investigate a RF-Ion source for sub aperture reactive ion beam applications and finally we examine the pattern transfer on large fused silica plates using NF{sub 3}-sub-aperture RIBE.

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNAs with Sticky Ends at Water/Fused Silica Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Slavica [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to study intermolecular interactions of DNAs with unpaired (sticky) ends of different lengths at water/fused silica interface at the single-molecule level. Evanescent field residence time, linear velocity and adsorption/desorption frequency were measured in a microchannel for individual DNA molecules from T7, Lambda, and PSP3 phages at various pH values. The longest residence times and the highest adsorption/desorption frequencies at the constant flow at pH 5.5 were found for PSP3 DNA, followed by lower values for Lambda DNA, and the lowest values for T7 DNA. Since T7, Lambda, and PSP3 DNA molecules contain none, twelve and nineteen unpaired bases, respectively, it was concluded that the affinity of DNAs for the surface increases with the length of the sticky ends. This confirms that hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between sticky ends and fused-silica surface are driving forces for DNA adsorption at the fused-silica surface. Described single-molecule methodology and results therein can be valuable for investigation of interactions in liquid chromatography, as well as for design of DNA hybridization sensors and drug delivery systems.

  3. Optical properties in the Cu-fused silica system irradiated with swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ranjana C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz East, Mumbai 400 098 (India); Kothari, D.C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz East, Mumbai 400 098 (India)]. E-mail: kothari@mu.ac.in; Choudhari, R.J. [Nuclear Science Centre, P.O. Box 10502, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Kumar, Ravi [Nuclear Science Centre, P.O. Box 10502, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Sahoo, P.K. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Lieb, K.P. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Klaumuenzer, S. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Swift heavy ions are used to study the effects of electronic energy loss on Cu cluster formation in fused silica after post-irradiation annealing. Fused silica substrates covered with 10 nm thin Cu-films were irradiated using beams of either 120 MeV Ag{sup 9+} ions or 350 MeV Au{sup 26+} ions at fluences ranging from 2 x 10{sup 13} to 1 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. After irradiation, the samples were annealed for 30 min in argon, at temperatures of 773-1200 K and characterized by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. The swift ion irradiations created E' and B{sub 2} defects in silica, which were partially eliminated during annealing. In addition, Cu cluster formation in silica was observed after annealing. Irradiation fluences exceeding 4 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} and annealing temperatures above 1100 K are more effective in forming larger nanoclusters.

  4. A new method for synthesizing fluid inclusions in fused silica capillaries containing organic and inorganic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Song, Y.; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable advances in our understanding of physicochemical properties of geological fluids and their roles in many geological processes have been achieved by the use of synthetic fluid inclusions. We have developed a new method to synthesize fluid inclusions containing organic and inorganic material in fused silica capillary tubing. We have used both round (0.3 mm OD and 0.05 or 0.1 mm ID) and square cross-section tubing (0.3 ?? 0.3 mm with 0.05 ?? 0.05 mm or 0.1 ?? 0.1 mm cavities). For microthermometric measurements in a USGS-type heating-cooling stage, sample capsules must be less than 25 mm in length. The square-sectioned capsules have the advantage of providing images without optical distortion. However, the maximum internal pressure (P; about 100 MPa at 22 ??C) and temperature (T; about 500 ??C) maintained by the square-sectioned capsules are less than those held by the round-sectioned capsules (about 300 MPa at room T, and T up to 650 ??C). The fused silica capsules can be applied to a wide range of problems of interest in fluid inclusion and hydrothermal research, such as creating standards for the calibration of thermocouples in heating-cooling stages and frequency shifts in Raman spectrometers. The fused silica capsules can also be used as containers for hydrothermal reactions, especially for organic samples, including individual hydrocarbons, crude oils, and gases, such as cracking of C18H38 between 350 and 400 ??C, isotopic exchanges between C18H38 and D2O and between C19D40 and H2O at similar temperatures. Results of these types of studies provide information on the kinetics of oil cracking and the changes of oil composition under thermal stress. When compared with synthesis of fluid inclusions formed by healing fractures in quartz or other minerals or by overgrowth of quartz at elevated P-T conditions, the new fused-silica method has the following advantages: (1) it is simple; (2) fluid inclusions without the presence of water can be formed; (3

  5. Surface roughening of ground fused silica processed by atmospheric inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Qiang; Li, Na; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo, E-mail: bradywang@hit.edu.cn; Li, Guo; Ding, Fei; Jin, Huiliang

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • The morphology evolution of ground fused silica, processed by atmospheric plasma, was investigated experimentally. • The roughness development results from opening and coalescing of the plasma-etched cracks. • The shapes of grain-like etched pits are the results of the adjacent cracks coalescing with one another. • The descent of the pits density is due to some smaller etched pits that are swallowed up by larger pits. • Leading role in surface smoothing is laterally etching away the side walls of the intersecting pits. - Abstract: Subsurface damage (SSD) is a defect that is inevitably induced during mechanical processes, such as grinding and polishing. This defect dramatically reduces the mechanical strength and the laser damage thresholds of optical elements. Compared with traditional mechanical machining, atmospheric pressure plasma processing (APPP) is a relatively novel technology that induces almost no SSD during the processing of silica-based optical materials. In this paper, a form of APPP, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), is used to process fused silica substrates with fluorocarbon precursor under atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology evolution of ICP-processed substrates was observed and characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the roughness evolves with the etching depth, and the roughness evolution is a single-peaked curve. This curve results from the opening and the coalescing of surface cracks and fractures. The coalescence procedure of these microstructures was simulated with two common etched pits on a polished fused silica surface. Understanding the roughness evolution of plasma-processed surface might be helpful in optimizing the optical fabrication chain that contains APPP.

  6. Thermal transport in CO2 laser irradiated fused silica: in situ measurements and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Draggoo, V G; Bisson, S E

    2009-07-07

    In situ spatial and temporal temperature measurements of pristine fused silica surfaces heated with a 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser were obtained using an infrared radiation thermometer based on a Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) camera. Laser spot sizes ranged from 250 {micro}m to 1000 {micro}m diameter with peak axial irradiance levels of 0.13 to 16 kW/cm{sup 2}. For temperatures below 2800K, the measured steady-state surface temperature is observed to rise linearly with both increasing beam size and incident laser irradiance. The effective thermal conductivity estimated over this range was approximately 2W/mK, in good agreement with classical calculations based on phonon heat capacities. Similarly, time-dependent temperature measurements up to 2000K yielded thermal diffusivity values which were close to reported values of 7 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/s. Above {approx}2800K, the fused silica surface temperature asymptotically approaches 3100K as laser power is further increased, consistent with the onset of evaporative heat losses near the silica boiling point. These results show that in the laser heating regime studied here, the T{sup 3} temperature dependent thermal conductivity due to radiation transport can be neglected, but at temperatures above 2800K heat transport due to evaporation must be considered. The thermal transport in fused silica up to 2800K, over a range of conditions, can then be adequately described by a linear diffusive heat equation assuming constant thermal properties.

  7. Scattering of ultrasonic shock waves in suspensions of silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Coulouvrat, François; Chanéac, Corinne

    2011-03-01

    Experiments are carried out to assess, for the first time, the validity of a generalized Burgers' equation, introduced first by Davidson [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 54, 1331-1342 (1973)] to compute the nonlinear propagation of finite amplitude acoustical waves in suspensions of "rigid" particles. Silica nanoparticles of two sizes (33 and 69 nm) have been synthesized in a water-ethanol mixture and precisely characterized via electron microscopy. An acoustical beam of high amplitude is generated at 1 MHz inside a water tank, leading to the formation of acoustical shock waves through nonlinear steepening. The signal is then measured after propagation in a cylinder containing either a reference solution or suspensions of nanoparticles. In this way, a "nonlinear attenuation" is obtained and compared to the numerical solution of a generalized Burgers' equation adapted to the case of hydrosols. An excellent agreement (corresponding to an error on the particles size estimation of 3 nm) is achieved in the frequency range from 1 to 40 MHz. Both visco-inertial and thermal scattering are significant in the present case, whereas thermal effects can generally be neglected for most hydrosols. This is due to the value of the specific heat ratio of water-ethanol mixture which significantly differs from unity.

  8. Femtosecond laser assisted 3-dimensional freeform fabrication of metal microstructures in fused silica (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Fatmah; Charvet, Raphaël.; Dénéréaz, Cyril; Mortensen, Andreas; Bellouard, Yves

    2017-03-01

    Femtosecond laser exposure of fused silica combined with chemical etching has opened up new opportunities for three-dimensional freeform processing of micro-structures that can form complex micro-devices of silica, integrating optical, mechanical and/or fluidic functionalities. Here, we demontrate an expansion of this process with an additional fabrication step that enables the integration of three-dimensional embedded metallic structures out of useful engineering metals such as silver, gold, copper as well as some of their alloys. This additional step is an adaptation of the pressure infiltration for the insertion of high conductivity, high melting point metals and alloys into topologically complex, femtosecond laser-machined cavities in fused silica. This produces truly 3-dimensional microstructures, including microcoils and needles, within the bulk of glass substrates. Combining this added capability with the existing possibilities of femtosecond laser micromachining (i.e. direct written waveguides, microchannels, resonators, etc.) opens up a host of potential applications for the contactless fabrication of highly integrated monolithic devices that include conductive element of all kind. We present preliminary results from this new fabrication process, including prototype devices that incorporate 3D electrodes with aspect ratios of 1:100 and a feature size resolution down to 2μm. We demonstrate the generation of high electric field gradients (of the order of 1013 Vm-2) in these devices due to the 3-dimensional topology of fabricated microstructures.

  9. Electrical field-induced faceting of etched features using plasma etching of fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, M.; Pedersen, M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports a previously unreported anomaly that occurs when attempting to perform deep, highly anisotropic etches into fused silica using an Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP) etch process. Specifically, it was observed that the top portion of the etched features exhibited a substantially different angle compared to the vertical sidewalls that would be expected in a typical highly anisotropic etch process. This anomaly has been termed as "faceting." A possible explanation of the mechanism that causes this effect and a method to eradicate it has been developed. Additionally, the method to eliminate the faceting is demonstrated. It is theorized that this faceting is a result of the interaction of the electro-potential electrical fields that surround the patterned nickel layers used as a hard mask and the electrical fields directing the high-energy ions from the plasma to the substrate surface. Based on this theory, an equation for calculating the minimum hard mask thickness required for a desired etch depth into fused silica to avoid faceting was derived. As validation, test samples were fabricated employing hard masks of thicknesses calculated based on the derived equation, and it was found that no faceting was observed on these samples, thereby demonstrating that the solution performed as predicted. Deep highly anisotropic etching of fused silica, as well as other forms of silicon dioxide, including crystalline quartz, using plasma etching, has an important application in the fabrication of several MEMS, NEMS, microelectronic, and photonic devices. Therefore, a method to eliminate faceting is an important development for the accurate control of the dimensions of deep and anisotropic etched features of these devices using ICP etch technology.

  10. Growth of laser damage in fused silica: diameter to depth ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Adams, J J; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hollingsworth, W G; Jarboe, J A; Matthews, M; Rubenchik, A M; Spaeth, M L

    2007-10-29

    Growth of laser initiated damage plays a major role in determining optics lifetime in high power laser systems. Previous measurements have established that the lateral diameter grows exponentially. Knowledge of the growth of the site in the propagation direction is also important, especially so when considering techniques designed to mitigate damage growth, where it is required to reach all the subsurface damage. In this work, we present data on both the diameter and the depth of a growing exit surface damage sites in fused silica. Measured growth rates with both 351 nm illumination and with combined 351 nm and 1054 nm illumination are discussed.

  11. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2001-12-21

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  12. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2003-06-10

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  13. Evaluation of UV absorption coefficient in laser-modified fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Burke, M W; Sutton, S B; DeMange, P; Feit, M D; Demos, S G

    2006-08-21

    Laser-induced damage in transparent dielectrics leads to the formation of laser-modified material as a result of exposure to extreme localized temperatures and pressures. In this work, we used an infrared thermal imaging system in combination with a fluorescence microscope to map the dynamics of the local surface temperature and fluorescence intensity under cw, UV excitation of laser-modified fused silica within a damage site. Based on a thermal diffusion model, we estimate the energy deposited via linear absorption mechanisms and derive the absorption coefficient of the modified material. In addition, irreversible changes in the absorption following extended laser exposure were observed.

  14. Three-dimensional optical storage in fused silica using modulated femtosecond pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Liu(刘青); Guanghua Cheng(程光华); Yishan Wang(王屹山); Zhao Cheng(程昭); Wei Zhao(赵卫); Guofu Chen(陈国夫)

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional bitwise optical recording with a density of 500 Gb/cm3 in fused silica using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser modulated by binary digits is demonstrated. Laser pulses modulation is realized by modulating two circuits of trigger pulses signal which are used to control laser pulses trapping and switching out from cavity, respectively. Bits are optically readout in both a parallel reading (phase-contrast) and a serial reading (confocal-type) methods. The method for modulating laser pulses can also be used in all of pulsed laser systems which operate in cavity-dumping configuration.

  15. Influence of Ambient Temperature on Nanosecond and Picosecond Laser-Induced Bulk Damage of Fused Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanosecond (ns and picosecond (ps pulsed laser-induced damage behaviors of fused silica under cryogenic and room temperature have been investigated. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT and damage probability are used to understand the damage behavior at different ambient temperatures. The results show that the LIDTs for both ns and ps slightly increased at cryogenic temperature compared to that at room temperature. Meanwhile, the damage probability has an inverse trend; that is, the damage probability at low temperature is smaller than that at room temperature. A theoretical model based on heated crystal lattice is well consistent with the experimental results.

  16. Femtosecond laser fabrication of phase-shifted Bragg grating waveguides in fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Jason R; Fernandes, Luís A; Aitchison, J Stewart; Marques, Paulo V S; Herman, Peter R

    2012-06-15

    Phase-shifted Bragg grating waveguides (PSBGWs) were formed in bulk fused silica glass by femtosecond laser direct writing to produce narrowband (22±3)  pm filters at 1550 nm. Tunable π and other phase shifts generated narrow passbands in controlled positions of the Bragg stopband, while the accurate placement of multiple cascaded phase-shift regions yielded a rectangular-shaped bandpass filter. A waveguide birefringence of (7.5±0.3)×10(-5) is inferred from the polarization-induced spectral shifting of the PSBGW narrowband filters.

  17. Femtosecond laser fabrication of birefringent directional couplers as polarization beam splitters in fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luís A; Grenier, Jason R; Herman, Peter R; Aitchison, J Stewart; Marques, Paulo V S

    2011-06-20

    Integrated polarization beam splitters based on birefringent directional couplers are demonstrated. The devices are fabricated in bulk fused silica glass by femtosecond laser writing (300 fs, 150 nJ at 500 kHz, 522 nm). The birefringence was measured from the spectral splitting of the Bragg grating resonances associated with the vertically and horizontally polarized modes. Polarization splitting directional couplers were designed and demonstrated with 0.5 dB/cm propagation losses and -19 dB and -24 dB extinction ratios for the polarization splitting.

  18. Femtosecond diffraction dynamics of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und - pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-04

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration, 800 nm center wavelength) is studied experimentally using a transillumination femtosecond time-resolved (0.1 ps-1 ns) pump-probe diffraction approach. This allows to reveal the generation dynamics of near-wavelength-sized LIPSS showing a transient diffraction at specific spatial frequencies even before a corresponding permanent surface relief was observed. The results confirm that the ultrafast energy deposition to the materials surface plays a key role and triggers subsequent physical mechanisms such as carrier scattering into self-trapped excitons.

  19. Laser Mode-Dependent Size of Plasma Zones Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Fused Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shan-Chun; JIANG Hong-Bing; LIU Yi; GONG Qi-Huang

    2008-01-01

    We carry out the numerical simulations of #emtosecond laser propagation with TEM00 mode, TEM10 mode and a beam combining both the modes in fused silica. It is found that the transverse size of plasma zones induced by laser pulses with the TEM10 mode is smaller than that induced by the TEMoo mode, while the longitudinal size is almost the same, and the saturated plasma density is higher. The transverse size, the longitudinal size and the ratio of the longitudinal to transverse size, for the beam combining both the modes, all could be reduced at the same time in comparison with the TEMoo mode under the same focusing conditions.

  20. Visible supercontinuum radiation of light bullets in the femtosecond filamentation of IR pulses in fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekalin, S. V.; Kompanets, V. O.; Dokukina, A. E.; Dormidonov, A. E.; Smetanina, E. O.; Kandidov, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    We report experimental and theoretical investigations of visible supercontinuum generation in the formation of light bullets in a filament produced by IR pulses. In the filamentation of a 1700 - 2200 nm pulse in fused silica, bright tracks are recorded resulting from the recombination glow of carriers in the laser plasma produced by a sequence of light bullets and from the scattering in silica of the visible supercontinuum generated by the light bullets. It is found that the formation of a light bullet is attended with an outburst of a certain portion of supercontinuum energy in the visible range. The energy outburst is the same for all bullets in the sequence and becomes smaller with increasing pulse wavelength.

  1. Ultraviolet laser-induced damage on fused silica substrate and its sol-gel coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Gross, Mark; Green, Katie; Oreb, Bob; Shen, Jun

    2012-06-15

    A comparative study of the laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) of fused silica substrates and their sol-gel silica coatings was carried out with 355 nm laser irradiation. Chemical etching and superpolishing were employed in different ways to improve the substrate. The laser damage tests showed that the coated substrate was no more susceptible to laser damage than the bare substrate, showing that the substrate quality was the dominant factor limiting the LIDT for UV irradiation. In addition, it was found that high value of substrate microroughness was more harmful to the LIDT of the coated than the bare substrate, and that a proper combination of etching and superpolishing can optimize the LIDT.

  2. Stabilities and rheological properties of coagulated silica sols formed from fumed silica suspensions in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Ryotaro; Kawaguchi, Masami

    2010-06-15

    The stability and rheological response of coagulated silica sols formed from fumed silica suspensions were investigated in aqueous KOH solution at pH 11 upon the addition of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C(16)TAC) as functions of silica and surfactant concentration. The coagulated silica sols with negative charges are stable at given concentration ranges of silica and C(16)TAC, and the C(16)TAC molecules are completely adsorbed on the silica surface in these ranges. The average hydrodynamic diameters of the coagulated silica colloidal sols at C(16)TAC concentrations from 1.0 x 10(-4) to 5.0 x 10(-4) M are almost twice the diameter observed in the absence of C(16)TAC, independent of silica concentration. At C(16)TAC concentrations below 4.0 x 10(-4) M, the resulting coagulated colloidal sols showed Newtonian responses under hysteresis loop measurements, whereas at above 5.0 x 10(-4) M, the flow curve changes from a positive hysteresis loop to a crossover hysteresis loop with increasing concentration. This change under shear flow is due to a partial breakdown of the coagulated structure of the fumed silica suspensions as a result of electrical neutralization. Finally, the coagulated colloidal sols which gave a crossover hysteresis loop present a shear-thinning behavior and their transit shear stresses exhibit overshoots whatever the shear rate used. Plots of the resulting steady-state viscosities against shear rate indicate shear-thinning behavior.

  3. Large-Scale Synthesis and Systematic Photoluminescence Properties of Monolayer MoS2 on Fused Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yi; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Yilun; Sheng, Bowen; Wang, Xinqiang; Dai, Lun

    2016-07-20

    Monolayer MoS2, with fascinating mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, has generated enormous scientific curiosity and industrial interest. Controllable and scalable synthesis of monolayer MoS2 on various desired substrates has significant meaning in both basic scientific research and device application. Recent years have witnessed many advances in the direct synthesis of single-crystalline MoS2 flakes or their polycrystalline aggregates on numerous diverse substrates, such as SiO2-Si, mica, sapphire, h-BN, and SrTiO3, etc. In this work, we used the dual-temperature-zone atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition method to directly synthesize large-scale monolayer MoS2 on fused silica, the most ordinary transparent insulating material in daily life. We systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) properties of monolayer MoS2 on fused silica and SiO2-Si substrates, which have different thermal conductivity coefficients and thermal expansion coefficients. We found that there exists a stronger strain on monolayer MoS2 grown on fused silica, and the strain becomes more obvious as temperature decreases. Moreover, the monolayer MoS2 grown on fused silica exhibits the unique trait of a fractal shape with tortuous edges and has stronger adsorbability. The monolayer MoS2 grown on fused silica may find application in sensing, energy storage, and transparent optoelectronics, etc.

  4. Damage in fused-silica spatial-filter lenses on the OMEGA laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatti, Amy L.; Smith, Douglas J.; Schmid, Ansgar W.; Papernov, Semyon; Kelly, John H.

    1999-04-01

    Vacuum surface damage to fused-silica, spatial-filter lenses is the most prevalent laser-damage problem occurring on the OMEGA laser system. Approximately one-half of the stage C- input and output, D-input, E-input, and F-input spatial- filter lenses are currently damaged with millimeter-scale fracture sites. With the establishment of safe operational damage criteria, laser operation has not been impeded. These sol-gel-coated lenses see an average fluence of 2 to 4 J/cm2 at 1053 nm/1 ns. Sol-gel coatings on fused-silica glass have small-spot damage thresholds at least a factor of 2 higher than this peak operational fluence. It is now known that the vacuum surface of OMEGA's spatial-filter lenses are contaminated with vacuum pump oils and machine oils used in the manufacture of the tubes; however, development-phase damage tests were conducted on uncontaminated witness samples. Possible explanations for the damage include absorbing defects originating form ablated pinhole materials, contamination nucleated at surface defects on the coating, or subsurface defects from the polishing process. The damage does not correlate with hot spots in the beam, and the possibility of damage from ghost reflections has been eliminated. Experiments have been initiated to investigate the long-term benefits of ion etching to remove subsurface damage and to replace sol-gel layers by dielectric oxide coatings, which do not degrade with oil contamination.

  5. Incident laser modulation of a repaired damage site with a rim in fused silica rear subsurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Xiang Xia; Zu Xiao-Tao; Yuan Xiao-Dong; He Shao-Bo; Jiang Xiao-Dong; Zheng Wan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be an effective method to prevent the 351-nm laser-induced damage sitesin a fused silica surface from exponentially growing,which is responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high fluence laser systems.However,the CO2 laser induced ablation crater is often surrounded by a raised rim at the edge,which can also result in the intensification of transmitted ultraviolet light that may damage the downstream optics.In this work,the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is developed to simulate the distribution of electrical field intensity in the vicinity of the CO2 laser mitigated damage site located in the exit subsurface of fused silica.The simulated results show that the repaired damage sites with raised rims cause more notable modulation to the incident laser than those without rims.Specifically,we present a theoretical model of using dimpled patterning to control the rim structure around the edge of repaired damage sites to avoid damage to downstream optics.The calculated results accord well with previous experimental results and the underlying physical mechanism is analysed in detail.

  6. Low scatter and ultra-low reflectivity measured in a fused silica window

    CERN Document Server

    Padilla, Cinthia; Muniz, Erik; Smith, Joshua R; Fritschel, Peter; Zhang, Liyuan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the reflectivity and optical scattering characteristics at 1064\\,nm of an antireflection coated fused silica window of the type being used in the Advanced LIGO gravitational-wave detectors. Reflectivity is measured in the ultra-low range of 5-10\\,ppm (by vendor) and 14-30\\,ppm (by us). Using an angle-resolved scatterometer we measure the sample's Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Function (BSDF) and use this to estimate its transmitted and reflected scatter at roughly 20-40\\,ppm and 1\\,ppm, respectively, over the range of angles measured. We further inspect the sample's low backscatter using an imaging scatterometer, measuring an angle resolved BSDF below $10^{-6}$ sr$^{-1}$ for large angles (10$^\\circ$--80$^\\circ$ from incidence in the plane of the beam). We use the associated images to (partially) isolate scatter from different regions of the sample and find that scattering from the bulk fused silica is on par with backscatter from the antireflection coated optical surfaces. To confirm th...

  7. Downstream Intensification Effects Associated with CO2 Laser Mitigation of Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M J; Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Widmayer, C C; Ravizza, F L

    2007-10-29

    Mitigation of 351nm laser-induced damage sites on fused silica exit surfaces by selective CO{sub 2} treatment has been shown to effectively arrest the exponential growth responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high-fluence laser systems. However, the perturbation to the optical surface profile following the mitigation process introduces phase contrast to the beam, causing some amount of downstream intensification with the potential to damage downstream optics. Control of the laser treatment process and measurement of the associated phase modulation is essential to preventing downstream 'fratricide' in damage-mitigated optical systems. In this work we present measurements of the surface morphology, intensification patterns and damage associated with various CO{sub 2} mitigation treatments on fused silica surfaces. Specifically, two components of intensification pattern, one on-axis and another off-axis can lead to damage of downstream optics and are related to rims around the ablation pit left from the mitigation process. It is shown that control of the rim structure around the edge of typical mitigation sites is crucial in preventing damage to downstream optics.

  8. Effect of the repaired damage morphology of fused silica on the modulation of incident laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Jiang, Y.; Qiu, R.; Zhou, Q.; Zuo, R.; Zhou, G. R.; Yao, K.

    2017-02-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be the most promising method to extend the life-time of fused silica. However, previous experimental data show that some raised rims are observed around the mitigated sites left from the mitigation process, which will result in hazardous light modulation to the downstream optics. In this work, the morphology features of mitigated sites on the surface of fused silica optics were analyzed in detail. According to measured morphology features, a 3D analytical model for simulating the modulation value induced by mitigated site has been developed based on the scalar diffraction theory. The diffraction patterns at a discrete distance downstream from each mitigated site are measured. The influences of geometry, laser wavelength and refractive index of substrates on the modulation by repaired damage morphology at different distances are discussed, respectively. The analytical model is usable and representative to evaluate the hazardous modulation induced by repaired damage morphology to downstream optics. Results on this research suggest that the downstream intensification can be suppressed by controlling the morphology features of mitigated sites, which provides a direction for the development and improvement of the mitigated techniques of damage optics.

  9. Micro Fluidic Channel Machining on Fused Silica Glass Using Powder Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sam Park

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, micro fluid channels are machined on fused silica glass via powder blasting, a mechanical etching process, and the machining characteristics of the channels are experimentally evaluated. In the process, material removal is performed by the collision of micro abrasives injected by highly compressed air on to the target surface. This approach can be characterized as an integration of brittle mode machining based on micro crack propagation. Fused silica glass, a high purity synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide, is selected as a workpiece material. It has a very low thermal expansion coefficient and excellent optical qualities and exceptional transmittance over a wide spectral range, especially in the ultraviolet range. The powder blasting process parameters affecting the machined results are injection pressure, abrasive particle size and density, stand-off distance, number of nozzle scanning, and shape/size of the required patterns. In this study, the influence of the number of nozzle scanning, abrasive particle size, and pattern size on the formation of micro channels is investigated. Machined shapes and surface roughness are measured using a 3-dimensional vision profiler and the results are discussed.

  10. Investigation of surface characteristics evolution and laser damage performance of fused silica during ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingjin; Dai, Yifan; Zhou, Lin; Shi, Feng; Wan, Wen; Xie, Xuhui; Sui, Tingting

    2016-08-01

    Surface characteristics have great influence on the optical properties especially the laser radiation resistivity of optics. In this paper, the surface characteristics evolutions of fused silica during ion-beam sputtering and their effects on the laser damage performance were investigated. The results show that roughness change is strongly removal depth dependent and a super-smooth surface (0.25 nm RMS) can be obtained by the ion-induced smoothing effect. The concentration of metal impurities (especially Ce element) in subsurface can be effectively decreased after the removal of polishing re-deposition layer. During ion-beam sputtering process, the plastic scratches can be removed while the brittle cracks can be broadened and passivated without increase in the depth direction. Laser damage threshold of fused silica improved by 36% after ion-beam sputtering treatment. Research results have a guiding significance for ion-beam sputtering process technology of fused silica optics.

  11. Monitoring annealing via carbon dioxide laser heating of defect populations in fused silica surfaces using photoluminescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, R N; Matthews, M J; Adams, J J; Demos, S G

    2010-02-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and spectroscopy under 266 nm and 355 nm laser excitation are explored as a means of monitoring defect populations in laser-modified sites on the surface of fused silica and their subsequent response to heating to different temperatures via exposure to a CO{sub 2} laser beam. Laser-induced temperature changes were estimated using an analytic solution to the heat flow equation and compared to changes in the PL emission intensity. The results indicate that the defect concentrations decrease significantly with increasing CO{sub 2} laser exposure and are nearly eliminated when the peak surface temperature exceeds the softening point of fused silica ({approx}1900K), suggesting that this method might be suitable for in situ monitoring of repair of defective sites in fused silica optical components.

  12. The effect of high-pressure devitrification and densification on ballistic-penetration resistance of fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avuthu, Vasudeva Reddy

    Despite the clear benefits offered by more advanced transparent materials, (e.g. transparent ceramics offer a very attractive combination of high stiffness and high hardness levels, highly-ductile transparent polymers provide superior fragment-containing capabilities, etc.), ballistic ceramic-glass like fused-silica remains an important constituent material in a majority of transparent impact-resistant structures (e.g. windshields and windows of military vehicles, portholes in ships, ground vehicles and spacecraft) used today. Among the main reasons for the wide-scale use of glass, the following three are most frequently cited: (i) glass-structure fabrication technologies enable the production of curved, large surface-area, transparent structures with thickness approaching several inches; (ii) relatively low material and manufacturing costs; and (iii) compositional modifications, chemical strengthening, and controlled crystallization have been demonstrated to be capable of significantly improving the ballistic properties of glass. In the present work, the potential of high-pressure devitrification and densification of fused-silica as a ballistic-resistance-enhancement mechanism is investigated computationally. In the first part of the present work, all-atom molecular-level computations are carried out to infer the dynamic response and material microstructure/topology changes of fused silica subjected to ballistic impact by a nanometer-sized hard projectile. The analysis was focused on the investigation of specific aspects of the dynamic response and of the microstructural changes such as the deformation of highly sheared and densified regions, and the conversion of amorphous fused silica to SiO2 crystalline allotropic modifications (in particular, alpha-quartz and stishovite). The microstructural changes in question were determined by carrying out a post-processing atom-coordination procedure. This procedure suggested the formation of high-density stishovite (and

  13. Mitigation of Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with a Galvanometer Scanned CO2 Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Hackel, R P

    2005-10-28

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), mitigation of laser surface damage growth on fused silica using single and multiple CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been consistently successful for damage sites whose lateral dimensions are less than 100 {micro}m, but has not been for larger sites. Cracks would often radiate outward from the damage when a CO{sub 2} pulse was applied to the larger sites. An investigation was conducted to mitigate large surface damage sites using galvanometer scanning of a tightly focused CO{sub 2} laser spot over an area encompassing the laser damage. It was thought that by initially scanning the CO{sub 2} spot outside the damage site, radiating crack propagation would be inhibited. Scan patterns were typically inward moving spirals starting at radii somewhat larger than that of the damage site. The duration of the mitigation spiral pattern was {approx}110 ms during which a total of {approx}1.3 J of energy was delivered to the sample. The CO{sub 2} laser spot had a 1/e{sup 2}-diameter of {approx}200 {micro}m. Thus, there was general heating of a large area around the damage site while rapid evaporation occurred locally at the laser spot position in the spiral. A 30 to 40 {micro}m deep crater was typically generated by this spiral with a diameter of {approx}600 {micro}m. The spiral would be repeated until there was no evidence of the original damage in microscope images. Using this technique, damage sites as large as 300 mm in size did not display new damage after mitigation when exposed to fluences exceeding 22 J/cm{sup 2} at 355 nm, 7.5 ns. It was found necessary to use a vacuum nozzle during the mitigation process to reduce the amount of re-deposited fused silica. In addition, curing spiral patterns at lower laser powers were used to presumably ''re-melt'' any re-deposited fused silica. A compact, shearing interferometer microscope was developed to permit in situ

  14. Dental resin composites containing silica-fused whiskers--effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on fracture toughness and indentation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hockin H K; Quinn, Janet B; Smith, Douglas T; Antonucci, Joseph M; Schumacher, Gary E; Eichmiller, Frederick C

    2002-02-01

    Dental resin composites need to be strengthened in order to improve their performance in large stress-bearing applications such as crowns and multiple-unit restorations. Recently, silica-fused ceramic whiskers were used to reinforce dental composites, and the whisker-to-silica ratio was found to be a key microstructural parameter that determined the composite strength. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on the fracture toughness, elastic modulus, hardness and brittleness of the composite. Silica particles and silicon carbide whiskers were mixed at whisker:silica mass ratios of 0:1, 1:5. 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 5:1, and 1:0. Each mixture was thermally fused, silanized and combined with a dental resin at a filler mass percentage of 60%. Fracture toughness was measured with a single-edge notched beam method. Elastic modulus and hardness were measured with a nano-indentation system. Whisker:silica ratio had significant effects on composite properties. The composite toughness (mean+/-SD; n = 9) at whisker:silica = 2:1 was (2.47+/-0.28) MPa m(1/2), significantly higher than (1.02+/-0.23) at whisker:silica = 0:1, (1.13+/-0.19) of a prosthetic composite control, and (0.95+/-0.11) of an inlay/onlay composite control (Tukey's at family confidence coefficient = 0.95). Elastic modulus increased monotonically and hardness plateaued with increasing the whisker:silica ratio. Increasing the whisker:silica ratio also decreased the composite brittleness, which became about 1/3 of that of the inlay:onlay control. Electron microscopy revealed relatively flat fracture surfaces for the controls, but much rougher ones for the whisker composites, with fracture steps and whisker pullout contributing to toughness. The whiskers appeared to be well-bonded with the matrix, probably due to the fused silica producing rough whisker surfaces. Reinforcement with silica-fused whiskers resulted in novel dental composites that possessed fracture toughness

  15. Determination of diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in fused silica between 296 and 523 K by Raman spectroscopy and application of fused silica capillaries in studying redox reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, L.; Chou, I.-Ming; Lu, W.; Burruss, R.C.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients (D) of hydrogen in fused silica capillaries (FSC) were determined between 296 and 523 K by Raman spectroscopy using CO2 as an internal standard. FSC capsules (3.25 ?? 10-4 m OD, 9.9 ?? 10-5 m ID, and ???0.01 m long) containing CO2 and H2 were prepared and the initial relative concentrations of hydrogen in these capsules were derived from the Raman peak-height ratios between H2 (near 587 cm-1) and CO2 (near 1387 cm-1). The sample capsules were then heated at a fixed temperature (T) at one atmosphere to let H2 diffuse out of the capsule, and the changes of hydrogen concentration were monitored by Raman spectroscopy after quench. This process was repeated using different heating durations at 296 (room T), 323, 375, 430, 473, and 523 K; the same sample capsule was used repeatedly at each temperature. The values of D (in m2 s-1) in FSC were obtained by fitting the observed changes of hydrogen concentration in the FSC capsule to an equation based on Fick's law. Our D values are in good agreement with the more recent of the two previously reported experimental data sets, and both can be represented by: ln D = - (16.471 ?? 0.035) - frac(44589 ?? 139, RT) (R2 = 0.99991) where R is the gas constant (8.3145 J/mol K), T in Kelvin, and errors at 1?? level. The slope corresponds to an activation energy of 44.59 ?? 0.14 kJ/mol. The D in FSC determined at 296 K is about an order of magnitude higher than that in platinum at 723 K, indicating that FSC is a suitable membrane for hydrogen at temperature between 673 K and room temperature, and has a great potential for studying redox reactions at these temperatures, especially for systems containing organic material and/or sulphur. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  17. Fabrication of 250-nm-hole arrays in glass and fused silica by UV laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, R.; Gödecke, A.; Prießner, A.; Ihlemann, J.

    2016-09-01

    Parallel nanohole drilling in glass using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm) is demonstrated. For the first time, hole arrays with 500 nm pitch and individual holes with 250 nm diameter and more than 100 nm depth are fabricated by phase mask imaging using a Schwarzschild objective. Holes in soda lime glass are drilled by direct ablation; fused silica is processed by depositing a SiOx-film on SiO2, patterning the SiOx by ablation, and finally oxidizing the remaining SiOx to SiO2. Thermally induced ordered dewetting of noble metal films deposited on such templates may be used for the fabrication of plasmonic devices.

  18. Filamentation of an annular laser beam with a vortex phase dislocation in fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, E. V.; Shlenov, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse in fused silica has been numerically investigated for the case of an annular beam with a phase singularity at a wavelength of 800 {\\text{nm}}. The spatiotemporal propagation dynamics of the pulse and the transformation of its frequency-angular spectra are analysed. It is shown that a tubular structure with a radius of 3 - 4 \\unicode{956}{\\text{m}}, peak intensity of about 2.4 × 1013 {\\text{W cm}}-2, and maximum plasma density on the order of 1020 {\\text{cm}}-3 is formed in the nonlinear focus; the length of this structure significantly exceeds the waist length in the linear case. The results of the analysis are compared with the data obtained for an annular beam free of phase dislocations and for a Gaussian beam.

  19. Embedded nanogratings in bulk fused silica under non-diffractive Bessel ultrafast laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, G.; Rudenko, A.; D'Amico, C.; Itina, T. E.; Colombier, J. P.; Stoian, R.

    2017-06-01

    We report the formation of embedded nanogratings in bulk fused silica under quasi-stationary field patterns generated by ultrashort laser pulses in nondiffractive modes. The zero-order Bessel beam consists of almost non-propagative light pulses distributed along a narrow micron-sized channel sustained over a large non-diffracting length. Upon multipulse irradiation, a regular pattern of nanoplanes is formed across the channel, spaced at approximately λ / 2 n . Applying an electromagnetic scattering model [A. Rudenko et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 075427 (2016)], we associate the formation of nanogratings with multiple scattering from randomly distributed scattering centers created by laser light. Constructive interference between the scattered wavelets leads to periodic excitation enhancement without requiring explicit synchronism conditions. Permanent material modifications are found whenever the local carrier densities are maximized towards the critical value. Multiple periodicities are predicted, either implicitly related to the coherent electromagnetic interaction or due to periodic field depletion and photon replenishment.

  20. Infrared Femtosecond Laser Direct-Writing Digital Volume Gratings in Fused Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Yu-Hua; Lu, Pei-Xiang

    2010-04-01

    We demonstrate that digital volume gratings can be fabricated in fused silica glass conveniently by direct femtosecond laser writing. The diffraction efficiencies of volume gratings can be essentially modulated by simply stacking and offsetting the unit structure. A series of volume gratings, which have the pitches of 5 μm and the size of 1 mm × 1 mm, have been fabricated with the writing speed of 500 μm/s, with which the processing period of each grating layer could be reduced to several minutes with a 1-kHz femtosecond laser system. Results show that the power spectrum of the diffracted waves of the volume gratings are dependent on the layer gap and layer offsetting.

  1. Nanostructuring of Fused Silica Assisted by Laser-shaped Metal Triangles Using a Nanosecond Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Grüner, Christoph; Ehrhardt, Martin; Bayer, Lukas; Zimmer, Klaus

    Self-organized processes are of special interest for the laser-induced nanostructuring of surfaces. In this study we combined two self-organized processes: the microsphere lithography and the molten phase transformation for the nanostructuring of dielectrics. A fused silica substrate was covered with periodically ordered polystyrene (PS) spheres and the system was subsequently covered with 30 nm chromium. Afterwards the PS spheres were removed and the bare and resultant periodic Cr triangles were irradiated in two steps using a KrF excimer laser. First step: A low laser fluence treatment results in a melting and shape transformation of the triangles. Second step: A high laser fluence treatment of the pre-treated surface results in a nanostructuring of the dielectric surface (and removal of the metal). The surface topography was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the different steps were simulated and compared with the experimental results.

  2. Dependence of growth rate of quartz in fused silica on pressure and impurity content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratello, V. J.; Hays, J. F.; Turnbull, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of pressure, temperature, and some variations in impurity content on the growth rate u of quartz into fused silica were measured. Under all conditions the growth rate was interface controlled and increased exponentially with pressure with an activation volume averaging -21.2 cu cm/mole. The activation enthalpy for all specimens is extrapolated to a zero pressure value of 64 kcal/mole, within the experimental uncertainty. At a given stoichiometry the effect of hydroxyl content on growth rate is described entirely by a linear term C(OH) in the prefactor of the equation for the growth rate. The effect of chlorine impurity can be described similarly. Also u is increased as the ideal stoichiometry is approached from the partially reduced state.

  3. Generation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on transparent material-fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Simon; Rung, Stefan; Hellmann, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    We report on a comparison between simulated and experimental results for the generation of laser-induced periodic surface structures with low spatial frequency on dielectrics. Using the established efficacy factor theory extended by a Drude model, we determine the required carrier density for the generation of low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and forecast their periodicity and orientation. In a subsequent calculative step, we determine the fluence of ultrashort laser pulses necessary to excite this required carrier density in due consideration of the pulse number dependent ablation threshold. The later calculation is based on a rate equation including photo- and avalanche ionization and derives appropriate process parameters for a selective generation of LSFL. Exemplarily, we apply this approach to the generation of LSFL on fused silica using a 1030 nm femtosecond laser. The experimental results for the orientation and spatial periodicity of LSFL reveal excellent agreement with the simulation.

  4. Irradiation effects of CO2 laser parameters on surface morphology of fused silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xia; Zheng Wan-Guo; Yuan Xiao-Dong; Dai Wei; Juang Yong; Li Xi-Bin; Wang Hai-Jun; Lü Hai-Bing; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2011-01-01

    To understand the surface morphology evolution of fused silica induced by 10.6-prn CO2 laser irradiation atdifferent parameters, this paper reports that optical microscopy, profilometry, and hydrophilicity tests are utilized to characterize the surface structure and roughness of the laser irradiated area. The results show that three typical surface morphologies and two typical by drophilicity test images are observed at different laser powers and pulse durations. Thecorrelations between surface temperature and surface morphology as well as hydrophilicity behaviours are presented.The different hydrophilicity behaviours are related to surface structures of the laser-induced crater and thermal diffusion area. The thermal diffusion length monotonously increases with increasing laser power and pulse duration. The crater width is almost determined by the laser beam size. The crater depth is more sensitive to the laser power and pulse duration than the crater width.

  5. Ultrafast laser induced electronic and structural modifications in bulk fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchik, K.; D'Amico, C.; Velpula, P. K.; Mauclair, C.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Stoian, R.

    2013-10-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses can modify the inner structure of fused silica, generating refractive index changes varying from soft positive (type I) light guiding forms to negative (type II) values with void presence and anisotropic sub-wavelength modulation. We investigate electronic and structural material changes in the type I to type II transition via coherent and incoherent secondary light emission reflecting free carrier behavior and post-irradiation material relaxation in the index change patterns. Using phase contrast microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy, we determine in a space-resolved manner defect formation, redistribution and spatial segregation, and glass network reorganization paths in conditions marking the changeover between type I and type II photoinscription regimes. We first show characteristic patterns of second harmonic generation in type I and type II traces, indicating the collective involvement of free carriers and polarization memory. Second, incoherent photoemission from resonantly and non-resonantly excited defect states reveals accumulation of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) in positive index domains and oxygen deficiency centers (ODCs) with O2- ions segregation in void-like regions and in the nanostructured domains, reflecting the interaction strength. Complementary Raman investigations put into evidence signatures of the different environments where photo-chemical densification (bond rearrangements) and mechanical effects can be indicated. NBOHCs setting in before visible index changes serve as precursors for subsequent compaction build-up, indicating a scenario of cold, defect-assisted densification for the soft type I irradiation regime. Additionally, we observe hydrodynamic effects and severe bond-breaking in type II zones with indications of phase transition. These observations illuminate densification paths in fused silica in low power irradiation regimes, and equally in energetic ranges, characterized by

  6. Internal structure of the nanogratings generated inside bulk fused silica by ultrafast laser direct writing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S. P.; Vilar, R. [ICEMS—Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [ICEMS—Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Herrero, P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2014-08-07

    The aim of the present work was to characterize the internal structure of nanogratings generated inside bulk fused silica by ultrafast laser processing and to study the influence of diluted hydrofluoric acid etching on their structure. The nanogratings were inscribed at a depth of 100 μm within fused silica wafers by a direct writing method, using 1030 nm radiation wavelength and the following processing parameters: E = 5 μJ, τ = 560 fs, f = 10 kHz, and v = 100 μm/s. The results achieved show that the laser-affected regions are elongated ellipsoids with a typical major diameter of about 30 μm and a minor diameter of about 6 μm. The nanogratings within these regions are composed of alternating nanoplanes of damaged and undamaged material, with an average periodicity of 351 ± 21 nm. The damaged nanoplanes contain nanopores randomly dispersed in a material containing a large density of defects. These nanopores present a roughly bimodal size distribution with average dimensions for each class of pores 65 ± 20 × 16 ± 8 × 69 ± 16 nm{sup 3} and 367 ± 239 × 16 ± 8 × 360 ± 194 nm{sup 3}, respectively. The number and size of the nanopores increases drastically when an hydrofluoric acid treatment is performed, leading to the coalescence of these voids into large planar discontinuities parallel to the nanoplanes. The preferential etching of the damaged material by the hydrofluoric acid solution, which is responsible for the pores growth and coalescence, confirms its high defect density.

  7. The Structure Evolution of Fused Silica Induced by CO2 Laser Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-Ming; LV Hai-Bing; ZHENG Wan-Guo; ZU Xiao-Tao; JIANG Yong; LUO Cheng-Si; SHI Xiao-Yan; REN Wei; XIANG Xia; WANG Hai-Jun; HE Shao-Bo; YUAN Xiao-Dong

    2012-01-01

    The structure evolution of fused silica induced by CO2 laser irradiation (with a wavelength of 10.6 μm) is studied in detail.In the non-evaporation mitigation process,the irradiation time should be long enough to completely eliminate damage.However,there is a raised rim around the mitigated site.The rim height is enhanced when the irradiation time increases,and the mitigated site can lead to off-axis and on-axis downstream light intensification.Volume shrinkage occurs during the irradiation and rapid cooling processes,and this may be due to a decrease in the Si O Si bond angle.The distribution of debris overlaps with the maximum phase retardance induced by stress.The debris arouses an enhanced light absorption in the region from 220nm to 800nm.%The structure evolution of fused silica induced by CO2 laser irradiation (with a wavelength of 10.6 μm) is studied in detail. In the non-evaporation mitigation process, the irradiation time should be long enough to completely eliminate damage. However, there is a raised rim around the mitigated site. The rim height is enhanced when the irradiation time increases, and the mitigated site can lead to off-axis and on-axis downstream light intensification. Volume shrinkage occurs during the irradiation and rapid cooling processes, and this may be due to a decrease in the Si-O-Si bond angle. The distribution of debris overlaps with the maximum phase retardance induced by stress. The debris arouses an enhanced light absorption in the region from 220 nm to 800 nm.

  8. Microstructuring of fused silica by laser-induced backside wet etching using picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, M. [Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Raciukaitis, G.; Gecys, P. [Laboratory for Applied Research, Institute of Physics, Savanoriu Ave. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zimmer, K., E-mail: martin.ehrhardt@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    The laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) is an advanced laser processing method used for structuring transparent materials. LIBWE with nanosecond laser pulses has been successfully demonstrated for various materials, e.g. oxides (fused silica, sapphire) or fluorides (CaF{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2}), and applied for the fabrication of microstructures. In the present study, LIBWE of fused silica with mode-locked picosecond (t{sub p} = 10 ps) lasers at UV wavelengths ({lambda}{sub 1} = 355 nm and {lambda}{sub 2} = 266 nm) using a (pyrene) toluene solution was demonstrated for the first time. The influence of the experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, pulse number, and absorbing liquid, on the etch rate and the resulting surface morphology were investigated. The etch rate grew linearly with the laser fluence in the low and in the high fluence range with different slopes. Incubation at low pulse numbers as well as a nearly constant etch rate after a specific pulse number for example were observed. Additionally, the etch rate depended on the absorbing liquid used; whereas the higher absorption of the admixture of pyrene in the used toluene enhances the etch rate and decreases the threshold fluence. With a {lambda}{sub 1} = 266 nm laser set-up, an exceptionally smooth surface in the etch pits was achieved. For both wavelengths ({lambda}{sub 1} = 266 nm and {lambda}{sub 2} = 355 nm), LIPSS (laser-induced periodic surface structures) formation was observed, especially at laser fluences near the thresholds of 170 and 120 mJ/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  9. Post-processing of fused silica and its effects on damage resistance to nanosecond pulsed UV lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2016-04-10

    HF-based (hydrofluoric acid) chemical etching has been a widely accepted technique to improve the laser damage performance of fused silica optics and ensure high-power UV laser systems at designed fluence. Etching processes such as acid concentration, composition, material removal amount, and etching state (etching with additional acoustic power or not) may have a great impact on the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of treated sample surfaces. In order to find out the effects of these factors, we utilized the Taguchi method to determine the etching conditions that are helpful in raising the LIDT. Our results show that the most influential factors are concentration of etchants and the material etched away from the viewpoint of damage performance of fused silica optics. In addition, the additional acoustic power (∼0.6  W·cm-2) may not benefit the etching rate and damage performance of fused silica. Moreover, the post-cleaning procedure of etched samples is also important in damage performances of fused silica optics. Different post-cleaning procedures were, thus, experiments on samples treated under the same etching conditions. It is found that the "spraying + rinsing + spraying" cleaning process is favorable to the removal of etching-induced deposits. Residuals on the etched surface are harmful to surface roughness and optical transmission as well as laser damage performance.

  10. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate in sub-critical water in fused silica capillary reactor with in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of using fused silica capillary reactor (FSCR) instead of conventional autoclave for studying chemical reactions at elevated pressure and temperature conditions were demonstrated in this study, including the allowance for visual observation under a microscope and in situ Raman spectroscopic characterization of polycarbonate and coexisting phases during hydrolysis in subcritical water. ?? 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Coupling semiconductor nanocrystals to a fused-silica microsphere: a quantum-dot microcavity with extremely high Q factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X; Palinginis, P; Lacey, S; Wang, H; Lonergan, M C

    2000-11-01

    We demonstrate a quantum-dot microcavity by coupling core-shell semiconductor nanocrystals to a fused-silica microsphere. We show that the composite microcavity can feature Q factors of the order of 10(8), providing a model system for investigating cavity QED and microlasers at the level of single quantum dots.

  12. Laser smoothing of sub-micron grooves in hydroxyl-rich fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N; Matthews, M J; Fair, J E; Britten, J A; Nguyen, H T; Cooke, D; Elhadj, S; Yang, S T

    2009-10-30

    Nano- to micrometer-sized surface defects on UV-grade fused silica surfaces are known to be effectively smoothed through the use of high-temperature localized CO{sub 2} laser heating, thereby enhancing optical properties. However, the details of the mass transport and the effect of hydroxyl content on the laser smoothing of defective silica at submicron length scales is still not completely understood. In this study, we examine the morphological evolution of sub-micron, dry-etched periodic surface structures on type II and type III SiO{sub 2} substrates under 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser irradiation using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In-situ thermal imaging was used to map the transient temperature field across the heated region, allowing assessment of the T-dependent mass transport mechanisms under different laser-heating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics simulations correlated well with experimental results, and showed that for large effective capillary numbers (N{sub c} > 2), surface diffusion is negligible and smoothing is dictated by capillary action, despite the relatively small spatial scales studied here. Extracted viscosity values over 1700-2000K were higher than the predicted bulk values, but were consistent with the surface depletion of OH groups, which was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy.

  13. CO2 laser microprocessing for laser damage growth mitigation of fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doualle, Thomas; Gallais, Laurent; Monneret, Serge; Bouillet, Stephane; Bourgeade, Antoine; Ameil, Christel; Lamaignère, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We report on the development of a mitigation process to prevent the growth of UV nanosecond laser-initiated damage sites under successive irradiations of fused silica components. The developed process is based on fast microablation of silica as it has been proposed by Bass et al. [Bass et al., Proc. SPIE 7842, 784220 (2010)]. This is accomplished by the displacement of the CO2 laser spot with a fast galvanometer beam scanner to form a crater with a typical conical shape to mitigate large (millimetric) and deep (few hundred microns) damage sites. We present the developed experimental system and process for this application. Particularly, we detail and evaluate a method based on quantitative phase imaging to obtain fast and accurate three-dimensional topographies of the craters. The morphologies obtained through different processes are then studied. Mitigation of submillimetric nanosecond damage sites is demonstrated through different examples. Experimental and numerical studies of the downstream intensifications, resulting in cone formation on the surface, are presented to evaluate and minimize the downstream intensifications. Eventually, the laser damage test resistance of the mitigated sites is evaluated at 355, 2.5 ns, and we discuss on the efficiency of the process for our application.

  14. Investigation of stress induced by CO2 laser processing of fused silica optics for laser damage growth mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe; Rullier, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-21

    Laser damage mitigation' is a process developed to prevent the growth of nanosecond laser-initiated damage sites under successive irradiation. It consists of re-fusing the damage area with a CO2 laser. In this paper we investigate the stress field created around mitigated sites which could have an influence on the efficiency of the process. A numerical model of CO2 laser interaction with fused silica is developed. It takes into account laser energy absorption, heat transfer, thermally induced stress and birefringence. Residual stress near mitigated sites in fused silica samples is characterized with specific photoelastic methods and theoretical data are compared to experiments. The stress distribution and quantitative values of stress levels are obtained for sites treated with the CO2 laser in various conditions of energy deposition (beam size, pulse duration, incident power). The results provided evidence that the presence of birefringence/residual stress around the mitigated sites has an effect on their laser damage resistance.

  15. Phase transitions of pyrogenic silica suspensions: a comparison to model laponite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätzel, Uwe; Richter, Thomas; Stintz, Michael; Barthel, Herbert; Gottschalk-Gaudig, Torsten

    2007-09-01

    Pyrogenic silica is often used as a thickening agent in paints, pastes, adhesives, or resins. Other applications include, e.g., abrasives in chemical mechanical planarization in the microelectronics industry. In all these applications it is essential to control the state of dispersion. Sometimes, phase transitions from the liquid to the solid state are required while in other cases they have to be completely avoided for the whole shelf life. The nature and influencing parameters of the fluid-solid transition for pyrogenic silica have not been investigated so far. Most investigations deal with the phase transitions of small clay particles such as laponite. Here, we dedicate our interest to the behavior of pyrogenic silica suspensions with varying specific surface area and ionic background concentration. To get an impression of the phase transition behavior we compare our results to model laponite suspensions. We apply dynamic light scattering measurements in the backscattering regime to minimize multiple scattering contributions from concentrated pyrogenic silica suspensions. Further on we exert a decomposition of the measured autocorrelation functions into an ergodic and nonergodic contribution. The analysis of the ergodic spectrum yields two different gelation kinetics for both systems, laponite and pyrogenic silica. For laponite these are in accordance with earlier investigations. The kinetics depend on the ionic background and the solids content of the suspensions. Additionally, we used dynamic extinction spectroscopy to follow the phase transitions of pyrogenic silica on a macroscale.

  16. Optical and electrical properties of boron doped diamond thin conductive films deposited on fused silica glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficek, M.; Sobaszek, M.; Gnyba, M. [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Ryl, J. [Department of Electrochemistry, Corrosion and Material Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Gołuński, Ł. [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Smietana, M.; Jasiński, J. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 75 Koszykowa St., 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Caban, P. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska St., 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Bogdanowicz, R., E-mail: rbogdan@eti.pg.gda.pl [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Growth of 60% of transmittance diamond films with resistivity as low as 48 Ω cm. • Two step seeding process of fused silica: plasma hydrogenation and wet seeding. • Nanodiamond seeding density of 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} at fused silica substrates. • High refractive index (2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. - Abstract: This paper presents boron-doped diamond (BDD) film as a conductive coating for optical and electronic purposes. Seeding and growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica have been investigated. Growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica were investigated at various boron doping level and methane admixture. Two step pre-treatment procedure of fused silica substrate was applied to achieve high seeding density. First, the substrates undergo the hydrogen plasma treatment then spin-coating seeding using a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond in dimethyl sulfoxide with polyvinyl alcohol was applied. Such an approach results in seeding density of 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. The scanning electron microscopy images showed homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology with minimal grain size of 200 nm for highly boron doped films. The sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. A high refractive index (range of 2.0–2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. The values of extinction coefficient were below 0.1 at λ = 550 nm, indicating low absorption of the film. The fabricated BDD thin films displayed resistivity below 48 Ohm cm and transmittance over 60% in the visible wavelength range.

  17. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  18. On the Complexity of Electrostatic Suspension Stabilization of Functionalized Silica Nanoparticles for Biotargeting and Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Bergman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Different means of attaching streptavidin to surface functionalized silica particles with a diameter of 240 nm were investigated with special focus on suspension stability for electrostatically stabilized suspensions. The influence of two different fluorescent dyes covalently linked to the streptavidin on suspension stability was also studied. The results clearly show that the stability of the suspensions is crucially dependent on all functional groups present on the surface. The surface functions may either directly affect the effective surface charge if the functions contain charged groups, or indirectly by affecting the relative concentration of charged groups on the particle surface. Poly(ethylene imine-functionalized silica particles, where the polymer is grown by surface hyperbranching polymerization, are shown to be promising candidates for bioapplications, as the zeta-potential can remain strongly positive even under biologically relevant conditions.

  19. Quantum efficiency of colloidal suspensions containing quantum dot/silica hybrid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyungjoon; Yoon, Cheolsang; Lee, Sooho; Lee, Doh C.; Shin, Kyusoon; Lee, Kangtaek

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the fluorescence properties of colloidal suspensions conntaining quantum dot (QD)/silica hybrid particles. First, we synthesized QD/silica hybrid particles with silica-QD-silica (SQS) core-shell-shell geometry, and monitored the quantum efficiencies of their suspensions at various particle concentrations. We found that the quantum efficiency (QE) of SQS particles in deionized (DI) water was much lower than that of the QDs even at low particle concentration, mainly due to the light scattering of emitted photons at the silica/water interface, followed by reabsorption by QDs. As the concentration of SQS particles was increased, both light scattering and reabsorption by QDs became more important, which further reduced the QE. Refractive index-matched solvent, however, reduced light scattering, yielding greater QE than DI water. Next, we induced aggregation of SQS particles, and found that QE increased as particles aggregated in DI water because of reduced light scattering and reabsorption, whereas it remained almost constant in the refractive index-matched solvent. Finally, we studied aggregation of highly concentrated silica particle suspensions containing a low concentration of SQS particles, and found that QE increased with aggregation because light scattering and reabsorption were reduced.

  20. Effect of acid and temperature on the discontinuous shear thickening phenomenon of silica nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangbing; Wang, Jixiao; Cai, Wei; Zhao, Song; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Shichang

    2016-08-01

    The discontinuous shear thickening (DST) phenomenon of silica nanoparticle suspensions was investigated in this article. First, the non-aggregated silica nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. The results indicate that the silica nanoparticles are spherical particles with a narrow size distribution with a diameter of approximately 90 nm. Next, the influence of nitric acid concentration and temperature on the DST phenomenon of shear thickening fluids (STFs) was investigated. The results indicate that the concentrated fluids with nitric acid concentration below 8.50 mmol/L and at a temperature below 40 °C exhibit a readily noticeable DST phenomenon.

  1. High temperature thermal behaviour modeling of large-scale fused silica optics for laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jing-Xia; He Shao-Bo; Xiang Xia; Yuan Xiao-Dong; Zheng Wan-Guo; Lü Hai-Bing; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2012-01-01

    High temperature annealing is often used for the stress control of optical materials.However,weight and viscosity at high temperature may destroy the surface morphology,especially for the large-scale,thin and heavy optics used for large laser facilities.It is necessary to understand the thermal behaviour and design proper support systems for large-scale optics at high temperature.In this work,three support systems for fused silica optics are designed and simulated with the finite element method.After the analysis of the thermal behaviours of different support systems,some advantages and disadvantages can be revealed.The results show that the support with the optical surface vertical is optimal because both pollution and deformation of optics could be well controlled during annealing at high temperature.Annealing process of the optics irradiated by CO2 laser is also simulated.It can be concluded that high temperature annealing can effectively reduce the residual stress.However,the effects of annealing on surface morphology of the optics are complex.Annealing creep is closely related to the residual stress and strain distribution.In the region with large residual stress,the creep is too large and probably increases the deformation gradient which may affect the laser beam propagation.

  2. Spherical Fused Silica Cells Filled with Pure Helium for NMR-Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maul, Andreas; Heil, Werner; Nikiel, Anna; Otten, Ernst; Petrich, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    High magnetic fields (> 1 T) are measured by NMR magnetometers with un-rivaled precision if the precessing spin sample provides long coherence times. The longest coherence times are found in diluted ${}^{3}$He samples, which can be hyperpolarized for sufficient signal strength. In order to have minimal influence on the homogeneity and value of the measured magnetic field the optimal container for the ${}^{3}$He should be a perfect sphere. A fused silica sphere with an inner diameter of 8 mm and an outer diameter of 12 mm was made from two hemispheres by diffusion bonding leaving only a small hole for cleaning and evacuation. This hole was closed in vacuum by a CO${}_{2}$ laser and the inner volume was filled with a few mbars of ${}^3$He via wall permeation. NMR-measurements on such a sample had coherence times of 5 min. While the hemispheres were produced with < 1 $\\mu$m deviation from sphericity, the bonding left a step of ca. 50 $\\mu$m at maximum. The influence of such a mismatch, its orientation and mat...

  3. Wavelength-tunable multicolored femtosecond laser pulse generation in a fused silica glass plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Liu, Jun

    2010-05-01

    We obtained an array of multicolored femtosecond laser pulses with as many as 17 different colors that are spatially isolated. The mechanism of generation was proved to be cascaded four-wave mixing and with the following procedure. The output beam from a femtosecond laser was split into two. One of the two beams was pulse-compressed with a hollow core fiber and the intensity of the other was reduced. The two beams were synchronized and combined with a small crossing angle in a plate of fused silica glass plate. The wavelengths of the sidebands are continuously tunable from near-ultraviolet to near-infrared. The pulse duration, spatial mode, spectrum, and energy stability of the sidebands were studied. As many as fifteen spectral up-shifted pulses and two spectral downshifted pulses were obtained with spectral bandwidths broader than 1.8 octaves. Properties such as pulse energy as high as 1 μmJ, 45 fs pulse duration, smaller than 1.1 times of the diffraction limit Gaussian spatial profile, and better than 2% RMS power stability of the generated sidebands make it can be used in various experiments. The characterization showed that the sidebands have sufficiently good qualities to enable application to for various multicolor femtosecond laser experiments, for example, a multicolor pump-probe experiment.

  4. Generation of microstripe cylindrical and toroidal mirrors by localized laser evaporation of fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L; Thomson, Ian J; Baker, Howard J; Hall, Denis R

    2012-09-10

    We report a new technique for the rapid fabrication of microstripe cylindrical and toroidal mirrors with a high ratio (>10) of the two principal radii of curvature (RoC(1)/RoC(2)), and demonstrate their effectiveness as mode-selecting resonator mirrors for high-power planar waveguide lasers. In this process, the larger radius of curvature (RoC(1)) is determined by the planar or cylindrical shape of the fused silica substrate selected for laser processing, whilst the other (RoC(2)) is produced by controlled CO(2) laser-induced vaporization of the glass. The narrow stripe mirror aperture is achieved by applying a set of partially overlapped laser scans, with the incident laser power, the number of laser scans, and their spacing being used to control the curvature produced by laser evaporation. In this work, a 1 mm diameter laser spot is used to produce grooves of cylindrical/toroidal shape with 240 μm width and 16 mm length. After high reflectance coating, these grooves are found to provide excellent mode selectivity as resonator mirrors for a 150 μm core Yb:YAG planar waveguide laser, producing high brightness output at more than 300 W. The results show clearly that the laser-generated microstripe mirrors can improve the optical performance of high-power planar waveguide lasers when applied in a low-loss mode-selective resonator configuration.

  5. Fracture Strength of Fused Silica From Photonic Signatures Around Collision Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cramer, K Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Impact sites in glass affect its fracture strength. An analytical model that predicts fracture strength from grey-field polariscope (GFP) readings (photoelastic retardations) has been developed and reported in the literature. The model is suggestive that stress fields, resulting from impact damage, destablizes sites within the glass, which lead to pathways that cause strength degradation. Using data collected from fused silica specimens fabricated from outer window panes that were designed for the space shuttle, the model was tested against four categories of inflicted damage. The damage sites were cored from the window carcasses, examined with the GFP and broken using the ASTM Standard C1499-09 to measure the fracture strength. A correlation is made between the fracture strength and the photoelastic retardation measured at the damage site in each specimen. A least-squares fit is calculated. The results are compared with the predictions from the model. A plausible single-sided NDE damage site inspection method (a version of which is planned for glass inspection in the Orion Project) that relates photoelastic retardation in glass components to its fracture strength is presented.

  6. Morphology and mechanisms of picosecond ablation of metal films on fused silica substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Isaac L.; Negres, Raluca A.; Stanion, Ken; Guss, Gabe; Keller, Wesley J.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Yoo, Jae Hyuck; Bude, Jeffrey D.

    2016-12-01

    The ablation of magnetron sputtered metal films on fused silica substrates by a 1053 nm, picosecond class laser was studied as part of a demonstration of its use for in-situ characterization of the laser spot under conditions commonly used at the sample plane for laser machining and damage studies. Film thicknesses were 60 and 120 nm. Depth profiles and SEM images of the ablation sites revealed several striking and unexpected features distinct from those typically observed for ablation of bulk metals. Very sharp thresholds were observed for both partial and complete ablation of the films. Partial film ablation was largely independent of laser fluence with a surface smoothness comparable to that of the unablated surface. Clear evidence of material displacement was seen at the boundary for complete film ablation. These features were common to a number of different metal films including Inconel on commercial neutral density filters, stainless steel, and aluminum. We will present data showing the morphology of the ablation sites on these films as well as a model of the possible physical mechanisms producing the unique features observed.

  7. Stable structure and optical properties of fused silica with NBOHC-E‧ defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-Fei; Wu, Li-Yuan; Yang, Yang; Wang, Wei-Zheng; Zhang, Chun-Fang; Yang, Chuang-Hua; Su, Rui; Chen, Jun

    2016-08-01

    First-principles method is used to simulate the stable structure and optical properties of a 96-atom fused silica. The preferable structure of NBOHC-E‧ (non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) and E‧ center) pair defect is predicted to be located at 2.4 Å for the Si-O bond length. The quasi-particle G0W0 calculations are performed and an accurate band gap is obtained in order to calculate the optical absorption properties. With the stretching of the Si1-O1 bond, an obvious redshift can be observed in the absorption spectrum. In the case of NBOHC-E‧ pair, the p-orbital DOS of Si1 atom will shift to the conduction band. Two obvious absorption peaks can be observed in the absorption spectrum. The calculation reproduced the peak positions of the well-known optical absorption bands. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB643900), the Open Fund of IPOC (BUPT), the Open Program of State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, the National Natural Science Foundation for Theoretical Physics Special Fund “Cooperation Program” (Grant No. 11547039), and Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Scientific Research Plan Projects, China (Grant No. SLGKYQD2-05).

  8. Influence of secondary treatment with CO2 laser irradiation for mitigation site on fused silica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Qiang; Qiu, Rong; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Hui-Li; Yao, Cai-Zhen; Wang, Jun-Bo; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Chun-Ming; Xiang, Xia; Zu, Xiao-Tao; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Miao, Xin-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    The ablation debris and raised rim, as well as residual stress and deep crater will be formed during the mitigation of damage site with a CO2 laser irradiation on fused silica surface, which greatly affects the laser damage resistance of optics. In this study, the experimental study combined with numerical simulation is utilized to investigate the effect of the secondary treatment on a mitigated site by CO2 laser irradiation. The results indicate that the ablation debris and the raised rim can be completely eliminated and the depth of crater can be reduced. Notable results show that the residual stress of the mitigation site after treatment will reduce two-thirds of the original stress. Finally, the elimination and the controlling mechanism of secondary treatment on the debris and raised rim, as well as the reasons for changing the profile and stress are analyzed. The results can provide a reference for the optimization treatment of mitigation sites by CO2 laser secondary treatment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61505170, 61505171, and 51535003), the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. U1530109), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2016M592709).

  9. Material removal and surface figure during pad polishing of fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, T I; Feit, M D; Steele, W A

    2009-05-04

    The material removal and surface figure after ceria pad polishing of fused silica glass have been measured and analyzed as a function of kinematics, loading conditions, and polishing time. Also, the friction at the workpiece/lap interface, the slope of the workpiece relative to the lap plane, and lap viscoelastic properties have been measured and correlated to material removal. The results show that the relative velocity between the workpiece & lap (determined by the kinematics) and the pressure distribution determine the spatial and temporal material removal and hence the final surface figure of the workpiece. In the case where the applied loading and relative velocity distribution over the workpiece are spatially uniform, a significant non-uniform spatial material removal from the workpiece surface is observed. This is due to a non-uniform pressure distribution resulting from: (1) a moment caused by a pivot point and interface friction forces; (2) viscoelastic relaxation of the polyurethane lap; and (3) a physical workpiece/lap interface mismatch. Both the kinematics and these contributions to the pressure distribution are quantitatively described, and then combined to form a spatial and temporal Preston model & code for material removal (called Surface Figure or SurF{copyright}). The surface figure simulations are consistent with the experiment for a wide variety of polishing conditions. This study is an important step towards deterministic full-aperture polishing, which would allow optical glass fabrication to be performed in a more repeatable, less iterative, and hence more economical manner.

  10. Determination of laser damage initiation probability and growth on fused silica scratches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Cross, D A; Negres, R A; Bude, J D; Steele, W A; Monticelli, M V; Suratwala, T I

    2010-10-26

    Current methods for the manufacture of optical components inevitably leaves a variety of sub-surface imperfections including scratches of varying lengths and widths on even the finest finishes. It has recently been determined that these finishing imperfections are responsible for the majority of laser-induced damage for fluences typically used in ICF class lasers. We have developed methods of engineering subscale parts with a distribution of scratches mimicking those found on full scale fused silica parts. This much higher density of scratches provides a platform to measure low damage initiation probabilities sufficient to describe damage on large scale optics. In this work, damage probability per unit scratch length was characterized as a function of initial scratch width and post fabrication processing including acid-based etch mitigation processes. The susceptibility of damage initiation density along scratches was found to be strongly affected by the post etching material removal and initial scratch width. We have developed an automated processing procedure to document the damage initiations per width and per length of theses scratches. We show here how these tools can be employed to provide predictions of the performance of full size optics in laser systems operating at 351 nm. In addition we use these tools to measure the growth rate of a damage site initiated along a scratch and compare this to the growth measured on an isolated damage site.

  11. Spherical fused silica cells filled with pure helium for nuclear magnetic resonance-magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maul, Andreas; Blümler, Peter, E-mail: bluemler@uni-mainz.de; Heil, Werner; Nikiel, Anna; Otten, Ernst [Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Petrich, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas [ifw Günter-Köhler-Institut für Fügetechnik und Werkstoffprüfung GmbH, Otto-Schott-Str. 13, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    High magnetic fields (>1 T) are measured by NMR magnetometers with unrivaled precision if the precessing spin sample provides long coherence times. The longest coherence times are found in diluted {sup 3}He samples, which can be hyperpolarized for sufficient signal strength. In order to have minimal influence on the homogeneity and value of the measured magnetic field, the optimal container for the {sup 3}He should be a perfect sphere. A fused silica sphere with an inner diameter of 8 mm and an outer diameter of 12 mm was made from two hemispheres by diffusion bonding leaving only a small hole for cleaning and evacuation. This hole was closed in vacuum by a CO{sub 2} laser and the inner volume was filled with a few mbars of {sup 3}He via wall permeation. NMR-measurements on such a sample had coherence times of 5 min. While the hemispheres were produced with <1 μm deviation from sphericity, the bonding left a step of ca. 50 μm at maximum. The influence of such a mismatch, its orientation, and the immediate environment of the sample is analyzed by FEM-simulations and discussed in view of coherence times and absolute field measurements.

  12. Second harmonic generation via femtosecond laser fabrication of poled, quasi-phase-matched waveguides in fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jason C; Herman, Peter R; Qian, Li

    2017-01-15

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is demonstrated in femtosecond laser written waveguides in fused silica through a combination of thermal poling and laser-based quasi-phase-matching (QPM) techniques. Quasi-phase-matching was controlled by the periodic erasure of induced nonlinearity through femtosecond laser erasure. A maximum SHG conversion efficiency of 6.6±0.5×10-5%/W is reported for the fundamental wavelength of 1552.8 nm with a phase-matching bandwidth of 4.4 nm for a 10.0 mm long waveguide. For a shorter sample, an effective second-order nonlinearity of χ(2)=0.012±0.001  pm/V was measured. Chirped QPM structures for wider SHG bandwidths also were demonstrated. Such periodically poled waveguides are promising for introducing nonlinear optical components within the 3D passive optical circuits that can be flexibly formed in fused silica by femtosecond laser writing.

  13. Detailed subsurface damage measurement and efficient damage-free fabrication of fused silica optics assisted by ion beam sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenlin; Dai, Yifan; Liu, Zongzheng; Xie, Xuhui; Nie, Xuqing; Xu, Mingjin

    2016-02-22

    Formation of subsurface damage has an inseparable relationship with microscopic material behaviors. In this work, our research results indicate that the formation process of subsurface damage often accompanies with the local densification effect of fused silica material, which seriously influences microscopic material properties. Interestingly, we find ion beam sputtering (IBS) is very sensitive to the local densification, and this microscopic phenomenon makes IBS as a promising technique for the detection of nanoscale subsurface damages. Additionally, to control the densification effect and subsurface damage during the fabrication of high-performance optical components, a combined polishing technology integrating chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) and ion beam figuring (IBF) is proposed. With this combined technology, fused silica without subsurface damage is obtained through the final experimental investigation, which demonstrates the feasibility of our proposed method.

  14. An AC phase measuring interferometer for measuring dn/dT of fused silica and calcium fluoride at 193 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagam, R.N.

    1998-09-01

    A novel method for the measurement of the change in index of refraction vs. temperature (dn/dT) of fused silica and calcium fluoride at the 193 nm wavelength has been developed in support of thermal modeling efforts for the development of 193 nm-based photolithographic exposure tools. The method, based upon grating lateral shear interferometry, uses a transmissive linear grating to divide a 193 nm laser beam into several beam paths by diffraction which propagate through separate identical material samples. One diffracted order passing through one sample overlaps the undiffracted beam from a second sample and forms interference fringes dependent upon the optical path difference between the two samples. Optical phase delay due to an index change from heating one of the samples causes the interference fringes to change sinusoidally with phase. The interferometer also makes use of AC phase measurement techniques through lateral translation of the grating. Results for several samples of fused silica and calcium fluoride are demonstrated.

  15. Optical and electrical properties of boron doped diamond thin conductive films deposited on fused silica glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Sobaszek, M.; Gnyba, M.; Ryl, J.; Gołuński, Ł.; Smietana, M.; Jasiński, J.; Caban, P.; Bogdanowicz, R.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents boron-doped diamond (BDD) film as a conductive coating for optical and electronic purposes. Seeding and growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica have been investigated. Growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica were investigated at various boron doping level and methane admixture. Two step pre-treatment procedure of fused silica substrate was applied to achieve high seeding density. First, the substrates undergo the hydrogen plasma treatment then spin-coating seeding using a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond in dimethyl sulfoxide with polyvinyl alcohol was applied. Such an approach results in seeding density of 2 × 1010 cm-2. The scanning electron microscopy images showed homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology with minimal grain size of 200 nm for highly boron doped films. The sp3/sp2 ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. A high refractive index (range of 2.0-2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. The values of extinction coefficient were below 0.1 at λ = 550 nm, indicating low absorption of the film. The fabricated BDD thin films displayed resistivity below 48 Ohm cm and transmittance over 60% in the visible wavelength range.

  16. High resolution characterization of modifications in fused silica after exposure to low fluence 355 nm laser at different repetition frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C H; Ju, X; Jiang, X D; Huang, J; Zhou, X D; Zheng, Z; Wu, W D; Zheng, W G; Li, Z X; Wang, B Y; Yu, X H

    2011-03-28

    We report on the characterization of modifications in fused silica after exposure to low fluence (2 J/cm2) 355 nm laser at repetition frequencies of 1 Hz, 5 Hz and 10 Hz. Synchrotron based XRF spectroscopy is employed to study concentration variation of metal inclusions in the surface layer. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy is used to probe atomic size defects variation in bulk silica. FT-IR is used to characterize changes of bond length and angle of Si-O-Si covalent bond of irradiated silica. Compared to the basic frequency, the big loss of cerium and iron concentration, the size enlargement of vacancy cluster and the decrease of Si-O-Si covalent bond length after 10 Hz laser irradiation are illustrated by our data. These tiny modifications provide important data to investigate laser damage mechanism.

  17. Dental composite resins containing silica-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers with various filler levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H

    1999-07-01

    Currently available direct-filling composite resins are susceptible to fracture and hence are not recommended for use in large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to use ceramic single-crystalline whiskers as fillers to reinforce composites, and to investigate the effect of whisker filler level on composite properties. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whiskers, thereby improving retention in the matrix. The composite flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, and degree of polymerization conversion were measured as a function of whisker filler mass fraction, which ranged from 0% to 70%. Selected composites were polished simulating clinical procedures, and the surface roughness was measured with profilometry. The whisker composite with a filler mass fraction of 55% had a flexural strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 196+/-10 MPa, significantly higher than 83+/-14 MPa of a microfill and 120+/-16 MPa of a hybrid composite control (family confidence coefficient = 0.95; Tukey's multiple comparison). The composite modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. The flexural strength first increased, then plateaued with increasing filler level. The degree of conversion decreased with increasing filler level. The whisker composite had a polished surface roughness similar to that of a conventional hybrid composite (p>0.1; Student's t). To conclude, ceramic whisker reinforcement can significantly improve the mechanical properties of composite resins; the whisker filler level plays a key role in determining composite properties; and the reinforcement mechanisms appear to be crack pinning by whiskers and friction from whisker pullout resisting crack propagation.

  18. Influence of Cutting Speed on Subsurface Damage Morphology and Distribution in Ground Fused Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Schnurbusch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In optical fabrication, brittle-hard materials are used for numerous applications. Especially for high-performance optics for laser or lithography applications, a complex and consistent production chain is necessary to account for the material properties. Particularly in pre-processing, e.g., for shaping optical components, brittle material behavior is dominant which leads to a rough surface layer with cracks that reach far below the surface. This so called subsurface damage (SSD needs to be removed in subsequent processes like polishing. Therefore, it is essential to know the extent of the SSD induced by shaping for an efficient design of precise corrective processes and for process improvement. Within this work the influence of cutting speed on SSD, in fused silica, induced by grinding has been investigated. To analyze the subsurface crack distribution and the maximum crack depth magnetorheological finishing has been appointed to polish a wedge into the ground surface. The depth profile of SSD was analyzed by image processing. For this purpose a coherent area of the polished wedge has been recorded by stitching microscopy. Taking the form deviation of the ground surface in to account to determine the actual depth beneath surface, the accuracy of the SSD-evaluation could be improved significantly. The experiments reveal a clear influence of the cutting speed on SSD, higher cutting speeds generate less SSD. Besides the influence on the maximum crack depth an influence on the crack length itself could be verified. Based on image analysis it was possible, to predict the maximum depth of cracks by means of crack length.

  19. Ultra-high-Q microcavities fabricated on fused silica chips with three-dimentional arrangement by femtosecond laser direct writing

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jintian; Ma, Yaoguang; Fang, Wei; He, Fei; Qiao, Lingling; Tong, Limin; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of ultra-high-Q whispering gallery microcavities on a fused silica chip by femtosecond laser microfabriction, enabled by the high spatial resolution and three-dimensional nature of femtosecond laser direct writing. The processing mainly consists of two steps: (1) formation of freestanding microdisks by femtosecond laser direct writing and subsequent chemical wet etching; and (2) transformation of microdisks to microtoroids by annealing with CO2 laser. We show that three-dimensionally arranged ultra-high Q microcavities with a Q-factor up to 1.07x10^6 can be achieved.

  20. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon two-color double-pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of laser pulse pairs (50 fs single-pulse duration) of two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm) is studied experimentally. Parallel polarized double-pulse sequences with a variable delay Δt between -10 and +10 ps and between the individual fs-laser pulses were used to investigate the LIPSS periods versus Δt. These two-color experiments reveal the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface by the first laser pulse for LIPSS formation. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSS frequencies.

  1. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon two-color double-pulse irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krüger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und –prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-16

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of laser pulse pairs (50 fs single-pulse duration) of two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm) is studied experimentally. Parallel polarized double-pulse sequences with a variable delay Δt between −10 and +10 ps and between the individual fs-laser pulses were used to investigate the LIPSS periods versus Δt. These two-color experiments reveal the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface by the first laser pulse for LIPSS formation. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSS frequencies.

  2. Time dependency of the laser-induced nanostructuring process of chromium layers with different thicknesses on fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, P., E-mail: pierre.lorenz@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Klöppel, M. [Institute of Scientific Computation, Department of Mathematics, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Smausz, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE Research Group on Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Csizmadia, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K. [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hopp, B. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • The ns laser-induced melting effect of thin Cr layers on fused silica was studied. • The molten layer was analyzed by study of the time-dependent optical properties. • The liquid phase lifetime Δt{sub LF} depends on the metal thickness and the fluence. • The Δt{sub LF} dependency can be well described by an analytic function. • The comparison of the results with FEM simulation yields to a moderate agreement. - Abstract: Nanostructures exhibit a raised importance in manifold application fields like electronics and optics. The laser irradiation of thin metal layers allows the fabrication of metal nanostructures induced by a melting and deformation process where the resultant structures are dependent on the laser and metal layer parameters. However, for an optimization of this process a detailed physical understanding is necessary. Therefore, the dynamics of the metal layer deformation process was measured by time-dependent reflection and transmission as well as shadow graph measurements at different KrF excimer laser parameters (laser fluence and number of laser pulses) and metal layer thicknesses were used. Magnetron-sputtered thin chromium films with a thickness from 10 to 100 nm on fused silica substrates were studied. Based on the optical measurements the liquid phase lifetime of the metal was estimated and compared with the calculated lifetime using a simple thermodynamic model.

  3. Results of applying a non-evaporative mitigation technique to laser-initiated surface damage on fused-silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J J; Bolourchi, M; Bude, J D; Guss, G M; Matthews, M J; Nostrand, M C

    2010-10-26

    We present results from a study to determine an acceptable CO{sub 2} laser-based non-evaporative mitigation protocol for use on surface damage sites in fused-silica optics. A promising protocol is identified and evaluated on a set of surface damage sites created under ICF-type laser conditions. Mitigation protocol acceptability criteria for damage re-initiation and growth, downstream intensification, and residual stress are discussed. In previous work, we found that a power ramp at the end of the protocol effectively minimizes the residual stress (<25 MPa) left in the substrate. However, the biggest difficulty in determining an acceptable protocol was balancing between low re-initiation and problematic downstream intensification. Typical growing surface damage sites mitigated with a candidate CO{sub 2} laser-based mitigation protocol all survived 351 nm, 5 ns damage testing to fluences >12.5 J/cm{sup 2}. The downstream intensification arising from the mitigated sites is evaluated, and all but one of the sites has 100% passing downstream damage expectation values. We demonstrate, for the first time, a successful non-evaporative 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser mitigation protocol applicable to fused-silica optics used on fusion-class lasers like the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  4. Mitigation of Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica NIF Optics with a Galvanometer Scanned Carbon Dioxide Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Draggoo, V; Guss, G M; Hackel, R P; Norton, M A

    2006-04-06

    Economic operation of the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory depends on controlling growth of laser damage in the large, high cost optics exposed to UV light at 351 nm. Mitigation of the growth of damage sites on fused silica surfaces greater than several hundred microns in diameter has been previously reported by us using galvanometer scanning of a tightly focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot over an area encompassing the laser damage. Further investigation revealed that fused silica vapor re-deposited on the surface as ''debris'' led to laser damage at unexpectedly low fluences when exposed to multiple laser shots at 351 nm. Additionally, laser power and spatial mode fluctuations in the mitigation laser led to poor repeatability of the process. We also found that the shape of the mitigation pit could produce downstream intensification that could damage other NIF optics. Modifications were made to both the laser system and the mitigation process in order to address these issues. Debris was completely eliminated by these changes, but repeatability and downstream intensification issues still persist.

  5. Localized CO2 laser treatment and post-heating process to reduce the growth coefficient of fused silica surface damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhen Xu; Xiaotao Zu; Xiaodong Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The lifetime of optical components in high-fluence ultraviolet (UV) laser applications is typically limited by laser-initiated damage and its subsequent growth. Using 10.6-μm CO2 laser pulses, we successfully mitigate 355-nm laser induced damage sites on fused silica surface with dimensions less than 200 μm.The damage threshold increases and the damage growth mitigates. However, the growth coefficients of new damage on the CO2 laser processed area are higher than those of the original sample. The damage grows with crack propagation for residual stress after CO2 laser irradiation. Furthermore, post-heating is beneficial to the release of residual stress and slows down the damage growth.%@@ The lifetime of optical components in high-fluence ultraviolet (UV) laser applications is typically limited by laser-initiated damage and its subsequent growth.Using 10.6-μm CO2 laser pulses, we successfully mitigate 355-nm laser induced damage sites on fused silica surface with dimensions less than 200 μm.The damage threshold increases and the damage growth mitigates.However, the growth coefficients of new damage on the CO2 laser processed area are higher than those of the original sample.The damage grows with crack propagation for residual stress after CO2 laser irradiation.Furthermore, post-heating is beneficial to the release of residual stress and slows down the damage growth.

  6. Formation of plano-convex micro-lens array in fused silica glass using CO2 laser assisted reshaping technique

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, Ik-Bu; Yoo, Dongyoon; Noh, Young-Chul; Ahsan, Md Shamim; Sung, Jae-Hee; Lee, Seong-Ku

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabricating high-fill-factor plano-convex spherical and square micro-lens arrays on fused silica glass surface using CO2 laser assisted reshaping technique. Initially, periodic micro-pillars have been encoded on the glass surface by means of a femtosecond laser beam. Afterwards, the micro-pillars are polished several times by irradiating a CO2 laser beam on top of the micro-pillars. Consequently, spherical micro-lens array with micro-lens size of 50 um x 50 um and square micro-lens array with micro-lens size of 100 um x 100 um are formed on fused silica glass surface. We also study the intensity distribution of light passed through the spherical micro-lens array engraved glass sample. The simulation result shows that, the focal length of the spherical micro-lens array is 35 um. Furthermore, we investigate the optical properties of the micro-lens array engraved glass samples. The proposed CO2 laser based reshaping technique is simple and fast that shows promises in fabrication arrays of smooth mic...

  7. Combined Advanced Finishing and UV-Laser Conditioning for Producing UV-Damage-Resistant Fused Silica Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menapace, J A; Penetrante, B; Golini, D; Slomba, A; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Nichols, M; Peterson, J

    2001-11-01

    Laser induced damage initiation on fused silica optics can limit the lifetime of the components when used in high power UV laser environments. Foe example in inertial confinement fusion research applications, the optics can be exposed to temporal laser pulses of about 3-nsec with average fluences of 8 J/cm{sup 2} and peak fluences between 12 and 15 J/cm{sup 2}. During the past year, we have focused on optimizing the damage performance at a wavelength of 355-nm (3{omega}), 3-nsec pulse length, for optics in this category by examining a variety of finishing technologies with a challenge to improve the laser damage initiation density by at least two orders of magnitude. In this paper, we describe recent advances in improving the 3{omega} damage initiation performance of laboratory-scale zirconium oxide and cerium oxide conventionally finished fused silica optics via application of processes incorporating magnetorheological finishing (MRF), wet chemical etching, and UV laser conditioning. Details of the advanced finishing procedures are described and comparisons are made between the procedures based upon large area 3{omega} damage performance, polishing layer contamination, and optical subsurface damage.

  8. Optical and structural properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond films grown on fused silica optical fibres pre-treated by high-power sonication seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, R.; Śmietana, M.; Gnyba, M.; Gołunski, Ł.; Ryl, J.; Gardas, M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the growth of polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond thin films on fused silica optical fibres has been investigated. The research results show that the effective substrate seeding process can lower defect nucleation, and it simultaneously increases surface encapsulation. However, the growth process on glass requires high seeding density. The effects of suspension type and ultrasonic power were the specific objects of investigation. In order to increase the diamond density, glass substrates were seeded using a high-power sonication process. The highest applied power of sonotrode reached 72 W during the performed experiments. The two, most common diamond seeding suspensions were used, i.e. detonation nanodiamond dispersed in (a) dimethyl sulfoxide and (b) deionised water. The CVD diamond nucleation and growth processes were performed using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition system. Next, the seeding efficiency was determined and compared using the numerical analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The molecular composition of nucleated diamond was examined with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The sp3/sp2 band ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. Thickness, roughness, and optical properties of the nanodiamond films in UV-vis wavelength range were investigated by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry. It has been demonstrated that the high-power sonication process can improve the seeding efficiency on glass substrates. However, it can also cause significant erosion defects at the fibre surface. We believe that the proposed growth method can be effectively applied to manufacture the novel optical fibre sensors. Due to high chemical and mechanical resistance of CVD diamond films, deposition of such films on the sensors is highly desirable. This method enables omitting the deposition of an additional adhesion interlayer at the glass-nanocrystalline interface, and thus potentially increases

  9. Interfacial aggregation of a nonionic surfactant: Effect on the stability of silica suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano-Palmino, F.; Denoyel, R.; Rouquerol, J. (CNRS, Marseille (France). Centre de thermodynamique et Microcalorimetrie)

    1994-06-01

    Nonionic surfactants are in widespread use in technological applications such as flotation, detergency, suspension stabilization (paints, ceramic preparation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics), and enhanced oil recovery. The adsorption of the nonionic surfactant TX 100 in two silica suspensions (Ludox HS40 and Syton W30) has been studied with the aim of relating the structure of the adsorbed layer to the stability of the suspension. First, a thermodynamic study based on the determination of adsorption isotherms and displacement enthalpies as a function of pH and solid/liquid ratio was carried out and lead to the conclusion that such a surfactant forms micelle-like aggregates on the silica surface. Then, a stability study based on visual observation, turbidimetry, and particle size determination (by photon correlation spectroscopy) was performed in order to determine the TX 100 concentration range in which flocculation occurs. Considering that the surface is covered with micelle-like aggregates in the flocculation range and that the [zeta]-potential (determined by microelectrophoresis) has varied only slightly at the onset of flocculation, it is concluded that the flocculation mechanism is a bridging of particles by surface micelles. This bridging of particles by aggregates similar in size and shape could be an explanation of the presence, in such systems, of optimum flocculation at half surface coverage.

  10. The Effect of HF/NH4F Etching on the Morphology of Surface Fractures on Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, L; Suratwala, T; Feit, M D; Miller, P E; Steele, R A

    2008-04-03

    The effects of HF/NH{sub 4}F, wet chemical etching on the morphology of individual surface fractures (indentations, scratches) and of an ensemble of surface fractures (ground surfaces) on fused silica glass has been characterized. For the individual surface fractures, a series of static or dynamic (sliding) Vickers and Brinnell indenters were used to create radial, lateral, Hertzian cone and trailing indentation fractures on a set of polished fused silica substrates which were subsequently etched. After short etch times, the visibility of both surface and subsurface cracks is significantly enhanced when observed by optical microscopy. This is attributed to the removal of the polishing-induced Bielby layer and the increased width of the cracks following etching allowing for greater optical scatter at the fracture interface. The removal of material during etching was found to be isotropic except in areas where the etchant has difficulty penetrating or in areas that exhibit significant plastic deformation/densification. Isolated fractures continue to etch, but will never be completely removed since the bottom and top of the crack both etch at the same rate. The etching behavior of ensembles of closely spaced cracks, such as those produced during grinding, has also been characterized. This was done using a second set of fused silica samples that were ground using either fixed or loose abrasives. The resulting samples were etched and both the etch rate and the morphology of the surfaces were monitored as a function of time. Etching results in the formation of a series of open cracks or cusps, each corresponding to the individual fractures originally on the surface of the substrate. During extended etching, the individual cusps coalesce with one another, providing a means of reducing the depth of subsurface damage and the peak-to-valley roughness. In addition, the material removal rate of the ground surfaces was found to scale with the surface area of the cracks as a

  11. Anderson localization of light in a colloidal suspension (TiO2@silica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Villar, Ernesto; da Silva, Iran F; Mestre, Valdeci; de Oliveira, Paulo C; Faustino, Wagner M; de Sá, Gilberto F

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, there has been dramatic progress in the photonics field in disordered media, ranging from applications in solar collectors, photocatalyzers, random lasing, and other novel photonic functions, to investigations into fundamental topics, such as light confinement and other phenomena involving photon interactions. This paper reports several pieces of experimental evidence of localization transition in a strongly disordered scattering medium composed of a colloidal suspension of core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2@silica) in ethanol solution. We demonstrate the crossover from a diffusive transport to a localization transition regime as the nanoparticle concentration is increased, and that an enhanced absorption effect arises at localization transition.

  12. Multilevel kinoform microlens arrays in fused silica for high-power laser optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuchin, Victor V.; Soldatenkov, I. S.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Mikhailov, E. V.; Pestryakov, Efim V.; Sheglov, Dmitriy V.

    2004-03-01

    Diffraction microlens arrays has been fabricated in silica substrates by deep UV photolithography and wet chemical etching. The calculated kinoform profile has been approximated by multistep function and this microrelief has been transfered into the surface with wet etching through the photoresist mask. The diffraction efficiency of eight-level kinoform microlens is as high as 85%.

  13. Polarization-independent etching of fused silica based on electrons dynamics control by shaped femtosecond pulse trains for microchannel fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X; Jiang, L; Li, X; Zhang, K; Xia, B; Liu, P; Qu, L; Lu, Y

    2014-09-01

    We propose an approach to realize polarization-independent etching of fused silica by using temporally shaped femtosecond pulse trains to control the localized transient electrons dynamics. Instead of nanograting formation using traditional unshaped pulses, for the pulse delay of pulse trains larger than 1 ps, coherent field-vector-related coupling is not possible and field orientation is lost. The exponential growth of the periodic structures is interrupted. In this case, disordered and interconnected nanostructures are formed, which is probably the main reason of etching independence on the laser polarization. As an application example, square-wave-shaped and arc-shaped microchannels are fabricated by using pulse trains to demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method in fabricating high-aspect-ratio and three-dimensional microchannels.

  14. Observation of nonlinear optical phenomena in fused silica and air using a 100 GW, 1.54 um source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, James Van; Law, R. J.; Luk, Ting Shan; Naudeau, Madeline L.; Nelson, Thomas Robert; Cameron, Stewart M.

    2006-02-01

    A 100-GW optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier system is used to study nonlinear effects in the 1.54 {micro}m regime. When focusing this beam in air, strong third-harmonic generation (THG) is observed, and both the spectra and efficiency are measured. Broadening is observed on only the blue side of the third-harmonic signal and an energy conversion efficiency of 0.2% is achieved. When propagated through a 10-cm block of fused silica, a collimated beam is seen to collapse and form multiple filaments. The measured spectral features span 400-2100 nm. The spectrum is dominated by previously unobserved Stokes emissions and broad emissions in the visible.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF FUSED-CORE SILICA HPLC COLUMNS AND THEIR RECENT PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwida Kamour*, Amal Ammar, Mohamed El-Attug and Tariq Almog

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In many analytical procedures, fast and reliable analysis technique is required. The development of HPLC stationary phases were in line with these goals. To achieve these goals of fast and efficient analysis, work was focused on reducing particle size of packing materials. Therefore, the development of superficially porous silica particles provided a new approach with overwhelming operating results to insure fast and reliable analysis at decreased system back pressure values. This work presents features and development aspects of fused core technology. Also it describes their chromatographic properties in comparison with monolithic and sub-2 µm particle columns. In addition, there is a discussion of its applicability to be used with conventional HPLC instruments. Finally, it outlines some of its recent applications in biological and pharmaceutical field.

  16. Effect of rapid thermal annealing on polycrystalline InGaN thin films deposited on fused silica substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazazis, S.A., E-mail: kazazis@physics.uoc.gr [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Papadomanolaki, E. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Androulidaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Kostopoulos, A.; Aperathitis, E. [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Iliopoulos, E. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Microelectronics Research Group, IESL-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion (Greece)

    2016-07-29

    In this work, we report on the effects of Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) on the structural, electrical and optical properties of polycrystalline InGaN thin films deposited on amorphous fused silica substrates by molecular beam deposition. Films with 20%, 35% and 50% indium content were grown and subjected to post-deposition RTA treatments. Annealing promoted crystallization in the case of the film with 0.5 InN mole fraction while in the lower indium content cases no apparent effect on the improvement of crystallinity was observed. For RTA temperature above 550 °C, film resistivity was reduced by at least two orders of magnitude due to annealing-induced increased carrier concentration. The optical properties of the films were systematically studied by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. In the highest indium content films, a monotonic optical band gap widening was observed upon annealing, explained by the Burstein–Moss effect. In contrast, photoluminescence peak position was not affected by the resulting Fermi level changes. This is attributed to the different mechanisms between optical absorption and emission in such highly doped semiconductors. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline InGaN films were deposited on fused silica substrates. • Rapid thermal annealing effect on structural, electrical and optical properties studied. • Films' resistivity significantly reduced after annealing at 550 °C, in all InN content cases. • In higher indium content films, optical band gap blueshifts upon annealing, due to Burstein–Moss effect. • Photoluminescence emission position was unaffected by the band gap shift.

  17. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  18. An AFM determination of the effects on surface roughness caused by cleaning of fused silica and glass substrates in the process of optical biosensor preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Lisa; Nagy, Noemi; Krull, Ulrich J

    2002-06-01

    The covalent attachment of organic films and of biological molecules to fused silica and glass substrates is important for many applications. For applications such as biosensor development, it is desired that the immobilised molecules be assembled in a uniform layer on the surface so as to provide for reproducibility and speed of surface interactions. For optimal derivatisation the surface must be appropriately cleaned to remove contamination, to create surface attachment sites such as hydroxyl groups, and to control surface roughness. The irregularity of the surface can be significant in defining the integrity and density of immobilised films. Numerous cleaning methods exist for fused silica and glass substrates and these include gas plasmas, and combinations of acids, bases and organic solvents that are allowed to react at varying temperatures. For many years, we have used a well established method based on a combination of washing with basic peroxide followed by acidic peroxide to clean and hydroxylate the surface of fused silica and glass substrates before oligonucleotide immobilisation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to evaluate the effect of cleaning on surface roughness for various fused silica and glass samples. The results indicate that surface roughness remains substantial after use of this common cleaning routine, and can provide a surface area that is more than 10% but less than 30% larger than anticipated from geometric considerations of a planar surface.

  19. Anderson localization of light in a colloidal suspension (TiO2@silica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Villar, Ernesto; da Silva, Iran F.; Mestre, Valdeci; de Oliveira, Paulo C.; Faustino, Wagner M.; de Sá, Gilberto F.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been dramatic progress in the photonics field in disordered media, ranging from applications in solar collectors, photocatalyzers, random lasing, and other novel photonic functions, to investigations into fundamental topics, such as light confinement and other phenomena involving photon interactions. This paper reports several pieces of experimental evidence of localization transition in a strongly disordered scattering medium composed of a colloidal suspension of core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2@silica) in ethanol solution. We demonstrate the crossover from a diffusive transport to a localization transition regime as the nanoparticle concentration is increased, and that an enhanced absorption effect arises at localization transition.In recent years, there has been dramatic progress in the photonics field in disordered media, ranging from applications in solar collectors, photocatalyzers, random lasing, and other novel photonic functions, to investigations into fundamental topics, such as light confinement and other phenomena involving photon interactions. This paper reports several pieces of experimental evidence of localization transition in a strongly disordered scattering medium composed of a colloidal suspension of core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2@silica) in ethanol solution. We demonstrate the crossover from a diffusive transport to a localization transition regime as the nanoparticle concentration is increased, and that an enhanced absorption effect arises at localization transition. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07540h

  20. Effects of Ti charge state, ion size and beam-induced compaction on the formation of Ag metal nanoparticles in fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magruder, R. H.; Meldrum, A.; Haglund, R. F.

    2015-04-01

    Metal nanoparticles formed by ion implantation in fused silica exhibit linear and nonlinear optical properties that can be altered by co-doping the silica substrate with transition-metal ions. For example, implantation of scandium in fused silica creates a directional optical dichroism due to the different spatial distribution of silver nanoparticles subsequently formed by Ag ion implantation. In this paper, we show that implantation of titanium ions alters the short- and intermediate-range order in the silica and thereby alters the diffusion and nucleation processes that lead to formation of silver nanoparticles. In particular, the dichroic response observed for Ag nanoparticles in Sc-implanted silica is, with one exception, in Ti-implanted silica. Compaction of the silica due to the ion implantation process appears to be similar for both Sc and Ti implantations, based on the observed shift of the 1,124 cm-1 transverse-optical phonon mode in the infrared reflectance spectrum. However, differences in chemical reactivity, bond lengths and electronic structure of Sc and Ti produce changes in electronic structure and strain that are sensitively reflected in the reflectance spectra of the Ag nanoparticles. These differences lead to modifications in the size, shape and spatial distributions of the silver nanoparticles and offer a powerful means of controlling their optical properties.

  1. Thermo-mechanical simulations of CO{sub 2} laser–fused silica interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doualle, T.; Gallais, L., E-mail: laurent.gallais@fresnel.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, Institut Fresnel UMR 7249, 13013 Marseille (France); Cormont, P.; Hébert, D.; Rullier, J.-L. [CEA-CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablières, CS 60001, F33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Combis, P. [CEA DAM Ile-de-France, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2016-03-21

    CO{sub 2} laser heating of silica glass is used in many scientific and industrial applications. Particularly, localized CO{sub 2} laser heating of silica glass has demonstrated its ability to mitigate surface damage on optics used for high power laser applications. To develop such applications, the control of temperature, heat affected area, and resulting mechanical stresses are critical. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the silica transformation, the material ejection, and the thermo-mechanical stresses induced by the laser heating and subsequent cooling. In this paper, we detail the development of comprehensive thermo-mechanical numerical simulations of these physical processes, based on finite-element method. The approach is developed for 2D or 3D cases to tackle the case of a moving beam at the surface of the sample, and we particularly discuss the choice of the different parameters based on bibliographic inputs. The thermal and mechanical numerical results have been compared to different dedicated experimental studies: infrared thermography measurements at the surface of the irradiated area, optical profilometry measurements of the laser-processed sites, and photo-elastic measurements. Very consistent results are obtained between numerical and experimental results for the description of the temperature gradients, the material ejection, and the residual stresses.

  2. Thermo-mechanical simulations of CO2 laser-fused silica interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doualle, T.; Gallais, L.; Cormont, P.; Hébert, D.; Combis, P.; Rullier, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser heating of silica glass is used in many scientific and industrial applications. Particularly, localized CO2 laser heating of silica glass has demonstrated its ability to mitigate surface damage on optics used for high power laser applications. To develop such applications, the control of temperature, heat affected area, and resulting mechanical stresses are critical. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the silica transformation, the material ejection, and the thermo-mechanical stresses induced by the laser heating and subsequent cooling. In this paper, we detail the development of comprehensive thermo-mechanical numerical simulations of these physical processes, based on finite-element method. The approach is developed for 2D or 3D cases to tackle the case of a moving beam at the surface of the sample, and we particularly discuss the choice of the different parameters based on bibliographic inputs. The thermal and mechanical numerical results have been compared to different dedicated experimental studies: infrared thermography measurements at the surface of the irradiated area, optical profilometry measurements of the laser-processed sites, and photo-elastic measurements. Very consistent results are obtained between numerical and experimental results for the description of the temperature gradients, the material ejection, and the residual stresses.

  3. Femtosecond laser writing of waveguide retarders in fused silica for polarization control in optical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luís A; Grenier, Jason R; Herman, Peter R; Aitchison, J Stewart; Marques, Paulo V S

    2011-09-12

    Femtosecond laser (300 fs, 500 kHz, 522 nm) fabrication of optical waveguides in bulk silica glass is extended to waveguide retarders. We study the merits of nanograting orientation (perpendicular or parallel to the waveguide) for generating high and low birefringence waveguides. This is used together with other exposure condition to control the waveguide birefringence between 10⁻⁵ and 10⁻⁴ permitting for the simultaneous fabrication of the waveguides and the tuning of the retardance demonstrating quarter and half-wave retarders in the 1200 nm to 1700 nm spectrum. The wavelength dependence of the birefringence is also characterized over a range of exposure conditions.

  4. Study of CO2 laser smoothing of surface roughness in fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N; Matthews, J; Fair, J E; Britten, J A; Nguyen, H T; Cooke, D; Elhadj, S; Henshaw, D; Guss, G M; Guss, G M; Yang, T

    2009-11-03

    Small micrometer-sized roughness on optical surfaces, caused by laser damage and/or redeposition of laser ablated material, can cause local electric field intensification which may lead to damage initiation both on the optics and/or downstream. We examined the smoothing of etched periodic surface structures on SiO{sub 2} substrate with 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser using atomic force microscopy. The characteristic surface tension driven mass flow of the glass under different laser parameters were simulated using computational fluid dynamics and correlated with experimental results. We found that during CO{sub 2} laser polishing the estimate viscosity of the silica glass appears to be higher than typical literature values measured at a temperature similar to the laser heating conditions. This discrepancy can be explained by the observation that at high temperature, a significant portion of the hydroxyl content in the layer of heated silica glass can diffuse out resulting in a much stiffer glass.

  5. Comparing the use of 4.6 um lasers versus 10.6 um lasers for mitigating damage site growth on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2010-10-21

    The advantage of using mid-infrared (IR) 4.6 {micro}m lasers, versus far-infrared 10.6 {micro}m lasers, for mitigating damage growth on fused silica is investigated. In contrast to fused silica's high absorption at 10.6 {micro}m, silica absorption at 4.6 {micro}m is two orders of magnitude less. The much reduced absorption at 4.6 {micro}m enables deep heat penetration into fused silica when it is heated using the mid-IR laser, which in turn leads to more effective mitigation of damage sites with deep cracks. The advantage of using mid-IR versus far-IR laser for damage growth mitigation under non-evaporative condition is quantified by defining a figure of merit (FOM) that relates the crack healing depth to laser power required. Based on our FOM, we show that for damage cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation using a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation using a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser.

  6. Effect of rogue particles on the sub-surface damage of fused silica during grinding/polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, T I; Steele, R; Feit, M D; Wong, L; Miller, P E; Menapace, J A; Davis, P J

    2007-05-02

    The distribution and characteristics of surface cracks (i.e., sub-surface damage or scratching) on fused silica formed during grinding/polishing resulting from the addition of rogue particles in the base slurry has been investigated. Fused silica samples (10 cm diameter x 1 cm thick) were: (1) ground by loose abrasive grinding (alumina particles 9-30 {micro}m) on a glass lap with the addition of larger alumina particles at various concentrations with mean sizes ranging from 15-30 {micro}m, or (2) polished (using 0.5 {micro}m cerium oxide slurry) on various laps (polyurethanes pads or pitch) with the addition of larger rogue particles (diamond (4-45 {micro}m), pitch, dust, or dried Ceria slurry agglomerates) at various concentrations. For the resulting ground samples, the crack distributions of the as-prepared surfaces were determined using a polished taper technique. The crack depth was observed to: (1) increase at small concentrations (>10{sup -4} fraction) of rogue particles; and (2) increase with rogue particle concentration to crack depths consistent with that observed when grinding with particles the size of the rogue particles alone. For the polished samples, which were subsequently etched in HF:NH{sub 4}F to expose the surface damage, the resulting scratch properties (type, number density, width, and length) were characterized. The number density of scratches increased exponentially with the size of the rogue diamond at a fixed rogue diamond concentration suggesting that larger particles are more likely to lead to scratching. The length of the scratch was found to increase with rogue particle size, increase with lap viscosity, and decrease with applied load. At high diamond concentrations, the type of scratch transitioned from brittle to ductile and the length of the scratches dramatically increased and extended to the edge of the optic. The observed trends can explained semi-quantitatively in terms of the time needed for a rogue particle to penetrate into a

  7. Microstructure variation in fused silica irradiated by different fluence of UV laser pulses with positron annihilation lifetime and Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zhu, Qihua; Chen, Jun; Wang, B. Y.; Ju, Xin

    2016-10-01

    We present an original study on the non-destructive evaluation of the microstructure evolution of fused silica induced by pulsed UV laser irradiation at low fluence (less than 50% Fth). Positron annihilation spectroscopy discloses that the spatial size of the vacancy cluster is increased exponentially with the linearly elevated laser fluence. Particularly, the vacancy cluster size in bulk silica is significantly increased by 14.5% after irradiated by pulsed 355 nm laser at F = 14 J/cm2 (50% Fth), while the void size varies only ∼2%. UV laser-excited Raman results suggest that the bond length and average bond angle of Sisbnd Osbnd Si bridging bond are both slightly reduced. Results reveals that the rearrangement process of (Sisbnd O)n fold rings and breakage of the Sisbnd O bridging bond in bulk silica occurred during pulsed UV laser irradiation. The micro-structural changes were taken together to clarify the effect of sub-threshold laser fluence on material stability of silica glass. The obtained data provide important information for studying material stability and controlling the lifetime of fused silica optics for high power laser system.

  8. High-resolution 3-D imaging of surface damage sites in fused silica with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guss, G; Bass, I; Hackel, R; Mailhiot, C; Demos, S G

    2007-10-30

    In this work, we present the first successful demonstration of a non-contact technique to precisely measure the 3D spatial characteristics of laser induced surface damage sites in fused silica for large aperture laser systems by employing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). What makes OCT particularly interesting in the characterization of optical materials for large aperture laser systems is that its axial resolution can be maintained with working distances greater than 5 cm, whether viewing through air or through the bulk of thick optics. Specifically, when mitigating surface damage sites against further growth by CO{sub 2} laser evaporation of the damage, it is important to know the depth of subsurface cracks below the damage site. These cracks are typically obscured by the damage rubble when imaged from above the surface. The results to date clearly demonstrate that OCT is a unique and valuable tool for characterizing damage sites before and after the mitigation process. We also demonstrated its utility as an in-situ diagnostic to guide and optimize our process when mitigating surface damage sites on large, high-value optics.

  9. An Improved Method of Mitigating Laser Induced Surface Damage Growth in Fused Silica Using a Rastered, Pulsed CO2 Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Nostrand, M J; Wegner, P L

    2010-10-21

    A new method of mitigating (arresting) the growth of large (>200 m diameter and depth) laser induced surface damage on fused silica has been developed that successfully addresses several issues encountered with our previously-reported large site mitigation technique. As in the previous work, a tightly-focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot is scanned over the damage site by galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous work, the laser is pulsed instead of CW, with the pulse length and repetition frequency chosen to allow substantial cooling between pulses. This cooling has the important effect of reducing the heat-affected zone capable of supporting thermo-capillary flow from scale lengths on the order of the overall scan pattern to scale lengths on the order of the focused laser spot, thus preventing the formation of a raised rim around the final mitigation site and its consequent down-stream intensification. Other advantages of the new method include lower residual stresses, and improved damage threshold associated with reduced amounts of redeposited material. The raster patterns can be designed to produce specific shapes of the mitigation pit including cones and pyramids. Details of the new technique and its comparison with the previous technique will be presented.

  10. Comparison of neutron and gamma irradiation effects on KU1 fused silica monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, D. [Department Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: david.bravo@uam.es; Lagomacini, J.C. [Department Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Leon, M.; Martin, P. [Materiales para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martin, A. [Department Fisica e Instalaciones, ETS Arquitectura UPM, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, F.J. [Department Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [Materiales para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies have been carried out on KU1 fused silica irradiated with neutrons at fluences 10{sup 21} and 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}, and gamma-ray doses up to 12 MGy. The effects of post-irradiation thermal annealing treatments, up to 850 deg. C, have also been investigated. Paramagnetic oxygen-related defects (POR and NBOHC) and E'-type defects have been identified and their concentration has been measured as a function of neutron fluence, gamma dose and post-irradiation annealing temperature. It is found that neutrons at the highest fluence generate a much higher concentration of defects (mainly E' and POR, both at concentrations about 5 x 10{sup 18} spins/cm{sup 3}) than gamma irradiations at the highest dose (mainly E' at a concentration about 4 x 10{sup 17} spins/cm{sup 3}). Moreover, for gamma-irradiated samples a lower treatment temperature (about 400 deg. C) is required to annihilate most of the observed defects than for neutron-irradiated ones (about 600 deg. C)

  11. Single molecule kinetics of horseradish peroxidase exposed in large arrays of femtoliter-sized fused silica chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrl, Benno N; Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2013-08-07

    Large arrays of femtoliter-sized chambers were etched into the surface of fused silica slides to enclose and observe hundreds of single horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules in parallel. Individual molecules of HRP oxidize the fluorogenic substrate Amplex Red to fluorescent resorufin in separate chambers, which was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Photooxidation of Amplex Red and photobleaching of resorufin have previously limited the analysis of HRP in femtoliter arrays. We have strongly reduced these effects by optimizing the fluorescence excitation and detection scheme to yield accurate single molecule substrate turnover rates. We demonstrate the presence of long-lived kinetic states of single HRP molecules that are individually different for each molecule in the array. The large number of molecules investigated in parallel provides excellent statistics on the activity distribution in the enzyme population, which is similar to that reported for other enzymes such as β-galactosidase. We have further confirmed that the product formation of HRP in femtoliter chambers is 10-fold lower than that in the bulk solution due to the particular two-step redox reaction mechanism of HRP.

  12. Sub-wavelength ripples in fused silica after irradiation of the solid/liquid interface with ultrashort laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, R; Vass, C; Hopp, B; Zimmer, K

    2008-12-10

    Laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) is performed using ultrashort 248 nm laser pulses with a pulse duration of 600 fs to obtain sub-wavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on the back surface of fused silica which is in contact with a 0.5 mol l(-1) solution of pyrene in toluene. The LIPSS are strictly one-dimensional patterns, oriented parallel to the polarization of the laser radiation, and have a constant period of about 140 nm at all applied laser fluences (0.33-0.84 J cm(-2)) and pulse numbers (50-1000 pulses). The LIPSS amplitude varies due to the inhomogeneous fluence in the laser spot. The LIPSS are examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their power spectral density (PSD) distribution is analysed at a measured area of 10 µm × 10 µm. The good agreement of the measured and calculated LIPSS periods strongly supports a mechanism based on the interference of surface-scattered and incident waves.

  13. Pepsin immobilized in dextran-modified fused-silica capillaries for on-line protein digestion and peptide mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stigter, E.C.A. [Division of Biomedical Analysis, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: e.c.a.stigter@uu.nl; Jong, G.J. de; Bennekom, W.P. van [Division of Biomedical Analysis, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-07-07

    On-line digestion of proteins under acidic conditions was studied using micro-reactors consisting of dextran-modified fused-silica capillaries with covalently immobilized pepsin. The proteins used in this study differed in molecular weight, isoelectric point and sample composition. The injected protein samples were completely digested in 3 min and the digest was analyzed with micro-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The different proteins present in the samples could be identified with a Mascot database search on the basis of auto-MS/MS data. It proved also to be possible to digest and analyze protein mixtures with a sequence coverage of 55% and 97% for the haemoglobin {beta}- and {alpha}-chain, respectively, and 35-55% for the various casein variants. Protease auto-digestion, sample carry-over and loss of signal due to adsorption of the injected proteins were not observed. The backpressure of the reactor is low which makes coupling to systems such as Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensors, which do not tolerate too high pressure, possible. The reactor was stable for at least 40 days when used continuously.

  14. Design and Simulation of a Fused Silica Space Cell Culture and Observation Cavity with Microfluidic and Temperature Controlling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangchun Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a principle prototype of space animal cell perfusion culture and observation. Unlike previous work, our cell culture system cannot only realize microfluidic and temperature controlling, automatic observation, and recording but also meet an increasing cell culture at large scale operation and overcome shear force for animal cells. A key component in the system is ingenious structural fused silica cell culture cavity with the wedge-shaped connection. Finite volume method (FVM is applied to calculate its multipoint flow field, pressure field, axial velocity, tangential velocity, and radial velocity. In order to provide appropriate flow rate, temperature, and shear force for space animal cell culture, a closed-loop microfluidic circuit and proportional, integrating, and differentiation (PID algorithm are employed. This paper also illustrates system architecture and operating method of the principle prototype. The dynamic culture, autofocus observation, and recording of M763 cells are performed successfully within 72 h in the laboratory environment. This research can provide a reference for space flight mission that carries an apparatus with similar functions.

  15. Correlating optical damage threshold with intrinsic defect populations in fused silica as a function of heat treatment temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Matthews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Elhadj, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Miller, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nelson, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamilton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-04-03

    Here, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used for the production of fused silica optics in high-power laser applications. However, relatively little is known about the ultraviolet laser damage threshold of CVD films and how they relate to intrinsic defects produced during deposition. We present here a study relating structural and electronic defects in CVD films to 355 nm pulsed-laser damage threshold as a function of post-deposition annealing temperature (THT). Plasma-enhanced CVD based on SiH4/N2O under oxygen-rich conditions was used to deposit 1.5, 3.1 and 6.4 µm thick films on etched SiO2 substrates. Rapid annealing was performed using a scanned CO2 laser beam up to THT ~ 2100 K. The films were then characterized using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. A gradual transition in the damage threshold of annealed films was observed for THT values up to 1600 K, correlating with a decrease in non-bridging silanol and oxygen deficient centres. An additional sharp transition in damage threshold also occurs at ~1850 K indicating substrate annealing. Based on our results, a mechanism for damage-related defect annealing is proposed, and the potential of using high-THT CVD SiO2 to mitigate optical damage is also discussed.

  16. Characterization of Optical and Electrical Properties of Transparent Conductive Boron-Doped Diamond thin Films Grown on Fused Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanowicz Robert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A conductive boron-doped diamond (BDD grown on a fused silica/quartz has been investigated. Diamond thin films were deposited by the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PECVD. The main parameters of the BDD synthesis, i.e. the methane admixture and the substrate temperature were investigated in detail. Preliminary studies of optical properties were performed to qualify an optimal CVD synthesis and film parameters for optical sensing applications. The SEM micro-images showed the homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology; the mean grain size was within the range of 100-250 nm. The fabricated conductive boron-doped diamond thin films displayed the resistivity below 500 mOhm cm-1 and the transmittance over 50% in the VIS-NIR wavelength range. The studies of optical constants were performed using the spectroscopic ellipsometry for the wavelength range between 260 and 820 nm. A detailed error analysis of the ellipsometric system and optical modelling estimation has been provided. The refractive index values at the 550 nm wavelength were high and varied between 2.24 and 2.35 depending on the percentage content of methane and the temperature of deposition.

  17. Laser-induced damage characteristics in fused silica surface due to mechanical and chemical defects during manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2017-06-01

    Mechanical and chemical defects incurred by grinding and polishing as well as post-processing have been recognized as the most influential culprits that hamper the elevation of laser power/energy in high peak power/energy laser systems. In order to find out the causes for limiting the operational power of laser systems, the effects of these defects on laser damage and removal and mitigation of the defects were investigated in detail in the article. Cracks and scratches were created, annealed, etched and damaged so as to reveal the likely effects of mechanical defects on damage and potential techniques to reduce their influence. The results show that HF-based etching can open and smooth cracks/scratches, improving laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) at scratches by up to >250%. Thermal annealing did heal, to some extent, cracks but the LIDT is little improved. Both HF-etching and leaching proves to be effective in removing metallic contamination during polishing process and handling of optics, which can "contribute" to damage/damage density in fused silica. However, HF-based etching may degrade surface roughness, from 20 nm under some conditions when >20 μm material was etched away while the surface roughness was perceptibly altered by leaching (30 J/cm2 (355 nm @3 ns, beam diameter 400 μm @1/e2), a significant progress.

  18. Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

    2009-11-02

    Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

  19. Array of chemically etched fused-silica emitters for improving the sensitivity and quantitation of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T; Page, Jason S; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2007-06-01

    An array of emitters has been developed for increasing the sensitivity of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The linear array consists of 19 chemically etched fused-silica capillaries arranged with 500 microm (center-to-center) spacing. The multiemitter device has a low dead volume to facilitate coupling to capillary liquid chromatography (LC) separations. The high aspect ratio of the emitters enables operation at flow rates as low as 20 nL/min/emitter, effectively extending the benefits of nanoelectrospray to higher flow rate analyses. To accommodate the larger ion current produced by the emitter array, a multicapillary inlet to the mass spectrometer was also constructed. The inlet, which matched the dimensions of the emitter array, preserved ion transmission efficiency. Standard reserpine solutions of varying concentration were electrosprayed at 1 microL/min using the multiemitter/multi-inlet combination, and the results were compared to those from a standard, single-emitter configuration. A 9-fold sensitivity enhancement was observed for the multiemitter relative to the single emitter. A bovine serum albumin tryptic digest was also analyzed, and a sensitivity increase ranging from 2.4- to 12.3-fold for the detected tryptic peptides resulted; the varying response was attributed to reduced ion suppression under the nanoESI conditions afforded by the emitter array. An equimolar mixture of leucine enkephalin and maltopentaose was studied to verify that ion suppression is indeed reduced for the multiplexed ESI (multi-ESI) array relative to a single emitter over a range of flow rates.

  20. Rheological responses of fumed silica suspensions under steady and oscillatory shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG HaiLin; RUAN JianMing; ZOU JianPeng; WU QiuMei; ZHOU ZhongCheng; ZHOU ZhiHua

    2009-01-01

    Rheological experiments under steady and oscillatory shear were conducted for fumed silica suspensions in polyethylene glycol. Under steady shear the shear-thinning and thickening response were exhibited and the flow exponent Nwas determined. With the increase of concentration the flow exponent N showed a rapid increase, and it increased dramatically when the discontinuous shear-thickening took place. Oscillatory shear experiments were conducted at constant frequency and constant amplitude strain, respectively. The shear-thinning and the discontinuous shear-thickening behavior were observed under different constant frequencies from 10 to 80 rad/s. The correlation between complex modulus (G*)and sweep frequency (ω) was illuminated atγ=750%. It was found that the correlation between G* and ω could be fitted by equation: G*∝ωn. The indexes in shear-thinning region and shear-thickening were determined. The indexes were similar to some extent at shear-thinning region end increased dramatically to a much higher value when the shear-thickening occurred, especially at higher weight fractions. The behaviors can be qualitatively explained as follows: the shear-thinning owes to decrease of viscosity, which results from disruption of the aggregates; the cluster theory attributes the shear-thickening to the formation of metastable, flow induced clusters, which block the system.

  1. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon cross-polarized two-color double-fs-pulse irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhm, S., E-mail: hoehm@mbi-berlin.de.de [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krüger, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und–prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Bonse, J., E-mail: joern.bonse@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und–prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LIPSS formation on fused silica is studied upon cross-polarized two-color (400 and 800 nm) double-fs-pulse irradiation. • LIPSS orientation follows the polarization of the first pulse. • LIPSS periods are determined by the wavelength of the first pulse. • LIPSS area is increased for temporally overlapping pulses due to nonlinear absorption. - Abstract: The dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration) is studied by cross-polarized two-color double-fs-pulse experiments. In order to analyze the relevance of temporally distributed energy deposition in the early stage of LIPSS formation, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used for generating multiple double-pulse sequences at two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm). The inter-pulse delay between the individual cross-polarized pulses of each sequence was systematically varied in the sub-ps range and the resulting LIPSS morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the polarization of the first laser pulse arriving to the surface determines the orientation and the periodicity of the LIPSS. These two-color experiments further confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface for LIPSS formation, particularly by the first laser pulse of each sequence. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSS characteristics (period, orientation)

  2. Development of a laser damage growth mitigation process, based on CO2 laser micro processing, for the Laser MegaJoule fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doualle, Thomas; Gallais, Laurent; Monneret, Serge; Bouillet, Stephane; Bourgeade, Antoine; Ameil, Christel; Lamaignère, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    In the context of high power laser systems, the laser damage resistance of fused silica surfaces at 351 nm in the nanosecond regime is a major concern. Under successive nanosecond laser irradiations, an initiated damage can grow which can make the component unsuitable. The localized CO2 laser processing has demonstrated its ability to mitigate (stopping) laser damage growth. In order to mitigate large damage sites (millimetric), a method based on fast microablation of silica has been proposed by Bass et al. [Bass et al., Proc. SPIE 7842, 784220 (2010)]. This is accomplished by scanning of the CO2 laser spot with a fast galvanometer beam scanner to form a crater with a typical conical shape. The objective of the present work is to develop a similar fast micro-ablation process for application to the Laser MegaJoule optical components. We present in this paper the developed experimental system and process. We describe also the characterization tools used in this study for shape measurements which are critical for the application. Experimental and numerical studies of the downstream intensifications, resulting of cone formation on the fused silica surface, are presented. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations for different crater shape in order to find optimal process conditions to minimize the intensifications in the LMJ configuration. We show the laser damage test experimental conditions and procedures to evaluate the laser damage resistance of the mitigated sites and discuss the efficiency of the process for our application.

  3. Silica sulfuric acid: a reusable solid catalyst for one pot synthesis of densely substituted pyrrole-fused isocoumarins under solvent-free conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Pathak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A convenient and efficient methodology for the synthesis of densely substituted pyrrole-fused isocoumarins, which employs solid-supported silica sulfuric acid (SSA as catalyst, has been developed. When the mixture of ninhydrin adducts of acetylacetone/ethyl acetoacetate and primary amines was heated on the solid surface of SSA under solvent-free conditions, the pyrrole-fused isocoumarins were formed in good yields. This synthetic method has several advantages such as the employment of solvent-free reaction conditions without the use of any toxic reagents and metal catalysts, the ease of product isolation, the use of a recyclable catalyst, the low cost, the easy availability of the starting materials, and the excellent yields of products.

  4. Separation of iron-free and iron-saturated forms of transferrin and lactoferrin via capillary electrophoresis performed in fused-silica and neutral capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Paweł; Śpiewak, Klaudyna; Brindell, Małgorzata; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Stochel, Grażyna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2013-12-20

    A capillary electrophoresis-based method for the cost-effective and high efficient separation of iron-free and iron-saturated forms of two members of transferrin family: transferrin and lactoferrin has been developed. The proposed qualitative method relying on the SDS application allowed us to separate iron-free and iron-saturated forms of these proteins, as well as human serum albumin, used as an internal standard. Owing to the distinct migration times under established conditions, the combination of transferrin and lactoferrin assays within a single analytical procedure was feasible. The performance of the method using a fused-silica capillary has been compared with the results obtained using the same method but performed with the use of a neutral capillary of the same dimensions. Neutral capillary has been used as an alternative, since the comparable resolution has been achieved with a concomitant reduction of the electroosmotic flow. Despite of this fact, the migration of analytes occurred with similar velocity but in opposite order, due to the reverse polarity application. A quantitative method employing fused-silica capillary for iron saturation study has been also developed, to evaluate the iron saturation in commercial preparations of lactoferrin.

  5. Comparison of three modifications of fused-silica capillaries and untreated capillaries for protein profiling of maize extracts by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobozy, Ewa; Sentkowska, Aleksandra; Piskor, Anna

    2014-09-01

    In this work, capillary electrophoresis was applied to protein profiling of fractionated extracts of maize. A comparative study on the application of uncoated fused-silica capillaries and capillaries modified with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, ω-iodoalkylammonium salt and a commercially available neutral capillary covalently coated with polyacrylamide is presented. The coating stability, background electrolyte composition, and separation efficiency were investigated. It was found that for zeins separation, the most stable and efficient was the capillary coated with polyacrylamide. Finally, the usefulness of these methods was studied for the differentiation of zein fraction in transgenic and nontransgenic maize. Zeins extracted from maize standards containing 0 and 5% m/m genetic modification were successfully separated, but slight differences were observed in terms of the zein content. Albumin and globulin fractions were analyzed with the use of unmodified fused-silica capillary with borate buffer pH 9 and the capillary coated with polyacrylamide with phosphate buffer pH 3. In the albumin fraction, additional peaks were found in genetically modified samples.

  6. Mechanical quality factor measurements of monolithically-suspended fused silica test masses of the GEO600 gravitational wave detector

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J. R.; Cagnoli, G.; Crooks, D; Fejer, M. M.; Gossler, S.; Luck, H.; Rowan, Ss; Hough, J.; Danzmann, K.

    2004-01-01

    Internal thermal noise is expected to be a limiting noise source in the most sensitive frequency band of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector. Because thermal noise is directly related to energy dissipation, care has been taken to construct test mass suspensions from low-dissipation materials and to eliminate inter-material rubbing where possible. Recently, the GEO 600 team finished the installation of triple-pendulum suspensions for the optics of the Michelson interferometer. Each of thes...

  7. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  8. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon multiple cross-polarized double-femtosecond-laser-pulse irradiation sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohloff, M.; Das, S. K.; Hoehm, S.; Grunwald, R.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of five Ti:sapphire femtosecond (fs) laser pulse pairs (150 fs, 800 nm) is studied experimentally. A Michelson interferometer is used to generate near-equal-energy double-pulse sequences with a temporal pulse delay from -20 to +20 ps between the cross-polarized individual fs-laser pulses ({approx}0.2 ps resolution). The results of multiple double-pulse irradiation sequences are characterized by means of Scanning Electron and Scanning Force Microscopy. Specifically in the sub-ps delay domain striking differences in the surface morphologies can be observed, indicating the importance of the laser-induced free-electron plasma in the conduction band of the solids for the formation of LIPSS.

  9. Polymer optical fiber fuse

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Although high-transmission-capacity optical fibers are in demand, the problem of the fiber fuse phenomenon needs to be resolved to prevent the destruction of fibers. As polymer optical fibers become more prevalent, clarifying their fuse properties has become important. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a fuse propagation velocity of 21.9 mm/s, which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude slower than that in standard silica fibers. The achieved threshold power density and proportionality constant between the propagation velocity and the power density are respectively 1/186 of and 16.8 times the values for silica fibers. An oscillatory continuous curve instead of periodic voids is formed after the passage of the fuse. An easy fuse termination method is presented herein, along with its potential plasma applications.

  10. Influence of fused Silica and chills incorporation on Corrosion, Thermal and Chemical composition of ASTM A 494 M Grade Nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, G.; Hemanth, Joel

    2016-09-01

    A review of a host of relevant literature on the composites leads to some important observations on the gap that prevails for developing the composite with increased strength to weight ratio, improved thermal properties and reduced corrosion rate with the addition of fused SiO2 dispersoid for the nickel based alloy. In the arena of engineering, metallurgists look for techniques to improve the thermal, corrosion and chemical properties of the materials. In this connection an investigation has been carried out to fabricate and evaluate the corrosion, chemical and thermal properties of chilled composites consisting of nickel matrix with fused silica particles (size 40-150 μm) in the matrix. The main objective of the present research is to obtain fine grain Ni/SiO2 chilled sound composite having very good properties. The dispersoid added ranged from 3 to 12 wt. % in steps of 3%. The subsequent composites cast in molds containing metallic and non-metallic chill blocks (MS, SiC & Cu) were tested for their microstructure, chemical, thermal properties and corrosion behavior.

  11. Temperature-dependent strain and temperature sensitivities of fused silica single mode fiber sensors with pulse pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Genda

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a distributed temperature and strain sensor based on pulse pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis. An uncoated, telecom-grade fused silica single-mode fiber as a distributed sensor was calibrated for its sensitivity coefficients under various strains and temperatures up to 800 °C. The Brillouin frequency of fiber samples changed nonlinearly with temperature and linearly with strain. The temperature sensitivity decreased from 1.113 to 0.830 MHz /°C in the range of 22-800 °C. The strain sensitivity was reduced from 0.054 to 0.042 MHz /μɛ as the temperature increased from 22 to 700 °C and became unstable at higher temperatures due to creep effect. The strain measurement range was reduced from 19 100 to 6000 μɛ in the temperature range of 22-800 °C due to fused silica’s degradation. The calibrated fiber optic sensor demonstrated adequate accuracy and precision for strain and temperature measurements and stable performance in heating-cooling cycles. It was validated in an application setting.

  12. Growth of carbon nanofiber coatings on nickel thin films on fused silica by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition: On the use of titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum as adhesion layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, D.B.; Tiggelaar, R.M.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Coatings of carbon nanofiber (CNF) layers were synthesized on fused silica substrates using a catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition process (C-TCVD). The effects of various adhesion layers–titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum–under the nickel thin film on the attachment of carbon nanofiber

  13. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons I. Determination by gas chromatography with glass and fused silica capillary columns; Analisis de Hidrocarburos aromaticos policiclicos. I. Determinacion por cromatografia de gases con columnas capilares de vidrio de silice fundida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, M. M.; Gonzalez, D.

    1987-07-01

    A study of the analysis by gas chromatography of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons is presented. The separation has been carried out by glass and fused silica capillary column. The limitations and the advantages of the procedure are discussed in terms of separation efficiency, sensitivity and precision. (Author) 17 refs.

  14. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon cross-polarized two-color double-fs-pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration) is studied by cross-polarized two-color double-fs-pulse experiments. In order to analyze the relevance of temporally distributed energy deposition in the early stage of LIPSS formation, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used for generating multiple double-pulse sequences at two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm). The inter-pulse delay between the individual cross-polarized pulses of each sequence was systematically varied in the sub-ps range and the resulting LIPSS morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the polarization of the first laser pulse arriving to the surface determines the orientation and the periodicity of the LIPSS. These two-color experiments further confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface for LIPSS formation, particularly by the first laser pulse of each sequence. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSS characteristics (period, orientation).

  15. Cryogenic surface distortion and hysteresis of a 50 CM diameter fused silica mirror cooled to 77 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey A.; Howard, Steven D.; Augason, Gordon C.; Melugin, Ramsey K.

    1990-11-01

    A 50 cm diameter, lightweight, Amersil TO8E, fused-natural-quartz mirror with a single arch cross section was tested at the NASA/Ames Research Center Cryogenic Optics Test Facility to measure cryogenic distortion and hysteresis. The mirror was cooled to 77 K in four serial tests and the mirror figure was measured with a phase-measuring interferometer. On the basis of the repeatability of room temperature and cryogenic optical measurements, it was determined that the Single Arch Mirror had no measurable hysteresis and displayed repeatable cryogenic distortion. The Cryogenic Optics Test Facility, optical and thermal test methods, test results, and measurement accuracy are described.

  16. Effects of Gas Flow Rates on Fused Silica Glass%气体流量对熔石英玻璃的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄耀松; 郑丽丽; 任祝寅; 张辉

    2015-01-01

    大尺寸熔石英玻璃的折射率均匀性对其光学特性有重要影响,本文对利用SiCl4水解合成熔石英玻璃的过程开展数值模拟研究,揭示 H2和 O2当量比以及载料气与 SiCl4质量比对温度分布和组分浓度分布的影响,及其对熔石英玻璃折射率均匀性潜在的影响.研究结果表明,在径向方向上,火焰温度分布呈现“高-低-高”的 M 型分布规律;增大 H2/O2当量比,会使轴向火焰预热区变短,当量比为1.0时,会产生一个比较长的火焰射流长度及宽的径向高温区,但是羟基浓度变化比较大,导致熔石英玻璃折射率不均匀性增加;采用小的当量比对提高玻璃折射率均匀性有一定的作用,因为在小的当量比下玻璃体沉积面上的温度梯度以及羟基浓度梯度较小,但是同时会降低火焰整体温度以及 SiO2生成量;另外,增加载料气对 SiCl4的质量比会降低玻璃体沉积面的温度变化,有利于改善折射率均匀性,但是与此同时,玻璃体沉积面上羟基浓度梯度增加了,对熔石英玻璃的折射率均匀性会产生不良影响.%The refractive index homogeneity of large-sized fused silica glass has great impact on its optical character-istics.In this paper,a numerical study on synthesis of fused silica glass by SiCl4 hydrolysis deposition is per-formed.The effects of the equivalence ratio of H2 to O2 and the mass ratio of carrier gas to SiCl4 on temperature pro-file and species concentration distributions are investigated,together with their potential impact on the homogeneity of refractive index of large-sized fused silica glass.It is found that the temperature profile in radial direction exhibits a high-low-high M-shape profile,and the increase of equivalence ratio of H2 to O2 results in a shorter axial preheating region.A long flame length and a broad high-temperature region can be obtained when the equivalence ratio is 1.0, but the

  17. Raman spectroscopic measurements of CO2 density: Experimental calibration with high-pressure optical cell (HPOC) and fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) with application to fluid inclusion observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Chou, I.-Ming; Hu, W.; Burruss, R.C.; Sun, Q.; Song, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method for the determination of CO2 densities in fluid inclusions, especially for those with small size and/or low fluid density. The relationship between CO2 Fermi diad split (??, cm-1) and CO2 density (??, g/cm3) has been documented by several previous studies. However, significant discrepancies exist among these studies mainly because of inconsistent calibration procedures and lack of measurements for CO2 fluids having densities between 0.21 and 0.75g/cm3, where liquid and vapor phases coexist near room temperature.In this study, a high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsules were used to prepare pure CO2 samples with densities between 0.0472 and 1.0060g/cm3. The measured CO2 Fermi diad splits were calibrated with two well established Raman bands of benzonitrile at 1192.6 and 1598.9cm-1. The relationship between the CO2 Fermi diad split and density can be represented by: ??=47513.64243-1374.824414????+13.25586152????2-0.04258891551????3 (r2=0.99835, ??=0.0253g/cm3), and this relationship was tested by synthetic fluid inclusions and natural CO2-rich fluid inclusions. The effects of temperature and the presence of H2O and CH4 on this relationship were also examined. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Bi-stage time evolution of nano-morphology on inductively coupled plasma etched fused silica surface caused by surface morphological transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lijuan; Bai, Yang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhengkun; Qiu, Keqiang; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Chuanchao; Yang, Ke; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Yilan; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the surface nano-roughness during the inductively coupled plasma etching of fused silica, and discover a novel bi-stage time evolution of surface nano-morphology. At the beginning, the rms roughness, correlation length and nano-mound dimensions increase linearly and rapidly with etching time. At the second stage, the roughening process slows down dramatically. The switch of evolution stage synchronizes with the morphological change from dual-scale roughness comprising long wavelength underlying surface and superimposed nano-mounds to one scale of nano-mounds. A theoretical model based on surface morphological change is proposed. The key idea is that at the beginning, etched surface is dual-scale, and both larger deposition rate of etch inhibitors and better plasma etching resistance at the surface peaks than surface valleys contribute to the roughness development. After surface morphology transforming into one-scale, the difference of plasma resistance between surface peaks and valleys vanishes, thus the roughening process slows down.

  19. Optical Evaluation of Digital Micromirror Devices (DMDs) with UV-Grade Fused Silica, Sapphire, and Magnesium Fluoride Windows and Longterm Reflectance of Bare Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs) are commercial micro-electromechanical systems, consisting of millions of mirrors which can be individually addressed and tilted into one of two states (+/-12deg). These devices were developed to create binary patterns in video projectors, in the visible range. Commercially available DMDs are hermetically sealed and extremely reliable. Recently, DMDs have been identified as an alternative to microshutter arrays for space-based multi-object spectrometers (MOS). Specifically, the MOS at the heart of the proposed Galactic Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) uses the DMD as a reprogrammable slit mask. Unfortunately, the protective borosilicate windows limit the use of DMDs in the UV and IR regimes, where the glass has insufficient throughput. In this work, we present our efforts to replace standard DMD windows with custom windows made from UV-grade fused silica, low-absorption optical sapphire (LAOS) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). We present transmission measurements of the antireflection coated windows and the reflectance of bare (window removed) DMDs. Furthermore, we investigated the long-term stability of the DMD reflectance and experiments for coating DMD active area with a layer of pure aluminum (Al) to boost reflectance performance in the UV spectral range (200-400 nm).

  20. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon multiple parallel polarized double-femtosecond-laser-pulse irradiation sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Arkadi, E-mail: rosenfeld@mbi-berlin.de [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Rohloff, Marcus; Hoehm, Sandra [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, Joerg [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Bonse, Joern, E-mail: joern.bonse@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPSS formation studied for double-fs-pulses (160 fs, 800 nm) of different fluences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Close to the damage threshold predominantly HSFL are observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HSFL period remains almost constant {approx}375 nm (delay independent). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high fluences and for short delays a transient metallic state is created (LSFL regime). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transition of the LSFL period from 750 to 530 nm is observed in the sub-ps delay range. - Abstract: The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences of parallel polarized Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulse pairs (160 fs pulse duration, 800 nm central wavelength) was studied experimentally. For that purpose, a Michelson interferometer was used to generate near-equal-energy double-pulse sequences allowing the temporal pulse delay between the parallel-polarized individual fs-laser pulses to be varied between 0 and 40 ps with {approx}0.2 ps temporal resolution. The surface morphologies of the irradiated surface areas were characterized by means of scanning electron and scanning force microscopy. In the sub-ps delay range a strong decrease of the LIPSS periods and the ablation crater depths with the double-pulse delay was observed indicating the importance of the laser-induced free-electron plasma in the conduction band of the solids for the formation of LIPSS.

  1. Quadruple suspension design for Advanced LIGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, N A; Cagnoli, G; Crooks, D R M; Elliffe, E; Grant, A; Heptonstall, A; Hough, J; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Plissi, M V; Rowan, S; Sneddon, P H; Strain, K A; Torrie, C I; Ward, H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Faller, J E [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Fritschel, P [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany St, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gossler, S [Universitat Hannover, Institut fuer Atom und Molekuelphysik, Abteilung Spektroskopie, D30167, Hannover (Germany); Lueck, H [Universitat Hannover, Institut fuer Atom und Molekuelphysik, Abteilung Spektroskopie, D30167, Hannover (Germany); Mittleman, R [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany St, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Shoemaker, D H [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany St, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Willems, P [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 18-34, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2002-08-07

    In this paper, we describe the conceptual design for the suspension system for the test masses for Advanced LIGO, the planned upgrade to LIGO, the US laser interferometric gravitational-wave observatory. The design is based on the triple pendulum design developed for GEO 600 - the German/UK interferometric gravitational wave detector. The GEO design incorporates fused silica fibres of circular cross-section attached to the fused silica mirror (test mass) in the lowest pendulum stage, in order to minimize the thermal noise from the pendulum modes. The damping of the low-frequency modes of the triple pendulum is achieved by using co-located sensors and actuators at the highest mass of the triple pendulum. Another feature of the design is that global control forces acting on the mirrors, used to maintain the output of the interferometer on a dark fringe, are applied via a triple reaction pendulum, so that these forces can be implemented via a seismically isolated platform. These techniques have been extended to meet the more stringent noise levels planned for in Advanced LIGO. In particular, the Advanced LIGO baseline design requires a quadruple pendulum with a final stage consisting of a 40 kg sapphire mirror, suspended on fused silica ribbons or fibres. The design is chosen to aim to reach a target noise contribution from the suspension corresponding to a displacement sensitivity of 10{sup -19} m Hz{sup -1/2} at 10 Hz at each of the test masses.

  2. Rheological responses of fumed silica suspensions under steady and oscillatory shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Rheological experiments under steady and oscillatory shear were conducted for fumed silica suspen- sions in polyethylene glycol. Under steady shear the shear-thinning and thickening response were exhibited and the flow exponent N was determined. With the increase of concentration the flow exponent N showed a rapid increase, and it increased dramatically when the discontinuous shear-thickening took place. Oscillatory shear experiments were conducted at constant frequency and constant amplitude strain, respectively. The shear-thinning and the discontinuous shear-thickening behavior were observed under different constant frequencies from 10 to 80 rad/s. The correlation between complex modulus (G*) and sweep frequency (ω) was illuminated at γ =750%. It was found that the correlation between G* and ω could be fitted by equation: G*∝ωn. The indexes in shear-thinning region and shear-thickening were determined. The indexes were similar to some extent at shear-thinning region and increased dramati- cally to a much higher value when the shear-thickening occurred,especially at higher weight fractions. The behaviors can be qualitatively explained as follows: the shear-thinning owes to decrease of viscos- ity, which results from disruption of the aggregates; the cluster theory attributes the shear-thickening to the formation of metastable, flow induced clusters, which block the system.

  3. Fused silica capillaries with two segments of different internal diameters and inner surface roughnesses prepared by etching with supercritical water and used for volume coupling electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horká, Marie; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal; Šlais, Karel

    2017-02-22

    In this work, single-piece fused silica capillaries with two different internal diameter segments featuring different inner surface roughness were prepared by new etching technology with supercritical water and used for volume coupling electrophoresis. The concept of separation and online pre-concentration of analytes in high conductivity matrix is based on the online large-volume sample pre-concentration by the combination of transient isotachophoretic stacking and sweeping of charged proteins in micellar electrokinetic chromatography using non-ionogenic surfactant. The modified surface roughness step helped to the significant narrowing of the zones of examined analytes. The sweeping and separating steps were accomplished simultaneously by the use of phosphate buffer (pH 7) containing ethanol, non-ionogenic surfactant Brij 35, and polyethylene glycol (PEG 10000) after sample injection. Sample solution of a large volume (maximum 3.7 μL) dissolved in physiological saline solution was injected into the wider end of capillary with inlet inner diameter from 150, 185 or 218 μm. The calibration plots were linear (R(2) ∼ 0.9993) over a 0.060-1 μg/mL range for the proteins used, albumin and cytochrome c. The peak area RSDs from at least 20 independent measuremens were below 3.2%. This online pre-concentration technique produced a more than 196-fold increase in sensitivity, and it can be applied for detection of, e.g. the presence of albumin in urine (0.060 μg/mL).

  4. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F. (UIUC)

    2014-09-24

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  5. 8-aminoquinoline functionalized silica nanoparticles: a fluorescent nanosensor for detection of divalent zinc in aqueous and in yeast cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Shiva K; Pal, Parul; Aston, D Eric; Bitterwolf, Thomas E; Branen, A Larry

    2011-05-01

    Zinc is one of the most important transition metal of physiological importance, existing primarily as a divalent cation. A number of sensors have been developed for Zn(II) detection. Here, we present a novel fluorescent nanosensor for Zn(II) detection using a derivative of 8-aminoquinoline (N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(3 (triethoxysilyl)propylamino)acetamide (QTEPA) grafted on silica nanoparticles (SiNPs). These functionalized SiNPs were used to demonstrate specific detection of Zn(II) in tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.22), in yeast cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suspension, and in tap water. The silane QTEPA, SiNPs and final product were characterized using solution and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric techniques, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nanosensor shows almost 2.8-fold fluorescence emission enhancement and about 55 nm red-shift upon excitation with 330 ± 5 nm wavelength in presence of 1 μM Zn(II) ions in tris-HCl (pH 7.22). The presence of other metal ions has no observable effect on the sensitivity and selectivity of nanosensor. This sensor selectively detects Zn(II) ions with submicromolar detection to a limit of 0.1 μM. The sensor shows good applicability in the determination of Zn(II) in tris-HCl buffer and yeast cell environment. Further, it shows enhancement in fluorescence intensity in tap water samples.

  6. Fused Zirconia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    ScopeThis standard specifies the terms,definitions,classification,brands,technical requirements,test methods,inspection rules,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of fused zirconia.This standard is applicable to monoclinic fused zirconia and partially stabilized fused zirconia.

  7. The analysis of the effect of homogeneous mechanical stress on the acoustic wave propagation in the "La3Ga5SiO14/fused silica" piezoelectric layered structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, S I; Zolotova, O P; Sorokin, B P; Turchin, P P

    2015-01-01

    The results of computer simulation taking into account the linear and nonlinear material constants have been presented. Study of the influence of external uniaxial mechanical stress on the dispersive characteristics of elastic waves in piezoelectric structures as "La3Ga5SiO14/fused silica" has been executed. The comparison of elastic wave velocity changes under the influence of an uniaxial stress while a full set of nonlinear material constants of crystalline layer+geometric nonlinearity, or only geometric nonlinearity of the layer induced by the static deformation of a substrate, has been fulfilled.

  8. Laser welding of fused silica glass with sapphire using a non- stoichiometric, fresnoitic Ba2TiSi2O8·3 SiO2 thin film as an absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablos-Martín, A.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Höche, Th.

    2017-07-01

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials is challenging, due to their difference in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE). In this work, fused silica-to-sapphire joints were achieved by employment of a ns laser focused in the intermediate Si-enriched fresnoitic glass thin film sealant. The microstructure of the bonded interphase was analyzed down to the nanometer scale and related to the laser parameters used. The crystallization of fresnoite in the glass sealant upon laser process leads to an intense blue emission intensity under UV excitation. This crystallization is favored in the interphase with the silica glass substrate, rather than in the border with the sapphire. The formation of SiO2 particles was confirmed, as well. The bond quality was evaluated by scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The substrates remain bonded even after heat treatment at 100 °C for 30 min, despite the large CTE difference between both substrates.

  9. Rapid and sensitive suspension array for multiplex detection of organophosphorus pesticides and carbamate pesticides based on silica-hydrogel hybrid microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Mu, Zhongde; Shangguan, Fengqi; Liu, Ran; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong

    2014-05-30

    A technique for multiplex detection of organophosphorus pesticides and carbamate pesticides has been developed using a suspension array based on silica-hydrogel hybrid microbeads (SHHMs). The main advantage of SHHMs, which consist of both silica and hydrogel materials, is that they not only could be distinguished by their characteristic reflection peak originating from the stop-band of the photonic crystal but also have low non-specific adsorption of proteins. Using fluorescent immunoassay, the LODs for fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos-methyl, fenthion, carbaryl and metolcarb were measured to be 0.02ng/mL, 0.012ng/mL, 0.04ng/mL, 0.05ng/mL and 0.1ng/mL, respectively, all of which are much lower than the maximum residue limits, as reported in the European Union pesticides database. All the determination coefficients for these five pesticides were greater than 0.99, demonstrating excellent correlations. The suspension array was specific and had no significant cross-reactivity with other chemicals. The results for the detection of pesticide residues collected from agricultural samples using this method agree well with those from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Our results showed that this simple method is suitable for simultaneous detection of these five pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables.

  10. 不同形态石英玻璃的析晶动力学研究%Crystallization kinetics of different morphologies of fused silica glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温广武; 雷廷权; 周玉

    2001-01-01

    应用XRD技术对三种形态(块状,粉末和纤维)石英玻璃在1 200~1 500℃范围内的等温析晶动力学过程进行了实验研究.实验结果表明,不同形态石英玻璃的析晶产物都是低温方石英,但形态不同的石英玻璃的析晶开始温度,同一温度下的析晶量及析晶量随温度的变化关系是不同的.三种形态石英玻璃析晶动力学可较好地用Avrami方程表示,其中块状,粉末和纤维的平均n值分别为1.65,1.68和1.92,活化能分别为495,445和430 kJ/mo1.析晶中的成核为表面成核机制.晶体生长受扩散和重排双重控制,随比表面和杂质含量的增大(块状→粉末→纤维),控制因素中扩散的比例降低,而重排的比例上升,因而n值上升而活化能下降,析晶倾向增大.%Kinetics of crystallization process of three forms (bulk, powder and fiber) of fused silica has been inves-tigated by means of XRD in the range of 1 200~1500 ℃. The results show that, the crystalline phases precipitatedare cristobalite in all specimens, but there are some difference in the starting temperature, degree of crystallinityand the variation of crystallinity with temperature among them. The kinetics of crystallization can be formulated withAvrami equation with n values of 1.65,1.68 and 1.92, and the activation energy of 495,445 and 430 kJ/mol forbulk, powder and fiber specimens, respectively. The nucleation can be thought of the surface mechanism and thecrystal growth is controlled by both diffusion and re-arrangement of atoms. With increasing specific area and impu-rity, the weight of the diffusion factor is decreased whereas that of the re-arrangement is increased, and thus the nvalue increases and the activation energy decreases. Therefore, the tendency to crystallization increases.

  11. 单个脉冲作用下熔融石英的温度和热应力研究%Research on the temperature and thermal stress of fused silica irradiated by a laser pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世雄; 张正平; 秦水介; 陈德良

    2016-01-01

    The models of temperature and thermal stress distribution in optical material irradiated by a laser pulse are researched theoretically.Based on the pulse characteristics,the temperature distribution models for long pulse and short pulse are built respectively,and on this basis,thermal stress distribution model is further set up.Taking fused silica as an example,the temperature and thermal stress distribution are calculated and analyzed.The results indicate that the temperature distribution profiles at the end of the pulse are same for long pulse and short pulse model.The theoretical analysis shows that the temperature near the spot center reaches the melting point or vapor point of fused silica,which leads to a melt damage or evaporation damage.The temperature rise in the focal areas is nonuniform, which leads to thermal stress.The thermal stress is greater than the fracture strength of sample,which induces the damage,such as thermal cracks.%理论研究单个激光脉冲作用光学材料的温度和热应力分布模型,根据脉冲特征,分别建立适用于短脉冲和长脉冲的温度分布模型;进一步建立单个脉冲作用下的热应力模型。以熔融石英为例数值计算和分析了单个脉冲作用下的温度和热应力分布。研究结果表明,如果只求解单脉冲结束时的温度分布,长脉冲和短脉冲模型计算结果一致。单个激光脉冲辐照熔融石英,材料温度升高,如果温度达到材料融化或汽化温度,将导致材料的熔融汽化破坏,另一方面,在焦点区域温升不均匀,将导致热应力产生,如果热应力达到材料的力学破坏阈值,将诱导材料的热应力损伤。

  12. Thermal stress simulation of laser induced damage of fused silica by contamination on the surface%表面污染物诱导熔石英损伤的热力学数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗心向; 袁晓东; 程晓锋; 贺少勃; 郑万国

    2011-01-01

    为了研究高功率固体激光装置内污染诱导光学元件损伤问题,基于有限元数值方法,结合污染物诱导熔石英损伤机理,给出了熔石英样片在高功率脉冲激光辐照下的温度场和应力场分布.结果表明,激光脉冲辐照过程中主要以污染物的温度升高为主,最高至2800K,而样片温升不大,仅为7K;在激光脉冲辐照后100μs的时间内,样片表面中心快速升温至2200K,而边缘处仅为700K,在较短的距离内温度变化剧烈,由此产生的热应力导致表面发生损伤;损伤区域中心表现为压应力,边缘为拉应力,最大可达30.73MPa.测试了污染物诱导样片损伤斑的微观显微形貌,实验结果和理论计算结果符合较好.%In order to study the laser-induced damage mechanism in inertial confinement fusion system, temperature and thermal stress distributions in the fused silica, heated by repetition frequency laser, were given by means of finite element methods. The simulated results indicate the temperature of the contaminations rise to 2800K during the pulse laser irradiation, but the fused silica' s temperature mainly rise from 300K to 2200K in 100μs after irradiation, and damage induced by the thermal stress occurs. The strong compressive in the damage region is about 30. 73MPa. The highest stress outside the damage region is deviatoric hoop stress. The damage morphologies were tested by means of optical microscopy. The simulated outcomes correspond to the experiment result.

  13. Residual stress calculation method for fused silica polishing surface%熔石英元件抛光加工表面残余应力的计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪祥; 侯晶; 严志龙; 朱本温; 陈贤华

    2015-01-01

    Fused silica glass is non⁃crystalline material, the traditional detection methods have complicated steps and low measurement accuracy, residual stresses are often unable to direct quantitative detection. A new residual stress calculation method for fused silica polishing surface was proposed based on brittle solid fracture mechanics, in which a series of nano⁃indentation experiments were conducted by a sharp indenter, and the sensitive parameters were extracted during indentation process, the experimental data were linear fit and the line slopes were determined, so residual stress was often calculated indirectly by measuring the other physical parameters change caused by residual stress. Comparative analysis showed that the calculation results had in good consistency with the test results obtained by stress birefringence analyzer, so the correctness of the residual stress calculation method was verified.%为解决传统检测方法无法直接定量检测非晶体熔石英玻璃表面残余应力的问题,基于脆性固体断裂力学理论,推导残余应力的理论计算公式,提出光学元件抛光加工表面残余应力计算新方法。采用尖锐压头进行纳米印压实验,提取压痕过程中对残余应力敏感的参数,并对实验数据进行线性拟合,确定拟合线的斜率,通过测量残余应力引起其他物理参数的变化计算残余应力。对比分析结果表明,计算得到残余应力值与应力双折射仪检测得到的数据基本吻合,验证了提出残余应力计算方法的正确性。

  14. Boron doped Si rich oxide/SiO{sub 2} and silicon rich nitride/SiN{sub x} bilayers on molybdenum-fused silica substrates for vertically structured Si quantum dot solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ziyun, E-mail: z.lin@unsw.edu.au; Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Zhang, Tian; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Yang, Terry Chien-Jen; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Building H6, Tyree Energy Technologies Building, Kensington, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

    2015-07-28

    Vertically structured Si quantum dots (QDs) solar cells with molybdenum (Mo) interlayer on quartz substrates would overcome current crowding effects found in mesa-structured cells. This study investigates the compatibility between boron (B) doped Si QDs bilayers and Mo-fused silica substrate. Both Si/SiO{sub 2} and Si/SiN{sub x} based QDs bilayers were studied. The material compatibility under high temperature treatment was assessed by examining Si crystallinity, microstress, thin film adhesion, and Mo oxidation. It was observed that the presence of Mo interlayer enhanced the Si QDs size confinement, crystalline fraction, and QDs size uniformity. The use of B doping was preferred compared to phosphine (PH{sub 3}) doping studied previously in terms of better surface and interface properties by reducing oxidized spots on the film. Though crack formation due to thermal mismatch after annealing remained, methods to overcome this problem were proposed in this paper. Schematic diagram to fabricate full vertical structured Si QDs solar cells was also suggested.

  15. Quadruple suspension design for Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, N A; Crooks, D R M; Elliffe, E; Faller, J E; Fritschel, P; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Heptonstall, A; Hough, J; Lück, H B; Mittleman, R; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Plissi, M V; Rowan, S; Shoemaker, D H; Sneddon, P H; Strain, K A; Torrie, C I; Ward, H; Willems, P

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the conceptual design for the suspension system for the test masses for Advanced LIGO, the planned upgrade to LIGO, the US laser interferometric gravitational-wave observatory. The design is based on the triple pendulum design developed for GEO 600 - the German/UK interferometric gravitational wave detector. The GEO design incorporates fused silica fibres of circular cross-section attached to the fused silica mirror (test mass) in the lowest pendulum stage, in order to minimize the thermal noise from the pendulum modes. The damping of the low-frequency modes of the triple pendulum is achieved by using co-located sensors and actuators at the highest mass of the triple pendulum. Another feature of the design is that global control forces acting on the mirrors, used to maintain the output of the interferometer on a dark fringe, are applied via a triple reaction pendulum, so that these forces can be implemented via a seismically isolated platform. These techniques have been extended to ...

  16. Surface crystallization of amorphous fused silica during electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching%非晶熔石英表面等离子体刻蚀过程中的表面晶化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锋; 吴卫东; 蒋晓东; 唐永建

    2012-01-01

    本工作采用电子回旋共振(ECR)低压等离子体刻蚀技术,刻蚀非晶熔石英表面.Ar/CF_4为反应气体刻蚀后再经O等离子体钝化,非晶熔石英表面出现晶化现象.晶化层约几百纳米厚.Ar/CF_4在ECR的电磁场作用下产生F离子与C离子,F离子使熔石英表面的Si-O共价键断裂,并释放出O离子.C离了与O离子迅速键合生成CO_2,而被断键的Si原子与四个F原子键合生成气态SiF4.熔石英原始表面被去除的同时,在新的表面留下大量不饱和Si原子.不饱和Si原子在高温条件下被O等离子钝化,形成结晶态α方石英.%After low pressure fluorine plasma ecthing and oxygen ion passivation,a crystallized layer composed of SiO_2 nano-crystal grains is observed in an amorphous fused silica surface.The depth of crystallized layer is at least several hundreds nanometers.Fluorine and carbon ion are generated from Ar/CF_4 by the method of electron cyclotron resonance(ECR).F ion breaks Si-O band of initial silica surface layer and releases O ion.Carbon ion combines with oxygen ion,and turns into CO_2,and SiF_4 is generated from fluorine and silicon.After initial surface layer is removed,unsaturated Si atom remains.Si dangling bond recombines with new O ion and then creates crystallizedα-cristobalite nano-crystal grains under a high temperature.

  17. 航天器舷窗玻璃超高速撞击损伤与M/OD撞击风险评估%Hypervelocity impact damage of fused silica glass and M/OD impact risk assessment of spacecraft windshield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞贺伟; 龚自正; 张文兵; 杨继运; 童靖宇

    2007-01-01

    用北京卫星环境工程研究所的18mm口径二级轻气炮(TLGG)和20 J激光驱动微小飞片装置(LDFF-20)对用作航天器舷窗玻璃的熔融石英玻璃的超高速撞击损伤特性进行了实验研究和分析.其中,TLGG发射的球形铝弹丸直径分别为1 mm和3 mm,速度2~6.5 km/s;LDFF-20发射的圆柱形飞片厚度7 μm,直径1 mm,速度1~8.3 km/s.撞击结果为:对12 mm厚的熔融石英玻璃,直径为3mm的弹丸甚至在2.8 km/s的低速下就将其穿透,而直径为1 mm的弹丸在6.5km/s的高速下没有穿透,这说明弹丸直径对撞击损伤特性有很强的影响;LDFF-20发射的微小飞片的撞击仅在玻璃表面产生很浅的凹坑,没有裂纹产生,但微小飞片的累积撞击损伤明显地降低了玻璃的透光性.实验初步获得了侵彻深度PC、侵彻直径D1与弹丸撞击速度Vp、弹丸质量Mp之间的经验关系.依据实验结果和目前的微流星体/空间碎片(M/OD)环境工程模型,建议对于高度为400 km、轨道倾角42°、寿命为3年的典型航天器,其舷窗玻璃的临界安全(非穿透)厚度至少为12mm.%Hypervelocity impact experiments were conducted on fused silica glass to obtain the damage characteristics and to build a damage model using Ly12 aluminum spheres of diameters 1 mm and 3 mm launched by the two-stage-light-gas gun of up to 6.5 km/s, and the small aluminum flyer of 1 mm in diameter and 7 μm in thickness launched by a laser-driven flyer facility of up to 8.3 km/s, developed by Beijing Institute of Spacecraft Environment (BISEE). The empirical damage equations were obtained to approximately predict the penetration depth (PC) and its diameter (D1) as a function of impact parameters (projectile velocityVp, mass Mp). For the Ly12 A1 projectile of 3 mm diameter sphere, the glass was perforated thoroughly even at a low impact velocity of 2.80 km/s. This means that the projectile diameter plays a major role with respect to the impact damage. The damage

  18. 1.2W laser amplification at 1427nm on the 4Fsub>3/2sub> to 4Isub>13/2sub> spectral line in an Nd3+ doped fused silica optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jay W; Pax, Paul H; Allen, Graham S; Drachenberg, Derrek R; Khitrov, Victor V; Schenkel, Nick; Messerly, Michael J

    2016-12-12

    A 9.3dB improvement in optical gain and a 100x improvement in total optical power over prior published experimental results from the 4Fsub>3/2sub> to 4Isub>13/2sub> transition in an Nd3+ doped fused silica optical fiber is demonstrated. This is enabled via an optical fiber waveguide design that creates high spectral attenuation in the 1050-1120nm-wavelength range, a continuous spectral filter for the primary 4Fsub>3/2sub> to 4Isub>11/2sub> optical transition. A maximum output power at 1427nm of 1.2W was attained for 43mW coupled seed laser power and 22.2W of coupled pump diode laser power at 880nm a net optical gain of 14.5dB. Reducing the coupled seed laser power to 2.5mW enabled the system to attain 19.3dB of gain for 16.5W of coupled pump power. Four issues limited results; non-optimal seed laser wavelength, amplified spontaneous emission on the 4Fsub>3/2sub> to 4Isub>9/2sub> optical transition, low absorption of pump light from the cladding and high spectral attenuation in the 1350-1450nm range. Future fibers that mitigate these issues should lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of the laser amplifier, though the shorter wavelength region of the transition from 1310nm to >1350nm is still expected to be limited by excited state absorption.

  19. The intrinsic mechanical loss factor of hydroxy-catalysis bonds for use in the mirror suspensions of gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sneddon, P H [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bull, S [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, University of Newcastle, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Cagnoli, G [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Crooks, D R M [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Elliffe, E J [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Faller, J E [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Fejer, M M [Edward L Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4088 (United States); Hough, J [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Rowan, S [Institute for Gravitational Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-07

    This paper describes investigations into the mechanical losses of bonds created by hydroxy-catalysis bonding. Evaluation of the magnitude of such losses is important for determining thermal noise levels in bonded suspensions for gravitational wave detectors. Three samples were investigated with bonds of varying geometries and surface areas. In two cases, the bonds were between two pieces of fused silica, whilst in the third a fused silica piece was attached to a sapphire substrate. In each case sodium silicate solution was used as the bonding agent. The thickness and Young's modulus of the bond material were evaluated enabling values for the intrinsic mechanical loss factor of the bonding material to be obtained.

  20. Pressure evolution during HBC fuse operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochette, D; Bussiere, W [Laboratoire Arc Electrique et Plasmas Thermiques (LAEPT)-CNRS UMR 6069, Universite Blaise Pascal, 24 Avenue des Landais, F 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the influence of the silica sand grains on pressure during the energy release in a high breaking capacity (HBC) fuse. During the HBC fuse operation, the pressure evolution is the result of two opposite trends: the pressure increase due to the interaction of the silica plasma with the surrounding granular sand, and the pressure decrease due to the propagation of the pressure waves toward the porous medium. Due to the complex phenomena occurring during the current extinction by a fuse, two kinds of pressure are distinguished: the pressure inside the silica plasma and the pressure in the silica sand. From the simulations we show that the Forchheimer flow resistance is stronger than the Darcy flow resistance once the electric power is over 30% of the maximum value. A comparison of the calculated and measured pressures is made at various positions from the fuse element axis. Two different pressures are obtained experimentally: the pressure P{sub SAND} exerted on the sand grains due to the plasma pressure, and the pressure P{sub GAS} of the gas flowing through the interstices of the silica sand. We show that the experimental and calculated trends are similar and they both depend on the electric power level and the silica sand mean granulometry. The maximum pressures are observed at the same time as the maximum electric power levels. The ratio P{sub SAND}/P{sub GAS} is about 8 with P{sub GAS} values not exceeding 1.5 x 10{sup 5} Pa.

  1. Silica gel stimulates the hydrolysis of lecithin by phospholipase A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goerke, J.; Gier, J. de; Bonsen, P.P.M.

    1971-01-01

    1. 1. Silica gel stimulates the hydrolysis of aqueous lecithin suspensions by phospholipase A. The activation is slightly greater than that caused by ether and takes place equally well in bulk suspensions of silica gel or on thin-layer Chromatographic plates prepared with silica. 2. 2. The hydrolys

  2. Sealed silica pressure ampoules for crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of vitreous silica and the mechanics of thick walled pressure vessels are reviewed with regard to the construction of sealed silica crucibles such as are used in the growth of mercury-cadmium telluride crystals. Data from destructive rupture tests are reported, failure modes discussed, and recommendations for design given. Ordinary commercial clear vitreous silica from flame fused quartz can withstand a surface stress of 20 MPa or more in this application.

  3. Nucleation and crystal growth in a suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres with bi-modal size distribution studied by time-resolved ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Menke, Dirk; Forthaus, Martin; Subatzus, Sebastian; Franke, Markus; Schöpe, Hans-Joachim; Palberg, Thomas; Perlich, Jan; Herlach, Dieter

    2014-12-07

    A suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres exhibiting a bi-modal size distribution of particles, thereby mimicking a binary mixture, was studied using time-resolved ultra-small-angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (USAXS). The sample, consisting of particles of diameters d(A) = (104.7 ± 9.0) nm and d(B) = (88.1 ± 7.8) nm (d(A)/d(B) ≈ 1.2), and with an estimated composition A(0.6(1))B(0.4(1)), was studied with respect to its phase behaviour in dependance of particle number density and interaction, of which the latter was modulated by varying amounts of added base (NaOH). Moreover, its short-range order in the fluid state and its eventual solidification into a long-range ordered colloidal crystal were observed in situ, allowing the measurement of the associated kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth. Key parameters of the nucleation kinetics such as crystallinity, crystallite number density, and nucleation rate density were extracted from the time-resolved scattering curves. By this means an estimate on the interfacial energy for the interface between the icosahedral short-range ordered fluid and a body-centered cubic colloidal crystal was obtained, comparable to previously determined values for single-component colloidal systems.

  4. Functional Use Database (FUse)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are five different files for this dataset: 1. A dataset listing the reported functional uses of chemicals (FUse) 2. All 729 ToxPrint descriptors obtained from...

  5. Experimental study and simulation of fused silica damage initiation by laser pulse irradiation; Etude experimentale et modelisation de l'initiation de l'endommagement de la silice sous irradiation laser impulsionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneau, F.; Combis, J.L.; Vierne, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee, 91 (France)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    In order to resolve problems concerning the understanding and the control of laser-induced damage of silica optical elements, a collaboration between the CEA (CESTA/DLP, DIF/DPTA, and Grenoble/LETI) and different university laboratories has been undertaken. Ultra-pure silica 'model' samples, seeded with gold nano-particles whose diameter does not exceed 5 nm, were made at the LASIM in Lyon. The aim in using these samples is to observe the mechanism of damage initiation that can be attributed to inclusions of nano-metric site. This report presents the different steps encountered during this study: making the samples, the laser-induced damage tests performed at the CESTA, and the 'Nomarski' and 'atomic force' microscope observations of this damage carried out at the Fresnel Institute in Marseille. These samples were also used for a series of experiments using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer at ANL near Chicago. This installation is of great interest because it enables us to combine the laser irradiation of the sample with the chemical identification of material ejected by the sample. A precise evaluation of the quantity of gold atoms emitted during irradiation can thus be obtained from the experimental results. The experimental data is then interpreted, and in particular, compared to, numerical simulations obtained with the DELPOR program. A very encouraging result is the existence of a pre-damage phase at very low fluences that is not detectable by classical optical devices. The experimental means developed for such 'model' samples should be transposable to the analysis of industrial glasses. (authors)

  6. 一种新型人工“流体包裹体”:融合二氧化硅毛细管技术%A new synthetic "fluid inclusion": The technique of optical fused silica capillary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪培; 丁俊英; I-Ming Chou; Jean Dubessy

    2011-01-01

    利用融合二氧化硅毛细管技术制作了纯H2O体系、纯CO2体系、H2O-NaCl体系和H2O-CO2体系的人工包裹体样品,并对样品进行了显微测温和激光拉曼光谱测试工作。实验结果显示毛细管样品中的流体成分具有代表性,而且常规的流体包裹体显微测温和显微激光拉曼光谱分析技术完全适于毛细管样品的测试。对样品的显微测温和拉曼光谱研究结果表明毛细管样品能够作为标样,标定流体包裹体显微测温过程中的流体相变以及流体包裹体拉曼光谱,而且能够发展和建立拉曼光谱分析流体包裹体成分的方法。此次工作表明,融合二氧化硅毛细管技术为流体包裹体研究提供了一种新的手段,在包裹体研究领域有着广阔的应用前景。%Synthetic fluid inclusions in the systems of pure H2O,of pure CO2,of H2O-NaCl and of H2O-CO2 were made using the technique of optical fused silica capillary.Those capillary samples were analyzed by micro-thermometry and micro-spectroscopy.The experiment shows that the fluids in silica capillary are the representative of loading fluids,and the micro-thermometry and micro-spectroscopy,the two common approaches for measuring the fluid inclusion,are suitable to be applied to the analysis of capillary samples.The micro-thermometric and micro-spectroscopic results reveal that the technique of silica capillary gives us a better means to understand the phase equilibria during the progress of micro-thermometry and to characterize the spectra of inclusion fluids and to develop the methods of analyzing the fluid inclusion.This study demonstrates that the technique of optical fused silica capillary provides a new means for the study of fluid inclusion,which may be widely applied to the fluid inclusion study.

  7. Aspects of suspension design for the development of advanced gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul

    The Institute for Gravitational Research in the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, Golm and the University of Cardiff has been actively involved in the research for the development of instruments and data analysis techniques to detect gravitational waves. This includes construction of a long ground based interferometer in Germany called GEO 600 (upgraded to GEO-HF) having an arm length 600 m and strong involvement in the larger detectors of the LIGO (Laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory) project in USA having arm lengths of 4 km (Operated by MIT, Boston and CALTECH, Pasadena). An upgrade to LIGO called Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) is currently under construction with significant input from the University of Glasgow. Thermal noise is one of the most significant noise sources affecting the sensitivity of the detector at a range of frequencies. Thermal noise arises due to the random fluctuations of atoms and molecules in the materials of the test mass mirrors and suspension elements, and is related to mechanical loss in these materials. The work presented in chapter 3 of this thesis is devoted to the analysis of aspects of mechanical loss and thermal noise in the final stages of the GEO suspension. The work in chapter 4 focuses on the theory of photoelasticty and birefringence techniques. A study of mechanical and thermal stress induced in fused silica has been discussed in chapter 5 of this thesis. To understand the working of photoelastic techniques learned in chapter 4, a study of mechanical stress was undertaken by applying a load on the sample to induce temporary birefringence. A study of thermal stress in fused silica welds has also been presented in chapter 5.

  8. Properties of silicon nitride thin overlays deposited on optical fibers — Effect of fiber suspension in radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śmietana, M., E-mail: M.Smietana@elka.pw.edu.pl [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warsaw 00-662 (Poland); Dominik, M.; Myśliwiec, M.; Kwietniewski, N. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warsaw 00-662 (Poland); Mikulic, P. [Centre de Recherche en Photonique, Université du Québec en Outaouais, 101 rue Saint-Jean-Bosco, Gatineau, J8X 3X7, Québec (Canada); Witkowski, B.S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, Warsaw 02-666 (Poland); Bock, W.J. [Centre de Recherche en Photonique, Université du Québec en Outaouais, 101 rue Saint-Jean-Bosco, Gatineau, J8X 3X7, Québec (Canada)

    2016-03-31

    This work discusses the effect of sample suspension in radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on properties of the obtained overlays. Silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) overlays were deposited on flat silicon wafers and cylindrical fused silica optical fibers. The influence of the suspension height and fiber diameter on SiN{sub x} deposition rate is investigated. It has been found that thickness of the SiN{sub x} overlay significantly increases with suspension height, and the deposition rate depends on fiber dimensions. Moreover, the SiN{sub x} overlays were also deposited on long-period gratings (LPGs) induced in optical fiber. Measurements of the LPG spectral response combined with its numerical simulations allowed for a discussion on properties of the deposited overlay. The measurements have proven higher overlay deposition rate on the suspended fiber than on flat Si wafer placed on the electrode. Results of this work are essential for precise tuning of the functional properties of new generations of optical devices such as optical sensors, filters and resonators, which typically are based on optical fibers and require the overlays with well defined properties. - Highlights: • The effect of optical fiber suspension in plasma process is discussed. • The deposition rate of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) overlay depends on fiber dimensions. • Thickness of the SiN{sub x} overlay strongly increases with suspension height. • Measurements and simulations of long-period grating confirms experimental results.

  9. A "gentle" nodal suspension for measurements of the acoustic attenuation in materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarini, E; Lorenzini, M; Campagna, E; Martelli, F; Piergiovanni, F; Vetrano, F; Losurdo, G; Cagnoli, G

    2009-05-01

    Loss angle measurements in ultralow mechanical loss materials is normally affected by a large systematic error due to the excess losses introduced by the suspension system used to hold the samples. Crystals such as sapphire and silicon or amorphous materials such as fused silica can have loss angles in the range of 10(-10)-10(-7); such materials are of extreme interest in the detection of small displacements as it is required in quantum measurements, frequency stabilization, Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and gravitational wave research. In the system proposed here the sample is suspended in equilibrium on top of a sphere, touching on one of the nodal points of vibration. The advantage of this system, as compared to others used so far, is twofold: (i) one surface only of the sample is touched and the contact surface is minimized because of the absence of applied forces; (ii) some relevant parameters of the suspension can be measured and eventually varied, giving the experimentalist the possibility to identify whether the measured loss is limited by the suspension system in use or it is an intrinsic property of the sample under investigation. The measurements of a 75 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness disk of Suprasil 311 gave a loss angle phi of 5x10(-8).

  10. Silica research in Glasgow

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, B W; Casey, M M; Clubley, D; Crooks, D R M; Danzmann, K; Elliffe, E J; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Grote, H; Heptonstall, A; Hough, J; Jennrich, O; Lück, H B; McIntosh, S A; Newton, G P; Palmer, D A; Plissi, M V; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Rowan, S; Skeldon, K D; Sneddon, P; Strain, K A; Torrie, C I; Ward, H; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Winkler, W

    2002-01-01

    The Glasgow group is involved in the construction of the GEO600 interferometer as well as in R and D activity on technology for advanced gravitational wave detectors. GEO600 will be the first GW detector using quasi-monolithic silica suspensions in order to decrease thermal noise significantly with respect to steel wire suspensions. The results concerning GEO600 suspension mounting and performance will be shown in the first section. Section 2 is devoted to the present results from the direct measurement of thermal noise in mirrors mounted in the 10 m interferometer in Glasgow which has a sensitivity limit of 4 x 10 sup - sup 1 sup 9 m Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 above 1 kHz. Section 3 presents results on the measurements of coating losses. R and D activity has been carried out to understand better how thermal noise in the suspensions affects the detector sensitivity, and in section 4 a discussion on the non-linear thermoelastic effect is presented.

  11. Silica-Based Carbon Source Delivery for In-situ Bioremediation Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, B.; Yang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Colloidal silica aqueous suspensions undergo viscosity increasing and gelation over time under favorable geochemical conditions. This property of silica suspension can potentially be applied to deliver remedial amendments to the subsurface and establish slow release amendment sources for enhanced remediation. In this study, silica-based delivery of carbon sources for in-situ bioremediation enhancement is investigated. Sodium lactate, vegetable oil, ethanol, and molasses have been studied for the interaction with colloidal silica in aqueous suspensions. The rheological properties of the carbon source amendments and silica suspension have been investigated. The lactate-, ethanol-, and molasses-silica suspensions exhibited controllable viscosity increase and eventually became gels under favorable geochemical conditions. The gelation rate was a function of the concentration of silica, salinity, amendment, and temperature. The vegetable oil-silica suspensions increased viscosity immediately upon mixing, but did not perform gelation. The carbon source release rate from the lactate-, ethanol-, and molasses-silica gels was determined as a function of silica, salinity, amendment concentration. The microbial activity stimulation and in-situ bioremediation enhancement by the slow-released carbon from the amendment-silica gels will be demonstrated in future investigations planned in this study.

  12. The distribution of subsurface damage in fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P E; Suratwala, T I; Wong, L L; Feit, M D; Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, R A

    2005-11-21

    Managing subsurface damage during the shaping process and removing subsurface damage during the polishing process is essential in the production of low damage density optical components, such as those required for use on high peak power lasers. Removal of subsurface damage, during the polishing process, requires polishing to a depth which is greater than the depth of the residual cracks present following the shaping process. To successfully manage, and ultimately remove subsurface damage, understanding the distribution and character of fractures in the subsurface region introduced during fabrication process is important. We have characterized the depth and morphology of subsurface fractures present following fixed abrasive and loose abrasive grinding processes. At shallow depths lateral cracks and an overlapping series of trailing indentation fractures were found to be present. At greater depths, subsurface damage consists of a series of trailing indentation fractures. The area density of trailing fractures changes as a function of depth, however the length and shape of individual cracks remain nearly constant for a given grinding process. We have developed and applied a model to interpret the depth and crack length distributions of subsurface surface damage in terms of key variables including abrasive size and load.

  13. Silica Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ghahramani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to heavy metals, organic solvents and silica is associated with a variety of renal manifestations. Improved understanding of occupational renal disease provides insight into environmental renal disease, improving knowledge of disease pathogenesis. Silica (SiO2 is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. Workers exposed to silica include sandblasters, miners, quarry workers, masons, ceramic workers and glass manufacturers. New cases of silicosis per year have been estimated in the US to be 3600–7300. Exposure to silica has been associated with tubulointerstitial disease, immune-mediated multisystem disease, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. A rare syndrome of painful, nodular skin lesions has been described in dialysis patients with excessive levels of silicon. Balkan endemic nephropathy is postulated to be due to chronic intoxication with drinking water polluted by silicates released during soil erosion. The mechanism of silica nephrotoxicity is thought to be through direct nephrotoxicity, as well as silica-induced autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. The renal histopathology varies from focal to crescentic and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with aneurysm formation suggestive of polyarteritis nodosa. The treatment for silica nephrotoxicity is non-specific and depends on the mechanism and stage of the disease. It is quite clear that further research is needed, particularly to elucidate the pathogenesis of silica nephropathy. Considering the importance of diagnosing exposure-related renal disease at early stages, it is imperative to obtain a thorough occupational history in all patients with renal disease, with particular emphasis on exposure to silica, heavy metals, and solvents.

  14. Infrared spectra of silica polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, C.; Noguchi, R.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.; Ohtaka, O.; Imai, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    The existence of silica within several debris disks has been suggested. We investigate the annealing conditions of α-cristobalite, and further prepare various types of silica, including α-cristobalite, α-quartz, coesite, stishovite, and fused quartz, which are natural, synthetic or commercial samples. We compare the results to previous studies and find that α-cristobalite synthesized at higher temperature than annealed silica. The interesting result of features similar to those of forsterite should be highlighted, where αcristobalite and coesite showed similar peaks at 16, 33, and 69 μm as forsterite. The 69 μm band for αcristobalite is especially very broad and strong, and shifts largely to a shorter wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The band for coesite, however, is very sharp, and shifts only a small amount to longer wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The peak positions of 16 and 69-μm band due to α-cristobalite can become index for temperature of silica dust. We discuss the possibility of silica detection around debris disks.

  15. Fused-Polished Fiber Couplers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sien; Chi; Shiao-Min; Tseng

    2003-01-01

    We report on fused-polished fiber couplers with a new fabrication method. This structure so fabricated is promising while achieving high-performance all-fiber WDM devices. Potential advantages and prospects of our works are presented.

  16. Load-cell based characterization system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor in advanced LIGO suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance) Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The background to this work was a prototype shadow sensor, which was designed for retro-fitting to an advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) test-mass/mirror suspension, in which 40 kg test-mass/mirrors are each suspended by four approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm diameter fused-silica suspension fibres. The shadow sensor comprised a LED source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation and a rectangular silicon photodiode detector, which, together, were to bracket the fibre under test. The aim was to detect transverse Violin-Mode resonances in the suspension fibres. Part of the testing procedure involved tensioning a silica fibre sample and translating it transversely through the illuminating NIR beam, so as to measure the DC responsivity of the detection system to fibre displacement. However, an equally important part of the procedure, reported here, was to keep the fibre under test stationary within the beam, whilst trying to detect low-level AC Violin-Mode resonances excited on the fibre, in order to confirm the primary function of the sensor. Therefore, a tensioning system, incorporating a load-cell readout, was built into the test fibre’s holder. The fibre then was excited by a signal generator, audio power amplifier, and distant loudspeaker, and clear resonances were detected. A theory for the expected fundamental resonant frequency as a function of fibre tension was developed and is reported here, and this theory was found to match closely with the detected resonant frequencies as they varied with tension. Consequently, the resonances seen were identified as being proper Violin-Mode fundamental resonances of the fibre, and the operation of the Violin-Mode detection system was validated.

  17. Thermal fatigue of electrical fuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelet Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electric Fuses have to respect different national or international standards such as IEC (International Electro-technical Commission 269. These standards define the characteristics of the fuses and describe the tests to be run in order to check fuse's ability to take up their main functions, i.e. current-conduction and operation under overloads and short-circuits. But fuses never carry current neither operate under standardized conditions. For example, rated current is evaluated under specified ambient temperature, without cooling air-flow, and with 1 meter-long connection-cables on both sides. In the field, temperature can reach up 80∘C, with or without air-flow and connection-parts are much more shorter. An issue is that current is never constant, often being cyclingly applied; equipments are frequently in use during the day and stopped in the night. ON-time and OFF-time generate alternative heating, then alternative stresses leading to thermal fatigue. MERSEN run many tests along the years, allowing to develop a method for choosing right fuses for each application. As a result, fuses don't melt unexpectedly in the field, but the method is supposed to be conservative and does not permit to get a better understanding of the phenomena neither an improvement of the products. The paper presents some specific ageing-tests run on conductive elements and tries to establish a correspondence between these tests and others carried out on complete fuses. Tests have been run on silver and copper, but their principle could be interesting for any structural material, especially because it underlines crack-opening.

  18. Liquefier Dynamics in Fused Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Guceri, Selcuk; Bertoldi, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    Layered manufacturing (LM) is an evolution of rapid prototyping (RP) technology whereby a part is built in layers. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a particular LM technique in which each section is fabricated through vector style deposition of building blocks, called roads, which...

  19. Hollow silica spheres: synthesis and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; D'Acunzi, Maria; Kappl, Michael; Auernhammer, Günter K; Vollmer, Doris; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2009-03-03

    Core-shell polystyrene-silica spheres with diameters of 800 nm and 1.9 microm were synthesized by soap-free emulsion and dispersion polymerization of the polystyrene core, respectively. The polystyrene spheres were used as templates for the synthesis of silica shells of tunable thickness employing the Stöber method [Graf et al. Langmuir 2003, 19, 6693]. The polystyrene template was removed by thermal decomposition at 500 degrees C, resulting in smooth silica shells of well-defined thickness (15-70 nm). The elastic response of these hollow spheres was probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A point load was applied to the particle surface through a sharp AFM tip, and successively increased until the shell broke. In agreement with the predictions of shell theory, for small deformations the deformation increased linearly with applied force. The Young's modulus (18 +/- 6 GPa) was about 4 times smaller than that of fused silica [Adachi and Sakka J. Mater. Sci. 1990, 25, 4732] but identical to that of bulk silica spheres (800 nm) synthesized by the Stöber method, indicating that it yields silica of lower density. The minimum force needed to irreversibly deform (buckle) the shell increased quadratically with shell thickness.

  20. Production of chicken chimeras by fusing blastodermal cells with electroporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Aritomi; N.Fujihara

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To establish techniques for producing somatic and gennline chimeric chicken by transferring blastodennal cells fused with electroporation. Methods: Stage-X blastodermal cells isolated from freshly laid fertile unincubated white Leghom and Rhode Island red chicken eggs were fused with electroporation. The treated cell suspension was transferred to the recovery medium (DMEM containing 10% FBS) and was injected into the subgerminal cavity of recipient tmincubated embryos (stage X). Results: Of 177 recipient embryos injected with the fusing blastodermal cells, 6 (3.4%) survived to hatching. Somatic chimerism was examined in the melanocyte of the feather. The presence of feathers originating from the donor cell was observed in 1 bird (16.7%) out of the 6 hatched birds. After 21 days of incubation two birds out of five embryos were subjected to polymemse chain reaction (PCR) analysis for W-chromosome-specific DNA for each tissue. One bird possessed W-chromosome-specific DNA in the stomach, and the other exhibited the same DNA in the left and right gonads and other tissues, but not the stomach. Conclusion: Recipient embryo having electrofused blastodermal cells yields somatic and germline chimeric chickens more successfully.(Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:271-275)

  1. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, Jr.; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag+ concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  2. Apparent wall-slip of colloidal hard-sphere suspensions in microchannel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Somnath; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the dependence of the apparent slip length (β) on the particle concentration for suspensions of colloidal hard spheres flowing through microchannels with smooth walls. Hydrostatic pressure was used to pump monodisperse suspensions of 1 μm silica spheres in water–glycerol mixture thro

  3. Hybrid integrated PDMS microfluidics with a silica capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Ivan K; Riaz, Asif; Ducrée, Jens; Lee, Luke P

    2010-06-07

    To harness the properties of both PDMS and silica, we have demonstrated hybrid integrated PDMS microfluidic systems with fused silica capillaries. The hybrid integrated PDMS microfluidics and silica capillary (iPSC) modules exhibit a novel architecture and method for leakage free CE sample injection merely requiring a single high voltage source and one pair of electrodes. The use of the iPSC device is based on a modular approach which allows the capillary to be reused extensively whilst replacing the attached fluidic module for different experiments. Integrating fused silica capillaries with PDMS microfluidic modules allows the direct application of a wide variety of well established conventional CE protocols for separations of complex analytes. Furthermore it bears the potential for facile coupling to standard electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), letting users focus on the sample analysis rather than the development of new separation protocols. The fabrication of the iPSC module consists of a simple and quick three-step method that submerges a fused silica capillary in PDMS prepolymer. After cross linking the prepolymer and punching the inlets, the iPSC module layer can be mounted onto a microfluidic device for CE separation.

  4. All-silica nanofluidic devices for DNA-analysis fabricated by imprint of sol-gel silica with silicon stamp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Morten Bo Lindholm; Letailleur, Alban A; Søndergård, Elin

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and cheap method for fabrication of silica nanofluidic devices for single-molecule studies. By imprinting sol-gel materials with a multi-level stamp comprising micro- and nanofeatures, channels of different depth are produced in a single process step. Calcination of the imprin......We present a simple and cheap method for fabrication of silica nanofluidic devices for single-molecule studies. By imprinting sol-gel materials with a multi-level stamp comprising micro- and nanofeatures, channels of different depth are produced in a single process step. Calcination...... of the imprinted hybrid sol-gel material produces purely inorganic silica, which has very low autofluorescence and can be fusion bonded to a glass lid. Compared to top-down processing of fused silica or silicon substrates, imprint of sol-gel silica enables fabrication of high-quality nanofluidic devices without...

  5. Stabilization of Colloidal Silica Using Small Polyols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GULLEY, GERALD L.; MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-09-07

    We have discovered that small polyols are reasonably effective at stabilizing colloidal silica against aggregation, even under the conditions of high pH and salt concentration. Both quasielastic and elastic light scattering were used to show that these polyols dramatically decrease the aggregation rate of the suspension, changing the growth kinetics from diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation to reaction-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. These polyols maybe useful in the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site.

  6. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  7. Agmatine attenuates silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Agamy, D S; Sharawy, M H; Ammar, E M

    2014-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence that nitric oxide (NO) formation is implicated in mediating silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. As a reactive free radical, NO may not only contribute to lung parenchymal tissue injury but also has the ability to combine with superoxide and form a highly reactive toxic species peroxynitrite that can induce extensive cellular toxicity in the lung tissues. This study aimed to explore the effect of agmatine, a known NO synthase inhibitor, on silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with agmatine for 60 days following a single intranasal instillation of silica suspension (50 mg in 0.1 ml saline/rat). The results revealed that agmatine attenuated silica-induced lung inflammation as it decreased the lung wet/dry weight ratio, protein concentration, and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Agmatine showed antifibrotic activity as it decreased total hydroxyproline content of the lung and reduced silica-mediated lung inflammation and fibrosis in lung histopathological specimen. In addition, agmatine significantly increased superoxide dismutase (p pulmonary nitrite/nitrate as well as tumor necrosis factor α. Collectively, these results demonstrate the protective effects of agmatine against the silica-induced lung fibrosis that may be attributed to its ability to counteract the NO production, lipid peroxidation, and regulate cytokine effects.

  8. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marchetti-Krantz (MMK) procedure; Laparoscopic retropubic colposuspension; Needle suspension; Burch colposuspension ... bladder. There are two ways to do retropubic suspension: open surgery or laparoscopic surgery. Either way, surgery ...

  9. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Science and Technology Assessment Printer Friendly Version Suspension Trauma/Orthostatic Intolerance Safety and Health Information Bulletin ... information about the hazards of orthostatic intolerance and suspension trauma when using fall arrest systems. This bulletin: ...

  10. Collapsing granular suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kadau, D.; Andrade Jr, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    A 2D contact dynamics model is proposed as a microscopic description of a collapsing suspension/soil to capture the essential physical processes underlying the dynamics of generation and collapse of the system. Our physical model is compared with real data obtained from in situ measurements performed with a natural collapsing/suspension soil. We show that the shear strength behavior of our collapsing suspension/soil model is very similar to the behavior of this collapsing suspension soil, for...

  11. The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

  12. About a New Type of Fuse Based on the Controllable Fusing Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PLESCA, A.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Fuses are among the best known of electrical devices and there are an extremely large number in use throughout the world. Beside of the advantageous features, the nowadays fuses have certain drawbacks. Therefore, a new type of fuse based on controllable fusing concept is proposed and a study as regards the total clearing time is done. The new concept has been validated through many experimental tests at different current values. The new type of fuse based on controllable fusing concept can be integrated within an overcurrent protection system especially to protect power semiconductors where the Joule integral criterion is better satisfied.

  13. An AC modulated near infrared gain calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" transimpedance amplifier, intended for advanced LIGO suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2016-07-01

    The background to this work was a prototype shadow sensor, which was designed for retro-fitting to an advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) test-mass/mirror suspension, in which a 40 kg test-mass/mirror is suspended by four approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm diameter fused-silica suspension fibres. The shadow sensor comprised a LED source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation, and a "tall-thin" rectangular silicon photodiode detector, which together were to bracket the fibre under test. The photodiode was positioned so as to be sensitive (primarily) to transverse "Violin-Mode" vibrations of such a fibre, via the oscillatory movement of the shadow cast by the fibre, as this moved across the face of the detector. In this prototype shadow sensing system the photodiode was interfaced to a purpose-built transimpedance amplifier, this having both AC and DC outputs. A quasi-static calibration was made of the sensor's DC responsivity, i.e., incremental rate of change of output voltage versus fibre position, by slowly scanning a fused-silica fibre sample transversely through the illuminating beam. The work reported here concerns the determination of the sensor's more important AC (Violin-Mode) responsivity. Recognition of the correspondence between direct AC modulation of the source, and actual Violin-Mode signals, and of the transformative role of the AC/DC gain ratio for the amplifier, at any modulation frequency, f, resulted in the construction of the AC/DC calibration source described here. A method for determining in practice the transimpedance AC/DC gain ratio of the photodiode and amplifier, using this source, is illustrated by a specific numerical example, and the gain ratio for the prototype sensing system is reported over the frequency range 1 Hz-300 kHz. In fact, a maximum DC responsivity of 1.26 kV.m(-1) was measured using the prototype photodiode sensor and amplifier discussed here. Therefore, the measured AC/DC transimpedance gain

  14. Dynamic simulation of flywheel-type fuses

    OpenAIRE

    Editorial Office

    1996-01-01

    Rounds of ammunition are normally armed with a fuse. In this study, a fuse is developed which uses a flywheel-type mechanism controlled by time or distance. Due to its simplicity of operation and construction, the concept is expected to have high reliabil­ity. The dynamic response of all the components of this flywheel-type fuse is mathematically modelled. Simulation software was developed which connects the mathematical models of the various components. With the definition of boundary value...

  15. FUSE Observations of eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Iping, R C; Gull, T R

    2004-01-01

    Eta Carinae was observed by FUSE through the LWRS (30 arcsec x30 arcsec) and HIRS (1.25 arcsec x 20 arcsec) apertures in March and April 2004. There are significant differences between the two spectra. About half of the LWRS flux appears to be due to two B-type stars near the edge of the LWRS aperture, 14 arcsec from eta Carinae. The HIRS spectrum (LiF1 channel) therefore reveals the intrinsic FUV spectrum of eta Carinae without this stellar contamination. The HIRS spectrum contains strong interstellar H2 having high rotational excitation (up to J=8). Most of the atomic species with prominent ISM features (C II, Fe II, Ar I, P II, etc) also have strong blue-shifted absorption to v= ~ -580 km/s that is associated with expanding debris from the 1840 eruption.

  16. Fused combiners for photonic crystal bers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordegraaf, Danny

    The work presented in this Ph.D. thesis focuses on the fabrication of fused combiners for high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers. The main focus of the Ph.D. project was to further develop the fused pump combiners for airclad photonic crystal bers (PCFs), and implement a signal feed...

  17. Antiproliferative effect of Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides encapsulated in chitosan-silica nanoparticles strongly depends on the metabolic activity type of the cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zwe-Ling; Chang, Jenq-Sheng; Chang, Ke Liang B.

    2013-09-01

    Chitosan molecules interact with silica and encapsulate the Antrodia camphorata extract (ACE) polysaccharides to form composite nanoparticles. The nanoparticle suspensions of ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in silica-chitosan and silica nanoparticles approach an average particle size of 210 and 294 nm in solution, respectively. The encapsulation efficiencies of ACE polysaccharides are 66 and 63.5 %, respectively. Scanning electron micrographs confirm the formation of near-spherical nanoparticles. ACE polysaccharides solution had better antioxidative capability than ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in silica or silica-chitosan nanoparticles suspensions. The antioxidant capacity of nanoparticles increases with increasing dissolution time. The antitumor effects of ACE polysaccharides, ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in silica, or silica-chitosan nanoparticles increased with increasing concentration of nanoparticles. This is the first report demonstrating the potential of ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in chitosan-silica nanoparticles for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, this study suggests that antiproliferative effect of nanoparticle-encapsulated bioactive could significantly depend on the metabolic activity type of the cell line.

  18. Antiproliferative effect of Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides encapsulated in chitosan-silica nanoparticles strongly depends on the metabolic activity type of the cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Zwe-Ling, E-mail: kongzl@mail.ntou.edu.tw; Chang, Jenq-Sheng; Chang, Ke Liang B. [National Taiwan Ocean University, Department of Food Science (China)

    2013-09-15

    Chitosan molecules interact with silica and encapsulate the Antrodia camphorata extract (ACE) polysaccharides to form composite nanoparticles. The nanoparticle suspensions of ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in silica-chitosan and silica nanoparticles approach an average particle size of 210 and 294 nm in solution, respectively. The encapsulation efficiencies of ACE polysaccharides are 66 and 63.5 %, respectively. Scanning electron micrographs confirm the formation of near-spherical nanoparticles. ACE polysaccharides solution had better antioxidative capability than ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in silica or silica-chitosan nanoparticles suspensions. The antioxidant capacity of nanoparticles increases with increasing dissolution time. The antitumor effects of ACE polysaccharides, ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in silica, or silica-chitosan nanoparticles increased with increasing concentration of nanoparticles. This is the first report demonstrating the potential of ACE polysaccharides encapsulated in chitosan-silica nanoparticles for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, this study suggests that antiproliferative effect of nanoparticle-encapsulated bioactive could significantly depend on the metabolic activity type of the cell line.

  19. Silica in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sargent, B A; Tayrien, C; McClure, M K; Li, A; Basu, A R; Manoj, P; Watson, D M; Bohac, C J; Furlan, E; Kim, K H; Green, J D; Sloan, G C

    2008-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectra of a few T Tauri stars (TTS) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope show prominent narrow emission features indicating silica (crystalline silicon dioxide). Silica is not a major constituent of the interstellar medium; therefore, any silica present in the circumstellar protoplanetary disks of TTS must be largely the result of processing of primitive dust material in the disks surrouding these stars. We model the silica emission features in our spectra using the opacities of various polymorphs of silica and their amorphous versions computed from earth-based laboratory measurements. This modeling indicates that the two polymorphs of silica, tridymite and cristobalite, which form at successively higher temperatures and low pressures, are the dominant forms of silica in the TTS of our sample. These high temperature, low pressure polymorphs of silica present in protoplanetary disks are consistent with a grain composed mostly of tridymite named Ada found...

  20. Multifunctional mesoporous silica catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Victor Shang-Yi; Tsai, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hung-Ting; Pruski, Marek; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-03-31

    The present invention provides bifunctional silica mesoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles ("MSN"), having pores modified with diarylammonium triflate and perfluoroaryl moieties, that are useful for the acid-catalyzed esterification of organic acids with organic alcohols.

  1. Anomalous low friction coefficient in shear thickening suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavaud, Cecile; Berut, Antoine; Metzger, Bloen; Forterre, Yoel; GEP Team

    2016-11-01

    We study the frictional behavior of classical and shear thickening suspensions under low confining pressure, by measuring the pile slope-angle in rotating drum flow experiments. We show that, at low rotation rates, the pile angle of the shear thickening suspension is about 8 .5° , which is much lower than pile angles observed with classical suspensions in the same conditions ( 25°). We then study the frictional behavior of silica powders in water, and show that we can switch from low to high pile angle by changing the salinity of the suspension. These results support a recent scenario for the shear-thickening transition in such non-Brownian systems, where inter particle repulsive forces suppress friction at low confining pressure. ERC PlantMove.

  2. Silica extraction from geothermal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, William L; Bruton, Carol J

    2014-09-23

    A method of producing silica from geothermal fluid containing low concentration of the silica of less than 275 ppm includes the steps of treating the geothermal fluid containing the silica by reverse osmosis treatment thereby producing a concentrated fluid containing the silica, seasoning the concentrated fluid thereby producing a slurry having precipitated colloids containing the silica, and separating the silica from the slurry.

  3. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  4. Collapsing granular suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadau, D; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2009-11-01

    A 2D contact dynamics model is proposed as a microscopic description of a collapsing suspension/soil to capture the essential physical processes underlying the dynamics of generation and collapse of the system. Our physical model is compared with real data obtained from in situ measurements performed with a natural collapsing/suspension soil. We show that the shear strength behavior of our collapsing suspension/soil model is very similar to the behavior of this collapsing suspension soil, for both the unperturbed and the perturbed phases of the material.

  5. Femtosecond laser fabrication of nanostructures in silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R S; Hnatovsky, C; Simova, E; Rayner, D M; Bhardwaj, V R; Corkum, P B

    2003-06-15

    A femtosecond laser beam focused inside fused silica and other glasses can modify the refractive index of the glass. Chemical etching and atomic-force microscope studies show that the modified region can have a sharp-tipped cone-shaped structure with a tip diameter as small as 100 nm. Placing the structure near the bottom surface of a silica glass sample and applying a selective chemical etch to the bottom surface produces clean, circular, submicrometer-diameter holes. Holes spaced as close to one another as 1.4 microm are demonstrated.

  6. Porphyrins Fused with Unactivated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Diev, Vyacheslav V.

    2012-01-06

    A systematic study of the preparation of porphyrins with extended conjugation by meso,β-fusion with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is reported. The meso-positions of 5,15-unsubstituted porphyrins were readily functionalized with PAHs. Ring fusion using standard Scholl reaction conditions (FeCl 3, dichloromethane) occurs for perylene-substituted porphyrins to give a porphyrin β,meso annulated with perylene rings (0.7:1 ratio of syn and anti isomers). The naphthalene, pyrene, and coronene derivatives do not react under Scholl conditions but are fused using thermal cyclodehydrogenation at high temperatures, giving mixtures of syn and anti isomers of the meso,β-fused porphyrins. For pyrenyl-substituted porphyrins, a thermal method gives synthetically acceptable yields (>30%). Absorption spectra of the fused porphyrins undergo a progressive bathochromic shift in a series of naphthyl (λ max = 730 nm), coronenyl (λ max = 780 nm), pyrenyl (λ max = 815 nm), and perylenyl (λ max = 900 nm) annulated porphyrins. Despite being conjugated with unsubstituted fused PAHs, the β,meso-fused porphyrins are more soluble and processable than the parent nonfused precursors. Pyrenyl-fused porphyrins exhibit strong fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, with a progressive improvement in luminescent efficiency (up to 13% with λ max = 829 nm) with increasing degree of fusion. Fused pyrenyl-porphyrins have been used as broadband absorption donor materials in photovoltaic cells, leading to devices that show comparatively high photovoltaic efficiencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Dynamic simulation of flywheel-type fuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Rounds of ammunition are normally armed with a fuse. In this study, a fuse is developed which uses a flywheel-type mechanism controlled by time or distance. Due to its simplicity of operation and construction, the concept is expected to have high reliabil­ity. The dynamic response of all the components of this flywheel-type fuse is mathematically modelled. Simulation software was developed which connects the mathematical models of the various components. With the definition of boundary values, the response of the projectile, flywheel and other components can be determined continuously for firing and in-flight conditions.

  8. Suspension trauma; Le traumatisme de suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudel, S. [Le Centre de sante et de services sociaux du rocher Perce, Chandler, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed the precautions that should be taken to avoid falls from wind turbines or transmission towers. Suspension trauma was explained by a medical doctor in terms of physiology and the body's normal circulation and the elements that disturb normal physiology when in suspension. The trauma occurs following a fall, which carries the risk of 1or more disorders, such as massive hemorrhage, high cardiac pulse, and constriction of blood vessels. Nausea, vertigo, cardiac arrhythmia and sweating occur 15 to 20 minutes following the fall. The presentation emphasized the importance of having qualified personnel at the site and wearing proper harnesses and equipment that supports the neck. figs.

  9. Research on School Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iselin, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Schools across the nation report increases in the use of punitive disciplinary methods (e.g., suspension). The need for these disciplinary practices to address serious student misconduct is undisputed. What research has questioned is why some students seem to be suspended more often than others, what effects suspension has on students, and whether…

  10. Coordination chemistry in fused-salt solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Spectrophotometric work on structural determinations with fused-salt solutions is reviewed. Constraints placed on the method, as well as interpretation of the spectra, are discussed with parallels drawn to aqueous spectrophotometric curves of the same materials.

  11. Fuse Protects Parabolic-Dish Solar Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding barrel and shutter protect against overheating. Downward movement of shutter initiated by melting of fuse wire that suspends it. Shutter lowered or raised under operator's control by depressuring or pressurizing hydraulic cylinder.

  12. Organometallic chemistry: Fused ferrocenes come full circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Rebecca A.; Manners, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Chemists have long been fascinated by electron delocalization, from both a fundamental and applied perspective. Macrocyclic oligomers containing fused ferrocenes provide a new structural framework -- containing strongly interacting metal centres -- that is capable of supporting substantial charge delocalization.

  13. Silica containing highly porous alumina ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svinka, R.; Svinka, V.; Zake, I.

    2011-04-01

    Porous alumina ceramic were produced by slip casting of aqueous alumina slurry with added small amount of metallic aluminium powder. Pores form in result of chemical reaction of aluminum with water by hydrogen gas evolution reaction and solidification of suspension. Porosity of such materials sintered at a temperature of 1600 - 1750°C varies from 60 to 90%. Pore size distribution and mechanical strength of these materials depend largely on the grain size of used raw materials. The major part of pores in the materials produced without additive of silica are larger than 10 ±m, but with 5 - 10 wt.% additive of silica in the raw mix pore size decreases considerably. The sintering shrinkage decreases to 2.5%. Coefficient of thermal expansion equally decreases from 8.9-10-6 K-1 to 7.1 10-6 K-1 and classification temperature increases to 1600°C, while deformation at high temperature decreases considerably.

  14. Size-selective separation of submicron particles in suspensions with ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Susumu; Oka, Naoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions containing silica or polystyrene latex were ultrasonically atomized for separating particles of a specific size. With the help of a fog involving fine liquid droplets with a narrow size distribution, submicron particles in a limited size-range were successfully separated from suspensions. Performance of the separation was characterized by analyzing the size and the concentration of collected particles with a high resolution method. Irradiation of 2.4MHz ultrasound to sample suspensions allowed the separation of particles of specific size from 90 to 320nm without regarding the type of material. Addition of a small amount of nonionic surfactant, PONPE20 to SiO2 suspensions enhanced the collection of finer particles, and achieved a remarkable increase in the number of collected particles. Degassing of the sample suspension resulted in eliminating the separation performance. Dissolved air in suspensions plays an important role in this separation.

  15. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  16. Quantitative evaluation of fiber fuse initiation with exposure to arc discharge provided by a fusion splicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    The optical communication industry and power-over-fiber applications face a dilemma as a result of the expanding demand of light power delivery and the potential risks of high-power light manipulation including the fiber fuse phenomenon, a continuous destruction of the fiber core pumped by the propagating light and triggered by a heat-induced strong absorption of silica glass. However, we have limited knowledge on its initiation process in the viewpoint of energy flow in the reactive area. Therefore, the conditions required for a fiber fuse initiation in standard single-mode fibers were determined quantitatively, namely the power of a 1480 nm fiber laser and the arc discharge intensity provided by a fusion splicer for one second as an outer heat source. Systematic investigation on the energy flow balance between these energy sources revealed that the initiation process consists of two steps; the generation of a precursor at the heated spot and the transition to a stable fiber fuse. The latter step needs a certain degree of heat accumulation at the core where waveguide deformation is ongoing competitively. This method is useful for comparing the tolerance to fiber fuse initiation among various fibers with a fixed energy amount that was not noticed before.

  17. Silica in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, A G; Hodson, M J

    1986-01-01

    Opaline silica deposits are formed by many vascular (higher) plants. The capacity of these plants for silica absorption varies considerably according to genotype and environment. Plant communities exchange silica between soil and vegetation, especially in warmer climates. Silica deposition in epidermal cell walls offers mechanical and protective advantages. Biogenic silica particles from plants are also implicated in the causation of cancer. Recent techniques are reviewed which may aid in the identification of plant pathways for soluble silica movement to deposition sites and in the determination of ionic environments. Botanical investigations have focused on silicification of cell walls in relation to plant development, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. Silica deposition in macrohair walls of the lemma of canary grass (Phalaris) begins at inflorescence emergence and closely follows wall thickening. The structure of the deposited silica may be determined by specific organic polymers present at successive stages of wall development. Lowering of transpiration by enclosure of Phalaris inflorescences in plastic bags reduced silica deposition in macrohairs. Preliminary freeze-substitution studies have located silicon, as well as potassium and chloride, in the cell vacuole and wall deposition sites during initial silicification.

  18. Toxicity of silica nanoparticles and the effect of protein corona

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Jespersen, Lars Vesterby; Wang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    ). The NPs were characterized by TEM and DLS as monodisperse and non-aggregated in solution and the NP suspensions were free of metal and endotoxin impurities as tested by ICP-MS and the LAL test. Cellular uptake and binding of the silica NPs was indirectly assessed by flow cytometry side scatter and SEM...... the NPs were found to cause increased cellular ROS production which could not be reduced by antioxidant treatment. In conclusion, our data suggest that surface area is an appropriate dose metric to predict cytotoxicity and inflammation induced by silica nanoparticles. Furthermore, the reduced toxicity...

  19. Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in silica glass and KDP crystal: A comparative study

    CERN Document Server

    Rolle, Jérémie; Duchateau, Guillaume; Skupin, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses propagating in silica glass and in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal are investigated by means of a unidirectional pulse propagation code. Filamentation in fused silica is compared with the self-channeling of light in KDP accounting for the presence of defect states and electron-hole dynamics. In KDP, laser pulses produce intense filaments with higher clamping intensities up to 200 TW/cm$^2$ and longer plasma channels with electron densities above $10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$. Despite these differences, the propagation dynamics in silica and KDP are almost identical at equivalent ratios of input power over the critical power for self-focusing.

  20. Fuse Modeling for Reliability Study of Power Electronics Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive modeling approach on reliability of fuses used in power electronic circuits. When fuses are subjected to current pulses, cyclic temperature stress is introduced to the fuse element and will wear out the component. Furthermore, the fuse may be used in a large...

  1. Fuse Modeling for Reliability Study of Power Electronics Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive modeling approach on reliability of fuses used in power electronic circuits. When fuses are subjected to current pulses, cyclic temperature stress is introduced to the fuse element and will wear out the component. Furthermore, the fuse may be used in a large...

  2. Microfluidic Bead Suspension Hopper

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Alexander K.; MacConnell, Andrew B.; Paegel, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Many high-throughput analytical platforms, from next-generation DNA sequencing to drug discovery, rely on beads as carriers of molecular diversity. Microfluidic systems are ideally suited to handle and analyze such bead libraries with high precision and at minute volume scales; however, the challenge of introducing bead suspensions into devices before they sediment usually confounds microfluidic handling and analysis. We developed a bead suspension hopper that exploits sedimentation to load b...

  3. The Mystical Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Santiesteban Oliva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mistical suspension, silence, time, absolute, ontology, ineffability, aletheiaIn the mystical ecstasy there is a sensorial and intellectual suspension when contemplating the absolute, the ontological Being. Silence is not only significant: it is revealing. The greatest expression of experience inner silence . The word is insufficient when the ontological reality is revealed. Revelation or truth , the Greek concept of aletheia, takes on greater significance in that transcendental experience. It is also suspended phenomenological time and remains eternity open.

  4. Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems. The detector is fabricated using wafer fusion to insert an electrically conductive grid, typically comprising a metal, between two solid semiconductor pieces, one having a cathode (negative electrode) and the other having an anode (positive electrode). The wafer fused semiconductor radiation detector functions like the commonly used Frisch grid radiation detector, in which an electrically conductive grid is inserted in high vacuum between the cathode and the anode. The wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector can be fabricated using the same or two different semiconductor materials of different sizes and of the same or different thicknesses; and it may utilize a wide range of metals, or other electrically conducting materials, to form the grid, to optimize the detector performance, without being constrained by structural dissimilarity of the individual parts. The wafer-fused detector is basically formed, for example, by etching spaced grooves across one end of one of two pieces of semiconductor materials, partially filling the grooves with a selected electrical conductor which forms a grid electrode, and then fusing the grooved end of the one semiconductor piece to an end of the other semiconductor piece with a cathode and an anode being formed on opposite ends of the semiconductor pieces.

  5. OPUS: the FUSE science data pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, James F.; Heller-Boyer, C.; Rose, M. A.; Swam, M.; Miller, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Oegerle, William R.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes how the OPUS pipeline, currently used for processing science data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), was used as the backbone for developing the science data pipeline for a much smaller mission. The far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer (FUSE) project selected OPUS for its data processing pipeline platform and selected the OPUS team at the STScI to write the FUSE pipeline applications. A total of 105 new modules were developed for the FUSE pipeline. The foundation of over 250 modules in the OPUS libraries allowed development to proceed quickly and with considerable confidence that the underlying functionality is reliable and robust. Each task represented roughly 90 percent reuse, and the project as a whole shows over 70 percent reuse of the existing OPUS system. Taking an existing system that is operational, and will be maintained for many years to come, was a key decision for the FUSE mission. Adding the extensive experience of the OPUS team to the task resulted in the development of a complete telemetry pipeline system within a matter of months. Reusable software has been the siren song of software engineering and object- oriented design for a decade or more. The development of inexpensive software systems by adapting existing code to new applications is as attractive as it has been elusive. The OPUS telemetry pipeline for the FUSE mission has proven to be a significant exception to that trend.

  6. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the solid–liquid interface of fused-silica nanofabricated channels with and without a hydrophilic 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (cyanosilane) coating. We develop a model that relaxes the assumption that the surface parameters C1, C2...... filling length ratio on ionic strength for different surface compositions, which can be difficult to achieve otherwise....

  7. Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

  8. Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

  9. Endodontic and post-endodontic management of a fused molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of fused teeth needs special care and attention to the bizarre anatomy. This paper describes root canal treatment of a fused carious tooth presenting with apical periodontitis. It is a rare case of fusion of the mandibular second molar with a paramolar. There is no literature regarding placement of crown over endodontically treated fused teeth. In this case, the fused teeth were endodontically treated and restored by a porcelain fused to metal crown.

  10. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  11. Silica Refractory Bricks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lingyan; Peng Xigao

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1.Scope This standard specifies the classification,technical requirements,test methods,quality appraisal procedures,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of silica refractory bricks.This standard is applicable to silica refractory bricks with single weight≤40 kg.

  12. Behavior of silica particles introduced into an isolated rat heart as potential drug carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borak, B [Institute of Material Sciences and Applied Mechanics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Smoluchowskiego 25, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Arkowski, J [Chair and Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Pasteura 4, 50-367 Wroclaw (Poland); Skrzypiec, M [Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Mikulicza-Radeckiego 2, 50-345 Wroclaw (Poland); Ziolkowski, P [Chair and Department of Patomorphology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Marcinkowskiego 1, 50-368 Wroclaw (Poland); Krajewska, B [Chair and Department of Histology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Chalubinskiego 6a, 50-369 Wroclaw (Poland); Wawrzynska, M [Chair and Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Pasteura 4, 50-367 Wroclaw (Poland); Grotthus, B [Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Mikulicza-Radeckiego 2, 50-345 Wroclaw (Poland); Gliniak, H [Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Mikulicza-Radeckiego 2, 50-345 Wroclaw (Poland); Szelag, A [Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Mikulicza-Radeckiego 2, 50-345 Wroclaw (Poland); Mazurek, W [Chair and Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Pasteura 4, 50-367 Wroclaw (Poland); Bialy, D [Chair and Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Pasteura 4, 50-367 Wroclaw (Poland); Maruszewski, K [Institute of Material Sciences and Applied Mechanics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Smoluchowskiego 25, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    Silica powders consisting of small spherical particles (50-200 nm) have been obtained by the sol-gel method. A suspension of such particles in the Krebs-Hanseleit solution has been introduced into the coronary circulation of a beating perfused rat heart. The influence of the suspension on the heart muscle and the coronary vessels in the rat body has been histopathologically examined. The particles have not left the lumen of the vessels and have not caused any side effects. These observations suggest the possibility of using such silica particles as a carrier for selected drugs.

  13. Ultra-fast synthesis of magnetic and luminescent silica beads for versatile bioanalytical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Schulte, Detlef [MagnaMedics GmbH, Martelenberger Weg 8, D-52066 Aachen (Germany)]. E-mail: dms@magnamedics.de; Schmitz-Rode, T. [Clinic for Radiology, University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Borm, Paul [Hogeschool Zuyd Centre of Expertise in Life Sciences, NL-6400 Heerlen (Netherlands)

    2005-05-15

    A method for the synthesis of both spherically shaped micro/nano silica particles and silica hybrid particles using a novel inverse sol-gel suspension technique was developed. The technique enables the synthesis of beads within seconds and provides a simple basis for quantum dot and biosubstances encapsulation. The carriers can be used as DNA adsorbents, individually addressable optical codes for bioassays and biomolecule library screening as well as photonic crystals.

  14. Ultra-fast synthesis of magnetic and luminescent silica beads for versatile bioanalytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schulte, Detlef; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Borm, Paul

    2005-05-01

    A method for the synthesis of both spherically shaped micro/nano silica particles and silica hybrid particles using a novel inverse sol-gel suspension technique was developed. The technique enables the synthesis of beads within seconds and provides a simple basis for quantum dot and biosubstances encapsulation. The carriers can be used as DNA adsorbents, individually addressable optical codes for bioassays and biomolecule library screening as well as photonic crystals.

  15. Fusing Facial Features for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Ahmad Dargham

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is an important biometric method because of its potential applications in many fields, such as access control, surveillance, and human-computer interaction. In this paper, a face recognition system that fuses the outputs of three face recognition systems based on Gabor jets is presented. The first system uses the magnitude, the second uses the phase, and the third uses the phase-weighted magnitude of the jets. The jets are generated from facial landmarks selected using three selection methods. It was found out that fusing the facial features gives better recognition rate than either facial feature used individually regardless of the landmark selection method.

  16. Surface chemistry and rheology of polysulfobetaine-coated silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Pierre; Mosse, Wade K J; Nicholas, Nathan J; Spiniello, Marisa; Tyrrell, Johanna; Nelson, Andrew; Qiao, Greg G; Ducker, William A

    2007-07-03

    We have measured the viscosity of suspensions of colloidal silica particles (d = 300 nm) and the properties of silica surfaces in solutions of a polymer consisting of zwitterionic monomer groups, poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate), polySBMA. This polymer has potential use in modifying surface properties because the polymer is net uncharged and therefore does not generate double-layer forces. The solubility of the polymer can be controlled and varies from poor to good by the addition of sodium chloride salt. Ellipsometry was used to demonstrate that polySBMA adsorbs to silica and exhibits an increase in surface excess at lower salt concentration, which is consistent with a smaller area per molecule at low salt concentration. Neutron reflectivity measurements show that the adsorbed polymer has a thickness of about 3.7 nm and is highly hydrated. The polymer can be used to exercise considerable control over suspension rheology. When silica particles are not completely covered in polymer, the suspension produces a highly viscous gel. Atomic force microscopy was used to show this is caused by bridging of polymer between the particles. At higher surface coverage, the polymer can produce either a high or very low viscosity slurry depending on the sodium chloride concentration. At high salt concentration, the suspension is stable, and the viscosity is lower. This is probably because the entrainment of many small ions renders the polymer film highly hydrophilic, producing repulsive surface forces and lubricating the flow of particles. At low salt concentrations, the polymer is barely soluble and more densely adsorbed. This produces less stable and more viscous solutions, which we attribute to attractive interactions between the adsorbed polymer layers.

  17. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: Silk–silica binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J.; Simmons, Leo O.; Perry, Carole C.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk–silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution–solution and solution– solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600–800 nm) were formed in the presence of the recombinant silk and chimeras, which were smaller than those formed by 15mer-SiBP chimeras [1], revealing that the molecular weight of the silk domain correlated to the sizes of the condensed silica particles in the solution system. In addition, the chimeras (6mer-A1/A3/R5) produced smaller condensed silica particles than the control (6mer), revealing that the silica particle size formed in the solution system is controlled by the size of protein assemblies in solution. In the solution–solid interface system, silicification reactions were performed on the surface of films fabricated from the recombinant silk proteins and chimeras and then treated to induce β-sheet formation. A higher density of condensed silica formed on the films containing the lowest β-sheet content while the films with the highest β-sheet content precipitated the lowest density of silica, revealing an inverse correlation between the β-sheet secondary structure and the silica content formed on the films. Intriguingly, the 6mer-A3 showed the highest rate of silica condensation but the lowest density of silica deposition on the films, compared with 6mer-A1 and -R5, revealing antagonistic crosstalk between the silk and the SiBP domains in terms of protein assembly. These findings offer a path forward in the tailoring of biopolymer–silica composites for biomaterial related needs. PMID:25462851

  18. Fungal Systematics and Evolution: FUSE 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, Pedro W; Schumacher, René K; Wingfield, Michael J; Lombard, Lorenzo; Giraldo, Alejandra; Christensen, Martha; Gardiennet, Alain; Nakashima, Chiharu; Pereira, Olinto L; Smith, Alexander J; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2015-01-01

    Fungal Systematics and Evolution (FUSE) is introduced as a new series to expedite the publication of issues relating to the epitypification of formerly described species, report new sexual-asexual connections, the merging of sexual and asexual gen¬era following the end of dual nomenclature, and to

  19. Fused aromatic thienopyrazines: structure, properties and function

    KAUST Repository

    Mondal, Rajib

    2010-01-01

    Recent development of a fused aromatic thieno[3.4-b]pyrazine system and their application in optoelectronic devices are reviewed. Introduction of a fused aromatic unit followed by side chain engineering, dramatically enhanced the charge carrier mobility in thin film transistor devices and mobilities up to 0.2 cm2/Vs were achieved. The optoelectronic properties of these fused aromatic thienopyrazine polymers (Eg = 1.3 to 1.6 eV, HOMO = -4.9 to -5.2 V) were tuned by introduction of various fused aromatic rings within thienopyrazine. By balancing the fundamental properties of these polymers, both high charge carrier mobilities and moderate PCEs in solar cells were achieved. Further, effects of copolymerizing units are discussed. Low band gap semiconducting polymer (Eg ∼ 1 eV) with high field effect mobility (0.044 cm2/Vs) was obtained using cyclopentadithiophene as copolymerizing unit. Finally, a molecular design approach to enhance the absorption coefficients is discussed, which resulted in improved power conversion efficiency in bulk heterojunction solar cells. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Renovating a Fusee Ceramique Barrel Vault

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerling, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a proposal to renovate a Fusee Ceramique Barrel Vault with steel diagonals In 1956 two workshops, varying in height and span, were built in Wormerveer, The Netherlands. Both workshops were roofed with a concrete barrel vault with a thickness of 110 mm. The cylindrical vaults w

  1. 30 CFR 56.6502 - Safety fuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety fuse. 56.6502 Section 56.6502 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... initiation systems, igniter cord and connectors, or other nonelectric initiation systems shall be used...

  2. Demonstrating Earth Connections and Fuses Working Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Earth wires and fuses work together in UK mains circuits to keep users safe from electric shocks and are taught in many school contexts. The subject can be quite abstract and difficult for pupils to grasp, and a simple but visually clear and direct demonstration is described which would be easy for most physics departments to build and which can…

  3. Mesoporous silica and organosilica films templated by nanocrystalline chitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Dinh; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2013-11-04

    Liquid crystalline phases can be used to impart order into inorganic solids, creating materials that mimic natural architectures. Herein, mesoporous silica and organosilica films with layered structures and high surface areas have been templated by nanocrystalline chitin. Aqueous suspensions of spindle-shaped chitin nanocrystals were prepared by sequential deacetylation and hydrolysis of chitin fibrils isolated from king crab shells. The nanocrystalline chitin self-assembles into a nematic liquid-crystalline phase that has been used to template silica and organosilica composites. Removal of the chitin template by either calcination or sulfuric-acid-catalyzed hydrolysis gave mesoporous silica and ethylene-bridged organosilica films. The large, crack-free mesoporous films have layered structures with features that originate from the nematic organization of the nanocrystalline chitin.

  4. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  5. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  6. Shear-thickening behavior of modified silica nanoparticles in polyethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Kejing; Cao Haijian, E-mail: caohaijian20010@163.com; Qian Kun; Sha Xiaofei; Chen Yanping [Jiangnan University, Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education (China)

    2012-03-15

    The surface of silica nanoparticles with an average diameter of 650 nm was modified by ball milling and chemical treatment with ethylene glycol (EG). The Fourier-transform infrared spectra and particle size analysis methods were used to characterize the modified silica nanoparticles. The morphologies of the silica nanoparticles before and after the different surface treatments were examined by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The rheological behaviors of modified silica suspensions in polyethylene glycol were studied by using Anton-paar 301 stress-controlled rheometer. The results of rheological tests indicated that the surface treatments had a great effect on increasing the maximum weight fraction of silica nanoparticles in Shear-thickening fluids, especially treated by the chemical method with EG.

  7. Rheology of organoclay suspension

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hato, MJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Colloid & Polymer Science Volume 289, Number 10, 1119-1125, DOI: 10.1007/s00396-011-2438-4 Rheology of organoclay suspension Mpitloane Joseph Hato, Ke Zhang, Suprakas Sinha Ray and Hyoung Jin Choi Abstract We have studied the rheological...

  8. Alternatives to Student Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, David

    2012-01-01

    Seven years ago, James A. Garfield High School in East Los Angeles set a school record with 613 student suspensions, out of a total enrollment of 5,000 students. The school, made famous by the 1988 film "Stand and Deliver", was no stranger to the high rates of student discipline all too common within the Los Angeles Unified School…

  9. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  10. Textiles: Some technocal information and data VI: fusing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cawood, MP

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available results. However, complaints of problem do occur particularly with the technology becoming more sophisticated. Fusing interlinings are coated with an adhesive which enables them to be fused under certain conditions of temperature, time and pressure onto...

  11. Cryonic Suspension and the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, George P.; Hall, Clare

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes three central problems which adversely affect use, development, and perfection of cryonic suspension of individuals: the extent to which a physician may be guilty of malpractice in assisting with a suspension; the need for a recognition of suspension; and the present effect of the law's anachronistic treatment of estate devolution upon a…

  12. Multimodal Plasmonics in Fused Colloidal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Teulle, Alexandre; Girard, C; Gurunatha, Kargal L; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen; Dujardin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the optical properties of noble metals down to the nanometer-scale is a key step towards fast and low-dissipative information processing. At the 10-nm length scale, metal crystallinity and patterning as well as probing of surface plasmon (SP) properties must be controlled with a challenging high level of precision. Here, we demonstrate that ultimate lateral confinement and delocalization of SP modes are simultaneously achieved in extended self-assembled networks comprising linear chains of partially fused gold nanoparticles. The spectral and spatial distributions of the SP modes associated with the colloidal superstructures are evidenced by performing monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy with a nanometer-sized electron probe. We prepare the metallic bead strings by electron beam-induced interparticle fusion of nanoparticle networks. The fused superstructures retain the native morphology and crystallinity but develop very low energy SP modes that are capable of supporting long range and s...

  13. Porous Silica-Supported Solid Lipid Particles for Enhanced Solubilization of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Rokhsana; Rao, Shasha; Bremmell, Kristen E; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-07-01

    Low dissolution of drugs in the intestinal fluid can limit their effectiveness in oral therapies. Here, a novel porous silica-supported solid lipid system was developed to optimize the oral delivery of drugs with limited aqueous solubility. Using lovastatin (LOV) as the model poorly water-soluble drug, two porous silica-supported solid lipid systems (SSL-A and SSL-S) were fabricated from solid lipid (glyceryl monostearate, GMS) and nanoporous silica particles Aerosil 380 (silica-A) and Syloid 244FP (silica-S) via immersion/solvent evaporation. SSL particles demonstrated significantly higher rate and extent of lipolysis in comparison with the pure solid lipid, depending on the lipid loading levels and the morphology. The highest lipid digestion was observed when silica-S was loaded with 34% (w/w) solid lipid, and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis confirmed the encapsulation of up to 2% (w/w) non-crystalline LOV in this optimal SSL-S formulation. Drug dissolution under non-digesting intestinal conditions revealed a three- to sixfold increase in dissolution efficiencies when compared to the unformulated drug and a LOV-lipid suspension. Furthermore, the SSL-S provided superior drug solubilization under simulated intestinal digesting condition in comparison with the drug-lipid suspension and drug-loaded silica. Therefore, solid lipid and nanoporous silica provides a synergistic effect on optimizing the solubilization of poorly water-soluble compound and the solid lipid-based porous carrier system provides a promising delivery approach to overcome the oral delivery challenges of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  14. Demonstrating Earth connections and fuses working together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Earth wires and fuses work together in UK mains circuits to keep users safe from electric shocks and are taught in many school contexts. The subject can be quite abstract and difficult for pupils to grasp, and a simple but visually clear and direct demonstration is described which would be easy for most physics departments to build and which can make the concepts much more immediately understandable.

  15. Shear thickening behavior of nanoparticle suspensions with carbon nanofillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, Xiaofei; Yu, Kejing, E-mail: yukejing@gmail.com; Cao, Haijian; Qian, Kun [Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles (China)

    2013-07-15

    Suspensions comprised of silica nanoparticle (average diameter: 650 nm) and carbon nanofillers dispersed in polyethylene glycol were prepared and investigated. Rheological measurement demonstrated that the mixed suspensions showed a non-Newtonian flow profile, and the shear thickening effect was enhanced by the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (main range of diameter: 10-20 nm; length: 5-15 {mu}m; purity: >97 wt%) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNs) (average diameter: >50 nm; average length: 20 {mu}m; purity: >92 wt%). It suggested that better the aggregation effect of dispersed particles was, the more significant the shear thickening effect achieved. The results also revealed that the formation of large nanomaterials clusters could be suitable to explain the phenomena. Furthermore, the trend of shear thickening behavior of the silica suspension with CNTs was more striking than that of GNs. The physical reactions between those multi-dispersed phases had been described by the schematic illustrations in papers. Otherwise, a model was built to explain these behaviors, which could be attributed to the unique structures and inherent properties of these two different nanofillers. And the morphologies of the shear thickening fluid which were examined by transmission electron microscopy confirmed this mechanism.

  16. Boron nitride nanotubes functionalized with mesoporous silica for intracellular delivery of chemotherapy drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhi, Chunyi; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Yamaguchi, Maho; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-08-25

    Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT)@mesoporous silica hybrids with controllable surface zeta potential were fabricated for intracellular delivery of doxorubicin. The materials showed higher suspension ability, doxorubicin intracellular endocytosis efficiency, and LNcap prostate cancer cell killing ability compared with naked BNNTs.

  17. Evidence of a green luminescence band related to surface flaws in high purity silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, J.; Neauport, J.; Grua, P. [CEA, CESTA, F-33114 Le Barp (France); Fournier, J.; Fargin, E.; Jubera, V. [Univ Bordeaux, CNRS, ICMCB, F-33608 Pessac (France); Talaga, D. [Univ Bordeaux, CNRS, ISM, F-33405 Talence (France); Jouannigot, S. [Univ Bordeaux 1, LCTS, SAFRAN, CNRS, CEA, UMR 5801, Pessac (France)

    2010-07-01

    Using luminescence con-focal microscopy under 325 nm laser excitation, we explore the populations of defects existing in or at the vicinity of macroscopic surface flaws in fused silica. We report our luminescence results on two types of surface flaws: laser damage and indentation on fused silica polished surfaces. Luminescence cartographies are made to show the spatial distribution of each kind of defect. Three bands, centered at 1.89 eV, 2.75 eV and 2.25 eV are evidenced on laser damage and indentations. The band centered at 2.25 eV was not previously reported in photo luminescence experiments on indentations and pristine silica, for excitation wavelengths of 325 nm or larger. The luminescent objects, expected to be trapped in sub-surface micro-cracks, are possibly involved in the first step of the laser damage mechanism when fused silica is enlightened at 351 nm laser in nanosecond regime. (authors)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a multimode stationary phase: Congo red derivatized silica in nano-flow HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Guan; Chen, Wujuan; He, Pingang; Wang, Qingjiang

    2016-02-01

    A novel Congo red (CR) derivatized silica stationary phase was prepared and packed into a fused silica capillary tube for nano-flow HPLC. A variety of analytes including poly-aromatic hydrocarbons, parabens, acids, sulfonamides, bases, and nucleosides were successfully separated using the CR. In comparison with commercial ODS columns, this new stationary phase has a different separation mechanism (hydrophobically-assisted ion-exchange), which was evident in the separation of benzoic acid derivatives and sulfonamides. The successful application of CR-bonded silica stationary phase in the HILIC and PALC modes demonstrates the effectiveness of this potential chromatographic material in nano flow HPLC.

  19. Antibacterial performance of nanocrystallined titania confined in mesoporous silica nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Peruzynska, Magdalena; Markowska-Szczupak, Agata; Chen, Xuecheng; Wajda, Anna; Lapczuk, Joanna; Kurzawski, Mateusz; Kalenczuk, Ryszard J; Drozdzik, Marek; Mijowska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we study synthesis and characteristics of mesoporous silica nanotubes modified by titanium dioxide, as well as their antimicrobial properties and influence on mitochondrial activity of mouse fibroblast L929. Nanocrystalized titania is confined in mesopores of silica nanotubes and its light activated antibacterial response is revealed. The analysis of the antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli. (ATCC 25922) shows strong enhancement during irradiation with the artificial visible and ultraviolet light in respect to the commercial catalyst and control sample free from the nanomaterials. In darkness, the mesoporous silica/titania nanostructures exhibited antibacterial activity dependent on the stirring speed of the suspension containing nanomaterials. Obtained micrograph proved internalization of the sample into the microorganism trough the cell membrane. The analysis of the mitochondrial activity and amount of lactate dehydrogenase released from mouse fibroblast cells L929 in the presence of the sample were determined with LDH and WST1 assays, respectively. The synthesized silica/titania antibacterial agent also exhibits pronounced photoinduced inactivation of the bacterial growth under the artificial visible and UV light irritation in respect to the commercial catalyst. Additionally, mesoporous silica/titania nanotubes were characterized in details by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), XRD and BET Isotherm.

  20. Colloidal gold and silica in mesothermal vein systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, R. J.; Wilkinson, J. J.

    1993-06-01

    Some of the textural features of mesothermal gold-quartz veins may be best explained by the initial precipitation of amorphous silica gel (colloid), which subsequently crystallizes to quartz. This can occur in brittle-ductile shear zones where a significant fluid-pressure drop occurs during stick-slip failure. Such a process rapidly supersaturates the hydrothermal fluid with respect to amorphous silica, which precipitates instead of quartz, owing to favorable kinetics. Depressurization also commonly leads to fluid unmixing and destabilization of soluble gold complexes. However, the presence of colloidal silica can stabilize gold colloid, allowing further transport of particulate gold in suspension in the hydrothermal fluid. Silica gel would be highly unstable under mesothermal conditions and would undergo rapid syneresis and crystallization to form quartz; solid impurities would tend to be expelled toward grain boundaries. This model can account for the primary anhedral aggregate textures typical of mesothermal quartz veins, the concentration of gold along grain boundaries and the formation of discrete gold nuggets, and the rare occurrence of low-order silica polymorphs and relict spheroidal structures. The transport of gold in colloidal form may be one reason for the frequently consistent bulk grade distribution in gold-quartz vein systems over many hundreds of metres (in some cases kilometres) of depth. In addition, the formation of charged colloidal particles may help to explain the attraction of gold grains to specific mineral surfaces.

  1. Nanomanufacturing of silica nanowires: Synthesis, characterization and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Praveen Kumar

    ) results from the Er doped silica nanowires indicate a sharp emission around 1.54 microm representative of the I13/2 to I15/2 transition in Erbium. Also, a five-fold increase in the PL intensity and 30% augment in luminescence life time have been observed in nanowires when compared to fused silica sample prepared under similar conditions. The experimental results indicate the potential of silica nanowires in a wide variety of applications such as the development of orthogonal biosensors, fabrication of metallic nanowires, and environmental sensing probes.

  2. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  3. Modelling and Analysis of Proximity Effect in IGBT Fuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Rasmussen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    . Even with an active protection, a high power IGBT still has a risk of exhibiting a violent rupture in the case of a fault if e.g. IGBT fuses are not protecting it. By introducing fuses into voltage source converters a better protection of IGBT's can be achieved. However, skin and proximity effects...... affect the current distribution in a fuse due to the high frequency currents and thus a need for de-rating the fuse. This paper shows an analytical model for studying the proximity effect into a fuse. The results obtained using this model are compared with experiments....

  4. Diaphragm-free fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer based on tapered hollow silica tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guocheng; Jia, Pinggang; Liang, Ting; Tan, Qiulin; Hong, Yingping; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-07-01

    A miniature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer fabricated by splicing a diaphragm-free hollow silica tube to a single-mode fiber and fusing the inner core to a taper is presented. The tapered zone forces lights to propagate from the fiber core into the silica tube, and the lights is reflected from the end faces of the optical fiber and the hollow silica tube. The contrast ratio of the interference fringe is determined by the minimum inner diameter of hollow silica tube. The responses of the proposed interferometer to high-temperature, gas refractive index, liquid refractive index and pressure were measured and were found to be linear with sensitivities of 16.26 pm/°C, 610.47 nm/RIU, -122.36 dB/RIU and 1.56 pm/kPa, respectively.

  5. A linker peptide with high affinity towards silica-containing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunna, Anwar; Chi, Fei; Bergquist, Peter L

    2013-06-25

    A peptide sequence with affinity to silica-containing materials was fused to a truncated form of Streptococcus strain G148 Protein G. The resulting recombinant Linker-Protein G (LPG) was produced in Escherichia coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. It displayed high affinity towards two natural clinoptilolite zeolites. The LPG also displayed high binding affinity towards commercial-grade synthetic zeolite, silica and silica-containing materials. A commercial sample of the truncated Protein G and a basic protein, both without the linker, did not bind to natural or synthetic zeolites or silica. We conclude that the zeolite-binding affinity is mediated by the linker peptide sequence. As a consequence, these data may imply that the binding affinity is directed to the SiO2 component rather than to the atomic orientation on the zeolite crystal surface as previously assumed.

  6. Effects of Silica on Serum Phospholipid,Lipid Peroxide and Morphological Characteristics of Rat Lung

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUOWEI-XIN; LIGUO-HUA; 等

    1995-01-01

    The effects of instilled silica have been studied on the serum-phospholipid(PL).lipid peroxide(LPO)and histopathology of rat lung up to 140 days from the first day of instillation.Silica induced relatively higher serum-PL throunghout the experiment.The level of LPO also increased appreciably.They presented positive linear correlation.The early lesion was acute alveolitis with silica particles.These lesions became silicotic nodules on the 30th day,which then were enlargen gradually and fused by fibrosis.Alveolar macrophages(AM)were activated and surface structure was damaged.These results indicate that instilled silica can induce lipid peroxidation of cell membrane and selective accumulation of lung PL.

  7. Dense Suspension Splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wendy; Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-03-01

    Upon impact onto a solid surface at several meters-per-second, a dense suspension plug splashes by ejecting liquid-coated particles. We study the mechanism for splash formation using experiments and a numerical model. In the model, the dense suspension is idealized as a collection of cohesionless, rigid grains with finite surface roughness. The grains also experience lubrication drag as they approach, collide inelastically and rebound away from each other. Simulations using this model reproduce the measured momentum distribution of ejected particles. They also provide direct evidence supporting the conclusion from earlier experiments that inelastic collisions, rather than viscous drag, dominate when the suspension contains macroscopic particles immersed in a low-viscosity solvent such as water. Finally, the simulations reveal two distinct routes for splash formation: a particle can be ejected by a single high momentum-change collision. More surprisingly, a succession of small momentum-change collisions can accumulate to eject a particle outwards. Supported by NSF through its MRSEC program (DMR-0820054) and fluid dynamics program (CBET-1336489).

  8. Speciation characterization and coagulation of poly-silica-ferric-chloride: The role of hydrolyzed Fe(Ⅲ) and silica interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Shi; Yan Zhang; Kaiyun Zou; Feng Xiao

    2011-01-01

    The highly efficient inorganic polymer flocculants (IPFs) of the ferric-silica system is a new and promising coagulant.Interactions between ferric species and silica play a large part in the coagulation of suspensions.These effects are quite distinct from those associated with polymeric or colloid silica.However, although these species are key to coagulation efficiency, they have not been comprehensively discussed.A new type of coagulant, poly-silica-ferric-chloride (PFSC), was synthesized by co-polymerization and characterized by time complexation spectroscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy.Compared with traditional ferric salt, the results indicated that PFSC had a higher molecular weight, lesser positive charge, lower Feb and higher Fec.The higher the Si/Fe ratio, the higher the silica and lower the silicac found.The PFSC with appropriate polysilica acid not only obtained better coagulation/flocculation efficiency in turbidity removal, enhanced the flocculation index (FI) and provided less residual ferric, it also lowered water treatment costs compared to traditional ferric salt.Results showed that PFSC could remove colloid particles in water by charge neutralization and sweeping, adsorption bridging mechanism.

  9. Automated coating procedures to produce poly(ethylene glycol) brushes in fused-silica capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N.; Østergaard, Jesper; Petersen, Nickolaj J.

    2017-01-01

    . Flexible and reliable approaches for preventing unwanted protein adsorption in separation science are thus in high demand. We therefore present new coating approaches based on an automated in-capillary surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization process (covalent coating) as well...... as by electrostatically adsorbing a pre-synthesized polymer leading to functionalized molecular brushes. The electroosmotic flow was measured following each step of the covalent coating procedure providing a detailed characterization and quality control. Both approaches resulted in good fouling resistance against...... the four model proteins cytochrome c, myoglobin, ovalbumin and human serum albumin in the pH range 3.4-8.4. Further, even samples containing 10% v/v plasma derived from human blood did not show signs of adsorbing to the coated capillaries. The covalent as well as the electrostatically adsorbed coating were...

  10. Optical modulation study of repaired damage morphologies of fused silica by scalar diffraction theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Qingyan; Jiang, Yong; Xiang, Xia; Liao, Wei; Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Haijun; Luan, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Wanguo; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    The cone and Gaussian repaired damage craters are two typical morphologies induced by CO2 laser evaporation and nonevaporation technologies. The mathematical models are built for these two types of repaired craters, and the light modulation at 355 nm induced by the millimeter-scale repaired damage morphology is studied by scalar diffraction theory. The results show that the modulation of the Gaussian repaired morphology has one peak and then decreases with the increasing distance from 0 to 30 cm. While the modulation for cone repaired morphology remains stable after decreasing quickly with the increasing distance. When the horizontal radius increases, the modulation looks like a saw-tooth. However, the modulation has irregular variations for two kinds of morphologies with the increasing vertical depth. The simulated results agree well with experimental results. The horizontal and vertical dimensions, and downstream distance have different influences on the modulation. The risk of damage to downstream optical components can be suppressed to improve the stability of the optical system if the shape and size of repaired craters are well controlled and the positions of downstream optical components are selected appropriately.

  11. Towards fast femtosecond laser micromachining of fused silica: The effect of deposited energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sheeba; Bellouard, Yves

    2010-09-27

    Femtosecond laser micromachining of glass material using low-energy, sub-ablation threshold pulses find numerous applications in the fields of integrated optics, lab-on-a-chips and microsystems in general. In this paper, we study the influence of the laser-deposited energy on the performance of the micromachining process. In particular, we show that the energy deposited in the substrate affects its etching rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal energy deposition value. These results are not only important from an industrial point-of-view but also provide new evidences supporting the essential role of densification and consequently stress-generation as the main driving factor promoting enhanced etching rate following laser exposure.

  12. Hollow Core Optical Fiber Gas Lasers: Toward Novel and Practical Systems in Fused Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Nampoothiri, University of New Mexico Fetah Benabid, GPPMM group, Xlim, CNRS Research Institute, Limoges, France Project Summary/Abstract Abstract (>500...Kagome lattice fiber has been demonstrated: 8 dB/km at 1 um. Furthermore, we have pushed the state-of-the art in tubular lattice fiber; a loss of...Laser, University of New Mexico .................................................................................. 4  E.2.  Acetylene HOFGLAS, Kansas

  13. A novel side electrode configuration integrated in fused silica microsystems for synchronous optical and electrical spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukas, S.; Schreuder, F.; de Wagenaar, B.; Swennenhuis, Joost Franciscus; van den Berg, Albert; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; le Gac, Severine

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel electrode configuration consisting of coplanar side electrode pairs integrated at the half height of the microchannels for the creation of a homogeneous electric field distribution as well as for synchronous optical and electrical measurements. For the integration of such electrod

  14. Near-field enhancement of the nanostructure on the fused silica with rigorous method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Qi, Hongji; Wang, Bin; Cui, Yanyan; Chai, Yingjie; Jin, Yunxia; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2015-05-10

    A rigorous electromagnetic method is developed to analyze the resonance effect of near field caused by nanoscale subsurface defects, which play a key role in describing absorption enhancement during laser-matter interaction for transparent dielectric materials. The total electric field calculated with this new method is consistent with the result of finite-difference time-domain simulation. The concept of mode amplitude density spectrum is developed to analyze the specific modes of the total field. A new mode parameter is proposed to demarcate the contribution of the resonance. The frequency space is divided into four parts and the resonance effect is analyzed as well as the contributions of different modes to the total field. The influence of the structure parameters on the near-field modulation and energy transference is also discussed. It is found that the enhancement mechanism of the near-field and local absorption is the resonance effect caused by the total internal reflection on the sidewall of the nanostructure. In addition, the surrounding energy is mainly guided into the structure by the root of the structure via the energy flow analysis.

  15. Full Aperture CO2 Laser Process to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Fused Silica Optical Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method is presented to scan the full-aperture optical surface rapidly by using galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous studies, the scanning velocity is faster by several orders of magnitude. The velocity is chosen to allow little thermodeposition thus providing small and uniform residual stress. An appropriate power density is set to obtain a lower processing temperature. The proper parameters can help to prevent optical surface from fracturing during operation at high laser flux. S-on-1 damage test results show that the damage threshold of scanned area is approximately 40% higher than that of untreated area.

  16. The Formation of the Second-Order Nonlinearity in Thermally Poled Fused Silica Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    4.5 kV potential to which a 50 V energy offset had been applied. Samples were coated with a -50 nm gold film to prevent electrical charging during... photochromic dyes, after finding an appropriate way to incorporate or apply the dye. A more direct measurement of the electric field would be useful to study

  17. Electrophoretic behavior of charge regulated zwitter ionic buffers in covalently and dynamically coated fused silica capillaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the electrophoretic behavior of zwitterionic buffers is investigated in the absence of electroosmotic flow (EOF. Electro mobilization of capillary contents is noted when zwitterionic buffers are employed as the background electrolyte at a pH where the buffering moiety carries a net charge. The bulk flow of capillary contents was demonstrated via monitoring the migration of a neutral marker as well as a free and micellar negatively charged marker and SDS–protein complexes. This electrolyte-driven mobilization (EDM was investigated in detail using 4-(2-hydroxyethylpiprazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES buffer over a wide pH range (pH 4.0–8.0. Results confirmed that at a pH where HEPES molecules carry a net negative charge, a bulk flow toward the anode is observed. This was attributed to the migration of HEPES ions toward the anode along with their hydration shells. The relatively large difference in size and solvation number between the ionic buffering moiety and its counter-migrating ions (Na+ or H+ resulted in such a net movement. Results indicated that at constant voltage, plotting the measured current versus buffer pH can be used for determination of the isoelectric point of the zwitterionic buffering moiety. Furthermore, this novel mobilization modality was demonstrated using five different HEPES analogs over pH range 5.0–8.0. More in depth investigations are required in order to explore the applicability of EDM in coated capillaries of different wall chemistries and dimensions.

  18. Densification and Devitrification of Fused Silica Induced by Ballistic Impact: A Computational Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-25

    and P. G. Dehmer, “Effect of the tin- vs. air-side plate-glass orientation on the impact response and penetration resistance of a laminated ...the multi-hit ballistic-protection performance of laminated transparent-armor systems,” Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, vol. 21, no...www.hindawi.com Volume 2014 Nanoscience Journal of Textiles Hindawi Publishing Corporation http://www.hindawi.com Volume 2014 Journal of Nanotechnology

  19. Thermal stability of neutron irradiation effects on KU1 fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, M. [Materiales Para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: monica.leon@ciemat.es; Martin, P. [Materiales Para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, Madrid (Spain); Bravo, D.; Lopez, F.J. [Departamento Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [Materiales Para Fusion, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, Madrid (Spain); Rascon, A. [Metrologia Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, Madrid (Spain); Mota, F. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, DENIM, Universidad Politecnica, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    Optical absorption spectra of neutron irradiated (10{sup 21} n/m{sup 2} and 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}) KU1 quartz glass samples have been measured. The effects of post-irradiation isochronal thermal annealing, up to 850 deg. C, have been investigated. The general effect of the isochronal annealing is a decrease in the optical absorption bands as the temperature increases. Optical absorption bands have been identified with known defects from the literature, and their concentration temperature dependence has been analyzed. While the annealing curves of the E' and non-bridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC) are similar, that corresponding to oxygen deficiency centres (ODC(II)) is quite different suggesting that the recombination of E' and NBOHC is part of the same process whereas the recombination of ODC is controlled by the presence of another undetected defect.

  20. Fused Silica Ion Trap Chip with Efficient Optical Collection System for Timekeeping, Sensing, and Emulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-22

    sourcing, or in some ion trap applications, RF resonant detection. The walls of the high aspect slots and undercuts used to establish electrode...voltage test of these prototypes under vacuum did not result in any trace of breakdown (i.e. no observation of sparks or resonance jumps) even after...holes are characteristically conical . This geometry provides two benefits: it minimizes any limitation to the numerical aperture of the optics, and it

  1. Fractals of Silica Aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhinhongLi; DongWu; Yuhansun; JunWang; YiLiu; BaozhongDong; Zhinhong

    2001-01-01

    Silica aggregates were prepared by base-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of alkoxides in alcohol.Polyethylene glycol(PEG) was used as organic modifier.The sols were characterized using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) with synchrotron radiation as X-ray source.The structure evolution during the sol-gel process was determined and described in terms of the fractal geometry.As-produced silica aggregates were found to be mass fractals.The fractl dimensions spanned the regime 2.1-2.6 corresponding to more branched and compact structures.Both RLCA and Eden models dominated the kinetic growth under base-catalyzed condition.

  2. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  3. Silica reinforced triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theunissen, E.; Overbergh, N.; Reynaers, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of silica and polymer coated silica particles as reinforcing agents on the structural and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene/butylene)-polystyrene (PS-PEB-PS) triblock gel has been investigated. Different types of chemically modified silica have been compared in order...... a viscoclastic rubber to a plastic fluid and from a plastic fluid to a viscoelastic liquid are shifted to more elevated temperatures when silica is added to the triblock copolymer gel. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Medicinal Chemistry Perspective of Fused Isoxazole Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmade, Mahesh A; Murumkar, Prashant R; Sharma, Mayank Kumar; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen containing heterocyclic rings with an oxygen atom is considered as one of the best combination in medicinal chemistry due to their diversified biological activities. Isoxazole, a five membered heterocyclic azole ring is found in naturally occuring ibetonic acid along with some of the marketed drugs such as valdecoxib, flucloxacillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, and danazol. It is also significant for showing antipsychotic activity in risperidone and anticonvulsant activity in zonisamide, the marketed drugs. This review article covers research articles reported till date covering biological activity along with SAR of fused isoxazole derivatives.

  5. Semiautomatic MDF deburring tool. [Mild detonating fuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonton, W.L.

    1976-03-31

    A device for semiautomatically deburring the ends of lengths of MDF (mild detonating fuse) was developed by the Automation Development group at Mound Laboratory. The device performs the deburring function by cutting a 0.002 in. x 0.002 in. chamfer on the MDF with small rotating blades. This air-operated, semiautomatic device provides improvement over the manual method of removing burrs by reduction in time and operator strain. A time study is underway to determine the time saved which is expected to be about 75 percent.

  6. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und-pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  7. SANS study to probe nanoparticle dispersion in nanocomposite membranes of aromatic polyamide and functionalized silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadav, Ghanshyam L; Aswal, Vinod K; Singh, Puyam S

    2010-11-01

    Silica nanoparticles produced from organically functionalized silicon alkoxide precursors were incorporated into polyamide film to produce a silica-polyamide nanocomposite membrane with enhanced properties. The dispersion of the silica nanoparticles in the nanocomposite membrane was characterized by performing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements on dilute reactant systems and dilute solution suspensions of the final product. Clear scattering of monodisperse spherical particles of 10-18 A R(g) were observed from dilute solutions of the initial reactant system. These silica nanoparticles initially reacted with diamine monomers of polyamide and subsequently were transformed into polyamide-coated silica nanoparticles; finally nanoparticle aggregates of 27-45 A R(g) were formed. The nanoparticle dispersion of the membrane as the nanosized aggregates is in corroboration with ring- or chain-like assemblies of the nanoparticles dispersed in the bulk polyamide phase as observed by transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that dispersions of silica nanoparticles as the nanosized aggregates in the polyamide phase could be achieved in the nanocomposite membrane with a silica content up to about 2 wt.%. Nanocomposite membranes with higher silica loading approximately 10 wt.% lead to the formation of large aggregates of sizes over 100 A R(g) in addition to the nanosized aggregates.

  8. Rayleigh scattering by aqueous colloidal silica as a cause for the blue color of hydrothermal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Shinji; Kawamura, Takao; Takamatsu, Nobuki; Yusa, Yuki

    2002-03-01

    Thermal waters in hydrothermal ponds, bathing pools and the brines of geothermal electric power plants commonly have a characteristic blue color. Although many researchers have assumed that the blue color is due to a colloidal suspension and/or absorption by dissolved ferrous iron or by water itself, there has been no specific effort to identify the physical nature of this phenomenon. We have tested, in synthetic and natural solutions, whether aqueous colloidal silica is responsible for the blue color. Aqueous colloidal silica is formed by silica polymerization in thermal waters of the neutral-chloride type which contain initially monomeric silica in concentrations up to three times above the solubilities of amorphous silica. The hue of the blue thermal waters in the pools tested agrees with that of a synthesized colloidal silica solution. Grain-size analyses of aqueous colloidal silica in the blue-colored thermal waters demonstrate that the color is caused by Rayleigh scattering from aqueous colloidal silica particles with diameters (0.1-0.45 μm) smaller than the wavelengths of visible radiation.

  9. Thin supported silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Tijana

    2007-01-01

    This thesis discusses several transport-related aspects relevant for the application of thin supported silica membranes for gas separation and nanofiltration. The influence of support geometry on overall membrane performance is investigated. Planar (i.e., flat plate), tubular, and multichannel suppo

  10. Loading antifungal drugs onto silica particles grafted with cyclodextrins by means of inclusion complex formation at the solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hbaieb, Souhaira; Kalfat, Rafik; Chevalier, Yves

    2012-12-15

    Immobilization of antifungal drugs to solid particles has been addressed in order to limit the skin penetration to the skin surface during topical administration. Antifungal drug griseofulvin has been immobilized at the surface of silica particles by formation of its inclusion complex with β-cyclodextrins grafted to silica. A simple and fast process for loading griseofulvin into the hydrophobic cavity of cyclodextrins at the surface of the solid particles in aqueous suspension has been designed. It allowed the formation of the griseofulvin:cyclodextrin inclusion complex of 1:1 stoichiometry to completion. Grafting β-cyclodextrins to silica surface has been performed in a two-step procedure. The coupling agent 3-amino-propylmethyldiethoxysilane was reacted onto fumed silica particles as a first step. The second step was the reaction of grafted primary amino groups with tosylated β-cyclodextrin that led to β-cyclodextrin grafted silica. Loading griseofulvin onto grafted silica particles have been investigated by IR spectroscopy and by tracking possible crystals of griseofulvin in aqueous suspension by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Successful formation of the inclusion complex at the surface of grafted silica suggested a strong adsorption of griseofulvin by means of heterogeneous nucleation of crystals, followed by inclusion complexation taking place between the partners being in close proximity at the surface of silica particles. The high adsorption capacity of CD-grafted silica for griseofulvin compared to bare silica and amino-grafted silica supports this interpretation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Split Bregman method for large scale fused Lasso

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Gui-Bo

    2010-01-01

    rdering of regression or classification coefficients occurs in many real-world applications. Fused Lasso exploits this ordering by explicitly regularizing the differences between neighboring coefficients through an $\\ell_1$ norm regularizer. However, due to nonseparability and nonsmoothness of the regularization term, solving the fused Lasso problem is computationally demanding. Existing solvers can only deal with problems of small or medium size, or a special case of the fused Lasso problem in which the predictor matrix is identity matrix. In this paper, we propose an iterative algorithm based on split Bregman method to solve a class of large-scale fused Lasso problems, including a generalized fused Lasso and a fused Lasso support vector classifier. We derive our algorithm using augmented Lagrangian method and prove its convergence properties. The performance of our method is tested on both artificial data and real-world applications including proteomic data from mass spectrometry and genomic data from array...

  12. Current advances in fused tetrathiafulvalene donor-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkamp, Jesse J; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-02-21

    Electron donor (D) and acceptor (A) systems have been studied extensively. Among them, fused D-A systems have attracted much attention during the past decades. Herein, we will present the evolution of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) fused D-A systems and their potential applications in areas such as solar cells, OFETs, molecular wires and optoelectronics just to name a few. The synthesis and electrochemical, photophysical and intrinsic properties of fused D-A systems will be described as well.

  13. Method for the removal of ultrafine particulates from an aqueous suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J. (Naperville, IL); Kopasz, John P. (Bolingbrook, IL); Ellison, Adam J. G. (Corning, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A method of separating ultra-fine particulates from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel containing the particulates, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

  14. Method for the Removal of Ultrafine Particulates from an Aqueous Suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J.; Kopasz, John P.; Ellison, Adam J.G.

    1999-03-05

    A method of separating ultra-fine particulate from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel-containing the particulate, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

  15. Stable suspension and dispersion-induced transitions from repulsive Casimir forces between fluid separated eccentric cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalvit, Diego A1 [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Alejandro W [MASS INST OF TECH; Munday, J N [HARVARD UNIV; Joannopoulos, J D [MASS INST OF TECH

    2008-01-01

    Using accurate numerical methods for finite-size nonplanar objects, we demonstrate a stable mechanical suspension of a silica cylinder within a metallic cylinder separated by ethanol, via a repulsive Casimir force between the silica and the metal. We investigate cylinders with both circular and square cross sections, and show that the latter exhibit a stable orientation as well as a stable position, employing a new method to accurately compute Casimir torques for finite objects. Furthermore, the stable orientation of the square cylinder is shown to undergo an unusual 45 transition as a function of the separation lengthscale, and this transition is explained as a consequence of material dispersion.

  16. 48 CFR 209.407 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 209.407... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 209.407 Suspension....

  17. 75 FR 27923 - Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... 3150-AI76 Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final... nonprocurement debarment and suspension. These regulations cover grants, cooperative agreements and other...) guidance on nonprocurement debarment and suspension found in OMB's regulations. DATES: Effective June...

  18. Vehicle with tilting suspension system

    OpenAIRE

    Festini, Andrea; Tonoli, Andrea; Cavalli, Fabio; Carabelli, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    The patent is relative to the application of a tilting suspension on a snowmobile to improve its drive feeling and safety. At high speed the introduction of the tilting suspension reduce the rollover risk during cornering. The vehicle can tilt as a motorcycle and its lateral dimensions can be reduced not compromising the vehicle stability

  19. Understanding error generation in fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Lennart; Bayley, Cindy; Helu, Moneer; Transchel, Robert; Wegener, Konrad; Dornfeld, David

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing offers completely new possibilities for the manufacturing of parts. The advantages of flexibility and convenience of additive manufacturing have had a significant impact on many industries, and optimizing part quality is crucial for expanding its utilization. This research aims to determine the sources of imprecision in fused deposition modeling (FDM). Process errors in terms of surface quality, accuracy and precision are identified and quantified, and an error-budget approach is used to characterize errors of the machine tool. It was determined that accuracy and precision in the y direction (0.08-0.30 mm) are generally greater than in the x direction (0.12-0.62 mm) and the z direction (0.21-0.57 mm). Furthermore, accuracy and precision tend to decrease at increasing axis positions. The results of this work can be used to identify possible process improvements in the design and control of FDM technology.

  20. Mid-IR fused fiber couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, G.; Woodbridge, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present results from our recent efforts on developing single-mode fused couplers in ZBLAN fibre. We have developed a custom fusion workstation for working with lower melting temperature fibres, such as ZBLAN and chalcogenide fibres. Our workstation uses a precisely controlled electrical heater designed to operate at temperatures between 100 - 250°C as our heat source. The heated region of the fibers was also placed in an inert atmosphere to avoid the formation of microcrystal inclusions during fusion. We firstly developed a process for pulling adiabatic tapers in 6/125 μm ZBLAN fibre. The tapers were measured actively during manufacture using a 2000 nm source. The process was automated so that the heater temperature and motor speed automatically adjusted to pull the taper at constant tension. This process was then further developed so that we could fuse and draw two parallel 6/125 μm ZBLAN fibres, forming a single-mode coupler. Low ratio couplers (1-10%) that could be used as power monitors were manufactured that had an excess loss of 0.76 dB. We have also manufactured 50/50 splitters and wavelength division multiplexers (WDMs). However, the excess loss of these devices was typically 2 - 3 dB. The increased losses were due to localised necking and surface defects forming as the tapers were pulled further to achieve a greater coupling ratio. Initial experiments with chalcogenide fibre have shown that our process can be readily adapted for chalcogenide fibres. A 5% coupler with 1.5 dB insertion loss was manufactured using commercial of the shelf (COTS) fibres.

  1. High Voltage Applications of Explosively Formed Fuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; Fowler, C. M.; Herrera, D. H.; King, J. C.; Lopez, E. A.; Martinez, E. C.; Oona, H.; Marsh, S. P.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Stokes, J.; Tabaka, L. J.; Torres, D. T.; Sena, F. C.; Kiuttu, G.; Degnan, J.

    2004-11-01

    At Los Alamos, we have primarily applied Explosively Formed Fuse (EFF) techniques to high current systems. In these systems, the EFF has interrupted currents from 19-25 MA, thus diverting the current to low inductance loads. The transferred current magnitude is determined by the ratio of storage inductance to load inductance and, with dynamic loads, the current has ranged from 12-20 MA. In a system with 18 MJ stored energy, the switch operates at a power of up to 6 TW. We are now investigating the use of the EFF technique to apply high voltages to high impedance loads in systems that are more compact. In these systems we are exploring circuits with EFF lengths from 43-100 cm, which have storage inductances large enough to apply 300-500 kV across high impedance loads. Experimental results and design considerations are presented. Using cylindrical EFF switches of 10 cm diameter and 43 cm length, currents of approximately 3 MA were interrupted producing ~200 kV. This indicates the switch had an effective resistance of ~100 mΩ where 150-200 mΩ was expected. To understand the lower performance, several parameters were studied including electrical conduction through the explosive products; current density; explosive initiation; insulator type and conductor thickness. The results show a number of interesting features, most notably that the primary mechanism of switch operation is mechanical and not electrical fusing of the conductor. Switches opening on a 1-10 μs time scale with resistances starting at 50 μΩ and increasing to perhaps 1 Ω now seem possible to construct using explosive charges as small as a few pounds.

  2. Aniline incorporated silica nanobubbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M J Rosemary; V Suryanarayanan; Ian Maclaren; T Pradeep

    2006-09-01

    We report the synthesis of stearate functionalized nanobubbles of SiO2 with a few aniline molecules inside, represented as C6H5NH2@SiO2@stearate, exhibiting fluorescence with red-shifted emission. Stearic acid functionalization allows the materials to be handled just as free molecules, for dissolution, precipitation, storage etc. The methodology adopted involves adsorption of aniline on the surface of gold nanoparticles with subsequent growth of a silica shell through monolayers, followed by the selective removal of the metal core either using sodium cyanide or by a new reaction involving halocarbons. The material is stable and can be stored for extended periods without loss of fluorescence. Spectroscopic and voltammetric properties of the system were studied in order to understand the interaction of aniline with the shell as well as the monolayer, whilst transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the silica shell.

  3. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into silica nanoparticles by inelastic collision via ultrasonic field: Role of colloidal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Azlan, Abdul Aziz [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology (NOR) Lab, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang, Malaysia Nano-Biotechnology Research (Malaysia); Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)/Silica composite nanoparticles were prepared by ultrasonically irradiating colloidal suspension of silica and SPION mixture. Both silica and SPION were synthesized independently via co-precipitation and sol-gel method, respectively. Their mixtures were sonicated at different pH between 3 and 5. Electrophoresis measurement and other physicochemical analyses of the products demonstrate that at lower pH SPION was found incorporated into the silica. However, at pH greater than 4, SPION was unstable and unable to withstand the turbulence flow and shock wave from the ultrasonic field. Results suggest that the formation of the SPION/silica composite nanoparticles is strongly related to the inelastic collision induced by ultrasonic irradiation. More so, the formation the composite nanoparticles via the ultrasonic field are dependent on the zeta potential and colloidal stability of the particles.

  4. Fused porphyrin-single-walled carbon nanotube hybrids: efficient formation and photophysical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiwen; Diev, Vyacheslav V; Roberts, Sean T; Antunez, Priscilla D; Brutchey, Richard L; Bradforth, Stephen E; Thompson, Mark E

    2013-04-23

    A systematic study of the interaction between π-extended porphyrins and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported here. Zinc porphyrins with 1-pyrenyl groups in the 5,15-meso positions, 1, as well as compounds where one or both of the pyrene groups have been fused at the meso and β positions of the porphyrin core, 2 and 3, respectively, have been examined. The strongest binding to SWNTs is observed for porphyrin 3, leading to debundling of the nanotubes and formation of stable suspensions of 3-SWNT hybrids in a range of common organic solvents. Absorption spectra of 3-SWNT suspensions are broad and continuous (λ=400-1400 nm), and the Q-band of 3 displays a significant bathochromic shift of 33 nm. The surface coverage of the SWNTs in the nanohybrids was estimated by spectroscopic and analytical methods and found to reach 64% for (7,6) nanotubes. The size and shape of π-conjugated porphyrins were found to be important factors in determining the strength of the π-π interactions, as the linear anti-3 isomer displays more than 90% binding selectivity compared to the bent syn-3 isomer. Steady-state photoluminescence measurements show quenching of porphyrin emission from the nanohybrids. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that this quenching results from ultrafast electron transfer from the photoexcited porphyrin to the SWNT (1/kCT=260 fs) followed by rapid charge recombination on a picosecond time scale. Overall, our data demonstrate that direct π-π interaction between fused porphyrins and SWNTs leads to electronically coupled stable nanohybrids.

  5. Influence of silk-silica fusion protein design on silica condensation in vitro and cellular calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowright, Robyn; Dinjaski, Nina; Zhou, Shun; Belton, David J.; Kaplan, David L.; Perry, Carole C.

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial design via genetic engineering can be utilized for the rational functionalization of proteins to promote biomaterial integration and tissue regeneration. Spider silk has been extensively studied for its biocompatibility, biodegradability and extraordinary material properties. As a protein-based biomaterial, recombinant DNA derived derivatives of spider silks have been modified with biomineralization domains which lead to silica deposition and potentially accelerated bone regeneration. However, the influence of the location of the R5 (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) silicifying domain fused with the spider silk protein sequence on the biosilicification process remains to be determined. Here we designed two silk-R5 fusion proteins that differed in the location of the R5 peptide, C- vs. N-terminus, where the spider silk domain consisted of a 15mer repeat of a 33 amino acid consensus sequence of the major ampullate dragline Spidroin 1 from Nephila clavipes (SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQGT). The chemical, physical and silica deposition properties of these recombinant proteins were assessed and compared to a silk 15mer control without the R5 present. The location of the R5 peptide did not have a significant effect on wettability and surface energies, while the C-terminal location of the R5 promoted more controlled silica precipitation, suggesting differences in protein folding and possibly different access to charged amino acids that drive the silicification process. Further, cell compatibility in vitro, as well as the ability to promote human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation were demonstrated for both variants of the fusion proteins. PMID:26989487

  6. The influence of molybdenum disulfide nanoplatelets on the dispersion of nano silica in natural rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Peijin; Wei, Qiuyan; Tang, Zhenghai; Lin, Tengfei; Guo, Baochun

    2015-12-01

    The dispersion of nanofiller in polymer composites is critical in governing the ultimate performances. Present study aimed to improve the dispersion of silica in elastomeric materials based on natural rubber (NR) composites using the nanoplatelets of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a graphene-like layered inorganic. NR latex was co-coagulated with MoS2 suspension to form NR/MoS2 compounds (1∼5 phr). Then silica (30 phr) was incorporated into NR/MoS2 compounds, followed by curing with sulfur, to obtained NR/MoS2/silica composites. The dispersion state of silica in the composites was examined by TEM and the effects of MoS2 on the performance of the composites were investigated. It was found that a small amount of MoS2 nanoplatelets significantly improved the silica dispersion. Consequently, the static and dynamic mechanical properties of the crosslinked natural rubber materials were greatly enhanced. The improved dispersion of silica is associated with charge transfer interaction, giving rise to electrostatic repulsion among silica.

  7. Cements and concentrated model suspensions. Flow, jamming and flocculation; Ciments et suspensions concentrees modeles. Ecoulement, encombrement et floculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lootens, D.

    2004-10-15

    Here we report about the rheological behavior of very concentrated dispersions -or pastes- of granular or colloidal particles of cement or of monodisperse spherical silica particles. The model system of silica particles is used in order to control the physical chemistry properties of the suspension. Our research project is centered on two points which are focusing on the slurries properties: (i) the first one is the study of the structuring process by the coagulation at rest and its relation with setting. We use special tools (ultrasonic, confocal) to follow and understand the evolution from coagulation to the setting of cement (ii) the second is the study of the dynamic structuring phenomena, under shear, typical of the concentrated suspensions and named jamming. The flow can enter into a shear-thickening and, possibly jamming regime. The onset of this regime is shown to involve giant fluctuations of stress, assigned to the formation and breakup of direct frictional contact chains. The surface state of the particles is a determining factor in this transition. The studies of the normal stress and microscopic observation give good reasons to believe that solid friction is involved in the jamming transition. (author)

  8. FUSE observations of the central star of Abell 78

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, K; Koesterke, L; Kruk, J W

    2002-01-01

    FUSE high resolution spectra of two PG1159 type central stars (K1-16 and NGC 7094) have revealed an unexpected iron deficiency of at least 1 or 2 dex (Miksa et al. 2002). Here we present early results of FUSE spectroscopy of the CSPN Abell 78. It is shown that iron is strongly deficient in this star, too.

  9. Thermal performance of back-up current-limiting fuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, E.; Mazon, A.J.; Fernandez, E.; Zamora, I. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo, s/n, Bilbao 48013, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez, J.C. [MESA - Schneider Electric, Gatica 48110 (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The design and development of current-limiting power fuses requires considerable time and expense on testing to verify that the maximum temperature limits under the rated current established in international standards are not exceeded. This paper presents a new methodology that reproduces the thermal behaviour of high voltage current-limiting fuses under currents up to the rated value and so, it reduces the need for testing as prototypes, more similar to the final design, can be obtained. Firstly, the methodology solves the transient heating process of the fuse to obtain the values of the power dissipated and the heat transfer coefficient, corresponding to the steady state condition. Once these values have been calculated, the temperature distribution at the surface of the complete fuse is obtained. The validity of the method proposed has been verified by comparison of the numerical values calculated with those obtained by testing real fuses. (author)

  10. Unifying suspension and granular rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, François; Guazzelli, Élisabeth; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2011-10-28

    Using an original pressure-imposed shear cell, we study the rheology of dense suspensions. We show that they exhibit a viscoplastic behavior similarly to granular media successfully described by a frictional rheology and fully characterized by the evolution of the friction coefficient μ and the volume fraction ϕ with a dimensionless viscous number I(v). Dense suspension and granular media are thus unified under a common framework. These results are shown to be compatible with classical empirical models of suspension rheology and provide a clear determination of constitutive laws close to the jamming transition.

  11. Infrared spectra of silica polymorphs and the conditions of their formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, C. [Department of Physics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Noguchi, R.; Ohtaka, O.; Imai, Y.; Matsumoto, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Chihara, H.; Tsuchiyama, A. [Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8052 (Japan); Suto, H., E-mail: koike-c@mua.biglobe.ne.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-11-20

    The existence of silica within several debris disks has been suggested. Data on both the spectroscopy and annealing conditions of the various polymorphs of silica need to be investigated, as these data are lacking and incomplete in the literature. We investigate the annealing conditions of silica and prepare various types of silica, including α-cristobalite, α-quartz, coesite, stishovite, and fused quartz, which are natural, synthetic, or commercial samples. This paper presents a new study of both the spectroscopy of relevant silica polymorphs and the conditions under which they form. We compare the results to previous studies and find that there are discrepancies. The interesting result of features similar to those of forsterite should be highlighted, where α-cristobalite and coesite showed similar peaks at 16, 33, and 69 μm as forsterite. The 69 μm band for α-cristobalite is especially very broad and strong and shifts largely to a shorter wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The band for coesite, however, is very sharp and shifts only a small amount to longer wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. We discuss the possibility of silica detection around debris disks.

  12. Infrared Spectra of Silica Polymorphs and the Conditions of Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, C.; Noguchi, R.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.; Ohtaka, O.; Imai, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    2013-11-01

    The existence of silica within several debris disks has been suggested. Data on both the spectroscopy and annealing conditions of the various polymorphs of silica need to be investigated, as these data are lacking and incomplete in the literature. We investigate the annealing conditions of silica and prepare various types of silica, including α-cristobalite, α-quartz, coesite, stishovite, and fused quartz, which are natural, synthetic, or commercial samples. This paper presents a new study of both the spectroscopy of relevant silica polymorphs and the conditions under which they form. We compare the results to previous studies and find that there are discrepancies. The interesting result of features similar to those of forsterite should be highlighted, where α-cristobalite and coesite showed similar peaks at 16, 33, and 69 μm as forsterite. The 69 μm band for α-cristobalite is especially very broad and strong and shifts largely to a shorter wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The band for coesite, however, is very sharp and shifts only a small amount to longer wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. We discuss the possibility of silica detection around debris disks.

  13. Dispersion and surface characteristics of nanosilica suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranganathan; Milanova, Denitsa

    2009-04-01

    Nanofluids consisting of nanometer-sized particles dispersed in base liquids are known to be effective in extending the saturated boiling regime and critical heat flux in pool boiling. The heat transfer characteristics of nanosilica suspensions with particle sizes of 10 and 20 nm in pool boiling with a suspended heating Nichrome wire have been analyzed. The pH value of the nanosuspensions is important from the point of view that it determines the stability of the particles and their mutual interactions toward the suspended heated wire. When silica is suspended in water with no additives, the surface potential of the nanoparticles determines their movement toward the electrodes. Particles continuously deposit on the wire and extend the burnout heat flux, influenced by the chemical composition of the nanofluids. This agglomeration allows high heat transfer through interagglomerate pores, resulting in a nearly threefold increase in burnout heat flux. Particle size, zeta potential, and the burnout heat flux values under different volume concentrations are provided. The burnout heat flux of the wire does not increase monotonically with concentration, but depends on the agglomeration characteristics, particle shape, and the hydroxylated surface of the nanoparticles.

  14. Hydrothermal stability of microporous silica and niobia-silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffa, V.; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal stability of microporous niobia–silica membranes was investigated and compared with silica membranes. The membranes were exposed to hydrothermal conditions at 150 and 200 °C for 70 h. The change of pore structure before and after exposure to steam was probed by single-gas permeation

  15. Optical absorption of neutron-irradiated silica fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Bennett, B.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Induced-loss spectra of silica-based optical fibers exposed to high (10{sup 23} n-m{sup {minus}2}) and low (10{sup 21} n-m{sup {minus}2}) fluences of neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) have been measured. Two types of fibers consisting of a pure fused silica core with fluorine-doped ({approximately}4 mole %) cladding were obtained from Fiberguide Industries and used in the as-received condition. Anhydroguide{trademark} and superguide{trademark} fibers contained less than 1 ppm, and 600 to 800 ppm of OH, respectively. The data suggest that presently available silica fibers can be used in plasma diagnostics, but the choice and suitability depends upon the spectral region of interest. Low-OH content fibers can be used for diagnostic purposes in the interval {approximately}800 to 1400 mn if the exposure is to high-fluence neutrons. For low-fluence neutron exposures, the low-OH content fibers are best suited for use in the interval {approximately}800 to 2000 nm, and the high-OH content fibers are the choice for the interval {approximately}400 to 800 nm.

  16. Production of recombinant proteins in suspension-cultured plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasson, Carole; Michel, Rémy; Lienard, David; Saint-Jore-Dupas, Claude; Sourrouille, Christophe; de March, Ghislaine Grenier; Gomord, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Plants have emerged in the past decade as a suitable alternative to the current production systems for recombinant pharmaceutical proteins and, today their potential for low-cost production of high quality, much safer and biologically active mammalian proteins is largely documented. Among various plant expression systems being explored, genetically modified suspension-cultured plant cells offer a promising system for production of biopharmaceuticals. Indeed, when compared to other plant-based production platforms that have been explored, suspension-cultured plant cells have the advantage of being totally devoid of problems associated with the vagaries of weather, pest, soil and gene flow in the environment. Because of short growth cycles, the timescale needed for the production of recombinant proteins in plant cell culture can be counted in days or weeks after transformation compared to months needed for the production in transgenic plants. Moreover, recovery and purification of recombinant proteins from plant biomass is an expensive and technically challenging business that may amount to 80-94% of the final product cost. One additional advantage of plant cell culture is that the recombinant protein fused with a signal sequence can be expressed and secreted into the culture medium, and therefore recovered and purified in the absence of large quantities of contaminating proteins. Consequently, the downstream processing of proteins extracted from plant cell culture medium is less expensive, which may/does balance the higher costs of fermentation. When needed for clinical use, recombinant proteins are easily produced in suspension-cultured plant cells under certified, controllable and sterile conditions that offer improved safety and provide advantages for good manufacturing practices and regulatory compliance. In this chapter, we present basic protocols for rapid generation of transgenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum, Oriza sativa and Arabidopis

  17. Silica Micro Encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, P.; Whitbread-Jordan, M. [KEECO (United Kingdom)

    2001-04-01

    The article explains how Silica Micro Encapsulation (SME) water treatment technology may be transferred from metal mining to coal mining operations. KEECO has been developing a unique solution for treating acid rock drainage in the metal sulphide mining sector and following trials in metal mining operations (described in the article), is preparing to transfer the technology to the coal industry. SME technology comprises metal precipitation and encapsulation accomplished with proprietary chemical, KB-1, and a group of patented chemical dosing systems, the K-series, to dose KB-1 into contaminated liquid wastes as a dry powder. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. ZBLAN, Silica Fiber Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This graph depicts the increased signal quality possible with optical fibers made from ZBLAN, a family of heavy-metal fluoride glasses (fluorine combined zirconium, barium, lanthanum, aluminum, and sodium) as compared to silica fibers. NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. In the graph, a line closer to the black theoretical maximum line is better. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  19. 5 CFR 919.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 919.1015 Section 919.1015 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an...

  20. 49 CFR 238.427 - Suspension system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 238.427 Section 238.427... Equipment § 238.427 Suspension system. (a) General requirements. (1) Suspension systems shall be designed to... equipment. (2) Passenger equipment shall meet the safety performance standards for suspension...

  1. 78 FR 2622 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...) that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  2. 77 FR 2646 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...) that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  3. 29 CFR 1472.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 1472.670 Section 1472.670 Labor Regulations... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.670 Suspension. Suspension means an... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension...

  4. 22 CFR 1008.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 1008.670 Section 1008.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  5. 75 FR 5890 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...), that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  6. 7 CFR 3017.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 3017.1015 Section 3017.1015 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 3017.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a suspending official under subpart G of this part that...

  7. 19 CFR 146.82 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 146.82 Section 146.82 Customs Duties U... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Penalties; Suspension; Revocation § 146.82 Suspension. (a) For cause. The... for a period not to exceed 90 days. Upon order of the Board the suspension may be continued....

  8. 50 CFR 13.27 - Permit suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit suspension. 13.27 Section 13.27... GENERAL PERMIT PROCEDURES Permit Administration § 13.27 Permit suspension. (a) Criteria for suspension... Government. Such suspension shall remain in effect until the issuing officer determines that the...

  9. 15 CFR 29.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 29.670 Section 29.670... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  10. 39 CFR 957.27 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 957.27 Section 957.27 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.27 Suspension. (a) Any firm or individual suspended under chapter 3, section 7 of the Postal Service Purchasing Manual who believes that the suspension has not been...

  11. 48 CFR 2909.407 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 2909.407... CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2909.407 Suspension. (a) The Senior... authorized to make an exception, regarding suspension by another agency suspending official under...

  12. 77 FR 9856 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...) that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  13. 41 CFR 105-68.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 105-68.1015 Section 105-68.1015 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations...-GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 105-68.1015 Suspension. Suspension is...

  14. 29 CFR 98.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension. 98.1015 Section 98.1015 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a suspending official under subpart G of this part that...

  15. 2 CFR 182.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 182.670 Section 182.670 Grants... Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a recipient from... guidance on nonprocurement debarment and suspension (2 CFR part 180, which implements Executive...

  16. 28 CFR 83.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 83.670 Section 83.670... WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  17. 77 FR 7537 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...) that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  18. 78 FR 2624 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...) that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  19. 31 CFR 19.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 19.1015 Section 19.1015 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a...

  20. 75 FR 4000 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...), that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and ]...

  1. 22 CFR 1508.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 1508.1015 Section 1508.1015 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1508.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a suspending official under subpart G...

  2. 45 CFR 1641.11 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1641.11 Section 1641.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION AND REMOVAL OF RECIPIENT AUDITORS Suspension § 1641.11 Suspension. (a) IPAs suspended from providing...

  3. 45 CFR 1173.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1173.670 Section 1173.670 Public... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1173.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  4. 22 CFR 1509.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 1509.670 Section 1509.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  5. 43 CFR 43.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 43.670 Section 43.670 Public... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 43.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a..., subpart 9.4) and 2 CFR part 180. Suspension of a recipient is a distinct and separate action...

  6. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 570.61 Section 570.61... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut... bushings shall not be cracked, extruded out from or missing from suspension joints. Radius rods shall...

  7. 13 CFR 147.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 147.670 Section 147...-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  8. 78 FR 5734 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...) that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  9. 29 CFR 1471.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 1471.1015 Section 1471.1015 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a...

  10. 2 CFR 180.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 180.1015 Section 180.1015 Grants... Reserved OMB GUIDELINES TO AGENCIES ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 180.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a suspending official under subpart G of...

  11. 14 CFR 1267.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 1267.670 Section 1267.670... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  12. 31 CFR 20.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 20.670 Section 20.670...-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  13. 76 FR 2596 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...), that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  14. 22 CFR 208.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 208.1015 Section 208.1015 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 208.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a suspending official under subpart G...

  15. 29 CFR 94.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension. 94.670 Section 94.670 Labor Office of the... § 94.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a... Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and Executive Order...

  16. 49 CFR 32.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 32.670 Section 32.670 Transportation... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  17. 77 FR 2650 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...) that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  18. 21 CFR 1405.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 1405.670 Section 1405.670 Food and... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  19. 45 CFR 630.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 630.670 Section 630.670 Public Welfare... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension...

  20. 24 CFR 21.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 21.670 Section 21.670... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 21.670 Suspension. Suspension means an... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension...

  1. 7 CFR 3021.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 3021.670 Section 3021.670 Agriculture... Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a recipient from... Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and Executive Order...

  2. 22 CFR 210.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 210.670 Section 210.670 Foreign... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency..., subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement),...

  3. 10 CFR 607.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 607.670 Section 607.670 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  4. 75 FR 9111 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...), that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  5. 20 CFR 439.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 439.670 Section 439.670 Employees... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  6. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a suspending official under subpart G...

  7. 34 CFR 84.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 84.670 Section 84.670 Education Office of... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  8. 76 FR 9666 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 64 Suspension of Community Eligibility AGENCY...), that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule because of... measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension will not occur and...

  9. 22 CFR 1006.1015 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 1006.1015 Section 1006.1015 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1006.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a suspending official under subpart G of...

  10. 22 CFR 312.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 312.670 Section 312.670 Foreign... § 312.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a... Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and Executive Order...

  11. 45 CFR 1155.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1155.670 Section 1155.670 Public... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  12. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1206.1-4 Section 1206.1-4 Public... GRANTS AND CONTRACTS-SUSPENSION AND TERMINATION AND DENIAL OF APPLICATION FOR REFUNDING Suspension and Termination of Assistance § 1206.1-4 Suspension. (a) General. The responsible Corporation official may...

  13. 22 CFR 133.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 133.670 Section 133.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that...-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement), that implements Executive Order 12549 and...

  14. 75 FR 60 - Suspension of Community Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... Part 64 [Docket ID FEMA-2008-0020; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-8111] Suspension of Community... Insurance Program (NFIP), that are scheduled for suspension on the effective dates listed within this rule... floodplain management measures prior to the effective suspension date given in this rule, the suspension...

  15. Paradoxical ratcheting in cornstarch suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Siu, Theo; Rutala, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Cornstarch suspensions are well known to exhibit strong shear thickening, and we show as a result that they must - and do - climb vertically vibrating rods and plates. This occurs because when the rod moves upward, it shears the suspension against gravity, and so the fluid stiffens, but when the rod moves downward, the suspension moves with gravity, and so the fluid is more compliant. This causes the fluid to be dragged up by the upstroke more than it is dragged down by the downstroke, effectively ratcheting the fluid up the rod every cycle. We show experimentally and computationally that this effect is paradoxically caused by gravity - and so goes away when gravity is removed - and we show that the suspension can be made to balance on the uphill side of an inclined rod in an analog of the inverted ``Kapitza pendulum,'' closely related to the recent report by Ramachandran & Nosonovsky, Soft Matter 10, 4633 (2014).

  16. Hydrodynamic shocks in microroller suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Driscoll, Michelle; Chaikin, Paul; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    We combine experiments, large-scale simulations, and continuum models to study the emergence of coherent structures in a suspension of magnetically driven microrollers sedimented near a floor. Collective hydrodynamic effects are predominant in this system, leading to strong density-velocity coupling. We characterize a uniform suspension and show that density waves propagate freely in all directions in a dispersive fashion. When sharp density gradients are introduced in the suspension, we observe the formation of a shock. Unlike Burgers' shocklike structures observed in other active and driven confined hydrodynamic systems, the shock front in our system has a well-defined finite width and moves rapidly compared to the mean suspension velocity. We introduce a continuum model demonstrating that the finite width of the front is due to far-field nonlocal hydrodynamic interactions and governed by a geometric parameter, the average particle height above the floor.

  17. "Point de suspension"

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    CERN - Globe of Science and Innovation 20 and 21 October Acrobatics, mime, a cappella singing, projections of images, a magical setting... a host of different tools of a grandeur matching that of the Universe they relate. A camera makes a massive zoom out to reveal the multiple dimensions of Nature. Freeze the frame: half way between the infinitesimally small and the infinitesimally large, a man suspends his everyday life (hence the title "Point de Suspension", which refers to the three dots at the end of an uncompleted sentence) to take a glimpse of the place he occupies in the great history of the Universe. An unusual perspective on what it means to be a human being... This spectacle in the Globe of Science and Innovation, specially created by the Miméscope* company for the official ceremony marking CERN's fiftieth anniversary, is a gift from the Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva, which also wishes to share this moment of wonder with the local population. There will be three performances for...

  18. "Point de suspension"

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    CERN - Globe of Science and Innovation 20 and 21 October Acrobatics, mime, a cappella singing, projections of images, a magical setting... a host of different tools of a grandeur matching that of the Universe they relate. A camera makes a massive zoom out to reveal the multiple dimensions of Nature. Freeze the frame: half way between the infinitesimally small and the infinitesimally large, a man suspends his everyday life (hence the title "Point de Suspension", which refers to the three dots at the end of an uncompleted sentence) to take a glimpse of the place he occupies in the great history of the Universe. An unusual perspective on what it means to be a human being... This wondrous show in the Globe of Science and Innovation, specially created by the Miméscope* company for the official ceremony marking CERN's fiftieth anniversary, is a gift from the Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva, which also wishes to share this moment of wonder with the local population. There will be three perfo...

  19. "Point de suspension"

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ CERN - Globe of Science and Innovation 20 and 21 October Acrobatics, mime, a cappella singing, projections of images, a magical setting... a host of different tools of a grandeur matching that of the Universe they relate. A camera makes a massive zoom out to reveal the multiple dimensions of Nature. Freeze the frame: half way between the infinitesimally small and the infinitesimally large, a man suspends his everyday life (hence the title "Point de Suspension", which refers to the three dots at the end of an uncompleted sentence) to take a glimpse of the place he occupies in the great history of the Universe. An unusual perspective on what it means to be a human being... This wondrous show in the Globe of Science and Innovation, specially created by the Miméscope* company for the official ceremony marking CERN's fiftieth anniversary, is a gift from the Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva, which also wishes to share this moment of wonder with the local pop...

  20. Photopolymerization of acrylamide as a new functionalization way of silica monoliths for hydrophilic interaction chromatography and coated silica capillaries for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Debs, R; Marechal, A; Dugas, V; Demesmay, C

    2014-01-24

    A simple, rapid and localizable photochemical process for the preparation of hydrophilic coated capillary and silica-based monolithic capillary columns is described. The process involves the free radical polymerization of acrylamide monomers onto acrylate pre-activated silica surface triggered by UV photoinitiation. The experimental conditions (monomer content, time of irradiation) were optimized on silica monolithic columns by monitoring the evolution of the chromatographic properties (retention, permeability, efficiency) in HILIC mode using a set of nucleosides as test solutes. Compared to thermal polymerization process, the photoinitiation allows the preparation of highly retentive and efficient HILIC monolithic columns in less than 10min of irradiation. This process was then successfully applied to the surface coating of fused silica capillary walls. In addition to its relative high stability and ability to reduce the electroosmotic flow, this polyacrylamide coating is localizable. Benefits of this localizable photochemical process are highlighted through the conception of an in-line integrated bimodal microseparation tool combining a SPE preconcentration step on a photografted silica monolith and an electrokinetic separation step in a polyacrylamide photopolymerized capillary section. Two neuropeptides are used as model solutes to illustrate the suitability of this approach.

  1. Tunable shear thickening: from understanding suspension thickening to controlling viscosity on the fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Itai; Lin, Neil; Ness, Chris; Sun, Jin; Cates, Mike; Guy, Ben; Hermes, Michiel; Poon, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Whether contact forces play a role in shear thickening of colloidal systems where hydrodynamic contributions are thought to dominate remains highly controversial. By performing shear reversal experiments on silica and latex colloidal particles, we directly measure the hydrodynamic and contact force contributions to the suspension viscosity. We find that contact forces are not only present, but dominate the shear thickening response. More importantly, this finding directly suggests a strategy for active controlling the thickening viscosities of dense suspensions. We demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand.

  2. Silaffins in Silica Biomineralization and Biomimetic Silica Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin C. Lechner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomineralization processes leading to complex solid structures of inorganic material in biological systems are constantly gaining attention in biotechnology and biomedical research. An outstanding example for biomineral morphogenesis is the formation of highly elaborate, nano-patterned silica shells by diatoms. Among the organic macromolecules that have been closely linked to the tightly controlled precipitation of silica in diatoms, silaffins play an extraordinary role. These peptides typically occur as complex posttranslationally modified variants and are directly involved in the silica deposition process in diatoms. However, even in vitro silaffin-based peptides alone, with and without posttranslational modifications, can efficiently mediate biomimetic silica precipitation leading to silica material with different properties as well as with encapsulated cargo molecules of a large size range. In this review, the biomineralization process of silica in diatoms is summarized with a specific focus on silaffins and their in vitro silica precipitation properties. Applications in the area of bio- and nanotechnology as well as in diagnostics and therapy are discussed.

  3. Three-dimensional Ordered Silica Colloidal Film Self-assembly Deposited on a Vertical Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽霞; 董鹏; 王晓冬; 程丙英

    2003-01-01

    A method for preparation of particle crystal film constructed trom monodisperse silica colloidal partices in diameter of about 300 nm is reported. The films were prepared from an ethanol suspension by vertical deposition that relies on capillary forces to assemble colloidal crystal particles on a vertical substrate. The 3D ordered films were characterized by transmission spectra and scanning electric microscope (SEM). The effect of evaporation temperature, particle concentration and sintered temperature on the quality of colloidal particle crystal film was investigated.

  4. Nucleation of polystyrene latex particles in the presence of gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane: functionalized silica particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie; Insulaire, Mickaelle; Reculusa, Stéphane; Perro, Adeline; Ravaine, Serge; Duguet, Etienne

    2006-02-01

    Silica/polystyrene nanocomposite particles with different morphologies were synthesized through emulsion polymerization of styrene in the presence of silica particles previously modified by gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). Grafting of the silane molecule was performed by direct addition of MPS to the aqueous silica suspension in the presence of an anionic surfactant under basic conditions. The MPS grafting density on the silica surface was determined using the depletion method and plotted against the initial MPS concentration. The influence of the MPS grafting density, the silica particles size and concentration and the nature of the surfactant on the polymerization kinetics and the particles morphology was investigated. When the polymerization was performed in the presence of an anionic surfactant, transmission electron microscopy images showed the formation of polymer spheres around silica for MPS grafting densities lower than typically 1 micromole x m(-2) while the conversion versus time curves indicated a strong acceleration effect under such conditions. In contrast, polymerizations performed in the presence of a larger amount of MPS moieties or in the presence of a non ionic emulsifier resulted in the formation of "excentered" core-shell morphologies and lower polymerization rates. The paper identifies the parameters that allow to control particles morphology and polymerization kinetics and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite colloids.

  5. [Silica-coated ethosome as a novel oral delivery system for enhanced oral bioavailability of curcumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chong; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yan; Su, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Yin; Chen, Zhang-Bao

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of silica-coated ethosome as a novel oral delivery system for the poorly water-soluble curcumin (as a model drug). The silica-coated ethosomes loading curcumin (CU-SE) were prepared by alcohol injection method with homogenization, followed by the precipitation of silica by sol-gel process. The physical and chemical features of CU-SEs, and curcumin release were determined in vitro. The pharmacodynamics and bioavailability measurements were sequentially performed. The mean diameter of CU-SE was (478.5 +/- 80.3) nm and the polydispersity index was 0.285 +/- 0.042, while the mean value of apparent drug entrapment efficiency was 80.77%. In vitro assays demonstrated that CU-SEs were significantly stable with improved release properties when compared with curcumin-loaded ethosomes (CU-ETs) without silica-coatings. The bioavailability of CU-SEs and CU-ETs was 11.86- and 5.25-fold higher, respectively, than that of curcumin suspensions (CU-SUs) in in vivo assays. The silica coatings significantly promoted the stability of ethosomes and CU-SEs exhibited 2.26-fold increase in bioavailablity relative to CU-ETs, indicating that the silica-coated ethosomes might be a potential approach for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs especially the active ingredients of traditional Chinese medicine with improved bioavailability.

  6. Rice Husk Ash-Derived Silica Nanofluids: Synthesis and Stability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Wenxiu; Zheng, Jianzhong; Wang, Guangquan; Ji, Jianbing

    2016-11-01

    Nanofluids, colloidal suspensions consisting of base fluids and nanoparticles, are a new generation of engineering working fluids. Nanofluids have shown great potential in heat/mass transfer applications. However, their practical applications are limited by the high production cost and low stability. In this study, a low-cost agricultural waste, rice husk ash (RHA), was used as a silicon source to the synthesis of silica nanofluids. First, silica nanoparticles with an average size of 47 nm were synthesized. Next, by dispersing the silica nanoparticles in water with ultrasonic vibration, silica nanofluids were formed. The results indicated that the dispersibility and stability of nanofluids were highly dependent on sonication time and power, dispersant types and concentrations, as well as pH; an optimal experiment condition could result in the highest stability of silica nanofluid. After 7 days storage, the nanofluid showed no sedimentation, unchanged particle size, and zeta potential. The results of this study demonstrated that there is a great potential for the use of RHA as a low-cost renewable resource for the production of stable silica nanofluids.

  7. Technical report on galvanic cells with fused-salt electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, E. J.; Crouthamel, C. E.; Fischer, A. K.; Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Johnson, C. E.; Shimotake, H.; Tevebaugh, A. D.

    1969-01-01

    Technical report is presented on sodium and lithium cells using fused salt electrolytes. It includes a discussion of the thermally regenerative galvanic cell and the secondary bimetallic cell for storage of electricity.

  8. Fused Cast Alumina Refractory Products for Glass Tank Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 Subject and Scope The standard specifies the requirement, testing method, inspection rule and requirements for the labeling, packing, shipping and storing of the fused cast alumina refractory products for glass tanks.

  9. Polymer Matrix Composites using Fused Deposition Modeling Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is an additive manufacturing technology that allows fabrication of complex three-dimensional geometries layer-by-layer. The goal of...

  10. IGBT Fuses for Protection Against Explosion in Voltage Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Iov, Florin; Rasmussen, H.

    2004-01-01

    The consequences of electrical faults can be severe; not only to the equipment, but also in the worse case, to people if safety principles are not observed. Every year new applications based on DC-link Voltage Source Converters are added and the demand for protection of power electronics increases...... regarding the high-power IGBT modules. Due to the fact that the power level increases more energy is stored in the DC-link and even with an active protection, a high-power IGBT still has a risk of case rupture (explode) when a circuit failure condition occurs. A possible solution is a protection...... of the converter with standard High Speed Fuses or High Speed IGBT fuses. It is discussed that protection can be achieved by introduction of IGBT fuse located in the DC-link. Experiments show that explosion can be avoided by use of High Speed Fuse protection and the added inductance of standard High Speed...

  11. Magnetic heating by silica-coated Co-Zn ferrite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veverka, M.; Závěta, K.; Kaman, O.; Veverka, P.; Knížek, K.; Pollert, E.; Burian, M.; Kašpar, P.

    2014-02-01

    This study is aimed at the preparation of silica-coated nanoparticles of cobalt-zinc ferrite and their heating properties with respect to potential application in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. The magnetic cores of Co0.4Zn0.6Fe2O4+γ possessing two different sizes were prepared by the coprecipitation method followed by annealing and mechanical treatment. The subsequent encapsulation of the samples by silica led to colloidally stable suspensions in water. The single phase character of the cores was confirmed by x-ray powder diffraction while detailed studies of the coated products by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the silica shell had a thickness of at least 5 nm. The dc magnetic measurements were employed in order to determine the concentrations of magnetic particles in suspensions and to analyse the distribution of blocking temperatures. The heating efficiency of the nanoparticles was studied simultaneously by means of magnetic and calorimetric measurements in various ac fields. Specifically, the magnetic losses were calculated from the ac hysteresis loops while the heating effect of the nanoparticles was determined by measuring the time dependence of the temperature of their suspensions. The evaluation of the heating power from the latter experiments was supplemented by deriving the corrections for non-adiabatic properties of the calorimeter. More accurate results enabled detailed analysis and comparison with data published for other heating agents.

  12. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanostructures through enzyme immobilization in colloidal silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Evan M.

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and carbon nanopipettes (CNP) provide interesting high aspect ratio scaffolds on which to base functionally gradient materials. In this dissertation, we present a general method for the production of an enzymatically active composite material based on MWNTs. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was applied to purified MWNTs, generating a positive electrostatic potential on the MWNTs. This positive potential was used to apply negatively charged colloidal silica particle in the presence of a high concentration of enzyme. The silica coating continued to grow via localized condensation of silica particles driven by the buffered saline conditions, immobilizing the enzyme within the coating. The mesoporous nanostructure was characterized via transmission electron microscopy. Optical spectroscopy experiments on the material employed as an active suspension showed that the immobilized enzymes horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and tyrosinase (TV) retained their activity upon incorporation into the material. Using HRP as a model enzyme, it was determined that the MWNT-HRP-Silica material showed similar pH and temperature dependencies in activity to those of free HRP in solution. An examination of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics showed that the material had a slightly higher value of KM than did free HRP. The MWNT-HRP-Silica material was also employed as an active filter membrane, which allowed us to explore the reusable nature of the material. We were able to show the denaturation of the filter due to the loss of Ca2+ cations at low pH and then restore the activity by soaking the filter membrane in 1 mM CaCl2. The MWNT-HRP-Silica material was used to modify a carbon microelectrode and produce a functioning electrochemical sensor for H2O2 . Utilizing cyclic voltammetry, the sensor was shown to have a linear response in limiting current versus concentration of H2O2 of 4.26 pA/microM. We also determined a lower detection limit of 0.67 microM H2O2. CNPs were

  13. Biogenic nanostructured silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is by far the most abundant element in the earth crust and also is an essential element for higher plants, yet its biology and mechanisms in plant tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses are poorly understood. Based on the molecular mechanisms of the biosilicification in marine organisms such as diatoms and sponges, the cell wall template-mediated self-assembly of nanostructured silica in marine organisms and higher plants as well as the related organic molecules are discussed. Understanding of the templating and structure-directed effects of silicon-processing organic molecules not only offers the clue for synthesizing silicon-based materials, but also helps to recognize the anomaly of silicon in plant biology.

  14. Fusing Manual and Machine Feedback in Biomedical Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Fusing manual and machine feedback in biomedical domain 1Jainisha Sankhavara, 1Fenny Thakrar, 2Shamayeeta Sarkar, 1Prasenjit Majumder 1DA-IICT...to obtain efficient biomedical document retrieval. We focused on fusing manual and machine feedback runs. Fusion run performs better and gives...retrieval of biomedical articles relevant for answering generic clini- cal questions about medical records. There are 30 topics provided, each

  15. ENDODONTIC MANAGEMENT OF FUSED MAXILLARY LATERAL INCISOR: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wavdhane

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is a rare occurrence and its definitive diagnosis is of prime importance for successful root canal treatment. This case report discusses the endodontic and esthetic management of fused maxillary right lateral incisor. Root canal treatment was performed on the fused tooth. Nickel Chromium with ceramic crown was fabricated in the shape of lateral incisor. The patient remained asymptomatic and there was a reduction in the size of periapical radiolucency after six months.

  16. A coordinate-wise optimization algorithm for the Fused Lasso

    OpenAIRE

    Höfling, Holger; Binder, Harald; Schumacher, Martin

    2010-01-01

    L1 -penalized regression methods such as the Lasso (Tibshirani 1996) that achieve both variable selection and shrinkage have been very popular. An extension of this method is the Fused Lasso (Tibshirani and Wang 2007), which allows for the incorporation of external information into the model. In this article, we develop new and fast algorithms for solving the Fused Lasso which are based on coordinate-wise optimization. This class of algorithms has recently been applied very successfully to so...

  17. Fusing Social Media and Mobile Analytics for Urban Sense Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0037 Fusing Social Media and Mobile Analytics for Urban Sense-Making Archan Misra SINGAPORE MANAGEMENT UNIVERSITY Final Report...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 11 Dec 2013 to 10 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fusing Social Media and Mobile Analytics for Urban Sense-Making 5a...UNLIMITED: PB Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The proposed research was motivated by the observation that urban environments are

  18. Microporous silica gels from alkylsilicate-water two phase hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, L.; Tejedor-Tejedor, M.I.; Anderson, M.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Water Chemistry Program

    1994-12-31

    Microporous silica gels have been synthesized through a nano-particulate sol-gel route. These gels have uniformly distributed and extremely small pores(< 15 {angstrom} in diameter). Hydrolysis and condensation reactions leading to these gels were carried out in an alkyl silicate-water (ammonia) two phase system. These reactions took place at the alkyl silicate droplet-water interfacial boundary. No alcohol was added. A clear, stable and uniformly distributed colloidal silica suspension having an average particle size less than 6 nm was prepared by this method. Fast hydrolysis, slow condensation and low solubility all contribute to a high supersaturation level and result in the formation of small particles. This process is consistent with classic nucleation theory. When the particles are produced under acidic rather than under basic reaction conditions, smaller particles are formed due to the slower condensation rate and lower solubility of these silica particles in acidic conditions. At the same pH, alkylsilicates having smaller alkyl groups react faster with water leading to smaller primary particles. Homogeneous nucleation conditions are achieved when the water/alkylsilicate ratio is high.

  19. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam...

  1. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophobic silicas. 584.700 Section 584.700 Food... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 584.700 Hydrophobic silicas. (a) Product. Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica or precipitated hydrophobic silica (CAS Reg. No....

  2. DISPERSION STABILITY AND RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF SUSPENSIONSOF POLYSTYRENE COATED FUMED SILICA PARTICLES IN POLYSTYRENE SOLUTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-ze Yin; Ye-qiang Tan; Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Polystyrene coated silica (SiO2@PS) core-shell composite particles with averaged diameter of about 290 nm were prepared by in situ emulsion polymerization of styrene on the surface of γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane grafted SiO2 nanoparticles of 20-50 nm in diameter.Rheological behavior and dispersion stability of SiO2@PS suspension in 10 wt% PS solution were compared with suspensions of untreated SiO2 and silane modified SiO2 nanoparticles.Suspensions of the untreated and the silane modified SiO2 exhibited obvious shear thinning.The SiO2@PS suspension exhibits shear viscosity considerably smaller than suspensions of untreated and silane modified SiO2 at low shear rates.Transmission electron microscopy showed that the composite particles can uniformly and stably dispersc in PS solution compared to other suspensions,implying that the PS shell can effectively enhance the particle compatibility with PS macromolecules in solution.

  3. In situ synthesis, characterization, and catalytic performance of tungstophosphoric acid encapsulated into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoshan; Liu, Zhenxing; Han, Chunying; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Songjie

    2012-07-01

    Mesoporous silica pillared clay (SPC) incorporated with tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) has been synthesized via in situ introducing P and W source in the acidic suspension of the clay interlayer template during the formation of the silica pillared clay. The samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, FT-IR, TG-DTA, N(2) adsorption-desorption, and SEM techniques. The results showed that the HPW formed by in situ method has been effectively introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay and its Keggin structure remained perfectly after formation of the materials. In addition, samples with similar HPW loadings were also prepared by impregnation method using SPC as the support. HPW in the incorporated samples was better dispersed into the silica pillared clay than in the impregnated samples. The results of catalytic tests indicated that the encapsulated materials demonstrated better catalytic performance than the impregnated samples in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT).

  4. Control of quadriaxial cardan suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozhilov, I. V.

    1984-04-01

    A quadriaxial Cardan suspension is to be servomechanically controlled so as to stabilize a definite orientation of the platform during arbitrary motion of the frame. The problem is solved with the use of five orthogonal systems of coordinates tied one to the platform, one to each of the three gimbals, and one to the frame respectively. The suspension is assumed to be structurally perfectly rigid and to be part of a gyroscopic indicator-stabilization system. The corresponding dynamic equations are written as equations for angular momenta and several variants of control, for the various rotations, are constructed. One such variant, a more intricate one, is course-vertical control. Dynamic control of the suspension in a stationary frame, to ensure any arbitrarily prescribed angular evolutions of the platform, is also considered and the procedure for constructing such a control is outlined.

  5. The Rheology of Concentrated Suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas Acrivos

    2004-09-07

    Research program on the rheological properties of flowing suspensions. The primary purpose of the research supported by this grant was to study the flow characteristics of concentrated suspensions of non-colloidal solid particles and thereby construct a comprehensive and robust theoretical framework for modeling such systems quantitatively. At first glance, this seemed like a modest goal, not difficult to achieve, given that such suspensions were viewed simply as Newtonian fluids with an effective viscosity equal to the product of the viscosity of the suspending fluid times a function of the particle volume fraction. But thanks to the research findings of the Principal Investigator and of his Associates, made possible by the steady and continuous support which the PI received from the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the subject is now seen to be more complicated and therefore much more interesting in that concentrated suspensions have been shown to exhibit fascinating and unique rheological properties of their own that have no counterpart in flowing Newtonian or even non-Newtonian (polymeric) fluids. In fact, it is generally acknowledged that, as the result of these investigations for which the PI received the 2001 National Medal of Science, our understanding of how suspensions behave under flow is far more detailed and comprehensive than was the case even as recently as a decade ago. Thus, given that the flow of suspensions plays a crucial role in many diverse physical processes, our work has had a major and lasting impact in a subject having both fundamental as well as practical importance.

  6. Sedimentation in Particulate Aqueous Suspensions as studied by means of Dielectric Time Domain Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersen, Bjoernar Hauknes

    1997-12-31

    Many problems in offshore oil production and multiphase transport are related to surface and colloid chemistry. This thesis applies dielectric spectroscopy as an experimental technique to study the behaviour of particle suspensions in polar media. The thesis opens with an introduction to suspensions and time domain dielectric spectroscopy. It then investigates the dielectric properties of silica and alumina dispersed in polar solvents. It is found that theoretical models can be used to calculate the volume fraction disperse phase in the suspension and that the particle sedimentation depends on the wetting of the particles, charge on the particle surface and viscosity of the solvent, and that this dependency can be measured by time domain dielectric spectroscopy. When the surface properties of silica and alumina particles were modified by coating them with a non-ionic polymer and a non-ionic surfactant, then different degrees of packing in the sedimented phase at the bottom of the sedimentation vessel occurred. Chemometrical methods on the synthesis of monodisperse silica particles were used to investigate what factors influence the particle size. It turned out that it is insufficient to consider only main variables when discussing the results of the synthesis. By introducing interaction terms, the author could explain the variation in the size of particles synthesized. The difference in the sedimentation rate of monodisperse silica particles upon variation of volume fraction particles, pH, salinity, amount of silanol groups at the particle surface and temperature was studied. The cross interactions play an important role and a model explaining the variation in sedimentation is introduced. Finally, magnetic particles dispersed in water and in an external magnetic field were used to study the impact on the sedimentation due to the induced flocculation. 209 refs., 90 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps...

  8. Functionalized silica materials for electrocatalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vellaichamy Ganesan

    2015-02-01

    Electrocatalysis is an important phenomenon which is utilized in metal–air batteries, fuel cells, electrochemical sensors, etc. To increase the efficiency of the electrocatalytic process and to increase the electrochemical accessibility of the immobilized electrocatalysts, functionalized and non-functionalized mesoporous organo-silica (MCM41-type-materials) are used in this study. These materials possess several suitable properties to be durable catalysts and/or catalyst supports. Owing to the uniform dispersion of electrocatalysts (metal complex and/or metal nanoparticles (NPs)) on the functionalized and non-functionalized silica, an enormous increase in the redox current is observed. Long range channels of silica materials with pore diameter of 15–100 Å allowed metal NPs to accommodate in a specified manner in addition to other catalysts. The usefulness of MCM-41-type silica in increasing the efficiency of electrocatalysisis demonstrated by selecting oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrite reduction reactions as examples

  9. Fabrication of a Porous TiO2-Coated Silica Glass Tube and Its Application for a Handy Water Purification Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ochiai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, handy, reusable, and inexpensive water purification unit including a one-end sealed porous amorphous-silica (a-silica tube coated with 2 μm of porous TiO2 photocatalyst layers has been developed. Both TiO2 and a-silica layers were formed through outside vapor deposition (OVD. Raman spectrum of the porous TiO2-coated a-silica glass tube indicated that the anatase content of the TiO2 layers of the tube was estimated to be approximately 60 wt%. Developed porous TiO2-coated a-silica glass tube has been assayed for the tube filtering feature against Escherichia coli (E. coli solution used as one of the typical bacteria size species or Qβ phage also used as typical virus size species and compared with the feature of porous a-silica tubes alone. The tubes removed E. coli completely from the aqueous suspension which contained 106 CFU/mL of E. coli without UV irradiation. The porous TiO2-coated a-silica glass tube with UV-C lamps successfully reduced the Qβ phage amount in the suspension from 109 to 103 PFU/mL.

  10. Silica exposure and systemic vasculitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mulloy, Karen B

    2003-01-01

    Work in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has exposed workers to multiple toxic agents leading to acute and chronic diseases. Many exposures were common to numerous work sites. Exposure to crystalline silica was primarily restricted to a few facilities. I present the case of a 63-year-old male who worked in DOE facilities for 30 years as a weapons testing technician. In addition to silica, other workplace exposures included beryllium, various solvents and heavy metals, depleted uranium, a...

  11. Fused Lasso Screening Rules via the Monotonicity of Subdifferentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Fan, Wei; Ye, Jieping

    2015-09-01

    Fused Lasso is a popular regression technique that encodes the smoothness of the data. It has been applied successfully to many applications with a smooth feature structure. However, the computational cost of the existing solvers for fused Lasso is prohibitive when the feature dimension is extremely large. In this paper, we propose novel screening rules that are able to quickly identity the adjacent features with the same coefficients. As a result, the number of variables to be estimated can be significantly reduced, leading to substantial savings in computational cost and memory usage. To the best of our knowledge, the proposed approach is the first attempt to develop screening methods for the fused Lasso problem with general data matrix. Our major contributions are: 1) we derive a new dual formulation of fused Lasso that comes with several desirable properties; 2) we show that the new dual formulation of fused Lasso is equivalent to that of the standard Lasso by two affine transformations; 3) we propose a novel framework for developing effective and efficient screening rules for fused Lasso via the monotonicity of the subdifferentials (FLAMS). Some appealing features of FLAMS are: 1) our methods are safe in the sense that the detected adjacent features are guaranteed to have the same coefficients; 2) the dataset needs to be scanned only once to run the screening, whose computational cost is negligible compared to that of solving the fused Lasso; (3) FLAMS is independent of the solvers and can be integrated with any existing solvers. We have evaluated the proposed FLAMS rules on both synthetic and real datasets. The experiments indicate that FLAMS is very effective in identifying the adjacent features with the same coefficients. The speedup gained by FLAMS can be orders of magnitude.

  12. Equilibrium and dynamic simulations of bidisperse suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Charles Andrew

    Monte Carlo simulations are being used to investigate the structural behavior of bidisperse colloidal (silica) liquids. The solids volume fraction is 40%, and the bidispersity is characterized by two parameters: alpha, the particle size ratio, and beta, the relative volume fraction of small particles over the total volume fraction of solids. Four different size ratios are used (two, three, four, and five-to-one). The largest particle size is 0.6 mum, while the smallest is 0.12 mum. The variables (electrolyte concentration, surface potential, etc.) of the potential are set to ensure the system is stable and non-flocculating. The radial distribution function g(r) for all combinations (small-small, small-large, and large-large) of particles along with the osmotic compressibility is calculated for the various size ratios at different beta values. There are two interesting changes between the monodisperse and bidisperse suspensions. First, g(r) for the large-large particles shows an interesting structural change in that the HCP (hexagonal close packing) structure for the monodisperse large particles evolves to a BCC-like (body centered cubic) structure as beta is increased. There is also an indication of phase separation which may be a consequence of depletion flocculation. These changes appear to occur for all size ratios that have been investigated. Also, the HCP (hexagonal close packing) structure for the monodisperse small particles is completely broken up when added to the large particle system. Second, the structural change appears approximately at the beta value corresponding to the minimum in the osmotic compressibility. The structure factor is also calculated from the Fourier transform of the radial distribution function. It is suggested as future work to obtain an effective potential between large particle potentials, treating the small particle-laden fluid as a continuum. This effective potential, which can be obtained using an inversion scheme, may indicate

  13. 30 CFR 56.12037 - Fuses in high-potential circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuses in high-potential circuits. 56.12037... § 56.12037 Fuses in high-potential circuits. Fuse tongs or hot line tools shall be used when fuses are removed or replaced in high-potential circuits....

  14. 30 CFR 57.12037 - Fuses in high-potential circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuses in high-potential circuits. 57.12037... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12037 Fuses in high-potential circuits. Fuse tongs or hotline tools, shall be used when fuses are removed or replaced in high-potential circuits....

  15. Producing a highly concentrated coal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokudzu, K.; Atsudzima, T.; Kiyedzuka, Y.

    1983-06-03

    Coal from wet and dry grinding is loaded into a mixer with a mixer arm with the acquisition of a highly concentrated suspension. Foamers (for instance, alkylbenzolsulfonate) and foam stabilizers (for instance diethanolamide of lauric acid) are added in a ratio of 10 to (2 to 5). The high fluidity of the suspension is maintained by injecting air into the suspension and an 80 percent concentration of the suspension is achieved.

  16. Rheology and structural arrest of casein suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Dahbi, Louisa; Alexander, M.; Trappe, Véronique; Dhont, J. K. G.; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The rheology of milk powder suspensions is investigated up to very high concentrations, where structural arrest occurs. The main component of the milk powder investigated is casein, so that the suspensions can be regarded as casein suspensions. Four concentration regimes are identified. For effective casein volume fractions less than 0.54 the concentration dependence of the zero-shear viscosity is similar to that of hard-sphere suspensions. However, due to the elastic deformation of the casei...

  17. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  18. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  19. Dynamics of the colloidal suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-yan; MA Hong-ru

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a survey on our current knowledge of the dynamics of the colloidal suspension,where each particle experiences the friction force with solvent,hydrodynamic interaction,and potential force from surrounding particles and thermodynamic force.It further contains a summary of the basic concepts about microstructures and equilibrium properties,and of analytical and numerical methods,which are relevant for the theoretical description of the suspensions.The description of the dynamics of colloidal particles,based on the generalized Smoluchowski equation,is justified for the time scale accessible in DLS experiments.The combined influence of hard sphere or electrostatic potential and solvent-mediated hydrodynamic interaction on the short-time dynamics of monodisperse suspensions is investigated in detail.A thorough study of tracer-diffusion in hard sphere and charge-stabilized suspensions is presented.Mean-square displacements and long-time tracer-diffusion coefficients are calculated with two alternative approximations,i.e.,a mode-coupling scheme and a single relaxation time ansatz.

  20. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the second of two papers, describing probe measurements of deposit buildup and removal (shedding), conducted in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, firing straw and wood. Investigations of deposit buildup and shedding have been made by use of an advanced online deposit probe and a s...

  1. Silica Supported Ceria Nanoparticles: A Hybrid Nanostructure To Increase Stability And Surface Reactivity Of Nano-crystalline Ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Varga, Tamas; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-01-21

    The mixed oxidation state (3+/4+) of ceria nanoparticles of smaller sizes make them attractive materials for their catalytic antioxidant biological properties. However the unmodified smaller ceria nanoparticles are limited in their use due to particles agglomeration and reduced surface chemical reactivity in the solutions used to disperse the nanoparticles. This work describes an effort to stabilize small ceria nanoparticles, retaining their desired activity, on a larger stable silica support. The ceria nanoparticles attached to silica was synthesized by a solution synthesis technique in which the surface functional groups of silica nanoparticles were found to be essential for the formation of smaller ceria nanoparticles. The surface chemical and vibrational spectroscopy analysis revealed cerium–silicate (Ce-O-Si) covalent bond linkage between silica and cerium oxide nanoparticles. The colloidal properties (agglomerate particle size and suspension stability) of ceria attached to silica was significantly improved due to inherent physico-chemical characteristics of silica against random collision and gravitation settling as opposed to unmodified ceria nanoparticles in solution. The bio-catalytic activity of ceria nanoparticles in the 3+ oxidation state was not found to be limited by attachment to the silica support as measured by free radical scavenging activity in different biological media conditions.

  2. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Katsuya; Nakamura, Hitomi; Nakanishi, Kazuma

    2014-02-01

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol-gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  3. 7 CFR 3015.123 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 3015.123 Section 3015.123 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Grant and Subgrant Closeout, Suspension and Termination § 3015.123 Suspension. (a) When a recipient has materially failed to comply with the...

  4. 36 CFR 1212.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 1212.670 Section... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1212.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a recipient...

  5. 48 CFR 609.407 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 609.407 Section 609.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 609.407 Suspension....

  6. 48 CFR 1409.407 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1409.407 Section 1409.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 1409.407 Suspension....

  7. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF... Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee has... assistance, suspend the grant. The notice preceding the suspension shall include the effective date of...

  8. 36 CFR 223.141 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 223.141 Section... DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Suspension and Debarment of Timber Purchasers § 223.141 Suspension. (a) The suspending official may, in the public interest, suspend a purchaser on the basis...

  9. 32 CFR 552.79 - Suspension action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension action. 552.79 Section 552.79 National... Suspension action. (a) When suspended for cause, immediately notify the company and the agent, in writing, of the reason. When the installation commander determines that suspension should be extended...

  10. 41 CFR 105-74.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 105-74.670...-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a recipient...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1640 - Oxibendazole suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxibendazole suspension. 520.1640 Section 520.1640... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1640 Oxibendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. The suspension contains 10 percent oxibendazole. (b) Sponsor. See 000069 in §...

  12. 45 CFR 1210.3-3 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1210.3-3 Section 1210.3-3 Public... § 1210.3-3 Suspension. (a) The ACTION State Director may suspend a Volunteer for up to 30 days in order... Volunteer. Suspension is not warranted if the State Director determines that sufficient grounds...

  13. 21 CFR 26.16 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 26.16 Section 26.16 Food and Drugs... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.16 Suspension. (a) Each party has the right... after such notification, the contested authority will be suspended. (d) Upon the suspension of...

  14. 32 CFR 776.82 - Interim suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim suspension. 776.82 Section 776.82... Complaint Processing Procedures § 776.82 Interim suspension. (a) Where the Rules Counsel determines there is... interim suspension, pending completion of a professional responsibility investigation. The...

  15. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension systems. 393.207 Section 393.207... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Frames, Cab and Body Components, Wheels, Steering, and Suspension Systems § 393.207 Suspension systems. (a) Axles. No axle positioning part shall be cracked, broken, loose or...

  16. 75 FR 24494 - Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ...; ] ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION 2 CFR Chapter 58 Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension AGENCY: U.S... proposed debarment and suspension regulations. These proposed regulations will apply to nonprocurement... Management and Budget (OMB) in a document on nonprocurement debarment and suspension published in the...

  17. 48 CFR 509.407 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 509.407 Section 509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 509.407 Suspension....

  18. 48 CFR 2009.407 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Suspension. 2009.407 Section 2009.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2009.407 Suspension....

  19. 21 CFR 522.1289 - Lufenuron suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lufenuron suspension. 522.1289 Section 522.1289 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Lufenuron suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of sterile aqueous suspension contains...

  20. 32 CFR 552.80 - Suspension period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension period. 552.80 Section 552.80 National... Suspension period. All solicitation privileges suspended by installation commanders will be for a specific time. Normally, it will not exceed 2 years. When the suspension period expires, the agent may...